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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Guidelines for management of noxious weeds at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated Pest Management Services is responsible for management and control of noxious weeds on the Hanford Site. Weed species and populations are prioritized and objective defined, according to potential site and regional impact. Population controls are implemented according to priority. An integrated approach is planned for noxious weed control in which several management options are considered and implemented separately or in coordination to best meet management objectives. Noxious weeds are inventories and monitored to provide information for planning and program review.

Roos, R.C.; Malady, M.B.

1995-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

2

Giant Hogweed An attractive but dangerous federal noxious weed.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(1) Giant Hogweed An attractive but dangerous federal noxious weed. Have you seen this plant attractive, giant hogweed is a public health hazard because it can cause se- vere skin irritation

3

Bonneville Power Administration, Lower Columbia Region: Noxious Weed Management, 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 1996 season ODA executed the contract between BPA and ODA. Execution of this contract included the following activities: Survey for target noxious weeds, such as Gorse; collection and redistribution of biological control agents, for example, Apion seed weevils for Scotch broom, bioagents for diffuse and spotted knapweed, Gorse spider mite, and gall fly releases for control of Canada thistle and bull thistle; and control of isolated infestations of Gorse on BPA rights-of-way. Training was provided for line crews at the Chemawa, Alevy and North Bend districts. The purpose of the program is to assist BPA in the integrated prevention and control of noxious weed species on BPA transmission line maintenance right-of-ways.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR; Oregon Department of Agriculture Noxious Weed Control Program

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

Peterson, Robert K. D.

5

Microsoft Word - LL-SHE Biological Weed Control.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biological Weed Control Biological Weed Control at the Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site M. Kastens, D. Johnson, S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado The Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site is located approximately 7.5 miles southwest of the town of Wellpinit in Stevens County. The site is approximately 35 miles northwest of Spokane. Mill decommissioning activities were completed in 1995; at that time, the disposal site was reclaimed and revegetated with native species. The site is not enclosed with fences, allowing for land use to return to pre-operational use of wildlife habitat. Significant populations of two noxious weed species, diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa) and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria dalmatica), occur throughout and around the Sherwood site. Minor,

6

Integrated Weed Control for Land Stewardship at Legacy Management's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado - 13086  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land stewardship is one of nine sustainability programs in the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management System. Land stewardship includes maintaining and improving ecosystem health. At the Rocky Flats Site near Westminster, Colorado, land stewardship is an integral component of the Office of Legacy Management's post-closure monitoring and management at the site. Nearly 263 hectares (650 acres) were disturbed and re-vegetated during site cleanup and closure operations. Proactive management of revegetation areas is critical to the successful reestablishment of native grasslands, wetlands, and riparian communities. The undisturbed native plant communities that occur at the site also require active management to maintain the high-quality wetlands and other habitats that are home to numerous species of birds and other wildlife such as elk and deer, rare plant communities, and the federally listed threatened Preble's meadow jumping mouse. Over the past several decades, an increase of Noxious weeds has impacted much of Colorado's Front Range. As a result, weed control is a key component of the land stewardship program at Rocky Flats. Thirty-three species of state-listed Noxious weeds are known to occur in the Central and Peripheral Operable Units at Rocky Flats, along with another five species that are considered invasive at the site. Early detection and rapid response to control new invasive species is crucial to the program. An integrated weed control/vegetation management approach is key to maintaining healthy, sustainable plant communities that are able to resist Noxious weed invasions. Weed mapping, field surveys, and field-staff training sessions (to learn how to identify new potential problem species) are conducted to help detect and prevent new weed problems. The integrated approach at Rocky Flats includes administrative and cultural techniques (prevention), mechanical controls, biological controls, and chemical controls. Several species of biocontrol insects have been released to assist with control of different target weed species. Monitoring is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of control efforts and to provide information for future control efforts. The effective implementation of this integrated approach has reduced the infestation levels of many species and has kept several newly discovered invasive species from spreading and becoming larger problems at the site. (authors)

Nelson, Jody K. [Stoller LMS Team, Contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, Colorado 80021 (United States)] [Stoller LMS Team, Contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, Colorado 80021 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad Spanish explorers of this region came across a lagoon in a coastal lagoon in Carlsbad, California, within San Diego County. An aggressive clone of this species has miles north of the Carlsbad occurrence). Genetic studies have determined these two infestations

Gille, Sarah T.

8

Wallowa Canyonlands Weed Partnership : Completion Report November 19, 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Noxious weeds threaten fish and wildlife habitat by contributing to increased sedimentation rates, diminishing riparian structure and function, and reducing forage quality and quantity. Wallowa Resources Wallowa Canyonlands Partnership (WCP) protects the unique ecological and economic values of the Hells Canyon grasslands along lower Joseph Creek, the lower Grande Ronde and Imnaha Rivers from invasion and degradation by noxious weeds using Integrated Weed Management techniques. Objectives of this grant were to inventory and map high priority weeds, coordinate treatment of those weeds, release and monitor bio-control agents, educate the public as to the dangers of noxious weeds and how to deal with them, and restore lands to productive plant communities after treatment. With collaborative help from partners, WCP inventoried {approx} 215,000 upland acres and 52.2 miles of riparian habitat, released bio-controls at 23 sites, and educated the public through posters, weed profiles, newspaper articles, and radio advertisements. Additionally, WCP used other sources of funding to finance the treatment of 1,802 acres during the course of this grant.

Porter, Mark C.; Ketchum, Sarah

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

EO 13112: Invasive Species  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

183 183 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 25 / Monday, February 8, 1999 / Presidential Documents Executive Order 13112 of February 3, 1999 Invasive Species By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990, as amended (16 U.S.C. 4701 et seq.), Lacey Act, as amended (18 U.S.C. 42), Federal Plant Pest Act (7 U.S.C. 150aa et seq.), Federal Noxious Weed Act of 1974, as amended (7 U.S.C. 2801 et seq.), Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and other pertinent statutes, to prevent the introduc- tion of invasive species and provide for their control and to minimize

10

Weed Seeds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weed Seeds Weed Seeds Nature Bulletin No. 469-A November 4, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WEED SEEDS The study of weed seeds can be fascinating, educational, and an inspiration for artistic designs -- especially if you use a good magnifying glass or hand lens. People wonder why weeds are so aggressive; why they succeed where desirable plants fail; why they thrive in spite of droughts, grass fires, mowing and cultivation. One answer, in the case of most weeds, can be found in the seeds that they produce. Some weed seeds have such a hard durable outer coat that they are unharmed by an ordinary grass fire. If eaten by a bird or a grazing animal, they are not digested in its stomach and are widely distributed. Some kinds have such vitality that they have been known to sprout and grow when brought to the surface after being buried deeply for many years. Many weed seeds have interesting appendages which cause them to be carried long distances by winds or which enable them to cling to passing animals.

11

Weed Management: Fact or Fable?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...distinguish the systematic approach to weed control, based...The need for a weed management approach is increasingly recognized...leguminous crops. In such management systems, interference...of support for weed science as a discipline, limited...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Noxious Weed Survey of the U.S. Air Force Academy and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Resources, CSU 254 General Services Building Fort Collins, CO of Natural Resources Prepared By: David G. Anderson, Amy Lavender, and Ron Abbott #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS............................................................................................................... 9 ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTIVENESS OF METHODOLOGY .................................................... 10

13

Noxious Weed Monitoring at the US Air Force Academy-Year 2 Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Air Force Academy Department of Natural Resources Prepared By: David G. Anderson and Amy Lavender Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Resources, CSU 8002 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO.................................................................................................................................................... 4 MAPPING AND ASSESSMENT

14

Noxious Weed Monitoring at the U.S. Air Force Academy-Year 3 Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: U.S. Air Force Academy Department of Natural Resources Prepared By: David G. Anderson and Amy Lavender Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Resources, CSU 8002 Campus Delivery Fort) ..................................................................... 35 MAPPING AND ASSESSMENT

15

Some Barnyard Weeds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Barnyard Weeds Barnyard Weeds Nature Bulletin No. 308-A May 25, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SOME BARNYARD WEEDS A number of remarkable weeds are commonly found in barnyards and farmlots. All of them were brought here from the Old World and most of them are called by different names in different localities. They grow along fences, in odd corners, and even in ground closely grazed and hard-packed by the trampling feet of livestock. Some of them are also common along paths worn by human feet, and some invade our carefully tended lawns. They are the tough bad boys of the vegetable kingdom, with a supervitality and stubbornness that you have to admire even though you cuss them.

16

Race, ethnicity, and noxious facilities: Environmental racism re- examined  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The charge has been made that hazardous facilities tend to be located in proximity to minority populations. This study uses a facility density measure for three categories of noxious facilities to examine the relationship between facilities and minority population concentrations. County-level data are used in a correlation analysis for African Americans, Hispanics, and Asians in the four major regions of the US. Even controlling for income and housing value, and limiting the data set to urban areas, consistent patterns of moderate to strong association of facility densities with minority population percentages are found.

Nieves, A.L. [Wheaton Coll., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute noxious stimulation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

level. Noxious cutaneous stimulation was applied... OC. DLP stimulation was done in trains of 2- 10 s during the course of ... Source: Apkarian, A. Vania - Department of...

18

Assistant Professor Agronomy (Weed Science)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Professor, Crop Protection, EARTH University, Costa Rica. 2007-2012 · Assistant Professor, Horticulture dormancy through light and temperature interactions. Weed Science. 51:752-758. #12;

Watson, Craig A.

19

Plant-Soil Interactions, Weed Control, and Rice Tolerance as Affected by Saflufenacil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to saflufenacil in combination with clomazone and imazethapyr; 3) evaluate the absorption and translocation of imazethapyr and saflufenacil in weed species 4) assess saflufenacil degradation and persistence in soils; and 5) investigate the use of reference...

Camargo, Edinalvo

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

A comparison of noxious facilities` impacts for home owners versus renters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The siting of noxious facilities, such as hazardous waste facilities, is often vigorously opposed by local residents, and thus it is now common for local residents to be compensated for the presence of the facility. One technique that has been employed to implicitly value noxious facilities is the intercity hedonic approach, which examines the wage and land rent premia between cities that result from the presence of the facility. However, most of the focus has been on the behavior of home owners as opposed to renters. Since these two groups of residents vary on numerous dimensions such as marital status, age, sex, and personal mobility, it would not be surprising to find different marginal valuations of local site characteristics. The authors use 1980 Census data to derive separate estimates for owners and renters of the implicit value placed on eight different types of noxious facilities. They find that renters and owners differ in their response to noxious facilities, although the differences are not systematic. Furthermore, the differences between owners and renters are not primarily due to differential mobility or socio-demographic factors. Controlling those factors decreases the differences between renters` and owners` implicit valuations of noxious facilities by less than 10%. Unmeasured differences between the two groups, such as tastes, risk aversion, or commitment to the community, must account for the remaining difference in valuations. These findings suggest that policymakers should separately consider the responses of owners and renters when estimating noxious facility impacts.

Clark, D.E. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Economics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

248 Weed Science 50, MarchApril 2002 Weed Science, 50:248260. 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in response to changes in envi- ronmental conditions or cultivation (Fenner 2000). Weed management strategies

Bradford, Kent

22

A comparison of noxious facilities` impacts for home owners versus renters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The siting of noxious facilities, such as hazardous waste facilities, is often vigorously opposed by local residents. As a result, one would expect people`s residential and employment choices to reflect a desire to avoid proximity to such facilities. Ibis behavior would in turn affect labor and housing prices. One technique that has been employed to implicitly value impacts of noxious facilities is the intercity hedonic approach, which examines the wage and land rent differentials among cities that result from environmental amenities and disamenities. However, most of the research focus has been on the behavioral response of home owners as opposed to renters. Since these two groups of residents vary on numerous dimensions such as marital status, age, sex, and personal mobility, it would not be surprising to find different marginal valuations of local site characteristics. We use 1980 Census data to derive separate estimates for owners and renters of the implicit value placed on eight different types of noxious facilities. Although the magnitude of the responses of renters and owners to noxious facilities and other environmental characteristics varies, the signs are generally consistent. The differences in values between owners and renters are not primarily due to differential mobility or sociodemographic factors. Controlling those factors decreases the differences between renters` and owners` implicit valuations by less than 10%. Unmeasured differences in characteristics between the two groups, such as tastes, risk aversion, or commitment to the community, must account for the remaining difference in valuations. These findings suggest that policymakers should separately consider the responses of owners and renters when estimating noxious facility impacts.

Clark, D.E. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Economics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Role of Allelopathy in Weed Management for Sustainable Agriculture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of smothering crops as allelopathic strategies could provide weed control, both in summer and winter crops. Although, these crops do not provide complete weed control they can manage weed population at eco...

S. S. Narwal; Raabia Haouala

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Weed Control Research in Sugar Beets.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

producers. Weed control methods that have been improved as average temperature imm&. PpJramin satisfactoiy for other sections of the country have not and Tillam gave little weed control in March when been consistend y effectite in West Texas. sugar...

Wiese, A. F.; Scott, P. R.; Lavake, D. E.; Winter, S. R.; Owen, D. F.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Suggestions for Weed Control in Sorghum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to label for specific weeds controlled) Basagran ? 4EC (bentazon) BASF 1.5 to 2.0 pts. Postemergence. Growth stage of weed determines rate (see label). Sorghum is tolerant at all growth stages. Slight speckling may occur but sorghum generally outgrows...

Baumann, Paul A.; Coffman, Cloyce G.

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

Determining perception-based impacts of noxious facilities on wage rates and property values  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, written for the US Department of Energy, discusses current information and the need for future research on estimating the impacts on wages and property values that could result from people's perceptions of the risks associated with noxious facilities. Psychometric studies indicate that the US population is averse to living near noxious facilities, nuclear-related facilities in particular. Contingent valuation and hedonic studies find that the net economic impacts of proximity to noxious facilities are generally negative and often substantial. Most of these studies are limited in scope, and none estimate the impacts derived from public perceptions of such facilities. This study examines the mechanisms by which negative public perceptions result in economic impacts reflected in wages and property values. On the basis of these mechanisms, it develops a predictive model of perception-based impacts and identifies the data and methods needed to implement it. The key to predicting perception-based impacts lies in combining psychometric and hedonic methods. The reliability of psychometric measures as indicators of aversive stimuli that precipitate economic impacts can be empirically tested. To test the robustness of the findings, alternative estimation methods an be employed in the hedonic analysis. Contingent valuation methods can confirm the results.

Nieves, L.A.; Clark, D.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Determining perception-based impacts of noxious facilities on wage rates and property values  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, written for the US Department of Energy, discusses current information and the need for future research on estimating the impacts on wages and property values that could result from people`s perceptions of the risks associated with noxious facilities. Psychometric studies indicate that the US population is averse to living near noxious facilities, nuclear-related facilities in particular. Contingent valuation and hedonic studies find that the net economic impacts of proximity to noxious facilities are generally negative and often substantial. Most of these studies are limited in scope, and none estimate the impacts derived from public perceptions of such facilities. This study examines the mechanisms by which negative public perceptions result in economic impacts reflected in wages and property values. On the basis of these mechanisms, it develops a predictive model of perception-based impacts and identifies the data and methods needed to implement it. The key to predicting perception-based impacts lies in combining psychometric and hedonic methods. The reliability of psychometric measures as indicators of aversive stimuli that precipitate economic impacts can be empirically tested. To test the robustness of the findings, alternative estimation methods an be employed in the hedonic analysis. Contingent valuation methods can confirm the results.

Nieves, L.A.; Clark, D.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic weeds progress Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

94 Weed Science 54, January-February 2006 Weed Science, 54:94-99. 2006 Volunteer potato... -Agricultural Research Service, Invasive Weed Management Research, University of...

29

Skylarks trade size and energy content in weed seeds to maximize total ingested lipid biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The trade-off between forage quality and quantity has been particularly studied in herbivore organisms, but much less for seed eating animals, in particular seed-eating birds which constitute the bulk of wintering passerines in European farmlands. The skylark is one of the commonest farmland birds in winter, mainly feeding on seeds. We focus on weed seeds for conservation and management purposes. Weed seeds form the bulk of the diet of skylarks during winter period, and although this is still a matter for discussion, weed seed predation by granivorous has been suggested as an alternative to herbicides used to regulate weed populations in arable crops. Our objectives were to identify whether weed seed traits govern foraging decisions of skylarks, and to characterize key seed traits with respect to size, which is related to searching and handling time, and lipid content, which is essential for migratory birds. We combined a single-offer experiment and a multiple-offer one to test for feeding preferences of the birds by estimating seed intake on weed seed species differing in their seed size and seed lipid content. Our results showed (1) a selective preference for smaller seeds above a threshold of seed size or seed size difference in the pair and, (2) a significant effect of seed lipid biomass suggesting a trade-off between foraging for smaller seeds and selecting seeds rich in lipids. Skylarks foraging decision thus seems to be mainly based on seed size, that is presumably a proxy for weed seed energy content. However, there are clearly many possible combinations of morphological and physiological traits that must play crucial role in the plantbird interaction such as toxic compound or seed coat.

Sabrina Gaba; Claire Collas; Thibaut Powolny; Franois Bretagnolle; Vincent Bretagnolle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

PRINCIPLES OF WEED SCIENCE -PLS 4601c INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT PLS 5632c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and environmental issues (emphasis on chemical weed control) associated with weed management. Topics covered. 208pp. #12;2 Grading System: In class quizes - 6 total, one drop (15%), 2 exams (35%), final exam (20, every student has signed the following statements: "I understand that the University of Florida expects

Watson, Craig A.

31

Race, region and risk: An examination of minority proximity to noxious facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past decade has given rise to terms like environmental racism, eco-racism, and environmental inequities to characterize a disproportional distribution of environmental disamenities among minority communities. Much of the literature supports the contention that racial and ethnic minorities and low-income groups bear a disproportionate burden of risk from hazardous activities and substances in the environment. This study expands the scope of prior studies by employing county-level data for the entire nation and including a broad range of facility types associated with environmental disamenities. In addition, it addresses the issue of the distribution of noxious facilities among white and non-white populations in an attempt to determine the relative exposure to risk among different racial and ethnic groups. In addition, the authors also explore the relative importance of nonurban versus urban residence.

Nieves, A.L. [Wheaton Coll., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Suggestions For Weed Control In Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

weather conditions prevail, the herbicidal activity of fluometuron may be delayed or reduced. Do not plant crops other than cotton within 6 months of the last application. West Texas: Do not use on sand, loamy sand or fine sandy loam soils nor on cotton... ? may be com- bined with MSMA or DSMA for enhanced weed control to cotton from 3 in high to first bloom. Refer to the label for more information. West Texas: Do not use on sand, loamy-sand or fine-sandy-loam soils. Most seedling broadleaf weeds...

Baumann, Paul A.; Lemon, Robert G.

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

33

558 Weed Science 49, JulyAugust 2001 Weed Science, 49:558566. 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. `Clockwork'; wild mustard, Brassica kaber (D.C.) L.C. Wheeler SINAR. Key words: Allelopathy, compost, green, concerns over the environmental effects, economic costs, and long-term efficacy of conventional weed

Sims, Gerald K.

34

Weed Busters: How to Pound Threadleaf Groundsel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Threadleaf groundsel is a shrubby perennial weed found on rangelands in west central and west Texas. It is toxic to cattle and horses. Two methods of controlling this plant are described--the ground broadcast spray method and the individual plant...

McGinty, Allan; Hart, Charles R.; Cadenhead, J. F.

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

35

Home Orchard Weed Control By Paul Vossen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the best weed control grew more, a lot more. The trial compared mulched trees (wood chips), herbicide and the moisture content of the soils was maintained evenly. Translating the growth rates of this experiment over: This is the best option. I recommend using at least 3 to 4 inches of fresh wood chips spread in an area surrounding

California at Davis, University of

36

From Conventional to Organic: Weed Management Principles for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Conventional to Organic: Weed Management Principles for the Transition Years Fabián Menalled weed management tool is located between your ears www.forages.oregonsate.edu #12;Today, we'll talk more about principles than specific practices #12;Outline for Today's Presentation Transitioning to organic

Maxwell, Bruce D.

37

Agronomic and environmental factors influence weed composition and canola competitiveness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agronomic and environmental factors influence weed composition and canola competitiveness. C. 2006. Agronomic and environmental factors influence weed composition and canola competitiveness in southern Manitoba. Can. J. Plant Sci. 86: 591­599. Canola yield in Manitoba has reached a plateau in recent

Kenkel, Norm

38

RESEARCH ARTICLE Biodegradable mulch instead of polyethylene for weed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Biodegradable mulch instead of polyethylene for weed control of processing tomato Abstract Black polyethylene (PE) film is used for mulch- ing in processing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum be an alternative. Keywords Polyethylene . Biodegradable mulch . Paper. Barley straw 1 Introduction Weeds

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

39

Texas High Plains Vegetable & Weed Control Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas High Plains Vegetable & Weed Control Research Program Research Summary Reports 2008 Texas RESULTS OF HIGH PLAINS TRIALS 8 Herbicides and Weed Control Herbicide screen for mustard and collard for heat tolerance and yield on the Texas High Plains (I) .................. 40 Evaluation of snap bean

Mukhtar, Saqib

40

Weed Technology. 2005. Volume 19:10501055 Alternative to Hand-Weeding Volunteer Potato (Solanum tuberosum) in Carrot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1050 Weed Technology. 2005. Volume 19:1050­1055 Alternative to Hand-Weeding Volunteer Potato herbicides are used in carrot production in the United States, and none suppress volunteer potato, a serious emerged volunteer potato within carrot. The objective of this work was to evaluate carrot tolerance

Sims, Gerald K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Tale of Two Depositories: Weeding Federal Depository Collections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be weeded. Up to that time, only revised titles listed in the Superseded List (purl.access.gpo. gov/GPO/LPS22813) had been weeded on a limited basis. I was familiar with the federal depository print collection because I had recently helped shift many... the col- lection, and items not superseded had to be offered to other depository libraries before withdrawing (purl.access.gpo.gov/ GPO/LPS89341, Chapter 5.14). After establishing what not to weed, criteria for items for removal were created. Because...

Sare, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Protecting the Environment Using Integrated Weed Management in Lawns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) can be used to control weeds, keep lawns healthy and protect the environment. This publication explains the steps to take in an IPM program and the importance of calibrating equipment and making proper calculations...

Ketchersid, Mary; Baumann, Paul A.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

Weed Seed Survival in Livestock Systems Jeanie Katovich and Roger Becker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- nure from producing cows had fewer weed seeds than manure from dry cows, presumably because the dry

Minnesota, University of

44

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2013 WEED CONTROL IN COTTON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2013 63 WEED CONTROL IN COTTON Mike Marshall, Extension Weed Specialist Preplant Burndown Herbicides for Weed Management in Cotton Herbicide is required before cotton planting. In general, CLARITY is less effective than 2,4-D LVE on cutleaf

Stuart, Steven J.

45

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2014 WEED CONTROL IN COTTON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2014 70 WEED CONTROL IN COTTON Mike Marshall, Extension Weed Specialist Preplant Burndown Herbicides for Weed Management in Cotton Herbicide is required before cotton planting. In general, CLARITY is less effective than 2,4-D LVE on cutleaf

Duchowski, Andrew T.

46

Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics C. Neal Stewart, Jr and their evolution remain poorly understood, but genomic approaches offer tremendous promise for elucidating these important features of weed biology. However, the genomic tools and resources available for weed research

Rieseberg, Loren

47

MHK Technologies/SeaWEED | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SeaWEED SeaWEED < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SeaWEED.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Grey Island Energy Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Sea Wave Energy Extraction Device is designed to maximize power production while maintaining a high degree of survivability in some of the world s harshest environments The device is designed to harness power generated by ocean surface waves by adjusting to varying wave conditions and utilizing a hydraulic takeoff system to transmit mechanical power Technology Dimensions Device Testing Scale Test *In water tests of the system were successfully completed in the tow tank of NRC Institute for Ocean Technology

48

LIBERTY TOLERANT COTTON: WEED CONTROL AND CROP TOLERANCE Brent Burns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBERTY TOLERANT COTTON: WEED CONTROL AND CROP TOLERANCE Brent Burns Texas Tech University Lubbock Acres planted with herbicide-tolerant cotton varieties have steadily increased since their introduction in 1995. Recently, the bar gene was introduced into Coker 312 cotton plants for tolerance to Liberty

Mukhtar, Saqib

49

Interannual variation in weed biomass on arable land in Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interannual variation in weed biomass on arable land in Sweden P MILBERG, E HALLGREN* & M W PALMER Department of Biology-IFM, Linko?ping University, S-581 83 Linko?ping, Sweden, *Department of Ecology and Crop Production Science, SLU, Box 7043, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden, and Department of Botany, Oklahoma

Palmer, Michael W.

50

2011 New England Guide To Chemical Weed and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or Garlon to control perennial weeds, ferns and brush. 7. Keep good records of equipment calibration in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914: the United States Department for field-grown stock. Four-year transplants or "plugs plus one" of spruces and firs are recommended

New Hampshire, University of

51

Influence of mulches for weed control in the landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wide scale (Chandler, 1985, Kolb et al. , 1983, Parker 1972, Parker and Fryer, 1975) . Weeds cost American farmers in excess of $5 billion annually (USDA Agriculture Handbook, 1965). The magnitude of this cost can be realized when it is compared..., Dinkel, 1966, Hopen, 1965, Liptay and Tiessen, 1970, Schwitz, 1983, Taylorson, 1969, Unger, 1978, Webster and Adamson, 1960). Organic mulches, such as straw, act to buffer soil temperature (Schwitz, 1983, Unger, 1978), whereas inorganic mulches...

Billeaud, Lorraine Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced ecophysiological weed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics, Plasma Physics Laboratory Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 24 Volunteer Potato Density Influences Critical Time of Weed Removal in Bulb Onion Summary: Volunteer...

53

Biofuels from a Floating Water Weed | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biofuels from a Floating Water Weed Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External...

54

Weed Mapping in Early-Season Maize Fields Using Object-Based Analysis of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 | e77151 Weed Maps with UAV Images References 1. ECPA (of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imagery for rangelandUnmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for Early Site Specific Weed

Kelly, Maggi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effects of polyethylene mulch in a short-rotation, poplar plantation vary with weed-control strategies,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of polyethylene mulch in a short-rotation, poplar plantation vary with weed polyethylene mulch (poly mulch) across a range of site conditions, weed-control treatments and genotypes rights reserved. Keywords: Polyethylene mulch; Woody crops; Weed control Forest Ecology and Management

Green, Scott

56

COTTON TOLERANCE AND WEED MANAGEMENT WITH SHARPEN Texas AgriLife Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COTTON TOLERANCE AND WEED MANAGEMENT WITH SHARPEN J.D. Reed Texas AgriLife Research Lubbock, TX J that was registered in 2009 for use in corn, soybeans, sorghum and cotton. Field studies were conducted in 2009 to 1 and perennial weeds, 2) evaluate Sharpen applied postemergence for volunteer glyphosate-resistant cotton

Mukhtar, Saqib

57

Characteristics of Herbicides and Weed Management Programs Most Important to Corn, Cotton, and Soybean Growers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristics of Herbicides and Weed Management Programs Most Important to Corn, Cotton of Herbicides and Weed Management Programs Most Important to Corn, Cotton, and Soybean Growers T.M. Hurley characteristics that influence profitability, using data from a telephone survey of 1,205 corn, cotton

Mitchell, Paul D.

