Sample records for noxious weed species

  1. Appendix M Cover - Noxious Weeds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3 TableimpurityAppeals8I CulturalM Noxious Weed

  2. Bonneville Power Administration, Lower Columbia Region: Noxious Weed Management, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR; Oregon Department of Agriculture Noxious Weed Control Program

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 1996 season ODA executed the contract between BPA and ODA. Execution of this contract included the following activities: Survey for target noxious weeds, such as Gorse; collection and redistribution of biological control agents, for example, Apion seed weevils for Scotch broom, bioagents for diffuse and spotted knapweed, Gorse spider mite, and gall fly releases for control of Canada thistle and bull thistle; and control of isolated infestations of Gorse on BPA rights-of-way. Training was provided for line crews at the Chemawa, Alevy and North Bend districts. The purpose of the program is to assist BPA in the integrated prevention and control of noxious weed species on BPA transmission line maintenance right-of-ways.

  3. Noxious Weed Survey of the U.S. Air Force Academy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noxious Weed Survey of the U.S. Air Force Academy and Farish Outdoor Recreation Area Colorado 80523 http://www.cnhp.colostate.edu April 15, 2003 Prepared For: U.S. Air Force Academy Department ................................................................................................... 5 OTHER RESEARCH AT THE U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY AND FARISH OUTDOOR RECREATION AREA

  4. Appendix M Cover - Noxious Weeds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recta cinquefoil, sulfur Class B Class B Class B Pueraria montana var. lobata kudzu Class A Class A Class A, T (K) Rorippa austriaca fieldcress, Austrian Class B Class B...

  5. Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

  6. Competitive effects of introduced annual weeds on some native and reclamation species in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.B.; Knight, D.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four experiments were conducted to examine the competitive effects of introduced annual weeds on certain native and reclamation species. The first experiment was initiated by discing three sites in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, at three distances from introduced weed seed sources. Introduced weed colonization was greatest when a seed source was located nearby. Higher weed cover resulted in reductions of percent cover, density, and richness of the native species. The second experiment was conducted in the greenhouse and was designed to determine if there are changes in response of S. kali and the native grasses Agropyron smithii and Bouteloua gracilis to competition and water regime. Both grass species had lower biomass and higher stomatal resistance when growing in mixed culture with S. kali than in pure culture in the dry regime, but there were no significant differences in the wet regime. In general, the difference in plant response between mixed and pure cultures was more pronounced in the dry than in the wet regime. The third study was a greenhouse experiment on germination and competition of S. kali (a C/sub 4/ species) with native species Lepidium densiflorum (C/sub 3/), Chenopodium pratericola (C/sub 3/), A. smithii (C/sub 3/), and B. gracilis (C/sub 4/) under May, June, and July temperature regimes. Salsola kali germinated equally well in all three regimes, but the other C/sub 4/ species had highest germination in the July regime and the C/sub 3/ species in the May and June regimes. The fourth study was designed to examine the effect of weed colonization on the success of mine reclamation. Little effect was observed, but colonization by introduced annuals was very low. (ERB)

  7. Nevada's Noxious Weed Program Nevada Department of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    Partnership *Lincoln County *Lower Truckee *Newark/Long Valley *N. Nye & Esmeralda *Pershing County *Railroad

  8. www.btny.purdue.edu/weedscience/ Noxious and Invasive Weeds and The Weed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but it does grow wild in Indiana. Also known as hemp, it was introduced in the US as a fiber crop and some

  9. Weed Control Recommendations in Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gaylon; Baumann, Paul A.; Baughman, Todd; Bean, Brent W.

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    , pennycress, Russian thistle, kochia, tansy mustard, wild mustard. 1?2-leaf stage or 1?6-leaf stage, depending on weed species; refer to label. Apply to wheat after emergence to before second node is detectable. Consult the product label for crop..., and combine their use with mechanical, cultural or biological methods. 2. Rotate or mix herbicides with different modes of action. 3. If possible, rotate crops where herbicide rotations are feasible. 4. Scout fields regularly for resistant weed populations...

  10. acute noxious stimulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presence of Chronic Pain Marwan N. Baliki,1 Paul Y. Geha,1 Howard L. Fields,5 compared brain activations in response to acute noxious thermal stimuli in controls and chronic back...

  11. Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad Spanish explorers of this region came across a lagoon Woodfield Dubbed "killer algae," the alien seaweed Caulerpa taxifolia was discovered in June 2000. Caulerpa taxifolia is a green alga native to tropical waters that typically grows to small size

  12. Suggestions For Weed Control In Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.; Lemon, Robert G.

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    broadcast Time to apply Remarks Many annual grasses and small-seeded broad- leaf weeds Refer to label for weed- specific rates. Prowl ? 3.3EC 1.2?4.8 pt (pendimethalin) BASF 10 gal water or more by ground. 5 gal or more by air. May also be applied... Herbicide common name Spray volume per acre broadcast Time to apply Remarks Refer to label for list of grasses and broadleaf species controlled or suppressed. Prowl ? H 2 O 1?4 pt (pendimethalin) BASF 10 gal water or more by ground. 5 gal or more...

  13. Weed Management Costs, Weed Best Management Practices, and The Roundup Ready Weed Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Paul D.

    substantially increase weed management costs and so discourage adoption. This paper uses survey results: glyphosate, resistance management, BMP adoption, telephone survey, herbicide #12;2 INTRODUCTION Roundup ReadyWeed Management Costs, Weed Best Management Practices, and The Roundup Ready® Weed Management

  14. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of noxious facilities'' be identified and measured To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  15. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of ``noxious facilities`` be identified and measured? To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  16. FIELD CROPS 2012 Weeds: Corn 5-53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in Delmarva corn production. To be successful in controlling weeds in corn, the weed control program must this record to plan your weed control program. Cultural control. Several aspects of cultural weed control should be considered in planning a corn weed control program. These include weed-free seed, cover crops

  17. WILDLAND WEEDS 19 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Sharon Ewe Mei

    and Myrsinaceae (Burkill 1935). Two field expeditions were undertaken during the trip. Fifteen natural areas the need for long-term food storage. Despite being noted in the floras of Central and South America-term alternatives. In describing this species, Martin (1974) observed that underground tubers were sometimes

  18. aquatic weeds progress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Choice of weeding option may be dictated by ground or weather conditions. On brownfield sites as inclement weather may preclude chemical weeding beyond a time when plants...

  19. annual dicotyledonous weeds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Choice of weeding option may be dictated by ground or weather conditions. On brownfield sites as inclement weather may preclude chemical weeding beyond a time when plants...

  20. autonomous laser weeding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Choice of weeding option may be dictated by ground or weather conditions. On brownfield sites as inclement weather may preclude chemical weeding beyond a time when plants...

  1. Weed Busters: How to Neutralize Silverleaf Nightshade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Extension publication L-5465, Weed Busters Sprayer Calibration Guide. Prepare the Herbicide Mix A mixture of either Grazon P+D?, Weedmaster?, or Range Star? is recommended to control silverleaf nightshade. Weedmaster? and Range Star? both con- tain dicamba...

  2. Weed Busters: How to Repel Rayless Goldenrod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    sprayers, see Extension publication L-5465, Weed Busters Sprayer Calibration Guide. Prepare the Herbicide Mix Two herbicides are available to effectively control ray- less goldenrod with the ground broadcast method: To rdon 22K? and Escort? (also sold under...

  3. RESEARCH ARTICLE Evidence for weed quantity as the major information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Evidence for weed quantity as the major information gathered by organic farmers quantity was the information most frequently col- lected by organic farmers both for short- and long, as weeds are one of the main limiting factors of yield (Bàrberi 2002). Weed biomass, density, diversity

  4. Weed Busters: How to Pound Threadleaf Groundsel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Hart, Charles R.; Cadenhead, J. F.

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    L-5470 9/05 How to Pound Threadleaf Groundsel (Senecio) Safe and effective three-step ways to control threadleaf groundsel Weed Treatment Series Allan McGinty, Charles Hart and J. F. Cadenhead Extension Range Specialists The Texas A&M University...

  5. Weed Control Research in Sugar Beets.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiese, A. F.; Scott, P. R.; Lavake, D. E.; Winter, S. R.; Owen, D. F.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . F. Owen* Total sugar beet acreage in the Texas Panhandle Service, Bushland; Holly Sugar Corporation, has paried from 20,000 to 40,000 acres since Holly Hereford; Texas Tech Center, Pantex; and farmers in Sugar Corporation started operations... in 1964. the Panhandle. : Ineffective weed control methods and high hoeing ' costs, excessive nitrogen fertilization, and leaf spot Preplant Incorporation I disease have created problems for sugar beet The effectiveness of preplant herbicides...

  6. assessing non-chemical weeding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Choice of weeding option may be dictated by ground or weather conditions. On brownfield sites as inclement weather may preclude chemical weeding beyond a time when plants...

  7. Nitrogen, Water, Weeds and Applying Science to the Art of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Nitrogen, Water, Weeds and Beetles: Applying Science to the Art of Vegetable Gardening 2009 LRES and Beans 6 2. Bait Cropping Experiment 14 3. Effects of mulching in a small scale vegetable garden 18 4 challenges in the management of insect pests, soil nutrients, water, and weeds. This paper presents

  8. Suggestions for Weed Control in Sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.; Coffman, Cloyce G.

    2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Roundup Ultra ? (glyphosate) Monsanto Roundup Ultra ? + Banvel ? (dicamba) BASF Roundup Ultra ? + 2,4-D ? (2,4-D) Several Manufacturers 4.0 to 5.0 qts. 2 qts. + 1 pt. (0.5 lb. a.i.) 2 qts. + 1 qt. (1 lb. a.i.) Before planting or after harvest. Apply when... for additional restrictions and use precautions. Use only "protected" sorghum seed. Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds Frontier ? 6.0 (dimethenamid) BASF 16 to 28 oz. Rate dependent on soil texture, C.E.C. and organic matter content Preplant surface applied...

  9. Weed Technology. 2005. Volume 19:10501055 Alternative to Hand-Weeding Volunteer Potato (Solanum tuberosum) in Carrot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    1050 Weed Technology. 2005. Volume 19:1050­1055 Alternative to Hand-Weeding Volunteer Potato herbicides are used in carrot production in the United States, and none suppress volunteer potato, a serious emerged volunteer potato within carrot. The objective of this work was to evaluate carrot tolerance

  10. Protecting the Environment Using Integrated Weed Management in Lawns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketchersid, Mary; Baumann, Paul A.

    2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) can be used to control weeds, keep lawns healthy and protect the environment. This publication explains the steps to take in an IPM program and the importance of calibrating equipment and making proper calculations...

  11. Weed Busters: How to Control Common (Annual) Broomweed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    to use, environmentally responsible and effective. ?The ground broadcast spray method is for larg- er areas with heavy infestations. ? The individual plant leaf spray method can be used for scattered or smaller infestations. Using these weed busters... on how to calibrate a ground broadcast sprayer, see Extension publication L-5465, Weed Busters: Sprayer Calibration Guide. Prepare the Herbicide Mix Several herbicide mixtures may be used to effectively control common broomweed with the ground broad- cast...

  12. Weed Busters: How to Get Drummond's and Common Goldenweed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    livestock or deer, and few cases of poisoning are document- ed. A close relative, rayless goldenrod, causes signif- icant livestock losses annually in West Texas. (See Extension publication L-5464, Weed Busters: How to Repel Rayless Goldenrod.) In recent... spray is best for treating sparse infestations. Using these Weed Busters methods, you will be able to selectively kill unwanted goldenweed plants with little or no damage to desirable vegetation. Your results may vary, but you should be able to kill...

  13. Weed Mapping in Early-Season Maize Fields Using Object-Based Analysis of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a weed infestation map in a grid structure. The estimationImages of a weed coverage map in a grid framework adapted toof a weed infestation map in a grid structure. A flowchart

  14. Horticultural & Forest crops 2014 Grapes: Weed Control in Vineyards 3-19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Horticultural & Forest crops 2014 Grapes: Weed Control in Vineyards 3-19 Weed Control in Vineyards and postemergence herbicides can be made to control existing vegetation and control weeds germinating from seed oz) Vines must be established at least 5 years. Do not use in soils high in sand or gravel. Apply

  15. Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics C. Neal Stewart, Jr and their evolution remain poorly understood, but genomic approaches offer tremendous promise for elucidating these important features of weed biology. However, the genomic tools and resources available for weed research

  16. Direct and Indirect Impacts of Weed Management Practices on Soil Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    : although effective weed management and enhancement of soil quality are necessary components of sustainable275 18 Direct and Indirect Impacts of Weed Management Practices on Soil Quality Richard G. Smith, crop yield, and agricultural sustainability (Kar- len et al., 2001), the impact that weed management

  17. Locoine, the Poisonous Principle of Loco Weed, Astragalus earlei.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    weed Astragalus *lei. The toxic principle has been given the name locoine. has been isolated by a long series of chemical separations, :h separation being tested by feeding to cats. It is a strong se, very soluble in water a.nd alcohol, but only... of the Toxic Principle The loco weed was at first extracted with boiling water. Considerable quantities of materials other than the toxic substance were dissolved. After the poisonous principle was found to be very soluble in alcohol, the plant...

  18. Suggestions for Chemical Weed and Brush Control on Rangeland.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Tommy G.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . beyond canopy edge. stem diameter Blackgum, sweetgum Ammate X-NI 4 Ib crystals Apply to freshly Fall and winter Wash metal container after use N Table 2. Herbicides for use on rangeland to control undesirable weeds and brush (continued). Brush or weed... or poorly Spike 20P 1/2 oz of pellets Anytime during drained sites nor on (I/looz) per year; optimum soils classified as clays. 45 sq ft or 2 to period is Oct. 1 to 4 in of stem April 1. diameter Common or Eastern Ammate X-NI 3 Ib crystals Apply...

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Biodegradable mulch instead of polyethylene for weed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of biodegradable plastic mulch, black, 15 m, (6) oxo-degradable plastic mulch, black, 15 m, (7) paper mulch, black mulches and PE ranging between 80% and 100% for all of them; also, yield was similar for all plasticRESEARCH ARTICLE Biodegradable mulch instead of polyethylene for weed control of processing tomato

  20. Weed Busters: How to Sweep Out Perennial Broomweed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan; Cadenhead, J. F.

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    . L-5471 9/05 How to Sweep Out Perennial Broomweed Safe and effective three-step ways to control perennial broomweed Weed Treatment Series Charles R. Hart, Allan McGinty and J.F. Cadenhead Extension Range Specialists The Texas A&M University System...

  1. Biofuels from a Floating Water Weed | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Biofuels from a Floating Water Weed Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External...

  2. 124 BioScience February 2013 / Vol. 63 No. 2 www.biosciencemag.org Navigating the "Noxious" and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    for bioenergy producers and others in plant industry, who are under scrutiny for promoting potentially invasive for yield-maximizing bioenergy crops for deployment into novel agricultural systems and less species as energy crops. As the bioenergy industry gains momentum, a revised regulatory regime may

  3. Page 1 of 5 Quick Guide for Weed Control in Texas High Plains Grain Sorghum2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Page 1 of 5 Quick Guide for Weed Control in Texas High Plains Grain Sorghum­2009 Brent Bean, Texas is no substitute for the herbicide product labels! It is intended to serve only as a guide for controlling weeds prior to crop emergence. Do not use on soils with less than 1% O.M. or sand, loamy sand or sandy loam

  4. Page 1 of 6 Quick Guide for Weed Control in Texas High Plains Grain Sorghum 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Page 1 of 6 Quick Guide for Weed Control in Texas High Plains Grain Sorghum ­ 2007 Brent Bean for the herbicide product labels! It is intended to serve only as a guide for controlling weeds in sorghum. Because emergence. Do not use on soils with less than 1% O.M. or sand, loamy sand or sandy loam textured. Good

  5. HOME GROUNDS & ANIMALS 2014 Home Ornamentals: Weed Management in Home Ornamental Beds 4-89

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    mulches: Use of solid black plastic or a landscape fabric improves weed control compared to an organic mulch alone. Solid black plastic is more effective for weed control than the available landscape fabrics. Organic mulches: Pine bark, hardwood bark, pine straw and wood chips are all good for mulching. Watch soil

  6. Preharvest Treatment Options for Dry Edible Beans Christy Sprague, Associate Professor and Weed Extension Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preharvest Treatment Options for Dry Edible Beans Christy Sprague, Associate Professor and Weed by earlier weed management practices and "green" stems or leaves of dry bean plants can be a major problem be used for preharvest treatments in dry beans. These products are Gramoxone Inteon 2SL (paraquat

  7. Volunteer Potato Density Influences Critical Time of Weed Removal in Bulb Onion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    Volunteer Potato Density Influences Critical Time of Weed Removal in Bulb Onion Martin M. Williams II, Corey V. Ransom, and W. Mack Thompson* Volunteer potato is highly competitive with onion and few control tactics are effective for removing this weed from an onion crop. Both volunteer potato density

  8. Locoine, the Poisonous Principle of Loco Weed, Astragalus earlei. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~l@rd & :J!j ha~':cl: C Acg e3: Texas College Staiion, Te~as. AGRICUhTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President - v eac ba* in n "L Phis bulletin contains an account of the separation and lation of the toxic principle of the loco... weed Astragalus *lei. The toxic principle has been given the name locoine. has been isolated by a long series of chemical separations, :h separation being tested by feeding to cats. It is a strong se, very soluble in water a.nd alcohol, but only...

  9. In: Weeds: Management, Economic Impacts and Biology ISBN: 978-1-60741-010-2 Editor: Rudolph V. Kingely Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and soil quality, recreational values, and wildlife habitat. Traditionally, weed management in natural because most weed management tools originated in agricultural systems where removal of the weed commonly of natural systems and the limitations of available management tools. To improve weed management in natural

  10. Genetic diversity and species relationships in the Oryza complex and glufosinate tolerance in rice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughan, Laura Kelly

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The weed red rice is a major problem in rice producing areas world wide. All of the red rice in commercial rice fields in the United States has traditionally been considered to be the same species as commercial rice, Oryza sativa. However, using DNA...

  11. Effects of Oilseed Meals on the Germination, Growth, and Survival of Crop and Weed Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothlisberger, Katie Lynn

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Oilseed crops are being widely evaluated for potential biodiesel production. Seed meal (SM) remaining after extracting oil may have use as a bioherbicide or organic fertilizer. Brassicaceae SM often contains glucosinolates that can hydrolyze...

  12. Tolerance and weed management systems in imidazolinone tolerant corn (Zea mays L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Ann Marie

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of imidazolinone weed management systems and tolerance of imidazolinone tolerant corn to imazapic. Field experiments were conducted in 1997 and 1998 at the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES...

  13. Weed Busters: How to take the Sting out of Texas Bull Nettle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; Lyons, Robert K.; McGinty, Allan

    2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    the Sting out of Texas Bullnettle Safe and effective three-step ways to control Texas bullnettle Weed Treatment Series Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Stephenville Robert K. Lyons, Extension Range Specialist, Uvalde Allan McGinty, Extension...

  14. Clean Diesel: Overcoming Noxious Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Daniel; Dwyer, Harry A.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel cells and other devices as auxiliary power units in long-haul truckshaul heavy-duty trucks. Over time, provides the potential for much greater energy efficiency and hybrid electric and fuel-

  15. QWhat are viable strategies for Iowa grape growers to successfully manage weeds and/or reduce pesticide usage while maintaining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    . Sustainable weed management that includes living or soil mulches minimizes some of the environmental risks for achieving weed management in Iowa vineyards will enable growers to sustainably manage this unique and encourage the use of sustainable land management practices that are environmentally sound, economically

  16. 243USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Effects of Seedling Protectors andWeed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of the more common products are plastic mesh cages, cylinders made from aluminum window screen, cages. These are rigid, translucent, double-walled plastic cylinders, developed in England and used there for more than to eliminate weeds, including mulch, herbicides, scalping and mowing. Though studies comparing weed control

  17. Three ACE awards for California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors, by

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Editor Janet White accepted the awards during the 2012 ACEa noxious weed. Three ACE awards for California AgricultureAgriculture team has won three awards from the Association

  18. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2013 AQUATIC WEED CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    . Replacement stocking of grass carp is necessary when fish are lost. A permit is required to stock grass carp of Natural Resources (SC DNR) now requires a free of charge permit prior to stocking tilapia and triploid grass carp for aquatic weed control in SC. A permit can be obtained from SC DNR at 803-734-3891 or from

  19. WEED INFESTATIONS ARE GENERALLY MORE frequent along roadsides and other disturbed areas than

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    in adjacent land, possibly because vehicles spread seeds into these areas and such areas provide suitable habitats for weed growth. Many types of vehicles, including passenger cars, 4-wheel drive (4WD) trucks, agricultural implements, tracked vehicles and all- terrain vehicles (ATVs) have been found to pick up seeds

  20. The biology of Canadian weeds. 117. Taraxacum officinale G. H. Weber ex Wiggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    The biology of Canadian weeds. 117. Taraxacum officinale G. H. Weber ex Wiggers S. M. Stewart-Wade1 officinale G. H. Weber ex Wiggers. Can. J. Plant Sci. 82: 825­853. Taraxacum officinale G. H. Weber ex. Weber ex Wiggers. Can. J. Plant Sci. 82: 825­853. Taraxacum officinale G. H. Weber ex Wiggers (pissenlit

  1. Weed evolution after crop gene introgression: greater survival and fecundity of hybrids in a new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Allison A.

    . raphanistrum · Raphanus sativus) in Michigan (MI), USA. Hybrid and wild populations had similar growth rates-wild hybrids, we established four wild (Raphanus raphanistrum) and four hybrid radish populations (R, Raphanus raphanistrum. Ecology Letters (2006) 9: 1198­1209 I N T R O DU C T I O N Weed populations can

  2. Herbicidal Activity of Mustard Seed Meal on Weed and Vegetable Emergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xi

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine the herbicidal activity of MSMs (Sinapis alba ‘IdaGold’ and Brassica juncea ‘Pacific Gold’) on weed and vegetable emergence. In Expt. 1, MSMs were applied at 0, 50, 100, 200 or 300 g/m2 to the bottom of petri dishes and covered with germination mix...

  3. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Common Brush and Weed Management Mistakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.; Clayton, Lindi

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and to the environment. Many may be illegal. When a neighbor or salesperson at the local feed store sug- gests a specific treatment, check the label and ask the experts to make sure it is accurate, safe and legal. Common Brush and Weed Management Mistakes Allan Mc...

  4. WEED CONTROL BPG NOTE 11 Best Practice Guidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    retrospectively after the situation has become severe. Avoiding a problem is better than taking remedial action quality tree planting stock as it will be able to resist competition better and will become established and containerised stock rather than specimen trees. On more fertile sites, fast growing tree species that can reach

  5. Endangered Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice LovatoEndangered Species

  6. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and fresh water aquatic weeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ORCA clone of the red seaweed Gracilaria tikvahiae has been in culture continuously for over two years. Yield for the past year has averaged 12 g ash-free dry wt/m/sup 2/ .day (17.5 t/a.y) in suspended 2600-1 aluminum tank cultures with four exchanges of enriched seawater per day and continuous aeration. Yields from nonintensive pond-bottom culture, similar to commercial Gracilaria culture methods in Taiwan, averaged 3 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day in preliminary experiments. Rope and spray cultures were not successful. Yields of water hyacinths from March 1978 to March 1979 averaged 25 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day (37 t/a.y). Season, nutrient availability (form and quantity) and stand density were found to affect the relative proportions of structural and nonstructural tissue in water hyacinths and thereby significantly affect digestibility of and methane production by the plants. Pennywort (Hydrocotyle) grew poorly in winter and its annual yield averaged only one-third that of water hyacinth. Water lettuce (Pistia) appears more comparable to hyacinths in preliminary studies and its yields will be monitored throughout a complete year. Stable, continuous anaerobic digestion of both water hyacinths and Gracilaria has been maintained with an average gas production from both species of 0.4 1/g volatile solids at 60% methane.

