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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region (1990) Geothermal Region (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

2

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our examination of Cerro Prieto gas analyses indicates that the geothermal system structure is changing with time. Gas data routinely measured in most geothermal fields; hence fluid-flow plots as presented here can be accomplished with little cost. Gas analytical data, therefore, are useful

3

MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compaction, computers, geothermal energy, pore-waternot MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE T GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION Opromise f o r developing geothermal energy i n the United

Lippmann, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0) 0) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first seven months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems

5

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TRACING...

6

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Multi-Fluid Geothermal Energy...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Multi-Fluid Geothermal Energy Production and Storage in Stratigraphic Reservoirs Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

8

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

9

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 2007 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the location of the heat source Notes Fluids have been sampled from 9 wells and 2 fumaroles from the East Flank of the Coso hydrothermal system with a view to identifying, if possible, the location and characteristics of the heat source inflows into this portion of the geothermal field. Preliminary results show that there has been extensive vapor loss in the system, most probably in response to

10

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement.

11

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Sierra Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

12

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine recharge for the system Notes Thirty-nine water samples were collected from the Coso geothermal system and vicinity and were analyzed for major chemical constituents and deltaD and delta18O. Non-thermal ground waters from the Coso Range were found to be isotopically heavier than non-thermal ground waters from the Sierra Nevada to the west. The deltaD value for the deep thermal water at Coso is

13

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References

14

Isotopic Analysis Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1997 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Identify the source of chlorine Notes The 36Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples have been measured. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic

15

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Rose Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

16

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1996 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present when the thermal plume was emplaced. Dilution of the thermal waters occurred above and below the plume producing strong gradients in their compositions. Comparison of mineral and fluid inclusion based temperatures demonstrates that cooling has occurred along the margins of the thermal system but that the interior of the system

17

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis 1) To determine if analyses of fluid propene and propane species in fluid inclusions can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process. 2) To evaluate the geology and thermal history of the East Flank, in order to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydro-fracturing. Notes 1) Analyses were performed on drill cuttings at 20ft intervals from four Coso geothermal wells. Two wells are good producers, one has cold-water entrants in the production zone, and the fourth is a non-producer. The ratios show distinct differences between producing and the non-producing

18

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical compounds have been designed under this contract that can be used to trace water that has been injected into vapor-dominated and two-phase geothermal fields. Increased knowledge of the injection flow is provided by the tracers, and this augments the power that can be produced. Details on the stability and use of these tracers are included in this report.

Michael C. Adams Greg Nash

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

20

Thermodynamics of geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model to predict the thermodynamic properties of geothermal brines, based on a minimum amount of experimental data on a few key systems, is tested. Volumetric properties of aqueous sodium chloride, taken from the literature, are represented by a parametric equation over the range 0 to 300{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 1 kbar. Density measurements at 20 bar needed to complete the volumetric description also are presented. The pressure dependence of activity and thermal properties, derived from the volumetric equation, can be used to complete an equation of state for sodium chloride solutions. A flow calorimeter, used to obtain heat capacity data at high temperatures and pressures, is described. Heat capacity measurements, from 30 to 200{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 200 bar, are used to derive values for the activity coefficient and other thermodynamic properties of sodium sulfate solutions as a function of temperature. Literature data on the solubility of gypsum in mixed electrolyte solutions have been used to evaluate model parameters for calculating gypsum solubility in seawater and natural brines. Predictions of strontium and barium sulfate solubility in seawater also are given.

Rogers, P.S.Z.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90) 90) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems

22

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine if fluid inclusion stratigraphy is applicable to geothermal Notes Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids.Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow and reservoir seals. Analyses from

23

GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The use of fluid inclusion gas analysis propene/propene ratios is investigated. Ratios of these species are affected by geothermal fluid temperature and oxidations state. Our purpose is to determine if analyses of these species in fluid inclusions these species to can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process. Analyses were performed on drill cuttings at 20ft intervals from four Coso geothermal wells. Two wells are good producers, one has cold-water entrants in the production zone, and the fourth is a non-producer. The ratios show distinct differences between

24

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1999 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Well and steam sample comparison Notes Vein and alteration assemblages from eight Coso wells have been collected and their fluid-inclusion gases analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. Four major types of alteration were sampled: 1) young calcite-hematite-pyrite veins; 2) wairakite or epidote veins and alteration that are spatially associated with deep reservoirs in the main field and eastern wells; 3) older sericite and pyrite wallrock alteration; and 4) stilbite-calcite veins that are common in cooler or marginal portions of

25

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Coso Geothermal Area (2004)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine effectiveness of FIS for geothermal exploration Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips were analyzed from Coso well 83-16, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by our CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman

26

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine effectiveness of FIS for geothermal exploration Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips were analyzed from Coso well 83-16, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by our CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman 1996) show that chips have a high density of homogeneous fluid inclusions.

