National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for noxious weed species

  1. Appendix M Cover - Noxious Weeds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B (K) P Clematis vitalba old man's beard Class C* Class C Class B (K) Conium maculatum poison hemlock Class B* Class B P Class B (K) Convolvulus arvensis bindweed, field Class C*...

  2. Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

  3. DEPARTMENTS INVOLVED WITH WEED RESEARCH AND EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    for yellow toadflax biocontrol, David Weaver Identifying and testing candidate agents for Russian olive to suppress spotted knapweed? Jeff Mosley Determining the efficacy of biocontrol using Mecinus janthinus biocontrol, David Weaver Memorize, recognize, prioritize: Noxious weed education action program, Jane

  4. Integrated Weed Control for Land Stewardship at Legacy Management's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado - 13086

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2013-07-01

    Land stewardship is one of nine sustainability programs in the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management System. Land stewardship includes maintaining and improving ecosystem health. At the Rocky Flats Site near Westminster, Colorado, land stewardship is an integral component of the Office of Legacy Management's post-closure monitoring and management at the site. Nearly 263 hectares (650 acres) were disturbed and re-vegetated during site cleanup and closure operations. Proactive management of revegetation areas is critical to the successful reestablishment of native grasslands, wetlands, and riparian communities. The undisturbed native plant communities that occur at the site also require active management to maintain the high-quality wetlands and other habitats that are home to numerous species of birds and other wildlife such as elk and deer, rare plant communities, and the federally listed threatened Preble's meadow jumping mouse. Over the past several decades, an increase of Noxious weeds has impacted much of Colorado's Front Range. As a result, weed control is a key component of the land stewardship program at Rocky Flats. Thirty-three species of state-listed Noxious weeds are known to occur in the Central and Peripheral Operable Units at Rocky Flats, along with another five species that are considered invasive at the site. Early detection and rapid response to control new invasive species is crucial to the program. An integrated weed control/vegetation management approach is key to maintaining healthy, sustainable plant communities that are able to resist Noxious weed invasions. Weed mapping, field surveys, and field-staff training sessions (to learn how to identify new potential problem species) are conducted to help detect and prevent new weed problems. The integrated approach at Rocky Flats includes administrative and cultural techniques (prevention), mechanical controls, biological controls, and chemical controls. Several species of biocontrol insects have been released to assist with control of different target weed species. Monitoring is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of control efforts and to provide information for future control efforts. The effective implementation of this integrated approach has reduced the infestation levels of many species and has kept several newly discovered invasive species from spreading and becoming larger problems at the site. (authors)

  5. Clean Diesel: Overcoming Noxious Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Daniel; Dwyer, Harry A.

    2001-01-01

    Clean Diesel: Overcoming NoxiousFumes Are diesel engines part of the problem or part of theS T H E T R U T H about diesel engines? Are they inherently

  6. In the Weeds: Idaho’s Invasive Species Laws and Biofuel Research and Development

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pope, April Lea

    2015-05-01

    Federal laws, policies, and programs that incentivize and mandate the development of biofuels have local effects on both Idaho’s environment and on research supporting biofuels. The passage of a new energy crop rule in Idaho, effective as of March 20, 2014, follows an increased interest in growing, possessing, and transporting energy crops comprised of invasive plant species that are regulated under Idaho’s Invasive Species Act. Idaho’s new energy crop rule is an example of how a state can take measures to protect against unintended consequences of federal laws, policies, and programs while also taking advantage of the benefits of suchmore »policies and programs.« less

  7. Weed Management Costs, Weed Best Management Practices, and The Roundup Ready Weed Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Paul D.

    Weed Management Costs, Weed Best Management Practices, and The Roundup Ready® Weed Management-commercial purposes by any means, provide that this copyright notice appears on all such copies. #12;1 Weed Management Costs, Weed Best Management Practices, and The Roundup Ready® Weed Management Program T.M. Hurley

  8. Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad Spanish explorers of this region came across a lagoon Woodfield Dubbed "killer algae," the alien seaweed Caulerpa taxifolia was discovered in June 2000. Caulerpa taxifolia is a green alga native to tropical waters that typically grows to small size

  9. Internal combustion engine system and method with reduced noxious emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, M.

    1988-03-22

    For use in conjunction with a combustion-based system including a combustion chamber having an exhaust, a source of input air and a source of fuel for providing input air and fuel to the combustion chamber, and means communicating with the combustion chamber for obtaining power from the combustion; the improvement is described comprising: an ultrasonic fogging device communicating with the input air, the fogging device being adapted to receive a fogger air supply and fogger water supply, and to generate a fog in the source of input air which has a droplet size of the order of ten microns or less, and evaporates to dryness in the input air; means for sensing noxious emissions in exhaust gases from the combustion chamber; and means for controlling the fogging device in accordance with the sensed noxious emissions.

  10. Internal combustion engine system and method with reduced noxious emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, M.

    1987-05-26

    An improved turbine apparatus is described comprising: a turbine power generator, including a source of input air, and a source of fuel, a compressor which receives the input air, a combustion chamber which receives air from the output of the compressor and fuel from the source of fuel, a turbine which receives exhaust gases from the combustion chamber; and an electrical generator mechanically coupled with the turbine. A fogging device communicates with the input air. The fogging device is adapted to receive a fogger air supply and a fogger water supply, and to generate a fog in the input air; means for sensing noxious emissions in the exhaust gases; and means for controlling the fogging device in accordance with the sensed noxious emissions.

  11. Weed Management in Organic Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    Weed Management in Organic Crops Research Results Update Bill Curran Penn State University #12;Weed management tactics for organic production · Crop rotation · Cover crops - dead mulches and green manures · Primary and secondary tillage · Irrigation and drainage · Crop residue management · Planting date

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, X governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    engineered organisms, synthetic X biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, X govemmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  15. FIELD CROPS 2012 Weeds: Corn 5-53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in Delmarva corn production. To be successful in controlling weeds in corn, the weed control program must this record to plan your weed control program. Cultural control. Several aspects of cultural weed control should be considered in planning a corn weed control program. These include weed-free seed, cover crops

  16. Suggestions for Weed Control in Sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.; Coffman, Cloyce G.

    2001-05-04

    is under growth stress because of drought, cold weather, water-logged soils, etc. Consult the Peak ? label for further precautions and restrictions. Annual broadleaf weed control and some grasses (refer to label for specific weeds controlled) atrazine 4L... for specific weeds controlled) MCPA ? Several manufacturers 3.0 pts. Postemergence when crop is 6 to 12 inches tall but before boot stage. Apply before weeds are 5 inches tall. Avoid cultivation after treatment while sorghum is brittle. Hybrids vary...

  17. Using weeds to fight wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-10-01

    Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and New Mexico State University have discovered that jimson weed and wild tomato plants can remove the toxic wastes in wastewater associated with the production of trinitrotoluene (TNT). According to Wolfgang F. Mueller of New Mexico State, tissue-cultured cells of jimson weed rapidly absorb and break down toxic and carcinogenic elements in {open_quotes}pink water,{close_quotes} a by-product of the manufacture of TNT. Mueller and his colleagues have found similar results with the wild tomato plant.

  18. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of ``noxious facilities`` be identified and measured? To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  19. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of noxious facilities'' be identified and measured To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  20. Weed Control Recommendations in Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gaylon; Baumann, Paul A.; Baughman, Todd; Bean, Brent W.

    2008-06-05

    to label for specific weeds. Apply after 2-leaf stage but before flagleaf is visible. Must be thoroughly mixed with water before adding to liquid nitrogen fertilizer. 2,4-D, MCPA, Clarity, Hoelon, Buctril. Refer to label for additional tankmixes... with water before adding to liquid nitrogen fertilizer. 2,4-D, MCPA, Clarity, Hoelon, Buctril. Refer to label for additional tankmixes. Barley Agility SG with TotalSol (Ally Extra+Dicamba) 1.6?3.2 oz Annual broadleaves: mustards, docks, henbit, kochia...

  1. Weed Control in Texas Pastures. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, John A.; Trew, E. M.

    1958-01-01

    that butyric forms of 2,4-D CP will give good control of curly dock in grass pastures with little damage to pasture I pmes when used at the rate of pound per acre. ipplications made when hop and white clover on the Trler Experiment Station were 2 to 3... inches high re- ' !lted in little injury to the clover. The control of dock cellent when the weeds were sprayed in the ; stage. Temperatures at the time of treatment $,,, ,,,out 50 degrees F. - I per , :~cnt, A1 1 :try smal I ) ti\\'es anc , TCA...

  2. Neuroscience Letters 392 (2006) 159164 Noxious heat induces fMRI activation in two anatomically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chabris, Christopher F.

    2006-01-01

    Neuroscience Letters 392 (2006) 159­164 Noxious heat induces fMRI activation in two anatomically; accepted 7 September 2005 Abstract Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we found were instructed on how to rate their pain intensity during the scan using a standard 11-point Likerts

  3. Safety Topic Chemical Hood General purpose: prevent exposure to toxic, irritating, or noxious chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Topic ­ Chemical Hood General purpose: prevent exposure to toxic, irritating, or noxious chemical vapors and gases. A face velocity of 100 feet per minute (fpm) provides efficient vapor capture the better. (T) (F) A chemical hood can be used for storage of volatile, flammable, or odiferous materials

  4. 838 Weed Science 54, SeptemberOctober 2006 Weed Science, 54:838846. 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hao

    @uoguelph.ca Robert S. Gallagher Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park 99164-3144 E. Patrick Fuerst Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman838 · Weed Science 54, September­October 2006 Weed Science, 54:838­846. 2006 Modeling site

  5. Race, region and risk: An examination of minority proximity to noxious facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, A.L. [Wheaton Coll., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The past decade has given rise to terms like environmental racism, eco-racism, and environmental inequities to characterize a disproportional distribution of environmental disamenities among minority communities. Much of the literature supports the contention that racial and ethnic minorities and low-income groups bear a disproportionate burden of risk from hazardous activities and substances in the environment. This study expands the scope of prior studies by employing county-level data for the entire nation and including a broad range of facility types associated with environmental disamenities. In addition, it addresses the issue of the distribution of noxious facilities among white and non-white populations in an attempt to determine the relative exposure to risk among different racial and ethnic groups. In addition, the authors also explore the relative importance of nonurban versus urban residence.

  6. Protecting the Environment Using Integrated Weed Management in Lawns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketchersid, Mary; Baumann, Paul A.

    2008-03-27

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) can be used to control weeds, keep lawns healthy and protect the environment. This publication explains the steps to take in an IPM program and the importance of calibrating equipment and making proper calculations...

  7. Introduction Weed control is of fundamental importance when planting trees, particularly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    control measures than trees planted in infertile areas. This is because the land is likely to contain form of mechanical weeding. It is also better to weed early rather than delay treatment as inclement

  8. Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics C. Neal Stewart, Jr and their evolution remain poorly understood, but genomic approaches offer tremendous promise for elucidating these important features of weed biology. However, the genomic tools and resources available for weed research

  9. `Raising the bar': improving the standard and utility of weed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Meetings `Raising the bar': improving the standard and utility of weed and invasive plant research around three major themes: plant invasions, herbicide resistance, and climate change impacts. `. . .the each theme. Below, we present some of the more broadly relevant topics of discussion from these themes

  10. RESEARCH ARTICLE Biodegradable mulch instead of polyethylene for weed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of biodegradable plastic mulch, black, 15 m, (6) oxo-degradable plastic mulch, black, 15 m, (7) paper mulch, black mulches and PE ranging between 80% and 100% for all of them; also, yield was similar for all plasticRESEARCH ARTICLE Biodegradable mulch instead of polyethylene for weed control of processing tomato

  11. Effect of Picloram and Tebuthiuron on Broadleaf Weeds and Bermudagrass in East-Central Texas Pastures. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bovey, R.W.; Meyer, R.E.; Baur, J.R.; Schulte, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    of Single Application on Weed and Grass Cover ??????????????????????? 6 Effect of Double Application on Weed and Grass Cover ??????????????????????? 8 Results of All Treatments on Weed Population ??????????????????????????????? 9 SUMMARY Pellet and spray... in January 1975 and retreated in July 1975 or treated in March 1975 and retreated in September 1976. Picloram pellets or sprays at 1.12 and 2.24 kg/ha applied in November 1974 and retreated in May 1975 also increased bermudagrass cover. Herbicide injury...

  12. Deleterious activity of cultivated grasses (Poaceae) and residues on soilborne fungal, nematode and weed pests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J.; Summers, Charles G.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Prather, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    on wheat seedlings. Crop Science, 35, 1652–1656. Burgos, N.system with cover crops. Weed Science, 44, 355–361. Cheema,

  13. Weed Mapping in Early-Season Maize Fields Using Object-Based Analysis of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2013-01-01

    10 | e77151 Weed Maps with UAV Images References 1. ECPA (of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imagery for rangelandUnmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for Early Site Specific Weed

  14. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 WEED CONTROL IN PEANUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 158 WEED CONTROL IN PEANUT Mike;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 159 Preplant/Burndown Herbicides for Weed, wild radish, or Carolina geranium. GLYPHOSATE can also be tank-mixed with VALOR or AIM to improve

  15. HOME GROUNDS & ANIMALS 2014 Home Ornamentals: Weed Management in Home Ornamental Beds 4-89

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    mulches: Use of solid black plastic or a landscape fabric improves weed control compared to an organic mulch alone. Solid black plastic is more effective for weed control than the available landscape fabrics. Organic mulches: Pine bark, hardwood bark, pine straw and wood chips are all good for mulching. Watch soil

  16. Effects of polyethylene mulch in a short-rotation, poplar plantation vary with weed-control strategies,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Scott

    Effects of polyethylene mulch in a short-rotation, poplar plantation vary with weed polyethylene mulch (poly mulch) across a range of site conditions, weed-control treatments and genotypes rights reserved. Keywords: Polyethylene mulch; Woody crops; Weed control Forest Ecology and Management

  17. Locoine, the Poisonous Principle of Loco Weed, Astragalus earlei. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1936-01-01

    . He gives descriptions of the loco plants. Couch (3) prepared from the loco weed Oxytropis lambertii gathered in the vicinity of Raton, New Mexico, a highly toxic fraction in the fil- trate from silicotungstic acid. He was unable to purify..., and the liquid evaporated to about 200 cc to remove alcohol. An excess of basic lead acetate was added in small amounts, small filtered portions being tested from time to time until no more material was precipitated. About 50 cc was required. The precipitate...

  18. Germination of three selections of Lantana species.: L. camara, L. camara 'Pink Caprice', and L. depressa.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    , and the United States (Vivian-Smith and Panetta, 2009). L. camara has become a problem weed in croplands that the species is altering native plant communities throughout the state of Florida. L. camara is negatively-day study, viable seeds of both selections of L. camara had the highest germination rates when treated

  19. Effects of Oilseed Meals on the Germination, Growth, and Survival of Crop and Weed Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothlisberger, Katie Lynn

    2012-02-14

    ...................................................................................... 90 VIII SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS ................................................... 92 REFERENCES .......................................................................................................... 95 VITA... ....................................................................................................... 72 Figure 23 Bacterial copy numbers for treatments at preplant and harvest 1 ............. 89 Figure 21 Fungal copy number for treatments at preplant and harvest 1 .................. 90 xi LIST OF TABLES...

  20. While soil-applied herbicides can be quite valuable in weed control, misuse can cause crop injury or failure to control weeds. This guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    While soil-applied herbicides can be quite valuable in weed control, misuse can cause crop injury and persistence of soil-applied herbicides. MT200405 AG issued 5/04 D-4 Getting the Most from Soil or cultivation. However, miscalculations in the use of soil- applied herbicides could cause crop injury or fail

  1. 243USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Effects of Seedling Protectors andWeed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of the more common products are plastic mesh cages, cylinders made from aluminum window screen, cages. These are rigid, translucent, double-walled plastic cylinders, developed in England and used there for more than to eliminate weeds, including mulch, herbicides, scalping and mowing. Though studies comparing weed control

  2. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 AQUATIC WEED CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 301 AQUATIC WEED CONTROL Cory Heaton and the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Aquatic pesticide applicators may be required to submit a Notice of Intent (NOI), practice Integrated Pest Management (IPM), and develop a Pesticide

  3. Tolerance and weed management systems in imidazolinone tolerant corn (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Ann Marie

    1999-01-01

    ) Field Laboratory, near College Station TX, and at TP Farms, near Waller TX. Different imidazolinone herbicide treatments were applied to imidazolinone tolerant corn between the 2- to 3- and 6- to 8- leaf stage at 36 and 72 pa/ha to evaluate weed control...

  4. WEED INFESTATIONS ARE GENERALLY MORE frequent along roadsides and other disturbed areas than

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    in adjacent land, possibly because vehicles spread seeds into these areas and such areas provide suitable habitats for weed growth. Many types of vehicles, including passenger cars, 4-wheel drive (4WD) trucks, agricultural implements, tracked vehicles and all- terrain vehicles (ATVs) have been found to pick up seeds

  5. Data Weeding Techniques Applied to Roget's Thesaurus Uta Priss, L. John Old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Old, L. John

    Data Weeding Techniques Applied to Roget's Thesaurus Uta Priss, L. John Old Napier University, such as Roget's Thesaurus, because the data sources tend to be large and complex. This paper discusses a va, first, in general and then with respect to Roget's Thesaurus. The aim is that resulting lattices should

  6. Data Weeding Techniques Applied to Roget's Thesaurus Uta Priss, L. John Old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priss, Uta

    Data Weeding Techniques Applied to Roget's Thesaurus Uta Priss, L. John Old Edinburgh Napier, such as Roget's Thesaurus, because the data sources tend to be large and complex. This paper discusses a va, first in general, and then with respect to Roget's Thesaurus. The aim is that resulting lattices should

  7. with input from Rich Zollinger, NDSU Weed Science Herbicides to Complement Glyphosate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    with input from Rich Zollinger, NDSU Weed Science Herbicides to Complement Glyphosate Common Giant the herbicide binds to control a plant Note: strengths and weakness and PRO's and CON's of PRE's such as crop injury potential under cool/wet conditions Note: problems with timing, crop injury potential, and vol

  8. Herbicidal Activity of Mustard Seed Meal on Weed and Vegetable Emergence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xi

    2014-11-21

    to determine the herbicidal activity of MSMs (Sinapis alba ‘IdaGold’ and Brassica juncea ‘Pacific Gold’) on weed and vegetable emergence. In Expt. 1, MSMs were applied at 0, 50, 100, 200 or 300 g/m2 to the bottom of petri dishes and covered with germination mix...

  9. Sensitive Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species Sensitive Species By avoiding or minimizing the

  10. Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization APPENDIX I This chapter describes the fish selected the focal species based on their significance and ability to characterize the health

  11. Clean Diesel: Overcoming Noxious Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Daniel; Dwyer, Harry A.

    2001-01-01

    emissions and by low diesel-fuel prices, relatively gentleand the absence of diesel fuel price terize and measureattraction where diesel fuel prices are lower than gasoline

  12. Clean Diesel: Overcoming Noxious Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Daniel; Dwyer, Harry A.

    2001-01-01

    quiet as gasoline engines. And freight companies rely almoststandards as gasoline cars. A few companies have technology

  13. Endangered Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJonHereEndangered Species

  14. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and fresh water aquatic weeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    The ORCA clone of the red seaweed Gracilaria tikvahiae has been in culture continuously for over two years. Yield for the past year has averaged 12 g ash-free dry wt/m/sup 2/ .day (17.5 t/a.y) in suspended 2600-1 aluminum tank cultures with four exchanges of enriched seawater per day and continuous aeration. Yields from nonintensive pond-bottom culture, similar to commercial Gracilaria culture methods in Taiwan, averaged 3 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day in preliminary experiments. Rope and spray cultures were not successful. Yields of water hyacinths from March 1978 to March 1979 averaged 25 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day (37 t/a.y). Season, nutrient availability (form and quantity) and stand density were found to affect the relative proportions of structural and nonstructural tissue in water hyacinths and thereby significantly affect digestibility of and methane production by the plants. Pennywort (Hydrocotyle) grew poorly in winter and its annual yield averaged only one-third that of water hyacinth. Water lettuce (Pistia) appears more comparable to hyacinths in preliminary studies and its yields will be monitored throughout a complete year. Stable, continuous anaerobic digestion of both water hyacinths and Gracilaria has been maintained with an average gas production from both species of 0.4 1/g volatile solids at 60% methane.

  15. Western Society of Weed Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico. March 10-12, 2009. Skurski TC, Maxwell, BD, and Rew LJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    significant environmental correlates with NIS impact and response to treatment will help guide weed management Community and Environmental Covariates of Non-Indigenous Plant Impacts Tanya C. Skurski, Lisa J. Rew, Bruce. If a significant relationship exists between environmental variables or biotic conditions and impact, knowledge

  16. Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Distributions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) disturbance frequency, and (4) the severity9 of the disturbance. Both frequency and severity are important1 Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Telephone: +01-928-556-2176, FAX +01-928-556-21308 9 SHORT TITLE: Soil Disturbances, Biodiversity

  17. TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

  18. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  19. book review: Species distribution models for species distribution modellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormann, Carsten F

    2012-01-01

    Mapping  species  distributions:  spa? tial inference and news and update  book review  Species distribution models for species distribution modellers  Ecological niches and 

  20. Controlling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvinia-eating weevils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    26 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Melanie Orth Caddo Lake is the focus of the first project for the Center for Invasive Species Eradication. Scientists will demonstrate and evaulate different methods for controlling and preventing...

  1. Contolling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvina-eating weevils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    26 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Melanie Orth Caddo Lake is the focus of the first project for the Center for Invasive Species Eradication. Scientists will demonstrate and evaulate different methods for controlling and preventing...

  2. Preservation of a species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witt, Sarah (Sarah Elizabeth)

    2011-01-01

    To put it simply, humans are going extinct. I identify the source of the problem as an imperceptible societal trend to eliminate the experience that authenticates us as a living species: failure. We've unanimously designated ...

  3. Collaboration, Consultation, Communication The Environmental Process in Calm and Crisis. Mn/DOT Environmental Stewardship & Streamlining Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    paint removals Bird buffer zones Turtle crossing/fence Plan locations Pay items/estimated quantities.0150 Hazardous, toxic materials Demolition Disposals Agriculture Noxious Weeds DNR Public waters Dewatering

  4. Montana Weed Control Association Annual Meeting. January 11th 2011, Great Falls, MT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Seed movement by vehicles: how many, how far, and under what conditions? Movement of seeds by vehicles is generally thought to increase the spread of invasive plant species, but few studies have vehicles when driven a range of distances on different surfaces (asphalt, unpaved and offroad) under wet

  5. Occurrence and Management of Glyphosate Resistant Amaranthus Weed Species in Central Texas Cotton and Evaluation of Spray Droplet Size Spectra as Affected by Nozzle Design and Herbicide Formulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Joshua Allan

    2014-08-28

    , also a member of the dioecious subgenus Acnida, is native to North America and is currently found in the Midwestern United States from Illinois and southern Michigan in the north, to Texas and Louisiana in the south (Horak et al. 1994; Pratt et al... be influenced by environmental conditions. Ellis and Griffin (2002) found that sublethal rates of 140 g ha-1 glyphosate and 53 g ha-1 glufosinate applied at several growth stages from 3-leaf to early bloom resulted in maximum visual injury values of 16...