  7. TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

  8. Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Distributions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) disturbance frequency, and (4) the severity9 of the disturbance. Both frequency and severity are important1 Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Telephone: +01-928-556-2176, FAX +01-928-556-21308 9 SHORT TITLE: Soil Disturbances, Biodiversity

  9. Evaluation of Herbicides For Weed Control and Crop Injury in Snap Beans: 2004 Russell W. Wallace, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Evaluation of Herbicides For Weed Control and Crop Injury in Snap Beans: 2004 Russell W. Wallace and potential phytotoxicity on snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) grown in the Pearsall, Texas region. Materials, then disking the field and planting beans in 5-row beds. Snap beans (var. "BBL 156") were planted on February

  10. Weed Technology. 2005. Volume 19:443450 Managing Volunteer Potato (Solanum tuberosum) in Field Corn with Mesotrione

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    443 Weed Technology. 2005. Volume 19:443­450 Managing Volunteer Potato (Solanum tuberosum) in Field: Volunteer potato is becoming increasingly detrimental in potato production regions. We assessed methods' potato varieties by mesotrione applied at 0.11 kg/ha. In field studies conducted near Paterson, WA

  11. 2007 Texas High Plains Sunflower Weed Control Guide Brent Bean, Extension Agronomy, Texas A&M-Amarillo, bbean@ag.tamu.edu, 806-677-5600

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    2007 Texas High Plains Sunflower Weed Control Guide Brent Bean, Extension Agronomy, Texas A, silty clay, clay. Medium = loam, silt loam, silt, sandy clay loam. Coarse = sand, loamy sand, sandy loam

  12. Invasive Species Conservation Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    and decline of birds, mammals, and other species · Result in electrical outages ­ 1600+ between `78-'97 #12;

  13. ENDANGERED SPECIES RESEARCH Endang Species Res

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    include thermal expansion of the warming oceans along with melting of glaciers and ice caps (Church et al considerably this century, potentially affecting species that rely on coastal habitat. The Northwestern

  14. book review: Species distribution models for species distribution modellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormann, Carsten F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mapping  species  distributions:  spa? tial inference and news and update  book review  Species distribution models for species distribution modellers  Ecological niches and 

  15. ENDANGERED SPECIES RESEARCH Endang Species Res

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girondot, Marc

    Metropolitan University, Department of Zoology, Port Elizabeth 6031, South Africa 2 Laboratoire Écologie 183 Amber Valley, Private Bag X 30, Howick 3290, South Africa ABSTRACT: Average age and size at first of a species/ population are highly modified by energy availability (Berner & Blanckenhorn 2007). Therefore

  16. Turbulent dispersal promotes species coexistence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkley, Heather A; Kendall, Bruce E.; Mitarai, Satoshi; Siegel, David A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drive all other species to extinction. However, empiricalA will always drive species B to extinction (unless f A = fductivity species (species B) to extinction (Fig. 2a). In

  17. ENDANGERED SPECIES PETITION MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 a. Petitions to List, Reclassify, or Delist Species . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 A. Petitions to List, Reclassify, or Delist Species

  18. Invasive Species Anthony Ricciardi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    monograph The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants [1] helped inspire two generations of scientists species on its environment. Invasibility The vulnerability of a habitat, community, or ecosystem of Species, Darwin (1859) warned "Let it be remembered how powerful the influence of a single introduced tree

  19. Savings Along the Rio Grande 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    management programs for noxious weeds and analyze sap-flux and water-use estimates for saltcedar trees. Publications developed from this research address irrigating urban landscapes with moderately saline water. Researchers have also acquired a user...

  20. anticholinesterase poisoning annual: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may and speech Make it hard to pay attention and learn FACT Most children get lead poisoning from paint 19 NOXIOUS WEED FACT SHEET Poison Hemlock CiteSeer Summary:...

  1. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    needed as follow-up to treat misses and any other re-growth from 2-3 years after initial treatment. Noxious weed treatments may be needed at this time. Future cycles - As tall...

  2. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Weed quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twelve anamolous areas attributable to gamma radiation in the uranium spectral window, and twenty-three in the thorium channel, have been recognized and delineated on the Weed quadrangle. The majority of the uranium anomalies are located in the southwestern part of the map sheet. Most of these are correlated with the pre-Cretaceous metamorphic rock system and the Mesozoic granitic rocks intrusive into it. Of the twenty-three anomalous areas of increased gamma radiation in the thorium spectral window, most are located in the northeast and the east center in a north-south trending belt. However, this apparent alignment is probably fortuitous as the individual anomalies are correlated with several different rock formations. Three are correlated with upper Cretaceous marine sediments, six with Ordovician marine sediments, two with Mesozoic granitic intrusives, and two with Silurian marine sediments. In the northwestern part of the quadrangle, four thorium radiation anomalies are delineated over exposures of upper Jurassic marine rocks. Anomaly 6, in the southwest, warrants attention as it suggests strong radiation in the uranium channel with little or no thorium radiation. The uranium/thorium and uranium/potassium ratio anomalies are also strong, supporting the likelihood of uranium enrichment. The feature is located on line 540, fiducials 7700 to 7720. Anomaly 7, on line 540, fiducials 8390 to 8420, shows similar characteristics although a minor thorium excursion is present. Anomaly 10, on line 3010 fiducials 9820 to 9840, is also characterized by a strong uranium radiation spike, with minor thorium radiation. The uranium/thorium and uranium/potassium ratio anomalies are well defined and relatively intense.

  3. Preservation of a species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witt, Sarah (Sarah Elizabeth)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To put it simply, humans are going extinct. I identify the source of the problem as an imperceptible societal trend to eliminate the experience that authenticates us as a living species: failure. We've unanimously designated ...

  4. Controlling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvinia-eating weevils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    26 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Melanie Orth Caddo Lake is the focus of the first project for the Center for Invasive Species Eradication. Scientists will demonstrate and evaulate different methods for controlling and preventing...

  5. Contolling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvina-eating weevils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    26 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Melanie Orth Caddo Lake is the focus of the first project for the Center for Invasive Species Eradication. Scientists will demonstrate and evaulate different methods for controlling and preventing...

  6. Genomic definition of species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  7. Montana Weed Control Association Annual Meeting. January 11th 2011, Great Falls, MT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Seed movement by vehicles: how many, how far, and under what conditions? Movement of seeds by vehicles is generally thought to increase the spread of invasive plant species, but few studies have vehicles when driven a range of distances on different surfaces (asphalt, unpaved and offroad) under wet

  8. The ideal site for a home vegetable garden is one that receives full sun all day long, is blessed with deep, well-drained topsoil, protected from strong winds, free of rocks and perennial weeds and located close to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    the area for an entire growing season with construction grade black plastic mulch. ...and rocks The soils to tend to the important chores of watering, weeding, mulching and monitor- ing for pests or diseases when

  9. Contolling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvina-eating weevils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wide, and are infested with the plant?s only biological enemy, the salvinia weevil. #22;e weevil prefers warm temperatures and eats the giant salvinia as its only food source. #22;ese tanks are being used to grow giant salvinia and propagate... the growth of giant salvinia. Photo by Lucas Gregory. Project members of the recently funded Center for Invasive Species Eradication (CISE) have been hard at work managing the center?s #28;rst undertaking, the Caddo Lake Giant Salvinia Eradication...

  10. Controlling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvinia-eating weevils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wide, and are infested with the plant?s only biological enemy, the salvinia weevil. #22;e weevil prefers warm temperatures and eats the giant salvinia as its only food source. #22;ese tanks are being used to grow giant salvinia and propagate... the growth of giant salvinia. Photo by Lucas Gregory. Project members of the recently funded Center for Invasive Species Eradication (CISE) have been hard at work managing the center?s #28;rst undertaking, the Caddo Lake Giant Salvinia Eradication...

  11. BPA Project #2006-004-00 Presentation to ISRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    weed infestations throughout the Wildlife Area #12;#12;·74,212 acres funded by BPA (105,461 total acres, and Manage: Shrub steppe habitat Forest habitat Riparian habitat Improve water quality · Monitor wildlife of undesirable vegetation, and noxious weed control. 1,280 acres restored with native & nativelike seedings

  12. Exotic Species What's the Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    of introduced species as "the stealth destroyers of the American environment" (McDonald 1999: A15). Another seeds, eggs, spores, or other biological material capable of propagating that species

  13. 2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

    2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the upland areas of the PNNL site in 2011. Efforts in 2011 to control noxious weed populations (comprising plant species designated as Class B noxious weeds by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board) discovered in 2009 and initially treated with herbicides in 2010 are described in Appendix B.

  14. Insect Conservation under the Endangered Species Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lugo, Ezequiel

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the trend toward species extinction, whatever the cost." 'protection for species on the verge of extinction. 43. Id.about the extinction of any species 3 1 and, unlike earlier

  15. Chytridiomycosis as a cause of species extinction?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Tamás

    Chytridiomycosis as a cause of species extinction? Yimin Du Penny Langhammer Yijun Lou John population declines, species extinctions ­ Biodiversity loss · Theoretical ­ Host extinction generally to amphibian species Stuart et al. 2004. Science 306: 17831786 #12;Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd

  16. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Game and Parks Commission is responsible for implementing and promulgating regulations to protect species named in the Endangered Species Act, as well as other endangered or threatened species...

  17. Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The regulations that accompany the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act list three categories of animals and plants in need of protection: endangered, threatened, and species of special concern....

  18. Invasive species Invasive species have been described as the second-greatest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark A.

    ····· Invasive species Invasive species have been described as the second-greatest extinction species a major cause of animal extinctions, or has the extinction threat of invasive species been exaggerated? By what mechanisms have invasive species driven animal species to extinction? Are certain animal

  19. Explaining species distribution patterns through hierarchical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfand, Alan E.; Silander, John A., Jr.; Wu, Shanshan; Latimer, Andrew; Lewis, Paul O.; Rebelo, Anthony G.; Holder, Mark T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bayesian Analysis (2006) 1, Number 1, pp. 41–92 Explaining Species Distribution Patterns through Hierarchical Modeling Alan E. Gelfand?, John A. Silander Jr†., Shanshan Wu‡, Andrew Latimer§, Paul O. Lewis¶, Anthony G. Rebelo? and Mark Holder..., spatial logistic re- gression, species range, species richness. 1 Introduction Ecologists increasingly use species distribution models to address theoretical and practi- cal issues including predicting the response of species to climate change (Midgley et...

  20. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez-García, Virginia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm --similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity-- here we propose a method which --by exploiting their nested architecture-- allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  1. Factoring species, non-species values and threats into biodiversity prioritisation across the ecoregions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    population density, and the extinction risk of species. This threat index is positively correlated with allFactoring species, non-species values and threats into biodiversity prioritisation across Biodiversity Species Non-species biological values Threat A B S T R A C T Biodiversity in Africa, Madagascar

  2. Strength in Numbers: Setting Quantitative Criteria for Listing Species under the Endangered Species Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins, Kalyani

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the trend toward species extinction, whatever the cost." 9 'to any species at a "measurable risk" of extinction. H.R.dan- ger of extinction while those species that are listed

  3. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion ...

  4. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandel, Navdeep S

    Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

  5. Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    Saving Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE Edited by Lee Hannah ISLANDPRESS-in-Publication Data Saving a million species : extinction risk from climate change / edited by LeeHannah. p. cm. ISBN, extinction, extinction risk, biodiversity,freshwater, marine, biology, coral bleaching, species area

  6. Genomic definition of species. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A genome is the sum total of the DNA sequences in the cells of an individual organism. The common usage that species possess genomes comes naturally to biochemists, who have shown that all protein and nucleic acid molecules are at the same time species- and individual-specific, with minor individual variations being superimposed on a consensus sequence that is constant for a species. By extension, this property is attributed to the common features of DNA in the chromosomes of members of a given species and is called species genome. Our proposal for the definition of a biological species is as follows: A species comprises a group of actual and potential biological organisms built according to a unique genome program that is recorded, and at least in part expressed, in the structures of their genomic nucleic acid molecule(s), having intragroup sequence differences which can be fully interconverted in the process of organismal reproduction.

  7. Plant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123127 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomimatsu,, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Genetics, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810, JapanPlant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123­127 © 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology Blackwell Science, LtdOxford, UKPSBPlant Species Biology1442-1984The Society for the Study of Species

  8. Correlates of vulnerability among arthropod species threatened by invasive ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krushelnycky, Paul D.; Gillespie, Rosemary G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    declines and extinctions of native species worldwide.and even extinctions, of native species through variousG (2004) How species respond to multiple extinction threats.

  9. COOPERATION WITH THE STATES THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT SECTION 6 PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    endangered and threatened species, candidate species, and recently de-listed species. Under section 6, NMFS

  10. Distributed Controller Synthesis for Local Speci cations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Madhusudan

    | and a speci#12;cation, say, a temporal logic formula. The plant is viewed as an existing program which speci Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA (On leave from Chennai Mathematical Institute, Chennai, India) thiagu as a temporal logic formula, whether there exists a program for the system such that no matter how

  11. SERI Aquatic Species Program: 1983 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1983 research was carried out under three tasks: biological, engineering, and analysis. Biological research was aimed at screening for promising species of microalgae, macroalgae, and emergent plants that could be cultivated for energy products. Promising species were studied further to improve yields.

  12. LEAH GERBER The U.S.Endangered Species Act establishes categories for endangered and threatened species but provides no crite-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    and threatened species but provides no crite- ria for deciding when a species should be listed, delisted

  13. Defining viral species: making taxonomy useful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Virus taxonomy at present is best characterized as a categorization of convenience, without a firm basis in the principles of evolutionary biology. Specifically, virus species definitions appear to depend more on tradition and popular opinion among...

  14. Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, E. E.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Aquatic Species Program 1978-1996 microalgae R&D activities, presented at the 2008 AFOSR Workshop in Washington, D.C.

  15. Languages and Species: Threats and Global Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, William

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Both languages and species are threatened with extinction. This talk will compare patterns of cultural and biological diversity. The aims will be to compare the extinction risk of languages with other groups and then compare the patterns...

  16. Reactive Gliosis Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . By sensing the electric signals generated by other 3368 Reactive Gliosis #12;individuals, mormyrids are alsoReactive Gliosis Glial Scar Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide Anions Neuroinflammation motor output. Reafferent Control in Electric Communication Reafferent Control in Electric Communication

  17. Digital holographic imaging of aquatic species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez-Caballero, José Antonio

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this thesis is to design, develop and implement a digital holographic imaging (DHI) system, capable of capturing three-dimensional (3D) images of aquatic species. The images produced by this system are used in ...

  18. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and angular information simultaneously. Photofragment species are state-selectively ionized for detection using 2+1 REMPI (Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization). The instrumentation employs a molecular beam of the XO radicals formed using pyrolitic...

  19. Evaluation of auxinic herbicides for broadleaf weed control, tolerance of forage bermudagrass hybrids [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], and absorption and translocation in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Frederick Thomas

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    herbicide never enters the target species (Duke 1985). With this in mind, studies on foliar absorption are imperative for the purpose of maximizing herbicide use efficiency. Sterling and Lownds (1992) investigated the foliar 11 absorption of picloram...

  20. COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES FOR BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK SPECIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buell, Carol Robin [Michigan State University; Childs, Kevin L [Michigan State University

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    While current production of ethanol as a biofuel relies on starch and sugar inputs, it is anticipated that sustainable production of ethanol for biofuel use will utilize lignocellulosic feedstocks. Candidate plant species to be used for lignocellulosic ethanol production include a large number of species within the Grass, Pine and Birch plant families. For these biofuel feedstock species, there are variable amounts of genome sequence resources available, ranging from complete genome sequences (e.g. sorghum, poplar) to transcriptome data sets (e.g. switchgrass, pine). These data sets are not only dispersed in location but also disparate in content. It will be essential to leverage and improve these genomic data sets for the improvement of biofuel feedstock production. The objectives of this project were to provide computational tools and resources for data-mining genome sequence/annotation and large-scale functional genomic datasets available for biofuel feedstock species. We have created a Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource that provides a web-based portal or �clearing house� for genomic data for plant species relevant to biofuel feedstock production. Sequence data from a total of 54 plant species are included in the Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource including model plant species that permit leveraging of knowledge across taxa to biofuel feedstock species.We have generated additional computational analyses of these data, including uniform annotation, to facilitate genomic approaches to improved biofuel feedstock production. These data have been centralized in the publicly available Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource (http://bfgr.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

  1. Variable effects of a kelp foundation species on rocky intertidal diversity and species interactions in central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Variable effects of a kelp foundation species on rocky intertidal diversity and species Facilitation Foundation species Kelp Negative effects Species diversity The effect of foundation species scales. Egregia menziesii (Turner) J.E. Areschoug is a large and robust perennial kelp that creates

  2. Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution Frank Le ke and Stephan Merz Institut fur We propose a solution to the steam boiler control speci cation problem AS] by means of a formal speci

  3. Species interactions differ in their genetic robustness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chubiz, Lon M.; Granger, Brian R.; Segre, Daniel; Harcombe, William R.

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Conflict and cooperation between bacterial species drive the composition and function of microbial communities. Stability of these emergent properties will be influenced by the degree to which species' interactions are robust to genetic perturbations. We use genome-scale metabolic modeling to computationally analyze the impact of genetic changes when Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica compete, or cooperate. We systematically knocked out in silico each reaction in the metabolic network of E. coli to construct all 2583 mutant stoichiometric models. Then, using a recently developed multi-scale computational framework, we simulated the growth of each mutant E. coli in the presence of S.more »enterica. The type of interaction between species was set by modulating the initial metabolites present in the environment. We found that the community was most robust to genetic perturbations when the organisms were cooperating. Species ratios were more stable in the cooperative community, and community biomass had equal variance in the two contexts. Additionally, the number of mutations that have a substantial effect is lower when the species cooperate than when they are competing. In contrast, when mutations were added to the S. enterica network the system was more robust when the bacteria were competing. These results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and studies of ecological stability. Cooperation and conflict alter the connection between genetic changes and properties that emerge at higher levels of biological organization.« less

  4. Species interactions differ in their genetic robustness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chubiz, Lon M. [Univ. of Missouri - St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Granger, Brian R. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Segre, Daniel [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Harcombe, William R. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Conflict and cooperation between bacterial species drive the composition and function of microbial communities. Stability of these emergent properties will be influenced by the degree to which species' interactions are robust to genetic perturbations. We use genome-scale metabolic modeling to computationally analyze the impact of genetic changes when Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica compete, or cooperate. We systematically knocked out in silico each reaction in the metabolic network of E. coli to construct all 2583 mutant stoichiometric models. Then, using a recently developed multi-scale computational framework, we simulated the growth of each mutant E. coli in the presence of S. enterica. The type of interaction between species was set by modulating the initial metabolites present in the environment. We found that the community was most robust to genetic perturbations when the organisms were cooperating. Species ratios were more stable in the cooperative community, and community biomass had equal variance in the two contexts. Additionally, the number of mutations that have a substantial effect is lower when the species cooperate than when they are competing. In contrast, when mutations were added to the S. enterica network the system was more robust when the bacteria were competing. These results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and studies of ecological stability. Cooperation and conflict alter the connection between genetic changes and properties that emerge at higher levels of biological organization.

  5. affecting species diversity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ecoregions, and geomorphology affect fish species composition in streams of eastern Oklahoma, USA Geosciences Websites Summary: in a New York stream system as a result of species...

  6. Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures. Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures. Abstract: Atomistic...

  7. alien species introductions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Invasive Plant Species and the New Bioeconomy Symposium The rapid expansion of the plant bioeconomy is creating Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: of the introduced species...

  8. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Abstract: Hydrogen...

  9. aquatic plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 243 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  10. accumulator plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 135 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  11. anthocyanic plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 109 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  12. altered plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 129 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  13. arecaceae species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    73 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  14. avian species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  15. animal species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  16. affects species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  17. alien plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 224 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  18. amazonian plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    species. In 1999, the National Key Protected Wild Plants identified about 1700 rare and endangered plant species (Chinese State Report on Biodiversity Editorial...

  19. Electrostatic supersolitons in three-species plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verheest, Frank [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hellberg, Manfred A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Kourakis, Ioannis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Superficially, electrostatic potential profiles of supersolitons look like those of traditional solitons. However, their electric field profiles are markedly different, having additional extrema on the wings of the standard bipolar structure. This new concept was recently pointed out in the literature for a plasma model with five species. Here, it is shown that electrostatic supersolitons are not an artefact of exotic, complicated plasma models, but can exist even in three-species plasmas and are likely to occur in space plasmas. Further, a methodology is given to delineate their existence domains in a systematic fashion by determining the specific limiting factors.

  20. Weed Busters: Sprayer Calibration Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Hanselka, C. Wayne; Lyons, Robert K.; Hart, Charles R.; Cadenhead, J. F.

    2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Series Allan McGinty, Extension Range Specialist, San Angelo C. Wayne Hanselka, Extension Range Specialist, Corpus Christi Robert K. Lyons, Extension Range Specialist, Uvalde Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton J. F...

  1. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  2. Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

  3. Inferring Ecological Networks From Species Abundance Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    (LASSO), Sparse Bayesian Regression (SBR), Graphical Gaussian Models (GGMs) and Bayesian Networks (BNs to thank Marco Grzegorczyk for the answering my question about Bayesian networks and the MCMC methodsInferring Ecological Networks From Species Abundance Data Frank Dondelinger Master of Science

  4. Species Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    droughts. Eco- logical responses to climate change in regions with Mediterranean climate regimes maySpecies Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to Changing Climate K. B. Suttle,1 * Meredith A. Thomsen,2 Mary E. Power1 Predictions of ecological response to climate change are based largely on direct

  5. Society for Range Management and Weed Science Society of America, "Working landscapes providing for the future", February 711 2010, Denver, Colorado. p80.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    , and Balbach H Dispersal of plant propagules by vehicles. Secondary dispersal of plant propagules by vehicles is generally perceived to be important in the spread of invasive species, though with only to vehicles will depend on a number of factors including type of ground surface (asphalt, gravel, or unpaved

  6. Objectives for Multiple-Species Conservation EMILY NICHOLSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    of extinction for multiple species. Although the assessment of extinction risk for single species is common, few researchers have formu- lated an objective function that combines the extinction risks of multiple species. We functions based on extinction risk across many species and illustrated the differences between

  7. How Many Species Can Two Essential Resources Support? Bingtuan Li #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and for two species to coexist, driving the others to extinction. In case n = 3, it is shown that every extinct. Every solution approaches a single­species or two­species steady state. However, as already notedHow Many Species Can Two Essential Resources Support? Bingtuan Li # Department of Mathematics

  8. THE BIOLOGY OF RARE AND DECLINING SPECIES AND HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities on declining species and habitats. Rarity, declining populations, and extinctions are natural may underiie llaturalpopulation declines of species leading to extirpationsand extinctions (Allendorf: additional factors push species towards extinction Ziswiler (1967) noted that 53 of the 77 species of birds

  9. TAXON 43 -FEB 1994 Are many plant species paraphyletic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    ). The converse pro- cess, the winnowing of lineages or extinction, acts through disappearance of species, since genera and families go extinct when their last species disappears. Species also represent the basic unitTAXON 43 - FEB 1994 Are many plant species paraphyletic? Loren H. ~ i e s e b e r ~ '& Luc

  10. Geochemical Cycling of Iodine Species in Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E; Blackwood, V

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine in soils is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we applied new analytical techniques to study the content and speciation of stable iodine in representative surface soils, and sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at numerous nuclear facilities in the United States, where anthropogenic {sup 129}I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. The surface soil samples were chosen for their geographic locations (e.g., near the ocean or nuclear facilities) and for their differing physico-chemical characteristics (organic matter, texture, etc). Extracted solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS methods to determine iodine concentrations and to examine iodine speciation (iodide, iodate, and organic iodine). In natural soils, iodine is mostly (nearly 90% of total iodine) present as organic species, while inorganic iodine becomes important (up to 50%) only in sediments with low organic matter. Results from laboratory column studies, aimed at examining transport of different iodine species, showed much greater retardation of 4-iodoaniline than iodide or iodate. Careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. In addition to speciation, input concentration and residence time effects will influence the biogeochemical cycling of anthropogenic 129I deposited on surface soils.

  11. Appendix S1 -A greener Greenland? Normand et al. Appendix S1: Study species and species occurrence data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Appendix S1 - A greener Greenland? Normand et al. 1 Appendix S1: Study species and species as in one or several of the floristic provinces bordering Greenland (Fig. S1.1). The selection were based subspecies) was considered. The selected species were assigned maximum heights and Greenlandic species

  12. 2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

    2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified on the PNNL Site.