27

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2002 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses were averaged and plotted verses depth (Figure 4). Fluid inclusion gas analyses done on vein minerals from drill hole 68-6 that we earlier analyzed (Adams 2000) were plotted for comparison in order to confirm that similar analyses are obtained from chips and vein minerals. This comparison is far from ideal. The drill holes are better than a kilometer apart, samples analyzed in the two bore holes are not from the same depths, and the chip analyses were performed on the new dual quadrupole system that

28

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2003) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area (2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2003 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis 1) Fracture/stress analysis. 2)To determine the driver of the relationship between hydrogen and organic species. Notes 1) Fluid inclusion analyses of cuttings from well 83-16 were used to determine the temperatures of vein mineralization. 2) Measurement of organic compounds in fluid inclusions shows that there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and

29

Direct contact, binary fluid geothermal boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is extracted from geothermal brines by direct contact with a working fluid such as isobutane which is immiscible with the brine in a geothermal boiler. The geothermal boiler provides a distributor arrangement which efficiently contacts geothermal brine with the isobutane in order to prevent the entrainment of geothermal brine in the isobutane vapor which is directed to a turbine. Accordingly the problem of brine carry-over through the turbine causes corrosion and scaling thereof is eliminated. Additionally the heat exchanger includes straightening vanes for preventing startup and other temporary fluctuations in the transitional zone of the boiler from causing brine carryover into the turbine. Also a screen is provided in the heat exchanger to coalesce the working fluid and to assist in defining the location of the transitional zone where the geothermal brine and the isobutane are initially mixed.

Rapier, Pascal M. (Richmond, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Direct contact, binary fluid geothermal boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is extracted from geothermal brines by direct contact with a working fluid such as isobutane which is immiscible with the brine in a geothermal boiler. The geothermal boiler provides a distributor arrangement which efficiently contacts geothermal brine with the isobutane in order to prevent the entrainment of geothermal brine in the isobutane vapor which is directed to a turbine. Accordingly the problem of brine carryover through the turbine causing corrosion and scaling thereof is eliminated. Additionally the heat exchanger includes straightening vanes for preventing startup and other temporary fluctuations in the transitional zone of the boiler from causing brine carryover into the turbine. Also a screen is provided in the heat exchanger to coalesce the working fluid and to assist in defining the location of the transitional zone where the geothermal brine and the isobutane are initially mixed.

Rapier, P.M.

1979-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

31

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic ratios (i.e. magmatic He, ~10 Ra; atmospheric He, Ra; and crustal He, ~0.1 Ra) and in terms of the processes which can alter the isotopic ratio (hydrologic mixing, U-Th series alpha production and weathering

32

The Influence of Reservoir Heterogeneity on Geothermal Fluid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. THE INFLUENCE OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY ON GEOTHERMAL FLUID AND METHANE RECOVERY FROM A GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Ariel Esposito...

33

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference...

34

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- High-potential Working Fluids...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

35

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

36

Lecture notes Ideal fluid mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involves energy loss--such fluids are known as viscous fluids--we will not consider them here. Some fluids of the basic equations underlying the dynamics of ideal fluids is based on three basic principles (see Chorin. Conservation of energy, energy is neither created nor destroyed. In turn these principles generate the: 1

Malham, Simon J.A.

37

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hydrogen isotope values of muscovite (δDMs ∼-100‰) and fluid inclusions in quartz (δDFluid ∼-85‰) indicate the presence of meteoric fluids during detachment dynamics. Recrystallized grain-shape fabrics and quartz c-axis fabric patterns reveal a large component of coaxial strain (pure shear), consistent with thinning of the detachment section. Therefore, the high thermal gradient preserved in the Raft River

38

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine which reservoir model best matches the isotope data. Notes 1) Chemical and light-stable isotope data are presented for water samples from the Raft River geothermal area and nearby. On the basis of chemical character, as defined by a trilinear plot of per cent milliequivalents, and light-stable isotope data, the waters in the geothermal area can be divided into waters that have and have not mixed with cold water. 2) Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic

39

Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume III. Geothermal fracture fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study of all available and experimental frac fluid systems is presented. They have been examined and tested for physical properties that are important in the stimulation of hot water geothermal wells. These fluids consist of water-based systems containing high molecular weight polymers in the uncrosslinked and crosslinked state. The results of fluid testing for many systems are summarized specifically at geothermal conditions or until breakdown occurs. Some of the standard tests are ambient viscosity, static aging, high temperature viscosity, fluid-loss testing, and falling ball viscosity at elevated temperatures and pressures. Results of these tests show that unalterable breakdown of the polymer solutions begins above 300/sup 0/F. This continues at higher temperatures with time even if stabilizers or other high temperature additives are included.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Modeling subsidence due to geothermal fluid production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, liquid dominated geothermal systems hold the maximum promise for exploiting geothermal energy in the United States. The principal characteristic of such systems is that most of the heat is transferred by flowing water, which also controls subsurface fluid pressures and stress changes. The reduction in pore pressures brought about by geothermal fluid extraction is potentially capable of causing appreciable deformation of the reservoir rocks leading to displacements at the land surface. In order to foresee the pattern and magnitude of potential ground displacements in and around producing liquid dominated geothermal fields, a numerical model has been developed. Conceptually, the simulator combines conductive and convective heat transfer in a general three dimensional heterogeneous porous medium with a one-dimensional deformation of the reservoir rocks. The capabilities of the model and its potential applicability to field cases are illustrated with examples considering the effects of temperature and pressure dependent properties, material heterogeneities and previous stress history.