  6. Genomic definition of species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  7. Endangered Species Consultation Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endangered Species Consultation Handbook Procedures for Conducting" " Consz~ltationand Conference Service March 1998 Final #12;FOREWORD It gives us great pleasure to introduce the final Section 7 Handbook Service employees. The Handbook provides internal guidance and establishes national policy for conducting

  8. Evaluation of auxinic herbicides for broadleaf weed control, tolerance of forage bermudagrass hybrids [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], and absorption and translocation in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Frederick Thomas

    2005-08-29

    chemical families, including the phenoxyalkanoic and pyridinecarboxylic acids, and are referred to as the phenoxy and pyridine herbicide families, respectively. These herbicides have the ability to act on susceptible broadleaf plants because... + fluroxypyr (1:1) at 0.28 kg a.e./ha was required. Western horsenettle (Solanum dimidiatum Raf.) and silverleaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav.), both members of the Solanaceae family, have become major weeds in both permanent pasture and row...

  9. Part 2. Species Selection Adaptability of Some Eucalyptus Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Part 2. Species Selection Adaptability of Some Eucalyptus Species in Southwest Oregon1 Lee O. Hunt2-industrial forest 1 Presented at the Workshop on Eucalyptus in California, June 14-16, 1983, Sacramento of harvesting in their life- times. The screening of trials of Eucalyptus species were a part of a personal

  10. Are hybrid species more fit than ancestral parent species in the current hybrid species habitats?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Are hybrid species more fit than ancestral parent species in the current hybrid species habitats? L Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Introduction Hybridization is receiving renewed attention as an important). For homoploid hybridization in plants, where chromosome number remains the same, models and empirical evi- dence

  11. 2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

    2012-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the upland areas of the PNNL site in 2011. Efforts in 2011 to control noxious weed populations (comprising plant species designated as Class B noxious weeds by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board) discovered in 2009 and initially treated with herbicides in 2010 are described in Appendix B.

  12. Species Doubling and Chiral Lagrangians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Creutz; Michel Tytgat

    1996-05-15

    Coupling gauge fields to the chiral currents from an effective Lagrangian for pseudoscalar mesons naturally gives rise to a species doubling phenomenon similar to that seen with fermionic fields in lattice gauge theory.

  13. Alien Species and Evolution: The Evolutionary Ecology of Exotic Plants, Animals, Microbes and Interacting Native Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehrbass, Nana

    2005-01-01

    Review: Alien Species and Evolution: The EvolutionaryGermany George W. Cox. Alien Species and Evolution: TheRecycled, acid-free paper. Alien Species and Evolution leads

  14. WILDLAND WEEDS 19 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Sharon Ewe Mei

    " (small fruit orchards) were examined. Ewe and her partners traveled approximately 600 km in the urban

  15. Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The regulations that accompany the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act list three categories of animals and plants in need of protection: endangered, threatened, and species of special concern....

  16. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14

    The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion ...

  17. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandel, Navdeep S

    Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

  18. Species discrimination from a hyperspectral perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Species discrimination from a hyperspectral perspective Md. Istiak Sobhan #12;Promoters: Prof. Dr University, the Netherlands #12;Species discrimination from a hyperspectral perspective Md. Istiak Sobhan in the auditorium of ITC, Enschede #12;Species discrimination from hyperspectral perspective © 2007 Md. Istiak

  19. eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration of large-river ecosystems-river ecosystems that are the subject of restoration efforts also typically are heavily invaded by alien species interactions that link alien species and river restoration. Most obviously, restoration may be aimed

  20. Genomic definition of species. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Dramanac, R.

    1992-06-01

    A genome is the sum total of the DNA sequences in the cells of an individual organism. The common usage that species possess genomes comes naturally to biochemists, who have shown that all protein and nucleic acid molecules are at the same time species and individual-specific, with minor individual variations being superimposed on a consensus sequence that is constant for a species. By extension, this property is attributed to the common features of DNA in the chromosomes of members of a given species and is called (species) genome. The definition of species based on chromosomes, genes, or genome common to its member organisms has been implied or mentioned in passing numerous times. Some population biologists think that members of species have similar ``homeostatic genotypes,`` which are to a degree resistant to mutation or environmental change in the production of a basic phenotype.

  1. Genomic definition of species. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1993-03-01

    A genome is the sum total of the DNA sequences in the cells of an individual organism. The common usage that species possess genomes comes naturally to biochemists, who have shown that all protein and nucleic acid molecules are at the same time species- and individual-specific, with minor individual variations being superimposed on a consensus sequence that is constant for a species. By extension, this property is attributed to the common features of DNA in the chromosomes of members of a given species and is called species genome. Our proposal for the definition of a biological species is as follows: A species comprises a group of actual and potential biological organisms built according to a unique genome program that is recorded, and at least in part expressed, in the structures of their genomic nucleic acid molecule(s), having intragroup sequence differences which can be fully interconverted in the process of organismal reproduction.

  2. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica...

  3. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    designing remediation strategies for such pollutants. Phylogenetic analyses place this new species within the deeply divergent order Gleobacterales, a branch that diverged...

  4. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL LANDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1957 Marine Biological Laboratory;#12;ABSTRACT This report presents data on the species composition of the industrial trawl fish catch landed OF TABLES Page Table 1. 1957 landings and number of trips of industrial trawl fish vessels at Pt. Judith

  5. SERI Aquatic Species Program: 1983 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    During 1983 research was carried out under three tasks: biological, engineering, and analysis. Biological research was aimed at screening for promising species of microalgae, macroalgae, and emergent plants that could be cultivated for energy products. Promising species were studied further to improve yields.

  6. Eukaryotic microbes, species recognition and the geographic limits of species: examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eukaryotic microbes, species recognition and the geographic limits of species: examples from of eukaryotic microbes, the Fungi. We show that inferred geographic range of a fungal species depends upon structure (Finlay & Fenchel 2004). Finlay & Fenchel's claim of global ranges for eukaryotic microbes echoes

  7. Applications and Research Using Remote Sensing for Rangeland Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

    - ability of clean water, sequester excess carbon dioxide, main- tain plant and animal diversityApplications and Research Using Remote Sensing for Rangeland Management E. Raymond Hunt, Jr., James remote sensing. Noxious weed infestations can be determined by careful selection of the spatial

  8. G SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This soil is well-drained, runoff is medium, and permeabil- ity is moderately rapid. The soil is slightly.). In 1927, the #12;first attempt was made to clear the pasture of this noxious weed, by digging and burning commercially. The seedlings were graded, and only thrifty trees with 8- to 12-inchtops and well developed root

  9. The Prairie Naturalist 43(1/2):3844; June 2011 Corresponding author email address: carol.johnston@sdstate.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Phragmites in unglaciated western South Dakota usually occurred on creeks and stock dams, stock dam, Prairie Coteau, Black Hills Common reed, Phragmites australis [(Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. (syn Dakota to list the non-native P. australis haplotype M as a noxious weed (South Dakota Rules §12

  10. Defining viral species: making taxonomy useful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2014-07-23

    Virus taxonomy at present is best characterized as a categorization of convenience, without a firm basis in the principles of evolutionary biology. Specifically, virus species definitions appear to depend more on tradition and popular opinion among...

  11. Effect of Variable Surrounding on Species Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandra Nowicka; Artur Duda; Miroslaw R. Dudek

    2002-07-08

    We construct a model of speciation from evolution in an ecosystem consisting of a limited amount of energy recources. The species posses genetic information, which is inherited according to the rules of the Penna model of genetic evolution. The increase in number of the individuals of each species depends on the quality of their genotypes and the available energy resources. The decrease in number of the individuals results from the genetic death or reaching the maximum age by the individual. The amount of energy resources is represented by a solution of the differential logistic equation, where the growth rate of the amount of the energy resources has been modified to include the number of individuals from all species in the ecosystem under consideration. We observe that small evolutionary changes of the inherited genetic information lead to spontaneous bursts of the evolutionary activity when many new species may appear in a short period.

  12. Irreversibility and uncertainty in species valuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Eileen L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper incorporates an option value into deforestation policy analysis. Similar to an option value in finance, the option value here reflects the advantage to delaying irreversible species extinction until more information ...

  13. Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, E. E.

    2008-02-01

    Presentation on lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Aquatic Species Program 1978-1996 microalgae R&D activities, presented at the 2008 AFOSR Workshop in Washington, D.C.

  14. COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES FOR BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK SPECIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buell, Carol Robin [Michigan State University; Childs, Kevin L [Michigan State University

    2013-05-07

    While current production of ethanol as a biofuel relies on starch and sugar inputs, it is anticipated that sustainable production of ethanol for biofuel use will utilize lignocellulosic feedstocks. Candidate plant species to be used for lignocellulosic ethanol production include a large number of species within the Grass, Pine and Birch plant families. For these biofuel feedstock species, there are variable amounts of genome sequence resources available, ranging from complete genome sequences (e.g. sorghum, poplar) to transcriptome data sets (e.g. switchgrass, pine). These data sets are not only dispersed in location but also disparate in content. It will be essential to leverage and improve these genomic data sets for the improvement of biofuel feedstock production. The objectives of this project were to provide computational tools and resources for data-mining genome sequence/annotation and large-scale functional genomic datasets available for biofuel feedstock species. We have created a Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource that provides a web-based portal or �clearing house� for genomic data for plant species relevant to biofuel feedstock production. Sequence data from a total of 54 plant species are included in the Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource including model plant species that permit leveraging of knowledge across taxa to biofuel feedstock species.We have generated additional computational analyses of these data, including uniform annotation, to facilitate genomic approaches to improved biofuel feedstock production. These data have been centralized in the publicly available Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource (http://bfgr.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

  15. Weed control in tomato seedbeds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeper, Paul W

    1957-01-01

    nanner different to those used by carlscsx (9)x cxeb- tzee and Laiffler (10), Dallynx Sawyer snd Seif (11)x Dsnielscxx (13) ~ snd !8mges (19) ~ Vapast has been used by a nuaber of warksxe (3) to sterilise scd. l well in advance of' plxsxting...

  16. Species interactions differ in their genetic robustness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chubiz, Lon M.; Granger, Brian R.; Segre, Daniel; Harcombe, William R.

    2015-04-14

    Conflict and cooperation between bacterial species drive the composition and function of microbial communities. Stability of these emergent properties will be influenced by the degree to which species' interactions are robust to genetic perturbations. We use genome-scale metabolic modeling to computationally analyze the impact of genetic changes when Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica compete, or cooperate. We systematically knocked out in silico each reaction in the metabolic network of E. coli to construct all 2583 mutant stoichiometric models. Then, using a recently developed multi-scale computational framework, we simulated the growth of each mutant E. coli in the presence of S.more »enterica. The type of interaction between species was set by modulating the initial metabolites present in the environment. We found that the community was most robust to genetic perturbations when the organisms were cooperating. Species ratios were more stable in the cooperative community, and community biomass had equal variance in the two contexts. Additionally, the number of mutations that have a substantial effect is lower when the species cooperate than when they are competing. In contrast, when mutations were added to the S. enterica network the system was more robust when the bacteria were competing. These results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and studies of ecological stability. Cooperation and conflict alter the connection between genetic changes and properties that emerge at higher levels of biological organization.« less

  17. Species interactions differ in their genetic robustness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chubiz, Lon M. [Univ. of Missouri - St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Granger, Brian R. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Segre, Daniel [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Harcombe, William R. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Conflict and cooperation between bacterial species drive the composition and function of microbial communities. Stability of these emergent properties will be influenced by the degree to which species' interactions are robust to genetic perturbations. We use genome-scale metabolic modeling to computationally analyze the impact of genetic changes when Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica compete, or cooperate. We systematically knocked out in silico each reaction in the metabolic network of E. coli to construct all 2583 mutant stoichiometric models. Then, using a recently developed multi-scale computational framework, we simulated the growth of each mutant E. coli in the presence of S. enterica. The type of interaction between species was set by modulating the initial metabolites present in the environment. We found that the community was most robust to genetic perturbations when the organisms were cooperating. Species ratios were more stable in the cooperative community, and community biomass had equal variance in the two contexts. Additionally, the number of mutations that have a substantial effect is lower when the species cooperate than when they are competing. In contrast, when mutations were added to the S. enterica network the system was more robust when the bacteria were competing. These results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and studies of ecological stability. Cooperation and conflict alter the connection between genetic changes and properties that emerge at higher levels of biological organization.

  18. Society for Range Management and Weed Science Society of America, "Working landscapes providing for the future", February 711 2010, Denver, Colorado. p80.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    , and Balbach H Dispersal of plant propagules by vehicles. Secondary dispersal of plant propagules by vehicles is generally perceived to be important in the spread of invasive species, though with only to vehicles will depend on a number of factors including type of ground surface (asphalt, gravel, or unpaved

  19. Effects of ethanol and reactive species on Hepatitis C virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seronello, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    polymerase chain reaction; RNS, reactive nitrogen species;oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and decreased antioxidantincrease the levels of ROS/RNS, oxidized thioredoxin, lipid

  20. Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel Exhaust and Aftertreatment Systems Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel...

  1. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouthier, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  2. Predicting species invasions using ecological niche modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Vieglais, David A.

    2001-05-01

    ) and commission (including niche space not ,lctually occupied by the 'pecies). Each algorithm for modeling specIes' ecological niches involves a specific com binatiol1 of errors of omission ,md commission. A rel.ltively new approach, called the (;enetic...

  3. Explaining species distribution patterns through hierarchical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfand, Alan E.; Silander, John A., Jr.; Wu, Shanshan; Latimer, Andrew; Lewis, Paul O.; Rebelo, Anthony G.; Holder, Mark T.

    2006-01-01

    ; 000 cells total for the region). We report on results for 40 species of a owering plant family Proteaceae (of about 330 in the CFR) for a de ned subregion. Using a Bayesian framework, we develop a two stage, spatially explicit, hierar- chical logistic...

  4. Accounting for species taxonomy improves distribution models Aidin Niamir a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    models, multispecies models, species distribution models Abstract: The use of species atlas data of species distribution models. Using atlas data, two taxonomically enhanced datasets were created for 356. Enhancement of atlas data by excluding irrelevant absences based on species taxonomy significantly improved

  5. Current generation by minority species heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J.

    1980-07-01

    It is proposed that electric currents be generated from the preferential heating of ions traveling in one direction but with no net momentum injected into the system. This can be accomplished with, for example, traveling waves in a two-ion-species plasma. The current can be generated efficiently enough for the scheme to be of interest in maintaining steady-state toroidal currents in a reactor.

  6. Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

    2005-02-22

    A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

  7. 2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

    2011-02-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified on the PNNL Site.

  8. SYSTEMATICS The Field Cricket Gryllus assimilis and Two New Sister Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, David A.

    for species with supposed transcontinental distributions must be resolved. One such species, Gryllus assimilis

  9. Aquatic species project report: FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.M. ); Sprague, S. )

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse'' gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

  10. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supports returningNew MexicoReactors |NewNew Species of

  11. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supports returningNew MexicoReactors |NewNew Species

  12. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supports returningNew MexicoReactors |NewNew SpeciesNew

  13. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supports returningNew MexicoReactors |NewNewNew Species

  14. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications64 2.251 2.211New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms

  15. Assessment Of Potential Indicator Species For Monitoring Environmental Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Assessment Of Potential Indicator Species For Monitoring Environmental Contamination contamination in the aquatic component of the Fraser River Basin, British Columbia. A list of criterion were species for laboratory study; and 5) knowledge availability pertaining to contaminant research

  16. DESIGNATION OF FOCAL VERTEBRATE SPECIES FOR THE LAKE TAHOE BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extirpated species were candidates for focal species status: Mountain sheep, heather vole, canyon mouse, white-tailed hare, wolverine, Sierra Nevada red fox, and grizzly bear. Amphibians and Reptiles We

  17. PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER A novel, combined approach to assessing species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morphological species of freshwater microalgae often have broad geographic distribution. However, traditional distribu- tional stability among microalgal species groups such as the desmids. Keywords Microalgae microalgae have recently been undergoing major conceptual changes in the light of increasing evidence

  18. Mycosphaerella species causing leaf disease in South African Eucalyptus plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mycosphaerella species causing leaf disease in South African Eucalyptus plantations Gavin C. HUNTER Eucalyptus plantations provide an important source of hardwood for forestry industries, worldwide. Several species of Mycosphaerella are associated with a destructive Eucalyptus leaf disease known

  19. Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

    2005-01-01

    Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

  20. Sexual Dimorphism in the Sceloporus undulatus Species Complex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittmer, Drew

    2012-10-19

    suggests four species lineages occur within S. undulatus. Traits within an interbreeding species that are influenced by sexual selection are under different selection pressures and may evolve independently from the selective forces of habitat. Sceloporus...

  1. A new species of Quexua from southeastern Peru (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Daniel J.

    2011-10-28

    A distinctive new species of the crabronine wasp genus Quexua Pate is described and figured from a single male collected from lowland Amazonian rain forest in southeastern Peru. Quexua cicra sp. n. is the only species in ...

  2. perspective: The keystone species concept: a critical appraisal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottee-Jones, Henry Eden W; Whittaker, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    the popular use  of  keystone,  flagship  and  umbrella key? stone  species  and  keystone  links  in  size?based Bond, W.  J.  (1993) Keystone species.  In: Biodiversity 

  3. THE CARTESIAN CLOSED BICATEGORY OF GENERALISED SPECIES OF STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winskel, Glynn

    THE CARTESIAN CLOSED BICATEGORY OF GENERALISED SPECIES OF STRUCTURES M. FIORE, N. GAMBINO, M. HYLAND, AND G. WINSKEL Abstract. The concept of generalised species of structures between small establishes that the bicategory of generalised species of structures is cartesian closed. 1. Introduction

  4. Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface Scott D. Peacor1 ecological processes. However, the influence on invasions of phenotypic plasticity, a key component of many species interactions, is unknown. We present a model in which phenotypic plasticity of a resident species

  5. Thermal physiology and species distribution models reveal climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, Stacey A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Thermal physiology and species distribution models reveal climate vulnerability warming than tropical species based on their larger thermal safety margins, the distance between ambient temperatures and species' thermal optima. We sought to test the prediction that high latitude amphibians

  6. Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of seven oreo species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of seven oreo species ITeleostei, Oreosomatidae species was examined.Allozyme variation at 26 loci was examined in seven species: six from Australasia. helgae). Two phenetic trees were constructed: an unweighted pair- group method with arithmetic averag

  7. Microbial immobilization drives nitrogen cycling differences among plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    1840 Microbial immobilization drives nitrogen cycling differences among plant species Ramesh cycling. We examined four potential mechanisms of plant species effects on nitrogen (N) cycling. We found no species differences in gross ammonification suggesting there are no changes in the ecosystem N cycling

  8. THE INTRODUCTION OF POTENTIALLY INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES FOR HORTICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE INTRODUCTION OF POTENTIALLY INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES FOR HORTICULTURAL PURPOSES IN NORTH: The Introduction of Potentially Invasive Alien Plant Species for Horticultural Purposes in North America: Assessing/Approved: ________________________________________ #12;iii ABSTRACT Invasive alien plant species are known to cause significant economic and ecological

  9. SPECIATION IN MAMMALS AND THE GENETIC SPECIES CONCEPT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Robert J.

    of mammals. We review criteria and methods for recognizing species of mammals and explore a theoretical, design of conservation initiatives, zoonoses, and so on. A paradigm shift relative to this and other Concept uses genetic data from mitochondrial and nuclear genomes to identify species and species

  10. San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program The goal from current citizen science groups (such as Audubon and SD Tracking Team

  11. Marine Introduced Species Q13: Are threats from marine invasive species increasing in Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappal, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    Non-native species have emerged as one of the leading environmental threats to our coastal habitats. These species have been recognized globally as a major threat to biological diversity as well as to agriculture and other ...

  12. An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China of invasive alien species in China. NeoBiota 15: 1­26. doi: 10.3897/neobiota.15.3575 Abstract Invasive alien: 10.3897/neobiota.15.3575 www.pensoft.net/journals/neobiota review ArtiCle Advancing research on alien

  13. DNA sequence incongruence and inconsistent morphology obscure species boundaries in the Teratosphaeria suttonii species complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the international paper and pulp industry (Turnbull 2000). The trees are propagated extensively as exoticsFULL PAPER DNA sequence incongruence and inconsistent morphology obscure species boundaries plantation industry in the sub- tropical and tropical areas of Australia (Andjic et al.

  14. SpecieS in the Spotlight: Survive to thrive Recovering threatened and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for taking the time to review this annual report to Congress. The report is important because it documents with renewed commitment and intensified efforts. Starting on May 15, 2015--Endangered Species Day) ·Central California Coast Coho Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) ·Cook Inlet Beluga Whale DPS ·Hawaiian

  15. Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  16. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-23

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

  17. Population dynamics of species-rich ecosystems: the mixture of matrix population models approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Vivien

    , tropical marine fish or coral reefs, high diversity implies that the sample size for most species. 2007), species extinction or conservation of endangered species (Cropper & Loudermilk 2006

  18. The Pricelessness of Biodiversity: Using the Endangered Species Act to Help Combat Extinction and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falberg, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    over others 200 because keystone “species are the buildingexample to demonstrate how a “keystone species” works in anor endangered is a keystone species of an ecosystem. If such

  19. Linking fisheries management and conservation in bioengineering species: the case of South American mussels (Mytilidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carranza, Alvar; Defeo, Omar; Beck, Mike; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2009-01-01

    and conservation in bioengineering species: the case oftives for these key bioengineering species. Keywords Mytilusto identify mytilid bioengineering species (i.e. , those

  20. Landscape corridors can increase invasion by an exotic species and reduce diversity of native species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resasco, Julian; et al,

    2014-04-01

    Abstract. Landscape corridors are commonly used to mitigate negative effects of habitat fragmentation, but concerns persist that they may facilitate the spread of invasive species. In a replicated landscape experiment of open habitat, we measured effects of corridors on the invasive fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, and native ants. Fire ants have two social forms: polygyne, which tend to disperse poorly but establish at high densities, and monogyne, which disperse widely but establish at lower densities. In landscapes dominated by polygyne fire ants, fire ant abundance was higher and native ant diversity was lower in habitat patches connected by corridors than in unconnected patches. Conversely, in landscapes dominated by monogyne fire ants, connectivity had no influence on fire ant abundance and native ant diversity. Polygyne fire ants dominated recently created landscapes, suggesting that these corridor effects may be transient. Our results suggest that corridors can facilitate invasion and they highlight the importance of considering species’ traits when assessing corridor utility.

  1. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn

    2006-07-01

    The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

  2. Mixed species radioiodine air sampling readout and dose assessment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Distenfeld, Carl H. (Mattituck, NY); Klemish, Jr., Joseph R. (Bohemia, NY)

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a simple, reliable, inexpensive and portable means and method for determining the thyroid dose rate of mixed airborne species of solid and gaseous radioiodine without requiring highly skilled personnel, such as health physicists or electronics technicians. To this end, this invention provides a means and method for sampling a gas from a source of a mixed species of solid and gaseous radioiodine for collection of the mixed species and readout and assessment of the emissions therefrom by cylindrically, concentrically and annularly molding the respective species around a cylindrical passage for receiving a conventional probe-type Geiger-Mueller radiation detector.

  3. Title 50 CFR 402 Interagency Cooperation - Endangered Species...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 50 CFR 402 Interagency Cooperation - Endangered Species Act of 1973, as...

  4. Data Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilches, Erika; Escobar, Ivan A.; Vallejo, E E; Taylor, C E

    2006-01-01

    11] Witten, I. ; Frank, E. ; Data Mining: Practical MachineData Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognitionthe application of data mining techniques to the problem of

  5. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  6. Data Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilches, Erika; Escobar, Ivan A.; Vallejo, E E; Taylor, C E

    2006-01-01

    I. ; Frank, E. ; Data Mining: Practical Machine LearningData Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognitionthe application of data mining techniques to the problem of

  7. FERC Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species - A Guide for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FERC Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species - A Guide for Applicants, Contractors, and Staff Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  8. Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species A Guide for Applicants...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species A Guide for Applicants, Contractors, and Staff Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Hydropower...