  13. Species differences in courtship acoustic signals among five Lake Malawi cichlid species (Pseudotropheus spp.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~ao em Eco-Etologia, ISPA, Rua Jardim do Tabaco 34, 1149-041 Lisboa, Portugal, Departamento de Biologia of the sounds produced in the early stage of court- ship by males of three closely related species from Lake

  14. Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

  15. Aquatic Invasive Species Vector Risk Assessment Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    , such as an insect stowed away in a cargo box or a lar- val fish brought on board a ship in the bal- last water. When is not just an eco- nomic issue--the health of our unique coastal and marine ecosystems is a source of pride into new areas--such as the unintentional transport of species in the ballast water of freight ships

  16. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 49, JULYAUGUST 2009 1523 Agricultural production in the United States and Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    and Europe has changed dramatically in the last 60 yr. One significant change has been replacement of manyKenzie et al., 1999; Tracy and Zhang, 2008). Weed Biomass and Species Composition as Affected was to evaluate how an integrated crop­livestock system would influence weed biomass and weed species composition

  17. Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

  18. asteraceae leaf extract: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    known as the Crofton weed; other common names are eupatory, sticky snakeroot, cat weed, hemp agrimony, sticky agrimony, Mexican Reddy, Gadi VP 17 THE EFFECTS OF A NIGERIAN SPECIE...

  19. PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER A novel, combined approach to assessing species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morphological species of freshwater microalgae often have broad geographic distribution. However, traditional distribu- tional stability among microalgal species groups such as the desmids. Keywords Microalgae microalgae have recently been undergoing major conceptual changes in the light of increasing evidence

  20. Characterization of NOx Species in Dehydrated and Hydrated Na...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOx Species in Dehydrated and Hydrated Na- and Ba-Y, FAU Zeolites Formed in NO Adsorption. Characterization of NOx Species in Dehydrated and Hydrated Na- and Ba-Y, FAU Zeolites...

  1. A new species of Chiasmognathus from Kazakhstan (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Michael S.; Packer, Laurence

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A new species of the ammobatine bee genus Chiasmognathus Engel (Nomadinae: Ammobatini) is described and figured from near Almaty, Kazakhstan. Chiasmognathus scythicus Engel & Packer, new species, is superficially similar to C. gussakovskii (Popov...

  2. Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

  3. aphid species aphis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ABS1003775P NEW INVASIVE SPECIES OF APHIDS (HEMIPTERA, APHIDIDAE) IN SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO CiteSeer Summary: Abstract-. Three new invasive species of aphids have been found in...

  4. Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document lists endangered, threatened, and species of special concern in Connecticut, along with procedures for petitioning to add or remove a species from these lists and to add or remove an...

  5. Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened and Endangered Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened and Endangered Species on U.S. Army-05 #12;#12;Disturbance Dependent T&E Species Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened

  6. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

  7. Aquatic species project report: FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.M. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse'' gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

  8. Threatened and Endangered Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe yearThermalSoulOaks, California:Species

  9. Performance of species richness estimators across assemblage types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    remains a topic of much debate (Brose et al., 2003). Attempts to quantify species diversity often include

  10. Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of seven oreo species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of seven oreo species ITeleostei, Oreosomatidae species was examined.Allozyme variation at 26 loci was examined in seven species: six from Australasia. helgae). Two phenetic trees were constructed: an unweighted pair- group method with arithmetic averag

  11. Epidemics in Two Competing Species Litao Han 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pugliese, Andrea

    infection and competition are revealed: (1) a species that would get extinct without the infection, may the infection, is driven to extinction by the infection; (3) an infection that would die out in either species: Epidemic model, Multi-host infection, Species extinction, Uniform persistence, Hopf bifurcation, Periodic

  12. Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padilla, Dianna

    Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions? Jessica Gurevitch and Dianna K. Padilla species invasions and the extinction of natives is widely accepted by scientists as well species on extinctions. Greater clarity in our under- standing of these patterns will help us to focus

  13. Species Loss and Aboveground Carbon Storage in a Tropical Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunker, Daniel E.

    of tropical tree species on carbon storage by simulating 18 possible extinction scenarios within a well-studied 50-hectare tropical forest plot in Panama, which contains 227 tree species. Among extinction as well as the size and longevity of tropical trees. Instead, we simulated species extinctions

  14. Invasive species are a leading cause of animal extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Invasive species are a leading cause of animal extinctions Miguel Clavero and Emili Garci and extinctions of species is unproven. They analyzed the IUCN Red List database [2] and stated that only 6% of the taxa are threatened with extinction as a result of invasion by alien species and !2% (ten terrestrial

  15. Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    Letters Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi Redpath Museum, Mc the generalization that biological invasions are a leading cause of species extinctions. The authors note zebra mussel colonization has accelerated the local extinction of unionid species by a factor of 10

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Inter-species interactions and ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erbilgin, Nadir

    (increased propagule load). Model simulations of hypothetical interactions of Dendroctonus rufipennis and I species of Ips and Dendroctonus in North America and Eurasia have failed to establish outside communities, and loss of biodiversity. Keywords Species introduction Á Invasive species Á Ips Á Dendroctonus Á

  17. Final Report Parris Island Depot Invasive Plant Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Species Occurrence and Management Page 6 a. Invasive Species Survey Conducted in 2001 Page 7 b. Management Plant Control Inc. (IPC) was contracted to survey and prescribe a management plan to control invasive and Control Efforts Page 9 c. Herbicides Page 10 IV. 2010 Survey of Invasive Species Page 16 a. Survey Methods

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE Modelling multi-species response to landscape dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    and to the spatio-temporal configuration of urban brownfield habitats in a multi-species approach (37 plant and 43- sion time of brownfield habitats required to support all and especially regionally rare species Dynamic landscape Á Species distribution model Á Habitat model Á Urban brownfields Á Model averaging Á

  19. Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface Scott D. Peacor1 ecological processes. However, the influence on invasions of phenotypic plasticity, a key component of many species interactions, is unknown. We present a model in which phenotypic plasticity of a resident species

  20. San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program The goal from current citizen science groups (such as Audubon and SD Tracking Team

  1. New Species of Aphanius (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae) from Isfahan Province of Iran and a Reanalysis of Other Iranian Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hrbek, Tomas - Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico

    New Species of Aphanius (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae) from Isfahan Province of Iran and a Reanalysis isfahanensis, is described from the Isfahan basin of Iran. It is distinguished from the other Iranian species in Iran. THE extant and extinct species of the killifish genus Aphanius Nardo, 1827 (Cyprinodon- tiformes

  2. Species Discovery versus Species Identification in DNA Barcoding Efforts: Response to Rubinoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    in the discus- sion. I start with Rubinoff's second point that there are "problems with DNA barcodes and species needs to be tested in a scientific context (Goldstein et al. 2000; Lipscomb et al. 2003; Sites of taxonomy (Dunn 2003; Lipscomb et al. 2003; Seberg et al. 2003). On the other hand DNA sequences can be used

  3. In Silico Modeling of Geobacter Species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, Derek, R.

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This project employed a combination of in silico modeling and physiological studies to begin the construction of models that could predict the activity of Geobacter species under different environmental conditions. A major accomplishment of the project was the development of the first genome-based models of organisms known environmental relevance. This included the modeling of two Geobacter species and two species of Pelobacter. Construction of these models required increased sophistication in the annotation of the original draft genomes as well as collection of physiological data on growth yields, cell composition, and metabolic reactions. Biochemical studies were conducted to determine whether proposed enzymatic reactions were in fact expressed. During this process we developed an Automodel Pipeline process to accelerate future model development of other environmentally relevant organisms by using bioinformatics techniques to leverage predicted protein sequences and the Genomatica database containing a collection of well-curated metabolic models. The Automodel Pipeline was also used for iterative updating of the primary Geobacter model of G. sulfurreducens to expand metabolic functions or to add alternative pathways. Although each iteration of the model does not lead to another publication, it is an invaluable resource for hypothesis development and evaluation of experimental data. In order to develop a more accurate G. sulfurreducens model, a series of physiological studies that could be analyzed in the context of the model were carried out. For example, previous field trials of in situ uranium bioremediation demonstrated that Geobacter species face an excess of electron donor and a limitation of electron acceptor near the point of acetate injection into the groundwater. Therefore, a model-based analysis of electron acceptor limitation physiology was conducted and model predictions were compared with growth observed in chemostats. Iterative studies resulted in the model accurately predicting acetate oxidation and electron acceptor reduction. The model also predicted that G. sulfurreducens must release hydrogen under electron-accepting conditions in order to maintain charge and electron balance. This prediction was borne out by subsequent hydrogen measurements. Furthermore, changes in gene expression were consistent with model predictions of flux changes around central metabolism. The model revealed multiple redundant pathways in central metabolism suggesting an apparent versatility unusual in microbial metabolism. The computational analysis led to the identification of 32 reactions that participated in eight sets of redundant pathways. The computational results guided the design of strains with mutations in key reactions to elucidate the role of the alternate pathways and obtain information on their physiological function. A total of seven strains with mutations in genes encoding five metabolic reactions were constructed and their phenotypes analyzed in 12 different environments. This analysis revealed several interesting insights on the role of the apparent redundant pathways. 13C labeling approaches were developed for further elucidation of metabolic pathways with model-driven interpretation. For example, the model was used to calculate the optimal acetate 13C labeling ratio for distinguishing flux through various pathways based on amino acid isotopomer distributions. With this method it was possible to elucidate the pathways for amino acid biosynthesis. Surprisingly, the labeling pattern of isoleucine deviated significantly from what was predicted by the metabolic reconstruction. Detailed analysis of the labeling patterns with the model led to the discovery that there are two pathways for leucine biosynthesis, including a novel citramalate pathway that was subsequently confirmed with biochemical analysis. In summary, the combined computational and experimental studies have been instrumental in further characterizing the central metabolism of members of the Geobacteraceae. Furthermore, the methods developed in these

  4. al4o2cl102 oxide species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the surrounding 5 km. We predicted that species richness would increase with park size and that species richness and evenness would decrease with development. Species...

  5. update: Species–area curves and the estimation of extinction rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011)  Extinctions:  consider  all  species.   Nature, 474, Species–area  relationships  always overestimate extinction and the estimation of extinction rates  The  species–area 

  6. Pain in a Balance: Noxious Events Engage Opposing Processes That Concurrently Modulate Nociceptive Reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grau, James

    , Maier, Mad- den, & Barchas, 1981; Meagher, Chen, Salinas, & Grau, 1993; Meagher, Grau, & King, 1989

  7. Recent Swiss records of rare bee species (Hymenoptera, Apidae) with two species new to Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    in the cities of Zürich and Lucerne did not yield any new or very rare bee species. The known distribution was conducted on 106 sampling sites in the Swiss cities of Zürich (47°22 N, 8°31 E), Lucerne (47°05 N, 8°17 E), and Lugano (46°07 N, 8°56 E) from June 13th to August 3rd 2006. In Lucerne, 34 sampling locations were chosen

  8. A study of selected species of Rosa using isozyme polymorphisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young-Ju

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : avid H. yrne (Chair of ommittee) S ephan L. Hatch (Member) James R. Manhart (Member) R. Daniel Lineber r (Head of Department) December 1994 Major Subject: Horticulture ABSTRACT A Study of Selected Species of Rosa Using Isozyme Polymorphisms.... Three of the subgenera are monotypic. The species in the subgenus Rosa are classified into 11 sections. Forty seven R o s a species (116 total accessions) from subgenera Rosa and Plaryrhodon were characterized for isozyme phenotypes using starch gel...

  9. FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

  10. WSDOT highway maintenance: environmental compliance for protected terrestrial species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Brien, Tracie; Carey, Marion; Forrester, Bret

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the WSDOT Highway Maintenance: Environmental Complianceand the Highway Maintenance Manual for Terrestrial Species.to impacts from routine maintenance activities. In response

  11. aquatic species program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    invasive species (AIS) is an aquatic parasite 5 Aquatic Pesticide Monitoring Program Review of Alternative Aquatic Pest Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  12. analysis chemical species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bonds (CACB) to simple organic reaction paths. CACB Goddard III, William A. 15 Using Fractal Analysis To Assess How Species Perceive Landscape Structure CiteSeer Summary: To...

  13. atiii species present: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from neontological Barnosky, Anthony D. 4 RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Prevalence of non Helicobacter pylori species in patients presenting with dyspepsia CiteSeer Summary:...

  14. Data Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilches, Erika; Escobar, Ivan A.; Vallejo, E E; Taylor, C E

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. ; Frank, E. ; Data Mining: Practical Machine LearningData Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognitionthe application of data mining techniques to the problem of

  15. Title 50 CFR 402 Interagency Cooperation - Endangered Species...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 50 CFR 402 Interagency Cooperation - Endangered Species Act of 1973, as...

  16. active nitrogen species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into groundwater and streams and other alterations of forest nutrient cycling), eutrophication of estuaries and coastal areas (Howarth 1988) and changes in species composition...

  17. FERC Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species - A Guide for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Regulatory Commission. 2001. FERC Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species - A Guide for Applicants, Contractors, and Staff. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission....

  18. TREE PLANTING SITE EVALUATION FORM "SITE DICTATES SPECIES"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TREE PLANTING SITE EVALUATION FORM "SITE DICTATES SPECIES" ABOVE GROUND Utilities: Electric issue) Parking proximity: Distance from car doors __________________ Wind: Problem _________ No problem:________________________________________________ Fire hydrant: ________________________________________________ Electric

  19. COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogeneous Species in Gas Turbine Exhaust, from Conkle, et82) Percent of Organic Gas Turbine Emissions which containnitrogen dioxide from gas turbines (from the data presented

  20. ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID...

  1. Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy...

  2. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  3. Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storch, David

    Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness Richard G. Davies1,*, C data on the global distribution of extant continental and continental island bird species to test, 1988; Currie 1991; Allen et al. 2002). Its role is also argued to extend to the influence of solar

  4. The unholy trinity: taxonomy, species delimitation and DNA barcoding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    The unholy trinity: taxonomy, species delimitation and DNA barcoding Rob DeSalle*, Mary G. Egan are clarified and resolved, before the use of DNA as a tool for taxonomy and species delimitation can framework for interweaving classical taxonomy with the goals of `DNA barcoding'. Keywords: DNA barcoding

  5. NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorken, Marcel

    NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of Echium endemic to the Canary Islands Marcel E. Dorken Abstract: Species of Echium from the Canary Islands represent an adaptive radiation fertility of females and hermaphrodites were de- tected. Key words: Canary Islands, Echium, island radiation

  6. Reactive oxygen species deglycosilate glomerular a-dystroglycan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    Reactive oxygen species deglycosilate glomerular a-dystroglycan NPJ Vogtla¨nder1 , WPM Tamboer1 open. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to degrade and depolymerize carbohydrates, and to playDa in skeletal muscle, ranging from 120 kDa in brain to 190 kDa in the Torpedo electric organ.8

  7. A NEW SPECIES OF MATELEA (APOCYNACEAE: ASCLEPIADOIDEAE) FROM HISPANIOLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    A NEW SPECIES OF MATELEA (APOCYNACEAE: ASCLEPIADOIDEAE) FROM HISPANIOLA Alexander Krings Herbarium_Krings@ncsu.edu ABSTRACT A new species of Matelea is described from Hispaniola, resulting from study of subtribe Hispaniola: Matelea pentactina Krings, sp. nov. (Fig. 1, A­B, E). TYPE: HAITI: Les Roseaux, Massif de la

  8. Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    COMMENTARY Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling? Remote sensing- guish among broad classes of vegetation. However, the applicability of remote sensing to classification like from remote sensing ­ a map of tree species ­ and what can be delivered ­ a map of forest types

  9. When to stop managing or surveying cryptic threatened species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgman, Mark

    When to stop managing or surveying cryptic threatened species Iadine Chade`s* , Eve Mc soon, failing to invest in sufficient surveying to be sufficiently sure further management increasingly difficult to detect as their populations decline. Managers of such cryptic threatened species face

  10. SIX NEW SPECIES OF ANTS (INSECTA: HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM EGYPT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    SIX NEW SPECIES OF ANTS (INSECTA: HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM EGYPT HASSAN H. FADL, REDA F. BAKR, RAWDA M. BADAWY AND MOSTAFA R. SHARAF Entomology Dept., Fac. Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. ABSTRACT Six new ant species from Egypt Cerapachys collingwoodi, Cataglyphis agostii, Messor eglalae

  11. Global attractors and extinction dynamics of cyclically competing species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transitions to absorbing states are of fundamental importance in non-equilibrium physics as well as ecology. In ecology, absorbing states correspond to the extinction of species. We here study the spatial population dynamics of three cyclically interacting species. The interaction scheme comprises both direct competition between species as in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, and separated selection and reproduction processes as in the May-Leonard model. We show that the dynamic processes leading to the transient maintenance of biodiversity are closely linked to attractors of the nonlinear dynamics for the overall species' concentrations. The characteristics of these global attractors change qualitatively at certain threshold values of the mobility, and depend on the relative strength of the different types of competition between species. They give information about the scaling of extinction times with the system size and thereby the stability of biodiversity. We define an effective free energy as the negative...

  12. Measurement of Species Distributions in Operating Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Armstrong, Timothy R. [ORNL

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement and understanding of transient species distributions across and within fuel cells is a critical need for advancing fuel cell technology. The Spatially Resolved Capillary Inlet Mass Spectrometer (SpaciMS) instrument has been applied for in-situ measurement of transient species distributions within operating reactors; including diesel catalyst, air-exhaust mixing systems, and non-thermal plasma reactors. The work described here demonstrates the applicability of this tool to proton exchange membrane (PEM) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) research. Specifically, we have demonstrated SpaciMS measurements of (1) transient species dynamics across a PEM fuel cell (FC) associated with load switching, (2) intra-PEM species distributions, and transient species dynamics at SOFC temperatures associated with FC load switching.

  13. Species separation and kinetic effects in collisional plasma shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellei, C., E-mail: bellei1@llnl.gov; Wilks, S. C.; Amendt, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Rinderknecht, H.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of collisional shock waves propagating in uniform plasmas are studied with ion-kinetic calculations, in both slab and spherical geometry and for the case of one and two ion species. Despite the presence of an electric field at the shock front—and in contrast to the case where an interface is initially present [C. Bellei et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 044702 (2013)]—essentially no ion reflection at the shock front is observed due to collisions, with a probability of reflection ?10{sup ?4} for the cases presented. A kinetic two-ion-species spherical convergent shock is studied in detail and compared against an average-species calculation, confirming effects of species separation and differential heating of the ion species at the shock front. The effect of different ion temperatures on the DT and D{sup 3}He fusion reactivity is discussed in the fluid limit and is estimated to be moderately important.

  14. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  15. Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

  16. Species for the screening assessment. Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, J.M.; Brandt, C.A.; Dauble, D.D.; Maughan, A.D.; O`Neil, T.K.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of past nuclear production operations along the Columbia River, there is intense public and tribal interest in assessing any residual Hanford Site related contamination along the river from the Hanford Reach to the Pacific Ocean. The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment was proposed to address these concerns. The assessment of the Columbia River is being conducted in phases. The initial phase is a screening assessment of the risk, which addresses current environmental conditions for a range of potential uses. One component of the screening assessment estimates the risk from contaminants in the Columbia River to the environment. The objective of the ecological risk assessment is to determine whether contaminants from the Columbia River pose a significant threat to selected receptor species that exist in the river and riparian communities of the study area. This report (1) identifies the receptor species selected for the screening assessment of ecological risk and (2) describes the selection process. The species selection process consisted of two tiers. In Tier 1, a master species list was developed that included many plant and animal species known to occur in the aquatic and riparian systems of the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and the Columbia River estuary. This master list was reduced to 368 species that occur in the study area (Priest Rapids Dam to McNary Dam). In Tier 2, the 181 Tier 1 species were qualitatively ranked based on a scoring of their potential exposure and sensitivity to contaminants using a conceptual exposure model for the study area.

  17. Spatial synchronization and extinction of species under external forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. E. Amritkar; Govindan Rangarajan

    2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the interplay between synchronization and extinction of a species. Using a general model we show that under a common external forcing, the species with a quadratic saturation term in the population dynamics first undergoes spatial synchronization and then extinction, thereby avoiding the rescue effect. This is because the saturation term reduces the synchronization time scale but not the extinction time scale. The effect can be observed even when the external forcing acts only on some locations provided there is a synchronizing term in the dynamics. Absence of the quadratic saturation term can help the species to avoid extinction.

  18. Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Friday, December 20, 2013 Fuel Cell Figure 1 Figure 1. In situ x-ray...

  19. andean wild species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004; Ferrer-Costa et al. 2007; Baresic et Zhang, Jianzhi 27 MOLECULAR MARKERS IN WILD TURKEY Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: and conservation of wildlife species. In the...

  20. affecting ornamental species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: FA182...

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Population Evidence of Cryptic Species and Geographical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    in the Cosmopolitan Ectomycorrhizal Fungus, Tricholoma scalpturatum Fabian Carriconde & Monique Gardes & Patricia, the Fungi constitute a major group of Eukaryota. There are vast numbers of species--a conser- vative

  2. Numerous rockfish species inhabit the waters off California, Oregon, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of the National Marine the southern euphausiid species Nyctiphanes simplex and juveniles of Pacific whiting (Merluccius productus

  3. Clonality as a taxonomic character of Actinian species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fautin, Daphne G.; Smith, Deborah R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea anemones of some species have been considered to exist both clonally and as solitary individuals. In two temperate taxa, these alternative forms have been demonstrated through molecular techniques actually to belong ...

  4. MICROBIOLOGY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS Species Composition of Bacterial Communities Influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Mosquitoes to Experimental Plant Infusions Loganathan Ponnusamy & Dawn M. Wesson & Consuelo Arellano & Coby use oviposition traps containing plant infusions for monitoring populations of these mosquito species significantly diminished responses to experimental infusions made with sterilized white oak leaves, showing

  5. Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

  6. aquatic invasive species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    species:321-333 DOI 10.1007s11258-009-9645-9 12;biogeographical isolation (Office of Technology Assessment 1993 (Robinia pseudoaca- cia) introduced to Europe in the...

  7. Pervasive poleward shifts among North American bird species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is expected to influence species’ geographic distributions in the form of poleward and upward range expansion combined with extirpations from the equatorial and downslope sides of the distribution, but such shifts observed to date...

  8. ORIGINAL PAPER Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major amphibian populations. Keywords Amphibia . Beta chain . Gene walking . Lithobates . Positive selection balancing selection Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00251

  9. Using species distribution models to inform IUCN Red List assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syfert, Mindy M.; Joppa, Lucas; Smith, Matthew J.; Coomes, David A.; Bachman, Steven P.; Brummitt, Neil A.

    2014-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    .g. hurricanes) or anthropogenic effects (e.g. deforestation) not included in the model fitting process (Elith and Leathwick 2009). Additionally, the SDM approach we have taken here does not explicitly take into account non-equilibrium species dynamics. While...

  10. Reactive oxygen species: a breath of life or death?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fruehauf, John P; Meyskens, Frank L Jr

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AP1, activator protein-1; ODD, oxygen-dependent degradationSignaling response when oxygen levels decrease (Fig. 1C;3. Halliwell B. Reactive oxygen species in living sys- tems:

  11. Insects in urban brownfields Analyses of species occurrences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    Insects in urban brownfields Analyses of species occurrences, community composition, and trait brownfields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.4 Habitat models forces for insects in urban brownfields 41 4.1 Introduction

  12. Negative magnetophoresis of submicron species in magnetic nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Lino A. (Lino Alberto), 1976-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we studied the focusing and trapping of submicron, nonmagnetic species immersed in a magnetic nanofluid under applied magnetic fields. Focusing was achieved using two pairs of permanent magnets, which forced ...

  13. active halogen species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are considered. We predict the major alkali and halogen species in a Pele-like volcanic gas and the major alklai and halogen condensates. We also model disequilibrium chemistry...

  14. anopheles funestus species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a spatial resolution of 1 arc-minute (9 185 275 cells of approximately 4 sq km). Using a maximum entropy method we construct niche models for 10 malaria vector species based on...

  15. Methods of propagation for selected native Texas woody plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senior, Jill Ellen

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    native species "'n the nursery trade because they can be produced more economically. Effi- cient and successful production methods nave been developeo whicn enable a nurseryman to cultivate many exotic plants in suffic' en numbers to profitably meet... native species such as Redbud, Sycamore, Flowering Dogwood, Live Cak, Yucc , Desert Willow, Virginia "reeper present ln the nursery trade. Similar efforts ln cultivation whicn have made these spec'es readily available could be applied to many other...

  16. Chemical, physical, and organoleptic properties of acorns of selected species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofcarcik, Ralph Paul

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL, AND ORGANOLEPTIC PROPERTIES OF ACORNS OF SELECTED SPECIES A Thesis By RALPH PAUL OFCARCIK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE J'anuary 1969 Major Subject& Food Technology CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL, AND ORGANOLEPTIC PROPERTIES OF ACORNS OF SELECTED SPECIES A Thesis RALPH PAUL OFCARCIK Approved as to style and content by: (Chaxrman C ttee) (Head of Department) mber...