Lippmann, M.J.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Compilation of Data on Fluids from Geothermal Resources in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory work to compile data of characteristics of the main U.S. geothermal source areas. The purpose of this compilation is to provide information on the chemistry of geothermal fluids to scientists and engineers involved with the development of liquid dominated geothermal energy resources. The compilation is a comprehensive tabulation of available geothermal fluid data from the most important geothermal resources in the United States. [Abstracter's note: This was part of a large but short-lived effort at LBNL to collect lots of geothermal data. There may be other reports that are worth searching for to add to the Geothermal Legacy collection at OSTI. DJE-2005

Cosner, S.R.; Apps, J.A.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Corrosion tests in Hawaiian geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exposure tests were conductd in binary geothermal brine on the island of Hawaii. The steam which flashes from the high pressure, high temperature water as it is brought to ambient pressure contains substantial amounts of H{sub 2}S. In the absence of oxygen this steam is only moderately aggressive but in the aerated state it is highly aggressive to carbon steels and copper alloys. The liquid after flasing is intermediately aggressive. The Hawaiian fluid is unique in chemistry and corrosion behavior; its corrosiveness is relatively mild for a geothermal fluid falling close to the Iceland-type resources. 24 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Larsen-Basse, J.; Lam, Kam-Fai

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

44

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

45

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: To increase our knowledge of gaseous species in geothermal systems by fluid inclusion analysis in order to facilitate the use of gas analysis in geothermal exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal

46

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Baja California,monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California,~~W. and Faust, C. R. , 1979, Geothermal resource simulation:

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fluid model for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Models are created using cross-sections and fence diagrams. A thick condensate and boiling zone is indicated across the western portion

48

Subsidence due to geothermal fluid withdrawal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Single-phase and two-phase geothermal reservoirs are currently being exploited for power production in Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, the U.S. and elsewhere. Vertical ground displacements of upto 4.5 m and horizontal ground displacements of up t o 0.5 m have been observed at Wairakei, New Zealand that are clearly attributable to the resource exploitation. Similarly, vertical displacements of about 0.13 m have been recorded at The Geysers, California. No significant ground displacements that are attributable to large-scale fluid production have been observed at Larderello, Italy and Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Observations show that subsidence due to geothermal fluid production is characterized by such features as an offset of the subsidence bowl from the main area of production, time-lag between production and subsidence and nonlinear stress-strain relationships. Several plausible conceptual models, of varying degrees of sophistication, have been proposed to explain the observed features. At present, relatively more is known about the physical mechanisms that govern subsidence than the relevant therma mechanisms. Although attempts have been made to simulate observed geothermal subsidence, the modeling efforts have been seriously limited by a lack of relevant field data needed to sufficiently characterize the complex field system.

Narasimhan, T.N.; Goyal, K.P.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt Area- Implications from Mt Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation,...

50

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids. This method is being studied for application to geothermal wells and is funded by the California Energy Commission. Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow

51

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

82) 82) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic ratios (i.e. magmatic He, ~10 Ra; atmospheric He, Ra; and crustal He, ~0.1 Ra) and in terms of the processes which can alter the isotopic ratio (hydrologic mixing, U-Th series alpha production and weathering release of crustal He, magma aging and tritiugenic addition of 3He). Raft

52

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2005 - 2006 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Include more wells from previous analysis Notes This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation

53

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

54

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Temperatures of 150°C to 200°C Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Temperatures of 150°C to 200°C Abstract Six geothermal reservoirs with fluid temperatures over 200°C and ten geothermal systems with measured fluid temperatures of 150-200°C have been discovered in the northern Basin and Range Province of the USA. A comparison of these high and moderate temperature systems shows considerable overlap in geographical distribution, geology, and physical properties. Our ability to distinguish between moderate and high temperature systems using fluid chemistry has been limited by often

55

Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fence-diagram for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Permeable zones are indicated by a large change in

56

A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: At least 660 fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature (Th) and 44 freezing temperature (Tm) measurements, mainly on anhydrite crystals sampled to 2.5 km depth from 28 wells, record thermal and chemical changes in the Tongonan geothermal field. Interpretations of the Th (175-368°C range). Tm (-0.3 to -12.7°C range) and crushing stage observations indicate that early trapped fluids contained up to (approximate)2 mol% CO2 (now measured at <0.4 mol%). reservoir temperatures have decreased by

57

Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems on the margins of the Basin and Range province that is associated with recent volcanic activity. This system, which is developed entirely in fractured granitic and metamorphic rocks, consists of a well-defined thermal plume that originates in the southern part of the field and then flows upward and laterally to the north. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present