58

Volunteer Potato Density Influences Critical Time of Weed Removal in Bulb Onion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volunteer Potato Density Influences Critical Time of Weed Removal in Bulb Onion Martin M. Williams II, Corey V. Ransom, and W. Mack Thompson* Volunteer potato is highly competitive with onion and few control tactics are effective for removing this weed from an onion crop. Both volunteer potato density

Sims, Gerald K.

59

Chemical Weed and Brush Control Suggestions for Rangeland 2009 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pronone Power Pellets 1 pellet/plant Spike 20 P H 7.5 lbs. (1.5 lbs.) Arsenal H 1 qt. (0.5 lbs.) VH 0.5% 10 to 25 gals./acre for ground broadcast. Thoroughly wet foliage for individual plant treatment. Add 1 to 2 qts. surfactant per 100 gals. water...% (4 lbs./gal. product) 2 to 4 gals. water for aerial spray; 10 to 25 gals. water for ground broadcast application. Thoroughly wet foliage for individual plant treatment. Add 1 to 2 qts. surfactant per 100 gals. of water. Spring, weed 4 to 6...

McGinty, Allan

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

60

Chemical Weed and Brush Control: Suggestions for Rangeland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 3 qts . 1 gal . 1 1 ?2 gals . 2 gals . 3 gals . 4 gals . 5 gals . 10 gals . 15 gals . 25 gals . Chemical Weed and Brush Control Suggestions for Rangeland 5 *example: to prepare 3 gallons of a spray mixture (herbicide, water and surfactant...) containing 1% herbicide, add 4 oz . of herbicide . note: add 1 ?4 % to 1 ?2 % commercial, non-ionic surfactant for mixtures using only water as the herbicide carrier . add 5% diesel fuel if an oil-in-water emulsion is desired to be the herbicide carrier...

McGinty, Allan; Ansley, Jim; Cadenhead, J. F.; Hamilton, Wayne T.; Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hart, Charles R.; Ueckert, Darrell

2005-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic weed control Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fisheries 2: 283-320. Cross, D. G. 1969. Aquatic weed control using grass carp. J. Fish Biol., 1: 27- 30... . 1982. Experience with grass carp for the ... Source: Ferreira, Maria...

62

Tolerance and weed management systems in imidazolinone tolerant corn (Zea mays L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of imidazolinone weed management systems and tolerance of imidazolinone tolerant corn to imazapic. Field experiments were conducted in 1997 and 1998 at the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES...

Thompson, Ann Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Chemistry of Cirsium and Carduus: a role in ecological risk assessment for biological control of weeds?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of host plant range and ecological impact of exotic phytophagous insects, such as insects for classical biological control of weeds, represents a major challenge. Recently, the flowerhead weevil (Rhinocyllus conicus Frl.), introduced from Europe into North America to control exotic thistles (Carduus spp.), has become invasive. It feeds heavily on some, but not all species of native North American thistles (Cirsium spp.). We hypothesized that such non-target use among native plants could be better predicted by knowledge of characteristic chemical profiles of secondary compounds to supplement the results of host specificity testing. To evaluate this hypothesis, we reviewed the literature on the chemistry of Cirsium and Carduus thistles. We asked what compounds are known to be present, what is known about their biological activity, and whether such information on chemical profiles would have better predicted realized host range and ecological effects of R. conicus in North America. We found an extensive, but incomplete literature on the chemistry of true thistles. Two main patterns emerged. First, consistent chemical similarities and interesting differences occur among species of thistles. Second, variation occurs in biologically active groups of characteristic compounds, specifically flavonoids, sterols, alkaloids and phenolic acids, that are known to influence host plant acceptance, selection, and feeding by phytophagous insects. Surprisingly, sesquiterpene lactones, which are characterisitic in closely related Asteraceae, have not been extensively reported for Cirsium or Carduus. The minimal evidence on sesquiterpene lactones may reflect extraction methods vs. true absence. In summary, our review suggests further research on thistle chemistry in insect feeding is warranted. Also, since the exotic Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) is an invasive thistle of current concern in North America, such research on mechanisms underlying host range expansion by exotic insects would be useful.

Ingrid E Jordon-Thaden; Svata M Louda

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effects of Oilseed Meals on the Germination, Growth, and Survival of Crop and Weed Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oilseed crops are being widely evaluated for potential biodiesel production. Seed meal (SM) remaining after extracting oil may have use as a bioherbicide or organic fertilizer. Brassicaceae SM often contains glucosinolates that can hydrolyze...

Rothlisberger, Katie Lynn

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

Sensitive Species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensitive Species Sensitive Species Sensitive Species By avoiding or minimizing the impact of Laboratory activities on sensitive species, LANL can potentially reduce the possibility of these species being upgraded to federal protection. April 12, 2012 sensitive species The bald eagle is one of our sensitive species. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Sensitive species are plants and animals that are protected at the state or local level. Keeping sensitive species safe We strive to minimize the impact of Laboratory operations on sensitive species, which are plants and animals not protected by the federal Endangered Species Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, but are protected on state or local levels.

66

Society for Range Management and Weed Science Society of America, "Working landscapes providing for the future", February 711 2010, Denver, Colorado. p56 [invited].  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Society for Range Management and Weed Science Society of America, "Working landscapes providing the ultimate goal of prioritizing weed management. Similarities between successful sitespecific approaches management: mapping, monitoring and modeling in agricultural to wildland systems. Recording the location

Maxwell, Bruce D.

67

Western Society of Weed Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico. March 10-12, 2009. Skurski TC, Maxwell, BD, and Rew LJ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" approaches are utilized to measure the competitive effects of NIS: weed removal and weed addition8. We to four treatments: manual removal of B. tectorum, ground disturbance to mimic that caused in the manual removal plots, herbicide application (fall application of Plateau at 10 oz/acre). We hypothesize

Maxwell, Bruce D.

68

Cotton Tolerance and Weed Management with Sharpen J.D. Reed, J.W. Keeling, and D.M. Petty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cotton Tolerance and Weed Management with Sharpen J.D. Reed, J.W. Keeling, and D.M. Petty Texas (PPO) inhibitor herbicide that was registered in 2009 for use in corn, soybeans, sorghum and cotton. Field studies were conducted to evaluate cotton tolerance and preplant and in-season weed control

Mukhtar, Saqib

69

Sensitive Species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plants and animals not protected by the federal Endangered Species Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, but are protected on state or local levels. The Sensitive Species Best...

70

Economic analysis of agrochemical use for weed control in field-grown celery: A case study for Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weeds are one of the major limiting factors for economically viable celery production. Agrochemicals are useful for control of weeds and their benefits may be estimated in terms of reduced crop losses. This study was conducted to analyse the farm-level economics of agrochemical use for weeds in celery grown in Izmir, Turkey. Data were collected from 24 farmers using a random sampling method. According to the results of the study, the treatment index of agrochemicals used for weed control varied between 0.48 and 1.60. The number of farmers who used a lot of agrochemicals for weeds was 9 (38%). The average usage of agrochemicals per hectare (as active ingredient) for weeds and all pests in celery production was estimated to be 1.76 and 1.90kg/ha, respectively. The average agrochemical use and application cost was determined as $111/ha. Agrochemicals and their application costs formed 3.79% of variable costs and 2.90% of total costs, respectively. The share of the costs of weed control in total agrochemical costs for pests was 40.29%.

Sait Engindeniz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

www.btny.purdue.edu/weedscience/ Nitrogen Accumulation by Annual Grass Weeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Roundup Ready corn or glufosinate (Liberty) in Liberty Link corn. So, if adoption of Roundup Ready corn projects that involved nitrogen accumulation by weeds in corn and impact on corn yield. In the next couple of articles I will summarize the results of these projects. The first project I will discuss was an evaluation

Ginzel, Matthew

72

Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Common Brush and Weed Management Mistakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To manage brush and weeds effectively, managers must select the right treatments and the right timing for them. They must know how to care for the land both before and after treatment. The tips in this publication can lessen the uncertainty...

McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.; Clayton, Lindi

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Clean Diesel: Overcoming Noxious Fumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evidence, the Health Effects Institute, premature death. aSummary of a Health Effects Institute (HEI) Special Report.

Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Daniel; Dwyer, Harry A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek Acclimation Site, Kittitas County, Washington

75

Alfalfa Seed Testing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................... 4 Goocl Alfalfa Seed ...................................... 4 Method of Examining for Purity ........................ 6 Weed Seeds Often Found in Alfalfa ...................... 6 Russian Thistles .................................. 7 Ribdrass.... - MELILOTUS ALBA. MELILOTUS INDICA MEDICAGO DENTICULATA. S. PLANTAIN. TUMBLE WEED. LANCEOLATA. AMARANTHUS GRACILARIS. CARELESS WEED. AMARANTHUS HYBRIDUS. SPECIALLY NOXIOUS WEED SEEDS FREQUENTLY FOUND IN k ,' ALFALFA SEED. RUSSIAN THISTLE. , :? I...

Ball, O. M. (Oscar Melville)

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS IN GLUFOSINATE TOLERANT COTTON. P. A. Dotray, J. W. Keeling, D. A. Peters, and J. A. Bond. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Texas Agricultural Extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS IN GLUFOSINATE TOLERANT COTTON. P. A. Dotray, J. W. Keeling, D. A. Peters Tech University, Lubbock. ABSTRACT In previous research, cotton growth and yield was not affected). The objectives of this research were evaluate weed management systems in glufosinate-tolerant cotton, compare

Mukhtar, Saqib

77

Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and fresh water aquatic weeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORCA clone of the red seaweed Gracilaria tikvahiae has been in culture continuously for over two years. Yield for the past year has averaged 12 g ash-free dry wt/m/sup 2/ .day (17.5 t/a.y) in suspended 2600-1 aluminum tank cultures with four exchanges of enriched seawater per day and continuous aeration. Yields from nonintensive pond-bottom culture, similar to commercial Gracilaria culture methods in Taiwan, averaged 3 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day in preliminary experiments. Rope and spray cultures were not successful. Yields of water hyacinths from March 1978 to March 1979 averaged 25 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day (37 t/a.y). Season, nutrient availability (form and quantity) and stand density were found to affect the relative proportions of structural and nonstructural tissue in water hyacinths and thereby significantly affect digestibility of and methane production by the plants. Pennywort (Hydrocotyle) grew poorly in winter and its annual yield averaged only one-third that of water hyacinth. Water lettuce (Pistia) appears more comparable to hyacinths in preliminary studies and its yields will be monitored throughout a complete year. Stable, continuous anaerobic digestion of both water hyacinths and Gracilaria has been maintained with an average gas production from both species of 0.4 1/g volatile solids at 60% methane.

Ryther, J.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Fifty-Year History of the Weed and Brush Program in Texas and Suggested Future Direction.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rodney W. Bovey* Summary Research on mesquite control was initiated by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES) in the late 1930s. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) also recognized the serious nature of the weed and brush problem... on cotton (23). Dr. Behrens spent most of his career as a weed scientist at the University of Minnesota at St. Paul after leaving Texas. Dr. Howard Morton was also a Research Agronomist with ARS and worked with Dr. Behrens before Dr. Behrens' depar ture...

Bovey, Rodney W.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Weed Technology. 2005. Volume 19:443450 Managing Volunteer Potato (Solanum tuberosum) in Field Corn with Mesotrione  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

443 Weed Technology. 2005. Volume 19:443­450 Managing Volunteer Potato (Solanum tuberosum) in Field: Volunteer potato is becoming increasingly detrimental in potato production regions. We assessed methods' potato varieties by mesotrione applied at 0.11 kg/ha. In field studies conducted near Paterson, WA

Sims, Gerald K.

80

Integrated Biological Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

JOHNSON, A.R.

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Integrated Biological Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects; and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (apriori) or in response to existing contamination spread (aposteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and apriori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, aposteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

JOHNSON, A.R.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Land Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Mission The team advocates improved ecosystem health on LM properties in accordance with DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management; federal regulations, such as the Endangered Species Act, the Noxious Weed Act, and the Wetlands and Floodplains Act; and in consideration of LM agreements with regulatory agencies and tribes. The team advocates identifying and proposing land management improvements on LM sites that are beneficial to ecosystems and improve remedy sustainability. Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team identifies and evaluates proposals to enhance ecosystem health at

83

Hydraulic fractur ing--also called hy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic fractur ing--also called hy drofracking or frack ing--is a process where large volumes) is an aquatic invasive spe cies listed on the USDA's federal noxious weeds list (http:// www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health

Goodman, Robert M.

84

Community Ecology & Species Assemblages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical regions ­ most diverse More solar energy, large geographic area, more stable, better climate] Uniformity of abundance in an assemblage of species. #12;3 Region X Region Y Site 3 Site 4 Site 1 Site 2 affected by several factors: Elevation, precipitation, climate, latitude affect species distributions

Dever, Jennifer A.

85

Eating Invasive Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Institute for Applied Ecology, a nonprofit organization promoting conservation and habitat restoration, launched the Eradication by Mastication...outreach, which consists of an annual Invasive Species Cook-off

Joseph A. Tuminello III

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

2005-2006 Coachella Valley MSHCP Monitoring Framework Priorities: Impacts of Exotic Weed Species including Saharan Mustard (Brassica TournefortiiI)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyzed for nitrogen and Phosphorous content. The patternswas detected for a nitrogen or phosphorous/mustard abundance

Barrows, Cameron W.; Allen, Michael F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

California Endangered Species Act Species List | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Species List Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: California Endangered Species Act Species ListLegal Published NA Year...

88

Assessment of ecological risks in weed biocontrol: Input from retrospective ecological analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of the outcomes of natural enemy introductions remains the most fundamental challenge in biological control. Quantitative retrospective analyses of ongoing biocontrol projects provide a systematic strategy to evaluate and further develop ecological risk assessment. In this review, we highlight a crucial assumption underlying a continued reliance on the host specificity paradigm as a quantitative prediction of ecological risk, summarize the status of our retrospective analyses of nontarget effects of two weevils used against exotic thistles in North America, and discuss our prospective assessment of risk to a federally listed, threatened species (Cirsium pitcheri) based on those studies. Our analyses quantify the fact that host range and preference from host specificity tests are not sufficient to predict ecological impact if the introduced natural enemy is not strictly monophagous. The implicit assumption when such use is made of the host specificity data in risk assessment is that population impacts are proportional to relative preference and performance, the key components of host specificity. However, in concert with shifting awareness in the field, our studies demonstrate that the environment influences and can alter host use and population growth, leading to higher than expected direct impacts on the less preferred native host species at several spatial scales. Further, we have found that straightforward, easily anticipated indirect effects, on intraguild foragers as well as on the less preferred native host plant species, can be both widespread and significant. We conclude that intensive retrospective ecological studies provide some guidance for the quantitative prospective studies needed to assess candidate biological control agent dynamics and impacts and, so, contribute to improved rigor in the evaluation of total ecological risk to native species.

Svata M. Louda; Tatyana A. Rand; F. Leland Russell; Amy E. Arnett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

CGC Trace Species Partitioning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trace Species Partitioning as Affected Trace Species Partitioning as Affected by Cold Gas Cleanup Conditions: A Thermodynamic Analysis February 10, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1503 T r ace Species P ar titioning at C old G as C leanup C onditions Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

90

Microsoft Word - toc.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D D Photographs of Utah and San Juan County-Listed Noxious Weeds and Undesirable Weeds Photographs taken from: Weeds of the West, Tom D. Whitson, Editor published by The Western Society of Weed Science, Newark, California 9th Edition, 2002 U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Annual sunflower, Helianthus annuus Undesirable Bermudagrass, Cynodon dactylon Noxious (on list) U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Buffalobur, Solanum rostratum Noxious (found near site) Camelthorn, Alhagi maurorum Noxious (on list) U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Canada thistle, Cirsium arvense Noxious (found near site) Cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum Undesirable U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Diffuse knapweed, Centaurea diffusa Noxious (on list) Dyer's woad, Isatis tinctoria Noxious (on list) U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Field bindweed, Convolvulus arvense

91

Why Sequence Methylotenera species?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methylotenera species? Methylotenera species? electron micrograph Scanning electron micrograph of cells of Methylotenera mobilis strain JLW8 grown on methylamine. Photo: Dennis Kunkel, Dennis Kunkel Microscopy, Inc. Metabolism of organic C1 compounds (compounds containing no carbon-carbon bonds) is an important part of the global carbon cycle. Methane has been recognized as one of the major C1 compounds in the environment and a major contributor to the greenhouse effect. While global emissions of other C1 compounds (methanol, methylated amines) have historically attracted less attention, recent models put their emissions on a scale similar to the scale of methane emissions. JGI plans to sequence three methylotrophs (degraders of C1 compounds) of the genus Methylotenera. Methylotrophic bacteria play a major role in maintaining the balance of C1

92

Endangered Species Bulletin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July/August 2002 Vol. XXVII No. 3 In the work that we and our partners undertake to conserve and recover vulnerable species, awareness of the efforts we take for native plants is often overshadowed by the interest received by animal species. Too often overlooked is the fact that plants provide the foundation upon which animal life, including our own, depends. Plants are not only of aesthetic value, they provide us with food, many medicines, vital ecosystem services, and a variety of other products that are essential to our economy and well being. Fortunately, we have an important partner in the protection of our nations imperiled flora, the Center for Plant Conservation. This edition of the

U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service

93

FWS - Candidate Species List under the Endangered Species Act...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

what a candidate species is under Section 4 of the Endangered Species Act. Author U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Published U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2011 DOI Not Provided...

94

Microsoft Word - SA-07-EIS-0169-biocontrol.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2003 14, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-07) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish & Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), the Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) Management Plan calls for noxious weed control at the hatchery and acclimation sites. Biological control agents are being proposed for use at the hatchery and Jack Creek acclimation sites to reduce weeds along BPA-owned property, hatchery structures, roads, and wildlife preserve lands. The Kittitas County Noxious Weed Control Board has targeted the management of diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa) and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria genistifolia ssp. Dalmatica) as

95

Are hybrid species more fit than ancestral parent species in the current hybrid species habitats?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are hybrid species more fit than ancestral parent species in the current hybrid species habitats? L Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Introduction Hybridization is receiving renewed attention as an important). For homoploid hybridization in plants, where chromosome number remains the same, models and empirical evi- dence

Rieseberg, Loren

96

Microsoft Word - S04877_AnnInspRpt2008.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Platte thistles were identified, but few other weedy species are evident. One patch of diffuse knapweed, a noxious species, is growing near the entrance gate. On-site...

97

2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the upland areas of the PNNL site in 2011. Efforts in 2011 to control noxious weed populations (comprising plant species designated as Class B noxious weeds by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board) discovered in 2009 and initially treated with herbicides in 2010 are described in Appendix B.

Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Weeds in fields with contrasting conventional and genetically modified herbicidetolerant crops. I. Effects on abundance and diversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...drainage, increased use of agrochemicals and fertilisers, loss of...qualified under the British Agrochemical Supply Industry Scheme...standard meas- ure of seedbank composition. The number of seedlings...Factors affecting the species composition of arable field boundary...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Prescribed Fire 3.6 Weed Control Methods Handbook, The Nature Conservancy, Tu et al., version April 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apfelbaum & Sams 1987 Henderson 1990 Phragmites australis Phragmites § burning will not reduce growth unless the roots burn § burning removes phragmites leaf litter, allowing seeds of other species to germinate

Nowak, Robert S.

100

Prescribed Fire 3.6 Weed Control Methods Handbook, The Nature Conservancy, Tu et al., version April 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advantage Apfelbaum & Sams 1987 Henderson 1990 Phragmites australis Phragmites § burning will not reduce growth unless the roots burn § burning removes phragmites leaf litter, allowing seeds of other species

Nowak, Robert S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

COTTON WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS WITH IGNITE. P. A. Dotray, T. A. Baughman, K.M McCormick, and J. W. Keeling. Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Lubbock;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COTTON WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS WITH IGNITE. P. A. Dotray, T. A. Baughman, K.M McCormick, and J. WLink cotton will be an option for growers in 2004. Ignite is a postemergence herbicide that has broad that has limited systemic movement in plants. Previous studies have shown that cotton tolerance to Ignite

Mukhtar, Saqib

102

TOLERANCE AND WEED CONTROL IN GLUFOSINATE-TOLERANT COTTON ON THE TEXAS SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS. B.C. Burns, P.A. Dotray, Texas Tech University Lubbock, TX 79409; and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOLERANCE AND WEED CONTROL IN GLUFOSINATE-TOLERANT COTTON ON THE TEXAS SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS. B for the development of glufosinate-tolerant cotton. In 1995, the bar gene was introduced into Coker 312 cotton of commercially available cultivars (designated as 8000515 and 8000535). Cotton tolerance to glufosinate

Mukhtar, Saqib

103

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LANDFILL COVER REVEGETATION AT THE LANDFILL COVER REVEGETATION AT THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE Jody K. Nelson Exponent, 4940 Pearl East Circle, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80020 ABSTRACT In 1998, a revegetation project was begun on a landfill cover at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Golden, Colorado. After final contouring of the landfill cover, the area was broadcast seeded with native species including: Agropyron smithii, Bouteloua gracilis, Buchloe dactlyoides, Andropogon gerardii, Andropogon scoparius, and Linum perenne. In May 1999, the cover was treated by helicopter with Tordon22K ® to control the noxious weed, Centaurea diffusa. During 2001, vegetation cover and species richness was measured along five 50-m transects. A total of 25

104

Why Sequence Three Acidovorax Species?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Three Acidovorax Species? Three Acidovorax Species? Intimate interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes have influenced the course of organismal evolution and ecological distribution. While ubiquitous, there is generally little understanding of the physiological basis of such associations, particularly when they are nonpathogenic in nature (symbiotic). Earthworms of the family Lumbricidae harbor novel symbiotic betaproteobacteria within their nephridia (excretory organ). Few symbiotic betaprotebacteria have been reported, and no other beneficial bacteria are described that specifically colonize the excretory organs of animals. To better understand the physiological and evolutionary dimensions of this symbiosis, JGI will sequence the genome of the isolated Acidovorax symbiont, and the genomes of two additional species within the genus: the

105

War on Weeds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4,5-T, Sizz-weeder, mechanical shredder, 2,4-dinitro-6-sec-butyl phenol...killers. To avoid chronic injury only light-weight oils are used. The best are...accepting a lot and the true quality (fraction defective) of the lot. For most sampling...

E. M. Hildebrand

1946-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

Weed Management -The Basics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/3 of the seedbank turns over annually #12;William Beal Buried Seed Study · Botanist at Michigan State University accumulation #12;Frank Telewske, curator of the Beal Botanical Garden, inspects the most recent germination results in an experiment initiated by botanist William J. Beal 120 years ago. #12;William Beal Buried Seed

Minnesota, University of

107

Why sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species? sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species? These common marine microorganisms with the tongue-twisting name behave like fungi in the ocean ecosystem but are actually protists. Their abundance in the ocean varies with the changing seasons. They feed on non-living organic matter such as decaying algae, plants such as mangrove leaves and salt marsh grass or even animal tissues. Species that belong to the Labyrinthulomycete category all fall under a larger category of protists that also includes diatoms and brown algae. Labyrinthulomycetes help break down organic matter in the waters, and some species can also break down crude oil and tarballs. Researchers believe they also "upgrade" the quality of the debris that feed other marine organisms by adding nutrients. Long chain fatty acids produced by

108

Electrochemical cell for the detection of noxious gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell for quantitatively detecting ethylene oxide is described comprising: (a) a first working electrode comprising gas diffusion membrane having bonded thereto a catalytic portion electrochemically reactive with ethylene oxide; (b) a second working electrode having electrochemical activity with oxidation/reduction products produced at the first working electrode; (c) a counter electrode; (d) a reference electrode; (e) an electrolyte in contact with the catalytic portion of the first working electrode and in contact with the second working, counter and reference electrodes; (f) means for containing the electrolyte and the first and second working electrodes; (g) means for maintaining a fixed potential on the first working electrode relative to the reference electrode of from above 1.0 to about 1.8 volts with respect to the potential of the reversible hydrogen couple in the electrolyte of the cell; and (h) means for maintaining a fixed potential on the second working electrode relative to the reference electrode of from about 1.0 to 2.2 volts with respect to the potential of the reversible hydrogen couple in the electrolyte of the cell.

Schneider, A.A.; Stewart, D.A.; Jolson, J.D.; Auel, R.M.; Price, J.F.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Alien Species and Evolution: The Evolutionary Ecology of Exotic Plants, Animals, Microbes and Interacting Native Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Alien Species and Evolution: The EvolutionaryGermany George W. Cox. Alien Species and Evolution: TheRecycled, acid-free paper. Alien Species and Evolution leads

Nehrbass, Nana

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Game and Parks Commission is responsible for implementing and promulgating regulations to protect species named in the Endangered Species Act, as well as other endangered or threatened species...

111

BLM Sensitive Species | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sensitive Species Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBLMSensitiveSpecies&oldid612378" Category: NEPA Resources...

112

Invasive, Nonnative Species | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Invasive, Nonnative Species Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleInvasive,NonnativeSpecies&oldid647789" Category: NEPA Resources...

113

Special Status Species | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Species Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSpecialStatusSpecies&oldid647804" Category: NEPA Resources...

114

Threatened and Endangered Species | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Endangered Species Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleThreatenedandEndangeredSpecies&oldid612178" Category: NEPA Resources...

115

Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas December 31, 2007 - 8:57am Addthis Jody K. Nelson*, USDOE - Rocky Flats Site, Westminster, CO Smooth Brome (Bromus inermis) - The Silent Invader of Native Areas Smooth brome (Bromus inermis) is an exotic graminoid species that has been used for over a century across much of North America for range improvement and revegetation. While most "noxious" weeds invade quickly and are quite noticeable, a smooth brome invasion can imperceptibly transform the native grassland diversity to a near monoculture over many years or decades. At the Rocky Flats Site, a U.S. Department of Energy facility near Denver, Colorado, smooth brome is increasingly problematic, as it is along

116

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-113-1): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Updates 9/27/02 SA-113 12/2/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

12/02/02 12/02/02 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-113-1) Updates 9/27/02 SA-113 Bill Erickson, TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: To perform remedial vegetation management for keeping vegetation a safe distance away from electric power facilities and controlling noxious weeds within a section of BPA's Big Eddy-Ostrander Transmission Corridor. During a site review conducted in late fall of 2001, the inspector observed various species of hardwood trees resprouted from stumps. The new vegetative growth encroached on the required "Minimum Safe Distance" between the top of vegetation and the conductor cables. The management action is necessary to reduce the current and potential future hazards that tall- growing vegetation poses to transmission

117

Automated species identification: why not?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...exhibiting basically the same body plan, a pro- portion of which may...to transform the images to a standard pose. In addition, many identifi...species identified database mining engines, etc. (a) (b...for pest identification: a review. In The identifi- cation and...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

Chandel, Navdeep S

119

eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration of large-river ecosystems-river ecosystems that are the subject of restoration efforts also typically are heavily invaded by alien species interactions that link alien species and river restoration. Most obviously, restoration may be aimed

Pace, Michael L.

120

Safeguarding Animal Health AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safeguarding Animal Health AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES & VIRAL HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA Teresa L. Dudis;Safeguarding Animal Health AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES An aquatic invasive species (AIS) is an aquatic parasite%20White%20Paper% 20%20-%20FINAL%20VERSION.pdf #12;Safeguarding Animal Health AIS ­ Parasites

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models Brice B. Hanberry1 *, Hong S: Pseudoabsence generation strategy completely affected the area predicted as present for species distribution) Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models. PLoS ONE 7(8): e44486. doi:10.1371/ journal

He, Hong S.