  17. Ecological niche modelling and prioritizing areas for species reintroductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Peterson, A. Townsend; Serví n, Jorge I.; Kiff, Lloyd F.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Corresponding author) Natural History Museum, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, USA. E-mail town@ku.edu Jorge I. Serv?´n Departamento de Desarrollo Sustentable, Instituto de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad Jua´rez del Estado de Durango, Apdo.... Introduction One of the aims of biodiversity conservation is to avoid loss of species. The best approach preserves natural systems prior to perturbation or damage by human activities. However, conservation action usually begins after species have been...

  18. Comparison of sampling techniques for Heliothis species in cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Michelle Lynn

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 19g& Najor Subject: Entomology COMPARISON OF SAMPLING TECHNIQUES FOR HELIOTHIS SPECIES IN COTTON A Thesis by MICHELLE LYNN WALTERS Approved as to style and content by: J. K. Walker, Jr. (Chairman of Committee) J. K. Olson (Member) A. E.... Percival (Member) 2 & F/yg. (Member) F, G. Maxwell (Head of Department) December 1986 ABSTRACT Comparison of Sampling Techniques for Heliothis Species in Cotton. (December 1986) Nichelle Lynn Walters, B. S. , Arizona State University; Chairman...

  19. Island biogeography Much of our current understanding of how many species occupy a community comes from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    a balance between ongoing immigration of new species to the island and continuous extinction of species') and E is the maximum rate of extinction (the rate of extinction when the number of species on the island there are no species on the island (logically). But extinction rate increases with increasing species on the island

  20. NO2 Adsorption on BaO/Al2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NO2 Adsorption on BaOAl2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. NO2 Adsorption on BaOAl2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. Abstract: The nature of nitrate species formed in the...

  1. Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Börger, Egon

    Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented Executable the steam boiler control speci cation problem to il- lustrate how the evolving algebra approach to the speci

  2. Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation across heterogeneous landscapes. Using data from the Willamette Basin, Oregon, we compare the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation under

  3. Environmental granularity, rivers and climate history as shaping factors for species' distribution and diversity patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakazawa Ueji, Yoshinori Jorge

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Species distributions are composed by those places in which the environmental conditions are suitable for the species to survive and maintain populations; where the interactions with other species are adequate; that have ...

  4. Three new phylogenetic and biological Neurospora species: N. hispaniola, N. metzenbergii and N. perkinsii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Three new phylogenetic and biological Neurospora species: N. hispaniola, N. metzenbergii and N description of species and, having failed to discredit the approach, describe the new species, N. hispaniola

  5. Intra-species sequence comparisons for annotating genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boffelli, Dario; Weer, Claire V.; Weng, Li; Lewis, Keith D.; Shoukry, Malak I.; Pachter, Lior; Keys, David N.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of sequence variation among members of a single species offers a potential approach to identify functional DNA elements responsible for biological features unique to that species. Due to its high rate of allelic polymorphism and ease of genetic manipulability, we chose the sea squirt, Ciona intestinalis, to explore intra-species sequence comparisons for genome annotation. A large number of C. intestinalis specimens were collected from four continents and a set of genomic intervals amplified, resequenced and analyzed to determine the mutation rates at each nucleotide in the sequence. We found that regions with low mutation rates efficiently demarcated functionally constrained sequences: these include a set of noncoding elements, which we showed in C intestinalis transgenic assays to act as tissue-specific enhancers, as well as the location of coding sequences. This illustrates that comparisons of multiple members of a species can be used for genome annotation, suggesting a path for the annotation of the sequenced genomes of organisms occupying uncharacterized phylogenetic branches of the animal kingdom and raises the possibility that the resequencing of a large number of Homo sapiens individuals might be used to annotate the human genome and identify sequences defining traits unique to our species. The sequence data from this study has been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AY667278-AY667407.

  6. Implantation, flux and recoil distributions for plasma species impinging on tokamak divertor materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshman, Nathan David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma Species Impinging on Tokamak Divertor Materials. APlasma Species Impinging on Tokamak Divertor Materials. byquantities needed to couple tokamak edge plasma to coolant

  7. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chivian, Dylan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - australian native species Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Key words: dam decommissioning, exotic fish removal, invasive species, native fish, stream restoration... of the river. The distribution of flows and non-native species prior...

  9. Life cycle studies of the red tide dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brosnahan, Michael L. (Michael Lewis)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blooms of toxic species within the algal dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense may cause Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning, a significant and growing environmental threat worldwide. However, blooms of closely ...

  10. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal...

  11. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe is described for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe`s distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device. 5 figs.

  12. Three-fold way to extinction in cyclically competing species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rulands, S; Frey, E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Species extinction occurs regularly and unavoidably in ecological systems. The time scales for extinction can broadly vary and inform on the ecosystem's stability. We study the spatio-temporal extinction dynamics of a paradigmatic population model where three species exhibit cyclic competition. The cyclic dynamics reflects the non-equilibrium nature of the species interactions. We identify three types of dynamics that leave leave their fingerprints in the extinction-time probability distribution: rapid extinction, heteroclinic orbits, and metastable traveling weaves. Based on these three types we develop semi-phenomenological arguments for the functional form and the scaling behavior of the extinction-time probability distribution. These analytical results are supported by extensive numerical simulations.

  13. Quantitative Ecology and the Conservation of Biodiversity: Species Richness, Abundance, and Extinction in Human-Altered Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitzes, Justin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for predicting species extinction by linking populationfor estimates of species extinctions. Ecology 81:3305–estimates of single-species extinction risks and community-

  14. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950[degree]C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800[degree] to 950[degree]C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na[sub 2]O, NaCl, and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820[degree]. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 [mu]m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  15. Vascular Plants of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an updated listing of the vascular plants present on and near the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. This document is an update of a listing of plants prepared by Sackschewdky et al. in 1992. Since that time there has been a significant increase in the botanical knowledge of the Hanford Site. The present listing is based on an examination of herbarium collections held at PNNL, at WSU-Tri Cities, WSU-Pullman, Bringham Young University, and The University of Washington, and on examination of ecological literature derived from the Hanford and Benton county areas over the last 100 years. Based on the most recent analysis, there are approximately 725 different plant species that have been documented on or around the Hanford Site. This represents an approximate 20% increase in the number of species reported within Sackschewsky et al. (1992). This listing directly supports DOE and contractor efforts to assess the potential impacts of Hanford Site operations on the biological environment, including impacts to rare habitats and to species listed as endangered or\\ threatened. This document includes a listing of plants currently listed as endangered, threatened, or otherwise of concern to the Washington Natural Heritage Program or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as well as those that are currently listed as noxious weeds by the State of Washington. Also provided is an overview of how plants on the Hanford Site can be used by people. This information may be useful in developing risk assessment models, and as supporting information for clean-up level and remediation decisions.

  16. CONSERVATION NOTES SEAWEEDS are not weeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of vitamins--beta-carotene (which is converted to vitamin A by the body), thiamin, riboflavin, niacin

  17. Suggestions for Weed Control in Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.

    2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    F r ontier ? for additional w eed contr ol. Consult (R efer to label for specific w eeds BASF U se rate determined b y inches of soil) or sur face applied the pr oduct label. R o tational cr o p r estrictions will contr olled.) C.E.C. (cationex...) or sur face contr olled.) BASF applied within 2 w eeks of U se rate is determined b y C.E.C. (cation ex change planting. Early postemergence capacity) or soil textur e and organic matter befor e corn is12 inches tall, but content. Can make split...

  18. Suggestions for Weed Control in Peanuts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.; Lemon, Robert G.

    2001-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    and restrictions . Annual grasses , small- F r ontier 6.0? 20 to 32 oz. Preplant Same as abo v e . seeded broadleaf w eeds Outlook 6.0? incorporated , and y ello w nutsedge (dimethenamid) preemergence B ASF 6 T able 2. Pr eplant incorpor ated and pr eemer g ence.... S ygenta F rontier?, Outlook? dimethenamid 6 lbs ./gal. B ASF P o ast Plus? setho xy dim 1 lb ./gal. B ASF Pro wl? pendimethalin 3.3 lbs ./gal. B ASF Pursuit DG? imazethap yr 0.125 lb ./soluble pack et B ASF R oundup Ultra? glyphosate 4 lbs ./gal...

  19. alien fish species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alien fish species First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Climate Change Vulnerability of...

  20. Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA182 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Roy P. E. Yanong (genus) of fish viruses in the family Iridoviridae (the iridoviruses). Megalocytiviruses cause systemic fishes in both cultured and wild stocks. In some disease outbreaks, 100% losses have oc- curred in under

  1. Current Time Step: 236 Carbon 14Name of Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenhauer, Greg S.

    of Species: Latitude: 70 N On-line Controller of Atmospheric Modeling 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 200 600 800400 Thread Thread Local monitors and central monitor probe events control steering controller trigger Application Monitoring & User Interaction Controller Trace Data Collector Trace Data Analyzer Filter

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of dynamic taxonomy on rare species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of dynamic taxonomy on rare species and conservation listing: insights from nature of biotic taxonomies and how these changes alter perceptions of extinction risk and conservation that the activity of a new, fine-scale taxonomy may have an effect in the taxonomy structure producing a taxonomic

  3. Differential tolerance of UV radiation between Chaoborus species and role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommaruga, Ruben

    Differential tolerance of UV radiation between Chaoborus species and role of photoprotective that this genus is highly sensitive to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Here, we first tested the UV sensi. obscuripes is associated with the presence of photo- protective compounds. Populations of UV

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and for carbon sequestration (Jandl et al. 2007). Soil acidification and carbon sequestration are influ- encedORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen transformation patterns in forest carbon release under broadleaved forest floors may explain this difference. Spruce forest floor exhibited

  5. Cytonuclear Introgressive Swamping and Species Turnover of Bass After an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avise, John

    . The spotted bass that were intro- duced (most likely by members of a bass- fishing club) are thought to haveCytonuclear Introgressive Swamping and Species Turnover of Bass After an Introduction J. C. Avise Fish and WUdllfe Research Unit (Pierce) and the National Biological Service (Van Den Avyle), Daniel B

  6. Electro-diffusion in a plasma with two ion species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagan, Grigory; Tang Xianzhu [Theoretical Division Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric field is a thermodynamic force that can drive collisional inter-ion-species transport in a multicomponent plasma. In an inertial confinement fusion capsule, such transport causes fuel ion separation even with a target initially prepared to have equal number densities for the two fuel ion species. Unlike the baro-diffusion driven by ion pressure gradient and the thermo-diffusion driven by ion and electron temperature gradients, electro-diffusion has a critical dependence on the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion species. Specifically, it is shown here that electro-diffusion vanishes if the ion species have the same charge-to-mass ratio. An explicit expression for the electro-diffusion ratio is obtained and used to investigate the relative importance of electro- and baro-diffusion mechanisms. In particular, it is found that electro-diffusion reinforces baro-diffusion in the deuterium and tritium mix, but tends to cancel it in the deuterium and helium-3 mix.

  7. Plasma equilibria with multiple ion species: Equations and algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galeotti, L.; Ceccherini, F. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Barnes, D. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Pegoraro, F. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Axisymmetric equilibrium of a magnetically confined plasma with multiple ion species is considered. To describe hot plasmas with isothermal surfaces, we adopt a formulation consistent with zero poloidal ion flow. This formulation includes all magnetic field components and also correctly includes all effects of toroidal ion rotation. There are two free surface functions for each species and a third which is determined by a differential equation relating surface functions per species. We have developed and implemented an algorithm for the solution of the resulting nonlinear equations and found solutions with large charge and mass contrast among the ion species for both compact (r = 0 included) and annular (r = 0 excluded) domains. Our solution method allows for arbitrary domain shapes, includes far-field conditions, and treats any combination of electrically conducting or insulating walls. Appropriate surface functions are used to describe the transition from closed to open field plasma in a reasonable manner. Solutions for advanced fuel cycle fusion systems (both D-{sup 3}He and p-{sup 11}B) are presented to illustrate the power of the method. Finally, we briefly discuss the special issues associated with obtaining very elongated solutions and describe the algorithm for implementing these features.

  8. Molecular Structure and Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Govind, Niranjan; Walter, Eric D.; Burton, Sarah D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Devaraj, Arun; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Karim, Ayman M.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ability to predict the solubility and stability of lithium polysulfide is vital in realizing longer lasting lithium-sulfur batteries. Herein we report a combined computational and experimental spectroscopic analysis to understand the dissolution mechanism of lithium polysulfide species in an aprotic solvent medium. Multinuclear NMR and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) analysis reveals that the lithium exchange between polysulfide species and solvent molecule constitutes the first step in the dissolution process. Lithium exchange leads to de-lithiated polysulfide ions which subsequently forms highly reactive free radicals through disproportion reaction. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility.

  9. How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology Roger Arditi and Lev R. Ginzburg, the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, in the research unit of Ecology and Evolution of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook University since 1977. He has published widely on theoretical

  10. Application of Branching Models in the Study of Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    and their empirical growth rates. We then characterize the estimated spatial-temporal rate of spread of red banana services. Pimentel et al. (2005, 2007) estimates the financial impact of invasive species in the United States at over 120 billion dollars per year, and Colautti et al. (2006) estimates the cost of eleven

  11. Procedure Speci cations in 10.1 Real Time Theorems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    (MDA) and Touch Down Zone Elevation (TDZE) which are important during the landing phase. Predicates-Time Speci#12;cations module Landing Defs DECLARATIONS constants DH ; MDA;TDZE variables alt DEFINITIONS below DH #1; = (alt MDA #1; = (alt MDA) at MDA #1; = (alt = MDA) landing ) (alt = TDZE

  12. TWO NEW SPECIES OF DICRANOCENTRUS FROM PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mari-Mutt, José A.

    TWO NEW SPECIES OF DICRANOCENTRUS FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC (COLLEMBOLA: ENTOMOBRYIDAE) JOSE A. MARI M U T T Department of Biology University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00708 National Forest, Puerto Rico and Provincia La Vega, Dominican Republic, and D. zebratus from the latter

  13. Impact of Tree Species on Carbon in Forest Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    species differ in productivity, litter quality and quantity, canopy structure and nitrogen deposition.1.6 Mycelia production (Paper V) 23 4.2 Vegetation 23 4.2.1 Tree biomass and litterfall (Paper II) 23 4.2.2 Understorey vegetation (Paper II) 24 4.2.3 Fine root biomass (Paper V) 25 4.2.4 Fine root production

  14. Developmental plasticity and the origin of species differences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    -Eberhard* Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Unit 2511, APO AA 34020-9511 Speciation is the origin of reproductive. Studies of reproductive isolation have dominated research on speciation, leaving the origin of species selection and genetic accommo- dation fueled by standing genetic variation or by subsequent mutation

  15. Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orrock, John

    Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness Peter B. Adler,1 * Eric W. Seabloom,2 that the relationship is hump-shaped, with richness first rising and then declining with increasing productivity by conducting standardized sampling in 48 herbaceous-dominated plant communities on five continents. We found

  16. RARE SPECIES CONSERVATORY FOUNDATION, INC. EIN: 65-0560456

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consulting and technical services to conservation teams, and forms educational, political and economic partnerships to expedite specific habitat and species conservation projects. Please also see detailed and stimulate collateral, in situ conservation investment. Lowry Park Zoo is preparing an on-exhibit Red

  17. Differential and Integral Equations Volume...., Number....., pp. N-SPECIES COMPETITION IN A PERIODIC CHEMOSTAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolkowicz, Gail S. K.

    , the single-species growth model, has a threshold between global extinction and uniform persistenceDifferential and Integral Equations Volume...., Number....., pp. N-SPECIES COMPETITION is proved and then applied to models of single-species growth and n-species competition in a periodically

  18. Xero-thermophilous and grassland ubiquist species dominate the weevil fauna of Swiss cities (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    (Curculionoidea) was sampled in the three Swiss cities of Lucerne, Lugano and Zurich. In total, 3448 individuals from 129 species were collected (Lucerne: 64 species; Lugano: 69 species; Zurich: 83 species). The most (Soerensen index) was highest be- tween the cities of Lucerne and Zurich, which could be expected since

  19. Extracting Species Trees From Complex Gene Trees: Reconciled Trees And Vertebrate Phylogeny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Roderic

    , trypsinogen, tyrosinase, vassopressin, and Wnt-7). The resulting species tree shows much similarity

  20. CONSEQUENCES OF SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL CLIMATE VARIABILITY FOR SPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Miguel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change, habitat loss, protected areas and the climate adaptation potential of species in Mediterranean

  1. 1A Appendix A--Statewide Management Assessment of Invasive Species in Oregon APPENDIX A. OREGON STATEWIDE MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT OF INVASIVE SPECIES SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATEWIDE MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT OF INVASIVE SPECIES SURVEY OISC Statewide Management Assessment of Invasive will not be shared. Rather, survey responses will be compiled as part of this statewide management assessment Species Survey and Management Question 2 If you conducted invasive species work in your fiscal year 2008

  2. Introduced Fish Species: "What do Introduced Fish Species: "What do the locals think?"the locals think?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    bass grass carp Currently 56 species of introduced fish in Tennessee waters 12 exotic to US12 exotic release Bait bucket Game fish introductions Procambarus acutus Two local examples brook troutstriped bass #12;10/19/2009 4 striped bass (Morone saxatilis) Anadromous fish native to Atlantic and Gulf coasts

  3. Conservation Genetics of Five Species of Dionda in West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Ashley

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    al. 2004), as well as the San Antonio River Basin (Scharpf 2005). Dionda serena inhabits the Frio, Nueces, and Sabinal rivers in the Nueces River basin (Scharpf 2005). The spring-dwelling nature of Dionda contributes to the relative isolation..., Guadalupe, Nueces and Frio rivers may once have been connected during times of lower sea levels, allowing for fish dispersal between rivers (Mayden 1992). The five species of Dionda in Texas are similar in ecological preferences and life history. All...

  4. Temporal modulation of plasma species in atmospheric dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Aijun; Wang, Xiaohua, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Dingxin; Rong, Mingzhe, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Centre for Plasma Biomedicine, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Kong, Michael G. [Centre for Plasma Biomedicine, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Virginia 23508 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge in helium is a pulsed discharge in nature and the moment of maximum species densities is almost consistent with peak discharge current density. In this paper, a one-dimensional fluid model is used to investigate the temporal structure of plasma species in an atmospheric He-N{sub 2} dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It is demonstrated that there exist microsecond delays of the moments of the maximum electron and ion densities from the peak of discharge current density. These time delays are caused by a competition between the electron impact and Penning ionizations, modulated by the N{sub 2} level in the plasma-forming gas. Besides, significant electron wall losses lead to the DBD being more positively charged and, with a distinct temporal separation in the peak electron and cation densities, the plasma is characterized with repetitive bursts of net positive charges. The temporal details of ionic and reactive plasma species may provide a new idea for some biological processes.

  5. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  6. Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the eleventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding. Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition. Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued nontarget taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into two chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fourth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima Basin. Chapter 2 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River.

  7. Properties of Reactive Oxygen Species by Quantum Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Zen; Bernhardt L. Trout; Leonardo Guidoni

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of Chemistry, Biology and Atmospheric Science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab-initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as $N^3-N^4$, where $N$ is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  8. Cargo transportation by two species of motor protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunxin Zhang

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The cargo motion in living cells transported by two species of motor protein with different intrinsic directionality is discussed in this study. Similar to single motor movement, cargo steps forward and backward along microtubule stochastically. Recent experiments found that, cargo transportation by two motor species has a memory, it does not change its direction as frequently as expected, which means that its forward and backward step rates depends on its previous motion trajectory. By assuming cargo has only the least memory, i.e. its step direction depends only on the direction of its last step, two cases of cargo motion are detailed analyzed in this study: {\\bf (I)} cargo motion under constant external load; and {\\bf (II)} cargo motion in one fixed optical trap. Due to the existence of memory, for the first case, cargo can keep moving in the same direction for a long distance. For the second case, the cargo will oscillate in the trap. The oscillation period decreases and the oscillation amplitude increases with the motor forward step rates, but both of them decrease with the trap stiffness. The most likely location of cargo, where the probability of finding the oscillated cargo is maximum, may be the same as or may be different with the trap center, which depends on the step rates of the two motor species. Meanwhile, if motors are robust, i.e. their forward to backward step rate ratios are high, there may be two such most likely locations, located on the two sides of the trap center respectively. The probability of finding cargo in given location, the probability of cargo in forward/backward motion state, and various mean first passage times of cargo to give location or given state are also analyzed.

  9. A new species of the allodapine bee genus Braunsapis from the Central African Republic (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Michael S.

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new species of the allodapine bee genus Braunsapis Michener (Allodapini: Allodapina) is described and figured from a series of females collected in the Central African Republic. Braunsapis maxschwarzi Engel, new species, ...

  10. Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical forests: the diversification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Mark

    Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical, Mesoamerica, niche conservatism, seasonally dry tropical forests. Summary · Mesoamerican arid biomes epitomize the vast species richness of Meso- american seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs), and to evaluate

  11. Reproductive traits of pioneer gastropod species colonizing deep-see hydrothermal vents after an eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayer, Skylar (Skylar Rae)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The colonization dynamics and life histories of pioneer species are vital components in understanding the early succession of nascent hydrothermal vents. The reproductive ecology of pioneer species at deep-sea hydrothermal ...

  12. Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species diversity in southern Rocky Mountain headwater streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species diversity in southern Rocky Mountain headwater and Conditions #12;MOLECULAR APPROACHES IN FRESHWATER ECOLOGY Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species: diversity, elevation, DNA barcoding, taxonomy, aquatic insect, EPT, southern Rocky Mountain Elevation

  13. SNAKE SPECIES RICHNESS IN RELATION TO HABITAT IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF EAST CENTRAL TEXAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putegnat, John

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examined snake species richness and relative abundances in a heterogeneous landscape within the post oak savannah of East Central Texas. Snakes were sampled using funnel traps (with drift fences for terrestrial species) and hand capture...

  14. Confronting Uncertainty and Missing Values in Species Conservation Investment with Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    1 Confronting Uncertainty and Missing Values in Species Conservation Investment with Environmental: Environmental value transfer and species conservation Key words: environmental value transfer, uncertainty (Department of Environmental Heritage 2005). This results in an underinvestment of conservation dollars

  15. Effects of hay management and native species sowing on grassland community structure, biomass, and restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Bryan L.; Kindscher, Kelly; Houseman, Greg R.; Murphy, Cheryl A.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    changes in species composition and lessened the negative impact of fertilization on diversity. In non-fertilized plots, sowing increased representation by native species and increased diversity, successional turnover, and biomass production. Our results...

  16. Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosys- tems- mon species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plu- mosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum

  17. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species Zhaohui Abstract Five species of freshwater green algae, including three strains of Botryococcus braunii (two in the algae, including alkadienes, botryococcenes, heptadecenes, fatty acids, and phytadiene, were measured

  18. Differences in sounds made by courting males of three closely related Lake Malawi cichlid species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . C. P. AMORIM*, M. E. KNIGHT, Y. STRATOUDAKIS§ AND G. F. TURNER{ *Unidade de Investigac¸a~o em Eco species, court- ship calls of three species of Pseudotropheus that co-occur at Nkhata Bay, on the western

  19. Revision of the bee genus Chlerogella (Hymenoptera: Halictidae), Part IV: A new species from southwestern Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Michael S.; Gonzalez, Victor H.; Hinojosa-Dí az, Ismael A.

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new species of the diverse augochlorine bee genus Chlerogella Michener (Halictinae: Augochlorini) is described and figured from southwestern Colombia. Chlerogella anchicaya Engel, Gonzalez, & Hinojosa-Díaz, new species, ...

  20. Review of the chewing louse genus Tinamotaecola (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae), with the description of three new species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellenthal, Ronald A.; Price, Roger D.; Timm, Robert M.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic study of the chewing louse genus Tinamotaecola (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) was undertaken, enabling us to recognize four species in the genus. The single previously recognized species, T. andinae Carriker, ...

  1. What matters for predicting spatial distributions of trees: Techniques, data, or species’ characteristics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guisan, A.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Elith, J.; Graham, C. H.; Phillips, S.; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data characteristics and species traits are expected to influence the accuracy with which species' distributions can be modeled and predicted. We compare 10 modeling techniques in terms of predictive power and sensitivity ...