58

Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 10-14, 1988, The Geothermal Research Society ofcaused by the mixing of different geothermal fluids, Proc.Twenty-third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,

Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluation of commercially available geothermal drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of geothermal drilling in the United States has revealed that serious problems are being encountered with corrosion and degradation of drilling fluids in high temperature wells. The best high temperature drilling fluids that could be formulated from commercially available materials were obtained from the five largest mud companies. These included samples of 9 and 18 lb/gal water muds and 18 lb/gal oil muds. Over 4,000 tests were conducted on these muds to evaluate their performance at high temperature. This included testing at temperatures to 550/sup 0/F and pressures to 15,000 psi. These tests revealed that most of the water muds had high viscosity, high filtration rates and poor corrosivity characteristics at temperatures above 350/sup 0/F. Although the oil muds performed better than water muds at high temperatures, some problems were encountered with viscosity at temperatures above 450/sup 0/F and with filtration at temperatures above 500/sup 0/F. Generally the corrosivity characteristics of the oil muds were much better than those of the water muds. Overall, oil muds have better temperature stability than water muds but their use is often limited because of problems with surface pollution, contamination of water zones and reservoir damage. Biodegradable oil mud systems would overcome some of these limitations.

Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; McDonald, W.J.; Maurer, W.C.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

LLNL-CONF-636436 Multi-Fluid Geothermal Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36 Multi-Fluid Geothermal Energy Production and Storage in Stratigraphic Reservoirs T. A. Buscheck, M. Chen, Y. Hao, J. M. Bielicki, J. B. Randolph, Y. Sun, H. Choi May 13, 2013...

62

Gas Analysis of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions: A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To increase our knowledge of gaseous species in geothermal systems by fluid inclusion analysis in order to facilitate the use of gas analysis in geothermal exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal production. Knowledge of the gas contents in reservoir fluids can be applied to fluid inclusion gas analysis of drill chip cuttings in a similar fashion as used in the petroleum industry. Thus the results of this project may lower exploration costs both in the initial phase and lower drill hole completion costs. Commercial costs for fluid inclusion analysis done on at 20 feet intervals on chip samples for 10,000 ft oil wells is about $6,000, and the turn around time is a few weeks.

David I. Norman; Joseph Moore

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

63

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Vein and alteration assemblages from eight Coso wells have been collected and their fluid-inclusion gases analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. Four major types of alteration were sampled: 1) young calcite-hematite-pyrite veins; 2) wairakite or epidote veins and alteration that are spatially associated with deep reservoirs in the main field and eastern wells; 3) older sericite and pyrite wallrock alteration; and 4) stilbite-calcite veins that are common in cooler or marginal portions of

64

Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

65

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cores from two of 13 U.S. Geological Survey research holes at Yellowstone National Park (Y-5 and Y-8) were evaluated to characterize lithology, texture, alteration, and the degree and nature of fracturing and veining. Porosity and matrix permeability measurements and petrographic examination of the cores were used to evaluate the effects of lithology and hydrothermal alteration on porosity and permeability. The intervals studied in these two core holes span the conductive zone and the upper portion of

66

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model to compute land subsidence, 11 Bull. Intl. Assn.geothermal production and subsidence history of the Wairakei5. Geertsma, J. , 1973, Land subsidence above compacting oil

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

Thomas, D.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

Thomas, D.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

High-resolution seismic studies applied to injected geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of high-resolution microseismicity studies to the problem of monitoring injected fluids is one component of the Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project at LLNL. The evaluation of microseismicity includes the development of field techniques, and the acquisition and processing of events during the initial development of a geothermal field. To achieve a specific detection threshold and location precision, design criteria are presented for seismic networks. An analysis of a small swarm near Mammoth Lakes, California, demonstrates these relationships and the usefulness of high-resolution seismic studies. A small network is currently monitoring the Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plant at Casa Diablo as it begins production.

Smith, A.T.; Kasameyer, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore-water pressures , subsidence. DISCLAIMER NeiIher ( h ehere," do not MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE T GEOTHERMAL FLUIDSecond Syhposium on Land Subsidence 1976 a t Anaheim, I n t

Lippmann, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Williams, Assessment of Geothermal Resources of the UnitedActivity coefficients i.n geothermal solutions J. L. Haas R.REPORT CHARACTERIZATION OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS A. Geothermal

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Working Fluids and Their Effect on Geothermal Turbines Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

working fluids leading to improved plant efficiency. Awardees (Company Institution) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Partner 1 Sandia National Laboratory Funding Opportunity...

74

Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t h e v a p r phase. I n a vapor-dominated geothermal r e s e r v o i r , t h e only "non-vapor" f l u when adsorbed water is the only "non-vapor" f l u i d present. There is a f u r t h e r consideration

Stanford University

75

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drilling activity completely ceased. Of these, 65 bores account for about 95 percent of the total fluid

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Modeling of fluid and heat flow in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In most geothermal reservoirs large-scale permeability is dominated by fractures, while most of the heat and fluid reserves are stored in the rock matrix. Early-time fluid production comes mostly from the readily accessible fracture volume, while reservoir behavior at later time depends upon the ease with which fluid and heat can be transferred from the rock matrix to the fractures. Methods for modeling flow in fractured porous media must be able to deal with this matrix-fracture exchange, the so-called interporosity flow. This paper reviews recent work at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on numerical modeling of nonisothermal multiphase flow in fractured porous media. We also give a brief summary of simulation applications to problems in geothermal production and reinjection. 29 refs., 1 fig.