122

Reprints Available from the Halophyte Biotechnology Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.M. Seliskar, and H.P. Bais. 2007. Root-secreted allelochemical in the noxious weed Phragmites australis. Blocking Phragmites australis reinvasion of restored marshes using plants selected from wild populations of Phragmites australis (common reed). Estuaries 29: 269-276. Seliskar, D.M. and J.L. Gallagher. 2005. Tidal

Firestone, Jeremy

123

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-46): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6) 6) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Franklin County noxious weed management along BPA rights-of-ways, transmission structures, roads, and switches listed in Attachment 1. Attachment 1 identifies the ROW, ROW width, and ROW length of the proposed action. Includes all BPA 115kV, 230kV, and 500 kV ROWs in Franklin County, Washington. Location: The ROWs are all located in Franklin County, Washington in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear noxious and/or unwanted low-growing vegetation in all BPA ROWs in Franklin County, Washington. In a cooperative effort, BPA, through landowners and the Franklin County Weed Control Board, plan to eradicate noxious plants and other

124

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-45): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5) 5) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Benton County noxious weed management along BPA rights-of-ways, transmission structures, roads, and switches listed in Attachment 1. Attachment 1 identifies the ROW, ROW width, and ROW length of the proposed action. Includes all BPA 115kV, 230kV, 345kV and 500 kV ROWs in Benton County, Washington. Location: The ROWs are all located in Benton County, Washington, Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear noxious and/or unwanted low-growing vegetation in all BPA ROWs in Benton County, Washington. In a cooperative effort, BPA, through landowners and the Benton County Weed Control Board, plan to eradicate noxious plants and other

125

Endangered Species Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Endangered Species Act Endangered Species Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Endangered Species Act Year 1973 Url Puerto-rican-parrott-TomMacKenzieUSFWS.jpg Description References The Endangered Species Act[1] Fish and Wildlife Service - ESA Overview[2] ESA Fact Sheet[3] When Congress passed the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1973, it recognized that our rich natural heritage is of "esthetic, ecological, educational, recreational, and scientific value to our Nation and its people." It further expressed concern that many of our nation's native plants and animals were in danger of becoming extinct. The purpose of the ESA is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. It is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Commerce Department's National Marine Fisheries

126

CORRELATION OF MELOSIRA SPECIES WITH TROPHIC ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

with immersion oil. Each complete valve ... and cell volume and total biomass (in parentheses) of predominant species of Melosira at times of peak abundance in...

2000-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

127

SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL FISH LANDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

346; SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL FISH LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1958 SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT-FISHERIES Na 346 #12;#12;United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary FishKernan, Director SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL-FISH LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1958 by Robert L. Edwards

128

Dissecting the speciesenergy relationship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...species occur in high-energy areas because more evolve...although its taxonomic status is debated (Summers...whilst using a range of energy metrics. Doing so enables us to test hypotheses relating...mechanisms of species-energy relationships (Currie...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Dryopteris huberi (Dryopteridaceae), an overlooked species, and a key for the species of Dryopteris in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dryopteris huberi is a neglected species endemic to the northern and central parts of Brazil. In this paper we describe, illustrate, and distinguish it from D. patula, the most similar species, a...

Jefferson Prado; Regina Y. Hirai; Alan R. Smith

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Fish and Game

131

Why sequence Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species? Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species? Aspergillus is not only one of the most important fungi for use in biotechnology it is also one of the most commonly found groups of fungi worldwide. This project seeks to sequence and annotate a series of additional Aspergillus species and Penicillium roqueforti to complement and strengthen the genomic data currently available for comparative studies. The data resulting from these species comparisonswill be of direct relevance to the DOE mission, particularly to howspecies have become adapted for utilization of specific carbon sources enabling efficientbiomass degradation. Principal Investigators: Ronald de Vries, CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, the Netherlands Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence Comparative analysis of Aspergilli

132

California Endangered Species Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Species ActLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation Colorado Fish and Game Code Sections 2050 et seq. DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:...

133

Dissecting the speciesenergy relationship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Evans et al. 2005c ). First, solar energy metrics, such as temperature or...radiation (UV), record the amount of solar energy falling upon the earth's surface. Broadly speaking, solar energy metrics may give rise to species-energy...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mammalian metabolism, longevity and parasite species richness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...populations were those used by Morand & Poulin (1998) (see table 1). The references...see Cooper & Fortey 1998; Morand & Poulin 1998) ( gure 1). A positive correlation...parasite species diversity (Morand & Poulin 1998; Gregory et al. 1996). Of various...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Digital holographic imaging of aquatic species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this thesis is to design, develop and implement a digital holographic imaging (DHI) system, capable of capturing three-dimensional (3D) images of aquatic species. The images produced by this system are used in ...

Domnguez-Caballero, Jos Antonio

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Organoarsenical Species Contents in Cooked Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organoarsenical Species Contents in Cooked Seafood ... Figure 1a shows that in most of the seafoods analyzed there is an increase in AB after cooking (median value of the differences above zero). ...

V. Devesa; M. A. Ser; S. Algora; D. Vlez; R. Montoro; M. Jaln; I. Urieta; M. L. Macho

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Weed Management in Pulse Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During At harvest #12;GoldSky ­ Crop Rotation · 9 Months: alfalfa, barley, canola, chickpea, dry bean PEA CAMELINA CANOLA BARLEY GOLDSKY Crop Rotation Study #12;GoldSky Crop Rotation Study ­ Herbicide #12;0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Lentil Canola Camelina Barley Field Pea Oat VisualDamage(%) GoldSky 1

Maxwell, Bruce D.

138

Weed control in tomato seedbeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paul", alber Ieeyer Bubmitted to the !JJaduate 'shool of the agricultural and ?achanical CcHego of Texac in rartial r ulfi liuent of the "Mquirejeonta for toe mdree of 'okapi i'A '3F "CT, :liCE Vapor, iub)ect g }hrt, icvlture A Tba& "sul... of importance in the production of tomatoes are Hidalgo, Cameron and Cherokee (23) ~ Not all of the tomatoes produced in Texas are marketed as fresh tomatoes. Ipproxlmatsly 20 psr cent of ths production goes to tomato processing plants (23), although Texas...

Leeper, Paul W

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Weed Busters: Sprayer Calibration Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final mixing Once a sprayer is calibrated, you will then be able to mix the herbicide in the spray tank properly. For example, if your recommended herbicide rate is 1 quart per acre and your sprayer is calibrated to deliver 15 gpa, you would... then add 1 quart of herbicide for every 15 gallons of spray in the tank. Keep these points in mind ?To properly calibrate a herbicide sprayer, you must be able to accurately set and maintain speed and pressure. ? Make sure all the nozzles are in good...

McGinty, Allan; Hanselka, C. Wayne; Lyons, Robert K.; Hart, Charles R.; Cadenhead, J. F.

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Weed Control in Texas Pastures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is hdavy, blunt and has no lips. An extra heavy knife and heavy duty clips are used with it. Rotary mowers are of two types-those driven by power takeoff and those powered by the supporting Figure 8. This inexpensive shop-made mower rig is fast.... The two types of ommonly used for pasture mowing are the la1 cutter-bar type and the rotary or shredder hird type machine, built on the principle of g stalk cutter, is sometimes used on areas I for the cutter-bar or rotary mowers and .,,,,, ,~h...

Long, John A.; Trew, E. M.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Weed Control Recommendations in Wheat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a pH above 7.9. Long rotation restrictions. Barley Hoelon 3EC 2?2.66 pt Annual grass: annual ryegrass. Apply at planting. If no rain occurs within 7 days, expect reduced control. Rate dependent on soil type. None Table 2. Preemergence herbicides.... North central Texas and southern Oklahoma only. Wheat seeds should be planted at least 1 in. deep. Crop rotations are dependent on soil pH. Oat Hoelon 3EC 2?2.66 pt Annual grass: Italian ryegrass. Apply at planting. If no rain occurs within 7 days...

Morgan, Gaylon; Baumann, Paul A.; Baughman, Todd; Bean, Brent W.

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

142

An Introduction to Species and the Rack Space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Racks were introduced in [FR]. In this ... A particularly important species is associated with a rack. A species has a nerve, analogous ... a category, and the nerve of the rack species yields a space associated ...

Roger Fenn; Colin Rourke; Brian Sanderson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

144

Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel Exhaust and Aftertreatment Systems Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel...

145

Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Abstract: Hydrogen...

146

Two new species of Vernonia (Asteraceae: Vernonieae) from Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two new species,Vernonia cocleana andV. chiriquiensis, are described from Panama. These endemic species are distinct from those...Vernonia.

Sterling C. Keeley

147

3) What makes a species invasive? Is it characteristics of the species or characteristics of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traits (Chapter 3 of NRC 2002) 1. Reproductive system · Dioecious vs. Monoecious · Self-incompatible Life History Traits (Chapter 3 of NRC 2002) 1. Reproductive system · Dioecious vs. Monoecious · Self-incompatible pollen vs. Self-compatible pollen #12;3) What makes a species invasive? Species characteristics: Plant

Nowak, Robert S.

148

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

149

Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

151

Chromosomal inversions and the reproductive isolation of species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exchange, particularly hybrid male sterility and female species preferences. We have examined the genetic basis of hybrid sterility and female species preferences in Drosophila pseudoobscura and Drosophila persimilis, two occasionally hybridizing North American species. Contrary to findings in other species groups

Pfrender, Michael

152

Integrating species traits with extrinsic threats: closing the gap between predicting and preventing species declines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Centre for Plant Biodiversity...the Amphibian Disease Ecology Group...this pandemic disease [13]. Nevertheless...key threats (disease, invasive...to powerful prediction of species...the field of machine learning [29], for...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Species traits and the form of individual speciesenergy relationships  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...avifauna using both solar (temperature) and productive energy metrics (normalized...al. 2005a ). Solar energy is the amount...the mammals of Mexico. Global Ecol...1983Species-energy theory, an extension...avifauna using both solar (temperature...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

endangered species | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

429 Throttled (bot load) 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142234558 Varnish cache server endangered species Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting #2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today in Boise. Though the intent of the meeting was to focus on identifying permitting concerns, agencies and developers alike had few concerns with the current process. There were agency personnel in attendance who had not attended the first Idaho meeting, so the workshop was a great opportunity to work through the flowcharts relevant to those agencies. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

155

Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned (Presentation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aquatic Species Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned AFOSR Workshop Washington, D.C. February 19-21, 2008 Sponsored by Air Force Office of Science Eric E. Jarvis, Ph.D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Bioenergy Center eric_jarvis@nrel.gov NREL/PR-510-43232 The ASP Didn't Invent the Concept of Fuels from Algae...  Algae for methane (via anaerobic digestion) * Meier (1955); UC Berkeley 1957-59 (Oswald and Golueke) * Wastewater use, recycling of CO 2 and nutrients  Revival during Energy Crisis of 1970's * Uziel et al. (1975); Benemann et al. (1976-80) * Still focused on methane and hydrogen * Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) * Later DOE (SERI founded in 1977) ...But the ASP Took the Concept to the Next Level  Supported work at SERI/NREL and through

156

Endangered Species Bulletins and Technical Reports (USFWS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July/August 2002 Vol. XXVII No. 3 In the work that we and our partners undertake to conserve and recover vulnerable species, awareness of the efforts we take for native plants is often overshadowed by the interest received by animal species. Too often overlooked is the fact that plants provide the foundation upon which animal life, including our own, depends. Plants are not only of aesthetic value, they provide us with food, many medicines, vital ecosystem services, and a variety of other products that are essential to our economy and well being. Fortunately, we have an important partner in the protection of our nations imperiled flora, the Center for Plant Conservation. This edition of the

Us Fish; Wildlife Service; Wildlife Service

157

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

158

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

159

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

160

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

Explaining species distribution patterns through hierarchical modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and its lower right at 34?20.5 S, 19?16.5 E, with total area of 4,456 km2. It comprises a rectangular area including the Kogelberg Biosphere Reserve and beyond, extending 41m east and 107m north from Cape Hangklip. The region is shown in Figure 1.... The survey paper of Guisan and Zimmerman (2000) provides discussion and extensive referencing. Let log ( p(k)i 1 ? p(k)i ) = wi??k + ?k + ?i, (5) where wi is a vector of grid cell level characteristics, and the ?ks are species level coefficients associated...

Gelfand, Alan E.; Silander, John A., Jr.; Wu, Shanshan; Latimer, Andrew; Lewis, Paul O.; Rebelo, Anthony G.; Holder, Mark T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A new species of Chiasmognathus from Kazakhstan (Hymenoptera: Apidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new species of the ammobatine bee genus Chiasmognathus Engel (Nomadinae: Ammobatini) is described and figured from near Almaty, Kazakhstan. Chiasmognathus scythicus Engel & Packer, new species, is superficially similar ...

Engel, Michael S.; Packer, Laurence

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Conservation Genetics of Five Species of Dionda in West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are important relative to monitoring habitat deterioration. This study used genetic data from geographic samples of the five nominal species of Dionda in Texas waters to document the conservation-genetics status of populations in each species. Fish were...

Hanna, Ashley

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Curecanti- Curecanti- Lost Canyon 230-kV Transmission Line Private Lands Herbicide Treatment for Vegetation Management San Miguel, Dolores, and Montezuma Counties, Colorado A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) would survey for and treat noxious weeds along its right-of-way (ROW) on the Curecanti to Lost Canyon (CCI-LCN) transmission lines from structure numbers 43/3 to 73/4 and 88/3 to 92/2. The proposed action would occur along Western's ROW on private lands only. The activity includes use of backpack, A TV- mounted sprayer or both, to treat individual and groups of noxious weeds and oak brush. The spraying Contractor shall be licensed in the State of Colorado and shall follow all applicable Federal, State and local laws, regulations and guidelines. No ground disturbance will occur. All travel will

167

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hesperus- Hesperus- Montrose 345-kV Transmission Line Private Lands Herbicide Treatment for Vegetation Management San Miguel and Dolores Counties, Colorado A. Brief Description of Proposal: Westem Area Power Administration (Western) would survey for and treat noxious weeds along its right-of-way (ROW) on the Hesperus to Montrose (HS-MTR) transmission lines from structure numbers 126 to 254. The proposed action would occur along Western's ROW on private lands only. The activity includes use of backpack, A TV-mounted sprayer or both, to treat individual and groups of noxious weeds and oak brush. The spraying Contractor shall be licensed in the State of Colorado and shall follow all applicable Federal, State and local laws, regulations and guidelines. No ground disturbance will occur. All travel will be

168

TWO NEW SPECIES OF THE ANT GENUS PERISSOMYRMEX SMITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TWO NEW SPECIES OF THE ANT GENUS PERISSOMYRMEX SMITH (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM CHINA1 Shanyi Zhou2 and Jianhua Huang3 ABSTRACT: Two new species of the ant genus Perissomyrmex Smith are described, China The ant genus Perissomyrmex was described by M. R. Smith in 1947 based on the type species P

Villemant, Claire

169

Conservation & the U.S. Endangered Species Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

birds #12;History of species-related legislation · Lacey Act (1900) · Migratory Bird Treaty Act (1918 Bird Treaty Act (1918) ­ All migratory birds are subject to federal regulation ­ Established protective as well as protected species #12;History of species-related legislation · Lacey Act (1900) · Migratory

Schweik, Charles M.

170

Sexual Dimorphism in the Sceloporus undulatus Species Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................................... xi CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION ................................................................................ 1 II VARIATION IN SEXUAL SIZE DIMORPHISM AMONG 4 SPECIES IN THE Sceloporus undulatus SPECIES COMPLEX ..... 7 Introduction............................................................................................................................. 69 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Sexual size dimorphism index (SDI) for all four species groups and all 12 populations...

Dittmer, Drew

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

171

THE INTRODUCTION OF POTENTIALLY INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES FOR HORTICULTURAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INTRODUCTION OF POTENTIALLY INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES FOR HORTICULTURAL PURPOSES IN NORTH: The Introduction of Potentially Invasive Alien Plant Species for Horticultural Purposes in North America: Assessing/Approved: ________________________________________ #12;iii ABSTRACT Invasive alien plant species are known to cause significant economic and ecological

172

Coherence and discontinuity in the scaling of specie's distribution patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

7 January 2004 research-article Coherence and discontinuity in the scaling of specie's...points Adobe PDF - rspb20032531s01.pdf Coherence and discontinuity in the scaling of species...2003 Published online 24 November 2003 Coherence and discontinuity in the scaling of species...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Species traits and the form of individual speciesenergy relationships  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2005a ). Solar energy is the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface...patterns of species richness: the mammals of Mexico. Global Ecol. Biogeogr. 13, 535-542...the British breeding avifauna using both solar (temperature) and productive energy metrics...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Factoring species, non-species values and threats into biodiversity prioritisation across the ecoregions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

population density, and the extinction risk of species. This threat index is positively correlated with all the ecoregions of Africa and its islands Neil D. Burgessa,b, *, Jennifer D'Amico Halesa , Taylor H. Rickettsa I N F O Article history: Received 3 September 2004 Available online 11 October 2005 Keywords: Africa

Vermont, University of

175

New Species of Aphanius (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae) from Isfahan Province of Iran and a Reanalysis of Other Iranian Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Species of Aphanius (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae) from Isfahan Province of Iran and a Reanalysis isfahanensis, is described from the Isfahan basin of Iran. It is distinguished from the other Iranian species in Iran. THE extant and extinct species of the killifish genus Aphanius Nardo, 1827 (Cyprinodon- tiformes

Hrbek, Tomas - Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico

176

Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal species population Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: animal species population Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biodiversity continued (Species Diversity)Biodiversity continued (Species Diversity) I. Patterns...

178

Revision of the bee genus Chlerogella (Hymenoptera: Halictidae), Part IV: A new species from southwestern Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terminalia can distinguish these species. Revised couplets are provided to the South American species of Chlerogella to permit identification of the new species....

Engel, Michael S.; Gonzalez, Victor H.; Hinojosa-Dí az, Ismael A.

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting species diversity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: affecting species diversity Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Community Ecology & Species Assemblages Summary: affect species distributions Tropical regions - most...

180

Development of phytotoxicity tests using wetland species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory phytotoxicity tests used to assess contaminant effects may not effectively protect wetland communities. The authors are developing routine culture and testing methods for selected fresh water plants, that can be used in risk assessments and monitoring of existing wetland systems. Utility of these tests includes evaluating the effects of point or non-point source contamination that may cause water or sediment quality degradation. Selected species include algae (blue-green, green), phytoflagellates (Chlamydomonas, Euglena), and floating or submerged vascular plants (milfoil, coontail, wild celery, elodea, duckweed). Algae toxicity tests range from 2-d, 4-d, and 7 day tests, and macrophyte tests from 10-d to 14 days. Metribuzin and boron are the selected contaminants for developing the test methods. Metribuzin, a triazinone herbicide, is a photosystem 11 inhibitor, and is commonly used for control of grass and broad-leaf plants. As a plant micronutrient, boron is required in very small amounts, but excessive levels can result in phytotoxicity or accumulation. The investigations focus on the influence of important factors including the influence of light quality and quantity, and nutrient media. Reference toxicant exposures with potassium chloride are used to establish baseline data for sensitivity and vitality of the plants. These culture and test methods will be incorporated into recommendations for standard phytotoxicity test designs.

Nelson, M.K.; Fairchild, J.F. [National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Species' geographic distributions through time: Playing catchup with changing climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and cold temperatures, produced by orbitally controlled phenomena termed Milankovitch cycles occurred during this period. For instance, during warm intervals, hippopotami frolicked in the Thames River, and during cold intervals, ice sheets progressed... new distributional opportunities and barriers for species and biotas. The relevance of these major changes to the distributional biology of species, of course, depends critically on the age of the species, which depends on the higher taxon...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Lieberman, Bruce S.

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

182

Biodiversity, Species Interactions and Ecological Networks in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity, Species Interactions and Ecological Networks in a Fragmented World Melanie Hagen*, W 172 10. Conclusions 175 Acknowledgements 177 Appendix 177 References 181 Abstract Biodiversity

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

183

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ETHYLENE AND SEED DORMANCY RELEASE IN ECHINACEA SPECIES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Inconsistent seed germination poses a problem for efficient seedling production of Echinacea species. Evidence suggests that ethylene can be effective for improving germination in Echinacea (more)

Wood, Laura Anne

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Two new species for the flora of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two new species from upland Panama,Licania chiriquiensis Prance (Chrysobalanaceae), andDichapetalum gentryi Prance. (Dichapetalaceae), are described and illustrated, and their relationships within their respectiv...

Ghillean T. Prance

185

A new species of Ornithocephalus (Orchidaceae) from Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ornithocephalus aristatus, a new species from Panama, is described and illustrated. Among the...Ornithocephalus, it can be distinguished by the nonresupinate flowers, the sepals each provided wit...

Franco Pupulin; Robert L. Dressler

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Ecology of toxigenic bacillus species in rice products.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Bacillus cereus is the most prevalent pathogenic Bacillus species found in foods, causing food spoilage and two types of toxin-mediated food poisoning known as the (more)

Oh, Mi Hwa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Species diversity and water quality in Galveston bay, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationships between species diversity of phytoplankton, zooplankton, nekton and benthos samples and the water quality of Galveston Bay, Texas were quantitatively compared. Two water quality parameters...

B. J. Copeland; Timothy J. Bechtel

1971-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Scrophularia sulaimanica (Scrophulariaceae), a new species from Kurdistan, Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scrophularia sulaimanica...S. A. Ahmad (Scrophulariaceae), a new species from the Hawraman Mountains of Kurdistan, Iraq is described, and its relationships to its...

Saman A. Ahmad

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Fish allergy-natural history and crossreactivity between fish species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The clinical course of fish allergy is not sufficiently studied. Persistence seems ... the high structural homology of parvalbumins from different fish species, crossreactivity among fishes is common.

George Stavroulakis; Stavroula Giavi

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

the chemical ecology of three species of myriophyllum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

may affect the physiological processes of ... the interrelated factors, For every locality at which a given species ... indicated which of the two interrelated variables...

2000-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - across-species across-assay investigation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Data collection Summary: across species employing a phylogeny for sex changing animals presented elsewhere 2 . Species may... Supplementary Information...

192

SIX NEW SPECIES OF ANTS (INSECTA: HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM EGYPT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIX NEW SPECIES OF ANTS (INSECTA: HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM EGYPT HASSAN H. FADL, REDA F. BAKR, RAWDA M. BADAWY AND MOSTAFA R. SHARAF Entomology Dept., Fac. Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. ABSTRACT Six new ant species from Egypt Cerapachys collingwoodi, Cataglyphis agostii, Messor eglalae

Villemant, Claire

193

Optimal Conservation of Migratory Species Tara G. Martin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biodiversity worldwide with annual investment for their conservation exceeding several billion dollars international borders. To date, conservation strategies for migratory species fail to take into account how connectivity results in the protection of the species across its entire range. Conclusions/ Significance. We

Queensland, University of

194

Wormholes record species history in space and time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wormholes record species history in space and time S. Blair Hedges e-mail...woodcut (1606) by Ramusio (Library of Congress). (c) Netherlandish...Bibliotheque national de France, Library of Congress, Metropolitan Museum...Wormholes record species history in space and time. | Genetic and fossil...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Matching experiments across species using expression values and textual information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the number of gene expression datasets deposited in public databases...us to better utilize these datasets: cross-species expression...Additionally, our subset contained nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor alpha...methods for comparing these datasets across species, relatively......

Aaron Wise; Zoltn N. Oltvai; Ziv BarJoseph

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Species and Spacing Effects of Northern Conifers on Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Species and Spacing Effects of Northern Conifers on Forest Productivity and Soil Chemistry in a 50 with reduced Ca levels in the forest floor. Keywords: conifer plantations, species and spacing trial, forest examines the long-term effects of experimental conifer monocultures on stem volume and soil chemistry

Mallik, Azim U.

197

Energy Resonances between Molecular Species in CO2 Gas Lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to a, number of other close energy resonances which exist, between laser levels of CO2, and the diatomic and triatomic; species expected to be present in various discharges in ... the diatomic and triatomic; species expected to be present in various discharges in. which CO2 laser action has been achieved. ...

R. W. NICHOLLS

1970-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

198

Design of Dissimilarity Measures: a New Dissimilarity between Species Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of Dissimilarity Measures: a New Dissimilarity between Species Distribution Areas Christian, 20146 Hamburg, Germany Abstract. We give some guidelines for the choice and design of dissimilarity mea distribution areas in biogeography. Species distribution data can be digitized as presences and absences

Guillas, Serge

199

ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/nutrient ratios, pH and nutrient contents according to the tree species (Vesterdal and Raulund-Rasmussen 1998ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen transformation patterns in forest Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract · Background Among forest management practices, forest tree

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

Morphometrics of Six Turtle Species from South Dakota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

213 Morphometrics of Six Turtle Species from South Dakota SARAH J. BANDAS1 and KENNETH F. HIGGINS, morphometric measurements were recorded for 755 turtles representing six species in South Dakota. Turtles were studies in nearby states or provinces. We recommend that morphometric measurements be taken on turtles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Schooling properties of an obligate and a facultative fish species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schooling properties of an obligate and a facultative fish species M. SORIA* , P. FREON § and P, Nouvelle-Calédonie, France Schooling fish species are conventionally subdivided into obligate interactions, Schooling behaviour, Polarity, Pelagic fish Running headline: Schooling properties of two fish

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

202

Coexistence induced by pollen limitation in flowering-plant species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...case in which species 2 (thin curves) does not satisfy the condition given by equation...this variable (with realistic values) does not change our main conclusions regarding...plant species: a review of evidence. In Handbook of experimental pollination ecology (ed...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

Gray, Matthew

204

Comparing disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus William Liu 1 , Benjamin Haley 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 From 1969 to 1992, the Janus program at Argonne National Laboratory performed a large series of radiobiology experiments, examining the effects of varying doses of neutron and gamma radiation on two disparate species of mice, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus. Much of this data has since been digitized and made freely accessible online. This study aims to revisit

205

Species for the screening assessment. Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of past nuclear production operations along the Columbia River, there is intense public and tribal interest in assessing any residual Hanford Site related contamination along the river from the Hanford Reach to the Pacific Ocean. The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment was proposed to address these concerns. The assessment of the Columbia River is being conducted in phases. The initial phase is a screening assessment of the risk, which addresses current environmental conditions for a range of potential uses. One component of the screening assessment estimates the risk from contaminants in the Columbia River to the environment. The objective of the ecological risk assessment is to determine whether contaminants from the Columbia River pose a significant threat to selected receptor species that exist in the river and riparian communities of the study area. This report (1) identifies the receptor species selected for the screening assessment of ecological risk and (2) describes the selection process. The species selection process consisted of two tiers. In Tier 1, a master species list was developed that included many plant and animal species known to occur in the aquatic and riparian systems of the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and the Columbia River estuary. This master list was reduced to 368 species that occur in the study area (Priest Rapids Dam to McNary Dam). In Tier 2, the 181 Tier 1 species were qualitatively ranked based on a scoring of their potential exposure and sensitivity to contaminants using a conceptual exposure model for the study area.