  9. Effects of ethanol and reactive species on Hepatitis C virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seronello, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    the mutation rate of hepatitis C virus RNA. Manuscript inreactive oxygen species during hepatitis C virus infection.2010) Ethanol enhances hepatitis C virus replication through

  10. Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant...

  11. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing found in similar shallow-water habitats in southernNewHampshire(JenkinsandBabbitt2003). The spotted, and a Species of Special concern in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Because their habitat overlaps

  12. A new species of Liphanthus from Peru (Hymenoptera: Andrenidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Victor H.; Rasmussen, Claus; Engel, Michael S.

    2014-04-10

    . Liphanthus Reed, 1894 (Hymenoptera, Andrenidae, Protandrenini): Two new Argentine species and keys to the species of the subgenera Liphanthus s.str. and Melaliphan- thus Ruz & Toro, 1983. Zootaxa 1854: 55?62. ZooBank: urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:BFB4BEEF-3F91...

  13. Protogynous species require special management considerations when fish-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    232 Protogynous species require special management considerations when fish- ing reduces). However, pro- togyny does not automatically imply elevated vulnerability to fishing if the population, to predict stock dynam- ics and a species' response to fishing pressure, it is important not only

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Co-habiting amphibian species harbor unique skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Valerie

    ; microbiome Introduction All species of plants and animals harbor assem- blages of microbes the microbiomes of different species of animals, and fewer still have examined animals in the wild. We sampled: microbe­microbe and microbe­host interactions Keywords: amphibian; skin; bacteria; host specific

  15. A New Species of Cryptotriton (Caudata: Plethodontidae) from Eastern Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wake, David B.

    A New Species of Cryptotriton (Caudata: Plethodontidae) from Eastern Guatemala Carlos R. Va (Plethodontidae) is described from the mountains of eastern Guatemala. The new species is distinguished from all~as del este de Guatemala. Cryptotriton sierraminensis se distingue de todos los otros miembros de su ge

  16. The unholy trinity: taxonomy, species delimitation and DNA barcoding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    The unholy trinity: taxonomy, species delimitation and DNA barcoding Rob DeSalle*, Mary G. Egan are clarified and resolved, before the use of DNA as a tool for taxonomy and species delimitation can framework for interweaving classical taxonomy with the goals of `DNA barcoding'. Keywords: DNA barcoding

  17. Two new Phytophthora species from South African Eucalyptus plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Two new Phytophthora species from South African Eucalyptus plantations Bongani MASEKOa, *, Treena I the cause of collar and root rot disease outbreaks of cold tolerant Eucalyptus species in South Africa and has a slower growth rate in culture. Both P. frigida and P. alti- cola are pathogenic to Eucalyptus

  18. Soil Conservation Service Tests of Eucalyptus Species for Windbreaks1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Conservation Service Tests of Eucalyptus Species for Windbreaks1 Gary L. Young2 The Soil in the southwest. We are looking for widely adapted cultivars of several Eucalyptus species for use 1 Presented at the Workshop on Eucalyptus in California, June 14-16, 1983, Sacramento

  19. Two new species of Leptolalax (Anura: Megophryidae) from northern Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Bob

    Two new species of Leptolalax (Anura: Megophryidae) from northern Vietnam Amy ~ a t h r o and Biological Resources, Nghia Do, Tu Liem, Hanoi, Vietnam Abstract. Two new species of Leptolalnx are described from two mountain ranges in northern Vietnam (Song Gam and Tain Dao) that are less than 150 km apart

  20. Proceedings of the Subcontractors' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

  1. Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    in nitrification, denitrification and trace nitrogen gas losses. Plant species also impact herbivore behaviourREVIEW Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling J. M. H. Knops,1 * K. L. Bradley1 and D. A. Wedin2 1 School of Biological Sciences, 2 School of Natural Resource Sciences

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER A new, disjunct species of Speleonectes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    , and it is now protected as an endemic species of the Canary Islands. First indications of the presence, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain Mar Biodiv (2009) 39:215­225 DOI 10.1007/s12526-009-0021-8 #12;columnORIGINAL PAPER A new, disjunct species of Speleonectes (Remipedia, Crustacea) from the Canary

  3. NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorken, Marcel

    NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of Echium endemic to the Canary Islands Marcel E. Dorken Abstract: Species of Echium from the Canary Islands represent an adaptive radiation fertility of females and hermaphrodites were de- tected. Key words: Canary Islands, Echium, island radiation

  4. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S.; Amendt, P.; Divol, L.; Kugland, N. L.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Rozmus, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  5. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, J S; Park, H S; Amendt, A; Divol, L; Kugland, N L; Rozmus, W; Glenzer, S H

    2012-05-01

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  6. Measurement of Species Distributions in Operating Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partridge Jr, William P; Toops, Todd J; Parks, II, James E; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2004-10-01

    Measurement and understanding of transient species distributions across and within fuel cells is a critical need for advancing fuel cell technology. The Spatially Resolved Capillary Inlet Mass Spectrometer (SpaciMS) instrument has been applied for in-situ measurement of transient species distributions within operating reactors; including diesel catalyst, air-exhaust mixing systems, and non-thermal plasma reactors. The work described here demonstrates the applicability of this tool to proton exchange membrane (PEM) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) research. Specifically, we have demonstrated SpaciMS measurements of (1) transient species dynamics across a PEM fuel cell (FC) associated with load switching, (2) intra-PEM species distributions, and transient species dynamics at SOFC temperatures associated with FC load switching.

  7. Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

  8. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic probe for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe's distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device.

  9. Migratory Birds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as: Installation of power poles and transmission lines Construction projects Invasive weed species eradication Waste treatment that utilizes retention and evaporation...

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species Driven Angiogenesis by Inorganic Nanorods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    The exact mechanism of angiogenesis by europium hydroxide nanorods was unclear. In this study we have showed that formation of reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2·?) is involved in redox signaling pathways during angiogenesis, ...

  11. Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

  12. Negative magnetophoresis of submicron species in magnetic nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Lino A. (Lino Alberto), 1976-

    2009-01-01

    In this work we studied the focusing and trapping of submicron, nonmagnetic species immersed in a magnetic nanofluid under applied magnetic fields. Focusing was achieved using two pairs of permanent magnets, which forced ...

  13. An Evolutionary Algorithm for the Selection of Geographically Informative Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashlock, Dan

    the correlation of the geographic distances between ponds with the Hamming distances between ponds computed from zooplankton in 1604 Canadian ponds. A species is geographically informative if its presence or absence on Canadian ponds cover

  14. Conservation Genetics of Five Species of Dionda in West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Ashley

    2012-02-14

    Minnows of the genus Dionda (Cyprinidae, Teleostei) inhabit spring-fed streams in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Five nominal species of Dionda (D. argentosa, D. diaboli, D. episcopa, D. nigrotaeniata and D. ...

  15. MICROBIOLOGY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS Species Composition of Bacterial Communities Influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Mosquitoes to Experimental Plant Infusions Loganathan Ponnusamy & Dawn M. Wesson & Consuelo Arellano & Coby use oviposition traps containing plant infusions for monitoring populations of these mosquito species significantly diminished responses to experimental infusions made with sterilized white oak leaves, showing

  16. Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Friday, December 20, 2013 Fuel Cell Figure 1 Figure 1. In situ x-ray...

  17. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing roost sites, each within rock crevices in outcrops near the base of the Surry Mountain Lake dam

  18. Ecological risk assessment and the Endangered Species Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, S.G.; Abood, K.A. [Lawler, Matusky and Skelly Engineers, Pearl River, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The presence of a threatened or endangered species (TES) at a CERCLA site requires that applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) to protect the species and its habitat be included in the remedial investigation/feasibility study process. In such cases there is a propensity to use the species as an endpoint in the ecological assessment of the site. This approach ensures the inclusion of the TES-related ARAR and provides for cost efficiency, but may not result in a thorough assessment of risks associated with remedial alternatives, especially if the TES is a state-listed rather than a federal species. This paper explores the importance of identifying ARARs related to TES, and the values and limitations of using TES as endpoints. In doing so it explores the technical vs emotional basis for TES-based risk assessments.

  19. Ecological niche structure determines rangewide abundance patterns of species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Dí az-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A. Townsend; Yá ñ ez-Arenas, Carlos

    2012-09-03

    Spatial abundance patterns across species’ ranges have seen intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographic distance from the range center (‘abundant-center ...

  20. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  1. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    1999-11-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  2. Grain Accumulation of Selenium Species in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Lombi, Enzo; Newville, Matt; Choi, Yongseong; Norton, Gareth J.; Price, Adam H.; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2012-09-05

    Efficient Se biofortification programs require a thorough understanding of the accumulation and distribution of Se species within the rice grain. Therefore, the translocation of Se species to the filling grain and their spatial unloading were investigated. Se species were supplied via cut flag leaves of intact plants and excised panicle stems subjected to a {+-} stem-girdling treatment during grain fill. Total Se concentrations in the flag leaves and grain were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Spatial accumulation was investigated using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microtomography. Selenomethionine (SeMet) and selenomethylcysteine (SeMeSeCys) were transported to the grain more efficiently than selenite and selenate. SeMet and SeMeSeCys were translocated exclusively via the phloem, while inorganic Se was transported via both the phloem and xylem. For SeMet- and SeMeSeCys-fed grain, Se dispersed throughout the external grain layers and into the endosperm and, for SeMeSeCys, into the embryo. Selenite was retained at the point of grain entry. These results demonstrate that the organic Se species SeMet and SeMeSeCys are rapidly loaded into the phloem and transported to the grain far more efficiently than inorganic species. Organic Se species are distributed more readily, and extensively, throughout the grain than selenite.

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER A review of the alien and expansive species of freshwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER A review of the alien and expansive species of freshwater cyanobacteria and algae their impact on local species and other real or potential risks resulting from their spread. The list of alien Alien species Á Invasive species Á Expansive species Á Cyanobacteria Á Algae Á Freshwater Á Czech

  4. New species of the Eastern Hemisphere genera Afroheriades and Noteriades (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae), with keys to species of the former

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griswold, Terry; Gonzalez, Victor H.

    2011-11-23

    New species of the rarely encountered megachilid genera Afroheriades Peters from South Africa, Afroheriades hyalinus sp. n., and Noteriades Cockerell from Myanmar and Thailand, Noteriades jenniferae sp. n. and Noteriades spinosus sp. n...

  5. Monitoring Sensitive Bat Species at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenberg, Kari M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Bats play a critical role in ecosystems and are vulnerable to disturbance and disruption by human activities. In recent decades, bat populations in the United States and elsewhere have decreased tremendously. There are 47 different species of bat in the United States and 28 of these occur in New Mexico with 15 different species documented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and surrounding areas. Euderma maculatum(the spotted bat) is listed as “threatened” by the state of New Mexico and is known to occur at LANL. Four other species of bats are listed as “sensitive” and also occur here. In 1995, a four year study was initiated at LANL to assess the status of bat species of concern, elucidate distribution and relative abundance, and obtain information on roosting sites. There have been no definitive studies since then. Biologists in the Environmental Protection Division at LANL initiated a multi-year monitoring program for bats in May 2013 to implement the Biological Resources Management Plan. The objective of this ongoing study is to monitor bat species diversity and seasonal activity over time at LANL. Bat species diversity and seasonal activity were measured using an acoustic bat detector, the Pettersson D500X. This ultrasound recording unit is intended for long-term, unattended recording of bat and other high frequency animal calls. During 2013, the detector was deployed at two locations around LANL. Study sites were selected based on proximity to water where bats may be foraging. Recorded bat calls were analyzed using Sonobat, software that can help determine specific species of bat through their calls. A list of bat species at the two sites was developed and compared to lists from previous studies. Species diversity and seasonal activity, measured as the number of call sequences recorded each month, were compared between sites and among months. A total of 17,923 bat calls were recorded representing 15 species. Results indicate that there is a statistically significant relationship between bat diversity and month of the year. Future studies will be implemented based on these findings.

  6. A revision of the Larainae (Coleoptera, Elmidae) of Venezuela, with description of nine new species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Crystal A.

    2013-09-05

    The species of the riffle beetle subfamily Larainae occurring in Venezuela are revised. Examination of 756 specimens yielded 22 species in nine genera occurring throughout the country. Seven species are newly recorded from the country: Phanoceroides...

  7. Environmental granularity, rivers and climate history as shaping factors for species' distribution and diversity patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakazawa Ueji, Yoshinori Jorge

    2009-08-31

    Species distributions are composed by those places in which the environmental conditions are suitable for the species to survive and maintain populations; where the interactions with other species are adequate; that have ...

  8. Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation across heterogeneous landscapes. Using data from the Willamette Basin, Oregon, we compare the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation under

  9. Stachys sp? (Weed in cultivated area) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David C. Reed

    2011-08-10

    Under cost-shared funding with the U.S. Department of Energy and the Gas Research Institute, AiResearch Manufacturing Company, Torrance, California has developed a ceramic/metallic hybrid recuperator to operate in dirty ...

  10. Suggestions for Weed Control in Corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.

    2002-02-19

    in seedling dock AA tr ex N i ne-O ? 0.9 to 1.1 lbs. on winter fallo w ed lands. the spring. N o rmal w eed contr ol pr ograms will be (atrazine) necessar y at cr op planting time. (R efer to label for specific S yngenta and others w eeds contr olled.) N umer... factant or cr op oil concentrate at 1.0% v/v . S yngenta cr op oil concentrate N o te: G r amo x one E xtra or M a x ? may be combined with atrazine or B ladex ? for r esidual contr ol Annual br oadleaf and grass w e eds R oundup U ltra ? 0.5 to 1.5 qts...

  11. DEPARTMENTS INVOLVED WITH WEED RESEARCH AND EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    for Producers, Bill Dyer Identifying and Testing Candidate Agents for Russian Olive Biocontrol, David Weaver Mosley Continental Divide Barrier Zone, Kim Goodwin Determining the Efficacy of Biocontrol Using and Monitoring Insectaries for Yellow Toadflax Biocontrol, David Weaver Herbicide Resistance Extension Info

  12. Suggestions for Weed Control in Peanuts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.; Lemon, Robert G.

    2001-05-10

    ation to pre v ent spreading w eed seed , rhizomes or roots . This is particularly important with perennial w eeds because of the w a y in which the y propagate (b y seed and root tissue). Ho w e v e r , also e x ercise caution when plo wing perennial... or at least reducing the potential for contin- ued infestation. 5. Consider the economics of using mechanical cultiv ation alone for w eed control in the crop, especially where annual w eed infestations are light. 6. Practice rotation to crops that ph ysically...

  13. Implantation, flux and recoil distributions for plasma species impinging on tokamak divertor materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshman, Nathan David

    2009-01-01

    Plasma Species Impinging on Tokamak Divertor Materials. APlasma Species Impinging on Tokamak Divertor Materials. byquantities needed to couple tokamak edge plasma to coolant

  14. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chivian, Dylan

    2008-01-01

    Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

  15. Life cycle studies of the red tide dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brosnahan, Michael L. (Michael Lewis)

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of toxic species within the algal dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense may cause Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning, a significant and growing environmental threat worldwide. However, blooms of closely ...

  16. Multiple prey traits, multiple predators: keys to understanding complex species interactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Randall Brian

    2002-01-01

    Species interactions generate both natural selection and ecological community structure. Among the more interesting species interactions are those that create adaptive tradeoffs-where phenotypes conferring improved ...

  17. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-12-10

    A fiber optic probe is described for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe`s distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device. 5 figs.

  18. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950[degree]C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800[degree] to 950[degree]C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na[sub 2]O, NaCl, and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820[degree]. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 [mu]m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  19. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Silver-haired bats do not remain in New Hampshire during the winter (see Izor 1979 for discussion to their summer habitat in New Hampshire (or, more gener- ally, to northern states; Cryan and Veilleux in press

  20. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Special Concern Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1 was listed as Threatened in New Hampshire between 1980 and 1986, was on the American Birds Blue List through

  1. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184 Federal Listing: None State Listing 1989). Natu- ral vegetation commonly occurring in these New Hampshire sandy soils include white pine't occur in Vermont or Maine. New Hampshire's peripheral population of hognose snakes is state threatened

  2. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G4 State Rank: S2 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Breeding habitat for the rusty blackbird in New Hampshire

  3. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218 Federal Listing: None State Listing: None Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Authors: Kim A. Tuttle and M. N. Marchand, New Hampshire Fish and Game grass- lands, pine barrens, blueberry barrens, and grassy hilltops (Klemens 1993, New Hampshire Reptile

  4. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Jillian R. Kelly, New Hampshire Fish and Game Element 1). In the winter, spruce grouse feed entirely on short conifer needles (Nature- Serve 2005). New Hampshire natural

  5. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing, and Wisconsin (NatureServe 2004). New Hampshire and Maine represent the northernmost extent of the known to New Jersey are vulnerable to development. In New Hampshire, ringed boghaunter populations are limited

  6. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Eastern red bats inhabit New Hampshire during the summer. Individuals migrate to southern states in the fall and return to New Hampshire and other northern states in the spring (Cryan and Veilleux in press

  7. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing included peer-re- viewed literature, Breeding Bird Survey Database, New Hampshire's Breeding Bird Atlas, and expert consultation. 1.8 Extent and Quality of Data The annual breeding bird survey, New Hampshire

  8. Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    of continuous values, and are more often used for predict- ing species distributions (Guisan & Zim- mermann regions. The structural complexity of vegetation and the relative proportion of cover in the understorey scattering data, both of which provide a much greater range of continuous data values than vegetation

  9. Vineyard snail Cernuella virgata Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Vineyard snail Cernuella virgata Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets Prepared by T. Noma, M. Colunga-Garcia, M. Brewer, J. Landis, and A. Gooch as a part of Michigan State common names Mediterranean snail, common white snail, maritime garden snail Systematic position Mollusca

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecological Differentiation of Cryptic Species within an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    indicated the existence of phyloge- netic signal in at least two phenotypic characters (production of hydro for macroscopic animals and plants because most small-sized protist species have global dispersal (Fenchel 2005; Fenchel and Finlay 2004). Accord- ing to this theory, the small size, extremely large popula- tions

  11. Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution Frank Le ke and Stephan Merz Institut fur of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi- cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

  12. parczoologiquedeparis.fr --1 --A new species of zoo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN THE WORLD TO HAVE BEEN ENTIRELY REBUILT A MOSAIC OF DIFFERENT LANDSCAPES, STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN NATURE of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy. The Museum manages two other animal parks: the Ménagerie (zoo AROUND THE WORLD 180 DIFFERENT SPECIES ANIMAL WELFARE CUSTOM-MADE STRUCTURES P24 THE TOUR FROM PATAGONIA

  13. Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA182 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Roy P. E. Yanong (genus) of fish viruses in the family Iridoviridae (the iridoviruses). Megalocytiviruses cause systemic fishes in both cultured and wild stocks. In some disease outbreaks, 100% losses have oc- curred in under

  14. Novel Flaviviruses Detected in Different Species of Mosquitoes in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figuerola, Jordi

    by arthropods. The genus includes major human path- ogens such as Yellow fever virus (YFV), Dengue virus (DENVNovel Flaviviruses Detected in Different Species of Mosquitoes in Spain Ana Va´zquez,1 Mari the characterization of three novel flaviviruses isolated in Spain. Marisma Mosquito virus, a novel mosquito borne

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of dynamic taxonomy on rare species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of dynamic taxonomy on rare species and conservation listing: insights from nature of biotic taxonomies and how these changes alter perceptions of extinction risk and conservation that the activity of a new, fine-scale taxonomy may have an effect in the taxonomy structure producing a taxonomic

  16. A Review of Interactions Between Hawaii's Fisheries and Protected Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lose bait and catch to bottlenose dolphins, rough-toothed dol phins, and Hawaiian monk seals. Trollfish fisheries. 55(2),1993 gered species involved in fishery in teractions are the Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus turtles, seabirds, and monk seals take bait and are known to become hooked, and false killer whales may

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and for carbon sequestration (Jandl et al. 2007). Soil acidification and carbon sequestration are influ- encedORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen transformation patterns in forest carbon release under broadleaved forest floors may explain this difference. Spruce forest floor exhibited

  18. MOLECULAR ENTOMOLOGY Molecular Identification Key for Pest Species of Scirtothrips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    primers and determining the size of the products by using standard agarose gel electrophoresis, followed, Neohydatothrips, molecular identiÞcation key, exotic pests, nondestruc- tive DNA extraction The genus Scirtothrips, several species of Scirtothrips have (or have the potential to) spread from their natural habitats

  19. Cuticular Hydrocarbonsfor Species Determination of Tropical Termites1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    species from loca- tions in the Pacific Rim and several Caribbean islands. We recently reexam- ined for People of the Pacific, XVII Pacific Science Congress, May 27-28, 1991, Honolulu, Hawaii. 2SupervisoryResearch Entomologist and Biological Technician, respec- tively, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U

  20. Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flecker, Alex

    Chapter 17 m Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant? Alison G. Power about the effects of plant viruses despite their ubiquitous distribution in plants. Several recent studies have stressed the prevalence of viruses in natural plant populations (e.g., Power and Remold 1996

  1. Growth of 11 Introduced Tree Species on Selected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eucalyptus (ElIca1.l'PIU.1 microcorys) plantation grows in the Kalopa section of the Hamakua Forest Reserve Silk-oak 3 Norfolk-Island-Pine 4 Redwood 6 Loblolly Pine and Slash Pine 6 Eucalyptus Species 8!.), slash pine (Pinus elliO/lii Engelm.), loblolly pine (Pinus taeda 1..), tallowwood eucalyptus (Eucalyptus

  2. Phylogeography of the magpie-robin species complex (Aves: Turdidae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winker, Kevin

    ) reveals a Philippine species, an interesting isolating barrier and unusual dispersal patterns, and the Indian Ocean from Madagascar to the Greater Sunda and Philippine islands. Methods We sequenced 1695. saularis, making C. saularis polyphyletic. Malagasy and non- Philippine Asian populations form

  3. Application of Branching Models in the Study of Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    and their empirical growth rates. We then characterize the estimated spatial-temporal rate of spread of red banana services. Pimentel et al. (2005, 2007) estimates the financial impact of invasive species in the United States at over 120 billion dollars per year, and Colautti et al. (2006) estimates the cost of eleven

  4. Deer were among the species studied by biologists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    Deer were among the species studied by biologists CATEGORIES TV RADIO COMMUNICATE WHERE I LIVE Rural housing market in 'crisis' Scottish horse racing romps home Buy-out may cut it for Caithness Homepage >> | BBC Sport >> | BBC Weather >> | BBC World Service >> About BBC News | Help | Feedback | News

  5. Molecular Structure and Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Govind, Niranjan; Walter, Eric D.; Burton, Sarah D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Devaraj, Arun; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Karim, Ayman M.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-01-01

    Ability to predict the solubility and stability of lithium polysulfide is vital in realizing longer lasting lithium-sulfur batteries. Herein we report a combined computational and experimental spectroscopic analysis to understand the dissolution mechanism of lithium polysulfide species in an aprotic solvent medium. Multinuclear NMR and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) analysis reveals that the lithium exchange between polysulfide species and solvent molecule constitutes the first step in the dissolution process. Lithium exchange leads to de-lithiated polysulfide ions which subsequently forms highly reactive free radicals through disproportion reaction. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility.

  6. Transposons Currently in Use in Genetic Analysis of Salmonella Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, John R.