Pruess, K.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Fraser E. Goff, Charles O. Grigsby, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale Counce, Andrea Kron (1981) Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff,_Et_Al.,_1981)&oldid=692519

78

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Following a period of exploration and development in the mid-late 1970's, there was little activity at the Raft River geothermal field for the next ~20 years. US Geothermal Inc. acquired the project in 2002, and began commercial power generation in January 2008. From mid-2004 to present, US Geothermal Inc. has collected geochemical data from geothermal and monitoring wells in the field, as well as other shallow wells in the

79

The feasibility of recovering medium to heavy oil using geopressured- geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility, economics and environmental concerns of producing more domestic oil using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) are reviewed and the unique nature of geopressured-geothermal (GPGT) fluids for thermal recovery are outlined. Current methods of TEOR are briefly discussed and it is noted that these methods are presently under scrutiny by both federal and state air quality agencies; and moreover, they often involve costly operational and mechanical problems associated with heating water on the surface for injection into the target reservoir. The characteristics of the GPGT resources as seen through previous Department of Energy (DOE) studies from sites in Louisiana and Texas are discussed. These studies indicate sufficient quantities of GPGT fluids can be produced to sustain a TEOR project. The Alworth Field in the south Texas Mirando Trend is proposed as a TEOR pilot site. The target reservoirs for injection of the GPGT fluids are the Jackson and Yegua sandstones of the upper Eocene Epoch. The reservoirs contain an estimated 4 MMbbls of heavy oil in place (OIP) (18.6{degree}API) of which it is estimated that at least 1 MMbbls could be recovered by TEOR. The problems associated with using the GPGT fluids for TEOR include those normally associated with hot water flooding but in addition the reaction of the brine from the geopressured-geothermal reservoir with the target reservoir is uncertain. Under the elevated temperatures associated with GPGT TEOR, actual increased porosity and permeability are possible. 120 refs., 40 figs., 13 tabs.

Negus-de Wys, J.; Kimmell, C.E.; Hart, G.F.; Plum, M.M.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal resources for electric power generation. i. PlantOF GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS Electric Power Generation SystemsUSE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO 2Fluid, Proceedings, World Geothermal Congress 2010, Bali,Remain? Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 17,

Pruess, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived from 3D Numerical Models Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived from 3D Numerical Models Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The efficiency of geothermal energy production at the Coso Geothermal Field in eastern California is reliant on the knowledge of fluid flow directions associated with fracture networks. We use finite element analysis to establish the 3D state of stress within the tectonic setting of the Coso Range. The mean and differential stress distributions are used to infer fluid flow vectors and second order fracture likelihood and orientation. The results show that the Coso Range and adjacent areas are

83

Modeling and optimization of geothermal power plants using the binary fluid cycle  

SciTech Connect

A computer simulation of a binary fluid cycle power plant for use with geothermal energy sources, and the subsequent optimization of this power plant type over a range of geothermal source conditions are described. The optimization technique employed for this analysis was based upon the principle of maximum use of geothermal energy.

Walter, R.A.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

CO2-based mixtures as working fluids for geothermal turbines.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for application to a variety of heat sources, including geothermal, solar, fossil, and nuclear power. This work is centered on the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) power conversion cycle, which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources and is very compact-a feature likely to reduce capital costs. One promising approach is the use of CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid mixtures. The introduction of additives to CO{sub 2} alters the equation of state and the critical point of the resultant mixture. A series of tests was carried out using Sandia's supercritical fluid compression loop that confirmed the ability of different additives to increase or lower the critical point of CO{sub 2}. Testing also demonstrated that, above the modified critical point, these mixtures can be compressed in a turbocompressor as a single-phase homogenous mixture. Comparisons of experimental data to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Standard Reference Database predictions varied depending on the fluid. Although the pressure, density, and temperature (p, {rho}, T) data for all tested fluids matched fairly well to REFPROP in most regions, the critical temperature was often inaccurate. In these cases, outside literature was found to provide further insight and to qualitatively confirm the validity of experimental findings for the present investigation.

Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Ames, David E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

86

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal production. Knowledge of the gas contents in...