Becker, J.M.; Brandt, C.A.; Dauble, D.D.; Maughan, A.D.; O`Neil, T.K.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Determining the Bohm criterion in plasmas with two ion species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model that uniquely determines the flow speed of each ion species at the sheath edge of two ion species plasmas is developed. In this analysis, ion-ion two-stream instabilities can play an important role because they significantly enhance the friction between ion species. Two-stream instabilities arise when the difference in flow speeds between the ion species exceeds a critical value: V{sub 1}-V{sub 2}{identical_to}{Delta}V{>=}{Delta}V{sub c}. The resultant instability-enhanced friction rapidly becomes so strong that {Delta}V cannot significantly exceed {Delta}V{sub c}. Using the condition provided by {Delta}V={Delta}V{sub c} and the generalized Bohm criterion, the speed of each ion species is uniquely determined as it leaves a quasineutral plasma and enters a sheath. Previous work [S. D. Baalrud et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 205002 (2009)] considered the cold ion limit (T{sub i}{yields}0), in which case {Delta}V{sub c}{yields}0 and each ion species obtains a common ''system'' sound speed at the sheath edge. Finite ion temperatures are accounted for in this work. The result is that {Delta}V{sub c} depends on the density and thermal speed of each ion species; {Delta}V{sub c} has a minimum when the density ratio of the two ion species is near one, and becomes larger as the density ratio deviates from unity. As {Delta}V{sub c} increases, the speed of each ion species approaches its individual sound speed at the sheath edge.

Baalrud, S. D.; Hegna, C. C. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1609 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Accounting for Incomplete Species Detection in Fish Community Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Riverine fish assemblages are heterogeneous and very difficult to characterize with a one-size-fits-all approach to sampling. Furthermore, detecting changes in fish assemblages over time requires accounting for variation in sampling designs. We present a modeling approach that permits heterogeneous sampling by accounting for site and sampling covariates (including method) in a model-based framework for estimation (versus a sampling-based framework). We snorkeled during three surveys and electrofished during a single survey in suite of delineated habitats stratified by reach types. We developed single-species occupancy models to determine covariates influencing patch occupancy and species detection probabilities whereas community occupancy models estimated species richness in light of incomplete detections. For most species, information-theoretic criteria showed higher support for models that included patch size and reach as covariates of occupancy. In addition, models including patch size and sampling method as covariates of detection probabilities also had higher support. Detection probability estimates for snorkeling surveys were higher for larger non-benthic species whereas electrofishing was more effective at detecting smaller benthic species. The number of sites and sampling occasions required to accurately estimate occupancy varied among fish species. For rare benthic species, our results suggested that higher number of occasions, and especially the addition of electrofishing, may be required to improve detection probabilities and obtain accurate occupancy estimates. Community models suggested that richness was 41% higher than the number of species actually observed and the addition of an electrofishing survey increased estimated richness by 13%. These results can be useful to future fish assemblage monitoring efforts by informing sampling designs, such as site selection (e.g. stratifying based on patch size) and determining effort required (e.g. number of sites versus occasions).

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Jager, Yetta [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern (Connecticut) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern (Connecticut) Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

209

Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (South Carolina) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (South Carolina) Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (South Carolina) Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

210

Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic probe for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe's distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Dataset Summary Description The general mission of the Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species group is to quantify the distributions and magnitudes of sources and sinks for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and halogen containing compounds. HATS utilizes numerous types of platforms, including ground-based stations, towers, ocean vessels, aircraft, and balloons, to accomplish its mission. For a detailed mission statement, consult our FAQ. Tags {"nitrous oxide","sulfur hexaflouride",CFC-11,CFC-12,CFC-113,CCl4,CH3CCl3,CH3Cl,halon-1211,HCFC-22,HCFC-142b,halocarbons,chromatograph,aircraft,balloons,vessels,ships,towers,"natural resources",environment,air,"GHG "}

212

Spatial effects on species persistence and implications for biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural ecosystems are characterized by striking diversity of form and functions and yet exhibit deep symmetries emerging across scales of space, time and organizational complexity. Species-area relationships and species-abundance distributions are examples of emerging patterns irrespective of the details of the underlying ecosystem functions. Here we present empirical and theoretical evidence for a new macroecological pattern related to the distributions of local species persistence times, defined as the timespans between local colonizations and extinctions in a given geographic region. Empirical distributions pertaining to two different taxa, breeding birds and herbaceous plants, analyzed in a new framework that accounts for the finiteness of the observational period, exhibit power-law scaling limited by a cut-off determined by the rate of emergence of new species. In spite of the differences between taxa and spatial scales of analysis, the scaling exponents are statistically indistinguishable from each oth...

Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Maritan, Amos; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea; 10.1073/pnas.1017274108

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Act of 1973Legal Abstract This page links to...

214

Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

Fisher, Bob

215

Cryptantha gypsophila (Boraginaceae: Boraginoideae), a new species from western Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryptantha gypsophila, a new species of sect.Oreocarya..., is described from gypsum outcrops in widely scattered valleys of Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel countries of western Colorado. It can be...

James L. Reveal; C. Rose Broome

216

A new species of thalictrum (Ranunculaceae) from Western Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new species,Thalictrum heliophilum..., from exposed, shale talus of the Green River Formation in western Colorado where it is associated with a number...T. fendleri by its shorter stature, relatively small, cor...

Dieter H. Wilken; Kirby DeMott

217

Negative magnetophoresis of submicron species in magnetic nanofluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we studied the focusing and trapping of submicron, nonmagnetic species immersed in a magnetic nanofluid under applied magnetic fields. Focusing was achieved using two pairs of permanent magnets, which forced ...

Gonzalez, Lino A. (Lino Alberto), 1976-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Rare Species Are Valued Big Time Elena Angulo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as ecotourism or the keeping of exotic pets may cause this effect ­ known as the anthropogenic Allee effect high prices [8­10]; negative impacts of ecotourism on species via disturbance would be mostly focused

Courchamp, Franck

219

FIVE SPECIES OF DIDYMODON (POTTIACEAE, BRYOPHYTA) NEW FOR RUSSIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIVE SPECIES OF DIDYMODON (POTTIACEAE, BRYOPHYTA) NEW FOR RUSSIA DIDYMODON (POTTIACEAE.Saito, D. luridus Hornsch. and D. maschalogenus (Renauld & Cardot) Broth. were discovered as new for Russia of Didymodon currently known in Russia is provided. , , Didymodon: D. brachyphyllus

Kucera, Jan

220

Spiranthes dendroneura (Orchidaceae), a new species from Chihuahua  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spiranthes dendroneura, a new species from the pine-oak forests of northwestern Mexico, resemblesS. parasilica andS. valerioi in the slender leafless flowering habit, the solitary, tuberously thi...

C. J. Sheviak; R. A. Bye

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Coevolutionary dynamics of interacting species Marc Ebner1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coevolutionary dynamics of interacting species Marc Ebner1 , Richard A. Watson2 , and Jason Alexander3 1 Eberhard Karls Universit¨at T¨ubingen, WSI f¨ur Informatik, Abt. RA, Sand 1, 72076 T

Ebner, Marc

222

ORIGINAL PAPER Molecular identification of two species of the carnivorous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

along the open coast. Voracious predators that secrete acid, Philine spp. have few natural enemies % of the invasive marine invertebrate and algal species known from western North America (Cohen and Carlton 1995

Krug, Patrick J.

223

Brachistus knappiae (Solanaceae), a new species from Chiriqu, Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new species of Brachistus...is described from the region of Chiriqu in Panama. Brachistus knappiae morphologically resembles Brachistus stramoniifolius, and has been confused with it in the past. The diagnosti...

Juan Carlos Montero-Castro; Mario Sousa-Pea

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

MICROBIOLOGY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS Species Composition of Bacterial Communities Influences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mosquitoes to Experimental Plant Infusions Loganathan Ponnusamy & Dawn M. Wesson & Consuelo Arellano & Coby use oviposition traps containing plant infusions for monitoring populations of these mosquito species significantly diminished responses to experimental infusions made with sterilized white oak leaves, showing

225

Reactive oxygen species: a breath of life or death?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AP1, activator protein-1; ODD, oxygen-dependent degradationSignaling response when oxygen levels decrease (Fig. 1C;3. Halliwell B. Reactive oxygen species in living sys- tems:

Fruehauf, John P; Meyskens, Frank L Jr

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Sunlight creates oxygenated species in water-soluble fractions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a t Sunlight creates oxygenated species in water-soluble fractions of Deepwater horizon oil Phoebe Z. Ray a , Huan Chen b , David C. Podgorski b,c , Amy M. McKenna b , Matthew A....

227

Toxic species emissions from controlled combustion of selected paving asphalts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOXIC SPECIES EMISSIONS FROM CONTROLLED COMBUSTION OF SELECTED PAVING ASPHALTS A Theis CARLOS LUIS MENDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas Adt, M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Safety Engineering TOXIC SPECIES EMISSIONS FROM CONTROLLED COMBUSTION OF SELECTED PAVING ASPHALTS A Thesis by CARLOS LUIS MENDEZ Submitted to Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment...

Mendez, Carlos Luis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Management Recommendations for Washington's Priority Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTENTS Acknowledgments ........................................................ iv Introduction ..............................................................v Species Status Definitions ................................................ vii Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Map ................. viii Species Management Recommendations Salamanders Cascade torrent salamander ......................................... 1-1 Columbia torrent salamander ........................................ 1-1 Dunn's salamander ............................................... 2-1 Van Dyke's salamander ............................................ 2-1 Larch Mountain salamander ......................................... 3-1 Frogs Columbia spotted frog ............................................. 4-1 Northern leopard frog ............................................. 5-1 Oregon spotted frog .....................

Volume Iii Amphibians; Eric M. Larsen; Eric M. Larsen

229

Species composition and distribution of the macrozooplankton in Postoak Lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and winter months. Cladocera predominated in late October and early November. The lnean momentary composition of Postoak Lake included 5. 6 cladoceran species and 3. 0 copepod species. Density differences between inshore and offshore areas occurred... but were not consistent over time. The cyclopoid opp d. T. ~o' 1 D ' * ' . d~M1~ edax were generally more abundant offshore. The calanoid . pp dp t*, ~11'd h d ho *ffh preference. The cladoceran Cerio~da hnia lacustris exhibi ed uniform horizonta...

Welch, Douglas Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Suggestions for Weed Control in Peanuts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(bentazon) w eed seedlings other details . T reat when broadleaf w e eds are nutsedge B ASF when peanut small and activ ely gro wing. Does not control gro wth stages are grasses . F or y ello w nutsedge , tw o applications are bunching to preferred . When...- (acifluorfen) stages listed on the herbicides . Do not use tr eated plants f or feed bur , da yflo w e r , spurred Basagr an 4E? 1 to 2 pts . label, but generally o r fo ra g e . anoda, y ello w nutsedge , (bentazon) 2- to 8-leaf stage . coffee senna, giant...

Baumann, Paul A.; Lemon, Robert G.

2001-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Weed Busters: How to Neutralize Silverleaf Nightshade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Works Best: If you have only a few or scattered silver- leaf nightshade plants to control or do not have a ground broadcast sprayer. When to Apply: Silverleaf nightshade should be sprayed in the spring when the plants begin to flower. Prepare... the Equipment To properly apply the herbicide using this method, all you will need is a pump-up garden sprayer, backpack sprayer, cattle sprayer or a sprayer mounted on an AT V. If there are many plants to spray, backpack and ATV sprayers are more efficient...

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Weed Busters: How to Repel Rayless Goldenrod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using this method, all you need is a pump-up garden sprayer, backpack sprayer, cattle sprayer or a sprayer mounted on an AT V. If there are many plants to spray, backpack and ATV sprayers are more efficient. Make sure your sprayer has an adjustable... cone nozzle (X6 to X8 orifice size) that can deliver a coarse spray (large droplets). Prepare the Herbicide Mixture You can expect 76 to 100 percent control of rayless goldenrod by spraying with a mixture of 1 percent To r don 22K? in water. To prepare...

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Forest Management Regime and Species choice options in a changing environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Management Regime and Species choice ­ options in a changing environment Bill Mason, Forest.mason@forestry.gsi.gov.uk May 18 2010 #12;2 Talk Structure 1. Introduction; 2. Species 3. Forest types; 4. Management regime; 5 in 2050. #12;10 Alternative species? [Read report Table 9.1] Broadleaf species Conifer species Acer

234

Confronting Uncertainty and Missing Values in Species Conservation Investment with Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in conservation actions that generate substantial non-use benefits, such as species and biodiversity conservation1 Confronting Uncertainty and Missing Values in Species Conservation Investment with Environmental: Environmental value transfer and species conservation Key words: environmental value transfer, uncertainty

Botea, Adi

235

Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation across heterogeneous landscapes. Using data from the Willamette Basin, Oregon, we compare the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation under

Weiblen, George D

236

A revision of the Larainae (Coleoptera, Elmidae) of Venezuela, with description of nine new species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The species of the riffle beetle subfamily Larainae occurring in Venezuela are revised. Examination of 756 specimens yielded 22 species in nine genera occurring throughout the country. Seven species are newly recorded from the country: Phanoceroides...

Maier, Crystal A.

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

237

Review of the Berosus Leach of Venezuela (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae, Berosini) with description of fourteen new species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The species of the water scavenger beetle genus Berosus Leach occurring in Venezuela are reviewed. Thirty-six species are recorded, including fifteen new species, fourteen of which are described here as new: Berosus aragua ...

Oliva, Adriana; Short, Andrew E. Z.

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

238

Comparing Patterns of Natural Selection Across Species Using Selective Signatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comparing gene expression profiles over many different conditions has led to insights that were not obvious from single experiments. In the same way, comparing patterns of natural selection across a set of ecologically distinct species may extend what can be learned from individual genome-wide surveys. Toward this end, we show how variation in protein evolutionary rates, after correcting for genome-wide effects such as mutation rate and demographic factors, can be used to estimate the level and types of natural selection acting on genes across different species. We identify unusually rapidly and slowly evolving genes, relative to empirically derived genome-wide and gene family-specific background rates for 744 core protein families in 30 gamma-proteobacterial species. We describe the pattern of fast or slow evolution across species as the 'selective signature' of a gene. Selective signatures represent a profile of selection across species that is predictive of gene function: pairs of genes with correlated selective signatures are more likely to share the same cellular function, and genes in the same pathway can evolve in concert. For example, glycolysis and phenylalanine metabolism genes evolve rapidly in Idiomarina loihiensis, mirroring an ecological shift in carbon source from sugars to amino acids. In a broader context, our results suggest that the genomic landscape is organized into functional modules even at the level of natural selection, and thus it may be easier than expected to understand the complex evolutionary pressures on a cell.

Alm, Eric J.; Shapiro, B. Jesse; Alm, Eric J.

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

239

Differential design for hopping in two species of wallabies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hindlimb musculoskeletal anatomy and steady speed over ground hopping mechanics were compared in two species of macropod marsupials, tammar wallabies and yellow-footed rock wallabies (YFRW). These two species are relatively closely related and are of similar size and general body plan, yet they inhabit different environments with presumably different musculoskeletal demands. Tammar wallabies live in relatively flat, open habitat whereas yellow-footed rock wallabies inhabit steep cliff faces. The goal of this study was to explore musculoskeletal differences between tammar wallabies and yellow-footed rock wallabies and determine how these differences influence each species' hopping mechanics. We found the cross-sectional area of the combined ankle extensor tendons of yellow-footed rock wallabies was 13% greater than that of tammar wallabies. Both species experienced similar ankle joint moments during steady-speed hopping, however due to a lower mechanical advantage at this joint, tammar wallabies produced 26% more muscle force. Thus, during moderate speed hopping, yellow-footed rock wallabies operated with 38% higher tendon safety factors, while tammar wallabies were able to store 73% more elastic strain energy (2.18J per leg vs. 1.26J in YFRW). This likely reflects the differing demands of the environments inhabited by these two species, where selection for non-steady locomotor performance in rocky terrain likely requires trade-offs in locomotor economy.

C.P. McGowan; R.V. Baudinette; A.A. Biewener

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species James F. Wishart In "Ionic Liquids as Green Solvents: Progress and Prospects" Rogers, R. D. and Seddon, K. R. , Eds.; ACS Symp. Ser. 856, Ch. 31, pp. 381-395, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2003. (ISBN 0-84123-856-1) [Information about the book] Abstract: An understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids is important for development of their applications in radioactive material processing and for the application of pulse radiolysis techniques to the general study of chemical reactivity in ionic liquids. The distribution of primary radiolytic species and their reactivities determine the yields of ultimate products and the radiation stability of a particular ionic liquid. This chapter introduces some principles of radiation chemistry and the

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - area endangered species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Land Management over Endangered Species Act violations connected to Grand Canyon uranium mining... flycatchers, have been added to the endangered species list, and...

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects species abundances Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Density Dependence Shapes Species Abundances in a Tropical Tree Community Liza S. Comita,1... a species' relative abundance, but empirical tests are ... Source: Reich, Peter...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - andean wild species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

16 wild species and Andean germplasm... landraces, 11 Chilean landraces, and two wild potato species as out- groups, and with chloroplast DNA data... through breeding efforts of...

245

Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal...

246

On the propagation of vorticity in multi-species plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of plasmas formed by several species is governed by one fluid equation for each species, all of them linked by an electromagnetic forcing and collisional terms, and the Maxwell equations. It is found that in the collisionless case, the field lines of a combination of fluid vorticity and magnetic field are transported by the flow as material points. In consequence, the vorticity propagates at the same velocity as the magnetic field. This is studied in depth for a number of simple configurations, showing that the vorticity travels at a certain fraction of the speed of light, depending on the size of the spatial mode.

Nez, Manuel [Department of Algebra and Mathematical Analysis and IMUVA, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)] [Department of Algebra and Mathematical Analysis and IMUVA, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Taxonomy, biology, and clinical aspects of Fusarium species.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...flora (247), even during contact lens wear (40), but they frequently contaminate...habitats of the Fusarium species in Trinidad, B. W. I. Can. J. Bot. 34:847-864. 79...117:29-36. 150. Nelson, P. E., B. W. Pennypacker, T. A. Toussoun, and R...

P E Nelson; M C Dignani; E J Anaissie

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution Frank Le ke and Stephan Merz Institut fur of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi- cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

249

Verifying SCR Requirements Speci cations Using State Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verifying SCR Requirements Speci cations Using State Exploration In Proc. First ACM SIGPLAN as the SCR Software Cost Reduction method, to specify the requirements of software systems using ta- bles. NRL has developed a formal state machine model de ning the SCR semantics and support tools for anal

250

Hidden species diversity of Australian burrowing snakes (Ramphotyphlops)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognition of species. Our dataset included 741 specimens morphologically attributed to 27 nominal mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b) and examined these SHs with additional evidence from a nuclear gene (prolactin receptor) and geographical data. Although the nuclear marker was not as fast-evolving and discriminating

Hedges, Blair

251

Molecular Structure and Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide Species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ability to predict the solubility and stability of lithium polysulfide is vital in realizing longer lasting lithium-sulfur batteries. Herein we report a combined computational and experimental spectroscopic analysis to understand the dissolution mechanism of lithium polysulfide species in an aprotic solvent medium. Multinuclear NMR and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) analysis reveals that the lithium exchange between polysulfide species and solvent molecule constitutes the first step in the dissolution process. Lithium exchange leads to de-lithiated polysulfide ions which subsequently forms highly reactive free radicals through disproportion reaction. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility.

Vijayakumar, M.; Govind, Niranjan; Walter, Eric D.; Burton, Sarah D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Devaraj, Arun; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Karim, Ayman M.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

252

Towards an Algebraic Speci cation of the Java Virtual Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards an Algebraic Speci cation of the Java Virtual Machine K Stephenson Department of Computer of the architecture of an abstract and simpli ed version of the Java Virtual Machine JVM. This concentration on the implementation-independent features of the machine allows us to build a clean and easily comprehensible model

Grant, P. W.

253

Species D Adenoviruses as Oncolytics against B-cell Cancers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Species D viruses can bind CAR, CD46, and sialic acid with...efficiently enter cells using CAR (21). When Ad26 and 48 were vectored as replication-defective vaccines, receptor utilization...suggested that they did not use CAR and only weakly used CD46 as...

Christopher Y. Chen; Julien S. Senac; Eric A. Weaver; Shannon M. May; Diane F. Jelinek; Philip Greipp; Thomas Witzig; and Michael A. Barry

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Equal partnership: two trematode species, not one, manipulate the burrowing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zealand cockle, Austrovenus stutchburyi C. Babirat, K.N. Mouritsen and R. Poulin* Department of Zoology, 2001; Poulin, 1995, 1998; Moore, 2002). Helminth species known to be capable of manipulating stutchburyi (Allison, 1979). Its ability to modify the behaviour of the cockle is well documen- ted

Poulin, Robert

255

A new deep sea species of Paramphinome (Polychaeta: Amphinomidae) from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paramphinome Sars, 1872 includes small deep-water species which are often very abundant in quantitative deep, mainly in deep waters and is characterized by the presence of one, two or three pairs of small notopodial made by PETROBRAS (Brazilian Petroleum Company) under the scope of the project `Campos Basin Deep

Paiva, Paulo Cesar de

256

TAXON 43 -FEB 1994 Are many plant species paraphyletic?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

derivative species. Due to the theoretical difficulty of transforming widespread population systems through of lineages (Mayr, 1969), while intraspe- cific processes foster adaptation and maintenance (Grant, 1963 of phylogenetic studies. Even where the phylogeny addresses higher categories (genera and above), cladistic

Rieseberg, Loren

257

Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FA182 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Roy P. E. Yanong (genus) of fish viruses in the family Iridoviridae (the iridoviruses). Megalocytiviruses cause systemic fishes in both cultured and wild stocks. In some disease outbreaks, 100% losses have oc- curred in under

Watson, Craig A.

258

kWh/OvenDryTonne Calorific Value by Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Forest Mensuration: a handbook for practitioners. HMSO #12;Wood Density As hardwood species are generally effect on CV of any of the variables. Not only does any water in the timber represent less fuel when in their current form. Methodology on how to determine moisture content and other physical properties of woodfuel

259

SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing caused by direct solar insolation and benefit from the cooling effects of wind caused by evaporative, as well as benefits from the cooling effects of wind. Eastern Red Bat Lasiurus borealis Roost trees

New Hampshire, University of

260

Influenza virus genome consists of eight distinct RNA species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nonstructural proteins NS1 and NS2 (24). Table 2 shows...only RNAs large enough to code for PI, P2, and P3...then suggest that Band 4 codes for hemagglutinin, Band...separate RNA species to code for the smaller non- structural protein NS2. There are several possible...

D McGeoch; P Fellner; C Newton

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...extend to the influence of solar energy and temperature upon speciation...young species of birds in Africa and South America and...35012228 . Hawkins, B.A , Energy, water, and broad-scale...and C.A Corey1987Does solar energy control organic diversity...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology Roger Arditi and Lev R. Ginzburg, the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, in the research unit of Ecology and Evolution of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook University since 1977. He has published widely on theoretical

Canet, Léonie

263

Genetic calibration of species diversity among North America's freshwater fishes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...313 321 . 11 Hebert PDN Penton EH Burns JM Janzen DH Hallwachs W ( 2004 ) Ten species in one: DNA barcoding...Evolution 53 : 1857 1871 . 31 Harris PM Roe KJ Mayden RL ( 2005 ) A mitochondrial...Biol 58:114 ZZQQhy129. 3. Harris PM, Roe KJ, Mayden RL (2005) A mitochondrial...

Julien April; Richard L. Mayden; Robert H. Hanner; Louis Bernatchez

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Population stability, cooperation, and the invasibility of the human species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a mechanism for these outcomes by modifying a simple density-dependent population model to allow varying populations expanded out of Africa and spread rapidly across the majority of the earth's land surfacePopulation stability, cooperation, and the invasibility of the human species Marcus J. Hamiltona

Brown, James H.

265

Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species Niklaus E. Zimmermanna,1 of climate extremes suggests the importance of understanding their additional influence on range limits. Here, we assess how measures representing climate extremes (i.e., interannual variability in climate

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

266

Electro-diffusion in a plasma with two ion species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric field is a thermodynamic force that can drive collisional inter-ion-species transport in a multicomponent plasma. In an inertial confinement fusion capsule, such transport causes fuel ion separation even with a target initially prepared to have equal number densities for the two fuel ion species. Unlike the baro-diffusion driven by ion pressure gradient and the thermo-diffusion driven by ion and electron temperature gradients, electro-diffusion has a critical dependence on the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion species. Specifically, it is shown here that electro-diffusion vanishes if the ion species have the same charge-to-mass ratio. An explicit expression for the electro-diffusion ratio is obtained and used to investigate the relative importance of electro- and baro-diffusion mechanisms. In particular, it is found that electro-diffusion reinforces baro-diffusion in the deuterium and tritium mix, but tends to cancel it in the deuterium and helium-3 mix.

Kagan, Grigory; Tang Xianzhu [Theoretical Division Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Electric Signal Variation Among Seven Blunt-Snouted Brienomyrus species (Teleostei: Mormyridae) from a Riverine Species Flock in Gabon, Central Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recently discovered species flock of mormyrid fishes is marked by a striking degree of electric signal diversity among species of rather similar form. We investigated electric organ discharge (EOD) variation...

Matthew E. Arnegard; Carl D. Hopkins

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Spatial effects on species persistence and implications for biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural ecosystems are characterized by striking diversity of form and functions and yet exhibit deep symmetries emerging across scales of space, time and organizational complexity. Species-area relationships and species-abundance distributions are examples of emerging patterns irrespective of the details of the underlying ecosystem functions. Here we present empirical and theoretical evidence for a new macroecological pattern related to the distributions of local species persistence times, defined as the timespans between local colonizations and extinctions in a given geographic region. Empirical distributions pertaining to two different taxa, breeding birds and herbaceous plants, analyzed in a new framework that accounts for the finiteness of the observational period, exhibit power-law scaling limited by a cut-off determined by the rate of emergence of new species. In spite of the differences between taxa and spatial scales of analysis, the scaling exponents are statistically indistinguishable from each other and significantly different from those predicted by existing models. We theoretically investigate how the scaling features depend on the structure of the spatial interaction network and show that the empirical scaling exponents are reproduced once a two-dimensional isotropic texture is used, regardless of the details of the ecological interactions. The framework developed here also allows to link the cut-off timescale with the spatial scale of analysis, and the persistence-time distribution to the species-area relationship. We conclude that the inherent coherence obtained between spatial and temporal macroecological patterns points at a seemingly general feature of the dynamical evolution of ecosystems.

Enrico Bertuzzo; Samir Suweis; Lorenzo Mari; Amos Maritan; Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe; Andrea Rinaldo

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Allee effect, stochastic dynamics and the eradication of alien species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT The Allee effect, stochastic dynamics and the eradication of alien species Andrew Liebhold1 biology of eradication have assumed that eradication can only be achieved via 100% removal of the alien of alien species. While most alien species have relatively few effects, many species have caused

Liebhold, Andrew

270

A synopsis of the Colombian species of Acalypha subgenus Linostachys (Euphorbiaceae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A synopsis of the Colombian species of Acalypha subgenus Linostachys (Euphorbiaceae) Josl~ MARIA). A synopsis of the Colombian species of Acalypha subgenus Linos- tachys (Euphorbiaceae). Brittonia 46: 200 and illustraled, and several species are reduced to synonymy. A key is provided to the Colombian species

Cardiel, José María

271

Composition of Salamander SpeciesComposition of Salamander Species Utilizing the Pigeon River WatershedUtilizing the Pigeon River Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to process wood · Toxic byproducts were dumped directly into the Pigeon River ­ Dioxins, furans" by Redmond & Scott documents species in Cocke Co. but no records exist for Pigeon · Know dioxins have for ResearchJustification for Research · Dioxins act as an endocrine disrupter and can cause abnormal

Gray, Matthew

272

Guidelines for Housing Multiple Species of Large Laboratory Animals Animals should not be housed with or near another species of animal that might compromise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Guidelines for Housing Multiple Species of Large Laboratory Animals I. General Animals should or in quarters designed to provide visual and auditory separation from other species. Dogs should be transported by the use of physical barriers, chemical restraint, visual separation, assignment of different species

Bandettini, Peter A.