  2. Spatial resolution of temperature and chemical species in a flame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albahadily, Fakhrildeen Niema

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Winefordner et al. (51). AE . /k A. g. I. B. ln ~ + ln ? + 1n? 1 A. g. i B. (36) where: subscript i = the level excited by the source subscript j = the thermally assisted level flame temperature AE . . ij the difference in energy between i and j.... Schweikert (Member) Abdel-Kad Ayou (Memb ) Vaneica . Y ng (Member) May 1984 ABSTRACT Spatial Resolution of Temperature and Chemical Species in a Flame. (May 1984) Fakhrildeen Niema Albahadily, B. S. , University of Basrah/Iraq Chairman of Advisory...

  3. 31 TAC 65.175 - Threatened Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe Commission | Open EnergyEnergyThreatened Species Jump

  4. 31 TAC 65.176 - Endangered Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe Commission | Open EnergyEnergyThreatened Species

  5. TWO NEW TRYPANOSOMA SPECIES FROM AFRICAN BIRDS, WITH NOTES ON THE TAXONOMY OF AVIAN TRYPANOSOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sehgal, Ravinder

    TWO NEW TRYPANOSOMA SPECIES FROM AFRICAN BIRDS, WITH NOTES ON THE TAXONOMY OF AVIAN TRYPANOSOMES situation in species taxonomy of avian trypanosomes is discussed. We call for the redescription of valid composition of avian trypanosomes and reconstructing the taxonomy of these organisms. Species of avian

  6. An Algebraic Speci cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bidoit, Michel

    An Algebraic Speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System Michel Bidoit 1 , Claude Chevenier describe how to derive an algebraic speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System starting from Introduction Our aim is to explain how one can solve the \\Steam-boiler control speci#12;cation problem

  7. A unified model of species immigration, extinction and abundance on islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Luke

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE A unified model of species immigration, extinction and abundance on islands James and extinction rates as functions of species richness at dynamic equilibrium. In contrast, the approach results highlight the importance of species abundances as indi- cators of immigration and extinction rates

  8. Spatially Synchronous Extinction of Species under External Forcing R. E. Amritkar*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarajan, Govindan

    Spatially Synchronous Extinction of Species under External Forcing R. E. Amritkar* Physical a synchronizing term. Absence of the quadratic saturation term can help the species to avoid extinction. DOI: 10 other examples are documented in Ref. [10]. The second important phenomenon is the extinction of species

  9. Thus, rarer species may be more buffered from extinction than expected from neutral sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Liang

    Thus, rarer species may be more buffered from extinction than expected from neutral sampling effects. However, time-lagged extinctions due to extinction debt may lead to additional species loss (31 species abundances, at least until future extinction debt is paid. References and Notes 1. M. Gaertner, A

  10. The Value of Endangered Species: the Importance of Conserving Biological Diversity1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    - tion. Since time began, countless species have gone extinct from natural processes. The extinction of dinosaurs is the best known example. Why Save Endangered Species? If extinction is a natural process, why extinction of plants and animals to natural causes. Today most species of plants and animals become extinct

  11. Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sax, Dov

    Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands Dov F. Sax, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 Predation by exotic species has caused the extinction these scenarios have for the future retention or extinction of native plant species. Finally, we identify invasion

  12. Extinction Risk, Ecological Stress and Climate Change: How Species Respond to Changes in Global Biodiversity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Extinction Risk, Ecological Stress and Climate Change: How Species Respond to Changes in Global subordinate species less intelligent than us, at risk of extinction. In other words, anthropogenic activities have made other species sensitive to changes in climate and habitat vulnerable to extinction [Parry et

  13. SHORT-TERM THERMAL RESISTANCE OF ZOEAE OF 10 SPECIES OF CRABS FROM PUGET SOUND, WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHORT-TERM THERMAL RESISTANCE OF ZOEAE OF 10 SPECIES OF CRABS FROM PUGET SOUND, WASHINGTON BENJAMIN to protect the most sensitive species studied is 24OC for the Puget Sound area. Thermal resistance of marine species of Puget INorthwest and Alaska Fisheries Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, 2725

  14. Mycological Society of America A Gene Genealogical Approach to Recognize Phylogenetic Species Boundaries in the Lichenized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Mycological Society of America A Gene Genealogical Approach to Recognize Phylogenetic Species-8897 A gene genealogical approach to recognize phylogenetic species boundaries in the lichenized fungus, was investigated as a model system in which to recognize species boundaries. Gene genealogies of 6 and 12 loci were

  15. A NEW SPECIES OF HALICYCLOPS (COPEPODA, CYCLOPOIDA, CYCLOPIDAE) FROM CENOTES OF THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    -4827. Halicyclops cenoticola sp. nov. is described from cenotes of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. The new speciesSARSIA A NEW SPECIES OF HALICYCLOPS (COPEPODA, CYCLOPOIDA, CYCLOPIDAE) FROM CENOTES OF THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO, WITH AN IDENTIFICATION KEY FOR THE SPECIES OF THE GENUS FROM THE CARIBBEAN REGION

  16. Generation of reactive oxygen species by a persulfide (BnSSH) Tonika Chatterji,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    Generation of reactive oxygen species by a persulfide (BnSSH) Tonika Chatterji, Kripa Keerthi generate reactive oxygen species under biologically rele- vant conditions via the sequence of reactions by reactive oxygen species generated in this manner may contribute to the cytotoxic properties of leinamycin

  17. 3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    changes in the extent and frequency of disturbance to an ecosystem #12;3) What makes a species invasive? i3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Many;3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Invasive

  18. vol. 171, no. 6 the american naturalist june 2008 Scale Dependence of Species-Energy Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Andrew

    on spatial turnover in the species com- position (beta diversity). Our results suggest that if energy richness, species-energy relationships, potential evapotranspiration, spatial scale, beta diversity, fishesvol. 171, no. 6 the american naturalist june 2008 Scale Dependence of Species-Energy Relationships

  19. Vol. 21 No. 3 2004 Endangered Species UPDATE 87 Andrew C. Keller &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    has declined by 33% since delisting (Rugh 2003). In light of this population decline, in this paper we of delisted species, monitoring beyond the 5 years required by the ESA is needed to ensure long-term viability UPDATE Vol. 21 No. 3 200488 Introduction Does delisting species under the En- dangered Species Act (ESA

  20. What Is the Indicator and Why Is It Important? As the number of species considered rare increases,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the likelihood of species extinction increases. This indicator focuses on species that have the greatest chance of species, tracking the number of species at risk of extinction can potentially indicate whether the use? The trend in species extinction since the turn of the 20th century varies by taxonomic group (figure 7

  1. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(1–40) fibril formation. ? At high A?(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  2. Scalable Quantum Computing Architecture with Mixed Species Ion Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Wright; Carolyn Auchter; Chen-Kuan Chou; Richard D. Graham; Thomas W. Noel; Tomasz Sakrejda; Zichao Zhou; Boris B. Blinov

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on progress towards implementing mixed ion species quantum information processing for a scalable ion trap architecture. Mixed species chains may help solve several problems with scaling ion trap quantum computation to large numbers of qubits. Initial temperature measurements of linear Coulomb crystals containing barium and ytterbium ions indicate that the mass difference does not significantly impede cooling at low ion numbers. Average motional occupation numbers are estimated to be $\\bar{n} \\approx 130$ quanta per mode for chains with small numbers of ions, which is within a factor of three of the Doppler limit for barium ions in our trap. We also discuss generation of ion-photon entanglement with barium ions with a fidelity of $F \\ge 0.84$, which is an initial step towards remote ion-ion coupling in a more scalable quantum information architecture. Further, we are working to implement these techniques in surface traps in order to exercise greater control over ion chain ordering and positioning.

  3. Electrokinetic removal of charged contaminant species from soil and other media using moderately conductive adsorptive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Mattson, Earl D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for collecting and concentrating charged species, specifically, contaminant species in a medium, preferably soil. The method utilizes electrokinesis to drive contaminant species into and through a bed adjacent to a drive electrode. The bed comprises a moderately electrically conductive adsorbent material which is porous and is infused with water or other solvent capable of conducting electrical current. The bed material, preferably activated carbon, is easily removed and disposed of. Preferably, where activated carbon is used, after contaminant species are collected and concentrated, the mixture of activated carbon and contaminant species is removed and burned to form a stable and easily disposable waste product.

  4. Single- and multi-photon ionization studies of organosulfur species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Y.S.

    1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate ionization energies (IE`s) for molecular species are used for prediction of chemical reactivity and are of fundamental importance to chemists. The IE of a gaseous molecule can be determined routinely in a photoionization or a photoelectron experiment. IE determinations made in conventional photoionization and photoelectron studies have uncertainties in the range of 3--100 meV (25--250 cm{sup {minus}1}). In the past decade, the most exciting development in the field of photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy has been the availability of high resolution, tunable ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser sources. The laser pulsed field ionization photoelectron (PFI-PE) scheme is currently the state-of-the-art photoelectron spectroscopic technique and is capable of providing photoelectron energy resolution close to the optical resolution. The author has focused attention on the photoionization processes of some sulfur-containing species. The studies of the photoionization and photodissociation on sulfur-containing compounds [such as CS{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}SH, CH{sub 3}SSCH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SH and C{sub 4}H{sub 4}S (thiophene) and sulfur-containing radicals, such as HS, CS, CH{sub 3}S, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}S and CH{sub 3}SS], have been the major subjects in the group because sulfur is an important species contributing to air pollution in the atmosphere. The modeling of the combustion and oxidation of sulfur compounds represents important steps for the control of both the production and the elimination of sulfur-containing pollutants. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of the thesis. Chapters 2 and 6 contain five papers published in, or accepted for publication in, academic periodicals. In Chapter 7, the progress of the construction in the laboratory of a new vacuum ultraviolet laser system equipped with a reflectron mass spectrometer is presented. Chapters 2 through 7 have been removed for separate processing. A general conclusion of these studies are given in Chapter 8 followed by an appendix.

  5. Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other potential complexants. The sodium nitrate and sodium phosphate salts that form most of the salt cake layers have little interaction with plutonium in the wastes and contain relatively small plutonium concentrations. For these reasons the authors consider plutonium species in the sludges and supernate solutions only. The low concentrations of plutonium in waste tank supernate solutions and in the solid sludges prevent identification of chemical species of plutonium by ordinary analytical techniques. Spectrophotometric measurements are not sensitive enough to identify plutons oxidation states or complexes in these waste solutions. Identification of solid phases containing plutonium in sludge solids by x-ray diffraction or by microscopic techniques would be extremely difficult. Because of these technical problems, plutonium speciation was extrapolated from known behavior observed in laboratory studies of synthetic waste or of more chemically simple systems.

  6. A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Jurez, Oaxaca, Mexico 55 A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wake, David B.

    A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico 55 A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico Sean M de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, AP 70-153, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 04510

  7. 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation Program 50 CFR 679b26.doc 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation Program Page 1 of 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manager of the processor. (xii) A signed statement from the applicant and from all persons who are listed for personal injury, death, sickness, damage to property directly or indirectly due to activities conducted§ 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation Program 50 CFR 679b26.doc § 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation

  8. Frogs of the genus Eleutherodactylus (Leptodactylidae) in the cordillera occidental in Peru with descriptions of three new species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duellman, William E.; Lehr, Edgar

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    , and two are members of the Eleutherodactylus unistrigatus Group. We recognize 15 species of Eleutherodactylus in the Cordillera Occidental; 10 of these species are reported for the first time from the Cordillera Occidental. Four of these species are shared...

  9. Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loge, Gary W. (2998 Plaza Blanca, Santa Fe, NM 87505)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a plasma containing the species after a sufficient time period has elapsed after the generation of the plasma and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample.

  10. Alfalfa.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, O. M. (Oscar Melville)

    1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Noxious weeds are given i heavy t;ype. UUYLpA,, number. Kind, character, and number of for- eign seeds in one pound. BUCKHORN, or Ribgrass 2350; GREEN FOXTAIL 270; LAMB'S QUARTER 270; Red clover 90; DOCK 180: WILD. CARROT 275: DODDER 180: Crimson... Clover 90; Total 3700. BUCKHORN 2100; GREEN FOX- TAIL 275 : YELLOW FOXTAIL 100 ; MALLOW 350; WILD CARROT 275; CHICORY 275; SOW THISTLE 200; CATCHFLY ZOO; Rape 100; Cab- bage 100; SORREL 200; DODDER 90; CENTAURY 200; LAMB'S QUARTER 275; Total 4740...

  11. Is there evidence for additional neutrino species from cosmology?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Verde, Licia, E-mail: stephen.feeney.09@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: h.peiris@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu [ICREA and ICC, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that recent cosmological and flavor-oscillation data favor the existence of additional neutrino species beyond the three predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. We apply Bayesian model selection to determine whether there is indeed any evidence from current cosmological datasets for the standard cosmological model to be extended to include additional neutrino flavors. The datasets employed include cosmic microwave background temperature, polarization and lensing power spectra, and measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale and the Hubble constant. We also consider other extensions to the standard neutrino model, such as massive neutrinos, and possible degeneracies with other cosmological parameters. The Bayesian evidence indicates that current cosmological data do not require any non-standard neutrino properties.

  12. Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuldt, Thilo; Krutzik, Markus; Bote, Lluis Gesa; Gaaloul, Naceur; Hartwig, Jonas; Ahlers, Holger; Herr, Waldemar; Posso-Trujillo, Katerine; Rudolph, Jan; Seidel, Stephan; Wendrich, Thijs; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Sven; Kubelka-Lange, André; Milke, Alexander; Rievers, Benny; Rocco, Emanuele; Hinton, Andrew; Bongs, Kai; Oswald, Markus; Franz, Matthias; Hauth, Matthias; Peters, Achim; Bawamia, Ahmad; Wicht, Andreas; Battelier, Baptiste; Bertoldi, Andrea; Bouyer, Philippe; Landragin, Arnaud; Massonnet, Didier; Lévèque, Thomas; Wenzlawski, Andre; Hellmig, Ortwin; Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus; von Klitzing, Wolf; Chaloner, Chris; Summers, David; Ireland, Philip; Mateos, Ignacio; Sopuerta, Carlos F; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Tino, Guglielmo M; Williams, Michael; Trenkel, Christian; Gerardi, Domenico; Chwalla, Michael; Burkhardt, Johannes; Johann, Ulrich; Heske, Astrid; Wille, Eric; Gehler, Martin; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Gürlebeck, Norman; Braxmaier, Claus; Rasel, Ernst

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry...

  13. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University] [Penn State University

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  14. Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter B. Adler; et al.

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than 30 years, the relationship between net primary productivity and species richness has generated intense debate in ecology about the processes regulating local diversity. The original view, which is still widely accepted, holds that the relationship is hump-shaped, with richness first rising and then declining with increasing productivity. Although recent meta-analyses questioned the generality of hump-shaped patterns, these syntheses have been criticized for failing to account for methodological differences among studies. We addressed such concerns by conducting standardized sampling in 48 herbaceous-dominated plant communities on five continents. We found no clear relationship between productivity and fine-scale (meters-2) richness within sites, within regions, or across the globe. Ecologists should focus on fresh, mechanistic approaches to understanding the multivariate links between productivity and richness.

  15. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  16. Apparatus and method for polarizing polarizable nuclear species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hersman, F. William; Leuschner, Mark; Carberry, Jeannette

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a polarizing process involving a number of steps. The first step requires moving a flowing mixture of gas, the gas at least containing a polarizable nuclear species and vapor of at least one alkali metal, with a transport velocity that is not negligible when compared with the natural velocity of diffusive transport. The second step is propagating laser light in a direction, preferably at least partially through a polarizing cell. The next step is directing the flowing gas along a direction generally opposite to the direction of laser light propagating. The next step is containing the flowing gas mixture in the polarizing cell. The final step is immersing the polarizing cell in a magnetic field. These steps can be initiated in any order, although the flowing gas, the propagating laser and the magnetic field immersion must be concurrently active for polarization to occur.

  17. Long-term trends in the avifauna of the Sierra Nevada: community dynamics and species occupancy over a century of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Morgan Winn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    habitat loss on extinctions at species' low-latitude rangeand local extinction when a species is detected imperfectly.species, with implications for Pleistocene extinctions and

  18. Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program threatened and endangered species survey: Progress report. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, A.L.; Awl, D.J.; Gabrielsen, C.A.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Endangered Species Act (originally passed in 1973) is a Federal statute that protects both animal and plant species. The Endangered Species Act identifies species which are, without careful management, in danger of becoming extinct and species that are considered threatened. Along with the designation of threatened or endangered, the Endangered Species Act provides for the identification of appropriate habitat for these species. Since 1993, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has supported a program to survey the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for threatened and endangered species. The Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program initiated vascular plant surveys during fiscal year 1993 and vertebrate animal surveys during fiscal year 1994 to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered species on the ORR at the present time. Data collected during these surveys are currently aiding Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigations on the ORR. They also provide data for ER and Waste Management decision documents, ensure that decisions have technical and legal defensibility, provide a baseline for ensuring compliance with principal legal requirements and will increase public confidence in DOE`s adherence to all related environmental resources rules, laws, regulations, and instructions. This report discusses the progress to date of the threatened and endangered species surveys of the ORR.

  19. Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loge, Gary W. (304 Cheryl Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a sample that is excited by incident laser radiation. Which generates a plasma therein after a sufficient time period has elapsed and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample such as nitrogen for gaseous air samples.

  20. Species specific blood typing in birds using hemagglutin and precipitin techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cragg, Peter Charles

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to focus on the reactivity across several species in an attempt to relate their taxonomic relationships. The blood from six species; Canada Goose (Branta canadensis), Bl khllldl'Dk(hdkdh 11), kghlggdgk (B 1 ~k), d G ld Ph (Ch PP(h B' ) 1- lected... used see Table 3. Taxonomic Grouping Ending Example order family subfamily tribe genus specific epithet species -iformes -idae -inae ? ini Anseriformes Anatidae Anserinae Anserini Branta canadensis Branta canadensis Canada Goose...

  1. Occurrence and distribution of special status plant species on the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C.; Cypher, B.L.; Holmstead, G.L.; Hammer, K.L.; Frost, N.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several special status plant species occur or potentially occur at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). Special status species are defined as those species that are either federally listed as endangered or threatened, or candidate taxa. Candidate species are classified as Category 1 or Category 2. Category 1 taxa are those species for which there is sufficient evidence to support listing, while Category 2 taxa are those species for which listing may possibly be appropriate, but for which sufficient data are lacking to warrant immediate listing. Determining the presence and distribution of these species on NPRC is necessary so that appropriate conservation or protection measures can be implemented. In the spring of 1988, a survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) was conducted to determine the occurrence of Hoover`s wooly-star (Eriastrum hooveri), Kern Mallow (Eremalche kemensis), San Joaquin wooly-threads (Lembertia congdonii), and California jewelflower (Caulanthus califonicus), all listed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as Category 2 species at that time. Of the four species, only Hoover`s wooly-star was found. It was concluded that Kern mallow and San Joaquin wooly-threads could potentially be found on NPR-1, but habitat for California jewelflower did not occur on NPR-1 and its occurrence was unlikely. As part of an ongoing effort to document the presence or absence of sensitive plant species on NPRC, surveys for species other than Hoover`s wooly-star were conducted in the spring of 1993. Abundant spring rains in 1993 created favorable growing conditions for annual forbs. Surveys in 1993 focused on potential habitat of several endangered and candidate species. The results of those surveys are presented in this report.

  2. Effect of collision parameters in electronegative plasma sheath with two species of positive ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulick, R.; Goswami, K. S. [Center of Plasma Physics, Institute for plasma Research, Sonapur, Guwahati 782402 (India)] [Center of Plasma Physics, Institute for plasma Research, Sonapur, Guwahati 782402 (India); Mahanta, M. K. [Department of Physics, Arya Vidyapeeth College, Guwahati 781016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Arya Vidyapeeth College, Guwahati 781016 (India)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of ion neutral collision is shown for two species of positive ions in electronegative plasma. The ion neutral collision is modeled using power law of collision cross section. It is a usual case for processing plasma to have two species of positive ions and hence we attempt to study the dynamics of the two species of ions inside the collisional sheath of electronegative plasma.

  3. Species richness in a successional grassland: effects of nitrogen enrichment and plant litter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Bryan L.; Gross, Katherine L.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Bromus inermis. The most common forb species in the community were Daucus carota, Achillea mil- lefolium, Hypericum perforatum, and Potentilla recta. Soils underlying the field site are a well-drained, Osh- temo sandy loam formed from glacial till... designed to explain the interdepen- dence of species diversity and productivity invoke the mechanism of competition for light occurring among living plants in causing species extinctions and reduc- tions in diversity at high levels of productivity (Gold...

  4. Rat colonic reactive oxygen species production and DNA damage are mediated by diet and age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Cara Aletha Everett

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diacetate docosahexanoic acid diphenyliodonium chloride ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid eicosapentanoic acid ethidium homodiner ? 1 fragment length analysis using repair enzymes Fapy glycosylase Hanks' balanced salt solution hydrogen peroxide lipid... the elimination of cancer cells. Production and Functions of Reactive Oxygen Species Formation of reactive oxygen species Reactive oxygen species are a by-product of normal metabolism and include superoxide (Ot' ), hydrogen peroxide (HzO&), and the hydroxyl...

  5. Biodiesel from aquatic species. Project report: FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.M.; Sprague, S.; Jarvis, E.E.; Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Zeiler, K.G.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers in the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project focus on the use of microalgae as a feedstock for producing renewable, high-energy liquid fuels. The program`s basic premise is that microalgae, which have been called the most productive biochemical factories in the world, can produce up to 30 times more oil per unit of growth area than land plants. It is estimated that 150 to 400 barrels of oil per acre per year (0.06 to 0.16 million liters/hectar) could be produced with microalgal oil technology. Initial commercialization of this technology is envisioned for the desert Southwest because this area provides high solar radiation and offers flat land that has few competing uses (hence low land costs). Similarly, there are large saline aquifers with few competing uses in the region. This water source could provide a suitable, low-cost medium for the growth of many microalgae. The primary area of research during FY 1993 was the effort to genetically improve microalgae in order to control the timing and magnitude of lipid accumulation. Increased lipid content will have a direct effect on fuel price, and the control of lipid content is a major project goal. The paper describes progress on the following: culture collection; molecular biology of lipid biosynthesis; microalgal transformation; and environmental, safety, and health and quality assurance.

  6. Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Nebraska)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

  7. Arsenic species and leachability in the fronds of the hyperaccumulator Chinese brake (Pteris vittata L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The impacts of air-drying on arsenic species Science Ltd. doi:10.1016/S0269-7491(02)00470-0 Enviro

  8. Proportional counter device for detecting electronegative species in an air sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allman, S.L.; Chen, F.C.; Chen, C.H.

    1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for detecting an electronegative species comprises an analysis chamber, an inlet communicating with the analysis chamber for admitting a sample containing the electronegative species and an ionizable component, a radioactive source within the analysis chamber for emitting radioactive energy for ionizing a component of the sample, a proportional electron detector within the analysis chamber for detecting electrons emitted from the ionized component, and a circuit for measuring the electrons and determining the presence of the electronegative species by detecting a reduction in the number of available electrons due to capture of electrons by the electronegative species. 2 figures.

  9. Effect of different intravenous iron preparations on lymphocyte intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and subpopulation survival.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ajay; Zhuo, Jiaying; Zha, Junli; Reddy, Srinivasa; Olp, Jonathan; Pai, Amy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IV iron compounds induced greater intracellular ROS generation,IV iron preparations on intracellular reactive oxygen species generationIV iron preparations on intracellular immune cell ROS generation

  10. Climate Change Risks and Conservation Implications for a Threatened Small-Range Mammal Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    and human impact using two species distribution modeling algorithms to test hypotheses on the factors of global warming. Conclusions/Significance: Climate change clearly poses a severe threat

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent countries species Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: listed over a dozen Pyramica species, and even more of Strumigenys, from Suriname and its adjacent... ) and all other countries that surround it. Recently, this...

  12. Biodiversity and the Courts: Endangered Species Law in the US, Australia, and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Robert

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    polar bear Ursus maritimus in Canada. ” Ottawa: Committeeof Endangered Wildlife in Canada, 2008. [8] “DeterminationSpecies at Risk Act. ” 145 Canada Gazette 27 (July 2, 2011):

  13. Habitat types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and plant species of concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, J.L.; Rickard, W.H.; Brandt, C.A. [and others

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide a comprehensive source of the best available information on Hanford Site sensitive and critical habitats and plants and animals of importance or special status. In this report, sensitive habitats include areas known to be used by threatened, endangered, or sensitive plant or animal species, wetlands, preserves and refuges, and other sensitive habitats outlined in the Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodology. Potentially important species for risk assessment and species of special concern with regard to their status as threatened, endangered, or sensitive are described, and potential habitats for these species identified.