    Transposons Currently in Use in Genetic Analysis of Salmonella Species ELLIOT ALTMAN, JOHN R. ROTH in genetic analysis, with emphasis on work done in Salmonella typhimurium (official designation, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium) and on the methods available for use in Salmonella spp. Many of these methods

  7. RARE SPECIES CONSERVATORY FOUNDATION, INC. EIN: 65-0560456

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    platform to facilitate global management of the species and in situ conservation investment in Brazil, along with field-based research, habitat protection and local capacity building, are directed toward-brows to the Brazilian government in recognition of Brazil's governing authority and progressive conservation and law

  8. performance. An absence of entrainment in such species would

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, Chip

    performance. An absence of entrainment in such species would raise the question of what else is required for entrainment. One possibility is the propensity to engage in joint social action. A recent study of entrainment in human children [11] showed that young children find it difficult to entrain

  9. ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: SECTION 7 CONSULTATION BIOLOGICAL OPINION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the following information sources: · Request by BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BPXA) for a LOA (USFWS), depending upon the protected species that may be affected. Formal consultations on most listed Division (NMFS PRl) requested formal consultation on regulations and subsequent Letter ofAuthorization (LOA

  10. Does GM wheat affect saprophagous Diptera species (Drosophilidae, Phoridae)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Does GM wheat affect saprophagous Diptera species (Drosophilidae, Phoridae)? Marco Peter, Andreas Antifungal resistance Powdery mildew Pleiotropic effect S u m m a r y Genetically modified (GM) plants might. Therefore, an ecological risk assessment for GM plants also has to include decomposers. In a laboratory diet

  11. RESEARCH ARTICLE Cichlid species diversity in naturally and anthropogenically turbid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Nile perch introduction, and decreases in water transparency and dissolved oxygen concentrations due-collapse period, spawning occurred year-round in shallow areas with hard substrates and relatively clear water differentiation in feeding techniques as well as year-round spawning, and both may facilitate species coexistence

  12. Phylogeny of the pollinating yucca moths, with revision of Mexican species (Tegeticula and Parategeticula;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segraves, Kari A.

    reported four species of pollinators (Riley, 1892; Davis, 1967; Frack, 1982; Powell, 1984), including three

  13. Favorable Climate Change Response Explains Non-Native Species' Success in Thoreau's Woods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Charles

    Favorable Climate Change Response Explains Non-Native Species' Success in Thoreau's Woods Charles G Invasive species have tremendous detrimental ecological and economic impacts. Climate change may exacerbate species invasions across communities if non-native species are better able to respond to climate changes

  14. The Requirements for Collision Data on the Species Helium, Beryllium and Boron in Magnetic Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Requirements for Collision Data on the Species Helium, Beryllium and Boron in Magnetic Confinement Fusion

  15. The Allee effect, stochastic dynamics and the eradication of alien species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebhold, Andrew

    REPORT The Allee effect, stochastic dynamics and the eradication of alien species Andrew Liebhold1 biology of eradication have assumed that eradication can only be achieved via 100% removal of the alien of alien species. While most alien species have relatively few effects, many species have caused

  16. Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03

    The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

  17. Vascular Plants of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2001-09-28

    This report provides an updated listing of the vascular plants present on and near the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. This document is an update of a listing of plants prepared by Sackschewdky et al. in 1992. Since that time there has been a significant increase in the botanical knowledge of the Hanford Site. The present listing is based on an examination of herbarium collections held at PNNL, at WSU-Tri Cities, WSU-Pullman, Bringham Young University, and The University of Washington, and on examination of ecological literature derived from the Hanford and Benton county areas over the last 100 years. Based on the most recent analysis, there are approximately 725 different plant species that have been documented on or around the Hanford Site. This represents an approximate 20% increase in the number of species reported within Sackschewsky et al. (1992). This listing directly supports DOE and contractor efforts to assess the potential impacts of Hanford Site operations on the biological environment, including impacts to rare habitats and to species listed as endangered or\\ threatened. This document includes a listing of plants currently listed as endangered, threatened, or otherwise of concern to the Washington Natural Heritage Program or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as well as those that are currently listed as noxious weeds by the State of Washington. Also provided is an overview of how plants on the Hanford Site can be used by people. This information may be useful in developing risk assessment models, and as supporting information for clean-up level and remediation decisions.

  18. Surface species produced in the radiolysis of zirconia nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrasco-Flores, Eduardo A.; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2007-12-21

    Modifications to water-zirconia nanoparticle interfaces induced by {gamma} irradiation have been examined using diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT), Raman scattering, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Spectroscopy with in situ heating was used to probe variations in the dissociatively bound chemisorbed water on the zirconia nanoparticles following evaporation of the physisorbed water. DRIFT spectra show that the bridged Zr-OH-Zr species decreases relative to the terminal Zr-OH species upon irradiation. No variation is observed with Raman scattering, indicating that the zirconia morphology is unchanged. EPR measurements suggest the possible formation of the superoxide ion, presumably by modification of the surface OH groups. Trapped electrons and interstitial H atoms are also observed by EPR.

  19. Aquatic Species Program review: proceedings of principal investigators meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of the Aquatic Species Program is to improve the productivity, conversion to fuels, and cost efficiency of aquatic plant culture technologies. The emphasis of the program is on developing a mass culture technology for cultivating oil-yielding microalgae in the American southwest. A technical and economic analysis indicated that such a concept would be feasible if (1) lipid yields from microalgae are improved, (2) there is sufficient saline water for large-scale development, and (3) microalgal lipids can be economically converted to conventional fuels. It was determined that fuels from microalgal lipids presented better options than converting the microalgal biomass to either alcohols or methane. All lipids can potentially be catalytically converted to gasoline, or the fatty acids can be converted to substitute diesel fuels. The Southwest has the necessary low, flat, underutilized lands, and carbon dioxide is available from either natural deposits or flue gas from industrial plants. The amount of saline water available will probably determine how much fuel can be produced from aquatic species, and this question should be answered during 1985. The largest constraint of this technology is the economical production of an oil-rich microalgal feedstock. The agenda for the review was divided into four sections: species selection and characterization, applied physiological studies, outdoor mass cultivation, and systems design and analysis. Papers from these presentations are included in these proceedings. Program advances were reported in the areas of species collection and selection, modulated light physiology, mass culture yields, harvesting of microalgae, mass culture facility design and analysis, and assessments on fuel options from microalgae. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  20. An alternative to climate change for explaining species loss in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Charles

    : J.M., S.C., R.D., and W.W. wrote the paper. The authors declare no conflict of interest. 1To whom.'s (1) 2003­2007 floral surveys, deer densities were likely between 5.7 and 9.6 km 1 , with locally). Many of the plant species groups listed as most reduced in their surveys (dogwoods, lillies, many or

  1. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  2. A new species of Chilicola from Bahia, Brazil (Hymenoptera, Colletidae), with a key to the species of the megalostigma group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Favizia; Mahlmann, Thiago; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-12-09

    ) C. longiceps (Ashmead, 1900) ?? Mexico: Jalisco; St. Vincent C. huberi (Ducke, 1908) ? Brazil: Ceará C. aequatoriensis Benoist, 1942 ?? Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela C. mexicana Toro & Michener, 1975 ?? Mexico: México, Hidalgo, Morelos C.... In addition, we provide an expanded and updated identification key to species for the megalostigma group. Material and methods Morphological terminology used herein is adapted from Engel (2001) and Michener (2007), while the format for the description...

  3. Characterization of GSTA3 Gene Products in Multiple Species and Demonstration of their Conservation in Divergent Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peer, Shawna Marie

    2015-05-12

    of all species investigated including those used as reference ……………………………………….. 51 7 Double stranded DNA sequences of the putative amplicons of GSTA1 and GSTA3 with primer binding sites for primers used... in qRT-PCR highlighted to demonstrate the primers’ specificity for GSTA3 ……………………….. 56 !ix LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Critical amino acids (AA) for 3-ketosteroid isomerase activity of GSTA3....... 13 2 PCR primer...

  4. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-07

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N{sup 3} ? N{sup 4}, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  5. Theory of electromagnetic fluctuations for magnetized multi-species plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro, Roberto E. Muñoz, Víctor; Araneda, Jaime; Moya, Pablo S.; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, Juan A.

    2014-09-15

    Analysis of electromagnetic fluctuations in plasma provides relevant information about the plasma state and its macroscopic properties. In particular, the solar wind persistently sustains a small but detectable level of magnetic fluctuation power even near thermal equilibrium. These fluctuations may be related to spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations arising from the discreteness of charged particles. Here, we derive general expressions for the plasma fluctuations in a multi-species plasma following arbitrary distribution functions. This formalism, which generalizes and includes previous works on the subject, is then applied to the generation of electromagnetic fluctuations propagating along a background magnetic field in a plasma of two proton populations described by drifting bi-Maxwellians.

  6. Species composition and distribution of the macrozooplankton in Postoak Lake 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Douglas Edward

    1977-01-01

    . (t) indicates presence of organism in samples. Copepoda Cladocera Diptera e V ts m c e V V J V V e l V V m m V l c V V V c 0 I n c c v l W V V V e V I o 0 V l"I 51 ml al Ol al lcl Ol Hl ZI all O I Ol &I &I 23 April 9 Slay...) ember) August 1977 ABSTRACT Species Composition and Distribut ion of the Macrozooplankton in Postoak Lake. (August 1977). Douglas E. Welch, B. S. , University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point Chairman of Advisory Cormpfittee: Dr. Richard Noble A...

  7. 31 TAC 65.175 - Threatened Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie,InformationSpecies | Open Energy31 TAC 65.175

  8. 31 TAC 65.176 - Endangered Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie,InformationSpecies | Open Energy31 TAC

  9. Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosys- tems- mon species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plu- mosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum

  10. Species Diversity and Distribution in Presence?Absence Matrices: Mathematical Relationships and Biological Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arita, Hé ctor T.; Christen, J. André s; Rodrí guez, Pilar; Soberó n, Jorge

    2008-10-01

    mathematical and biological relationships. We develop a theory and analyze data for North American mammals to interpret range?diversity plots in which the species diversity of sites and the geographic range of species can be depicted simultaneously. We show...

  11. Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species diversity in southern Rocky Mountain headwater streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species diversity in southern Rocky Mountain headwater and Conditions #12;MOLECULAR APPROACHES IN FRESHWATER ECOLOGY Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species: diversity, elevation, DNA barcoding, taxonomy, aquatic insect, EPT, southern Rocky Mountain Elevation

  12. Land use, food production, and the future of tropical forest species in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Benjamin Timothy

    2010-07-06

    in low-yielding farming systems, but there was considerable turnover between these systems and forests, with widespread generalists replacing narrowly endemic forest-dependent species. Species most dependent on forest as a natural habitat, those...

  13. Willow species (genus: Salix) with contrasting habitat affinities differ in their photoprotective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Willow species (genus: Salix) with contrasting habitat affinities differ in their photoprotective, we investigated the response of six willow (Salix) species to a short- term drought. In a greenhouse

  14. Taxonomy is important in conservation: a preliminary reassessment of Philippine species-level bird taxonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2006-01-01

    careful analysis. In this paper, I develop a first-pass assessment of Philippine bird taxonomy under an alternative species concept, and compare the results with the traditional biological species concept lists. Differences between the two lists were...

  15. Evolutionary implications of microsatellite variation in the Peromyscus maniculatus species group 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chirhart, Scott Edward

    2004-11-15

    Given the distribution and probable evolutionary history of the Peromyscus maniculatus species group, an interspecific comparison of microsatellite variation among these species would be logically based (at least initially) on primers isolated from...

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Spatial spread of an alien tree species in a heterogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petite, Samuel

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Spatial spread of an alien tree species in a heterogeneous forest landscape the observed invasion patterns of an alien tree species, Prunus serotina Ehrh., in a heterogeneous managed

  17. Observer error in identifying species using indirect signs: analysis of a river otter track survey technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jonah Wy

    2007-09-17

    Indirect signs of species presence (e.g., tracks, scats, hairs) are frequently used to detect target species in occupancy, presence/absence, and other wildlife studies. Indirect signs are often more efficient than direct ...

  18. Road traffic noise modifies behaviour of a keystone species Graeme Shannon a, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angeloni, Lisa

    Road traffic noise modifies behaviour of a keystone species Graeme Shannon a, * , Lisa M. Angeloni the influence of traffic noise on foraging and vigilance in a keystone species in North American prairie systems

  19. Abundance, diversity, and resource use in an assemblage of Conus species in Enewetak lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, A.J.

    1980-10-01

    Eight species of the gastropod genus Conus co-occur in sand substrate and an adjacent meadow of Halimeda stuposa in Enewetak lagoon, an unusually diverse assemblage for this type of habitat. Population density is high, and large species predominate; they represent all major feeding groups in the genus: predators on polychaetes, enteropneusts, gastropods, and fishes. Although the two most common Conus species eat primarily the same prey species, they mainly take prey of different sizes in different microhabitats. The results suggest that sufficient microhabitat heterogeneity and prey diversity exist to permit spatial segregation and specialization on different prey resources by the different Conus species present. Between-species dissimilarity in resource use thus agrees with previous observations on more diverse Conus assemblages of subtidal coral reef platforms. Prey species diversity is inversely related to body size, confirming and extending a previously identified pattern among Conus species that prey on sedentary polychaetes.

  20. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ? A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(1–40) fibril formation. ? At high A?(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  1. Mycological Society of America A Gene Genealogical Approach to Recognize Phylogenetic Species Boundaries in the Lichenized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Mycological Society of America A Gene Genealogical Approach to Recognize Phylogenetic Species-8897 A gene genealogical approach to recognize phylogenetic species boundaries in the lichenized fungus, was investigated as a model system in which to recognize species boundaries. Gene genealogies of 6 and 12 loci were

  2. Mycological Society of America Identification of Armillaria Species from New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Thomas C.

    Mycological Society of America Identification of Armillaria Species from New Hampshire Author(s): T-5126 BRIEF ARTICLE IDENTIFICATION OF ARMILLARIA SPECIES FROM NEW HAMPSHIRE T. C. Harrington Department? ton, 1993). We have identified six species of Ar? millaria in New Hampshire. Herein we record

  3. 11Skewed Distribution of Species Number in Grass Genera: Is It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilu, Khidir

    165 11Skewed Distribution of Species Number in Grass Genera: Is It a Taxonomic Artefact? K. W. Hilu .................................................................................................................................... 176 ABSTRACT The grass family (Poaceae) comprises about 10,000 species distributed in some 785 genera, seven large subfamilies and a few small ones. The distribution of species in genera appears skewed

  4. The blue shark (Prionace glauca) is an oceanic species that occurs in tem-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    720 The blue shark (Prionace glauca) is an oceanic species that occurs in tem- perate and tropical); numerically, the blue shark is the top nontarget species captured by the U.S. longline pelagic Atlantic fleet) on the catch rate of several target and bycatch species, including the blue shark. However, they did

  5. Reliable DNA Barcoding Performance Proved for Species and Island Populations of Comoran Squamate Reptiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a DNA barcoding study of squamates of the Comoros archipelago, a poorly studied group of oceanic islands of the 29 currently recognized squamate species of the Comoros, including 17 of the 18 endemic species. Some species considered endemic to the Comoros according to current taxonomy were found to cluster with non

  6. A NEW SPECIES OF RHABDIAS (NEMATODA: RHABDIASIDAE) FROM AGAMID LIZARDS ON LUZON ISLAND, PHILIPPINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    A NEW SPECIES OF RHABDIAS (NEMATODA: RHABDIASIDAE) FROM AGAMID LIZARDS ON LUZON ISLAND, PHILIPPINES. is described on the basis of specimens found in the lungs of 2 species of agamid lizards: the Philippine flying in Aurora Province, Luzon Island, Philippines. The new species of Rhabdias is characterized by presence of 4

  7. Modelling butterfly species richness using mesoscale environmental variables: model construction and validation for mountain ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the central Great Basin of western North America. Species inventory data and values for 14 environmental variation in species richness, we generated and tested predictions of species richness for `new' locations comprehensive field inventories. However, inventory data for many regions are sparse, and logistics and funding

  8. ESPM 131 Using microbes to understand effects S06 and drivers of species diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    ESPM 131 Using microbes to understand effects S06 and drivers of species diversity Microbial. Perceived disadvantages and counterpoints: too simple, too artificial microbes are fundamentally different;ESPM 131 Using microbes to understand effects S06 and drivers of species diversity Species richness

  9. vol. 171, no. 6 the american naturalist june 2008 Scale Dependence of Species-Energy Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Andrew

    on spatial turnover in the species com- position (beta diversity). Our results suggest that if energy richness, species-energy relationships, potential evapotranspiration, spatial scale, beta diversity, fishesvol. 171, no. 6 the american naturalist june 2008 Scale Dependence of Species-Energy Relationships

  10. Of the more than 110 species of Sebastes recognized worldwide, by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    preserved for over a century. Ranging around the rim of the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea, from Japan of species are found in the North Pacific Ocean, where about 100 species are currently considered valid (Kai of Alaska. In the western Pacific, Matsubara (1934) described two species similar to Sebastes aleutianus, S

  11. Pathogenicity of seven species of the Botryosphaeriaceae on Eucalyptus clones in Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pathogenicity of seven species of the Botryosphaeriaceae on Eucalyptus clones in Venezuela S. R. The Botryosphaeriaceae include several well recognised Eucalyptus pathogens of which various species have recently been found on Eucalyptus spp. in Venezuela. An initial inoculation trial was conducted using seven species

  12. Taxonomy and pathogenicity of Ceratocystis species on Eucalyptus trees in South China, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taxonomy and pathogenicity of Ceratocystis species on Eucalyptus trees in South China, including C Research Foundation 2012 Abstract Commercial plantations of Eucalyptus species have been established economy. As part of a survey of fungal diseases affecting Eucalyptus species in South China, Ceratocystis

  13. PROACTIVE ASSESSMENT OF IMPACTS TO USACE NAVIGATION FROM PROPOSED THREATENED AND ENDANGERED SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    or plant from the list of Endangered and Threatened wildlife and Plants. Distinct Population Segment (DPS that is proposed in the Federal Register to be listed under Section 4 of the Endangered Species Act. Plants to adversely affect listed species, proposed species, or designated critical habitat. Biological Opinion

  14. Functional differences between native and alien species: a global-scale comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Ian

    Functional differences between native and alien species: a global-scale comparison Alejandro, a synthetic view of multi-trait differences between alien and native species is not yet available. 2. We separately, co-occurring native and alien species significantly differed in their traits. These differences

  15. Alien species in fresh waters: ecological effects, interactions with other stressors, and prospects for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alien species in fresh waters: ecological effects, interactions with other stressors, and prospects dozens of alien species. 2. Invasions are highly nonrandom with respect to the taxonomic identity, which probably have been underestimated as an ecological force. 4. The number of alien species

  16. INVASIVE RODENTS ON ISLANDS Avoiding surprise effects on Surprise Island: alien species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courchamp, Franck

    INVASIVE RODENTS ON ISLANDS Avoiding surprise effects on Surprise Island: alien species control Abstract Eradications of invasive alien species have generally benefited biodiversity. However, without following the sudden removal of an invasive alien that was exerting an ecological force on those species

  17. REVIEWS AND SYNTHESIS TEASIng apart alien species risk assessments: a framework for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    REVIEWS AND SYNTHESIS TEASIng apart alien species risk assessments: a framework for best practices and Montserrat Vila`13 Abstract Some alien species cause substantial impacts, yet most are innocuous. Given limited resources, forecasting risks from alien species will help prioritise management. Given that risk

  18. 3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    changes in the extent and frequency of disturbance to an ecosystem #12;3) What makes a species invasive? i3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Many;3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Invasive

  19. Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Börger, Egon

    Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented Executable the steam boiler control speci cation problem to il- lustrate how the evolving algebra approach to the speci, in June 1995, to control the Karlsruhe steam boiler simulator satisfactorily. The abstract machines

  20. Revealing patterns of local species richness along environmental1 gradients with a novel network tool2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, Angel "Anxo"

    33 large scale patterns by including at the local community level information about species37 variance of the newly defined species richness, highlighting that, at the local scale, communities,8, while ambient energy becomes limiting in cold climates1.50 Analyses of species richness

  1. Food-Web Models Predict Species Abundances in Response to Habitat Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    sizes of food-web constituents than did simple keystone species models, models that included only-species demographic analyses [9] and assessments of extinction risk. Single-factor models also include keystone species effects, which emphasize responses of populations to changes in the abundance of a single keystone

  2. Introduction pathways and establishment rates of invasive aquatic species in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Introduction pathways and establishment rates of invasive aquatic species in Europe E. García invasion pathways within Europe. Of the 123 aquatic species introduced into six contrasting Euro- pean of a better establishment capability. The most frequently introduced aquatic species in Europe are freshwater

  3. Variability in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism: A Survey of North Carolina Succulent Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Craig E.; Lubbers, Anne E.; Teeri, James A.

    1982-01-01

    non- succulent species of genera previously reported to have CAM were sampled, e.g., Yucca and Tillandsia. Only species growing in the state of North Carolina (one study site wTas located in South Carolina near the North Carolina border) were... of these species were examined previously. Atriplex patula is a C 3 species (BJORKMAN 1973) . Although dark 1 4 C 0 2 up­ take was reported in Salicornia europaea, S. virginica, and Borrichia frutescens ( W E B B and BURLEY 1965) , TABLE 1 SPECIES, STUDY SITES...

  4. Electrokinetic removal of charged contaminant species from soil and other media using moderately conductive adsorptive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Mattson, Earl D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01

    Method for collecting and concentrating charged species, specifically, contaminant species in a medium, preferably soil. The method utilizes electrokinesis to drive contaminant species into and through a bed adjacent to a drive electrode. The bed comprises a moderately electrically conductive adsorbent material which is porous and is infused with water or other solvent capable of conducting electrical current. The bed material, preferably activated carbon, is easily removed and disposed of. Preferably, where activated carbon is used, after contaminant species are collected and concentrated, the mixture of activated carbon and contaminant species is removed and burned to form a stable and easily disposable waste product.

  5. A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Jurez, Oaxaca, Mexico 55 A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wake, David B.

    A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico 55 A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico Sean M de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, AP 70-153, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 04510

  6. Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loge, Gary W. (2998 Plaza Blanca, Santa Fe, NM 87505)

    1999-01-01

    Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a plasma containing the species after a sufficient time period has elapsed after the generation of the plasma and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample.

  7. Fragmentation, domain formation and atom number fluctuations of a two-species Boseâ??Einstein condensate in an optical lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Uttam; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2012-01-01

    Two-species atomic Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) exhibitof a two-species Bose–Einstein condensate in an opticalof a two-species Bose–Einstein condensate to an optical

  8. Clade Age and Diversification Rate Variation Explain Disparity in Species Richness among Water Scavenger Beetle (Hydrophilidae) Lineages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloom, Devin D.; Fiká ?ek, Martin; Short, Andrew E. Z.

    2014-06-02

    Explaining the disparity of species richness across the tree of life is one of the great challenges in evolutionary biology. Some lineages are exceptionally species rich, while others are relatively species poor. One ...

  9. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surdutovich, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well.

  10. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University] [Penn State University

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  11. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  12. Apparatus and method for polarizing polarizable nuclear species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hersman, F. William; Leuschner, Mark; Carberry, Jeannette

    2005-09-27

    The present invention is a polarizing process involving a number of steps. The first step requires moving a flowing mixture of gas, the gas at least containing a polarizable nuclear species and vapor of at least one alkali metal, with a transport velocity that is not negligible when compared with the natural velocity of diffusive transport. The second step is propagating laser light in a direction, preferably at least partially through a polarizing cell. The next step is directing the flowing gas along a direction generally opposite to the direction of laser light propagating. The next step is containing the flowing gas mixture in the polarizing cell. The final step is immersing the polarizing cell in a magnetic field. These steps can be initiated in any order, although the flowing gas, the propagating laser and the magnetic field immersion must be concurrently active for polarization to occur.