87

Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Satellite Interferometric Radar (Insar)- New Insights Into Reservoir Extent And Structural Controls Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Satellite Interferometric Radar (Insar)- New Insights Into Reservoir Extent And Structural Controls Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present a new example of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar's (InSAR) remarkable utility for defining an operating geothermal reservoir's lateral extent and hydrologically active fracture systems. InSAR reveals millimeter-level surface change due to volume change in the reservoir and overlying aquifer systems caused by fluid pressure reduction

88

Sampling and analysis methods for geothermal fluids and gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sampling procedures for geothermal fluids and gases include: sampling hot springs, fumaroles, etc.; sampling condensed brine and entrained gases; sampling steam-lines; low pressure separator systems; high pressure separator systems; two-phase sampling; downhole samplers; and miscellaneous methods. The recommended analytical methods compiled here cover physical properties, dissolved solids, and dissolved and entrained gases. The sequences of methods listed for each parameter are: wet chemical, gravimetric, colorimetric, electrode, atomic absorption, flame emission, x-ray fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, ion exchange chromatography, spark source mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, and emission spectrometry. Material on correction of brine component concentrations for steam loss during flashing is presented. (MHR)

Watson, J.C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Aqueous foam surfactants for geothermal drilling fluids: 1. Screening  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aqueous foam is a promising drilling fluid for geothermal wells because it will minimize damage to the producing formation and would eliminate the erosion problems of air drilling. Successful use of aqueous foam will require a high foaming surfactant which will: (1) be chemically stable in the harsh thermal and chemical environment, and (2) form stable foams at high temperatures and pressures. The procedures developed to generate and test aqueous foams and the effects of a 260/sup 0/C temperature cycle on aqueous surfactant solutions are presented. More than fifty selected surfactants were evaluated with representatives from the amphoteric, anionic, cationic, and nonionic classes included. Most surfactants were severely degraded by this temperature cycle; however, some showed excellent retention of their properties. The most promising surfactant types were the alkyl and alkyl aryl sulfonates and the ethoxylated nonionics.

Rand, P.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) (Redirected from Isotopic Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Fraser E. Goff, Charles O. Grigsby, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale Counce,

91

Fluid Temperature and Power Estimation of Geothermal Power Plants by a Simplified Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an estimation of power generated in a given geothermal heat pipe system. Such power generation is basically controlled by the ultimate temperature of fluid flowing through the u-shape pipes and could also be affected by power consumption ... Keywords: energy, geothermal power plant, numerical model, heat conduction, optimum design

Ge Ou; Itai Einav

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References U. Fehn, R. T. D. Teng, Usha Rao, Fraser E. Goff (1996) Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Retrieved from

93

Chemical analysis and sampling techniques for geothermal fluids and gases at the Fenton Hill Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general description of methods, techniques, and apparatus used for the sampling, chemical analysis, and data reporting of geothermal gases and fluids is given. Step-by-step descriptions of the procedures are included in the appendixes.

Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Preliminary investigation of scale formation and fluid chemistry at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemistry of geothermal, production, and injection fluids at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada, was characterized to address an ongoing scaling problem and to evaluate the effects of reinjection into the reservoir. Fluids generally followed mixing-dilution trends. Recharge to the Dixie Valley system apparently originates from local sources. The low-pressure brine and injection waters were saturated with respect to amorphous silica, which correlated with the ongoing scaling problem. Local shallow ground water contains about 15% geothermal brine mixed with regional recharge. The elevated Ca, Mg, and HCO{sub 3} content of this water suggests that carbonate precipitation may occur if shallow groundwater is reinjected. Downhole reservoir fluids are close to equilibrium with the latest vein mineral assemblage of wairakite-epidote-quartz-calcite. Reinjection of spent geothermal brine is predicted to affect the region near the wellbore differently than it does the region farther away.

Bruton, C.J.; Counce, D.; Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F.; Johnson, S.D.; Moore, J.N.; Nimz, G.

1997-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt Area- Implications from Mt Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt Area- Implications from Mt Resistivity Surveying Abstract Extended magnetotelluric (MT) profiling results over the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt area were recently completed to explore the hypothesis that fluid circulation to depths of 10 km or more is generating well temperatures in the field >280 C.This transect has revealed families of resistivity structures commonly dominated by high-angle

96

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System Available online 12 June 2011 Keywords: Salton Sea Geothermal System hydrothermal seeps gas and water geochemistry flux measurements mantle The Salton Sea Geothermal System (California) is an easily accessible

Mazzini, Adriano

97

Simulation of fluid-rock interactions in a geothermal basin. Final report. [QUAGMR (quasi-active geothermal reservoir)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General balance laws and constitutive relations are developed for convective hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. A fully interacting rock-fluid system is considered; typical rock-fluid interactions involve momentum and energy transfer and the dependence of rock porosity and permeability upon the fluid and rock stresses. The mathematical model also includes multiphase (water/steam) effects. A simple analytical model is employed to study heat transfer into/or from a fluid moving in a porous medium. Numerical results show that for fluid velocities typical of geothermal systems (Reynolds number much less than 10), the fluid and the solid may be assumed to be in local thermal equilibrium. Mathematical formalism of Anderson and Jackson is utilized to derive a continuum species transport equation for flow in porous media; this method allows one to delineate, in a rigorous manner, the convective and diffusive mechanisms in the continuum representation of species transport. An existing computer program (QUAGMR) is applied to study upwelling of hot water from depth along a fault; the numerical results can be used to explain local temperature inversions occasionally observed in bore hole measurements.