  14. Species trials for biomass plantations in Hawaii: a first appraisal. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, T.H.; Whitesell, C.D.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast-growing trees producing high-density wood are required to justify from an exonomic standpoint short rotation biomass plantations. Nine species trials were established on five sub-tropical sites on the island of Hawaii. Survival and growth of 27 introduced species and the native Acacia koa were appraised at one or more locations, for periods from 24 to 60 months. Performance varied greatly, within, and between all species tested. Eucalyptus saligna and E. grandis usually proved to be the species best adapted to well drained sites. Most failures a-d unsatisfactory performances related to harsh site conditions, such as low soil fertility, droughts, and high winds.

  15. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Enterohepatic Helicobacter Species Isolated from Both Laboratory and Wild Rodents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheh, Alexander

    The draft genome sequences of eight enterohepatic Helicobacter species, H. muridarum, H. trogontum, H. typhlonius, and five unnamed helicobacters, are presented here. Using laboratory mice pervasively infected with ...

  16. Two new species of Bennaria Melichar, 1914 (Hemiptera, Fulgoromorpha, Cixiidae, Bennini) from Papua New Guinea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Two new species of Bennaria Melichar, 1914 (Hemiptera, Fulgoromorpha, Cixiidae, Bennini) from Papua's thesis dissertation ("Community structure of Au- chenorrhyncha (Hemiptera: Insecta) along an altitudinal

  17. aerosol-associated ionic species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    completely eliminates the solvent separated minimum SSM that is seen in bulk water. The free energy profiles Thirumalai, Devarajan 2 Species CiteSeer Summary: Abstract...

  18. Endangered Species Program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Chevron USA. Production Company (CPDN). Four federally-listed endangered animal species and one federally-threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, giant kangaroo rat, Tipton kangaroo rat, and Hoover`s wooly-star. All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which declares that it is ``...the policy of Congress that all Federal departments and agencies shall seek to conserve endangered species and threatened species and shall utilize their authorities in furtherance of the purposes of the Act.`` DOE is also obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The major objective of the EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. Endangered Species Program on NPRC is to provide DOE with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the Endangered Species Act. The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress and results of the Endangered Species Program made during fiscal year 1993.

  19. Proportional counter device for detecting electronegative species in an air sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allman, Steve L. (Knoxville, TN); Chen, Fang C. (Knoxville, TN); Chen, Chung-Hsuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for detecting an electronegative species comprises an analysis chamber, an inlet communicating with the analysis chamber for admitting a sample containing the electronegative species and an ionizable component, a radioactive source within the analysis chamber for emitting radioactive energy for ionizing a component of the sample, a proportional electron detector within the analysis chamber for detecting electrons emitted from the ionized component, and a circuit for measuring the electrons and determining the presence of the electronegative species by detecting a reduction in the number of available electrons due to capture of electrons by the electronegative species.

  20. Deleting species from model food webs Christopher Quince, Paul G. Higgs and Alan J. McKane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Alan

    causing extinction of further species from the food web. To investigate these effects we used one species was deleted. On average, only 2.1% of the remaining species went extinct as a result of extinction. The probability of extinction of prey of the deleted species was also significantly higher than

  1. Conservation plan for protected species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otten, M.R.M.; Cypher, B.L.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitats in and around Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) support populations of various vertebrates and plants, including a number of threatened and endangered species. Adequate conservation of habitats and species, particularly protected species, can be facilitated through development and implementation of management plans. This document provides a comprehensive plan for the conservation of protected species on NPR-1, through compliance with terms and conditions expressed in Biological Opinions rendered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for NPR-1 activities. Six conservation strategies by which threatened and endangered species have been, and will be, protected are described: population monitoring, mitigation strategies, special studies, operating guidelines and policies, information transfer and outreach, and the endangered species conservation area. Population monitoring programs are essential for determining population densities and for assessing the effects of oil field developments and environmental factors on protected species. Mitigation strategies (preactivity surveys and habitat reclamation) are employed to minimize the loss of important habitats components and to restore previously disturbed lands to conditions more suitable for species` use. A number of special studies were undertaken between 1985 and 1995 to investigate the effectiveness of a variety of population and habitat management techniques with the goal of increasing the density of protected species. Operating guidelines and policies governing routine oil field activities continue to be implemented to minimize the potential for the incidental take of protected species and minimize damage to wildlife habitats. Information transfer and outreach activities are important means by which technical and nontechnical information concerning protected species conservation on NPR-1 is shared with both the scientific and non-scientific public.

  2. Reactions of inorganic nitrogen species in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dell`Orco, P.C. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)] [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Redox reactions of nitrate salts with NH3 and methanol were studied in near-critical and supercritical water at 350 to 530 C and constant pressure of 302 bar. Sodium nitrate decomposition reactions were investigated at similar conditions. Reactions were conducted in isothermal tubular reactor under plug flow. For kinetic modeling, nitrate and nitrite reactants were lumped into an NO{sub x}{sup -} reactant; kinetic expressions were developed for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X and sodium nitrate decomposition reactions. The proposed elementary reaction mechanism for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X reaction indicated that NO{sub 2} was the primary oxidizing species and that N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O selectivities could be determined by the form of MNO{sub 3} used. This suggest a nitrogen control strategy for use in SCWO (supercritical water oxidation) processes; nitrate or NH3 could be used to remove the other, at reaction conditions far less severe than required by other methods. Reactions of nitrate with methanol indicated that nitrate was a better oxidant than oxygen in supercritical water. Nitrogen reaction products included NH3 and nitrite, while inorganic carbon was the major carbon reaction product. Analysis of excess experiments indicated that the reaction at 475 C was first order in methanol concentration and second order in NO{sub x}{sup -} concentration. In order to determine phase regimes for these reactions, solubility of sodium nitrate was determined for some 1:1 nitrate electrolytes. Solubilities were measured at 450 to 525 C, from 248 to 302 bar. A semi-empirical solvation model was shown to adequately describe the experimental sodium nitrate solubilities. Solubilities of Li, Na, and K nitrates revealed with cations with smaller ionic radii had greater solubilities with nitrate.

  3. Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thilo Schuldt; Christian Schubert; Markus Krutzik; Lluis Gesa Bote; Naceur Gaaloul; Jonas Hartwig; Holger Ahlers; Waldemar Herr; Katerine Posso-Trujillo; Jan Rudolph; Stephan Seidel; Thijs Wendrich; Wolfgang Ertmer; Sven Herrmann; André Kubelka-Lange; Alexander Milke; Benny Rievers; Emanuele Rocco; Andrew Hinton; Kai Bongs; Markus Oswald; Matthias Franz; Matthias Hauth; Achim Peters; Ahmad Bawamia; Andreas Wicht; Baptiste Battelier; Andrea Bertoldi; Philippe Bouyer; Arnaud Landragin; Didier Massonnet; Thomas Lévèque; Andre Wenzlawski; Ortwin Hellmig; Patrick Windpassinger; Klaus Sengstock; Wolf von Klitzing; Chris Chaloner; David Summers; Philip Ireland; Ignacio Mateos; Carlos F. Sopuerta; Fiodor Sorrentino; Guglielmo M. Tino; Michael Williams; Christian Trenkel; Domenico Gerardi; Michael Chwalla; Johannes Burkhardt; Ulrich Johann; Astrid Heske; Eric Wille; Martin Gehler; Luigi Cacciapuoti; Norman Gürlebeck; Claus Braxmaier; Ernst Rasel

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry, the detection unit, the vacuum system for $10^{-11}$ mbar ultra-high vacuum generation, and the high-suppression factor magnetic shielding as well as the thermal control system. The laser system is based on a hybrid approach using fiber-based telecom components and high-power laser diode technology and includes all laser sources for 2D-MOT, 3D-MOT, ODT, interferometry and detection. Manipulation and switching of the laser beams is carried out on an optical bench using Zerodur bonding technology. The instrument consists of 9 units with an overall mass of 221 kg, an average power consumption of 608 W (819 W peak), and a volume of 470 liters which would well fit on a satellite to be launched with a Soyuz rocket, as system studies have shown.

  4. Electrochemical natural gas conversion to more valuable species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchynka, D.J.; Cook, R.L.; Fammells, A.F. (Eltron Research, Inc., Aurora, IL (US))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the electrochemical oxidative dimerization of methane to give C{sub 2} hydrocarbon species investigated in solid oxide fuel cells possessing the general configuration: CH{sub 4}, anode electrocatalyst/ZrO{sub 2}(8 m/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3})/La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}O{sub 2}(air). Perovskite anode electrocatalysts shown to possess activity toward promoting the subject reaction include Sm{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.5}CuO{sub 3}, Tb{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.2}CuO{sub 3}, Gd{sub 0.9}Th{sub 0.1}CuO{sub 3}, Gd{sub 0.9}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}, and Th{sub 0.8}Yb{sub 0.2}NiO{sub 3}. Maximum partial faradaic current densities at active perovskite anode electrocatalysts for promoting the subject reaction were found to be directly correlatable to their calculated oxygen binding energies on the perovskite surface, where increasing binding energies were found to favor higher rates for electrochemical partial methane oxidation. Increasing surface oxygen binding energies at perovskite anode electrocatalysts were found to correlate with increasing perovskite lattice-free volumes with electrochemical measurements, supporting increasing surface oxygen binding energies and perovskite lattice-free volumes as leading to enhanced rates for the subject reaction. As a consequence, synergism was found between experimentally determined perovskite anode electrocatalyst activities, their calculated surface oxygen binding energies, and lattice ionic-free volumes.

  5. Appendix 15 Red and Blue-Listed Vertebrate and Vascular Plant Species The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    indicate the SRMMP. Ranges for vertebrates were obtained from Cannings et al. (1999), Fraser et al. (1999, and industrial activities. Competition with introduced exotic species. Distribution: Mottled Sculpin are found agricultural, urban and industrial activities. Competition and hybridization with introduced species

  6. Cuticular Hydrocarbons: Species and Population-Level Discrimination in Termites1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Cuticular Hydrocarbons: Species and Population-Level Discrimination in Termites1 Michael I. Haverty Marion Page Barbara L. Thorne Pierre Escoubas2 Abstract: Hydrocarbons in the cuticle of insects and the apparent species-specificity of cuticular hydrocarbon mixtures make them excellent taxo nomic characters

  7. Effect of gaseous cement industry effluents on four species of Amlie Talec a, b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of gaseous cement industry effluents on four species of microalgae Amélie Talec a, b , Myrvline Philistin a the possibility to grow microalgae with CO2 from gaseous effluent of cement industry. Four microalgal species the composition of a typical Cement Flue Gas (CFG). In a second stage, the culture submitted to the CFG received

  8. Mycoscience 41: 595--606, 2000 New Leptographium species from Indonesia and Eastern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mycoscience 41: 595--606, 2000 595 New Leptographium species from Indonesia and Eastern North from pine infested with an Ips sp. in Indonesia. In addition, two unknown species have been collected that the isolates from Indonesia and those from Eastern North America represent three previously un described taxa

  9. New species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia and Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    781 New species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia and Africa P.W. Crous and M.J. Wingfield Ahstract:Although Africa and Indonesia have not been particularly well surveyed Eucalyptus leaves from Indonesia. The former species is of particular interest, because its anamorph

  10. Composing Speci cations using Communication Helen Treharne, Steve Schneider, and Marchia Bramble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    CSPto enable controlled interaction between B machines. This illustrates how B machines are essential abstract speci cation described in CSP. This allows safety and liveness properties to be established for combinations of communicating B machines. Keywords: B-Method, CSP, Composing Speci cations, Combining

  11. Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species identity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flecker, Alex

    REPORT Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species in recycling nutrients, thus providing a mechanism for how animal species identity mediates ecosystem processes) recycled nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in a tropical stream supports stoichiometry theory. Mass

  12. Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field on snow albedo and arctic atmospheric chemistry. During the OASIS field campaign, in March and April 2009), Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow

  13. Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from Microbes to Jellyfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    SYMPOSIUM Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from, Engineering and Applied Science, Pasadena, CA, 91125, USA From the symposium ``Marine Ecosystem Engineers@si.edu Synopsis Ecosystem engineers are species that alter the physical environment in ways that create new

  14. The initial phase of a Longleaf Pine-Wiregrass Savanna restoration: species establishment and community responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschenbach, Todd, A; Foster, Bryan, L.; Imm, Donald, W.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AbstractAbstract The significant loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem in the southeastern United States has serious implications for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In response to this loss, we have initiated a long-term and landscape-scale restoration experiment at the 80,125 ha (310 mi2) Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. Aristida beyrichiana (wiregrass), an important and dominant grass (i.e., a “matrix” species) of the longleaf pine savanna understory, and 31 other herbaceous “non-matrix” species were planted at six locations throughout SRS in 2002 and 2003. Of the 36,056 transplanted seedlings, 75% were still alive in June 2004, while mean 1–2 year survival across all planted species was 48%. Lespedeza hirta (hairy lespedeza) exhibited the greatest overall survival per 3 ×3 m cell at 95%, whereas Schizachyrium spp. (little bluestem) exhibited the greatest mean cover among individual species at 5.9%. Wiregrass survival and cover were significantly reduced when planted with non-matrix species. Aggregate cover of all planted species in restored cells averaged 25.9% in 2006. High rates of survival and growth of the planted species resulted in greater species richness (SR), diversity, and vegetative cover in restored cells. Results suggest that the loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem may be ameliorated through restoration efforts and illustrate the positive impact of restoration plantings on biodiversity and vegetative cover.

  15. Terrain and vegetation structural influences on local avian species richness in two mixed-conifer forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    avian species richness in two mixed conifer forests, Moscow Mountain and Slate Creek, containing included height variability and canopy density whereas at Slate Creek they included slope, elevation, patch at Moscow Mountain but were strong predictors of avian species richness at the higher elevation Slate Creek

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF LEUCOCYTOZOON TODDI GROUP (HAEMOSPORIDA: LEUCOCYTOZOIDAE), WITH REMARKS ON THE SPECIES TAXONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sehgal, Ravinder

    ON THE SPECIES TAXONOMY OF LEUCOCYTOZOIDS Gediminas Valkiu¯nas, Ravinder N. M. Sehgal*, Tatjana A. Iezhova. e-mail: gedvalk@ekoi.lt ABSTRACT: The current taxonomy of leucocytozoids (Haemosporida identified species of avian haemosporidians. Based on the current taxonomy, Leucocytozoon toddi is the sole

  17. Born of Fire--Restoring Sagebrush Steppe reversing the presence of invasive species,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    displace native species, but can fuel fires that favor invasion and yet more fires. Restoring a healthy and present use of native and nonnative plants in revegetation projects. Invasive Species Influenced by Fire between 1988 and 1999 indicated that there was a doubling of fires in the last 12 years, mostly between

  18. Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species increasing more in pathogen load. Elevated CO2 increased pathogen load of C3 grasses, perhaps by decreasing

  19. Avoiding Extinction in a Managed Single Species Population Model by means of Anticipative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Mark

    Avoiding Extinction in a Managed Single Species Population Model by means of Anticipative Control which end in a population collapse and consequent extinction. In a managed environment, it might, the dynamics of a managed single species are modelled using an Anticipatory System and possible control

  20. Basins of coexistence and extinction in spatially extended ecosystems of cyclically competing species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Ying-Cheng

    Basins of coexistence and extinction in spatially extended ecosystems of cyclically competing species Xuan Ni,1 Rui Yang,1,a Wen-Xu Wang,1 Ying-Cheng Lai,1,2,3 and Celso Grebogi3 1 School of species coexistence. In this pursuit almost all exist- ing works focus on the relevant dynamical behaviors

  1. 3) What makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    3) What makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis Davis et al. (2000) Basic concepts: · In most plant communities at most times, most of the resources that are available makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis Davis et al. (2000) Basic

  2. Hurricanes and the Urban Forest: II. Effects on Tropical and Subtropical Tree Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    data for Hurricane Andrew for some analyses. The percent urban forest loss ranged from 13% for Georges species in Hurricanes Jeanne, Charley, Georges, or Andrew. Two other measurements of wood strength survival in Hurricane Georges. A reanalysis of seven dicot species and their survival in Hurricane Andrew

  3. TROPICAL LEPIDOPTERA, 9(2): 45-53 THREE NEW SPECIES OF CALISTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedges, Blair

    , Dominican Republic, endemism, Hispaniola, Jamaica, Neotropical, taxonomy, West Indies. The island of Hispaniola, with 36 of the 42 known species of Calisto (sensu Smith, Miller and Miller, 1994), is the center in Hispaniola is not an artifact of collecting. However, the known distribution of species within Hispaniola

  4. Variation in hydraulic conductivity of mangroves: influence of species, salinity, and nitrogen and phosphorus availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Sharon Ewe Mei

    Variation in hydraulic conductivity of mangroves: influence of species, salinity, and nitrogen identity and variation in salinity and nutrient availability influence the hydraulic conductivity of mangroves. Using a fertilization study of two species in Florida, we found that stem hydraulic conductivity

  5. The evolution of antiherbivore defenses and their contribution to species coexistence in the tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, Phyllis

    Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Box 0843-03092, Balboa, Panama; cLaboratoire Evolution et Diversite (Fabaceae). Inga has >300 species, has radiated recently, and is frequently one of the most diverse and abundant genera at a given site. For 37 species from Panama and Peru we characterized developmental, ant

  6. Adaptive radiation, correlated and contingent evolution, and net species diversification in Bromeliaceae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sytsma, Kenneth J.

    Adaptive radiation, correlated and contingent evolution, and net species diversificationRB, United Kingdom j Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa, Ancon, Republic of Panama k large-scale adaptive radiations and accompanying pulses of speciation account for 86% of total species

  7. Lycopene cyclase paralog CruP protects against reactive oxygen species in oxygenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtzel, Eleanore

    , quenching singlet oxygen generated during the water-splitting process of photo- synthesis (10, 11). VariousLycopene cyclase paralog CruP protects against reactive oxygen species in oxygenic photosynthetic cyclase. Instead, we show that CruP aids in preventing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS

  8. Active species downstream of an ArO surface-wave microwave discharge for biomedicine,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Vasco

    Active species downstream of an Ar­O 2 surface-wave microwave discharge for biomedicine, surface.1088/0963-0252/20/3/035006 Active species downstream of an Ar­O2 surface-wave microwave discharge for biomedicine, surface treatment in a 0.5 cm diameter tube at pressures between 1 and 12 mbar. The early afterglow that occurs downstream

  9. Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe Miguel Á and amphibian species richness in Europe and 11 environmental variables related to five hypotheses, an estimate of plant biomass generated through satellite remote sensing, both described similar proportions

  10. OIKOS 103: 4558, 2003 Plant species diversity, plant biomass and responses of the soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leps, Jan "Suspa"

    species diversity, plant biomass and responses of the soil community on abandoned land across EuropeOIKOS 103: 45­58, 2003 Plant species diversity, plant biomass and responses of the soil community on abandoned land across Europe: idiosyncracy or above-belowground time lags K. Hedlund, I. Santa Regina, W. H

  11. Tradeable risk permits to prevent future introductions of invasive alien species into the Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    or control of IAS populations (e.g., integrated pest management [IPM]), or adaptation. Historically, efforts; Risk management; Permit trading 1. Introduction Invasive alien species (IAS)--species that establish, damage, or degrade assets (e.g., power plants, boats, piers, and reservoirs) and result in significant

  12. Aquatic Species Program Review: Proceedings of the March 1983 Principal Investigators Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

  13. Biogenic emissions from Citrus species in California Silvano Fares a,b,*, Drew R. Gentner c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Biogenic emissions from Citrus species in California Silvano Fares a,b,*, Drew R. Gentner c , Jeong May 2011 Accepted 26 May 2011 Keywords: BVOC emissions OVOC Terpene Basal emission rate Citrus a b such as the Central Valley of California. Moreover, the BVOC emissions from Citrus species have not been characterized

  14. COMPETITIVE EXCLUSION OF MICROBIAL SPECIES FOR A SINGLE-NUTRIENT WITH INTERNAL STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    COMPETITIVE EXCLUSION OF MICROBIAL SPECIES FOR A SINGLE-NUTRIENT WITH INTERNAL STORAGE SZE-BI HSU species for a single-limited resource based on storage. The model incorporates internal resource storage to give a variable yield model, or so called "internal storage" model. He proposed the ideas that organism

  15. Prediction of plant species distributions across six Peter B. Pearman,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    LETTER Prediction of plant species distributions across six millennia Peter B. Pearman,1 The usefulness of species distribution models (SDMs) in predicting impacts of climate change on biodiversity alternative way to evaluate the predictive ability of SDMs across time is to compare their predictions

  16. Effects of resource availability and social aggregation on the species richness of raccoon endoparasite infracommunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gompper, Matthew E.

    ­parasite relationships between different host species. In contrast, few studies have examined the role of host or eco and infracommunity). There is a need to better understand this dynamic relation- ship, as generalized cross-species trends do not adequately describe and can contradict the known ecological relation- ships that may occur

  17. Post-Delisting Monitoring Plan Guidance Under the Endangered Species Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post-Delisting Monitoring Plan Guidance Under the Endangered Species Act U.S. Fish and Wildlife............................................................................................1-5 1.3 Role of the states, other Service programs, and other partners in Post-delisting Monitoring.4 Post-delisting Monitoring for species in foreign countries....................................1-7 2

  18. REGULARIZED NONLINEAR SOLVERS FOR IMEX METHODS APPLIED TO DIFFUSIVELY CORRECTED MULTI-SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    -Kutta schemes, nonlinear solvers, polydisperse sedimentation, multi-class traffic models, hy- perbolicity. AMS-species kinematic flow models arise in many engineering ap- plications that involve the flow of one disperse-SPECIES KINEMATIC FLOW MODELS RAIMUND B¨URGER, PEP MULET, AND LUIS M. VILLADA Abstract. Implicit-explicit (IMEX

  19. Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project of potential risk to the species. #12;Corn Snake ­ Fairly common in Delaware, but is not likely to be present

  20. NICKEL SPECIES EMISSION INVENTORY FOR OIL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin C. Galbreath; Richard L. Schulz; Donald L. Toman; Carolyn M. Nyberg

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative duplicate fly ash samples were obtained from the stacks of 400-MW and 385-MW utility boilers (Unit A and Unit B, respectively) using a modified U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 17 sampling train assembly as they burned .0.9 and 0.3 wt% S residual oils, respectively, during routine power plant operations. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) samples were analyzed for nickel (Ni) concentrations and speciation using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and a water-soluble Ni extraction method. ROFA water extraction residues were also analyzed for Ni speciation using XAFS and XRD. Total Ni concentrations in the ROFAs were similar, ranging from 1.3 to 1.5 wt%; however, stack gas Ni concentrations in the Unit A were {approx}990 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} compared to {approx}620 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} for Unit B because of the greater residual oil feed rates employed at Unit A to attain higher load (i.e., MW) conditions with a lower heating value oil. Ni speciation analysis results indicate that ROFAs from Unit A contain about 3 wt% NiSO{sub 4} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O (where x is assumed to be 6 for calculation purposes) and a Ni-containing spinel compound, similar in composition to (Mg,Ni)(Al,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 4}. ROFAs from Unit B contain on average 2.0 wt% NiSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O and 1.1 wt% NiO. XAFS and XRD analyses did not detect any nickel sulfide compounds, including nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}) (XAFS detection limit is 5% of the total Ni concentration). In addition, XAFS measurements indicated that inorganic sulfate and organic thiophene species account for >97% of the total sulfur in the ROFAs. The presence of NiSO{sub 4} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O and nickel oxide compound mixtures and lack of carcinogenic Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} or nickel sulfide compounds (e.g., NiS, NiS{sub 2}) in ROFAs stack-sampled from 400- and 385-MW boilers are contrary to EPA's Ni inhalation cancer risk assessment (''Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units--Final Report to Congress'', February 1998), where it is assumed that the Ni compound mixture emitted from oil-fired utilities is 50% as carcinogenic as Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}. Apparently, this assumption greatly overestimates the Ni inhalation cancer risk from oil-fired utilities.

  1. Mean-field analysis of two-species TASEP with attachment and detachment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minghua Song; Yunxin Zhang

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In cells, most of cargos are transported by motor proteins along microtubule. Biophysically, unidirectional motion of large number of motor proteins along a single track can be described by totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). From which many meaningful properties, such as the appearance of domain wall (defined as the borderline of high density and low density of motor protein along motion track) and boundary layers, can be obtained. However, it is biologically obvious that a single track may be occupied by different motor species. So previous studies based on TASEP of one particle species are not reasonable enough to find more detailed properties of the motion of motors along a single track. To address this problem, TASEP with two particle species is discussed in this study. Theoretical methods to get densities of each particle species are provided. Using these methods, phase transition related properties of particle densities are obtained. Our analysis show that domain wall and boundary layer of single species densities always appear simultaneously with those of the total particle density. The height of domain wall of total particle density is equal to the summation of those of single species. Phase diagrams for typical model parameters are also presented. The methods presented in this study can be generalized to analyze TASEP with more particle species.