  13. Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loge, Gary W. (304 Cheryl Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1998-01-01

    Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a sample that is excited by incident laser radiation. Which generates a plasma therein after a sufficient time period has elapsed and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample such as nitrogen for gaseous air samples.

  14. Biodiesel from aquatic species. Project report: FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.M.; Sprague, S.; Jarvis, E.E.; Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Zeiler, K.G.

    1994-01-01

    Researchers in the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project focus on the use of microalgae as a feedstock for producing renewable, high-energy liquid fuels. The program`s basic premise is that microalgae, which have been called the most productive biochemical factories in the world, can produce up to 30 times more oil per unit of growth area than land plants. It is estimated that 150 to 400 barrels of oil per acre per year (0.06 to 0.16 million liters/hectar) could be produced with microalgal oil technology. Initial commercialization of this technology is envisioned for the desert Southwest because this area provides high solar radiation and offers flat land that has few competing uses (hence low land costs). Similarly, there are large saline aquifers with few competing uses in the region. This water source could provide a suitable, low-cost medium for the growth of many microalgae. The primary area of research during FY 1993 was the effort to genetically improve microalgae in order to control the timing and magnitude of lipid accumulation. Increased lipid content will have a direct effect on fuel price, and the control of lipid content is a major project goal. The paper describes progress on the following: culture collection; molecular biology of lipid biosynthesis; microalgal transformation; and environmental, safety, and health and quality assurance.

  15. Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.; Jarvis, E.; Dunahay, T.; Roessler, P.; Zeiler, K. ); Sprague, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The primary goal of the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project is to develop the technology for growing microalgae as a renewable biomass feedstock for the production of a diesel fuel substitute (biodiesel), thereby reducing the need for imported petroleum. Microalgae are of interest as a feedstock because of their high growth rates and tolerance to varying environmental conditions, and because the oils (lipids) they produce can be extracted and converted to substitute petroleum fuels such as biodiesel. Microalgae can be grown in arid and semi-arid regions with poor soil quality, and saline water from aquifers or the ocean can be used for growing microalgae. Biodiesel is an extremely attractive candidate to fulfill the need for a diesel fuel substitute. Biodiesel is a cleaner fuel than petroleum diesel; it is virtually free of sulfur, and emissions of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and particulates during combustion are significantly reduced in comparison to emissions from petroleum diesel. Biodiesel provides essentially the same energy content and power output as petroleum-based diesel fuel.

  16. Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D.

    2011-03-01

    Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

  17. Embedding potentials for excited states of embedded species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesolowski, Tomasz A.

    2014-05-14

    Frozen-Density-Embedding Theory (FDET) is a formalism to obtain the upper bound of the ground-state energy of the total system and the corresponding embedded wavefunction by means of Euler-Lagrange equations [T. A. Wesolowski, Phys. Rev. A 77(1), 012504 (2008)]. FDET provides the expression for the embedding potential as a functional of the electron density of the embedded species, electron density of the environment, and the field generated by other charges in the environment. Under certain conditions, FDET leads to the exact ground-state energy and density of the whole system. Following Perdew-Levy theorem on stationary states of the ground-state energy functional, the other-than-ground-state stationary states of the FDET energy functional correspond to excited states. In the present work, we analyze such use of other-than-ground-state embedded wavefunctions obtained in practical calculations, i.e., when the FDET embedding potential is approximated. Three computational approaches based on FDET, that assure self-consistent excitation energy and embedded wavefunction dealing with the issue of orthogonality of embedded wavefunctions for different states in a different manner, are proposed and discussed.

  18. Red Rice Research and Control. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, John B.; Baldwin, Ford L.; Bourgeois, W.J.; Cox, Clodis H.; Craigmiles, Julian P.; Dishman, William D.; Eastin, E. Ford; Helpert, Charles W.; Hill, Lewis C.; Huey, Bobby A.; Klosterboer, Arlen D.; Sonnier, Earl A.

    1980-01-01

    ...................................... 10 E. A. Sonnier RED RICE CONTROL IN ALTERNATE CROPS ................................ 16 F. L. Baldwin ..# RED RICE CONTROL ..................................................lg B. A. Huey and F. L. Baldwin RED RICE HERBICIDE SCREENING TESTS... - t o discuss the l a t e s t f indings and procedures f o r con t ro l l ing red r i c e . In accom- pl ishing t h i s we want two-way communication s o t h a t all present w i l l become current on t h i s most noxious weed of r i c e...

  19. EA-2008: Colorado River Storage Project Programmatic Operations and Maintenance Project; Coconino, Maricopa, Navajo, and Yavapai Counties (Arizona) and San Juan County (Utah)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of Western’s programmatic operations and management (O&M) process and an integrated vegetation management (IVM) program on the Colorado River Storage Project System. O&M activities would consist of aerial and ground patrols, regular and preventive maintenance, inspections and repairs, and road repair. The IVM program would remove vegetation to protect facilities from fire, control the spread of noxious weeds to protect environmental quality, establish and maintain stable, low-growing plant communities in the ROW, and activities for public and worker safety around transmission lines and other facilities.

  20. DOE/EA-2008: Colorado River Storage Project Programmatic Operations and Maintenance Project; Coconino, Maricopa, Navajo, and Yavapai Counties (Arizona) and San Juan County (Utah)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of Western’s programmatic operations and management (O&M) process and an integrated vegetation management (IVM) program on the Colorado River Storage Project System. O&M activities would consist of aerial and ground patrols, regular and preventive maintenance, inspections and repairs, and road repair. The IVM program would remove vegetation to protect facilities from fire, control the spread of noxious weeds to protect environmental quality, establish and maintain stable, low-growing plant communities in the ROW, and activities for public and worker safety around transmission lines and other facilities.

  1. Alfalfa. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, O. M. (Oscar Melville)

    1908-01-01

    . Noxious weeds are given i heavy t;ype. UUYLpA,, number. Kind, character, and number of for- eign seeds in one pound. BUCKHORN, or Ribgrass 2350; GREEN FOXTAIL 270; LAMB'S QUARTER 270; Red clover 90; DOCK 180: WILD. CARROT 275: DODDER 180: Crimson... Clover 90; Total 3700. BUCKHORN 2100; GREEN FOX- TAIL 275 : YELLOW FOXTAIL 100 ; MALLOW 350; WILD CARROT 275; CHICORY 275; SOW THISTLE 200; CATCHFLY ZOO; Rape 100; Cab- bage 100; SORREL 200; DODDER 90; CENTAURY 200; LAMB'S QUARTER 275; Total 4740...

  2. Genera of orders Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Hexacorallia), and their type species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fautin, Daphne G.; Zelenchuk, Taras; Raveendran, Dinesh

    2007-12-21

    relatively small taxon, containing 1426 nominal species, of which 1103 are currently considered valid (Fautin 2007). However, it is rich in genera, 425 having been made available. We determined the type species, if any, for all genera of the order..., there are no junior homonyms and one senior homonym; 13 are currently considered valid. The name Endocoelactis was proposed for an actiniarian genus by Carlgren (1897) but no species was attributed to the genus, so it is a nomen nudum (ICZN Article 12...

  3. Occurrence and distribution of special status plant species on the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C.; Cypher, B.L.; Holmstead, G.L.; Hammer, K.L.; Frost, N.

    1994-10-01

    Several special status plant species occur or potentially occur at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). Special status species are defined as those species that are either federally listed as endangered or threatened, or candidate taxa. Candidate species are classified as Category 1 or Category 2. Category 1 taxa are those species for which there is sufficient evidence to support listing, while Category 2 taxa are those species for which listing may possibly be appropriate, but for which sufficient data are lacking to warrant immediate listing. Determining the presence and distribution of these species on NPRC is necessary so that appropriate conservation or protection measures can be implemented. In the spring of 1988, a survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) was conducted to determine the occurrence of Hoover`s wooly-star (Eriastrum hooveri), Kern Mallow (Eremalche kemensis), San Joaquin wooly-threads (Lembertia congdonii), and California jewelflower (Caulanthus califonicus), all listed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as Category 2 species at that time. Of the four species, only Hoover`s wooly-star was found. It was concluded that Kern mallow and San Joaquin wooly-threads could potentially be found on NPR-1, but habitat for California jewelflower did not occur on NPR-1 and its occurrence was unlikely. As part of an ongoing effort to document the presence or absence of sensitive plant species on NPRC, surveys for species other than Hoover`s wooly-star were conducted in the spring of 1993. Abundant spring rains in 1993 created favorable growing conditions for annual forbs. Surveys in 1993 focused on potential habitat of several endangered and candidate species. The results of those surveys are presented in this report.

  4. Effect of collision parameters in electronegative plasma sheath with two species of positive ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulick, R.; Goswami, K. S. [Center of Plasma Physics, Institute for plasma Research, Sonapur, Guwahati 782402 (India)] [Center of Plasma Physics, Institute for plasma Research, Sonapur, Guwahati 782402 (India); Mahanta, M. K. [Department of Physics, Arya Vidyapeeth College, Guwahati 781016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Arya Vidyapeeth College, Guwahati 781016 (India)

    2013-09-15

    The effect of ion neutral collision is shown for two species of positive ions in electronegative plasma. The ion neutral collision is modeled using power law of collision cross section. It is a usual case for processing plasma to have two species of positive ions and hence we attempt to study the dynamics of the two species of ions inside the collisional sheath of electronegative plasma.

  5. Proportional counter device for detecting electronegative species in an air sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allman, Steve L. (Knoxville, TN); Chen, Fang C. (Knoxville, TN); Chen, Chung-Hsuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting an electronegative species comprises an analysis chamber, an inlet communicating with the analysis chamber for admitting a sample containing the electronegative species and an ionizable component, a radioactive source within the analysis chamber for emitting radioactive energy for ionizing a component of the sample, a proportional electron detector within the analysis chamber for detecting electrons emitted from the ionized component, and a circuit for measuring the electrons and determining the presence of the electronegative species by detecting a reduction in the number of available electrons due to capture of electrons by the electronegative species.

  6. Managing invasive species: Rules of thumb for rapid assessment Brian Leung a,*, David Finnoff b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    of global environmental change and economic damages, spurring governments worldwide to increase prevention that species invasion is a critical driver of global environmental change has focused attention

  7. Spatial-Temporal Branching Point Process Models in the Study of Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balderama, Earvin

    2012-01-01

    A review of models of alien plant spread,” EcologicalThe establishment of alien (invasive) plant and animaleconomic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the

  8. Risk analysis for species introductions: forecasting population growth of Eurasian ruffe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk analysis for species introductions: forecasting population growth of Eurasian ruffe productivity (Leung et al. 2002). Risk-analysis methodology for intentional and unintentional introductions

  9. Proportional counter device for detecting electronegative species in an air sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allman, S.L.; Chen, F.C.; Chen, C.H.

    1994-03-08

    Apparatus for detecting an electronegative species comprises an analysis chamber, an inlet communicating with the analysis chamber for admitting a sample containing the electronegative species and an ionizable component, a radioactive source within the analysis chamber for emitting radioactive energy for ionizing a component of the sample, a proportional electron detector within the analysis chamber for detecting electrons emitted from the ionized component, and a circuit for measuring the electrons and determining the presence of the electronegative species by detecting a reduction in the number of available electrons due to capture of electrons by the electronegative species. 2 figures.

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Enterohepatic Helicobacter Species Isolated from Both Laboratory and Wild Rodents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheh, Alexander

    The draft genome sequences of eight enterohepatic Helicobacter species, H. muridarum, H. trogontum, H. typhlonius, and five unnamed helicobacters, are presented here. Using laboratory mice pervasively infected with ...

  11. Using GIS to showcase “endangered species and transportation” initiatives in Georgia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baffour, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    courses in transportation engineering and GIS. Dr. Baffour’data technologies such as GIS and GPS in transportation andUSING GIS TO SHOWCASE “ENDANGERED SPECIES AND

  12. Endangered Species Program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Chevron USA. Production Company (CPDN). Four federally-listed endangered animal species and one federally-threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, giant kangaroo rat, Tipton kangaroo rat, and Hoover`s wooly-star. All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which declares that it is ``...the policy of Congress that all Federal departments and agencies shall seek to conserve endangered species and threatened species and shall utilize their authorities in furtherance of the purposes of the Act.`` DOE is also obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The major objective of the EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. Endangered Species Program on NPRC is to provide DOE with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the Endangered Species Act. The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress and results of the Endangered Species Program made during fiscal year 1993.

  13. Journal of Biogeography ( 1 998) 25, 795-805 Latitudinal patterns of mammalian species richness in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    of organismal distribution, including work on the pattern of species distribution on island systems (island

  14. Species richness and vegetation pattern in interdune lowlands of an active dune field in Inner Mongolia, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Species richness and vegetation pattern in interdune lowlands of an active dune field in Inner Limnocryptophyte species Psammophyte Semi-arid inner dunes Steppe species Species­area curve A B S T R A C T Vegetation pattern in lowlands between active sand dunes has rarely been studied, but it may play

  15. Am. Midi. Nat. (2014) 171:321-327 Day and Night Substrate Use in Six Minnow Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyron, Mark

    2014-01-01

    advantages for bioenergetics avoiding prédation (Clark and Levy, 1988). Diel movements of .single species

  16. Electrochemical natural gas conversion to more valuable species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchynka, D.J.; Cook, R.L.; Fammells, A.F. (Eltron Research, Inc., Aurora, IL (US))

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports on the electrochemical oxidative dimerization of methane to give C{sub 2} hydrocarbon species investigated in solid oxide fuel cells possessing the general configuration: CH{sub 4}, anode electrocatalyst/ZrO{sub 2}(8 m/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3})/La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}O{sub 2}(air). Perovskite anode electrocatalysts shown to possess activity toward promoting the subject reaction include Sm{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.5}CuO{sub 3}, Tb{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.2}CuO{sub 3}, Gd{sub 0.9}Th{sub 0.1}CuO{sub 3}, Gd{sub 0.9}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}, and Th{sub 0.8}Yb{sub 0.2}NiO{sub 3}. Maximum partial faradaic current densities at active perovskite anode electrocatalysts for promoting the subject reaction were found to be directly correlatable to their calculated oxygen binding energies on the perovskite surface, where increasing binding energies were found to favor higher rates for electrochemical partial methane oxidation. Increasing surface oxygen binding energies at perovskite anode electrocatalysts were found to correlate with increasing perovskite lattice-free volumes with electrochemical measurements, supporting increasing surface oxygen binding energies and perovskite lattice-free volumes as leading to enhanced rates for the subject reaction. As a consequence, synergism was found between experimentally determined perovskite anode electrocatalyst activities, their calculated surface oxygen binding energies, and lattice ionic-free volumes.

  17. Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thilo Schuldt; Christian Schubert; Markus Krutzik; Lluis Gesa Bote; Naceur Gaaloul; Jonas Hartwig; Holger Ahlers; Waldemar Herr; Katerine Posso-Trujillo; Jan Rudolph; Stephan Seidel; Thijs Wendrich; Wolfgang Ertmer; Sven Herrmann; André Kubelka-Lange; Alexander Milke; Benny Rievers; Emanuele Rocco; Andrew Hinton; Kai Bongs; Markus Oswald; Matthias Franz; Matthias Hauth; Achim Peters; Ahmad Bawamia; Andreas Wicht; Baptiste Battelier; Andrea Bertoldi; Philippe Bouyer; Arnaud Landragin; Didier Massonnet; Thomas Lévèque; Andre Wenzlawski; Ortwin Hellmig; Patrick Windpassinger; Klaus Sengstock; Wolf von Klitzing; Chris Chaloner; David Summers; Philip Ireland; Ignacio Mateos; Carlos F. Sopuerta; Fiodor Sorrentino; Guglielmo M. Tino; Michael Williams; Christian Trenkel; Domenico Gerardi; Michael Chwalla; Johannes Burkhardt; Ulrich Johann; Astrid Heske; Eric Wille; Martin Gehler; Luigi Cacciapuoti; Norman Gürlebeck; Claus Braxmaier; Ernst Rasel

    2014-12-08

    Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry, the detection unit, the vacuum system for $10^{-11}$ mbar ultra-high vacuum generation, and the high-suppression factor magnetic shielding as well as the thermal control system. The laser system is based on a hybrid approach using fiber-based telecom components and high-power laser diode technology and includes all laser sources for 2D-MOT, 3D-MOT, ODT, interferometry and detection. Manipulation and switching of the laser beams is carried out on an optical bench using Zerodur bonding technology. The instrument consists of 9 units with an overall mass of 221 kg, an average power consumption of 608 W (819 W peak), and a volume of 470 liters which would well fit on a satellite to be launched with a Soyuz rocket, as system studies have shown.

  18. Conservation plan for protected species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otten, M.R.M.; Cypher, B.L.

    1997-07-01

    Habitats in and around Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) support populations of various vertebrates and plants, including a number of threatened and endangered species. Adequate conservation of habitats and species, particularly protected species, can be facilitated through development and implementation of management plans. This document provides a comprehensive plan for the conservation of protected species on NPR-1, through compliance with terms and conditions expressed in Biological Opinions rendered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for NPR-1 activities. Six conservation strategies by which threatened and endangered species have been, and will be, protected are described: population monitoring, mitigation strategies, special studies, operating guidelines and policies, information transfer and outreach, and the endangered species conservation area. Population monitoring programs are essential for determining population densities and for assessing the effects of oil field developments and environmental factors on protected species. Mitigation strategies (preactivity surveys and habitat reclamation) are employed to minimize the loss of important habitats components and to restore previously disturbed lands to conditions more suitable for species` use. A number of special studies were undertaken between 1985 and 1995 to investigate the effectiveness of a variety of population and habitat management techniques with the goal of increasing the density of protected species. Operating guidelines and policies governing routine oil field activities continue to be implemented to minimize the potential for the incidental take of protected species and minimize damage to wildlife habitats. Information transfer and outreach activities are important means by which technical and nontechnical information concerning protected species conservation on NPR-1 is shared with both the scientific and non-scientific public.

  19. Aquatic Species Program Review: Proceedings of the March 1983 Principal Investigators Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

  20. A Characterization of the Set of Species Trees that Produce Anomalous Ranked Gene Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    A Characterization of the Set of Species Trees that Produce Anomalous Ranked Gene Trees James H characterize the set of unranked species tree topologies that give rise to ARGTs, showing that this set generalizes beyond the specific five-taxon case. Here, we perform a complete characterization of the set

  1. Belowground traits of herbaceous species in young coniferous forests of the Olympic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Jerry

    , Washington Ann L. Lezberg, Joseph A. Antos, and Charles B. Halpern Abstract: Variation in belowground traits, vegetative spread, and proportion of biomass in belowground structures. All species were perennial and most structures. The proportion of total biomass in belowground structures varied considerably among species (21

  2. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated by 1Hydroxyphenazine, a Virulence Factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated by 1Hydroxyphenazine, a Virulence Factor tool for the detection of ROS generation mediated by 1-HP. These assays provided evidence that 1-HP evidence that 1-HP mediates the generation of intracellular oxidants. Generation of reactive oxygen species

  3. A NEW SPECIES OF HALICYCLOPS (COPEPODA, CYCLOPOIDA, CYCLOPIDAE) FROM CENOTES OF THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    PENINSULA, MEXICO, WITH AN IDENTIFICATION KEY FOR THE SPECIES OF THE GENUS FROM THE CARIBBEAN REGION (Copepoda, Cyclopoida, Cyclopidae) from cenotes of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, with an identification key-4827. Halicyclops cenoticola sp. nov. is described from cenotes of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. The new species

  4. SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH;SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH POPULATIONS of the elements of study included monitoring the effects of pulp mill effluent on resident fish populations

  5. Biogenic emissions from Citrus species in California Silvano Fares a,b,*, Drew R. Gentner c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Biogenic emissions from Citrus species in California Silvano Fares a,b,*, Drew R. Gentner c , Jeong May 2011 Accepted 26 May 2011 Keywords: BVOC emissions OVOC Terpene Basal emission rate Citrus a b such as the Central Valley of California. Moreover, the BVOC emissions from Citrus species have not been characterized

  6. Identifying Keystone Species in the Human Gut Microbiome from Metagenomic Timeseries Using Sparse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Pankaj

    Identifying Keystone Species in the Human Gut Microbiome from Metagenomic Timeseries Using Sparse to follow the relative abundance of microbes in a community over time. These microbial communities exhibit the species interactions in the gut microbiomes of two individuals and found that the interaction networks

  7. Forest Management Regime and Species choice options in a changing environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Management Regime and Species choice ­ options in a changing environment Bill Mason, Forest.mason@forestry.gsi.gov.uk May 18 2010 #12;2 Talk Structure 1. Introduction; 2. Species 3. Forest types; 4. Management regime; 5 essential] to make it more resilient to climate change over the next 50-100 years. Resilience implies

  8. An Algebraic Speci cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bidoit, Michel

    An Algebraic Speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System Michel Bidoit 1 , Claude Chevenier describe how to derive an algebraic speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System starting from to specify the detection of the steam-boiler fail- ures. Finally we discuss validation and veri#12;cation

  9. New species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia and Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    781 New species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia and Africa P.W. Crous and M.J. Wingfield Ahstract:Although Africa and Indonesia have not been particularly well surveyed Eucalyptus leaves from Indonesia. The former species is of particular interest, because its anamorph

  10. Mycoscience 41: 595--606, 2000 New Leptographium species from Indonesia and Eastern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mycoscience 41: 595--606, 2000 595 New Leptographium species from Indonesia and Eastern North from pine infested with an Ips sp. in Indonesia. In addition, two unknown species have been collected that the isolates from Indonesia and those from Eastern North America represent three previously un described taxa

  11. A Landscape Ecology Approach to Informing the Ecology and Management of Coastal Marine Species and Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Mary Alida

    2014-01-01

    and ecosystem-based approaches, there is a growing need for spatially explicit, quantitative informationand ecosystem-based approaches, there is a growing need for spatially explicit, quantitative informationinformation on the distributions of species and the processes that maintain diversity, populations, species, and ecosystems (

  12. Agricultural and biofuel implications of a species diversity experiment with native perennial grassland plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Agricultural and biofuel implications of a species diversity experiment with native perennial-negative biofuels. Fertilized mono- cultures of Panicum virgatum (one of the species in the Tilman et al., 2006a). An important question to now consider is whether biofuel crop breeding programs should also be initiated

  13. Auritella foveata, a new species of Inocybaceae (Agaricales) from tropical India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matheny, P. Brandon

    Auritella foveata, a new species of Inocybaceae (Agaricales) from tropical India P. Brandon Matheny & Matheny is described as new from mixed evergreen forests in tropical India. The species is distinctive due, systematics. Introduction India is exceedingly rich in fungal diversity (Manoharachary et al. 2005). Indeed

  14. A New Species of Parodia (Cactaceae, Notocacteae) from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zürich, Universität

    A New Species of Parodia (Cactaceae, Notocacteae) from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Marlon C. Machado Grande do Sul, Brazil. jlarocca@unisinos.br ABSTRACT . A new species, Parodia gaucha M. Machado & Larocca (Cactaceae, Notocacteae), from Encruzilhada do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, is described and illustrated

  15. IKOS 101: 398410, 2003 Comparing species richness among assemblages using sample units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machado, Glauco