Garg, S.K.; Blake, T.R.; Brownell, D.H. Jr.; Nayfeh, A.H.; Pritchett, J.W.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Fluid Imaging Project Description EGS has been defined as enhanced reservoirs that have been created to extract economical amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. Critical to the success of EGS is the successful manipulation of fluids in the subsurface to enhance permeability. Knowledge in the change in volume and location of fluids in the rocks and fractures (both natural and induced) will be needed to manage injection strategies such as the number and location of step out wells, in-fill wells and the ratio of injection to production wells. The key difficulty in manipulating fluids has been our inability to reliably predict their locations, movements and concentrations. We believe combining data from MEQ and electrical surveys has the potential to overcome these problems and can meet many of the above needs, economically. Induced seismicity is currently viewed as one of the essential methods for inferring the success of creating fracture permeability and fluid paths during large scale EGS injections. Fluids are obviously playing a critical role in inducing the seismicity, however, other effects such as thermal, geochemical and stress redistribution, etc. may also play a role.

99

A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on anhydrite crystals sampled to 2.5 km depth from 28 wells, record thermal and chemical changes in the Tongonan geothermal field. Interpretations of the Th (175-368C...

100

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

> 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids. This method is being studied for application...

102

Experimental study of electron beam induced removal of H/sub 2/S from geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The treatment of geothermal steam by electron beam irradiation is a potential alternative method of H/sub 2/S removal which can be applied upstream or downstream and has no chemical requirements. The experimental work reported here examines the effectiveness of electron beam treatment of geothermal fluids. These fluids are produced by combining the constituents in a heated cell, which contains an electron beam transparent window. Irradiation of the contents and subsequent chemical analysis allows an evaluation of effectiveness. These results are used for a commercial feasibility assessment.

Helfritch, D.J.; Singhvi, R.; Evans, R.D.; Reynolds, W.E.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hydrogeologic and hydrogeochemical assessment of geothermal fluids in the Pyramid Lake area, Washoe country, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical characteristics of the geothermal fluids in the Pyramid Lake area using data from existing published and unpublished reports on springs, challow and deep wells in the area. Four geochemical provinces, namely, chloride, bicarbonate, suphate and nixed chloride-bicarbonate have been identified. Chloride waters are found in known geothermal areas. Two subsurface water recharge zones which reed the shallow and deep geothermal systems are proposed. These are the Virginia Mountains and their Northern extension and the Fox and Lake Ranges. Tertiary and Quaternary faulting systems in these mountains and Ranges act as heat conduits for geothermal fluids. The Needle Rocks geothermal system is postulated to be deeper than the San Emidio system. A connection between the Needle Rocks system and the Pyramid and Anaho islands warm springs is not clear from this study because of lack of chemical data from these islands. More systematic measurements of static water levels, temperatures, well lithology, water chemistry and isotopes data are recommended to enable better understanding of the geothermal systems in the area.

Ojiambo, S. Bwire

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Geothermal binary-cycle working-fluid properties information. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research discussed was performed prior to December 31, 1979. The report was not released until September 30, 1981, so that pressure-enthalpy diagrams for a number of potential geothermal binary cycle working fluids could be prepared in SI units. Efforts were directed principally to working fluid thermophysical property correlation and presentation of properties information. Pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented for propane, normal butane, isobutane, normal pentane, isopentane and propylene. Generalized correlations are presented for the thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrocarbon pure and mixture working fluids. Specific correlations are presented for the thermodynamic properties of 27 fluids and for the viscosity and thermal conductivity of hydrocarbons including isobutane and isopentane.

Starling, K.E.; Kumar, K.H.; Malik, Z.I.; Batson, B.; Plumb, P.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir, one is neutral and the other is acidic (pH=3). It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. We carried out reactive geothermal transport simulations using TOUGHREACT (Xu and Pruess, 1998 and 2001) to test such a conceptual model. Mn-rich smectite precipitated near the mixing front and is likely to form an impermeable barrier between regions with acidic and neutral fluids.

Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitosi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

106

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Previous and current attempts to develop EGS in the U.S., Japan, Europe and Australia have all employed water as a heat transmission fluid. Water has many properties that make it a favorable medium for heat extraction, but it also has serious drawbacks. The use of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) instead of water as heat extraction fluid was suggested by Donald Brown of Los Alamos National Laboratory as a "game changing" alternative that can avoid the problems of aqueous fluids, make heretofore inaccessible energy resources available for human use, and provide ancillary benefits by using and storing CO2.

107

Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States) Evans (Charles) and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Tailored Working Fluids for Enhanced Binary Geothermal Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conversion efficiency of systems employed by: - Tailoring the subcritical andor supercritical glide of enhanced working fluids to best match thermal resources. - Identifying...

109

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Our ability to distinguish between moderate and high temperature systems using fluid chemistry has been limited by often inaccurate estimates based on shallow samples and by a...