273

Contrasting nutrient stocks and litter decomposition in stands of native and invasive species in a sub-tropical estuarine marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alterniflora Phragmites australis Cyperus malaccensis Alien invasive species Native aggressive species Biomass invasive species (Spartina alterniflora, smooth cordgrass) and a native aggressive species (Phragmites australis, common reed) as they have expanded into the native Cyperus malaccensis (shichito matgrass

Gauci, Vincent

274

Invasive Species -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications Wildlife What's New Publications Wildlife What's New Invasive Species Some of the links on this page are to documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) that can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. Non-native plants and animals cause problems for many native species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Protected and relatively undisturbed for the past 60 years, the ORR has changed considerably since 1942 when it was acquired as part of the Manhattan project. At that time about half of the land was cleared and cultivated. Those cleared areas have gradually returned to forest through plantings and natural succession. Now about 70% of the reservation is in mature or maturing native habitats. However, invasive, non-native plants and animals often impact these areas.

275

Nonlinear magnetosonic waves in a multi-ion-species plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetosonic waves are intensively studied due to their importance in space plasmas and also in fusion plasmas where they are used in particle acceleration and heating experiments. In the present paper, the magnetosonic waves propagating in a multi-ion-species plasma perpendicular to an external magnetic field are investigated. Due to the presence of several ion species, this mode splits into two branches: high- and low-frequency modes. This opens a new channel of nonlinear interactions (between these two modes), and qualitatively changes the picture of turbulence in the long-wave region. Considering the limit of a cold collisionless plasma, a general system describing the propagation of nonlinearly coupled high- and low-frequency waves is derived. This system includes the Korteweg{endash}de Vries (KdV), Boussinesq, and Zakharov equations as limiting cases. Solitary solutions of the system of coupled equations are obtained. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Boldyrev, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey08543 (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Surface species produced in the radiolysis of zirconia nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modifications to water-zirconia nanoparticle interfaces induced by {gamma} irradiation have been examined using diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT), Raman scattering, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Spectroscopy with in situ heating was used to probe variations in the dissociatively bound chemisorbed water on the zirconia nanoparticles following evaporation of the physisorbed water. DRIFT spectra show that the bridged Zr-OH-Zr species decreases relative to the terminal Zr-OH species upon irradiation. No variation is observed with Raman scattering, indicating that the zirconia morphology is unchanged. EPR measurements suggest the possible formation of the superoxide ion, presumably by modification of the surface OH groups. Trapped electrons and interstitial H atoms are also observed by EPR.

Carrasco-Flores, Eduardo A.; LaVerne, Jay A. [Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States) and Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, 46556 (United States)

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

277

Ecological niche modelling and prioritizing areas for species reintroductions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, topographic index; USGS, 1997) and annual means of climate variables (diurnal temperature range, precipitation, maximum, minimum, and mean temperatures, solar radiation, wet days, and vapour pressure; IPCC, 1999). Environmental data sets were resampled to a...): (1) habitat quality of release area, (2) release site relative to historical distribution of the species, and (3) number of individuals released. Reintroductions generally involve analysis, planning, and selection of optimal areas. Such analyses have...

Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Peterson, A. Townsend; Serví n, Jorge I.; Kiff, Lloyd F.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The identification of mycoplasma species by gas chromatography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( Mem r May 1969 ABSTRACT The Identification of Mycoplasma Species by Gas Chromatography (May 1969) Milton Donald Shult, Jr . , B, S. , Texas Lutheran College Directed by: Dr. R. J. Hidalgo A study was undertaken to characterize the fatty acid... which were isolated from avian, human and bovine sources, respectively . The organisms were propagated in a growth medium pre- pared from identical control lots of commercially avaiable dehydrated broth. The fatty acids of the organisms were assayed...

Shult, Milton Donald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Identifying of meat species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Meat has been widely consumed as an important protein source in daily life of human. Furthermore, with busy and intense urban lifestyle, processed food is now one of the main protein sources of ones diet. Consumers rely on the food labeling to decide if the meat product purchased is safe and reliable. Therefore, it is important to ensure the food labeling is done in a correct manner to avoid consumer fraud. More consumers are now concern about the food quality and safety as compared to before. This study described the meat species identification and detection method using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 8 types of meats (cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, pork and horse). The objective of this study is to decide on the specificity of oligonucleotide sequences obtained from previous study. There were 5 proposed oligonucleotide primer in this study. The main important finding in this work is the specificity of oligonucleotide primers to raw meats. It if found that the oligonucleotide primers proposed were not specific to the local raw meat species. Therefore, further study is needed to obtain a species-specific oligonucletide primers for PCR, in order to be applied in food product testing.

Foong, Chow Ming; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

SIMULTANEOUS CONSTRAINTS ON THE NUMBER AND MASS OF RELATIVISTIC SPECIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent indications from both particle physics and cosmology suggest the possible existence of more than three neutrino species. In cosmological analyses the effects of neutrino mass and number of species can in principle be disentangled for fixed cosmological parameters. However, since we do not have perfect measurements of the standard {Lambda} cold dark matter model parameters, some correlation remains between the neutrino mass and number of species, and both parameters should be included in the analysis. Combining the newest observations of several cosmological probes (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure, expansion rate), we obtain N {sub eff} = 3.58{sup +0.15} {sub -0.16}(68% CL){sup +0.55} {sub -0.53}(95% CL) and {Sigma}m {sub {nu}} < 0.60 eV(95% CL), which are currently the strongest constraints on N {sub eff} and {Sigma}m {sub {nu}} from an analysis including both parameters. The preference for N {sub eff} >3 is at the 2{sigma} level.

Riemer-Sorensen, Signe; Parkinson, David; Davis, Tamara M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Blake, Chris, E-mail: signe@physics.uq.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)] [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energetics of Multiple-Ion Species Hohlraum Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes in multiple-ion species plasmas has been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with densities of xe22/cc are heated to Te=3keV and backscattered laser light is measured by a suite of absolutely calibrated backscatter diagnostics. Ion Landau damping is increased by adding hydrogen to the CO2/CF4 gas fill. We find that the backscatter from stimulated Brillouin scattering is reduced is monotonically reduced with increasing damping, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in ICF relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. The reduction in backscatter is accompanied by a comparable increase in both transmission of a probe beam and an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics/performance. Comparison of the experimental data to linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale 3D laser-plasma interaction simulations show quantitative agreement. Our findings confirm the importance of Landau damping in controlling backscatter from high-electron temperature hohlraum plasmas and have lead to the inclusion of multi-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

Neumayer, P; Berger, R; Callahan, D; Divol, L; Froula, D; London, R; MacGowan, B J; Meezan, N; Michel, P; Ross, J S; Sorce, C; Widmann, K; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

282

Water Use Efficiency in Water and Salt Stressed Lycopersicon pennellii and Lycopersicon esculentum Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

L. esculentum and L. pennellii are related species. The first is the cultivated tomato, and the second is a drought tolerant Peruvian weed. The two species were grown in 12 kg pots for 130 days a...

Y. Vaadia

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cargo transportation by two species of motor protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cargo motion in living cells transported by two species of motor protein with different intrinsic directionality is discussed in this study. Similar to single motor movement, cargo steps forward and backward along microtubule stochastically. Recent experiments found that, cargo transportation by two motor species has a memory, it does not change its direction as frequently as expected, which means that its forward and backward step rates depends on its previous motion trajectory. By assuming cargo has only the least memory, i.e. its step direction depends only on the direction of its last step, two cases of cargo motion are detailed analyzed in this study: {\\bf (I)} cargo motion under constant external load; and {\\bf (II)} cargo motion in one fixed optical trap. Due to the existence of memory, for the first case, cargo can keep moving in the same direction for a long distance. For the second case, the cargo will oscillate in the trap. The oscillation period decreases and the oscillation amplitude increases with the motor forward step rates, but both of them decrease with the trap stiffness. The most likely location of cargo, where the probability of finding the oscillated cargo is maximum, may be the same as or may be different with the trap center, which depends on the step rates of the two motor species. Meanwhile, if motors are robust, i.e. their forward to backward step rate ratios are high, there may be two such most likely locations, located on the two sides of the trap center respectively. The probability of finding cargo in given location, the probability of cargo in forward/backward motion state, and various mean first passage times of cargo to give location or given state are also analyzed.

Yunxin Zhang

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

284

Demographic modeling of selected fish species with RAMAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microcomputer program RAMAS 3 developed for EPRI, has been used to model the intrinsic natural variability of seven important fish species: cod, Atlantic herring, yellowtail flounder, haddock, striped bass, American shad and white perch. Demographic data used to construct age-based population models included information on spawning biology, longevity, sex ratio and (age-specific) mortality and fecundity. These data were collected from published and unpublished sources. The natural risks of extinction and of falling below threshold population abundances (quasi-extinction) are derived for each of the seven fish species based on measured and estimated values for their demographic parameters. The analysis of these species provides evidence that including density-dependent compensation in the demographic model typically lowers the expected chance of extinction. This is because if density dependence generally acts as a restoring force it seems reasonable to conclude that models which include density dependence would exhibit less fluctuation than models without compensation since density-dependent populations experience a pull towards equilibrium. Since extinction probabilities are determined by the size of the fluctuation of population abundance, models without density dependence will show higher risks of extinction, given identical circumstances. Thus, models without compensation can be used as conservative estimators of risk, that is, if a compensation-free model yields acceptable extinction risk, adding compensation will not increase this risk. Since it is usually difficult to estimate the parameters needed for a model with compensation, such conservative estimates of the risks of extinction based on a model without compensation are very useful in the methodology of impact assessment. 103 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

Saila, S.; Martin, B.; Ferson, S.; Ginzburg, L.; Millstein, J. (Applied Biomathematics, Inc., Setauket, NY (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Properties of Reactive Oxygen Species by Quantum Monte Carlo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of Chemistry, Biology and Atmospheric Science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab-initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as $N^3-N^4$, where $N$ is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

Andrea Zen; Bernhardt L. Trout; Leonardo Guidoni

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

286

Sympathetic Cooling with Two Atomic Species in an Optical Trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We simultaneously trap ultracold lithium and cesium atoms in an optical dipole trap formed by the focus of a CO2 laser and study the exchange of thermal energy between the gases. The optically cooled cesium gas efficiently decreases the temperature of the lithium gas through sympathetic cooling. Equilibrium temperatures down to 25 ?K have been reached. The measured cross section for thermalizing 133Cs-7Li collisions is 810-12 cm2, for both species unpolarized in their lowest hyperfine ground state. Besides thermalization, we observe evaporation of lithium purely through elastic cesium-lithium collisions (sympathetic evaporation).

M. Mudrich; S. Kraft; K. Singer; R. Grimm; A. Mosk; M. Weidemller

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Predicting the geography of species' invasions via ecological niche modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

427 in Population Studies: Animal Ecology and Demography. Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology, Volume 22. Cold Spring Har- bor (NY ): Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. Inouye D W, Barr B, Armitage K B, Inouye B D. 2000. Climate change is affecting... influences on hab- itat selection of coexisting species: climate change impacts? Ecology 82:175188. Martin W K. 1996. The current and potential distri- bution of the common myna Acridotheres tristis in Australia. Emu 96:166173. Martinez-Meyer E. 2002...

Peterson, A. Townsend

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Methods of propagation for selected native Texas woody plant species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cuttings, but some success may be obtained by taking cuttings of partially matured wood in late spring or early summer ( Hartmann and Kester, 1968) These should be inserted in a peat/perlite or sand mixture under intermittent mist. The effects... Acer germinate the same season that they ripen, while other species are dormant until the following spring. Dormancy may be broken by fall sowing or by stratification in moist sand or peat moss at 41'F (5~C) for 30 days Se. d lots of Acez vary...

Senior, Jill Ellen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Theory of electromagnetic fluctuations for magnetized multi-species plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of electromagnetic fluctuations in plasma provides relevant information about the plasma state and its macroscopic properties. In particular, the solar wind persistently sustains a small but detectable level of magnetic fluctuation power even near thermal equilibrium. These fluctuations may be related to spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations arising from the discreteness of charged particles. Here, we derive general expressions for the plasma fluctuations in a multi-species plasma following arbitrary distribution functions. This formalism, which generalizes and includes previous works on the subject, is then applied to the generation of electromagnetic fluctuations propagating along a background magnetic field in a plasma of two proton populations described by drifting bi-Maxwellians.

Navarro, Roberto E., E-mail: roberto.navarro@ug.uchile.cl; Muoz, Vctor [Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Araneda, Jaime [Departamento de Fsica, Universidad de Concepcin, Concepcin 4070386 (Chile); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C. 20064 (United States); Vias, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, Juan A. [Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios Bsicos y Aplicados en Complejidad, CEIBA complejidad, Bogot (Colombia)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

NOXIOUS GAS EMISSIONS FROM THE CLOSED IRON MINES TO THE BUILT-UP AREAS ON THE SURFACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mine workings, in which some inhabitants observed the dysfunctioning of gas cookers and boilers effects, the observed dysfunctioning of combustion appliances (boiler, gas cooker) due to CO2 polluted

Boyer, Edmond

291

SNAKE SPECIES RICHNESS IN RELATION TO HABITAT IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF EAST CENTRAL TEXAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project examined snake species richness and relative abundances in a heterogeneous landscape within the post oak savannah of East Central Texas. Snakes were sampled using funnel traps (with drift fences for terrestrial species) and hand capture...

Putegnat, John

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - alien fish species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fish species Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alien fish species Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Hydrobiologia 500: 217230, 2003. K....

293

An arsenic-tolerant new species of Eleocharis (Cyperaceae) from Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new aquatic, arsenic-tolerant species ofEleocharis (Cyperaceae) endemic to Chihuahua, Mexico, is described and illustrated. It...Eleocharis sect.Eleogenus seriesMaculosae. A key for the species ofEleocharis sec...

M. Socorro Gonzlez-Elizondo; Jorge A. Tena-Flores; Ma. Teresa Alarcn-Herrera

294

Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosys- tems- mon species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plu- mosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum

Martone, Patrick T.

295

Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: biodiversity, ecosystem, elevated carbon dioxide, nitrogen enrichment, parasites, plant pathogensEffects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species

Crews, Stephen

296

A new species of Puccinia (Pucciniales, Basidiomycota) and new records of rust fungi from Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new species of Puccinia with diorchidioid teliospores is described from Urochloa decumbens (Poaceae) in Panama. It differs from the other known species...Puccinia...with diorchidioid teliospores by uredinia wit...

O. Perdomo-Snchez; M. Piepenbring

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - alters dual-species biofilm Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: alters dual-species biofilm Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: in a Dual-Species Biofilm Exposed to Mixed...

298

Gain and Loss of Fruit Flavor Compounds Produced by Wild and Cultivated Strawberry Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...species from the Plant Research International (PRI) breeding collection were...Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts (cv SRI) were prepared and transformed...domesticated species. | Plant Research International, 6700 AA, Wageningen, The Netherlands...

Asaph Aharoni; Ashok P. Giri; Francel W.A. Verstappen; Cinzia M. Bertea; Robert Sevenier; Zhongkui Sun; Maarten A. Jongsma; Wilfried Schwab; Harro J. Bouwmeester

299

Multiple prey traits, multiple predators: keys to understanding complex species interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Species interactions generate both natural selection and ecological community structure. Among the more interesting species interactions are those that create adaptive tradeoffs-where phenotypes conferring improved performance in interactions...

Langerhans, Randall Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

Patch size effects on plant species decline in an experimentally fragmented landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the relative contribution of fragment size vs. succession on species' declines by examining distributions of abundances for 18 plant species declining over time in an experimentally fragmented landscape in northeast Kansas, USA. If patch size effects dominate...

Collins, Cathy Diane; Holt, Robert D.; Foster, Brian L.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tropical leguminous species for acid soils: studies on plant form and growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fixing ability were analyzed for species at four abandoned pasture sites at the La Selva Biological Station, Sarapiqui, Costa Rica. Survival of the majority of the species after 3 years was high. Pithecellobium idiopodum, Inga edulis, A lbizia guichapele...

Tilki, Fahrettin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Damning study blames BP oil spill for heart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damning study blames BP oil spill for heart defects in fish Scientists find evidence of Deepwater also found evidence of potentially lethal heart defects in two species of tuna and one species the effect of noxious compounds. Slower heart rates, fluid accumulation, and arrhythmia The researchers found

Grosell, Martin

303

Detection and species identification of baleen whale calls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Baleen whales live over extensive home range and time scales. Study of how these animals use their vocalizations for communication requires massive data sampling over long periods. This paper describes a system for automating the sampling and analysis of baleen whale calls. Many species produce stable homogeneous call structures which lend themselves to automated species identification. We have benchmarked a series of bioacoustical call identification algorithms against a set of blue and fin whale calls while systematically manipulating the signal?to?noise ratio. Blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whale calls are very stereotypical. Blue whale A and B calls have fundamental frequencies of approximately 17 Hz narrow bandwidth well?defined harmonic structure and typical duration of 1525 s. Fin whale pulses have fundamental frequencies of approximately 17 Hz but are broadband in nature and short (approximately 1?s) duration. The results demonstrated a typical tradeoff of speed versus accuracy. The best algorithm was inserted into an underwater sound recording system and its signal?detection theoretic performance was quantified. Results will be discussed with respect to technological ecological and conservation aspects of baleen whale bioacoustics. [Project CS?1082 of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program.

David A. Helweg

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Scalable Quantum Computing Architecture with Mixed Species Ion Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on progress towards implementing mixed ion species quantum information processing for a scalable ion trap architecture. Mixed species chains may help solve several problems with scaling ion trap quantum computation to large numbers of qubits. Initial temperature measurements of linear Coulomb crystals containing barium and ytterbium ions indicate that the mass difference does not significantly impede cooling at low ion numbers. Average motional occupation numbers are estimated to be $\\bar{n} \\approx 130$ quanta per mode for chains with small numbers of ions, which is within a factor of three of the Doppler limit for barium ions in our trap. We also discuss generation of ion-photon entanglement with barium ions with a fidelity of $F \\ge 0.84$, which is an initial step towards remote ion-ion coupling in a more scalable quantum information architecture. Further, we are working to implement these techniques in surface traps in order to exercise greater control over ion chain ordering and positioning.

Wright, John; Chou, Chen-Kuan; Graham, Richard D; Noel, Thomas W; Sakrejda, Tomasz; Zhou, Zichao; Blinov, Boris B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Arsenic species separation by IELC-ICP/OES: Arsenocholine behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the literature an increasing interest is observed in developing methods to determine arsenobetaine, arsenocholine and related compounds in sea food and in reference materials. The separation conditions and quantification of As(III), As(V), monomethylarsenate (MMA), dimethylarsinate (DMA), arsenobetaine (AsBet) and arsenocholine (AsChol) are studied by Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled directly to an Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP/OES) system. The separation conditions are optimized to improve the resolution of the six arsenic species. Arsenocholine shows a particular pattern of behavior when phosphate is used as eluent: two peaks are observed in the chromatogram, thus a systematic study assaying different pH and concentration of phosphate is carried out to improve resolution and analysis time when the six arsenic compounds are analyzed in a mixture. Boric acid as mobile phase avoids the splitting of the arsenocholine peak and leads to a good separation of the six arsenic compounds. Detection limits are established for the six arsenic species.

Rubio, R.; Peralta, I.; Alberti, J.; Rauret, G. (Univ. de Barcelona (Spain))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? A?(140) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(140) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(140) fibril formation. ? At high A?(140) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (140) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(140) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleationpolymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(140) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented Executable the steam boiler control speci cation problem to il- lustrate how the evolving algebra approach to the speci, in June 1995, to control the Karlsruhe steam boiler simulator satisfactorily. The abstract machines

Börger, Egon

308

Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water, Sediment, and Biota of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water, Sediment, and Biota Data Series 658 #12;#12;Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water.J., 2012, Mercury species and other selected constituent concentrations in water, sediment, and biota

309

Mycelial carton galleries of Azteca brevis (Formicidae) as a multi-species network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...brevis (Formicidae) as a multi-species network Veronika...is a one-to-many multi-species network. Vertical...brevis |Chaetothyriales|multi-species network|nest-wall...basidiomycetes of the mushroom families Lepiotaceae and Pterulaceae...reinforce the walls of a building (Holldobler Wilson 1990...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Alien species in fresh waters: ecological effects, interactions with other stressors, and prospects for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alien species in fresh waters: ecological effects, interactions with other stressors, and prospects dozens of alien species. 2. Invasions are highly nonrandom with respect to the taxonomic identity, which probably have been underestimated as an ecological force. 4. The number of alien species

311

Project 35013 Species-and Site-specific Impacts of Gas Supersaturation on Aquatic Animals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

three species tend to be bottom oriented and deep water species, and most TDG effects are in the upperProject 35013 Species- and Site-specific Impacts of Gas Supersaturation on Aquatic Animals Sponsor in the river?" The proposal was submitted primarily at the request of the state water quality agencies

312

Cooperative wasp-killing by mixed-species colonies of honeybees, Apis cerana and Apis mellifera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooperative wasp-killing by mixed-species colonies of honeybees, Apis cerana and Apis mellifera Ken-species colonies of honeybees, Apis cerana and Apis mellifera, were tested against a predatory wasp, Vespa velutina / defensive behaviour / mixed species / Apis cerana / Apis mellifera 1. INTRODUCTION Altruism and cooperation

313

Sorption and transport of iodine species in sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption and transport of iodine species in sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites analytical techniques to study the sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4 and batch experiments to investigate the interconversion, sorption and transport of iodine species

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

314

Size-dependent species richness: trends within plant communities and across latitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a result of sampling effects (McGeoch & Gaston 2002). Likewise, for even-aged populations, plant density, Ithaca, NY, USA 2 Department of Botany, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa 3 Department.edu Abstract We examine how species richness and species-specific plant density (number of species and number

Rand, Richard H.

315

Temperature dependence, spatial scale, and tree species diversity in eastern Asia and North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

100871, China; and bDepartment of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 Contributed richness kinetic energy species-area relationship The increase of species richness from poles scale, which are known to affect species diversity (1, 16, 20, 21), and have recently received renewed

Brown, James H.

316

Species composition and seasonal abundance of stink bugs in cotton in the Lower Texas Gulf Coast and the virulence of Euschistus species to cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the drop cloth. ........................................................................................................... 26 2.2. Distribution of most common pest stink bugs by county, 2004. ........................ 31 2.3. Distribution... Page 2.1. Mean number of stink bug species collected per six row-feet, by date. Lower Texas Gulf Coast region, 2004.............................................................. 30 2.2. Mean number of stink bug species...

Hopkins, Bradley Wayne

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

Species measurements in a hypersonic, hydrogen-air, combustion wake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A continuously sampling, time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used to measure relative species concentrations in a two-dimensional, hydrogen-air combustion wake at mainstream Mach numbers exceeding 5. The experiments, in a free piston shock tunnel, yielded distributions of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, water, and nitric oxide at stagnation enthalpies ranging from 5.6 MJ/kg to 12.2 MJ/kg and at a distance of approximately 100s times the thickness of the initial hydrogen jet. The amount of hydrogen mixed in stoichiometric proportions was approximately independent of the stagnation enthalpy, despite the fact that the proportion of hydrogen in the wake was increased with stagnation enthalpy. Roughly 50% of the mixed hydrogen underwent combustion at the highest enthalpy. The proportion of hydrogen reacting to water could be approximately predicted using reaction rates based on mainstream temperatures.

Skinner, K.A.; Stalker, R.J. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)] [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry...

Schuldt, Thilo; Krutzik, Markus; Bote, Lluis Gesa; Gaaloul, Naceur; Hartwig, Jonas; Ahlers, Holger; Herr, Waldemar; Posso-Trujillo, Katerine; Rudolph, Jan; Seidel, Stephan; Wendrich, Thijs; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Sven; Kubelka-Lange, Andr; Milke, Alexander; Rievers, Benny; Rocco, Emanuele; Hinton, Andrew; Bongs, Kai; Oswald, Markus; Franz, Matthias; Hauth, Matthias; Peters, Achim; Bawamia, Ahmad; Wicht, Andreas; Battelier, Baptiste; Bertoldi, Andrea; Bouyer, Philippe; Landragin, Arnaud; Massonnet, Didier; Lvque, Thomas; Wenzlawski, Andre; Hellmig, Ortwin; Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus; von Klitzing, Wolf; Chaloner, Chris; Summers, David; Ireland, Philip; Mateos, Ignacio; Sopuerta, Carlos F; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Tino, Guglielmo M; Williams, Michael; Trenkel, Christian; Gerardi, Domenico; Chwalla, Michael; Burkhardt, Johannes; Johann, Ulrich; Heske, Astrid; Wille, Eric; Gehler, Martin; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Grlebeck, Norman; Braxmaier, Claus; Rasel, Ernst

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a plasma containing the species after a sufficient time period has elapsed after the generation of the plasma and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample.

Loge, Gary W. (2998 Plaza Blanca, Santa Fe, NM 87505)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

85-SA-117: Supplement Analysis 85-SA-117: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the non-electric portions of the Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex. BPA proposes to manage and maintain grounds and landscaping in the non-electrical portions of the Ross Facility. Vegetation management at the Facility shall include: 1) bare ground management of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking areas; 2) mechanical and/or spot herbicide control of some broad leafs and noxious weeds; 3) mowing, fertilizing, and broadleaf control of landscaped lawn areas; 4) weed control in ornamental shrub areas; and 4) areas requiring only mechanical control to manage unwanted grasses, and shrubs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: Supplement Analysis 7: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the non-electric portions of the Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex. BPA proposes to manage and maintain grounds and landscaping in the non-electrical portions of the Ross Facility. Vegetation management at the Facility shall include: 1) bare ground management of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking areas; 2) mechanical and/or spot herbicide control of some broad leafs and noxious weeds; 3) mowing, fertilizing, and broadleaf control of landscaped lawn areas; 4) weed control in ornamental shrub areas; and 4) areas requiring only mechanical control to manage unwanted grasses, and shrubs. DOE/EIS-0285-SA-117, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis

322

Eric Hanson Department of Horticulture, MSU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

April 2014 to NW Michigan growers #12;Weeds are "plants out of place". Blackberries are a crop plant grape leaves, reducing the amount of light energy the vine can absorb. #12;Weeds are "problem makers other grape species closely related to cultivated types: Vitis riparia is the River Bank grape. #12

Isaacs, Rufus

323

Saimiri sciureus and Cebus apella Mixed-Species Associations in Raleighvallen, Suriname Ultimate Functions and Proximate Mechanisms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A mixed-species association (MSA) is two or more species traveling and foraging together as a cohesive group. Prior research suggests that MSAs are adaptive responses, (more)

Phillips, Carson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Tamarix Species (Salt Cedar) Stem Density Along Fluvial and Salinity Gradients on the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Invasive species and river alteration have major impacts on riparian ecosytems. I have examined density patterns of the invasive species Tamarix in relation to soil (more)

Ray, Karen Louise

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Kinetic theory and numerical simulations of two-species coagulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we study the stochastic process of two-species coagulation. This process consists in the aggregation dynamics taking place in a ring. Particles and clusters of particles are set in this ring and they can move either clockwise or counterclockwise. They have a probability to aggregate forming larger clusters when they collide with another particle or cluster. We study the stochastic process both analytically and numerically. Analytically, we derive a kinetic theory which approximately describes the process dynamics. One of our strongest assumptions in this respect is the so called well-stirred limit, that allows neglecting the appearance of spatial coordinates in the theory, so this becomes effectively reduced to a zeroth dimensional model. We determine the long time behavior of such a model, making emphasis in one special case in which it displays self-similar solutions. In particular these calculations answer the question of how the system gets ordered, with all particles and clusters moving in the same direction, in the long time. We compare our analytical results with direct numerical simulations of the stochastic process and both corroborate its predictions and check its limitations. In particular, we numerically confirm the ordering dynamics predicted by the kinetic theory and explore properties of the realizations of the stochastic process which are not accessible to our theoretical approach.