    IKOS 101: 398­410, 2003 Comparing species richness among assemblages using sample units: why, R. J. 2003. Comparing species richness among assemblages using sample units: why not use´ria Natural, Inst. de Biologia, Uni6. Estadual de Campinas, CP 6109, BR-13083-970 Campinas, SP, Brazil

  16. Constraints on surface NOx emissions by assimilating satellite observations of multiple species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constraints on surface NOx emissions by assimilating satellite observations of multiple species; published 6 September 2013. [1] Surface NOx emissions are estimated by a combined assimilation of satellite for species other than NO2 provides additional constraints on the NOx emissions by adjusting

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF LEUCOCYTOZOON TODDI GROUP (HAEMOSPORIDA: LEUCOCYTOZOIDAE), WITH REMARKS ON THE SPECIES TAXONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sehgal, Ravinder

    ON THE SPECIES TAXONOMY OF LEUCOCYTOZOIDS Gediminas Valkiu¯nas, Ravinder N. M. Sehgal*, Tatjana A. Iezhova. e-mail: gedvalk@ekoi.lt ABSTRACT: The current taxonomy of leucocytozoids (Haemosporida identified species of avian haemosporidians. Based on the current taxonomy, Leucocytozoon toddi is the sole

  18. A new shoot and stem disease of Eucalyptus species caused by Erwinia psidii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A new shoot and stem disease of Eucalyptus species caused by Erwinia psidii T. A. Coutinho & C. L Eucalyptus grandis, E. dunnii, E. globulus and E. globulus subsp. maidenii has been observed in plantations previously observed on any species of Eucalyptus. In this study, we describe the symptoms of this new disease

  19. Characterization of Botryosphaeriaceae from plantation-grown Eucalyptus species in South China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of Botryosphaeriaceae from plantation-grown Eucalyptus species in South China S. F The Botryosphaeriaceae is a species-rich family that includes pathogens of a wide variety of trees, including Eucalyptus in Eucalyptus plantations in South China. The aim of this study was to identify the Botryosphaeriaceae

  20. New species, hyper-diversity and potential importance of Calonectria spp. from Eucalyptus in South China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New species, hyper-diversity and potential importance of Calonectria spp. from Eucalyptus in South in the Guangdong, Guangxi and Hainan Provinces of South China, where Eucalyptus trees in plantations or cuttings to Eucalyptus forestry in China. The remarkable diversity of Calonectria species in a relatively small area

  1. Models for Multi-Specie Chemical Reactions Using Polynomial Stochastic Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    Models for Multi-Specie Chemical Reactions Using Polynomial Stochastic Hybrid Systems Abhyudai for chemical reactions is presented. This is done by representing the population of various species involved in a chemical reaction as the continuous state of a polynomial Stochastic Hybrid System (pSHS). An important

  2. Phylogenetic patterns of species loss in Thoreau's woods are driven by climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Charles

    Phylogenetic patterns of species loss in Thoreau's woods are driven by climate change Charles G) Climate change has led to major changes in the phenology (the timing of seasonal activities of species loss under rapid climate change. Henry David Thoreau initiated a dataset of the Concord

  3. Seedling insensitivity to ozone for three conifer species native to Great Smoky Mountains National Park$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Seedling insensitivity to ozone for three conifer species native to Great Smoky Mountains National concentrations of ozone had little eect on seedlings of three species of conifers commonly found in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Abstract Field symptoms typical of ozone injury have been observed on several

  4. New Species of Octocorals (Coelenterata: Anthozoa) from the Penghu Archipelago, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benayahu, Yehuda

    New Species of Octocorals (Coelenterata: Anthozoa) from the Penghu Archipelago, Taiwan Yehuda: Anthozoa) from the Penghu Archipelago, Taiwan. Zoological Studies 50(3): 350-362. As an outcome of an octocoral survey conducted on reefs in the Penghu Archipelago, Taiwan, 3 new species of the genera

  5. The species, sex, and stage specificity of a Caenorhabditis sex pheromone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

    The species, sex, and stage specificity of a Caenorhabditis sex pheromone J. R. Chasnov*, W. K. So chemotaxis assays, we demonstrate that females secrete a potent sex pheromone that attracts males from a distance, whereas hermaphrodites do not. The female sex pheromone is not species-specific, with males

  6. Carbon Integration in Two Plantago Species Elizabeth P. Lacey; C. Marshall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacey, Elizabeth P.

    Carbon Integration in Two Plantago Species Elizabeth P. Lacey; C. Marshall American Journal://www.jstor.org Tue Nov 27 11:09:56 2007 #12;American Journal of Botany 79(10): 1108-1 112. 1992. CARBON INTEGRATION of other studies, these data suggest that comparisons of carbon integration in species differing

  7. Climate Change Risks and Conservation Implications for a Threatened Small-Range Mammal Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    Climate Change Risks and Conservation Implications for a Threatened Small-Range Mammal Species Naia: Climate change is already affecting the distributions of many species and may lead to numerous extinctions be used to assess climate sensitivity and potential climate change impacts, even for rare and cryptic

  8. Climate-based models of spatial patterns of species richness in Egypt's butterfly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obbard, Darren

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Climate-based models of spatial patterns of species richness in Egypt's butterfly, Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency, Maadi, Cairo and 3 Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt of butterfly and mammal species richness. Location Egypt. Methods Data on the occurrence of butterflies

  9. Differences in germination and seedling establishment of alien and native Impatiens species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Differences in germination and seedling establishment of alien and native Impatiens species Rozdíly., Jarosík V. & Pysek P. (2009): Differences in germi- nation and seedling establishment of alien and native design. In this study seed and seedling traits of three congeneric alien species in Europe, differing

  10. Scale dependence of native and alien species richness in North American floras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    Scale dependence of native and alien species richness in North American floras Vliv mítka studia na of native and alien species richness in North American flo- ras. ­ Preslia 78: 427­436. I analyzed data from and alien diversity vary as a function of spatial grain. Moving window multi- ple regression revealed

  11. Which Factors Affect the Success or Failure of Eradication Campaigns against Alien Species?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Which Factors Affect the Success or Failure of Eradication Campaigns against Alien Species? Therese, The Netherlands Abstract Although issues related to the management of invasive alien species are receiving factors that relate to the success of management campaigns aimed at eradicating invasive alien

  12. The role of stochastic processes in producing nested patterns of species distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Richard E.

    that underlie species distributions on island systems, then null models might be better determined on the basis of species. Island size and abundance had less of an effect on nestedness in systems dominated by only a few (uniform, dominance-decay, random-assortment, and dominance-preemption), island-size distributions (uniform

  13. Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe Miguel Á energy, that proposes that richness will be best described by energy inputs into an area (e.g., Turner et and amphibian species richness in Europe and 11 environmental variables related to five hypotheses

  14. 3) What makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    3) What makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis Davis et al. (2000) Basic concepts: · In most plant communities at most times, most of the resources that are available makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis Davis et al. (2000) Basic

  15. Extraction of arsenate and arsenite species from soils and sediments Myron Georgiadis a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Extraction of arsenate and arsenite species from soils and sediments Myron Georgiadis a , Yong Cai 2005 NaDDC preserves arsenite during soil and sediment extraction. Abstract The primary objective and bioavailable arsenic species from soil and sediment while at the same time minimizing the transformation

  16. The role of plant species in biomass production and response to elevated CO2 and N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    REPORT The role of plant species in biomass production and response to elevated CO2 and N Joseph M that factorially manipulated plant diversity, CO2, and N, we quantified the effects of the presence of species having less variation in biomass over time. The response of plant biomass to elevated N, but not CO2

  17. Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species increasing more in pathogen load. Elevated CO2 increased pathogen load of C3 grasses, perhaps by decreasing

  18. The initial phase of a Longleaf Pine-Wiregrass Savanna restoration: species establishment and community responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschenbach, Todd, A; Foster, Bryan, L.; Imm, Donald, W.

    2010-09-01

    AbstractAbstract The significant loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem in the southeastern United States has serious implications for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In response to this loss, we have initiated a long-term and landscape-scale restoration experiment at the 80,125 ha (310 mi2) Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. Aristida beyrichiana (wiregrass), an important and dominant grass (i.e., a “matrix” species) of the longleaf pine savanna understory, and 31 other herbaceous “non-matrix” species were planted at six locations throughout SRS in 2002 and 2003. Of the 36,056 transplanted seedlings, 75% were still alive in June 2004, while mean 1–2 year survival across all planted species was 48%. Lespedeza hirta (hairy lespedeza) exhibited the greatest overall survival per 3 ×3 m cell at 95%, whereas Schizachyrium spp. (little bluestem) exhibited the greatest mean cover among individual species at 5.9%. Wiregrass survival and cover were significantly reduced when planted with non-matrix species. Aggregate cover of all planted species in restored cells averaged 25.9% in 2006. High rates of survival and growth of the planted species resulted in greater species richness (SR), diversity, and vegetative cover in restored cells. Results suggest that the loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem may be ameliorated through restoration efforts and illustrate the positive impact of restoration plantings on biodiversity and vegetative cover.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Cuticular Hydrocarbons from a Rapid Species Radiation of Hawaiian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, Sean P.

    Identification and Characterization of Cuticular Hydrocarbons from a Rapid Species Radiation Island taxa represents the loss of ancestral hydrocarbons found on Maui. To test this hypothesis, we characterized and identified the structures of cuticular hydrocarbons for seven species of Hawaiian Laupala, two

  20. Cuticular Hydrocarbons: Species and Population-Level Discrimination in Termites1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuticular Hydrocarbons: Species and Population-Level Discrimination in Termites1 Michael I. Haverty Marion Page Barbara L. Thorne Pierre Escoubas2 Abstract: Hydrocarbons in the cuticle of insects and the apparent species-specificity of cuticular hydrocarbon mixtures make them excellent taxo nomic characters

  1. grasslands by adding a diverse mixture of na-tive species without knowing which are likely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fee, Michale S.

    tractable than the one that has made me famous--but not rich." Paine argues that keystone interactions, are the keystone. Otters eat urchins, which is what allows kelp to thrive and facilitate other species. Bertness's own research in fact under- scores the importance of keystone species, Paine claims. In a study

  2. Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, James T.

    Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species Ganesh P of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms. australis stands expanded in size by 6­35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over

  3. Production and characterization of a dual species magneto-optical trap of cesium and ytterbium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, S L; Freytag, R; Hopkins, S A; Hinds, E A; Tarbutt, M R; Cornish, S L

    2015-01-01

    We describe an apparatus designed to trap and cool a Yb and Cs mixture. The apparatus consists of a dual species effusive oven source, dual species Zeeman slower, magneto-optical traps in a single ultra-high vacuum science chamber, and the associated laser systems. The dual species Zeeman slower is used to load sequentially the two species into their respective traps. Its design is flexible and may be adapted for other experiments with different mixtures of atomic species. The apparatus provides excellent optical access and can apply large magnetic bias fields to the trapped atoms. The apparatus regularly produces 10${}^{8}$ Cs atoms at 13.3 $\\mu$K in an optical molasses, and 10${}^{9}$ Yb atoms cooled to 22 $\\mu$K in a narrowband magneto-optical trap.

  4. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  5. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

  6. Genera of orders Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Hexacorallia), and their type species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fautin, Daphne G.; Zelenchuk, Taras; Raveendran, Dinesh

    2007-12-21

    taxon, containing 1426 nominal species, of which 1103 are currently considered valid (Fautin 2007). However, it is rich in genera, 425 having been made available. We determined the type species, if any, for all genera of the order Actiniaria, as well... homonyms and one senior homonym; 13 are currently considered valid. The name Endocoelactis was proposed for an actiniarian genus by Carlgren (1897) but no species was attributed to the genus, so it is a nomen nudum (ICZN Article 12.2.5). The name...

  7. 21/01/2015 07:14The Hives of Others: Bees Wage War across Species -Scientific American Page 1 of 4http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-hives-of-others-bees-wage-war-across-species/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    21/01/2015 07:14The Hives of Others: Bees Wage War across Species - Scientific American Page 1 of 4http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-hives-of-others-bees-wage-war-across-species/ O I L S E L American Volume 312, Issue 2 » Advances The Hives of Others: Bees Wage War across Species Australian

  8. Genetic diversity and structure in two species of Leavenworthia with self-incompatible and self-compatible populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koelling, Vanessa A.; Hamrick, J.L.; Mauricio, Rodney

    2011-01-01

    of two cedar glade endemic species, Leavenworthia alabamica and L. crassa. These species have self-incompatible (SI) and self-compatible (SC) populations and are therefore ideal for understanding how the mating system affects genetic diversity...

  9. Phylogeography of five species of the stygobitic shrimp genus Typhlatya, as determined from the sequence analysis of three mitochondrial genes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belcher, Rebecca Lane

    2004-01-01

    analyses using parsimony and neighbor-joining were used to determine what phylogenetic relationships exist between disjunct insular versus continental and marine versus freshwater species within the genus and to test the monophyletic origin of these species...

  10. Role of nitric oxide in neurodegeneration and vulnerability of neuronal cells to nitric oxide metabolites and reactive oxygen species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, SC; Lahiri, DK; Ghosh, C; Rogers, JT; Greig, NH

    2010-01-01

    hormone · Reactive nitrogen species · RNS · Tissue culture 1reactive nitrogen species (RNS), such as NO, suggest that inDisorders NO and other ROS and RNS exert important roles in

  11. A comparison of diversity in the zfy gene in two species of pinnipeds with different breeding strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweny, Jason Michael

    2006-04-12

    Sequence variation was examined for the Zinc-finger Y (zfy) gene and the mitochondrial control region for two species of pinnipeds, the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) and harbor seal (Phoca vitulina). The two species ...

  12. Differential translation efficiency of orthologous genes is involved in phenotypic divergence of yeast species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilpel, Yitzhak

    for oxidative respiration or fermentation and are efficiently translated in aerobic or anaerobic species anticodons translating glutamic acid (E), proline (P), glutamine (Q), arginine (R) and leucine (L) can

  13. Characterization process of emission sources of spin entangled pairs with several species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Delgado

    2011-03-24

    Normally, sources of entangled pairs generate several species of them. This work proposes a characterization algorithm for relatively general bipartite entangled states, generating several standard Bell states with controlled population as output.

  14. thesis abstract: Applying species distribution modeling for the conservation of Iberian protected invertebrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chefaoui, Rosa María

    2011-01-01

    ibero?baleares.   Ph.D.   Thesis.   Universidad  Autó? noma 6596  news and update  thesis abstract  Applying species María Chefaoui  PhD Thesis, Departamento de Biodiversidad y 

  15. SNAKE SPECIES RICHNESS IN RELATION TO HABITAT IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF EAST CENTRAL TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putegnat, John

    2006-07-11

    habitats are 7 surrounded by rattlebush (Sesbania drummondii), greenbriar, yaupon, black willow (Salix nigra), and post oaks. Capture, Handling, and Data Collection Surveys were conducted for snake species from April ? August 2005, following...

  16. Local Mobile Gene Pools Rapidly Cross Species Boundaries To Create within Global Vibrio cholerae Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucher, Yan

    Vibrio cholerae represents both an environmental pathogen and a widely distributed microbial species comprised of closely related strains occurring in the tropical to temperate coastal ocean across the globe (Colwell RR, ...

  17. Discrete dragline attachment induces aggregation in spiderlings of a solitary species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theraulaz, Guy

    Discrete dragline attachment induces aggregation in spiderlings of a solitary species RAPHAEL and the experimental data shows that the discrete pattern of silk dragline attachment is the key mechanism involved

  18. Influence of plant host species on intraspecific competition during infection by Aspergillus flavus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    Influence of plant host species on intraspecific competition during infection by Aspergillus flavus H. L. Mehla and P. J. Cottyab * a School of Plant Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, cottonseed, intraspecific competition, maize Introduction Aflatoxins, highly carcinogenic secondary

  19. Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

  20. Alkbh8 Regulates Selenocysteine-Protein Expression to Protect against Reactive Oxygen Species Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres, Lauren

    Environmental and metabolic sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can damage DNA, proteins and lipids to promote disease. Regulation of gene expression can prevent this damage and can include increased transcription, ...

  1. Method of molecular specie alteration by nonresonant laser induced dielectric breakdown

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ronn, Avigdor M. (Great Neck, NY)

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of a molecular specie by itself or in the presence of a secondary material at a pressure above a threshold value for the particular system by a laser of predetermined minimum power and having a frequency displaced from an absorption line of the specie causes severance of the weakest bond and a yield of products containing at least one dissociative fragment from said specie. A Rogowski type TEA CO.sub.2 --N.sub.2 --He laser has been used successfully on a wide variety of molecular species. Solid, liquid and gaseous end products have been obtained depending upon the starting materials. When solids have been produced they are in the form of microfine particles or microfine aggregates. A neodymium glass laser has also been used successfully.

  2. Host identity impacts rhizosphere fungal communities associated with three alpine plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becklin, Katie M.; Hertweck, Kate L.; Jumpponen, Ari

    2012-01-01

    , diversity, and composition of rhizosphere fungi colonizing three alpine plant species, Taraxacum ceratophorum, Taraxacum officinale, and Polemonium viscosum. Roots were collected from open meadow and willow understory habitats at treeline on Pennsylvania...

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Enterohepatic Helicobacter Species Isolated from Humans and One from Rhesus Macaques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zeli

    Draft genome sequences of seven enterohepatic Helicobacter species, H. bilis, H. canadensis, H. canis, H. cinaedi, H. winghamensis, H. pullorum, and H. macacae, are presented. These isolates were obtained from clinical ...

  4. Evaluating the use of DNA Sequences for Species Identification in Medusozoans (Phylum Cnidaria)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Rhea

    2012-04-01

    = the density of =enetic distances of pair ; ise comparisons of =enetic variation ; i t h i n and enetic variation within species is less than the =enetic variation enetic...

  5. Signal honesty and predation risk among a closely related group of aposematic species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenas, Lina María; Walter, Dominic; Stevens, Martin

    2015-06-05

    . Moreover, the warning colours of the strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) influence mate choice39. The different colour morphs of these species have different toxicity and these may advertise an honest signal for avian pred- ators40. In addition...

  6. Growth Rate of Marine Microalgal Species using Sodium Bicarbonate for Biofuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gore, Matthew

    2013-08-05

    With additional research on species characteristics and continued work towards cost effective production methods, algae are viewed as a possible alternative biofuel crop to current feedstocks such as corn. Current open pond production methods...

  7. Binational collaboration in recovery of endangered species: the Mexican wolf as a case study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal Stoopen, Jose Francisco

    2004-09-30

    The goal of this inductive study was to identify factors that facilitate and inhibit binational collaboration in the recovery of endangered species in the northern Mexico borderlands, focusing on the Mexican wolf (Canis ...

  8. The role of piscivores in a species-rich tropical river 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layman, Craig Anthony

    2004-11-15

    Much of the world's species diversity is located in tropical and sub-tropical ecosystems, and a better understanding of the ecology of these systems is necessary to stem biodiversity loss and assess community- and ...

  9. Correlation Between CAM-Cycling and Photosynthetic Gas Exchange in Five Species of Talinum (Portulacaceae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Fred S.; Martin, Craig E.

    1991-01-01

    Photosynthetic gat exchange and malic acid fluctuations were monitored in 69 well-watered plants from five morphologically similar species of Talinum in an investigation of the ecophysiological significance of the Crassulacean ...

  10. Inhibition of Pyruvate Kinase M2 by Reactive Oxygen Species Contributes to Cellular Antioxidant Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    Control of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations is critical for cancer cell survival. We show that, in human lung cancer cells, acute increases in intracellular concentrations of ROS caused inhibition ...

  11. High-Efficiency Multiplex Genome Editing of Streptomyces Species Using an Engineered CRISPR/Cas System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    High-Efficiency Multiplex Genome Editing of Streptomyces Species Using an Engineered CRISPR and of various sizes (ranging from 20 bp to 30 kb) with efficiency ranging from 70 to 100%. The designed p

  12. Original article Effect of functional group richness and species richness in manipulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leps, Jan "Suspa"

    environmental conditions by changing the proportions of individual species. © 2005 Elsevier SAS. All rights Budejovice, Czech Republic Received 7 March 2005; accepted 9 August 2005 Available online 21 September 2005

  13. Making Isoprene from Biomass Material using Bacillus Species Birgitte Ahring,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Making Isoprene from Biomass Material using Bacillus Species Birgitte Ahring,1 Junfeng Xue, 1 for genetically modifying the pathway to substantially increase the yield of isoprene from biomass. The following

  14. Molybdenum and tungsen alkylidene species for catalytic Enantio-, Z-, and E-selective olefin metathesis reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinescu, Smaranda Constan?a

    2011-01-01

    CHAPTER1 A general introduction to olefin metathesis is given. Highlights include a detailed discussion of group VI imido alkylidene catalysts. CHAPTER 2 Several bispyrrolide species Mo(NAr)(CHCMe 2Ph)(pyr)2 (Ar = ...

  15. Effect of the shutdown of a large coal fired power plant on ambient mercury species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yungang

    2014-01-01

    the shutdown of a coal-fired power plant on urban ultrafineof a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury speciesof a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species

  16. Elucidating the relationships within the Limnonectes kuhlii species complex (Amphibia: Anura: Dicroglossidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLeod, David Stirling

    2010-05-31

    In a period where all life on Earth faces considerable threats and pressures, it is especially significant that many recent studies have demonstrated that complexes of multiple, unidentified, cryptic species often reside ...

  17. New earthworm species of the genus Amynthas Kinberg, 1867 from Thailand (Clitellata, Oligochaeta, Megascolecidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bantaowong, Ueangfa; Chanabun, Ratmanee; Tongkerd, Piyoros; Sutcharit, Chirasak; James, Samuel W.; Panha, Somsak

    2011-04-14

    Waterfall, Amynthas borealis sp. n., from Chaloemprakiat district, and Amynthas srinan sp. n., from Srinan National Park.After comparing with the two closely related Laos species Amynthas chandyi Hong, 2008 and Amynthas namphouinensis Hong, 2008, the four...

  18. Detection of Rhodococcus equi by polymerase chain reaction using species-specific, non-proprietary primers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arriaga, Jose Miguel

    2002-01-01

    Species-specific primers for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Rhodococcus equi were developed. These primers were based on unique DNA fragments produced from R. equi reference strains and field isolates. Following random...

  19. Species-specific patterns in bivalve larval supply to a coastal embayment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Christine Mingione

    2011-01-01

    Larval supply is an important process linking reproductive output to recruitment of benthic marine invertebrates. Few species-specific studies of bivalve larvae have been performed due to the lack of suitable methods for ...

  20. Contributions of pterin and carotenoid pigments to dewlap coloration in two anole species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    shown to be derived from two types of pigments: pterins (Ortiz et al., 1962) and carotenoids (Macedonia; Macedonia et al., 2000). However, little work has been done on pigment profiles within individual species

  1. Variation in hydraulic conductivity of mangroves: influence of species, salinity, and nitrogen and phosphorus availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Sharon Ewe Mei

    is well established (Givnish 1986), but the hydraulic architecture and hydraulic conductiv- ity of xylemVariation in hydraulic conductivity of mangroves: influence of species, salinity, and nitrogen identity and variation in salinity and nutrient availability influence the hydraulic conductivity

  2. Numerical modeling of species transport in turbulent flow and experimental study on aerosol sampling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Vishnu Karthik

    2007-04-25

    Numerical simulations were performed to study the turbulent mixing of a scalar species in straight tube, single and double elbow flow configurations. Different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation ...