  2. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

  3. Spatio-temporal mapping of ablated species in ultrafast laser-produced graphite plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the spatial and temporal distributions of ionic, neutral, and molecular species generated by femtosecond laser produced plasma under varying ambient nitrogen gas pressures. Plasmas were generated by irradiating planar graphite targets using 40 fs pulses of 800 nm radiation from a Ti:Sapphire laser. The results show that in the presence of an ambient gas, the molecular species spatial extension and lifetime are directly correlated to the evolution of excited ions. The present studies also provide valuable insights into the evolution history of various species and their excitation during ultrafast laser ablation.

  4. Investigation of an Invasive Ant Species: Nylanderia fulva Colony Extraction, Management, Diet Preference, Fecundity, and Mechanical Vector Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Danny 1983-

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Invasive species often threaten biodiversity and environmental processes in their introduced range by extirpating native species due to competition for resources. Nylanderia fulva (formerly N. (=Paratrechina) sp. nr. pubens) is an ecologically...

  5. Scale and ecological and historical determinants of a species' geographic range: The plant parasite Phoradendron californicum Nutt. (Viscaceae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lira Noriega, Andres

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Geographic ranges of species are fundamental units of study in ecology and evolutionary biology, since they summarize views of how species' populations and individuals are organized in space and time. Here, I assess how ...

  6. across-species across-assay investigation: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M. Leschine; Robert Pavia; I Kate Starbird 16 chickens (8, 26), but not with small-scale feath-er tip melanization across species of Phyllosco- Biology and Medicine Websites...

  7. Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeffler, Frank E.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species The overarching goal of this 3-year project is to explore uranium reduction in Anaeromyxobacter species. Specifically, we explore the physiological requirements of available Anaeromyxobacter isolates, design molecular biology tools to detect and quantify Anaeromyxobacter in pure cultures, consortia, and environmental samples, assess their diversity, distribution, and abundance in the environment, including DOE sites, and attempt the isolation of additional Anaeromyxobacter species from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC). The performers on this project include Frank Loeffler (PI), Robert Sanford (Co-PI), Qingzhong Wu (postdoc), Sara Henry (graduate student with fellowship, no charges to NABIR project), Ivy Thomson (graduate student, no charges to NABIR project), and Ryan Wagner (''Special Topics'' bioinformatics undergraduate student, no charges to NABIR project). Exploratory MALDI-TOF MS experiments for the specific detection of Anaeromyxobacter species were performed by Kerry Preston (graduate student, no charges to NABIR project).

  8. Supporting Information Dry deposition fluxes and deposition velocities of seven trace metal species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    significant digits (Fang et al., 2007a, b). 2. Chemical analysis The samples were placed in an oven one night-MS (Perkin Elmer Sciex ELAN DRC ) analysis of arsenic species and inductively coupled plasma - atomic

  9. Interactions of Plasma-Generated Species on Porous Dielectric Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joe

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanisms of plasma-induced damage focus on the role of ionconstant. These treatments focus on plasma species that haveindustry focuses more on partially-ionized plasmas in which

  10. Myrmica constricta Karavajev, 1934 a cryptic sister species of Myrmica hellenica Finzi, 1926 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    are demonstrated as junior synonyms of M. hellenica. Myrmica constricta is a more western and northern species in Italy and the Balkans and there are no clear suggestions for hybridisation in this area. A distribution

  11. A multidimensional platform for the purification of non-coding RNA species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBee, Megan E.

    A renewed interest in non-coding RNA (ncRNA) has led to the discovery of novel RNA species and post-transcriptional ribonucleoside modifications, and an emerging appreciation for the role of ncRNA in RNA epigenetics. ...

  12. Growth Rate of Marine Microalgal Species using Sodium Bicarbonate for Biofuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gore, Matthew

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    With additional research on species characteristics and continued work towards cost effective production methods, algae are viewed as a possible alternative biofuel crop to current feedstocks such as corn. Current open pond production methods...

  13. Thecal morphology of Ornithocercus magnificus (dinoflagellata) with notes on related species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Dean Rayburn

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Michener. 1911. Reports on the scient, results of the exped. to the eastern tropical Pacific, in charge of Alexander Agassiz by the U. S, Fish Commission Steamer "Albatross. " New genera and species of dinoflagellates, Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. Harvard...

  14. High voltage repetitive pulsed nanosecond discharges as a selective source of reactive species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra García, Carmen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High voltage nanosecond duration discharges can be used in a repetitive manner to create a sustained pool of short lived excited species and ions and long-lived radicals in a gas. Although the suitability of the Repetitive ...

  15. The Effects of Habitat Complexity on the Cognitive Performance of Two Fish Species and Their Hybrids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Heather

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    attributes. In the field, I quantified habitat complexity in populations of two species of swordtail fishes – Xiphophorus birchmanni and X. malinche – as well as two populations of naturally occurring X. birchmanni/X. malinche hybrids found in the Rio Calnali...

  16. Environmental Air and water pollution, extinction of species, depletion of ozone in the stratosphere,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    ecosystem ecology, environmental health, and environmental conservation and sustainability. The curriculumEnvironmental Sciences Air and water pollution, extinction of species, depletion of ozone to examine and understand complex environmental issues, to predict environmental change, and to participate

  17. Molybdenum and tungsen alkylidene species for catalytic Enantio-, Z-, and E-selective olefin metathesis reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinescu, Smaranda Constan?a

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHAPTER1 A general introduction to olefin metathesis is given. Highlights include a detailed discussion of group VI imido alkylidene catalysts. CHAPTER 2 Several bispyrrolide species Mo(NAr)(CHCMe 2Ph)(pyr)2 (Ar = ...

  18. Distribution patterns of the Anopheles quadrimaculatus (Diptera: Culicidae) species complex in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murrell, Jennifer Ann

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary vector of malaria in the eastern United States, Anopheles quadrimaculatus (Say), was recently discovered to be a complex of five different cryptic species: A - An. quadrimaculatus, B - An. smaragdinus, C1 - An. diluvialis, C2 - An...

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Enterohepatic Helicobacter Species Isolated from Humans and One from Rhesus Macaques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zeli

    Draft genome sequences of seven enterohepatic Helicobacter species, H. bilis, H. canadensis, H. canis, H. cinaedi, H. winghamensis, H. pullorum, and H. macacae, are presented. These isolates were obtained from clinical ...

  20. A new species of Eutrichophilus (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae) from the Brazilian black dwarf porcupine (Rodentia: Erethizontidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Robert M.; Price, Roger D.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new species of chewing louse, Eutrichophilus koopmani (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae), is described and illustrated based on an adult male specimen taken off the Brazilian black dwarf porcupine, Coendou nycthemera (Olfers) ...

  1. TREE vol. 2, no. 6, June 1987 Species diversity on the earth has in-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    by mass extinctions and widespread radiations. Various models for global taxonomic diversification have in the canopy of specific trees in Panama over several sea- sons, and counted the numbers of species

  2. S-nitrosothiols and reactive oxygen species in plant disease resistance and development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brzezek, Kerstin

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitric oxide (NO) as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in defence signalling in plants. After successful recognition of an invading pathogen, an increase in ROS occurs, the ’oxidative burst’; ...

  3. Prediction of concentrations of reactive nitrogen species in aqueous solutions and cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, ChangHoon, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) derived from nitric oxide (NO) have been implicated in cancer and other diseases, but their intracellular concentrations are largely unknown. To estimate them under steady-state conditions ...

  4. Elucidating the relationships within the Limnonectes kuhlii species complex (Amphibia: Anura: Dicroglossidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLeod, David Stirling

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In a period where all life on Earth faces considerable threats and pressures, it is especially significant that many recent studies have demonstrated that complexes of multiple, unidentified, cryptic species often reside ...

  5. Growth Rate of Marine Microalgal Species using Sodium Bicarbonate for Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gore, Matthew

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    With additional research on species characteristics and continued work towards cost effective production methods, algae are viewed as a possible alternative biofuel crop to current feedstocks such as corn. Current open pond production methods...

  6. TAXON 50 -FEBRUARY 2001 47 The biological reality of species: gene flow, selection, and collective evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    to contribute more fuel to the debate, nor add another barnacle to Coyne's whale. Nonetheless, ideas have been put forward about species that offer challenges to students of speciation. In particular

  7. Species-specific patterns in bivalve larval supply to a coastal embayment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Christine Mingione

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Larval supply is an important process linking reproductive output to recruitment of benthic marine invertebrates. Few species-specific studies of bivalve larvae have been performed due to the lack of suitable methods for ...

  8. Species visitation at free-choice quail feeders in west Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henson, Kelly Diane

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing supplemental feed is a popular management practice for quail (northern bobwhite Colinus virginianus and scaled quail Callipepla squamata ) in Texas. It is common knowledge that non-target species, e.g., raccoons (Procyon lotor...

  9. Original article Allozyme variation in six native oak species in Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    poor growth and quality. In regard to their eco- nomic and ecological potential, it is likely that can be used to distinguish between the species and clarification of the systematic relation- ships

  10. Assembly and Physico-Chemical Properties of Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Films Co-Assembled with Guest Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xiayun

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , such as surfactants, lubricants, transition metal ions or nanoparticles, have been investigated. The interaction of these various foreign species with the PEM film is of fundamental interest, influencing many properties such as strength or wettability. In one example...

  11. A comparison of 137 Cs radioactivity in localized evergreen and deciduous plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangel, Ruben Canales

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requires the CPSES to routinely sample broadleaf vegetation in place of milk samples. Few commercial dairies exist in the vicinity. Broadleaf tree species are scarce because the climate and local limestone geology...

  12. The Influence of Tree Species Composition on Songbird Abundance and Productivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Ashley Marie

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    of ecological conditions a species inhabits and may result in the application of inappropriate conservation strategies. The golden-cheeked warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia; hereafter warbler) is a federally endangered songbird that breeds in oak-juniper woodland...

  13. Inhibition of Pyruvate Kinase M2 by Reactive Oxygen Species Contributes to Cellular Antioxidant Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    Control of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations is critical for cancer cell survival. We show that, in human lung cancer cells, acute increases in intracellular concentrations of ROS caused inhibition ...

  14. Chapter 7 Other Groundfish, Other Prohibited Species & Forage Fish Bering Sea Chinook Salmon Bycatch 411

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bycatch 411 Final EIS ­ December 2009 7.0 OTHER GROUNDFISH, OTHER PROHIBITED SPECIES & FORAGE FISH & Forage Fish 412 Bering Sea Chinook Salmon Bycatch EIS Final EIS ­ December 2009 Incidental catch of some

  15. PERSPECTIVE Predicting species distributions for conservation decisions Antoine Guisan,1,2,3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    for analysis and learning. Furthermore, the decision framework within which SDMs are used is rarely made explicit. Using case studies from biological invasions, identification of critical habitats, reserve planning, critical habitats, environmental suitability, reserve selection, species distribution model

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCAL SPECIES BASED ON VARIATIONS IN PROTEIN SEQUENCES (MASS SPECTROMETRY) AND DNA SEQUENCE (sodA MICROARRAY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kooken, Jennifer M.; Fox, Karen F.; Fox, Alvin; Altomare, Diego; Creek, Kim E.; Wunschel, David S.; Pajares-Merino, Sara; Martinez-Ballesteros, Ilargi; Garaizar, Javier; Oyarzabal, Omar A.; Samadpour, Mansour

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCAL SPECIES BASED ON VARIATIONS IN PROTEIN SEQUENCES (MASS SPECTROMETRY) AND DNA SEQUENCE (sodA MICROARRAY)

  17. Growth response of selected vegetable species to plant residue of guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Debbie John

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Horticulture GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Approved as to style...

  18. The effects of stocking density on two Tilapia species raised in an intensive culture system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson-Arzapalo, Anne

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS'OF STOCKING DENSITY ON TWO TILAPIA SPECIES RAISED IN AN INTENSIVE CULTURE SYSTEM A Thesis by ANNE HENDERSON-ARZAPALO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December l979 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Science THE EFFECTS OF STOCKING DENSITY ON TWO TILAPIA SPECIES RAISED IN AN INTENSIVE CULTURE SYSTEM A Thesis by ANNE HENDERSON-ARZAPALO Approved as to style...

  19. Toxic species emissions from controlled combustion of selected automotive rubber components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalkowski, Mark Henry

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TOXIC SPECIES EMISSIONS FROM CONTROLLED COMBUSTION OF SELECTED AUTOMOTIVE RUBBER COMPONENTS A Thesis by MARK HENRY SHALKOWSKI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Safety Engineering TOXIC SPECIES EMISSIONS FROM CONTROLLED COMBUSTION OF SELECTED AUTOMOTIVE RUBBER COMPONENTS A Thesis by MARK HENRY SHALKOWSKI Approved as to style and content by: // John...

  20. Multiple species of Phoreiobothrium from the blacktip shark, Carcharhinus limbatus, in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Hannah L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these fishes (Wiley and Mayden, 1985). Additionally, along the Gulf Coast at least 14 clades of organisms are parapatrically distributed with a hybrid zone between Eastern Mississippi and Northwestern Florida. These include the sea robins Prionotus alatus... (see Table 1), which to date contains 31 species (Compano et al., 2005). Seventeen species of Phoreiobothrium have been reported from sharks from the western Atlantic Ocean as far north as New York and as far south as the Bahamas, including the Gulf...

  1. Effects of Tree Species Composition and Foraging Effort on the Productivity of Golden-Cheeked Warblers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Mike E.

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF TREE SPECIES COMPOSITION AND FORAGING EFFORT ON THE PRODUCTIVITY OF GOLDEN-CHEEKED WARBLERS A Thesis by MIKE E. MARSHALL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Warblers Copyright 2011 Mike E. Marshall EFFECTS OF TREE SPECIES COMPOSITION AND FORAGING EFFORT ON THE PRODUCTIVITY OF GOLDEN-CHEEKED WARBLERS A Thesis by MIKE E. MARSHALL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  2. Synaptonemal complex analysis of chromosomal pairing in two species of quail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Elizabeth Jeanne

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEX ANALYSIS OF CHROMOSOMAL PAIRING IN TWO SPECIES OF QUAIL A THESIS by ELIZABETH JEANNE RYDER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Maj or subj ect: Genetics SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEX ANALYSIS OF CHROMOSOMAL PAIRING IN TWO SPECIES OF QUAIL A THESIS by ELIZABETH JEANNE RYDER Approved as to style and content by: / '. '/, ( ~ P /, g/? Ira F...

  3. Evolutionary implications of microsatellite variation in the Peromyscus maniculatus species group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chirhart, Scott Edward

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    comparisons of the genetic distances from the allelic data for the 11 microsatellite loci present in all of the species examined. DPS and DA (in parentheses) above and DC below the diagonal... (DPS above the diagonal, DA above the diagonal in parenthesis, and DC below the diagonal) for the pairwise comparisons of the alleles at the 11 microsatellites present in all samples of the species in the Peromyscus maniculatus group...

  4. First Mesozoic Microphysidae (Hemiptera): a new genus and species in Late Cretaceous amber from Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKellar, Ryan C.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First Mesozoic Microphysidae (Hemiptera): a new genus and species in Late Cretaceous amber from Canada Ryan C. McKellar, Michael S. Engel Abstract—A new genus and species of microphysid bug is described and illustrated from two individuals preserved... reconnues, les Ciorullinae et les Microphysinae, ce qui laisse croire que ces taxons ne sont pas distincts et qu’ils requie`rent une analyse cladistique. [Traduit par la Re´daction] Introduction Microphysidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) is a small family...

  5. Comparison of small mammal species diversity near wastewater outfalls, natural streams, and dry canyons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymer, D.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Biggs, J.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilizes water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to compare nocturnal small mammal communities at wet areas created by wastewater outfalls with communities in naturally created wet and dry areas. Thirteen locations within LANL boundaries were selected for small mammal mark-recapture trapping. Three of these locations lacked surface water sources and were classified as {open_quotes}dry,{close_quotes} while seven sites were associated with wastewater outfalls ({open_quotes}outfall{close_quotes} sites), and three were located near natural sources of surface water ({open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} sites). Data was collected on site type (dry, outfall or natural), location, species trapped, and the tag number of each individual captured. This data was used to calculate mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity at each type of site. When data from each type of site was pooled, there were no significant differences in these variables between dry, outfall, and natural types. However, when data from individual sites was compared, tests revealed significant differences. All sites in natural areas were significantly higher than dry areas in daily mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity. Most outfall sites were significantly higher than dry areas in all three variables tested. When volume of water from each outfall site was considered, these data indicated that the number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity of nocturnal small mammals were directly related to the volume of water at a given outfall.

  6. Systematics of the southern races of two species of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys compactus and D. ordi)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumgardner, George D

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SYSTEMATICS OF THE SOUTHERN RACES OF TWO SPECIES OF KANGAROO RATS (DIPODOMYS COMPACTUS AND D. ORDI) A Thesis by GEORGE DAVIS BAUMGARDNER Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment o- the requirement... for the deqree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Nildlife and Fisheries Sciences SYSTEMATICS OF THE SOUTHERN RACES OF TWO SPECIES OF KANGAROO RATS (DIPODOMYS COMPACTUS AND D. ORDI) A Thesis by GEORGE DAVIS BAUMGARDNER Approved as to style...

  7. Fungal species on baobabs in Western Australia Prepared by: Draginja Pavlic (PhD student working on a project entitled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fungal species on baobabs in Western Australia Prepared by: Draginja Pavlic (PhD student working species endemic in Australia and is restricted to the north-western parts of the country. Baobabs belong is a single species from the family Bombaceae present in Australia. A recent study revealed that A. gibbosa

  8. Generalized solution to multi-dimensional multi-species transport equations coupled with a first-order reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Generalized solution to multi-dimensional multi-species transport equations coupled with a first-species reactive transport equations. The new method can be used for solving multi-species transport problems transport problem. In addition, three one-dimensional problems and two three-dimensional problems are solved

  9. Plant Species Biology (2006) 21, 112 doi: 10.1111/j.1442-1984.2006.00145.x 2006 The Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomimatsu,, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal compilation © 2006 The Society for the Study of Species Biology Blackwell Publishing AsiaMelbourne, AustraliaPSBPlant Species Biology0913-557XThe Society for the Study of Species Biology, 2006April 2006211112Invited Article CONSERVATION OF FRAGMENTED POPULATIONSM. OHARA ET AL. Correspondence: Masashi Ohara Email

  10. 3.12 Competition models, Mutualism or Symbiosis The general n -species competition model is decribed by the following systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    : 122 )1( 2 2 xK x =0 (i) Extinction case: species y wins Figure 12.1 In this case ),0( 22 KE())(),((lim 221 Ktxtx t . #12;(ii) Extinction case: species 1x win, Figure 12.2 In this case )0,( 11 KE§3.12 Competition models, Mutualism or Symbiosis The general n -species competition model

  11. Basins of attraction for species extinction and coexistence in spatial rock-paper-scissors games Hongjing Shi,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Ying-Cheng

    Basins of attraction for species extinction and coexistence in spatial rock-paper-scissors games on extinction induced by asym- metric interactions among species 15 . In addition, the size effect of population dynamics of mobile species under cyclic competition by breaking the symmetry in the initial populations

  12. MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 642, pp. 16, 3 figs. Pteropus vampyrus. By Thomas H. Kunz and Deborah P. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayssen, Virginia

    MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 642, pp. 1­6, 3 figs. Pteropus vampyrus. By Thomas H. Kunz and Deborah P in- cludes 58 species (Koopman, 1993). Andersen (1912) divided Pter- opus into 17 species groups; P. vampyrus is in the vampyrus group, which also includes P. giganteus, P. intermedius, and P. lylei (Corbet

  13. -Grazing effects on the species-area relationship -25 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 25-34, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leps, Jan "Suspa"

    ; Heterogeneity; Land use; Manage- ment; Mediterranean; Power law species­area curve; Sheep- grazing. Nomenclature in different plot sizes (from 0.01 to 100 m2) and the slope of the species-area curves was calculated differentially affected the slope (z) of the species-area curve (power function S = c Az) in different climatic

  14. INHIBITION OF CASPASE-LIKE ACTIVITIES PREVENTS THE APPEARANCE OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AND DARK-INDUCED APOPTOSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berges, John A.

    cells revealed by SYTOX-green staining, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we usedINHIBITION OF CASPASE-LIKE ACTIVITIES PREVENTS THE APPEARANCE OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AND DARK viability; Dunaliella tertiolecta; phosphatidylserine; phytoplankton; reactive oxygen species; unicellular

  15. RESUS-D-12-00285 Mild hypothermia reduces per-ischemic reactive oxygen species production4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    this dysfunction through per-ischemic3 inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation.4 Methods: First, ROS ischemic injuries through complex events2 involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation 1, 2RESUS-D-12-00285 1 2 3 Mild hypothermia reduces per-ischemic reactive oxygen species production4

  16. Beam dynamics of a double-gap acceleration cell for ion implantation with multiple atomic species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadlinger, E.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Rusnak, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Saadatmand, K. [Eaton Corporation, Semiconductor Equipment Operation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of our work on ion implantation, we derived equations for the beam dynamics of a two-gap-resonator cavity for accelerating and bunching various ion species of varying energies with the cavity designed for one particular ion species of a given energy (the design-reference particle). A two gap structure is useful at low resonant frequencies where lumped circuit elements (inductors) can be used and the structure kept small. A single gap structure has the advantage that each gap can be independently phased to produce the desired beam dynamics behavior for various ion species and ion energies. However at low frequencies, single gap resonant structures can be large. We find that the two-gap structure, where the phase difference between gaps, for the design reference particle, is fixed at {pi} radians can give acceptable performance provided that the individual two gap cells in the entire accelerator are optimized for the ion species having the largest mass to charge ratio and having the maximum required output energy. Our equations show how to adjust the cavity phases and electric fields to obtain equivalent first-order accelerator performance for various ion species and energies. These equations allow for the effective evaluation of various accelerator concepts and can facilitate the tuning of a linac when changing energies and ion species. Extensive simulations have confirmed the efficacy of our equations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. A multi-species exchange model for fully fluctuating polymer field theory simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Düchs, Dominik; Delaney, Kris T., E-mail: kdelaney@mrl.ucsb.edu [Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Fredrickson, Glenn H., E-mail: ghf@mrl.ucsb.edu [Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Materials and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Field-theoretic models have been used extensively to study the phase behavior of inhomogeneous polymer melts and solutions, both in self-consistent mean-field calculations and in numerical simulations of the full theory capturing composition fluctuations. The models commonly used can be grouped into two categories, namely, species models and exchange models. Species models involve integrations of functionals that explicitly depend on fields originating both from species density operators and their conjugate chemical potential fields. In contrast, exchange models retain only linear combinations of the chemical potential fields. In the two-component case, development of exchange models has been instrumental in enabling stable complex Langevin (CL) simulations of the full complex-valued theory. No comparable stable CL approach has yet been established for field theories of the species type. Here, we introduce an extension of the exchange model to an arbitrary number of components, namely, the multi-species exchange (MSE) model, which greatly expands the classes of soft material systems that can be accessed by the complex Langevin simulation technique. We demonstrate the stability and accuracy of the MSE-CL sampling approach using numerical simulations of triblock and tetrablock terpolymer melts, and tetrablock quaterpolymer melts. This method should enable studies of a wide range of fluctuation phenomena in multiblock/multi-species polymer blends and composites.

  18. A multi-species exchange model for fully fluctuating polymer field theory simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik Düchs; Kris T Delaney; Glenn H Fredrickson

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field-theoretic models have been used extensively to study the phase behavior of inhomogeneous polymer melts and solutions, both in self-consistent mean-field calculations and in numerical simulations of the full theory capturing composition fluctuations. The models commonly used can be grouped into two categories, namely {\\it species} models and {\\it exchange} models. Species models involve integrations of functionals that explicitly depend on fields originating both from species density operators and their conjugate chemical potential fields. In contrast, exchange models retain only linear combinations of the chemical potential fields. In the two-component case, development of exchange models has been instrumental in enabling stable complex Langevin (CL) simulations of the full complex-valued theory. No comparable stable CL approach has yet been established for field theories of the species type. Here we introduce an extension of the exchange model to an arbitrary number of components, namely the multi-species exchange (MSE) model, which greatly expands the classes of soft material systems that can accessed by the complex Langevin simulation technique. We demonstrate the stability and accuracy of the MSE-CL sampling approach using numerical simulations of triblock and tetrablock terpolymer melts, and tetrablock quaterpolymer melts. This method should enable studies of a wide range of fluctuation phenomena in multiblock/multi-species polymer blends and composites.