Carlos Escudero; Fabricio Macia; Raul Toral; Juan J. L. Velazquez

2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Embedding potentials for excited states of embedded species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frozen-Density-Embedding Theory (FDET) is a formalism to obtain the upper bound of the ground-state energy of the total system and the corresponding embedded wavefunction by means of Euler-Lagrange equations [T. A. Wesolowski, Phys. Rev. A 77(1), 012504 (2008)]. FDET provides the expression for the embedding potential as a functional of the electron density of the embedded species, electron density of the environment, and the field generated by other charges in the environment. Under certain conditions, FDET leads to the exact ground-state energy and density of the whole system. Following Perdew-Levy theorem on stationary states of the ground-state energy functional, the other-than-ground-state stationary states of the FDET energy functional correspond to excited states. In the present work, we analyze such use of other-than-ground-state embedded wavefunctions obtained in practical calculations, i.e., when the FDET embedding potential is approximated. Three computational approaches based on FDET, that assure self-consistent excitation energy and embedded wavefunction dealing with the issue of orthogonality of embedded wavefunctions for different states in a different manner, are proposed and discussed.

Wesolowski, Tomasz A. [Dpartement de Chimie Physique, Universit de Genve, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genve 4 (Switzerland)] [Dpartement de Chimie Physique, Universit de Genve, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genve 4 (Switzerland)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Macroalgal diversity along the Baltic Sea salinity gradient challenges Remanes species-minimum concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remanes species-minimum concept, which states that the lowest number of taxa occurs at the horohalinicum (58psu), was tested by investigating macroalgal diversity on hard substrates along the natural salinity gradient in the Baltic Sea. Field data on species occurrence and abundance were collected by SCUBA diving along 10 transects of the Finnish, Swedish and German coasts, covering a salinity range from 3.9 to 27psu. Macroalgal species numbers declined steadily with salinity, decreasing until 7.2psu was reached, but in the horohalinicum, a marked reduction of species number and a change in diversity were indicated by the Shannon index and evenness values. The non-linear decrease in macroalgal diversity at 58psu and the lack of increase in species numbers at salinities below 5psu imply a restricted applicability of Remanes species-minimum concept to macroalgae.

Hendrik Schubert; Peter Feuerpfeil; Ronny Marquardt; Irena Telesh; Sergei Skarlato

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Enhanced Water Use Efficiency in Dry Loess Grassland Species Grown at Elevated Air CO2 Concentration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Net CO2 assimilation rate (PN), stomatal conductance (gs), transpiration rate (E), and water use efficiency (WUE) in four perennial C3 species...

K. Szente; Z. Nagy; Z. Tuba

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal species characterization Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: be divided into three categories. Firstly, species of plants, animals, fungi and micro-organisms provide... of the known causes of animal extinctions since 1600 reveals...

330

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous species habitat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

species habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Predicting the distribution of anadromous fish in fresh water using habitat models Steve Lindley Summary: , critical habitat, and...

331

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian native species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: australian native species Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Freshwater fish resources in the Snowy River, Victoria. Freshwater fish resources in the Snowy Summary:...

332

PREDICTING AND PREVENTING LOSSES OF IMPERILED FISH SPECIES IN AN URBANIZING ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and spatial autocorrelation. For a species (the Cherokee darter, Etheostoma etowahae) that shows, urbanization, Cherokee darter, Etowah darter, amber darter, predictive modeling, stormwater runoff, effective

Rosemond, Amy Daum

333

Spatial-Temporal Branching Point Process Models in the Study of Invasive Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review of models of alien plant spread, EcologicalThe establishment of alien (invasive) plant and animaleconomic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the

Balderama, Earvin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Species richness, diversity and density of understory vegetation along disturbance gradients in the Himalayan conifer forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated whether species richness, diversity and density of understory herbaceous plants differed along logging (gap) and grazing (primarily by cattle) disturbance gradients, and sought to identify drivers...

Kesang Wangchuk; Andrs Darabant; Prem Bahadur Rai

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - avian species richness Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

richness and avian spleen mass... here, we found no link between species ... Source: Poulin, Robert - Department of Zoology, University of Otago Collection: Biology and Medicine...

336

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal species richness Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a positive relationship between parasite species richness... richness and ... Source: Poulin, Robert - Department of Zoology, University of Otago Collection: Biology and Medicine...

337

Functional trait expression of grassland species shift with short- and long-term nutrient additions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Humans are altering nutrient availability worldwide, likely affecting plant trait expression, with consequences for community composition and ecosystem function. Here, we examined the responses of plant specie...

Kimberly J. La Pierre; Melinda D. Smith

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Visiting insect diversity and visitation rates for seven globally-imperiled plant species in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................................... 3 Study area..................................................................... 51 Appendix 3- The Natural Heritage Ranking System restricted areas in the middle Arkansas Valley of Colorado. These species were observed to determine

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - angiosperm evergreen species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 40 INSTITUTS FRANAIS DE RECHERCHE EN INDE FRENCH RESEARCH INSTITUTES IN INDIA Summary: . Among the qualitative characters of species...

340

Myrsidea willardi Price and Johnson, a New Species of Chewing Louse (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae) from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Myrsidea willardi Price and Johnson, a New Species of Chewing Louse (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae) from Schlegel's Asity (Passeriformes: Philepittidae) ROGER D. PRICE 1 AND KEVIN P. JOHNSON 2 ABSTRACT

Johnson, Kevin P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in four fish species from different trophic levels in the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentration of ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds were determined in liver of four fish species from different trophic levels (Aurigequula fasciata, omnivore; Alepes djedaba, carnivore; Liza ab...

Shirin Rahmanpour; Nasrin Farzaneh Ghorghani

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Two new species of Echinobothrium van Beneden, 1849 (Cestoda: Diphyllidea) from the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two new species of diphyllidean cestodes are described from the Persian Gulf, Echinobothrium persiense n. sp. from Rhinobatos punctifer Compagno & Randall and Echinobothrium hormozganiense n. sp. ...

Mohammad Haseli; Masoumeh Malek; Harry W. Palm

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Spatial Designation of Critical Habitats for Endangered and Threatened Species in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Establishing biological reserves or "hot spots" for endangered and threatened species is critical to support real-world species regulatory and management problems. Geographic data on the distribution of endangered and threatened species can be used to improve ongoing efforts for species conservation in the United States. At present no spatial database exists which maps out the location endangered species for the US. However, spatial descriptions do exists for the habitat associated with all endangered species, but in a form not readily suitable to use in a geographic information system (GIS). In our study, the principal challenge was extracting spatial data describing these critical habitats for 472 species from over 1000 pages of the federal register. In addition, an appropriate database schema was designed to accommodate the different tiers of information associated with the species along with the confidence of designation; the interpreted location data was geo-referenced to the county enumeration unit producing a spatial database of endangered species for the whole of US. The significance of these critical habitat designations, database scheme and methodologies will be discussed.

Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL; Sabesan, Aarthy [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

E-Print Network 3.0 - anopheles mosquito species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine 22 Environews Innovations A 468 VOLUME 113 | NUMBER 7 | July 2005 Environmental Health Perspectives Summary: 't protect against some dangerous mosquito species, including...

345

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent countries species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 American Journal of Botany 88(11): 21012112. 2001. GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF WILD POTATO SPECIES1 Summary: georeferenced database of locations where wild potatoes were...

346

E-Print Network 3.0 - arachis wild species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

information for this subject... in one generation of a serial increase for two wild potato species, one an outcrossing diploid, the other... in greenhouses) does not. For wild...

347

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeromonas species isolated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

may represent important... microflora of five species of sharks obtained in the Indian Ocean; and Yap (1979) reported on skin isolates... of intestinal material from five...

348

Identification of Wood Species by Acoustic-Resonance Spectrometry Using Multivariate Subpopulation Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The identification of wood species remains an issue in restoration involving rare, old, or disguised wood parts. Precise restoration is required in reconditioning the works of...

Mills, Timothy P; Jones, Angela; Lodder, Robert A

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic utricularia species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: by aquatic plants (Figure 3h). The intro- duced species, common reed (Phragmites australis) and purple... survey. By comparison, there were few changes in the...

350

Exotic, Invasive, Alien, Nonindigenous, or Nuisance Species: No Matter What You Call Them, They're a Growing Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exotic, Invasive, Alien, Nonindigenous, or Nuisance Species: No Matter What You Call Them, They nonindigenous species. What is the Difference between Exotic, Nonindigenous, Non-Native, Alien, Nuisance of February 3, 1999, defined "alien" species as "any species, including its seeds, eggs, spores, or other

351

RAD sequencing yields a high success rate for westslope cutthroat and rainbow trout species-diagnostic SNP assays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: conservation genomics, hybridization, introgression, invasive species, microfluidic PCR, salmonids, SNP, trout

Hohenlohe, Paul A.

352

Oregon's Rocky Shore Species: Anemones Giant Green Anemones get their bright coloration from symbiotic, single-celled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(right) and grow flat. Photos: Laurel Hillmann #12;Oregon's Rocky Shore Species: Molluscs & ArthropodsOregon's Rocky Shore Species: Anemones Giant Green Anemones get their bright coloration from;Oregon's Rocky Shore Species: Sea Stars Rocky shores are home to a diverse group of species including

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

353

The effects of forest management on plant species diversity in a Sierran conifer forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We used a large data set collected as part of a wildlife habitat study at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada of California to assess the influence of management practices on vascular plant diversity in the mixed conifer forest. In addition to the existing data, we conducted botanical inventories in 32 plots (0.28ha in size) from five different silvicultural regimes in 1997. Based on these inventories, understory species richness normalized to a total area sampled of 1.13ha was significantly greater in plots under plantation (80 species) and shelterwood (77 species) management compared to plots in reserve sites (i.e., approximately 80 year with no active management, 48 species). This pattern in species richness was consistent in the larger data set. Based on 372 plots sampled between 1977 and 1996, plantations and shelterwoods routinely had the highest species richness and the reserve units routinely were the least rich. Stands under single-tree selection had species richness values closer to those of the reserve stands. The relative diversity observed in group selection plots varied from year to year. Based on the 1997 data, canopy closure and seedbed were significantly correlated to understory plant diversity. Plots that were more open and had more bare ground tended to have higher species richness. This result supports the suggestion that in addition to the total amount of biomass removed, post-harvest practices also affect plant diversity. There were considerable differences in the composition of the understory communities among silvicultural treatments. Plots under a group selection, single tree selection or reserve management regime had a greater proportion of late-seral vs. early-seral species and a lower proportion of introduced exotic species compared to plantations and shelterwoods. In this forest, more intensive management maximized species richness, but the lower intensity practices better conserved understory plants typical of late-seral stands.

John J Battles; Ayn J Shlisky; Reginald H Barrett; Robert C Heald; Barbara H Allen-Diaz

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

care and maintenance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Care and Maintenance of the Prairie Parcel Care and Maintenance of the Prairie Parcel Now that your prairie parcel is up and growing, there are just a few concerns that you should consider about its care. Weeding The question of weeding is really just a matter of aesthetics. You do not have to weed your parcel. If your parcel is a large one, weeding may not even be practical. Although the "weed" species will dominate your parcel for the first few years, they will give way to the native plant species. You can liken the native plants to long distance runners; they appear to start off slowly, but end up winning the ecological race. After all, they are the plants that are genetically-suited and adapted to growing in this environment. The native prairie plants will be developing extensive root structure the

355

An Algebraic Speci cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Algebraic Speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System Michel Bidoit 1 , Claude Chevenier describe how to derive an algebraic speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System starting from to specify the detection of the steam-boiler fail- ures. Finally we discuss validation and veri#12;cation

Bidoit, Michel

356

Ti-Peroxo Species in the TS-1/H2O2/H2O System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is devoted to the study of the active species present on the TS-1-H2O2/H2O catalytic system and to the elucidation of the mechanisms of formation and interconversion of these species. In particular new experimental data and computational ...

Francesca Bonino; Alessandro Damin; Gabriele Ricchiardi; Marco Ricci; Guido Span; Rino D'Aloisio; Adriano Zecchina; Carlo Lamberti; Carmelo Prestipino; Silvia Bordiga

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

Iron Species in Argonne Premium Coal Samples:? An Investigation Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron Species in Argonne Premium Coal Samples:? An Investigation Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 ... Iron K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the iron species that are present within the Argonne Premium Coal Samples. ...

Stephen R. Wasserman; Randall E. Winans; Robert McBeth

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Optimal-Sustainable Management of Multi-Species Fisheries: Lessons from a Predator-Prey Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal-Sustainable Management of Multi-Species Fisheries: Lessons from a Predator-Prey Model):355-377. Please consult that version for citations #12;2 Optimal-Sustainable Management of Multi-Species Fisheries: Lessons from a Predator-Prey Model Abstract: In this paper we define fisheries management as sustainable

Woodward, Richard T.

359

Fish Species of Greatest Conservation Need in Iowa's Nonwadeable Rivers: Distribution, Relative Abundance, and Influences from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish Species of Greatest Conservation Need in Iowa's Nonwadeable Rivers: Distribution, Relative of fish species of greatest conservation need in Iowa's nonwadeable rivers. · Evaluate the influence of potential movement barriers and anthropogenic stressors on fish distributions in Iowa's nonwadeable rivers

Koford, Rolf R.

360

Hybrid Automata: An Algorithmic Approach to the Speci cation and Veri cation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Automata: An Algorithmic Approach to the Speci cation and Veri cation of Hybrid Systems1 of hybrid automata as a model and speci cation language for hybrid systems. Hybrid automatacan be viewed erential equations. We show that many of the examples considered in the workshop can be de ned by hybrid

Henzinger, Thomas A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Multilocus sequence data reveal extensive phylogenetic species diversity within the Neurospora discreta complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

obtained from three unlinked nuclear loci, and phylogenetic species recognition was applied to the dataset and geographical ranges of the species. Sequence data were obtained from three unlinked nuclear loci and analyzed with parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic methods. To the dataset we applied previously described protocols

362

Climate Change Risks and Conservation Implications for a Threatened Small-Range Mammal Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Risks and Conservation Implications for a Threatened Small-Range Mammal Species Naia: Climate change is already affecting the distributions of many species and may lead to numerous extinctions be used to assess climate sensitivity and potential climate change impacts, even for rare and cryptic

Schierup, Mikkel Heide

363

Variation in Phenotype for Resistance to Phytophthora ramorum in a Range of Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-grown Viburnum for resistance to P. ramorum. Materials and Methods We evaluated nine species of field83 Variation in Phenotype for Resistance to Phytophthora ramorum in a Range of Species: Phytophthora ramorum, resistance, sudden oak death, Viburnum Introduction Phytophthora ramorum is a recently

Standiford, Richard B.

364

Pathogenicity of seven species of the Botryosphaeriaceae on Eucalyptus clones in Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pathogenicity of seven species of the Botryosphaeriaceae on Eucalyptus clones in Venezuela S. R Milla, 5101-A Mérida, Venezuela. B Department of Genetics, Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology found on Eucalyptus spp. in Venezuela. An initial inoculation trial was conducted using seven species

365

Six new Pyramica species from Suriname (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) by Dr Dewanand Makhan*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Six new Pyramica species from Suriname (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) by Dr Dewanand Makhan* *Willem Bilderdijkhove 19, 3438 PM Nieuwegein, The Netherlands Makhan, D. (2007). Six new Pyramica species from Suriname Suriname are described: Pyramica amrishi sp. nov., P. aschnae sp. nov., P. aschnakiranae sp. nov., P

Villemant, Claire

366

Biogenic emissions from Citrus species in California Silvano Fares a,b,*, Drew R. Gentner c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogenic emissions from Citrus species in California Silvano Fares a,b,*, Drew R. Gentner c , Jeong May 2011 Accepted 26 May 2011 Keywords: BVOC emissions OVOC Terpene Basal emission rate Citrus a b such as the Central Valley of California. Moreover, the BVOC emissions from Citrus species have not been characterized

Silver, Whendee

367

Exploitation-related reef fish species richness depletion in the epicenter of marine biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploitation-related reef fish species richness depletion in the epicenter of marine biodiversity historically has the highest concentration of coral reef fishes than any other large marine area in the world in Marine Protected Areas in this region in increasing species richness at local scales suggests

Hynes, Wayne L.

368

The Living Planet Index: using species population time series to track trends in biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Living Planet Index: using species population time series to track trends in biodiversity of the world's biodiversity over time. It uses time-series data to calculate average rates of change in a large number of populations of terrestrial, freshwater and marine vertebrate species. The dataset contains

Vermont, University of

369

Extraction of arsenate and arsenite species from soils and sediments Myron Georgiadis a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extraction of arsenate and arsenite species from soils and sediments Myron Georgiadis a , Yong Cai 2005 NaDDC preserves arsenite during soil and sediment extraction. Abstract The primary objective and bioavailable arsenic species from soil and sediment while at the same time minimizing the transformation

Florida, University of

370

Analytica Chimica Acta 477 (2003) 279291 Measurement of arsenic species in marine sediments by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytica Chimica Acta 477 (2003) 279­291 Measurement of arsenic species in marine sediments 2002 Abstract Extraction of sediments with phosphoric acid (0.5 M) and hydroxylamine hydrochloride (0 to separate arsenic species. Recoveries of sediments spiked with As(V) were quantitative whereas for sediments

Canberra, University of

371

ccsd00001869, Multi-ion-species e ects on magnetosonic waves and energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd­00001869, version 1 ­ 22 Oct 2004 Multi-ion-species e#11;ects on magnetosonic waves and energy, wave damping, energy transport 1. Introduction The presence of multiple ion species introduces many Magnetosonic waves propagating perpendicular to an external magnetic #12;eld are studied with attention

372

Differences in germination and seedling establishment of alien and native Impatiens species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differences in germination and seedling establishment of alien and native Impatiens species Rozdíly., Jarosík V. & Pysek P. (2009): Differences in germi- nation and seedling establishment of alien and native design. In this study seed and seedling traits of three congeneric alien species in Europe, differing

Kratochvíl, Lukas

373

Scale dependence of native and alien species richness in North American floras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scale dependence of native and alien species richness in North American floras Vliv mítka studia na of native and alien species richness in North American flo- ras. ­ Preslia 78: 427­436. I analyzed data from and alien diversity vary as a function of spatial grain. Moving window multi- ple regression revealed

Minnesota, University of

374

Moorland pools as refugia for endangered species characteristic of raised bog gradients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In intact raised bog landscapes transitions from ombrotrophic into minerotrophic conditions occur. These gradients are lost from many bogs due to peat harvesting and drainage, and are difficult to restore. To determine which endangered species are characteristic of pristine raised bog gradients and their current status in degraded bogs, plants and macroinvertebrates were surveyed in Estonian intact raised bogs and Dutch degraded bog remnants. Dutch national distribution data were used to determine whether communities with these species occurred outside bog habitats. Water chemistry data were used to describe associated environmental conditions. Intact bog gradients were the preferred habitat for six plant species and fifteen macroinvertebrate species, all of which are endangered. In degraded bogs these species were scarce or not recorded. In intact bogs these species lived at sites where runoff from the bog massif came into contact with regional ground water resulting in a gradient in pH, alkalinity, Ca, Fe and ionic ratio. Analysis of Dutch national distribution data revealed aggregations of these endangered species in moorland pools. These pools contained water chemistry gradients similar to those found in pristine bogs, which occurred at sites were groundwater seepage and stream water came in contact. In the past, stream water has been used to increase pH and trophic status of moorland pools facilitating fisheries. Today, this practice offers a conservation strategy for the protection of endangered species for which no short-term alternatives are available.

Hein H. van Kleef; Gert-Jan A. van Duinen; Wilco C.E.P. Verberk; Rob S.E.W. Leuven; Gerard van der Velde; Hans Esselink

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Effects of the Training Dataset Characteristics on the Performance of Nine Species Distribution Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of the Training Dataset Characteristics on the Performance of Nine Species Distribution species need to be fitted to a training dataset before practical use. The training dataset of this paper is to study the effect of the training dataset characteristics on model performance and to compare

Kratochvíl, Lukas

376

Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species identity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species in recycling nutrients, thus providing a mechanism for how animal species identity mediates ecosystem processes) recycled nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in a tropical stream supports stoichiometry theory. Mass

Flecker, Alex

377

Biogeography, ecoregions, and geomorphology affect fish species composition in streams of eastern Oklahoma, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeography, ecoregions, and geomorphology affect fish species composition in streams of eastern B.V. 2007 Abstract Stream fish assemblages are structured by biogeographical, physical and stream habitat, influenced fish species composition (presence­absence) in eastern Oklahoma, USA relative

Marston, Richard A.

378

Characterization of Mg/Ca distributions in planktonic foraminifera species by electron microprobe mapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of Mg/Ca distributions in planktonic foraminifera species by electron microprobe] The distribution of Mg/Ca within the tests of eight modern planktonic foraminifer species has been characterized variations in Mg/Ca composition within individual tests. However, the pattern of Mg/Ca variation is notably

379

Phylogeny of the pollinating yucca moths, with revision of Mexican species (Tegeticula and Parategeticula;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Manzanillo, Tecomán, Colima, 28100, Mexico 3 Department of Biology, 130 College Place, Syracuse University recognized, increasing the number of described species from four to 20. Based on field surveys in Mexico reported four species of pollinators (Riley, 1892; Davis, 1967; Frack, 1982; Powell, 1984), including three

Althoff, David M.

380

Costus loangensis from Gabon 11 Costus loangensis, an exciting new species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costus loangensis from Gabon 11 Costus loangensis, an exciting new species from Gabon, Africa from Gabon, Africa. PhytoKeys 18: 11­18. doi: 10.3897/phytokeys.18.3713 Abstract A new species of spiral ginger (Costus: Costaceae) from Gabon, Africa is described. Costus loangensis H. Maas & Maas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ORIGINAL PAPER Recruitment of tree species in mixed selection and irregular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In addition, forest types, soil pH, stand basal area, mean diameter, and the basal area of the same treeORIGINAL PAPER Recruitment of tree species in mixed selection and irregular shelterwood forest The main goals of the study were to examine the recruitment of the main tree species in selection and irreg

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

382

Influence of bark pH on the occurrence and distribution of tree canopy myxomycete species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of bark pH on the occurrence and distribution of tree canopy myxomycete species Sydney E species and bark pH but showed no difference with respect to height in the canopy. On individual trees in the canopy of living trees and neighboring grapevines. Corticolous myxomycetes of three temperate forests

Everhart, Sydney E.

383

Tree Species Effects on Soil Organic Matter Dynamics: The Role of Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tree Species Effects on Soil Organic Matter Dynamics: The Role of Soil Cation Composition Sarah E the influence of tree species on soil carbon and nitrogen (N) dynamics in a common garden of replicated substantial divergence in foliar and soil base cation concentrations and soil pH among spe- cies, we

Minnesota, University of

384

Effect of Cooking Temperatures on Chemical Changes in Species of Organic Arsenic in Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Cooking Temperatures on Chemical Changes in Species of Organic Arsenic in Seafood ... The results obtained showed that, in all of the types of seafood studied, TMA+ appeared after cooking, possibly because heating facilitates decarboxylation of AB to TMA+. ... Keywords: Arsenic; organoarsenical species; seafood; cooking; chemical changes ...

V. Devesa; A. Martnez; M. A. Ser; D. Vlez; C. Almela; R. Montoro

2001-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

385

Can we predict carbon stocks in tropical ecosystems from tree diversity? Comparing species and functional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and functional diversity in a plantation and a natural forest Maria C. Ruiz-Jaen1 and Catherine Potvin1,2 1, functional trait diversity, functional traits, mixed-species plantations, Panama, species diversity, tree motivation to con- serve tropical forests and to design carbon-enriched plantations. Here, we examine

Bermingham, Eldredge

386

Factors affecting leech parasitism on four turtle species in St. Lawrence Islands National Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors affecting leech parasitism on four turtle species in St. Lawrence Islands National Park and body condition) in the host-parasite interaction between four turtle species found in St. Lawrence counted and measured to determine their prevalence and biomass respectively on a total of 324 turtles from

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

387

Gas Plume Species Identification in LWIR Hyperspectral Imagery by Regression Analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Plume Species Identification in LWIR Hyperspectral Imagery by Regression Analyses by David Title of Thesis: Gas Plume Species Identification in LWIR Hyperspectral Imagery by Regression Analyses I in whole or in part. Any reproduction will not be for commercial use or profit. Signature Date ii #12;Gas

Salvaggio, Carl

388

Sex and species differences in spatial memory in food-storing kangaroo rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sex and species differences in spatial memory in food-storing kangaroo rats CYNTHIA L. BARKLEY differences in spatial memory in two species of kangaroo rats that are predicted by foraging ecology. Merriam's kangaroo rat, Dipodomys merriami, a scatter hoarder that hoards intensively, showed ac- curate memory

Jacobs, Lucia

389

A new species of CrypllOnectria from South Africa and Australia, pathogenic to Eucalyptus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new species of CrypllOnectria from South Africa and Australia, pathogenic to Eucalyptus Marieka (FABI), University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa Venter, M., H. Myburg, B. D. Wingfield, T. A. Coutinho & M. J. Wingfield (2002). A new species of Cryphonectria from South Africa and Australia, patho

390

Canaries in the coal mine: a cross-species analysis of the plurality of obesity epidemics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research articles 1001 87 60 69 Canaries in the coal mine: a cross-species analysis of the plurality of obesity...this Data Supplement: Supplementary Material Canaries in the coal mine: a cross-species analysis of the plurality of obesity...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Although data on nesting biology are avail-able for several nest-excavating species [2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although data on nesting biology are avail- able for several nest-excavating species [2, 5­7, 35, 41­44], detailed studies of this aspect for species that nest in preexisting cavities has only been made in Centris (Hemisiella) vittata [32]. In this paper we present observations on the nesting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

392

Nest architecture and species status of the bumble bee Bombus (Mendacibombus) shaposhnikovi (Hymenoptera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nest architecture and species status of the bumble bee Bombus (Mendacibombus) shaposhnikovi ­ Revised 25 May 2010 ­ Accepted 27 May 2010 Abstract ­ The nesting behaviour of the subgenus Mendacibombus is known only from Bombus mendax. Here, we describe the nest of a second species of Mendacibombus

393

WOOD PROPERTIES AND THEIR VARIATIONS WITHIN THE TREE STEM OF LESSER-USED SPECIES OF TROPICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WOOD PROPERTIES AND THEIR VARIATIONS WITHIN THE TREE STEM OF LESSER-USED SPECIES OF TROPICAL to utilization about the species. This paper examines physical and mechanical properties of wood. There was an overall increase of wood's physical and mechanical properties from the breast height to the top

394

Species richness and selenium accumulation of plants in soils with elevated concentration of selenium and salinity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies were conducted in soils with elevated concentrations of Se and salinity at Kesterson, California. Biomass distribution, species richness, and selenium accumulation of plants were examined for two sites where 15 cm of surface soil was removed and replaced with fill dirt in the fall of 1989, and two sites were native soil cover. The Se concentrations in the top 15 cm of fill dirt ranged from undetectable to 36 ng g-1. For the native soil sites, Se levels ranged from 75 to 550 ng g-1. Soil Se concentrations below 15 cm ranged from 300 to 700 ng g-1 and were comparable between the fill dirt and the native soil sites. At least 20 different plant species were brought into the two fill dirt sites with the top soil. Avena fatua L., Bassia hyssopifolia Kuntze Rev. Gen. Pl., Centaurea solstitialis L., Erysimum officianale L., Franseria acanthicarpa Cav. Icon., and Melilotus indica (L.) All. contributed over 60% of the total biomass. Only 5 species were found in the native soil sites, and salt grass (Distichlis spicata L.) was the predominant species and accounted for over 80% of the total biomass. Between 1989 and 1990, two years after the surface soil replacement, the two fill dirt sites had a 70% reduction in species richness. Plant tissue selenium concentrations were found to be quite variable between plant species and between sites of sampling. At the fill dirt sites, the plant species with deep root systems accumulated greater amounts of selenium than the shallow-rooted species. The soil selenium concentration of the field soil had no negative effect on pollen fertility, seed set, and seed germination for the plant species examined. However, seedling growth was impaired by the soil selenium concentrations. This suggests that a selection pressure of soil Se concentration may have been imposed on plant species such as M. indica in an early stage of its life cycle.