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCAL SPECIES BASED ON VARIATIONS IN PROTEIN SEQUENCES (MASS SPECTROMETRY) AND DNA SEQUENCE (sodA MICROARRAY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kooken, Jennifer M.; Fox, Karen F.; Fox, Alvin; Altomare, Diego; Creek, Kim E.; Wunschel, David S.; Pajares-Merino, Sara; Martinez-Ballesteros, Ilargi; Garaizar, Javier; Oyarzabal, Omar A.; Samadpour, Mansour

    2014-02-03

    IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCAL SPECIES BASED ON VARIATIONS IN PROTEIN SEQUENCES (MASS SPECTROMETRY) AND DNA SEQUENCE (sodA MICROARRAY)

  4. Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.; Tharp, M Lynn; Fogel, Jonah

    2009-02-01

    Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

  5. Optimum time for artificial insemination of the bovine species at various times of the year 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broadway, John Louis

    1973-01-01

    OPTIMUM TIME FOR ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION OF THE BOVINE SPECIES AT VARIOUS TIMES OF THE YEAR A Thesis by JOHN LOUIS BROAUNAY, III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject; Physiology of Reproduction OPTIMUM TIME FOR ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION OP THE BOVINE SPECIES AT VARIOUS TIMES OF THE YEAR A Thesis by JOHN LOUIS BROAINAY, III Approved as to style and content...

  6. Species interactions during diversification and community assembly in an island radiation of shrews.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Rafe M.

    2011-01-01

    similar species often have adjacent distributions, suggesting competitive exclusion may contribute to the structure of some natural communities. In systems such as island archipelagos, where speciation is often tightly associated with dispersal over... similar species often have adjacent distributions, suggesting competitive exclusion may contribute to the structure of some natural communities. In systems such as island archipelagos, where speciation is often tightly associated with dispersal over...

  7. Federal policy and the endangered species act: the politics, perceptions, and technologies of protecting sea turtles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risenhoover, Alan Dean

    1990-01-01

    FEDERAL POLICY AND THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: THE POLITICS PERCEPTIONS, AND TECHNOLOGIES OF PROTECTING SEA TURTLES A Thesis by ALAN DEAN RISENHOOVER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences PEDERAL POLICY AND THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: THE POLITICS, PERCEPTIONS~ AND TECHNOLOGIES OP PROTECTING SEA TURTLES A Thesis ALAN DEAN...

  8. Trait variation within a species determines warming responses at different scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Souza, Lara [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    Plant species, and the traits associated with them, can help buffer ecosystems to environmental perturbations. Few studies have examined whether within species variation, both among and within populations, can similarly buffer ecosystems to environmental perturbations, such as climatic warming, across levels of organization. Using a dominant plant species in the eastern US, Solidago altissima, we examined whether genotypes of the same species from both southern and northern latitude populations exhibited differential short-term responses to temperature at the cell, leaf, and plant level. At the cell level we quantified the production of reactive oxygen species (by-product of temperature stress) and total oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (which ameliorates temperature stress by-products). At the leaf and plant levels, we measured CO2 assimilation. Increasing temperatures had strong negative impacts on plant-level carbon gain, but weak impacts on cell-level antioxidant capacity. Southern latitude genotypes had greater total antioxidant capacity, but lower leaf-level carbon gain, than did northern genotypes under elevated temperature. At the plant level, northern and southern genotypes exhibited similar declines in carbon gain under elevated temperature, likely because total plant leaf area was higher for southern genotypes than northern genotypes, which compensated for their lower per unit area leaf-level carbon gain. Overall, short-term temperature-induced declines in carbon gain at the plant level may scale to reduce within species variation, both across and within populations, potentially altering ecosystem carbon cycling.

  9. A multi-species exchange model for fully fluctuating polymer field theory simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik Düchs; Kris T Delaney; Glenn H Fredrickson

    2014-10-01

    Field-theoretic models have been used extensively to study the phase behavior of inhomogeneous polymer melts and solutions, both in self-consistent mean-field calculations and in numerical simulations of the full theory capturing composition fluctuations. The models commonly used can be grouped into two categories, namely {\\it species} models and {\\it exchange} models. Species models involve integrations of functionals that explicitly depend on fields originating both from species density operators and their conjugate chemical potential fields. In contrast, exchange models retain only linear combinations of the chemical potential fields. In the two-component case, development of exchange models has been instrumental in enabling stable complex Langevin (CL) simulations of the full complex-valued theory. No comparable stable CL approach has yet been established for field theories of the species type. Here we introduce an extension of the exchange model to an arbitrary number of components, namely the multi-species exchange (MSE) model, which greatly expands the classes of soft material systems that can accessed by the complex Langevin simulation technique. We demonstrate the stability and accuracy of the MSE-CL sampling approach using numerical simulations of triblock and tetrablock terpolymer melts, and tetrablock quaterpolymer melts. This method should enable studies of a wide range of fluctuation phenomena in multiblock/multi-species polymer blends and composites.

  10. Deleting species from model food webs Christopher Quince, Paul G. Higgs and Alan J. McKane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Alan

    Deleting species from model food webs Christopher Quince, Paul G. Higgs and Alan J. McKane Quince, C., Higgs, P. G. and McKane, A. J. 2005. Deleting species from model food webs. Á/ Oikos 110: 283Á causing extinction of further species from the food web. To investigate these effects we used

  11. Additionally, a key based primarily on vegetative features is pro-vided for North Carolina species of Desmodium.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    Additionally, a key based primarily on vegetative features is pro- vided for North Carolina species of Desmodium. METHODS The foliar morphology of North Carolina Desmodium species was critically studied based by Wilbur (1963). RESULTS and DISCUSSION North Carolina Desmodium species can be artificially categorized

  12. MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 642, pp. 16, 3 figs. Pteropus vampyrus. By Thomas H. Kunz and Deborah P. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayssen, Virginia

    MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 642, pp. 1­6, 3 figs. Pteropus vampyrus. By Thomas H. Kunz and Deborah P in- cludes 58 species (Koopman, 1993). Andersen (1912) divided Pter- opus into 17 species groups; P. vampyrus is in the vampyrus group, which also includes P. giganteus, P. intermedius, and P. lylei (Corbet

  13. Plant Species Classification using a 3D LIDAR Sensor and Machine Learning Ulrich Weiss and Peter Biber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Plant Species Classification using a 3D LIDAR Sensor and Machine Learning Ulrich Weiss and Peter of the plant and species. Automatically distinguishing between plant species is a challenging task, because of the appearances and the differences between the plants used by humans, into a formal, computer understandable form

  14. Arte mexicana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincó n, Antonio, 1555-1601

    2010-10-16

    The evolution of herbicide-resistant weed species in cotton production has created a need for new herbicide technology tools. Herbicide technologies not classified as genetically modified by recombinant DNA can provide ...

  15. Symposium 16 Photoprotection, Photoinhibition and Dynamics 447 Tenuazonic Acid, a Novel Natural PSII Inhibitor, Impacts on Photosynthetic Activity by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    ) is a recurrent motif among natural products originating from a variety of marine and terrestrial species with the whole plant, especially the host plant and the target weed. Fast Chl a fluorescence transient kinetics

  16. A new species of antipatharian coral (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Antipatharia: Schizopathidae) from the Pacific coast of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opresko, Dennis M; Breedy, Odalisca

    2010-09-01

    A new species of black coral, Aphanipathes colombiana (Cnidaria:Antipatharia) from the Caribbean coast of Colombia is described. The species forms small flabellate colonies with anisomorphic polypar spines. It is morphologically similar to the western Atlantic species A. thyoides (Pourtales) but its hypostomal polypar spines are not reduced in size. The new species also resembles the Indo-Pacific species A. reticulata van Pesch but it has smooth-surfaced polypar spines, whereas in A. reticulata these spines have small tubercles on their surface

  17. Subalpine Forest Carbon Cycling Short- and Long-Term Influence ofClimate and Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueppers, L.; Harte, J.

    2005-08-23

    Ecosystem carbon cycle feedbacks to climate change comprise one of the largest remaining sources of uncertainty in global model predictions of future climate. Both direct climate effects on carbon cycling and indirect effects via climate-induced shifts in species composition may alter ecosystem carbon balance over the long term. In the short term, climate effects on carbon cycling may be mediated by ecosystem species composition. We used an elevational climate and tree species composition gradient in Rocky Mountain subalpine forest to quantify the sensitivity of all major ecosystem carbon stocks and fluxes to these factors. The climate sensitivities of carbon fluxes were species-specific in the cases of relative above ground productivity and litter decomposition, whereas the climate sensitivity of dead wood decay did not differ between species, and total annual soil CO2 flux showed no strong climate trend. Lodge pole pine relative productivity increased with warmer temperatures and earlier snowmelt, while Engelmann spruce relative productivity was insensitive to climate variables. Engelmann spruce needle decomposition decreased linearly with increasing temperature(decreasing litter moisture), while lodgepole pine and subalpine fir needle decay showed a hump-shaped temperature response. We also found that total ecosystem carbon declined by 50 percent with a 2.88C increase in mean annual temperature and a concurrent 63 percent decrease ingrowing season soil moisture, primarily due to large declines in mineral soil and dead wood carbon. We detected no independent effect of species composition on ecosystem C stocks. Overall, our carbon flux results suggest that, in the short term, any change in subalpine forest net carbon balance will depend on the specific climate scenario and spatial distribution of tree species. Over the long term, our carbon stock results suggest that with regional warming and drying, Rocky Mountain subalpine forest will be a net source of carbon to the atmosphere.

  18. Above- and belowground competition from longleaf pine plantations limits performance of reintroduced herbaceous species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.B. Harrington; C.M. Dagley; M.B. Edwards.

    2003-10-01

    Although overstory trees limit the abundance and species richness of herbaceous vegetation in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantations, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood because of confounding among limiting factors. In fall 1998, research was initiated to determine the separate effects of above- and belowground competition and needlefall from overstory pines on understory plant performance. Three 13- to 15-yr-old plantations near Aiken, SC, were thinned to 0, 25, 50, or 100% of nonthinned basal area (19.5 m2 ha-1). Combinations of trenching (to eliminate root competition) and needlefall were applied to areas within each plot, and containerized seedlings of 14 perennial herbaceous species and longleaf pine were planted within each. Overstory crown closure ranged from 0 to 81%, and soil water and available nitrogen varied consistently with pine stocking, trenching, or their combination. Cover of planted species decreased an average of 16.5 and 14.1% as a result of above- and below-ground competition, respectively. Depending on species, needlefall effects were positive, negative, or negligible. Results indicate that understory restoration will be most successful when herbaceous species are established within canopy openings (0.1-0.2 ha) managed to minimize negative effects from above- and belowground competition and needlefall.

  19. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, annual report FY97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are oil fields administered by the DOE in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. Four federally endangered animal species and one federally threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia silus), giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), Tipton kangaroo rat (Dipodomys nitratoides), and Hoover`s wooly-star (Eriastrum hooveri). All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. The DOE/NPRC is obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The primary objective of the Endangered Species and Cultural Resources Program is to provide NPRC with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the ESA, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress, results, and accomplishments of the program during fiscal year 1997 (FY97).

  20. Weed Identification: Using Plant Structures as a Key (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.

    1999-08-30

    Life Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas AgriLife Extension Service est?n disponibles para... todas las personas, sin distinci?n de raza, color, sexo, discapacidad, religi?n, edad u origen nacional. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics, Acts of Congress of May 8, 1914, as amen June 30, 1914...

  1. Criterion for burner design in thermal weed control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Telca Marisa

    2001-01-01

    A covered infrared burner was designed and constructed so that it could be compared to an open-flame burner. Two covered burners, a high configuration and a low configuration, were constructed. A low configuration covered infrared burner, high...

  2. Pre- and post-emergence weed control in bermudagrass turf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duble, Richard L

    1965-01-01

    Station, Texas, 1963. 34 10 Effects of arsenicals on common bermudagrass and nutsedge after 3 applications, College Station, Texas. 1964. 35 v Table Page An evaluation of the phytotoxicity of arseniqals to Tifgreen bermudagrass pnder golf green... to arsenic, College Station, Texas, 1964. 45 16 The analysis of variance of pre-emergence crabgrass control data under field conditions with 4-hydroxy- 3-nitrobenzene ar sonic acid, College Station, Texas, 1963. 59 17 The analysis of variance...

  3. 2011 New England Guide To Chemical Weed and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    or more times the year before planting. Organic mulches such as wood chips, or pine needles conserve. Read and follow label directions and precautions, including mixing, loading, storage and reentry

  4. Chemical Weed and Brush Control Suggestions for Rangeland 2009 Update 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    2009-04-22

    2 years of the initial application may be required to control yucca seedlings and regrowth from rootstocks. Cimarron Plus + 2,4-D low volatile ester H 0.675 oz. Cimarron Plus + 1 qt. 2,4-D (4 lbs. a.i./gal. product) NEW Burrobrush Tordon 22K VH 1... per acre Individual plant/ spot treatment 6 African rue Velpar L VH** 2 ml/plant Use an exact delivery handgun to apply undiluted herbicide to soil surface at the edge of the plant canopy. Spring or summer. Do not use on heavy clay or caliche soils...

  5. Texas High Plains Vegetable & Weed Control Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    of Plastic Mulch Type on Tomato Vigor and Yield (2004) 60 Effects of Postemergence Herbicides on Crop Injury (2005) 102 CROP PRODUCTION AND VARIETY TRIALS Transplanted Watermelon Production with Colored Plastic Mulches on the Texas High Plains (2005) 106 Yield and Quality Evaluation for Selected Tomato Varieties

  6. Suggestions for Weed Control in Pastures and Forages 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.; Bade, David H.

    2004-04-06

    , pasture sod suppression and renovation, clover permanent grass pastures and established grass crops, sorghum-sudan hybrids, alfalfa and clover, winter pastures for grazing only, and grazing/hay restrictions. Sprayer calibration instructions are included....

  7. Chemical Weed and Brush Control: Suggestions for Rangeland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Ansley, Jim; Cadenhead, J. F.; Hamilton, Wayne T.; Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hart, Charles R.; Ueckert, Darrell

    2005-04-25

    Power Pellet 2 lbs ./gal . (Velpar l) 75% (Pronone Power Pellet) imazapyr 2-[4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-5-oxo-1h-imidazol-2-yl]-3- pyridinecarboxylic acid arsenal, habitat 2 lbs ./gal . metsulfuron methyl methyl 2-[[[[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1... on heavy clay or caliche soils . Pronone Power Pellet Vh 1 pellet/plant Berlander lobelia, bitter sneezeweed, broomweed (annual or common), buffalobur, camphorweed, cocklebur, croton, horehound, marshelder (sumpweed, sulfaweed), plantain...

  8. Suggestions for Chemical Weed and Brush Control on Rangeland. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Tommy G.

    1988-01-01

    /6 oz of pellets pellets (3/4 Ib) (1/30 oz) per 100 sq ft Spray volume (per acre for broadcast, as described for individual plant) (I pt to 2 qt diesel fuel oil and water to make 2 to 4 gal/acre) or 2 to 4 gaJ of water with 8 to 32 oz... classified as clays. Bigelow shinoak Spike 20P 7.5 Ib of 1/2 oz of Anytime For individual plant treatment, (white shinoak) pellets pellets during year ; apply pellets evenly on the (l 1/2 Ib) (1/100Z) optium period soil under the plant canopy per 100 sq...

  9. MHK Technologies/SeaWEED | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar <OMIS D E <

  10. A shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    To extend the semi-empirical techniques of Benson and coworkers, and to extend the database of reliable high temperature measurements of OH radicals with hydrocarbons and other fuels and their decomposition products, the authors undertook a research program with both experimental and computational tasks. The experimental goal was to design a procedure for measuring, at combustion temperatures, the reaction rate coefficients of OH radicals with fuels and other species of importance in combustion or propulsion systems. The computational effort was intended to refine the semi-empirical transition-state-theory procedures for extrapolating rate coefficients of reactions of OH with combustion species of interest, for predicting rate coefficients for species not studied in the laboratory, and to examine the ability of the theory to predict rate coefficients for different pathways in the case the reagent possessed more than one nonequivalent H atoms.

  11. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  12. Global architecture of metabolite distributions across species and its formation mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Living organisms produce metabolites of many types via their metabolisms. Especially, flavonoids, a kind of secondary metabolites, of plant species are interesting examples. Since plant species are believed to have specific flavonoids with respect to diverse environment, elucidation of design principles of metabolite distributions across plant species is important to understand metabolite diversity and plant evolution. In the previous work, we found heterogeneous connectivity in metabolite distributions, and proposed a simple model to explain a possible origin of heterogeneous connectivity. In this paper, we show further structural properties in the metabolite distribution among families inspired by analogy with plant-animal mutualistic networks: nested structure and modular structure. An earlier model represents that these structural properties in bipartite relationships are determined based on traits of elements and external factors. However, we find that the architecture of metabolite distributions is desc...

  13. Valid flow combinations for stable sheath in a magnetized multiple ion species plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Devendra; Kaw, Predhiman K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-11-15

    Theoretical study is done of the entry criterion for the plasma flow into the electrostatic boundary layer, or sheath, forming in a magnetized multiple ion species plasma. Finding valid entry velocity combinations in a magnetized set up requires a magnetized equivalent of the generalized Bohm criterion. A magnetized generalized entry criterion is obtained with the scale length distribution in a region of validity for the stable solutions. The analysis finds that the valid entry flow velocity combinations with distinct values of individual ion species can correspond to a unique system phase velocity. Magnetization effects govern the region of validity whose boundaries collapse to the unmagnetized sheath criterion in the limit of normal incidence, independent of the strength of the magnetic field. Considerably smaller entry velocities, in comparison to the unmagnetized system sound velocity, are recovered for the species in appropriate regime of magnetization in the cases of oblique incidences.

  14. Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2006-09-19

    A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

  15. System and method for generating current by selective minority species heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Princeton, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    A system for the generation of toroidal current in a plasma which is prepared in a toroidal magnetic field. The system utilizes the injection of low-frequency waves into the plasma by means of phased antenna arrays or phased waveguide arrays. The plasma is prepared with a minority ion species of different charge state and different gyrofrequency from the majority ion species. The wave frequency and wave phasing are chosen such that the wave energy is absorbed preferentially by minority species ions traveling in one toroidal direction. The absorption of energy in this manner produces a toroidal electric current even when the injected waves themselves do not have substantial toroidal momentum. This current can be continuously maintained at modest cost in power and may be used to confine the plasma. The system can operate efficiently on fusion grade tokamak plasmas.

  16. A New Empirical Constraint on the Prevalence of Technological Species in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address the cosmic frequency of technological species. Recent advances in exoplanet studies provide strong constraints on all astrophysical terms in the Drake Equation. Using these and modifying the form and intent of the Drake equation we show that we can set a firm lower bound on the probability that one or more additional technological species have evolved anywhere and at any time in the history of the observable Universe. We find that as long as the probability that a habitable zone planet develops a technological species is larger than ~$10^{-24}$, then humanity is not the only time technological intelligence has evolved. This constraint has important scientific and philosophical consequences.

  17. Elk Hills endangered and threatened species program: Phase 1 progress summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.

    1980-03-01

    The endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and bluntnosed leopard lizard, Crotaphytus silus, are known to occur on the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve, NPR-1. An integrated, multiphased field program was designed to gather, synthesize, and interpret ecological information necessary for Biological Assessments required by the Secretary of Interior. These assessments will be used as the basis for a formal consultation with the Department of Interior to determine whether DOE activities on Elk Hills are compatible with the continued existence of the two species. Transects totalling 840 km were walked through all sections of Elk Hills to determine: (1) the presence and relative densities of endangered or threatened species; (2) past and potential impacts of NPR-1 activities on endangered and threatened species; and (3) the potential application of remote sensing for gathering necessary data.

  18. Widespread Discordance of Gene Trees with Species Tree inDrosophila: Evidence for Incomplete Lineage Sorting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Moses, Alan M.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2006-08-28

    The phylogenetic relationship of the now fully sequencedspecies Drosophila erecta and D. yakuba with respect to the D.melanogaster species complex has been a subject of controversy. All threepossible groupings of the species have been reported in the past, thoughrecent multi-gene studies suggest that D. erecta and D. yakuba are sisterspecies. Using the whole genomes of each of these species as well as thefour other fully sequenced species in the subgenus Sophophora, we set outto investigate the placement of D. erecta and D. yakuba in the D.melanogaster species group and to understand the cause of the pastincongruence. Though we find that the phylogeny grouping D. erecta and D.yakuba together is the best supported, we also find widespreadincongruence in nucleotide and amino acid substitutions, insertions anddeletions, and gene trees. The time inferred to span the two keyspeciation events is short enough that under the coalescent model, theincongruence could be the result of incomplete lineage sorting.Consistent with the lineage-sorting hypothesis, substitutions supportingthe same tree were spatially clustered. Support for the different treeswas found to be linked to recombination such that adjacent genes supportthe same tree most often in regions of low recombination andsubstitutions supporting the same tree are most enriched roughly on thesame scale as linkage disequilibrium, also consistent with lineagesorting. The incongruence was found to be statistically significant androbust to model and species choice. No systematic biases were found. Weconclude that phylogenetic incongruence in the D. melanogaster speciescomplex is the result, at least in part, of incomplete lineage sorting.Incomplete lineage sorting will likely cause phylogenetic incongruence inmany comparative genomics datasets. Methods to infer the correct speciestree, the history of every base in the genome, and comparative methodsthat control for and/or utilize this information will be valuableadvancements for the field of comparative genomics.

  19. Estimation of above-ground biomass and pod nutrition value for selective Prosopis species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oduol, Peter Allan

    1985-01-01

    ESTIMATION OF ABOVE-GROUND BIOMASS AND POD NUTRIT I VE VALUE FOR SELECTED PROSOPIS SPECIES A Thesis by PETER ALLAN ODUOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AItM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19gS ivlajor Subject: Forestry ESTIMATION OF ABOVE-GROUND BIOMASS AND POD NUTR IT I VE VALUE FOR SELECTED PROSOPIS SPECIES A Thesis by PETER ALLAN ODUOL Approved as to style and content by: C. R McKinley (Chairman...

  20. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950{degree}C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800{degree} to 950{degree}C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na{sub 2}O, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820{degree}. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 {mu}m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  1. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  2. Structure of Extremely Nanosized and Confined In-O Species in Ordered Porous Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Ramallo Lopez; M. Renteria; E. E. Miro; F. G. Requejo; A. Traverse

    2007-04-18

    Perturbed-angular correlation, x-ray absorption, and small-angle x-ray scattering spectroscopies were suitably combined to elucidate the local structure of highly diluted and dispersed InOx species confined in porous of ZSM5 zeolite. These novel approach allow us to determined the structure of extremely nanosized In-O species exchanged inside the 10-atom-ring channel of the zeolite, and to quantify the amount of In2O3 crystallites deposited onto the external zeolite surface.

  3. Endangered Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    primary threats to Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo are habitat loss and degradation from cattle, development, and compositional change of habitat due to climate change. RELATED...

  4. Lead in Species of Greatest Conservation Need: Free-flying Bald Eagles as Indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    Lead in Species of Greatest Conservation Need: Free-flying Bald Eagles as Indicators Principal Wildlife Grant Goals and Objectives: o Characterize lead levels in nesting and wintering Bald Eagles in Iowa State University o Compare lead exposure in free-flying eagles with eagles admitted

  5. Coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy system for point temperature and major species concentration measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, J.P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    1993-10-01

    The Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy system (CARS) has been developed as a laser-based, advanced, combustion-diagnostic technique to measure temperature and major species concentration. Principles of operation, description of the system and its capabilities, and operational details of this instrument are presented in this report.