  19. Distribution of the Chuckwalla, Western Burrowing Owl, and Six Bat Species on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Willis

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Surveys were conducted in 1996 to determine the current distribution of several animal species of concern on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). They included the chuckwall (Sauromalus obesus), western burrowing owl (Speotyto cunicularia), and six species of bats. Nineteen chuckwallas and 118 scat locations were found during the chuckwalla field study. Eighteen western burrowing owls were found at 12 sighting locations during the 1996 field study. Of the eleven bat species of concern which might occur on the NTS, five, and possibly six, were captured during this survey. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, takes certain management actions to protect and conserve the chuckwalla, western burrowing owl, and bats on the NTS. These actions are described and include: (1) conducting surveys at sites of proposed land-disturbing activities (2) altering projects whenever possible to avoid or minimize impacts to these species (3) maintaining a geospatial database of known habitat for species of concern (4) sharing sighting and trap location data gathered on the NTS with other local land and resource managers, and (5) conducting periodic field surveys to monitor these species distribution and relative abundance on the NTS.

  20. Genetic Analysis, Inheritance and Stability of Mutation-based Herbicide Tolerance in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutts, George Sherrod

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of herbicide-resistant weed species in cotton production has created a need for new herbicide technology tools. Herbicide technologies not classified as genetically modified by recombinant DNA can provide tools with less associated...

  1. Arte mexicana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincó n, Antonio, 1555-1601

    2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of herbicide-resistant weed species in cotton production has created a need for new herbicide technology tools. Herbicide technologies not classified as genetically modified by recombinant DNA can provide ...

  2. Minipig and beagle animal model genomes aid species selection in pharmaceutical discovery and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vamathevan, Jessica J., E-mail: jessica.j.vamathevan@gsk.com [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Hall, Matthew D.; Hasan, Samiul; Woollard, Peter M. [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Xu, Meng; Yang, Yulan; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaoli [BGI-Shenzen, Shenzhen (China); Kenny, Steve [Safety Assessment, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Ware (United Kingdom); Brown, James R. [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA (United States); Huxley-Jones, Julie [UK Platform Technology Sciences (PTS) Operations and Planning, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Lyon, Jon; Haselden, John [Safety Assessment, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Ware (United Kingdom); Min, Jiumeng [BGI-Shenzen, Shenzhen (China); Sanseau, Philippe [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving drug attrition remains a challenge in pharmaceutical discovery and development. A major cause of early attrition is the demonstration of safety signals which can negate any therapeutic index previously established. Safety attrition needs to be put in context of clinical translation (i.e. human relevance) and is negatively impacted by differences between animal models and human. In order to minimize such an impact, an earlier assessment of pharmacological target homology across animal model species will enhance understanding of the context of animal safety signals and aid species selection during later regulatory toxicology studies. Here we sequenced the genomes of the Sus scrofa Göttingen minipig and the Canis familiaris beagle, two widely used animal species in regulatory safety studies. Comparative analyses of these new genomes with other key model organisms, namely mouse, rat, cynomolgus macaque, rhesus macaque, two related breeds (S. scrofa Duroc and C. familiaris boxer) and human reveal considerable variation in gene content. Key genes in toxicology and metabolism studies, such as the UGT2 family, CYP2D6, and SLCO1A2, displayed unique duplication patterns. Comparisons of 317 known human drug targets revealed surprising variation such as species-specific positive selection, duplication and higher occurrences of pseudogenized targets in beagle (41 genes) relative to minipig (19 genes). These data will facilitate the more effective use of animals in biomedical research. - Highlights: • Genomes of the minipig and beagle dog, two species used in pharmaceutical studies. • First systematic comparative genome analysis of human and six experimental animals. • Key drug toxicology genes display unique duplication patterns across species. • Comparison of 317 drug targets show species-specific evolutionary patterns.

  3. Monitoring, assessing and evaluating the pollinator species (Hymenoptera: apoidea) found on a native brush site, a revegetated site and an urban garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cate, Carrie Ann

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    broad universal tastes for nectar, many solitary species have fixed species specific requirements for pollen from a narrow range of hosts and a few are known as oil collectors (Vogel, 1981). The emergence of these oligotrophic species of bees must...

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polani, Sagi, E-mail: sagi.polani@gmail.co [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel); Roca, Alfred L., E-mail: roca@illinois.ed [Department of Animal Sciences and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rosensteel, Bryan B., E-mail: bryanr1@umbc.ed [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis, E-mail: koloko@amnh.or [Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila, E-mail: bargal@agri.huji.ac.i [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

  5. Metabolic relationships between monogalactosyldiacylglycerol and digalactosyldiacylglycerol molecular species in Dunaliella salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, S.H.; Thompson, G.A. Jr.

    1987-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Dunaliella salina cells were pulse-labeled for 2 min with (/sup 14/C)palmitic acid, (/sup 14/C)oleic acid, or (/sup 14/C)lauric acid in order to trace the pathway of galactolipid biosynthesis and desaturation. Through the use of high performance liquid chromatography it was possible to follow the movement of radioactivity through many individual molecular species of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) for periods of 24 h and, in some cases, as much as 120 h. Analysis of the fatty acid fluxes permitted us to refine current views regarding biosynthesis of the predominantly prokaryotic galactolipids. The initial D. salina MGDG molecular species, containing paired oleate and palmitate (18:1/16:0), can follow two metabolic routes. If the palmitoyl chain is desaturated to 16:1, the resulting 18:1/16:1 MGDG is subject to rapid further desaturation to varying degrees, and a part of these products is subsequently galactosylated to DGDG. Contrary to widely held opinions, these DGDG molecular species can themselves be further desaturated toward a 18:3/16:4 final product. In a separate series of reactions, a smaller portion of the nascent 18:1/16:0 MGDG is directly galactosylated to 18:1/16:0 DGDG. This molecular species can then be sequentially desaturated to 18:2/16:0 DGDG and 18:3/16:0 DGDG. However, there is only very limited desaturation of the palmitoyl group attached to these molecular species.

  6. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, annual report FY97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are oil fields administered by the DOE in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. Four federally endangered animal species and one federally threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia silus), giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), Tipton kangaroo rat (Dipodomys nitratoides), and Hoover`s wooly-star (Eriastrum hooveri). All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. The DOE/NPRC is obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The primary objective of the Endangered Species and Cultural Resources Program is to provide NPRC with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the ESA, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress, results, and accomplishments of the program during fiscal year 1997 (FY97).

  7. Above- and belowground competition from longleaf pine plantations limits performance of reintroduced herbaceous species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.B. Harrington; C.M. Dagley; M.B. Edwards.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although overstory trees limit the abundance and species richness of herbaceous vegetation in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantations, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood because of confounding among limiting factors. In fall 1998, research was initiated to determine the separate effects of above- and belowground competition and needlefall from overstory pines on understory plant performance. Three 13- to 15-yr-old plantations near Aiken, SC, were thinned to 0, 25, 50, or 100% of nonthinned basal area (19.5 m2 ha-1). Combinations of trenching (to eliminate root competition) and needlefall were applied to areas within each plot, and containerized seedlings of 14 perennial herbaceous species and longleaf pine were planted within each. Overstory crown closure ranged from 0 to 81%, and soil water and available nitrogen varied consistently with pine stocking, trenching, or their combination. Cover of planted species decreased an average of 16.5 and 14.1% as a result of above- and below-ground competition, respectively. Depending on species, needlefall effects were positive, negative, or negligible. Results indicate that understory restoration will be most successful when herbaceous species are established within canopy openings (0.1-0.2 ha) managed to minimize negative effects from above- and belowground competition and needlefall.

  8. Adaptive Management Plan for Sensitive Plant Species on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site supports numerous plant species considered sensitive because of their past or present status under the Endangered Species Act and with federal and state agencies. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office (DOE/NV) prepared a Resource Management Plan which commits to protects and conserve these sensitive plant species and to minimize accumulative impacts to them. This document presents the procedures of a long-term adaptive management plan which is meant to ensure that these goals are met. It identifies the parameters that are measured for all sensitive plant populations during long-term monitoring and the adaptive management actions which may be taken if significant threats to these populations are detected. This plan does not, however, identify the current list of sensitive plant species know to occur on the Nevada Test Site. The current species list and progress on their monitoring is reported annually by DOE/NV in the Resource Management Plan.

  9. Valid flow combinations for stable sheath in a magnetized multiple ion species plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Devendra; Kaw, Predhiman K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical study is done of the entry criterion for the plasma flow into the electrostatic boundary layer, or sheath, forming in a magnetized multiple ion species plasma. Finding valid entry velocity combinations in a magnetized set up requires a magnetized equivalent of the generalized Bohm criterion. A magnetized generalized entry criterion is obtained with the scale length distribution in a region of validity for the stable solutions. The analysis finds that the valid entry flow velocity combinations with distinct values of individual ion species can correspond to a unique system phase velocity. Magnetization effects govern the region of validity whose boundaries collapse to the unmagnetized sheath criterion in the limit of normal incidence, independent of the strength of the magnetic field. Considerably smaller entry velocities, in comparison to the unmagnetized system sound velocity, are recovered for the species in appropriate regime of magnetization in the cases of oblique incidences.

  10. System and method for generating current by selective minority species heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Princeton, NJ)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for the generation of toroidal current in a plasma which is prepared in a toroidal magnetic field. The system utilizes the injection of low-frequency waves into the plasma by means of phased antenna arrays or phased waveguide arrays. The plasma is prepared with a minority ion species of different charge state and different gyrofrequency from the majority ion species. The wave frequency and wave phasing are chosen such that the wave energy is absorbed preferentially by minority species ions traveling in one toroidal direction. The absorption of energy in this manner produces a toroidal electric current even when the injected waves themselves do not have substantial toroidal momentum. This current can be continuously maintained at modest cost in power and may be used to confine the plasma. The system can operate efficiently on fusion grade tokamak plasmas.

  11. Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

  12. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  13. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the piedmont. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 16 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Piedmont. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,753 trees sampled in the Piedmont and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  14. Cold inelastic collisions between lithium and cesium in a two-species magneto-optical trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlöder, U; Schünemann, U; Grimm, R; Weidemüller, M

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate collisional properties of lithium and cesium which are simultaneously confined in a combined magneto-optical trap. Trap-loss collisions between the two species are comprehensively studied. Different inelastic collision channels are identified, and inter-species rate coefficients as well as cross sections are determined. It is found that loss rates are independent of the optical excitation of Li, as a consequence of the repulsive Li$^*$-Cs interaction. Li and Cs loss by inelastic inter-species collisions can completely be attributed to processes involving optically excited cesium (fine-structure changing collisions and radiative escape). By lowering the trap depth for Li, an additional loss channel of Li is observed which results from ground-state Li-Cs collisions changing the hyperfine state of cesium.

  15. Counterflow Superfluidity of Two-Species Ultracold Atoms in a Commensurate Optical Lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Kuklov; B. V. Svistunov

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    If two species of ultracold atoms are loaded in a sufficiently tight optical lattice at a commensurate total filling factor, the net number-of-atoms transport is suppressed by the Mott-Hubbard localization. Nonetheless, the counterflow low-frequency dynamics of the two components may survive. We consider corresponding effective Hamiltonians for the three classes of the two-species insulators-- fermion-fermion, boson-boson, and boson-fermion type-- and reveal the conditions when the resulting groundstate supports super-counter-fluidity (SCF) of the two components. Alternative groundstates are found to be phase-segregated states. We emphasize a crucial role of breaking the isotopic symmetry between the species for realizing the SCF phase.

  16. Elk Hills endangered and threatened species program: Phase 1 progress summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and bluntnosed leopard lizard, Crotaphytus silus, are known to occur on the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve, NPR-1. An integrated, multiphased field program was designed to gather, synthesize, and interpret ecological information necessary for Biological Assessments required by the Secretary of Interior. These assessments will be used as the basis for a formal consultation with the Department of Interior to determine whether DOE activities on Elk Hills are compatible with the continued existence of the two species. Transects totalling 840 km were walked through all sections of Elk Hills to determine: (1) the presence and relative densities of endangered or threatened species; (2) past and potential impacts of NPR-1 activities on endangered and threatened species; and (3) the potential application of remote sensing for gathering necessary data.

  17. A shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To extend the semi-empirical techniques of Benson and coworkers, and to extend the database of reliable high temperature measurements of OH radicals with hydrocarbons and other fuels and their decomposition products, the authors undertook a research program with both experimental and computational tasks. The experimental goal was to design a procedure for measuring, at combustion temperatures, the reaction rate coefficients of OH radicals with fuels and other species of importance in combustion or propulsion systems. The computational effort was intended to refine the semi-empirical transition-state-theory procedures for extrapolating rate coefficients of reactions of OH with combustion species of interest, for predicting rate coefficients for species not studied in the laboratory, and to examine the ability of the theory to predict rate coefficients for different pathways in the case the reagent possessed more than one nonequivalent H atoms.

  18. Widespread Discordance of Gene Trees with Species Tree inDrosophila: Evidence for Incomplete Lineage Sorting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Moses, Alan M.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The phylogenetic relationship of the now fully sequencedspecies Drosophila erecta and D. yakuba with respect to the D.melanogaster species complex has been a subject of controversy. All threepossible groupings of the species have been reported in the past, thoughrecent multi-gene studies suggest that D. erecta and D. yakuba are sisterspecies. Using the whole genomes of each of these species as well as thefour other fully sequenced species in the subgenus Sophophora, we set outto investigate the placement of D. erecta and D. yakuba in the D.melanogaster species group and to understand the cause of the pastincongruence. Though we find that the phylogeny grouping D. erecta and D.yakuba together is the best supported, we also find widespreadincongruence in nucleotide and amino acid substitutions, insertions anddeletions, and gene trees. The time inferred to span the two keyspeciation events is short enough that under the coalescent model, theincongruence could be the result of incomplete lineage sorting.Consistent with the lineage-sorting hypothesis, substitutions supportingthe same tree were spatially clustered. Support for the different treeswas found to be linked to recombination such that adjacent genes supportthe same tree most often in regions of low recombination andsubstitutions supporting the same tree are most enriched roughly on thesame scale as linkage disequilibrium, also consistent with lineagesorting. The incongruence was found to be statistically significant androbust to model and species choice. No systematic biases were found. Weconclude that phylogenetic incongruence in the D. melanogaster speciescomplex is the result, at least in part, of incomplete lineage sorting.Incomplete lineage sorting will likely cause phylogenetic incongruence inmany comparative genomics datasets. Methods to infer the correct speciestree, the history of every base in the genome, and comparative methodsthat control for and/or utilize this information will be valuableadvancements for the field of comparative genomics.

  19. Drift mode in a bounded plasma having two-ion species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, Ali; Sajid, M.; Saleem, H. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad, Pakistan and Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad, Pakistan and Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The drift wave is investigated in a two-ion species plasma in several different cases. The global drift mode is studied in a plasma bounded in a cylinder having Gaussian density profile corresponding to different poloidal wavenumbers. The frequency of the mode becomes a little larger when it is investigated without including the ion cyclotron wave dynamics. The effect of magnetic shear on the wave propagation along the density gradient is studied in a Cartesian geometry assuming absorbing boundary. It is found that the wave amplitude is reduced when two-ion species are present (with the same concentration) compared to pure electron-ion plasma.

  20. Two new species of Euglossa from South America, with notes on their taxonomic affinities (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinojosa-Dí az, Ismael A.; Nemesio, Andre; Engel, Michael S.

    2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    . Hinojosa-Díaz (hinojosadiaz@gmail.com); André Nemésio (andre.nemesio@gmail.com) Academic editor: Michael Ohl | Received 10 July 2012 | Accepted 31 August 2012 | Published 13 September 2012 urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:02106488-7B26-4E82-810C-DB1CB075D7B4... with around 130 species (Nemésio and Rasmussen 2011). Since the discovery of the chemicals involved in the attraction of euglossine males to orchid flowers (Dodson et al. 1969), numerous new species have been described. Revision of historical material...

  1. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  2. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950{degree}C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800{degree} to 950{degree}C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na{sub 2}O, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820{degree}. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 {mu}m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  3. Experimentally testing and assessing the predictive power of species assembly rules for tropical canopy ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayle, Tom M.; Eggleton, Paul; Manica, Andrea; Yusah, Kalsum M.; Foster, William A.

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    to be sufficient to stabilise this quantity for all assembly rules of interest (with the exception of the null rule, which is, by definition, stochastic). To avoid gradual reduction of diversity due to local extinction of species, we reintroduced extinct species... ). The impact of forest conversion to oil palm on arthropod abundance and biomass in Sabah, Malaysia. J. Trop. Ecol., 25, 23–30. Turner, E.C., Snaddon, J.L., Johnson, H.R. & Foster, W.A. (2007). The impact of bird’s nest ferns on stemflow nutrient concentration...

  4. Influence of probe sampling on reacting species measurement in diluted combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupant, D.; Pesenti, B.; Lybaert, P. [UMONS - University of Mons, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Thermal Engineering and Combustion, Rue de l'epargne 56, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In-flame measurements of temperature and major species are realized with intrusive probes in a laboratory scale furnace working in diluted combustion. The shape and the position of the reaction zone are experimentally identified from the distribution of temperature and carbon monoxide in a particular symmetry plane. For this purpose, two probes were designed: the sampling probe, to measure species content of the gas sample and the suction pyrometer, for the temperature. The first is completely cooled to quench the reaction, but the second is just partly cooled for handling. However, as both probes take gas sample, the species content is available in either case. Consequently the suction pyrometer can be used to measure simultaneously temperature and species, reducing by half the length of the experimental campaign. Comparing species contents on a non-reactive mixture, it has been observed that the spatial averaging is the same with both probes. The perturbation of the flow is assessed thanks to a CFD modeling of the furnace including the probe. Even if it is significant - the differences between the computed values and the measurements are about 3-4 times the measurement error - the position and the value of the maximum is well captured as well as the opening of the jet. However, the species contents measured within a reactive mixture differ significantly. For a stable regime, the levels and the distribution of CO are similar with both probes, but the gradients at the border of the reaction zone are sharper with the suction pyrometer. For another regime, for which the reaction zone is lifted and less stable, the fields of species are completely different following the probe used. A chemical kinetic modeling has shown that the reaction inside the non-cooled part of the suction pyrometer is promoted when it is placed in particular region. The use of the suction pyrometer as sampling probe inside a reaction zone should therefore be avoided even in diluted combustion. The error made on the fields of species cannot be quantified to be taken into account a posteriori, because in certain conditions the results are completely unrealistic. (author)

  5. Sensitive Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is TakingDepartment

  6. 2011 AQUATIC WEED SURVEYS IN TIMOTHY LAKE, LAKE HARRIET &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prepared for: Portland General Electric, Clackamas River Hydroelectric Project By: Vanessa Morgan and Mark Regulatory Commission (FERC) for the continued operation and maintenance of the Clackamas River Hydroelectric

  7. advanced ecophysiological weed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2001). These studies have a wide range of outcomes, from low to high by Jim Ehleringer D. R. Campbell (&) ? C. A. Wu Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Campbell,...

  8. aquatic weed control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    saw timber, and burls. Culvert repairreplacement, road restoration or decommissioning, slope stabilization, habitat improvement projects, stream improvement projects,...

  9. Weed Identification: Using Plant Structures as a Key (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.

    1999-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    mostradas. La distinci?n entre los margenes de la hojas apinada y palmeada puede ser efectuada examinando las nervaduras de la hojas. En las hojas apinadas, las nervaduras se originan desde varios puntos a lo largo del eje central, mientras en las hojas... palmeadas las nervaduras de las hojas se originan en el mismo punto en la base de la hoja. 116 La pubescencia o pelos de las hojas son comunmente una caracter?stica clave en la identificaci?n de algunas malezas gram?neas espec?ficas. La pubescencia puede...

  10. Criterion for burner design in thermal weed control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Telca Marisa

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that may be achieved for the given speeds, theoretical field capacities (TFC), and fuel dosages. Speed TFC Ener for Ener for 20 kg/ha propane 30 kg/ha propane (km/h) (ha/h) (k ) (kJ/h) (k ) (kJ/h) Ener for 100 kg/ha propane (k /11) (kJ/11) 2. 0 0...

  11. Pre- and post-emergence weed control in bermudagrass turf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duble, Richard L

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Station, Texas, 1963. 34 10 Effects of arsenicals on common bermudagrass and nutsedge after 3 applications, College Station, Texas. 1964. 35 v Table Page An evaluation of the phytotoxicity of arseniqals to Tifgreen bermudagrass pnder golf green... to arsenic, College Station, Texas, 1964. 45 16 The analysis of variance of pre-emergence crabgrass control data under field conditions with 4-hydroxy- 3-nitrobenzene ar sonic acid, College Station, Texas, 1963. 59 17 The analysis of variance...

  12. Suggestions for Weed Control in Pastures and Forages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.; Bade, David H.

    2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    - 10 days F or use after planting v egetativ e pr opagules (stolons) br oadleaf w eeds (2,4-D + dicamba) after planting. of hybrid bermudagrass. R educed contr ol may be BASF expected if w eeds ar e allo w ed to r each 1 inch tall befor e application... , large crabgrass, (imazapic) label for w eed specifics) bermudagrass gr een-up . should be expected. The sev erity an d longevity of gr een fo xtail, barnyar dgrass, BASF this suppr ession will be minimiz ed if bermudagrass br oadleaf signalgrass...

  13. Controlling Weeds and Volunteer Crops During Fallow Periods.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiese, A.F.; Chenault, E.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BASF Poast Haloxyfop Dow Chemical Co. Verdict Sulfosate Stauffer Chemical Co. Touchdown Trimethylnonyl DuPont Co. WK Surfactant polyethoxyethanol 2,4-D Several 2,4-D 6 poor none 0.5 0.25 0.25 Formulation 90% 80% 2lb/gal 1.67Ib/gal 4lb...

  14. Chemical Weed and Brush Control Suggestions for Rangeland 2009 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural Products and BASF. The information given herein is for educational purposes only. Reference to commercial products or trade names is made with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement by the Texas Agri...

  15. A Tale of Two Depositories: Weeding Federal Depository Collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sare, Laura

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of this is the Medical Supply Catalog. It has been under four different SuDoc stems: HE 1.64, HE 20.302:M 46, HE 20.5002:M 46, and HE 20.9002:M 46. I identified these titles when I was working on a government documents serials project updating holdings after... acquainted with the historical print collection. One issue developed with titles published in the 1980s and 1990s that had switched formats from paper to microfiche. #31;is involved verifying if certain old print documents had a microfiche version...

  16. Texas High Plains Vegetable & Weed Control Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    of Plastic Mulch Type on Tomato Vigor and Yield (2004) 60 Effects of Postemergence Herbicides on Crop Injury (2005) 102 CROP PRODUCTION AND VARIETY TRIALS Transplanted Watermelon Production with Colored Plastic Mulches on the Texas High Plains (2005) 106 Yield and Quality Evaluation for Selected Tomato Varieties

  17. Criterion for burner design in thermal weed control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Telca Marisa

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A covered infrared burner was designed and constructed so that it could be compared to an open-flame burner. Two covered burners, a high configuration and a low configuration, were constructed. A low configuration covered infrared burner, high...

  18. Chemical Weed and Brush Control: Suggestions for Rangeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Ansley, Jim; Cadenhead, J. F.; Hamilton, Wayne T.; Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hart, Charles R.; Ueckert, Darrell

    2005-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    quick way to identify plants. Accurate plant identification is critical for selecting proper control technologies. TDD uses digital images and the internet to provide this service. Contact your County Extension Agent to learn more about this program... dicamba 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid Banvel, clarity 4 lbs ./gal . dicamba:2,4-d(1:3) see dicamba and 2,4-d weedmaster, Banvel + d, rangestar 4 lbs ./gal . diesel fuel oil or kerosene refined petroleum fractions several manufacturers glyphosate n...

  19. Weed Management in Alfalfa Stands Dr. Case R. Medlin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , johnsongrass, hemp dogbane, quackgrass, and others) are a primary concern since management options

  20. MHK Technologies/SeaWEED | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK ProjectsFlagshipNARECRhoInformation