Huang, Z.Z.; Wu, L. (Department of Environmental Horticulture, University of California, Davis (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NICKEL SPECIES EMISSION INVENTORY FOR OIL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representative duplicate fly ash samples were obtained from the stacks of 400-MW and 385-MW utility boilers (Unit A and Unit B, respectively) using a modified U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 17 sampling train assembly as they burned .0.9 and 0.3 wt% S residual oils, respectively, during routine power plant operations. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) samples were analyzed for nickel (Ni) concentrations and speciation using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and a water-soluble Ni extraction method. ROFA water extraction residues were also analyzed for Ni speciation using XAFS and XRD. Total Ni concentrations in the ROFAs were similar, ranging from 1.3 to 1.5 wt%; however, stack gas Ni concentrations in the Unit A were {approx}990 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} compared to {approx}620 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} for Unit B because of the greater residual oil feed rates employed at Unit A to attain higher load (i.e., MW) conditions with a lower heating value oil. Ni speciation analysis results indicate that ROFAs from Unit A contain about 3 wt% NiSO{sub 4} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O (where x is assumed to be 6 for calculation purposes) and a Ni-containing spinel compound, similar in composition to (Mg,Ni)(Al,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 4}. ROFAs from Unit B contain on average 2.0 wt% NiSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O and 1.1 wt% NiO. XAFS and XRD analyses did not detect any nickel sulfide compounds, including nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}) (XAFS detection limit is 5% of the total Ni concentration). In addition, XAFS measurements indicated that inorganic sulfate and organic thiophene species account for >97% of the total sulfur in the ROFAs. The presence of NiSO{sub 4} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O and nickel oxide compound mixtures and lack of carcinogenic Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} or nickel sulfide compounds (e.g., NiS, NiS{sub 2}) in ROFAs stack-sampled from 400- and 385-MW boilers are contrary to EPA's Ni inhalation cancer risk assessment (''Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units--Final Report to Congress'', February 1998), where it is assumed that the Ni compound mixture emitted from oil-fired utilities is 50% as carcinogenic as Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}. Apparently, this assumption greatly overestimates the Ni inhalation cancer risk from oil-fired utilities.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Richard L. Schulz; Donald L. Toman; Carolyn M. Nyberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

In-situ characterization of adsorbed species on methanol synthesis catalysts by FT-IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transmission infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize adsorbed species on methanol synthesis catalysts during reaction conditions. A copper carbonyl, bidentate formate, and methoxy species were identified as stable surface groups. An adsorbed formaldehyde species was unstable at the reaction temperature, but could be observed on the catalyst surface at the beginning of the reaction. Surface species were very similar for feed mixtures of 1) carbon monoxide and hydrogen, 2) carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen, and 3) formic acid and hydrogen. The role of copper in methanol synthesis catalysts was to increase the adsorption of carbon monoxide to form a linear carbonyl species. This carbonly promoted the hydrogenation of formate groups. The formate species was adsorbed on a zinc site (Zn/sub ..beta../) different from the zinc site (Zn/sub ..gamma../) on which formaldehyde and methoxy groups were adsorbed. The rate-determining step in methanol synthesis was determined to be the reaction of hydrogen from a hydroxyl species adsorbed on another zinc site (Zn/sub ..cap alpha../) with a methoxy group to yield methanol. It was established that at the experimental conditions used in this study, the methanol synthesis reaction was far from equilibrium while the water-gas shift reaction was near equilibrium.

Edwards, J.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

In situ characterization of adsorbed species on methanol synthesis catalysts by FT-IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transmission infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize adsorbed species on methanol synthesis catalysts during reaction conditions. A copper carbonyl, bidentate formate, and methoxy species were identified as stable surface groups. An adsorbed formaldehyde species was unstable at the reaction temperature, but could be observed on the catalyst surface at the beginning of the reaction. Surface species were very similar for feed mixtures of (1) carbon monoxide and hydrogen, (2) carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen, and (3) formic acid and hydrogen. The role of copper in methanol synthesis catalysts was to increase the adsorption of carbon monoxide to form a linear carbonyl species. This carbonyl promoted the hydrogenation of formate groups. The formate species was adsorbed on a zinc site (Zn/sub ..beta../) different from the zinc site (Zn/sub ..gamma../) on which formaldehyde and methoxy groups were adsorbed. The rate-determining step in methanol synthesis was determined to be the reaction of hydrogen from a hydroxyl species adsorbed on another zinc site (Zn/sub ..cap alpha../) with a methoxy group to yield methanol. It was established that at the experimental conditions used in this study, the methanol synthesis reaction was far from equilibrium while the water-gas shift reaction was near equilibrium. 186 references, 83 figures, 28 tables.

Edwards, J.F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Acoustic identification of nine delphinid species in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic techniques have the potential to increase the reliability of cetacean species identification during shipboard surveys. The whistles of nine odontocete species were compared using data collected from a towed array and sonobuoys deployed during dolphin abundance surveys in the eastern tropical Pacific. Twelve variables were measured manually from spectrographic displays of each whistle (n=912). Multivariate discriminant function analysis (DFA) resulted in 49.9% of whistles being classified to the correct species. It was hypothesized that some whistles carry less species?specific information than others therefore groups of five whistles were averaged to reduce the effect of these ambiguous whistles. Correct classification increased to 65.4% when DFA was run on the averaged data set. A species identification decision tree that used 7 of the 12 whistle variables was constructed using nonparametric techniques (classification and regression trees) and resulted in 53.1% correct classification when applied to the original data set. Prior probabilities were added to the decision tree based on sighting rates for each species in the study area resulting in 56.7% correct classification. The species identification decision tree provides a relatively simple acoustic method that can be used to augment conventional visual techniques.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Distribution and diversity of fungal species in and adjacent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fungi have demonstrated their ability to diversify and specialize to take advantage of new environments (Murphy 1996). These species are essential to the normal functioning of ecosystems and the impacts of human activities may be harmful to fungi. There is a need to inventory fungi throughout the range of their environments. Previously archived information representing 43 sample locations was used to perform a preliminary evaluation of the distributions and diversity of fungal species at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and in adjacent environments. Presence-absence data for 71 species of fungi in five habitats, pinon-juniper, canyon-bottom ponderosa pine, ponderosa pine, canyon-bottom mixed conifer, and mixed conifer were analyzed. The results indicate that even though fungi occur in each of the habitats, fungal species are not distributed evenly among these habitats. The richness of fungal species is greater in the canyon-bottom mixed conifer and mixed conifer habitats than in the pinon-juniper, canyon-bottom ponderosa pine or ponderosa pine habitats. All but three of the fungal species were recorded in either the canyon-bottom mixed conifer or the mixed conifer habitats, and all but seven of the fungal species were found in the mixed conifer habitat.

Balice, R.G.; Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Influence of landscape elements on population densities and habitat use of three small-mammal species.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mabry, K.E., E.A. Dreelin, and G.W. Barrett. 2003. Influence of landscape elements on population densities and habitat use of three small-mammal species. J. Mammology. 84(1):20-25. Corridor effects on population densities and habitat use of 3 small mammal species were assessed in an experimentally fragmented landscape. Corridor presence did not have a statistically significant effect on population densities of cotton rats or cotton mice; however, a significant effect was observed for old-field mice. The results suggest that landscape fragmentation and habitat structure may have varying effects on population densities of different species.

Mabry, Karen, E.; Dreelin, Erin, A.; Barrett, Gary, W.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Profitable Small Grain Production In the Texas Gulf Coast.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in continuous wheat Examples include mustards, henbit, thistles, ryegrass, rescuegrass and other brome species. Use of weed-free seed is important Clean the combines before harvesting uninfested fields. If possi ble, custom applicators should harvest clean... in continuous wheat Examples include mustards, henbit, thistles, ryegrass, rescuegrass and other brome species. Use of weed-free seed is important Clean the combines before harvesting uninfested fields. If possi ble, custom applicators should harvest clean...

Miller, Travis D.; Livingston, Steve

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 83 THE CENTER FOR INVASIVE SPECIES AND ECOSYSTEM HEALTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

awareness, education, and applied research in these areas This poster will introduce the center and provide AND ECOSYSTEM HEALTH: TOOLS AND INFORMATION AVAILABLE TO SUPPORT INVASIVE SPECIES AND FOREST HEALTH EDUCATION G in these areas Integrate and develop information and programs Produce Web sites, publications, posters

403

Where and when does a ring start and end? Testing the ring-species hypothesis in a species complex of Australian parrots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...s00122-006-0381-4 Higgins, P.J Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic...dots) all as in figure 3 Where and when does a ring start and end? Testing the ring-species...to form. A ring speciation hypothesis does not explain the patterns we have observed...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Chromosomes and DNA of Mus: Terminal DNA synthetic sequences in three species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The DNA replication patterns of the terminal S phase of three species of Mus were analyzed by tritiated thymidine autoradiography. The centromeric heterochromatin of M. fulvidiventris is the latest component to f...

T. C. Hsu; Amara Markvong

405

ORIGINAL PAPER Impacts of species-led conservation on ecosystem services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity conservation organisations have recently begun to consider a wider ecosystem services context targeted biodiversity conservation initiatives have been successful at con- serving species and habitats) demonstrates that biodiversity conservation often loses out to other interests (Wilcove et al. 1998

Vermont, University of

406

A systematic study of select species complexes of Eleocharis subgenus Limnochloa (Cyperaceae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of achene micro-morphology as an aid in systematics in Eleocharis, especially its potential in assigning sectional or serial rank. Menapace (1993) was also able to place species of Eleocharis at the series level previously unassigned by Svenson (1939...

Rosen, David Jonathan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 46: 2008. 1 J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 46: 1-7 Summary: % of the fish species listed in the Endangered Spe- cies Act (Lassuy 1994). Invasive aquatic plant...

408

The Effects of Habitat Complexity on the Cognitive Performance of Two Fish Species and Their Hybrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attributes. In the field, I quantified habitat complexity in populations of two species of swordtail fishes Xiphophorus birchmanni and X. malinche as well as two populations of naturally occurring X. birchmanni/X. malinche hybrids found in the Rio Calnali...

Chance, Heather

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

409

Calculations on spin-paired species in metal-ammonia solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we show that the spin-paired species in ammonia is consistent with a cluster of two single-electron ammoniated cavity species held together by a cation, also probably solvated. With the electronic part of the wave functions for the ammoniated electron as determined by Newton, the ground-state electronic configuration is a singlet and the singlet-triplet separation is calculated to be about 0.1 eV. The spectrum of the individual cavity species is only shifted by a few hundredths of an electronvolt based on perturbation calculations. These data are consistent with the experimental values recently found by Schindewolf and Werner, who have other data which support the particular species studied in this paper.

Kestner, N.R.; Rao, B.K.; Finley, C.W.

1983-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

A new species of Dalea series Compactae (Leguminosae: Amorpheae) from northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dalea janosensis,...a new species from the northwestern periphery of the Mexican state of Chihuahua, is described and illustrated. It belongs...Dalea subgenus Dalea section Kuhnistera series Comp...

A. Eduardo Estrada-C.; Jos A. Villarreal-Q.; Humberto Vega-M.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project

Firestone, Jeremy

412

Intracellular targeting of telomeric retrotransposon Gag proteins of distantly related Drosophila species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The retrotransposons that maintain telomeres in Drosophila melanogaster have unique features that are shared across all Drosophila species but are not found in other retrotransposons. Comparative analysis of these features ...

Pardue, Mary-Lou

413

Revision of the orchid bee subgenus Euglossella (Hymenoptera, Apidae), Part I, The decorata species group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Euglossella, one of the most distinctive subgenera of orchid bees of the genus Euglossa, is composed of two characteristic assemblages of species, one of them comprising bees bearing the strongly metallic integument trademark ...

Hinojosa-Dí az, Ismael; Engel, Michael S.

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

414

Pore-water chemistry in mangrove sediments: relationship with species composition and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pore-water chemistry in mangrove sediments: relationship with species composition and developmental communities and variable surface water inputs strongly impact sediment and ground water properties. In the upper sediment, changes in salinity are mainly controlled by seasonal conditions, transpiration

Boyer, Edmond

415

Cytogenetics of F1 hybrids between Cajanus and Atylosia species and its phylogenetic implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cytogenetic relationships between two cultivars of Cajanus cajan and six species of Atylosia...were investigated. Of the 12 cross combinations obtained, only seven could be studied. Meiotic chromosome pairing, po...

R. P. S. Pundir; R. B. Singh

416

Assessment of estuarine habitats for resident and estuarine-dependent species: tools for conservation and management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to other tropical estuarine systems, they appear to provide important habitat for several economically- and ecologically-valued species. In the GOM, I examined the fish and invertebrate communities of adjacent oyster reef (oyster), vegetated marsh edge (VME...

Shervette, Virginia Rhea

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - avian species belonging Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

avian influenza in different bird species. Vet. Microbiol. 2000, 74, 3-13. 10. Mukhtar, M.M.; Rasool, S... Abstract: Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus is an...

418

On the origin of species: insights from the ecological genomics of lake whitefish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...species: insights from the ecological genomics of lake whitefish Louis Bernatchez 1...have been conducting on the ecological genomics of sympatric forms of whitefish (Coregonus...speciation. speciation|ecological genomics|454 sequencing|microarrays|selection...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A New Species of Rhytisma Causes Tar Spot on Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae) in Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fungus causing tar spots on leaves of Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae) in Panama is described as a new species, Rhytisma panamense. The fungus forms gregarious black stromata on pale yellow spots on the a...

Cheng-Lin Hou; Tanja Trampe; Meike Piepenbring

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ticks species (Ixodida) in the Summit Municipal Park and adjacent areas, Panama City, Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From September 2007 to September 2009, we studied the species of ticks present in the Summit Municipal Park. Ticks were extracted from zoo animals, free-living wild mammals and reptiles trapped, dead mammals o...

Sergio E. Bermdez C.; Roberto J. Miranda C.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Zamiaceae in Panama with comments on phytogeography and species relationships  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A key to, and descriptions of, the eleven species ofZamia in Panama are presented. Four of these are new...Z. cunaria, Z. dressleri, Z. ipetiensis, andZ. neurophyllidia. Floristically,Zamia, is represented in Panama

Dennis Wm. Stevenson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Tree Species Composition and Beta Diversity in the Upper Ro Chagres Basin, Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tree species composition at two sites in the upper Ro Chagres basin of central Panama was evaluated using rapid inventory methods. At ... inventories were compared to 81 others within the Panama Canal Watershed,...

Rolando Prez; Salomn Aguilar; Agustn Somoza; Richard Condit

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Water relations of five tropical tree species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diurnal curves of xylem pressure potential (P) and leaf conductance (C) were measured for five tree species of the lowland tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Measurements were taken just before and...

Ned Fetcher

424

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic species carcinogen Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biological Report 85(1.11) Contaminant Hazard Reviews May 1987 Report No. 11 Summary: for PAHs by any regulatory agency for the protection of sensitive species of...

425

Two new species of Iotonchus (Nematoda: Mononchida) from the Silent Valley, Kerala, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two new species of Iotonchus are described from the Silent Valley, Kerala, India. Females of I. silvallus...n.sp. have a mono-prodelphic reproductive tract and a long filiform tail, with subterminal spinneret. Fe...

Wasim Ahmad; M. Shamim Jairajpuri

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan: A Decade of Delays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes the history of the Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (CVMSHCP), ... than a decade to complete, and the long duration of these processes often results in...

Peter S. Alagona; Stephanie Pincetl

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF TRANSPORT OF STRONGLY RETAINED SPECIES BY SOIL COLUMNS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Column experiments have been extensively used in transport studies of major cations but few investigations are available on migration through soils of strongly retained species that are environmentally relevan...

MARCO PETRANGELI PAPINI; MAURO MAJONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Mercury (Hg) and methyl mercury (MMHg) bioaccumulation in three fish species (sea food) from Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, mercury (Hg) and methyl mercury (MMHg) were determined in three fish species including benthic, benthopelagic and pelagic fish from Arvand river, northwest of Persian Gulf. Mercury and methyl mercu...

Sajad Abdolvand; Sahar Kayedinejad Esfahani

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

Neilson, J.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The role of piscivores in a species-rich tropical river  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Much of the world's species diversity is located in tropical and sub-tropical ecosystems, and a better understanding of the ecology of these systems is necessary to stem biodiversity loss and assess community- and ecosystem-level responses...

Layman, Craig Anthony

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - arthropod species based Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of the arthropod community based solely on the genetic make-up of a host-plant patch. Recent work has shown... that the number of species in the associated arthropod...

432

Characterization and cross-species amplification of microsatellites from the endangered Hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricate)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Twelve novel polymorphic microsatellites were isolated from the endangered Hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricate...). Eight of 12 markers were used to study genetic diversity of two sea turtle species: E. imbr...

Grace Lin; Alex Chang; Hon Wah Yap; Gen Hua Yue

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Two new species of Gliricola (Phthiraptera: Gyropidae) from the spiny tree rat, Mesomys hispidus, in Peru.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two new species of Gliricola, G. woodmani and G. halli (Phthiraptera: Gyropidae), are described and illustrated for specimens from the spiny tree rat, Mesomys hispidus (Rodentia: Echimyidae), in Peru. Resumen--Se ...

Price, Roger D.; Timm, Robert M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Transcriptome resources for three hybrid sunflower species (Helianthus anomalus, H. deserticola, H. paradoxus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title Transcriptome resources for three hybrid sunflower species (Helianthus anomalus, H Molecular Ecology Resources #12;Introduction Natural hybridization between closely related taxa is frequent and speciation. In recent years, evidence of hybridization facilitating adaptive divergence has accumulated

Rieseberg, Loren

435

Species visitation at free-choice quail feeders in west Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Providing supplemental feed is a popular management practice for quail (northern bobwhite Colinus virginianus and scaled quail Callipepla squamata ) in Texas. It is common knowledge that non-target species, e.g., raccoons (Procyon lotor...

Henson, Kelly Diane

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

Developmental Osteology of Two Species of Economically Important Sciaenids, Sciaenops ocellatus and Cynoscion nebulosus (Teleostei: Sciaenidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Development of the skeleton in S. ocellatus and C. nebulosus was compared with Agyrosomus meagre and Micropogonias furnieri, two other species of sciaenid for which information on skeletal development is available. No major differences were identified...

Kubicek, Kole

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

437

Karyotype and synteny among the chromosomes of all four species of human malaria parasite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The karyotype and chromosomes of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have been well characterized in recent years. Here we present karyotype maps of the three other human malaria species, P. vivax, P. malariae and P. ovale. Chromosomes of these species were found to be of significantly higher molecular weight than those of P. falciparum. Some 14 P. vivax chromosomes were distinguishable, and 1214 P. malariae and P. ovale chromosomes. The chromosome location of 15 genes, known to be present within five synteny groups between P. falciparum and the rodent malarias, were analyzed, and four of these synteny groups were found to be conserved between all of the human malaria species. In addition, a more detailed genome map of P. vivax was made using ten housekeeping and antigen genes. These data represent the first karyotype maps of all species of malaria which infect man.

Jane M.-R Carlton; Mary R Galinski; John W Barnwell; John B Dame

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Effects of hay management and native species sowing on grassland community structure, biomass, and restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned HILD hay field in eastern Kansas to evaluate effects of fertilization, haying, and native species sowing on community dynamics, biomass, and potential for restoration to native LIHD hay meadow. Fertilized plots maintained dominance by introduced...

Foster, Brian L.; Kindscher, Kelly; Houseman, Greg R.; Murphy, Cheryl A.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

E-Print Network 3.0 - above-ground beetle species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A good bug with some bad habits The multi-colored Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis Pallas) is a native of Asia and is relatively new Summary: species, it has readily adapted to...

440

OIKOS 103: 101112, 2003 Strong interactions between species of phytophagous fly: a case of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species compete strongly for stems of the common reed, Phragmites australis. L. lucens is competitively induces P. australis to form a large, robust gall that repels the attacks of the ichneumonid wasp

Nottingham, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Marine macroalgal biodiversity hotspots: why is there high species richness and endemism in southern Australian marine benthic flora?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The southern Australian marine macroalgal flora has the highest levels of species richness and endemism of any regional macroalgal flora in the world. Analyses of species composition and distributions for the ...

Julie A. Phillips

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Differences in plant species diversity between conifer (Pinus tabulaeformis) plantations and natural forests in middle of the Loess plateau  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compared differences in plant species diversity between conifer (Pinus tabulaeformis) plantations and natural secondary forests in the middle of the Loess plateau. ... diversity and in species responses to cha...

Renyan Duan; Chao Wang; Xiao-an Wang; Zhihong Zhu; Hua Guo

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Three new species of shallow water, yellow zoanthids (Hexacorallia: Zoanthidea: Epizoanthidae) from southern California, USA, and southern Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In southern California and southern Australia, several species of hexacorals that are common at diving depths have been referred to as Yellow Zoanthids. We describe three new species of them in the genus Epizoanthus because all have a macrocnemic...

Phillipp, Nicholas A.; Fautin, Daphne G.

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Geographic variation in size and coloration in the Turdus poliocephalus complex: A first review of species limits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among the most dramatically variable of bird species under the traditional polytypic biological' species concept is Turdus poliocephalus Latham 1801, which is distributed across parts of Southeast Asia and Oceania. This ...

Peterson, A. Townsend

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

445

Both malvaceous and non-malvaceous betasatellites are associated with two wild cotton species grown under field conditions in Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The presence and viral load of begomoviruses was investigated in wild species of the genus Gossypium available at CCRI, Multan, Pakistan. This is the worlds largest herbarium of wild species of genus Gossypium.....

Muhammad Tehseen Azhar; Imran Amin; Zahid Iqbal Anjum; Muhammad Arshad

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Phylogeny of the genus Gossypium and genome origin of its polyploid species inferred from variation in nuclear repetitive DNA sequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

origin of its polyploid species. Twenty-two interspersed repeated sequence clones derived from G. hirsutum, each representing a repeated sequence family, were hybridized to the genomic DNA of the 35 species, respectively. Southern hybridization showed...

Rong, Ying

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

447

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (completed May 31, 2011)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (Completed May 31, 2010) Description NeuCo, Inc. (which acquired original participant Pegasus Technologies), a developer of power plant control and optimization technologies, demonstrated the capability to optimize mercury speciation and control of emissions from an existing power plant. This demonstration took place at an 890 megawatt (MW) utility boiler in Jewett,

448

Systematics of the southern races of two species of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys compactus and D. ordi)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEMATICS OF THE SOUTHERN RACES OF TWO SPECIES OF KANGAROO RATS (DIPODOMYS COMPACTUS AND D. ORDI) A Thesis by GEORGE DAVIS BAUMGARDNER Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment o- the requirement... for the deqree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Nildlife and Fisheries Sciences SYSTEMATICS OF THE SOUTHERN RACES OF TWO SPECIES OF KANGAROO RATS (DIPODOMYS COMPACTUS AND D. ORDI) A Thesis by GEORGE DAVIS BAUMGARDNER Approved as to style...

Baumgardner, George D

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Smoke and toxic species analyses from combustion of guayule bagasse modified fiberboards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The determination of particle size distribution. 3. The identification of heavy metals in the smoke and ash phases. 4. The identification of other major smoke components. These tests will also be performed on normal, untreated fiberboard samples so... and untreated fiberboards were less than 10 microns in size and were, therefore, respirable to humans. Toxic species identification through the use of the gas chromatograph/mass spectroscopy identified no unusually toxic chemical species within the smoke...

Paris, Lisa Danielle

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An arrangement is provided for the in-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams. The beam is directed onto a target surface of known composition, such that Rutherford backscattering of the beam occurs. The yield-energy characteristic response of the beam to backscattering from the target is analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques to determine the yields of energy species components of the beam.

Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ); Kaita, Robert (Englishtown, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A method for making dendritic metal nanostructures using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making dendritic metal nanostructures using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

452

TABLE 1. -Caloric and ash values for some North Atlantic copepoda. Species are recorded in order from largest to smallest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, planktonic copepod species have been few (Slobodkin and Richman 1961; Comita et al. 1966; Cummins 1967). My

453

Distribution of the Chuckwalla, Western Burrowing Owl, and Six Bat Species on the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field Surveys were conducted in 1996 to determine the current distribution of several animal species of concern on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). They included the chuckwall (Sauromalus obesus), western burrowing owl (Speotyto cunicularia), and six species of bats. Nineteen chuckwallas and 118 scat locations were found during the chuckwalla field study. Eighteen western burrowing owls were found at 12 sighting locations during the 1996 field study. Of the eleven bat species of concern which might occur on the NTS, five, and possibly six, were captured during this survey. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, takes certain management actions to protect and conserve the chuckwalla, western burrowing owl, and bats on the NTS. These actions are described and include: (1) conducting surveys at sites of proposed land-disturbing activities (2) altering projects whenever possible to avoid or minimize impacts to these species (3) maintaining a geospatial database of known habitat for species of concern (4) sharing sighting and trap location data gathered on the NTS with other local land and resource managers, and (5) conducting periodic field surveys to monitor these species distribution and relative abundance on the NTS.