  6. Movements of Palearctic and Afrotropical bird species during the dry season (NovemberFebruary) within Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    ­February) within Nigeria WILL CRESSWELL1, MARK BOYD2 & MATT STEVENS1 1AP Leventis Ornithological Research Institute, Jos, Nigeria & School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. wrlc@st-and.ac.uk 2Afrotropical bird species during the dry season (November­February) within Nigeria. pp. 18­28. In: Harebottle, D

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Predicting regional spread of non-native species using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    that are transported by ocean currents. Given the importance of currents in steering these propagules, ocean- ographic- ingly made use of oceanographic circulation models to estimate currents and track species dispersal models designed to estimate and forecast currents could be valuable for forecasting the spread (Queiroga

  8. Comparative toxicity of pentachlorophenol to three earthworm species in artificial soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, D.; Lanno, R.P.; Farwell, A.; Dixon, D.G.

    1994-12-31

    Although methods for standardized toxicity tests with earthworms exist, many of the test parameters and conditions have not been validated in actual tests and with different species of worms. This study evaluated the toxicity of pentachlorophenol (PCP) to three species of earthworms, Lumbricus terrestris, Eisenia fetida, and Eudrilus eugeniae using various methods of data analysis and body residues. Tests were conducted in artificial soil for a period of 28 days or until an Acute Lethality Threshold (ALT) was reached. An intensive temporal sampling regime was applied to generate sufficient data for the accurate estimation of ALTs using both LC50/time and time-to-death/soil concentration methods of data analysis. L. terrestris was tested at 15 C, E. eugeniae at 24 C, and E. fetida at both temperatures. Total body residues of PCP were measured by GC following cryogenic separation of the lipid fraction of the worm. ALTs were significantly different between E. fetida and the two larger species of worms. No effect of temperature on the ALT for E. fetida was observed, although the time taken to reach the ALT increased at the lower temperature. The relationship of PCP residues at mortality will be discussed in terms of the effects of species, body size and temperature. Limitations of the artificial soil based upon growth curves of worms will also be examined.

  9. Geographic profiling as a novel spatial tool for targeting the control of invasive species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knell, Rob

    of Criminal Justice, Texas State Univ., 601 Univ. Drive, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA. Geographic profiling (GP data from the Biological Records Centre (BRC) for 53 invasive species in Great Britain, ranging from to produce a geoprofile. Geoprofiles do not provide an exact location for the criminal's home, but rather

  10. Scientific advice on species at risk: a comparative analysis of status assessments of polar bear,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    Scientific advice on species at risk: a comparative analysis of status assessments of polar bear believed to be at heightened risk of extinction must be underpinned by scientific evaluations of past assignations peuvent influencer diffe´remment les bases scientifiques qui me`nent a` l'e´laboration de

  11. Sex and species differences in spatial memory in food-storing kangaroo rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    did not differentially affect recovery in the two species of kangaroo rats, unlike previous studies recovery. Female performance was significantly impaired by the absence of local landmarks, while male persistence. Using a touch-screen to simulate a feeder array, coal tits, Periparus ater, show greater mem- ory

  12. Observations on the measurement of total antimony and antimony species in algae, plant and animal tissuesw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    Observations on the measurement of total antimony and antimony species in algae, plant and animal of total antimony and antimony speciation in algae, plant and animal tissues. Digestion with nitric acid.g. some plants and algae, the addition of tetrafluorboric acid is required to dissolve silica as some

  13. Research Paper Abstract: Numerous species of Ardisia (shrubs in the Myrsina-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sack, Lawren

    . For the symbiotic species, performance was assessed for intact plants, for plants with nodules clipped off colonies in the shoot buds infect each develop- ing leaf through specialized marginal pores, and infect notable investment in nodule structure, replete with transfer surfaces, and extensive vascularization

  14. Equation of state for high explosives detonation products with explicit polar and ionic species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastea, S; Glaesemann, K R; Fried, L E

    2006-06-28

    We introduce a new thermodynamic theory for detonation products that includes polar and ionic species. The new formalism extends the domain of validity of the previously developed EXP6 equation of state library and opens the possibility of new applications. We illustrate the scope of the new approach on PETN detonation properties and water ionization models.

  15. New reports of Vaucheria species (Vaucheriales, Xanthophyceae, Heterokontophyta) from the Czech Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (gametophore), or individually on the tube. Traditional classification of the species is mostly based corresponds with the morphology-based classification (aNDerseN & baiLey 2002). In Czech Republic, in total 10 microscopes (Olympus CX­31 and BX­51). Photographs were taken on the Olympus BX­51 with Olympus C­5060 digital

  16. Linking spatial patterns of bird and butterfly species richness with Landsat TM derived NDVI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a potentially powerful source of information on the latter, its principal application to biodiversity studies of species composition of plants, these schemes generally do not provide information on primary productivity vegetation heterogeneity or primary productivity. Although remote sensing has long been identified

  17. Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios the degree to which an individual plant's leaf waxes D/H ratios are affected by these parameters remains- sitions of leaf wax n-alkanes, stem and surface waters were analyzed and compared against high

  18. Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios plant's leaf waxes D/H ratios are affected by these parameters remains in question. Understanding Coast of the US, from Florida to Maine. Hydrogen isotopic compo- sitions of leaf wax n-alkanes, stem

  19. A SPECIES OF BARNACLE (DICHELASPIS) PARASITIC ON THE GILLS OF EDIBLE CRABS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . COKER. 399 #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;NOTES ON A SPECIES OF BARNACLE (DICHELASPIS) PARASITIC ON THE GILLS OF EDIBLE CRABS. By ROBERT E: COKER. In the summer of 1900 Prof. H. V. Will;402 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH OOMMISSION. females when with eggs must be much less vigorous

  20. RELATIONSHIPS OF THE BLUE SHARK, PRZONACE GLAUCA, AND ITS PREY SPECIES NEAR SANTA CATALINA ISLAND, CALIFORNIA'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tricas, Timothy C.

    RELATIONSHIPS OF THE BLUE SHARK, PRZONACE GLAUCA, AND ITS PREY SPECIES NEAR SANTA CATALINA ISLAND the major prey for the blue shark, Prionace glauca, near Santa Catalina Island, Calif. The northern anchovy to prey behavior. The blue shark,Prionace glauca (Carcharhinidae) (Figure 11,is a pelagic carnivore

  1. Lau's observations on relative abundance ofP. phrictus indicate that this species may constitute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , OR 97331 A RECURRENT MASS STRANDING OF THE FALSE KILLER WHALE, PSEUDORCA CRASSIDENS, IN FLORIDA The false killer whale, Pseudorca crassidens, is one of the several species of odontocetes known primarily through, b; Purves and Pil- leri 1978). Pseudorca crassidens is distributed worldwide in temperate

  2. Production of various species of focused ion beam and T.-J. King

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production of various species of focused ion beam Q. Jia) and T.-J. King Lawrence Berkeley National. It is shown that over 90% P ions are produced. The production of BF2 and O2 increases with increasing gas devices, particle accelerators, ion implan- tation systems, neutron tubes for oil well logging and proton

  3. A New Species of the Genus Tetramorium (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) From Chamela, Jalisco, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    A New Species of the Genus Tetramorium (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) From Chamela, Jalisco, Mexico by T. Marques1* , M. Vásquez-Bolaños2 & M. Quesada3 ABsTrAcT AnewantspeciesofthegenusTetramoriumfromchamela,Jalisco,Mexico Guadalajara, Zapopan, Jalisco, 45100, Mexico. 3 centro de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas, universidad nacional

  4. Original article Linking density, productivity and trends of an endangered species: The Bonelli's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seoane, Javier

    density is a good indicator of environmental quality according to demo- graphic variables such as breeding-range is a good indicator of environmental quality and reproductive output, and that peripheral populations occupy in the environment. The under- standing of species' geographic ranges and their borders is partic- ularly important

  5. Light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets University IPM Program and M. Philip of Michigan Department of Agriculture. The light brown apple moth and agricultural commodities. Michigan risk maps for exotic plant pests. Other common names apple leafroller

  6. INTRODUCTION Most of the world's 40,000 species of spiders produce dragline silk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    1990 INTRODUCTION Most of the world's 40,000 species of spiders produce dragline silk from major ampullate silk glands to spin lifelines and frames of webs (Fig.1A,B). Dragline silk's impressive toughness, allowing silk to act as a high performance mimic of biological muscles. At high humidity spider dragline

  7. Functional Identification of Galactosyltransferases (SCGs) Required for Species-specific Modifications of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverley, Stephen M.

    and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Lipophosphoglycan (LPG feature of LPG is a polymer of phosphoglycan (PG) (6Gal 1,4Man 1-PO4) repeating units. In L. major and survival. We utilized evolutionary polymorphisms in LPG structure and cross-species transfections

  8. Analyses of Gene Diversity in Some Species of Conifers1 Francis C. Yeh2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analyses of Gene Diversity in Some Species of Conifers1 Francis C. Yeh2 Abstract: Genetic variation ssp. latifolia [Engelm.] Critchfield). The overall mean proportion of polymorphic loci was 61 side and interior Douglas-fir on the high side of overall mean genetic variation. Distribution of loci

  9. Temperature dependence, spatial scale, and tree species diversity in eastern Asia and North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    that determine the latitudinal gradient of species diversity, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The recently proposed metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) aims to explain ecological patterns and body size on the metabolism of organisms. Here we use 2 comparable databases of tree distributions

  10. Black-capped (Poecile atricapillus) and mountain chickadee (Poecile gambeli) contact call contains species, sex, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Michael

    Black-capped (Poecile atricapillus) and mountain chickadee (Poecile gambeli) contact call contains black-capped and mountain chickadees, is among the most frequently produced call of each species of adult allopatric and sympatric black-capped and mountain chickadees in terms of nine acoustic features

  11. Risk Analysis, Vol. 12, No. 4, 1992 Extrapolation of Carcinogenicity Between Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Lois Swirsky

    Risk Analysis, Vol. 12, No. 4, 1992 Extrapolation of Carcinogenicity Between Species: Qualitative the accuracy of prediction from rats or mice to humans, but 0272-433u92/1200-0579$06.50/101992 Socicry for Risk Analysis 579 #12;580 Gold, Manley, and Ames because epidemiologic data are usually lacking and ex

  12. Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project would be located. Within the tidal marsh there were also tidal creeks and guts. The following list

  13. Species abundance distribution results from a spatial analogy of central limit theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storch, David

    autocorrelation of abundances, and can be pre- dicted using this information. The theory therefore provides abundances [the species abundance distribution (SAD)] is considered to be a fundamental characteristic covering that plot. We show that this splicing, if applied repeatedly to produce subplots of progressively

  14. Red-belted clearwing Synanthedon myopaeformis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Red-belted clearwing Synanthedon myopaeformis Michigan State University's invasive species State University IPM Program and M. Philip of Michigan Department of Agriculture. The red-belted. Michigan risk maps for exotic plant pests. Other common names small red-belted clearwing, apple clearwing

  15. THE FOOD HABITS OF FIVE CRAB SPECIES AT PETTAQUAMSCUTT RIVER, RHODE ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Mter completing collection and examination of green crab stomachs from Plum Island Sound, MA, I found The stomach contents offive crab species-green crab. Carc-inus malllUl$; blue crab. Callinectes sapidus; lady of the green, blue, and lady crabs. Intense predation on small. recently set pelecypods was indicated

  16. North Carolina Coastal Plain savannas rank among the most species rich communities in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    North Carolina Coastal Plain savannas rank among the most species rich communities in the world floristic inventory of a North Carolina savanna: Big Savannah (Pender Co.) (Shelingoski et al. 2005 & Shunk (1928), AK thanks: Donna Wright (North Carolina State University) for thoughtful discussions

  17. Predicting fine-scale distributions of peripheral aquatic species in headwater streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Thomas J.

    value to managers due to their potential to maximize intraspecies diversity and species' adaptive capa developed correlative logistic regression models to predict occurrence of brook trout, rainbow trout, and brown trout for every interconfluence stream reach in the study area. A stream network was generated

  18. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species. Final progress report, June 1, 1986--May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouthier, D.J.

    1996-05-01

    This project involved the study of the spectroscopy and excited state dynamics of transient molecules, particularly sulfur- and/or oxygen-containing species. The identification and study of sulfur species is important in understanding their role in combustion processes, as sulfur compounds are often present in fuels. The oxygen-containing species chosen for study were new systems whose spectroscopy was only poorly documented. The major experimental techniques employed in this work were pyrolysis jet spectroscopy, intracavity dye laser spectroscopy and high-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Since many of the species had not been previously studied by laser techniques, much effort was devoted to determining methods for producing, identifying and studying them. We have been very successful in a number of cases and have developed some new experimental techniques. Lists of publications resulting from the work and graduate and postdoctoral students supported during this project are included at the end of this report. Summaries of the results of some specific aspects of the project are given below.

  19. New York's Online Invasive Species Database and Mapping System What is iMapInvasives?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    New York's Online Invasive Species Database and Mapping System What is iMapInvasives? i through batch uploads and quality- controlled online submissions. The New York Natural Heritage Program.NYimapinvasives.org Questions? Contact: imapinvasives@nynhp.org Supported by the New York State Environmental Protection Fund

  20. New York's Online Invasive Species Database and Mapping System What is iMapInvasives?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    New York's Online Invasive Species Database and Mapping System What is iMapInvasives? i through batch uploads and quality- controlled online submissions. The New York Natural Heritage Program, and map data www.NYimapinvasives.org Questions? Contact: imapinvasives@nynhp.org Supported by the New York

  1. An evaluation of the contaminant impacts on plants serving as habitat for an endangered species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeShields, B.R.; Stelljes, M.E.; Hawkins, E.T.; Alsop, W.R. [Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA (United States); Collins, W. [Dept. of the Army, Fort Ord, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    As part of an ecological risk assessment at a Superfund site in Monterey County, California, potential impacts on an endangered species, the Smith`s blue butterfly (Euphilotes enoptes smithi) were evaluated. This species of butterfly lives along beach dunes historically used as small arms trainfire ranges. Historical land use resulted in the accumulation of spent bullets and varying concentrations of metals in site soil. Two species of buckwheat occurring at the site (Erigonium parvifolium and E. latifolium) that serve as the sole habitat for the butterfly were evaluated. It was assumed that if there were no impacts to the habitat, there would be no impacts to the endangered species itself. Surface soil and collocated plants were sampled and chemically analyzed in order to correlate soil concentrations with plant tissue concentrations. Surface soil and collocated plants were also sampled at reference sites to determine background concentrations. Tissue concentrations were compared to benchmark concentrations to evaluate potential impacts. In addition, soil samples and seeds from buckwheat growing at the site were collected and used to conduct root elongation assays in the laboratory. The objective of the assays was to assess effects of metals associated with the spent bullets in soil on plant growth. Within the plants, higher concentrations of all metals except zinc were found in the roots; zinc was equally distributed throughout the plants. No chemical-related impacts to the plants were identified.

  2. Non-target effects of invasive species management: beachgrass, birds, and bulldozers in coastal dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dunes PHOEBE L. ZARNETSKE,1, ERIC W. SEABLOOM,2 AND SALLY D. HACKER 1 1 Department of Zoology, Oregon may have knock-on effects on non-target native species and ecosystems. For example, coastal dunes arenaria and Ammophila breviligulata. These invasive grasses have converted open, low-lying sand dunes

  3. Xylem cavitation caused by drought and freezing stress in four co-occurring Juniperus species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Xylem cavitation caused by drought and freezing stress in four co-occurring Juniperus species induced by drought but in many cases, not by freezing. Rarely have vulnerability to drought and freezing and distribution of plants in many regions of the world. We studied vulnerability to drought- and freezing- induced

  4. A NEW GENUS AND SPECIES OF FLEA BEETLE (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE: ALTICINAE) FROM THE RAINFOREST CANOPY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    . Key Words: La Selva, ALAS Project, morphology, rainforest canopy fogging, Sphaeronychini, Monoplatini Malaise trapping was more efficient on a per- individual basis and canopy fogging was more efficient on a per-sample basis. This study also demonstrated that fog- ging multiple tree species captured spe- cies

  5. Analytical and characterization studies of organic and inorganic species in brown coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Domazetis; M. Raoarun; B.D. James; J. Liesegang; P.; J. Pigram; N. Brack [La Trobe University, Vic. (Australia). Department of Chemistry

    2006-08-15

    Detailed studies have been carried out on the distribution of organic functional groups and inorganic species in as-received (ar) and acid-washed (aw) brown coals using elemental analysis, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Surface concentrations of the various carbon groups, organic oxygen, and inorganic hydroxide were obtained using XPS, but oxygen from clay and quartz, if present, interfered with organic oxygen determinations for the coals. A comparison of ar and aw coals using XPS and SEM-EDX is provided in terms of inorganic and organic sulfur groups. Chloride in these coals is present mainly as acid extractable forms, but small amounts of chloride in the organic matrix were indicated by the elemental analysis of ultra low-ash coals. TOF-SIMS fragments from brown coals were indicative of polymers consisting mainly of single aromatic groups linked by hydrocarbons with carboxyl and phenol functional groups. Sulfur fragments were from inorganic sulfur, thiols, organo-sulfates, and S-N-organic species. Numerous fragments containing organically bound chloride were observed. Fragments of the inorganic species Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Ga were also observed. Environmentally undesirable species, particularly from organo-sulfur and organo-chloride groups in brown coal, are likely to emerge from processes that heat coal-water mixture. 54 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Novel species of Celoporthe from Eucalyptus and Syzygium trees in China and Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novel species of Celoporthe from Eucalyptus and Syzygium trees in China and Indonesia ShuaiFei Chen cumini. Three morphologically similar fungal isolates collected previously from Indonesia also were analyses showed that the Chinese isolates and those from Indonesia reside in a clade close to previously

  7. Ion species control in high flux deuterium plasma beams produced by a linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, G.-N.; Shu, W.M.; Nakamura, H.; O'Hira, S.; Nishi, M.

    2004-11-01

    The ion species ratios in low energy high flux deuterium plasma beams formed in a linear plasma generator were measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. And the species control in the plasma generator was evaluated by changing the operational parameters like neutral pressure, arc current, and axial magnetic confinement to the plasma column. The measurements reveal that the lower pressures prefer to form more D{sup +} ions, and the medium magnetic confinement at the higher pressures results in production of more D{sub 2}{sup +}, while the stronger confinement and/or larger arc current are helpful to D{sub 2}{sup +} conversion into D{sub 3}{sup +}. Therefore, the ion species can be controlled by adjusting the operational parameters of the plasma generator. With suitable adjustment, we can achieve plasma beams highly enriched with a single species of D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, or D{sub 3}{sup +}, to a ratio over 80%. It has been found that the axial magnetic configuration played a significant role in the formation of D{sub 3}{sup +} within the experimental pressure range.

  8. SubViral RNA: a database of the smallest known auto-replicable RNA species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    or partial sequences of vHDV. Figure 1. Evolution of the database since its creation. The number of sequencesSubViral RNA: a database of the smallest known auto-replicable RNA species Martin Pelchat*, Lynda and Accepted September 24, 2002 ABSTRACT We describe here the establishment of an online database containing

  9. Washington State Exotics Expedition 2000: A Rapid Survey of Exotic Species in the Shallow Waters of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Claudia E.

    Washington State Exotics Expedition 2000: A Rapid Survey of Exotic Species in the Shallow Waters T. Sewell, Kathy Welch For: The Nearshore Habitat Program Washington State Department of Natural Resources 1111 Washington Street SE, PO Box 47027, Olympia, WA 98504-7027 (360) 902-1100 October 2001 #12

  10. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species Zhaohui in media containing different concentrations of deuterium. The hydrogen isotopic ratios of lipids that lipid dD values can be used to determine water dD values, hydrogen isotope fractionation was found

  11. Review of the chewing louse genus Abrocomophaga (Phthiraptera: Amblycera), with description of two new species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Roger D.; Timm, Robert M.

    2000-04-01

    and illustrations for two new species of Abrocomophaga: A. emmonsae off Cuscomys ashaninka Emmons from Perú and A. hellenthali off the degu, Octodon degus (Molina), from Chile. After our reevaluation of the status of the family Abrocomophagidae, we consider it a...

  12. ECOLOGY AND POPULATION BIOLOGY Differential Survivorship of Invasive Mosquito Species in South Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juliano, Steven A.

    mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti (L.), the primary epidemic vector of dengue and yellow fever, was spreadECOLOGY AND POPULATION BIOLOGY Differential Survivorship of Invasive Mosquito Species in South of the arrival of the invasive container mosquito Aedes albopictus (Skuse), the previously dominant invasive

  13. Brazil Should Facilitate Research Brazil is home to more species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Letters Brazil Should Facilitate Research Permits Brazil is home to more species of plants is probably the world's lowest; as much as 40 times lower than in the United States (World Taxonomist Database 2009). Given Brazil's expanding in- vestments in meat and ethanol pro- duction and industrial

  14. Comment on 'Species separation in inertial confinement fusion fuels'[Phys. Plasmas 20, 012701 (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larroche, O. [CEA DIF, Bruyeres le Chatel, 91297 Arpajon Cedex (France)

    2013-04-15

    A recent paper presents numerical simulations of shock waves in a two-ion-component plasma, investigating how species separation occurring in the latter can affect the nuclear fusion yield of inertial confinement fusion targets. Here, it is shown that an important physical mechanism has obviously been omitted in those calculations, which thus lead to significantly overestimated results.

  15. early 800 native fish species in 36 families inhabit the freshwater rivers, streams, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    N early 800 native fish species in 36 families inhabit the freshwater rivers, streams, and lakes of the United States and Canada. North America has the most diverse temperate freshwater fish fauna in the world. Only about 5 percent of these are the familiar sport or game fishes like trout and bass. The remaining

  16. Soil Processes Affected by Sixteen Grassland Species Grown under Different Environmental Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Soil Processes Affected by Sixteen Grassland Species Grown under Different Environmental Conditions with the environment, de- termine both the quantity and chemistry of organic matter inputs to soils. Indeed, countless interspecific differences or changing environmental conditions, influences the dynamics of soil organic matter

  17. Identifying low-coverage surface species on noble metal nanoparticles by DNP-NMR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on ?-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  18. Enhanced Longevity by Ibuprofen, Conserved in Multiple Species, Occurs in Yeast through Inhibition of Tryptophan Import 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chong; Tsuchiyama, Scott K.; Nguyen, Quynh T.; Plyusnina, Ekaterina N.; Terrill, Samuel R.; Sahibzada, Sarah; Patel, Bhumil; Faulkner, Alena R.; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail V.; Tian, Ruilin; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Kaeberlein, Matt; Moskalev, Alexey A.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Polymenis, Michael

    2014-12-18

    by Ibuprofen, Conserved in Multiple Species, Occurs in Yeast through Inhibition of Tryptophan Import Chong He1, Scott K. Tsuchiyama1, Quynh T. Nguyen2, Ekaterina N. Plyusnina3,4, Samuel R. Terrill2, Sarah Sahibzada2, Bhumil Patel1, Alena R. Faulkner1, Mikhail V...

  19. The lethal fighting of larvae in many parasitoid species is a striking example of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayhew, Peter

    The lethal fighting of larvae in many parasitoid species is a striking example of sibling rivalry. Theory has suggested that such fighting, and subsequent solitary development, might be irreversible larvae, with the retention of fighting behaviour, is one way to escape the trap of solitary development

  20. New species of Anthostomella on fynbos, with a key to the genus in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New species of Anthostomella on fynbos, with a key to the genus in South Africa Seonju LEE, South Africa. E-mail : slee@maties.sun.ac.za Received 3 April 2002; accepted 18 November 2002. A study of saprobic fungi occurring on the fynbos of the Western Cape Province of South Africa yielded four unknown