Cathy A. Willis

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Multiple ion species plasmas with thermal ions in an oblique magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a three-fluid model, the combined effects of an oblique magnetic field and finite temperature of positive ion species on the characteristics of the sheath region of multi-component plasmas are investigated numerically. It is assumed that the ion species are singly charged and have different masses. In the presence of an external magnetic field, it is shown that the density distribution of positive ion species (especially the lighter ion species) begins to fluctuate and does not decrease monotonically towards the wall. Also, it is shown that by increasing the magnetic field, the amplitude of fluctuation increases and its position moves towards the sheath edge. Moreover, it is illustrated that the presence of the magnetic field affects the sheath width and by increasing the magnetic field, the sheath width decreases. In addition, the results show that in the presence of the magnetic field, the increase of temperature of positive ion species has an infinitesimal effect on the sheath width and density distribution of positive ion species.

Hatami, M. M. [Physics Department of K N Toosi University of Technology, 15418-49611 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Physics Department of K N Toosi University of Technology, 15418-49611 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

AN INTRODUCTION TO SPECIES AND THE RACK SPACE Math Dept Sussex University Brighton BN1 9QH UK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN INTRODUCTION TO SPECIES AND THE RACK SPACE Roger Fenn Math Dept Sussex University Brighton BN1 9QH UK Colin Rourke Brian Sanderson Math Dept Warwick University Coventry CV4 7AL UK ABSTRACT. Racks.* A particularly important species is associated with a rack. A species has a nerve, analogous to the nerve

Fenn, Roger

456

Two-Dimensional Continuous Extraction in Multiphase Lipid Bilayers To Separate, Enrich, and Sort Membrane-Bound Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Membrane-Bound Species Ling Chao,, Mark J. Richards, Chih-Yun Hsia, and Susan Daniel* School of Chemical yield of each species. This new procedure sorts membrane species on the basis of chemical properties denaturation. This platform could facilitate the separation and identification of lipid membrane domain

Daniel, Susan

457

Update on the environmental and economic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Update on the environmental and economic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the United University, Ithaca, NY 14850-0901, United States Available online 29 December 2004 Abstract Invading alien% of the species on the Threatened or Endangered species lists are at risk primarily because of alien

Schweik, Charles M.

458

Species diversity and the scale of the landscape mosaic: do scales of movement and patch size aect diversity?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Species diversity and the scale of the landscape mosaic: do scales of movement and patch size aect on the measurement of local butter¯y species diversity. In landscapes where patch sizes are smaller, the type of patch adjacent to the patch surveyed can in¯uence both local species richness and incidence

Debinski, Diane M.

459

Transgenic crop may have bred with wild weed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... One fertile plant resembled charlock, but was not killed by the Liberty herbicide that the oilseed rape had been engineered to be resistant against. When the ... that confers this tolerance. Even if it were a true hybrid, the resistance to Liberty herbicide would be unlikely to confer a benefit outside that field, so the plant ...

Michael Hopkin

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

460

Weed Identification: Using Plant Structures as a Key (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

para el ?xito de cualquier programa de manejo de malezas. Frecuentemente, claves simples para identificar plantas o gu?as para identificar malezas basadas en fotograf?as o dibujos se usan para identificar malezas. Sin embargo, algunas claves taxon...

Baumann, Paul A.

1999-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noxious weed species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Applying a weed risk assessment approach to GM crops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current approaches to environmental risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) plants are modelled on chemical risk assessment methods, which have a strong focus on toxicity. There are additional types of ha...

Paul K. Keese; Andrea V. Robold; Ruth C. Myers; Sarah Weisman

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Winter Weed Pressure in Winter Wheat Edward Davis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

26 Wheat ** ** * Barley *** * * Oats *** ** Canola * * * Lentil * * ** Millet ** ** Corn Beyond PrePare Maverick (Field Bioassay) #12;LENTIL OAT PEA CAMELINA CANOLA BARLEY PowerFlex ROTATIONAL

Maxwell, Bruce D.

463

Criterion for burner design in thermal weed control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A covered infrared burner was designed and constructed so that it could be compared to an open-flame burner. Two covered burners, a high configuration and a low configuration, were constructed. A low configuration covered infrared burner, high...

Gonzalez, Telca Marisa

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

2011 AQUATIC WEED SURVEYS IN TIMOTHY LAKE, LAKE HARRIET &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prepared for: Portland General Electric, Clackamas River Hydroelectric Project By: Vanessa Morgan and Mark Regulatory Commission (FERC) for the continued operation and maintenance of the Clackamas River Hydroelectric

465

Controlling Weeds and Volunteer Crops During Fallow Periods.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with applicators In?unted on a small tractor. Spray additives were used WIth most treatments, and amounts are shown in the tables. Additives used were X-77 (alkylaryl polyoxy- I"Herbi" and "Micro Max" are products of the Micron Corporation, P.O. Box 19698.... In another study, paraquat and glyphosate each at 0.18 and 0.251b/A were applied in late June to pigweed that w~re 2 .to 4 inches tall with poor growth because th~ soil m~Isture level was approaching the wilting pOInt. Carner volume varied from 0.55 to 26...

Wiese, A.F.; Chenault, E.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Pre- and post-emergence weed control in bermudagrass turf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station, Texas, 1963. 34 10 Effects of arsenicals on common bermudagrass and nutsedge after 3 applications, College Station, Texas. 1964. 35 v Table Page An evaluation of the phytotoxicity of arseniqals to Tifgreen bermudagrass pnder golf green... to arsenic, College Station, Texas, 1964. 45 16 The analysis of variance of pre-emergence crabgrass control data under field conditions with 4-hydroxy- 3-nitrobenzene ar sonic acid, College Station, Texas, 1963. 59 17 The analysis of variance...

Duble, Richard L

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Weed Busters: How to Get Drummond's and Common Goldenweed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of new terminal growth has occurred. Prepare the Equipment The leaf spray can be applied with a pump-up garden sprayer, backpack sprayer, cattle sprayer or a sprayer mounted on an ATV. If many plants need to be sprayed, backpack and ATV sprayers are more... efficient. Make sure your sprayer has an adjustable cone nozzle (ConeJet 5500 - X6 to X8 orifice size) that can deliver a coarse spray (large droplets). Prepare the Herbicide Mixture You can expect greater than 76 percent control of goldenweed by spraying...

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

468

Weed Busters: How to Sweep Out Perennial Broomweed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perennial broomweed is widespread on dry ranges and deserts from California to Texas and north to Idaho. It is poisonous to cattle, sheep, goats and swine. Two methods of controlling this plant are described--the ground broadcast spray method...

Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan; Cadenhead, J. F.

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

469

Weed Busters: How to Control Common (Annual) Broomweed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of herbicide, surfactant and dye, then continue to fill the tank to the desired level with water. Be sure to add a spray marking dye and add the surfactant at 1 ?4 to 1 ?2 percent. Spray the Common Broomweed Spray individual common broomweed plants... Leaf Spray Method Herbicide rates for individual plant leaf spray. Amount of ingredient for Concentration varying spray tank sizes in Spray (gallons) Ingredient Solution 3 14 25 Herbicide 1% 4 ounces 18 ounces 32 ounces Surfactant 1 /4%1 ounce 5 ounces...

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

470

Suggestions for Chemical Weed and Brush Control on Rangeland.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, cocklebur, for ground no susceptible crops croton, horehound, marshelder broadcast are nearby. (sumpweed, sulfaweed), prairie application. gerardia (see remarks), ragweed, Add surfactant For Western bitterweed smartweed, sunflower, thistles, as needed.../4 Ib) product mixed 2,4-0, 4 Ib/gal with 8 to 32 oz product surfactant as needed for wetting and water to make 100 gal of mixture Broom snakeweed Grazon PC I pt to I qt 2qt(llb) 2 to 4 gal Ouring and after Add emulsifer to oil for proper...

Welch, Tommy G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Weed control and desiccation strategies in chickpea Executive Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-harvest desiccation. Studies were conducted at Minot and Williston, ND and Bozeman, MT from 2002-2004. Sulfentrazone to excellent control of kochia, redroot pigweed, and wild buckwheat. At Williston, sulfentrazone alone, tank

Lawrence, Rick L.

472

Rapid evolution of an invasive weed Kathryn G. Turner1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, Colorado State University, 1177 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523 in benign and stressful conditions (drought, flooding, nutrient stress and simulated herbivory), to evaluate

Rieseberg, Loren

473

Weed Identification: Using Plant Structures as a Key  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paul A. Baumann Professor and Extension W eed Specialist, The T exas A&M University System. B-6079 3-99 U si n g P lan t S t r u ct u r e s a s a Ke y W eed Identification: eed identification is necessary to the success of any...

Baumann, Paul A.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Biological Weed Control at the Sherwood, Washington, Disposal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Team Environmental Justice Environmental Management System Applied Studies and Technology Post-Closure Benefits Property Records Management Stakeholder Relations...

475

Minipig and beagle animal model genomes aid species selection in pharmaceutical discovery and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving drug attrition remains a challenge in pharmaceutical discovery and development. A major cause of early attrition is the demonstration of safety signals which can negate any therapeutic index previously established. Safety attrition needs to be put in context of clinical translation (i.e. human relevance) and is negatively impacted by differences between animal models and human. In order to minimize such an impact, an earlier assessment of pharmacological target homology across animal model species will enhance understanding of the context of animal safety signals and aid species selection during later regulatory toxicology studies. Here we sequenced the genomes of the Sus scrofa Gttingen minipig and the Canis familiaris beagle, two widely used animal species in regulatory safety studies. Comparative analyses of these new genomes with other key model organisms, namely mouse, rat, cynomolgus macaque, rhesus macaque, two related breeds (S. scrofa Duroc and C. familiaris boxer) and human reveal considerable variation in gene content. Key genes in toxicology and metabolism studies, such as the UGT2 family, CYP2D6, and SLCO1A2, displayed unique duplication patterns. Comparisons of 317 known human drug targets revealed surprising variation such as species-specific positive selection, duplication and higher occurrences of pseudogenized targets in beagle (41 genes) relative to minipig (19 genes). These data will facilitate the more effective use of animals in biomedical research. - Highlights: Genomes of the minipig and beagle dog, two species used in pharmaceutical studies. First systematic comparative genome analysis of human and six experimental animals. Key drug toxicology genes display unique duplication patterns across species. Comparison of 317 drug targets show species-specific evolutionary patterns.

Vamathevan, Jessica J., E-mail: jessica.j.vamathevan@gsk.com [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Hall, Matthew D.; Hasan, Samiul; Woollard, Peter M. [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Xu, Meng; Yang, Yulan; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaoli [BGI-Shenzen, Shenzhen (China); Kenny, Steve [Safety Assessment, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Ware (United Kingdom); Brown, James R. [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA (United States); Huxley-Jones, Julie [UK Platform Technology Sciences (PTS) Operations and Planning, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Lyon, Jon; Haselden, John [Safety Assessment, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Ware (United Kingdom); Min, Jiumeng [BGI-Shenzen, Shenzhen (China); Sanseau, Philippe [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

The ecological value of stream restoration measures: An evaluation on ecosystem and target species scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Stream restoration is widely applied for conservation of freshwater ecosystems, but systematic comparisons on the effects of different techniques are rare. In this study, we systematically evaluated two types of gravel introduction, substratum raking and the placement of boulders in six streams. We compared indicator-based and multi-scale approaches that simultaneously assess effects on target species, different taxonomic groups and on ecosystem scale. Gravel introduction had by far the strongest effects on macroinvertebrates (increase of species density and numbers of individuals), periphyton (increase of cell numbers) and macrophytes (decrease of coverage, species numbers and biomass), followed by substratum raking. The placement of boulders had no significant long-term effects on aquatic communities. Over all investigated restoration treatments, fish community composition only changed significantly in 50% of the study rivers depending on the occurrence of species sensitive to the structures introduced by the restoration treatments. These were lithophilic, rheophilic and invertivorous fishes, comprising several species listed in the Red List of endangered species, which used the added 1632mm gravel as juvenile habitat. Areas with introduced gravel were also most frequently used by spawning Salmo trutta, Thymallus thymallus and Phoxinus phoxinus. In contrast, active bioindication using Salmo trutta eggs indicated that none of the restoration treatments was sufficient to enhance habitat conditions in deeper substratum layers throughout the egg incubation period. Our results suggest that instream restoration measures can contribute to freshwater biodiversity conservation, but reproductive success of species depending on long-term improvement of interstitial water quality cannot be achieved without considering catchment effects and natural substratum dynamics.

Melanie Mueller; Joachim Pander; Juergen Geist

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Behavioral and phylogenetic differentiation in a potential cryptic species complex, the canyon treefrog  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detection of genetic and behavioral diversity within morphologically similar species has led to the discovery of cryptic species complexes. We tested the hypothesis that the canyon treefrog (Hyla arenicolor) may consist of cryptic species by examining mate-attraction signals among highly divergent lineages defined by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Unexpectedly calls exhibited little variation among the three U.S. lineages despite large mtDNA sequence divergences. We re-analyzed intraspecific and interspecific phylogenetic relationships by sequencing both mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers among populations and a closely related but morphologically and behaviorally different species the Arizona treefrog (H. wrightorum). Discordance between mitochondrial and nuclear datasets suggests multiple instances of introgression of H. wrightorum's mitochondrial genome into populations of H. arenicolor. Furthermore intraspecific population structure based on nuclear markers shows better congruence with patterns of call variation than population structure based on the mitochondrial dataset. Although the U.S. lineages do not appear to represent cryptic species Mexican lineages do show biologically relevant call differences as assessed through female preference tests. Our results suggest that call variation can indicate genetic structure of populations; however a multilocus approach should be used in defining genetic structure as using only mtDNA may lead to erroneous conclusions.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

ASSESSING THE RISK OF INVASIVE ALIEN SPECIES PROMOTED FOR BIOFUELS CONTEXT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many countries are currently looking at growing high-yielding crops for the production of biofuels as alternatives to traditional fuels (petrol and diesel) to address imminent shortages and reduce impacts of climate change. If these initiatives are not carefully assessed, however, promoting the cultivation of some popular species for biofuel production will increase two of the major causes of biodiversity loss on the planet: clearing and conversion of yet more natural areas for monocultures, and invasion by non-native species. Habitat conversion is already the leading cause of biodiversity loss worldwide, and limiting the enthusiastic cultivation of new crops to areas already converted is not an easy or popular task. The issue addressed here, though, is that a number of the most commonly recommended species for biofuel production are also major invasive species in many parts of the world. Thus, they need to be assessed for the likelihood of invasion before being cultivated on a large-scale for biofuels production. Some of these species are spread by birds, small mammals and other animals, making their control difficult or impossible, with impacts increasing over

unknown authors

479

Above- and belowground competition from longleaf pine plantations limits performance of reintroduced herbaceous species.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although overstory trees limit the abundance and species richness of herbaceous vegetation in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantations, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood because of confounding among limiting factors. In fall 1998, research was initiated to determine the separate effects of above- and belowground competition and needlefall from overstory pines on understory plant performance. Three 13- to 15-yr-old plantations near Aiken, SC, were thinned to 0, 25, 50, or 100% of nonthinned basal area (19.5 m2 ha-1). Combinations of trenching (to eliminate root competition) and needlefall were applied to areas within each plot, and containerized seedlings of 14 perennial herbaceous species and longleaf pine were planted within each. Overstory crown closure ranged from 0 to 81%, and soil water and available nitrogen varied consistently with pine stocking, trenching, or their combination. Cover of planted species decreased an average of 16.5 and 14.1% as a result of above- and below-ground competition, respectively. Depending on species, needlefall effects were positive, negative, or negligible. Results indicate that understory restoration will be most successful when herbaceous species are established within canopy openings (0.1-0.2 ha) managed to minimize negative effects from above- and belowground competition and needlefall.

T.B. Harrington; C.M. Dagley; M.B. Edwards.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Effects of unseeded areas on species richness of coal mines reclaimed with municipal biosolids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land application of municipal biosolids on coal mine spoils can benefit vegetation establishment in mine reclamation. However, the application of biosolids leads to domination by early-successional species, such as grasses, and low establishment of woody and volunteer species, thus reducing potential for forestry as a postmining land use. In this experiment, tree seedlings were planted in strips (0.6-, 1-, and 4-m wide) that were not seeded with grasses, and the effects of unseeded strip width on seedling growth and species richness were assessed. Planted seedling mortality was high; therefore, the effect of unseeded strip width on seedling growth could not be determined. However, it was found that natural plant invasion and species richness were highest in the 4-m unseeded strips. The practice of leaving 4-m-wide unseeded strips in mine reclamation with biosolids in the eastern United States, along with the improvement of tree seedling planting practices and planting stock, would help promote a more species-rich plant community that could be utilized for forestry or a variety of other postmining land uses.

Halofsky, J.E.; McCormick, L.H. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). School for Forest Resources

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

The effect of variable environmental arsenic contamination on urinary concentrations of arsenic species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Urinary arsenic species have been determined for approximately 3,000 urine samples obtained from residents of a community surrounding an arsenic-emitting copper smelter. Levels of inorganic, monomethylated and dimethylated arsenic species ranged from less than 1 {mu}g/L (the instrumental detection limit) to 180 {mu}g/L seen for dimethyl arsenic. Comparison of a subsample of this population that had the least environmental contamination with the subsample having highest environmental arsenic concentrations showed small but statistically significant differences in urinary arsenic levels for all species except dimethylated arsenic. However, for children under 7 years of age living in areas with increased environmental arsenic contamination, there was a larger and equally significant increase in all urinary species. This effect was more pronounced and was observed as a weaker effect in the next higher age group (7-13 years of age). Reported consumption of seafood also was significantly related to increased urinary dimethyl arsenic, but changes in distribution among the urinary arsenic species detected was not a sensitive indicator of recent seafood consumption.

Kalman, D.A.; Hughes, J.; van Belle, G.; Mottet, N.K.; Polissar, L. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA)); Bolgiano, D. (Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Coble, K. (Tacoma-Pierce County Health Dept., WA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

483

A shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To extend the semi-empirical techniques of Benson and coworkers, and to extend the database of reliable high temperature measurements of OH radicals with hydrocarbons and other fuels and their decomposition products, the authors undertook a research program with both experimental and computational tasks. The experimental goal was to design a procedure for measuring, at combustion temperatures, the reaction rate coefficients of OH radicals with fuels and other species of importance in combustion or propulsion systems. The computational effort was intended to refine the semi-empirical transition-state-theory procedures for extrapolating rate coefficients of reactions of OH with combustion species of interest, for predicting rate coefficients for species not studied in the laboratory, and to examine the ability of the theory to predict rate coefficients for different pathways in the case the reagent possessed more than one nonequivalent H atoms.

Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

System and method for generating current by selective minority species heating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for the generation of toroidal current in a plasma which is prepared in a toroidal magnetic field. The system utilizes the injection of low-frequency waves into the plasma by means of phased antenna arrays or phased waveguide arrays. The plasma is prepared with a minority ion species of different charge state and different gyrofrequency from the majority ion species. The wave frequency and wave phasing are chosen such that the wave energy is absorbed preferentially by minority species ions traveling in one toroidal direction. The absorption of energy in this manner produces a toroidal electric current even when the injected waves themselves do not have substantial toroidal momentum. This current can be continuously maintained at modest cost in power and may be used to confine the plasma. The system can operate efficiently on fusion grade tokamak plasmas.

Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Princeton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Polyspectral technique for the analysis of stress-waves characteristics and species recognition in wood veneers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work a simple technique to obtain information about the species of wood samples using stress-wave sounds in the audible range is presented. However, spectra of wood sounds generated by pendulum impact are very complex and feature extraction for classification purposes is very difficult. Polyspectral techniques have been successfully applied to several problems from radar pattern recognition to medical signal processing. Following this approach, convolution of four different sound impacts has been done. This permits to extract clear polyspectral features suitable for wood species recognition with possible applications to both human assisted and automatic wood identification systems with minimal intersample variability. Results indicate that using this technique only the two most intense polyspectral peaks are enough for species recognition.

R. Snchez Montero; P.L. Lpez Esp; J. Alpuente; J.A.M. Rojas; S. Vignote

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

First Mesozoic Microphysidae (Hemiptera): a new genus and species in Late Cretaceous amber from Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hairy attachment structures in Reduviidae (Cimicomorpha, Heteroptera), with observations on the fossula spongiosa in some other Cimicomorpha. Zoologischer Anzeiger, 246: 155175. doi:10.1016/j.jcz.2007.03.003. Wheeler, A.G., Jr. 1992. Chinaola quercicola... species appear to have a Holarctic distribution with some putative South African exceptions (Schuh and S?tys 1991; Schuh and Slater 1995). The Recent fauna is composed of approximately 30 species in either five (e.g., Schuh and Slater 1995) or four genera...

McKellar, Ryan C.; Engel, Michael S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Arsenic species in raw and cooked rice: Implications for human health in rural Bengal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study compares the concentrations of total and different species of arsenic (As) in 29 pairs of raw and cooked rice samples collected from households in an area of West Bengal affected by endemic arsenicism. The aim is to investigate the effects of indigenous cooking practice of the rural villagers on As accumulation and speciation in cooked rice. It is found that inorganic As is the predominant species in both raw (93.8%) and cooked rice (88.1%). Cooking of rice with water low in As (health threat (in terms of chronic As toxicity) to the study population.

Dipti Halder; Ashis Biswas; Zdenka lejkovec; Debashis Chatterjee; Jerome Nriagu; Gunnar Jacks; Prosun Bhattacharya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Estimation of above-ground biomass and pod nutrition value for selective Prosopis species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATION OF ABOVE-GROUND BIOMASS AND POD NUTRIT I VE VALUE FOR SELECTED PROSOPIS SPECIES A Thesis by PETER ALLAN ODUOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AItM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19gS ivlajor Subject: Forestry ESTIMATION OF ABOVE-GROUND BIOMASS AND POD NUTR IT I VE VALUE FOR SELECTED PROSOPIS SPECIES A Thesis by PETER ALLAN ODUOL Approved as to style and content by: C. R McKinley (Chairman...

Oduol, Peter Allan

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Karyotypic variation in the Peromyscus boylii species group in western Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

de Caballo 49(1), 51(7) 52(14)% 53(11), 54(1) Oaxaca 4. Llano de las Flores 48(1), 50(3) 51(8), ** 52P(2), 54(1) P. b. ~1 5. Cerro San Felipe 6. Juquila 7. Suchixtepec Chihuahua 8. Santa Barbara Aguascalientes 9. Rincon de Romos 48(1) 50... of their geographic ranges in western Chihuahua and their karyotypic similarity suggest the possibility that they may represent a single species. Nevertheless, the karyotypic data suggest that P. il ' o 1o ly 11' d to P. p 1' th to other species in the P. ~bo lii...

Davis, Kathleen Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

491

Sibling species in Montastraea annularis, coral bleaching, and the coral climate record  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measures of growth and skeletal isotopic ratios in the Caribbean coral Montastraea annularis are fundamental to many studies of paleoceanography, environmental degradation, and global climate change. This taxon is shown to consist of at least three sibling species in shallow water. The two most commonly studied of these show highly significant differences in growth rate and oxygen isotopic ratios, parameters routinely used to estimate past climatic conditions; unusual coloration in the third may have confused research on coral bleaching. Interpretation or comparison of past and current studies can be jeopardized by ignoring these species boundaries.

Knowlton, N.; Weil, E.; Weigt, L.A.; Guzman, H.M. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Inst., Apartado, Balboa (Panama))

1992-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

492

Variability in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism: A Survey of North Carolina Succulent Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.9%0. Voucher specimens were collected and deposited in the Duke University Herbarium. Results and discussion None of the salt marsh succulent species exhibited nighttime 1 4 C02 fixation (table 2). A significant nocturnal increase in tissue titratable... ) . The seven salt marsh species yielded 5 1 3C values characteristic of C3 plants (table 2). Based on these data, it appears highly unlikely tha t any of the salt marsh succulents examined here take up atmospheric CO2 via the CAM pathway. Several...

Martin, Craig E.; Lubbers, Anne E.; Teeri, James A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

The comparative nutritive value of fillet and minced flesh of some species of fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COMPARATIVE NUTRITIVE VALUE OF FILLET AND MINCED FLESH OF SOME SPECIES OF FISH A Thesis by ANN AI-YU CHOY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1974 Major Subject: Food Technology THE COMPARATIVE NUTRITIVE VALUE OF FILLET AND MINCED FLESH OF SOME SPECIES OF FISH A Thesis by ANN AI-YU CHOY Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Mem r...

Choy, Ann Ai-Yu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

494

Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

Hamilton, G.W.

1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

495

Abundance and distribution of potential arthropod prey species in a typical Golden cheeked Warbler habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and has found 97 genera, including 38 tribes and 13 families. He has determined that 41% of the species that he's collected are at or near the northern boundary of their range, 39% are in midrange, 18% are near the eastern boundary of their range, 17..., and has found 97 genera, including 38 tribes and 13 families. He has determined that 41% of the species that he's collected are at or near the northern boundary of their range, 39% are in midrange, 18% are near the eastern boundary of their range, 17...

Quinn, Michael Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

496

Description of Anopheles gabonensis, a new species potentially involved in rodent malaria transmission in Gabon, Central Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The genus Anopheles includes mosquito vectors of human malaria and arboviruses. In sub-Saharan Africa, the anopheline fauna is rich of nearly 150 species, few of which are anthropophilic and capable of transmitting pathogens to humans. Some of the remaining species are found in forests far from human environments and are vectors of wildlife pathogens. The diversity and the biology of these species have yet to be fully described. As a contribution to furthering knowledge of sylvan Anophelinae, using morphological and molecular tools we describe a new Anopheles species collected in Gabon (Central Africa), which we have named Anopheles gabonensis n. sp. We also molecularly screened this species to detect infections by Plasmodium parasites. The results showed the species to have been infected by Plasmodium vinckei, a rodent parasite. We discuss the role of An. gabonensis n. sp. in the transmission of P. vinckei in the rainforest areas of Central Africa and its potential to transfer pathogens to humans.

Nil Rahola; Boris Makanga; Patrick Yangari; Davy Jiolle; Didier Fontenille; Franois Renaud; Benjamin Ollomo; Diego Ayala; Franck Prugnolle; Christophe Paupy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

biodiversity over the past two decades, but, except for a few flagship species, detailed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiversity over the past two decades, but, except for a few flagship species, detailed studies disturbance from increased navigation are also likely to negatively impact the riverine biodiversity. To alleviate these problems and conserve biodiversity, establishing nature reserves in biodiversity hotspots

Li, Zhanqing

498

The Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan: A Decade of Delays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiversity conservation planning process began, in 1994, local par- ticipants and supporters had numerous Biodiversity conservation Á Endangered species Á California Á Coachella Valley Introduction In 1994, residents of promoting both regional economic development and long-term biodiversity conservation. If enacted

Handy, Susan L.

499

Building indicator groups based on species characteristics can improve conservation planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is in identifying important areas for the conservation of biodiversity. As networks of areas encompassing biodiversity to select networks of areas for conservation? In the literature, reliable indicator groupsBuilding indicator groups based on species characteristics can improve conservation planning

Manne, Lisa

500

Brazil Should Facilitate Research Brazil is home to more species of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letters Brazil Should Facilitate Research Permits Brazil is home to more species of plants 2009). Given Brazil's expanding in- vestments in meat and ethanol pro- duction and industrial in Brazil is particularly prob- lematic. To further assess this prob- lem, we launched a survey among