110

Fluid and heat flow in gas-rich geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical-simulation techniques are used to study the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on geothermal reservoir behavior in the natural state and during exploitation. It is shown that the presence of CO/sub 2/ has large effects on the thermodynamic conditions of a reservoir in the natural state, especially on temperature distributions and phase compositions. The gas will expand two-phase zones and increase gas saturations to enable flow of CO/sub 2/ through the system. During exploitation, the early pressure drop is primarily due to degassing of the system. This process can cause a very rapid initial pressure drop, on the order of tens of bars, depending upon the initial partial pressure of CO/sub 2/. The following gas content from wells can provide information on in-place gas saturations and relative permeability curves that apply at a given geothermal resource. Site-specific studies are made for the gas-rich two-phase reservoir at the Ohaki geothermal field in New Zealand. A simple lumped-parameter model and a vertical column model are applied to the field data. The results obtained agree well with the natural thermodynamic state of the Ohaki field (pressure and temperature profiles) and a partial pressure of 15 to 25 bars is calculated in the primary reservoirs. The models also agree reasonably well with field data obtained during exploitation of the field. The treatment of thermophysical properties of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures for different phase compositions is summarized.

O'Sullivan, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Blakeley, M.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems, paper presentedin the Deep Reservoir of the Mt. Amiata Geothermal Field,Italy, Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, 31, 153-

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of Enhanced Geothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.2004b. Pruess, K. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Using CO

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

strategies such as the number and location of step out wells, in-fill wells and the ratio of injection to production wells. The key difficulty in manipulating fluids has been...

115

Session 12: Land Subsidence and Microseismicity Associated with Geopressured-Geothermal Fluid Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subsidence and fault-related surface displacements are the chief environmental concerns related to the long-term production of large volumes of fluids from geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. Environmental monitoring efforts at the three designed test well sites in Louisiana (Parcperdue, Sweet Lake, and Gladys McCall) have focused on leveling surveys, recording of microseismic events, and tiltmeter installation to provide baseline and fluid-production-related data useful in measuring land-surface and faulting effects of testing. Analysis of pretesting land-surface elevation surveys has revealed a complex pattern of subsidence related to sediment compaction, basin subsidence, and possibly to ground-water production and soil wetting and drying. The relative importance of each of these is not clear and the impact of geopressured-geothermal fluid production has not been determined. A three-year period of microseismic monitoring has produced reports by contractors of some 1000 suspected microseismic events; many of these require further verification. 64 events were recorded at Parcperdue, 141 at Gladys McCall, and 893 at Sweet Lake. Considering only events recorded by 5 stations or more reduces the total to 316, of which only six have the classic microseismic event characteristics. Analysis of all recorded events and their relation to fluid production and/or disposal is continuing. Tiltmeter data from Sweet Lake indicate that ground deformation correlates with fluid production and seismicity. This relationship is being studied and will be compared with data from Gladys McCall gathered during fluid production. The complexity of background subsidence and fault-related processes in the Gulf Coast area makes identification of processes directly related to geopressured-geothermal fluid production very difficult. Data from Sweet Lake suggest a correlation; hopefully, results from Gladys McCall will clarify interpretations made thus far.

Groat, C.G.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Review and evaluation of literature on testing of chemical additives for scale control in geothermal fluids. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A selected group of reported tests of chemical additives in actual geothermal fluids are reviewed and evaluated to summarize the status of chemical scale-control testing and identify information and testing needs. The task distinguishes between scale control in the cooling system of a flash plant and elsewhere in the utilization system due to the essentially different operating environments involved. Additives for non-cooling geothermal fluids are discussed by scale type: silica, carbonate, and sulfide.

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

2002-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

118

Organometallic Polymer Coatings for Geothermal-Fluid-Sprayed Air-Cooled Condensers: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers are developing polymer-based coating systems to reduce scaling and corrosion of air-cooled condensers that use a geothermal fluid spray for heat transfer augmentation. These coating systems act as barriers to corrosion to protect aluminum fins and steel tubing; they are formulated to resist the strong attachment of scale. Field tests have been done to determine the corrosion and scaling issues related to brine spraying and a promising organometallic polymer has been evaluated in salt spray tests.

Gawlik, K.; Sugama, T.; Jung, D.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1978 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine fluid origin in two exploratory wells Notes Collected water from original coso hot springs well (1967) and CGEH No. 1. and completed chemical analysis to determine fluid origin. The surface expression of fumarole and acid sulfate pools and shallow steam wells gives a false indication of an extensive vapor dominated system because upward convecting, boiling alkaline-chloride waters do not reach the surface.

120

Core Analysis At Dunes Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dunes Geothermal Area (1976) Dunes Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Dunes Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Dunes Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fracture analysis to determine if sealing or open fractures exist Notes Core samples show diagenesis superimposed on episodic fracturing and fracture sealing. The minerals that fill fractures show significant temporal variations. Fracture sealing and low fracture porosity imply that only the most recently formed fractures are open to fluids. References Michael L. Batzle; Gene Simmons (1 January 1976) Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas

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121

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Mexico  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our examination of Cerro Prieto gas analyses indicates that the geothermal system structure is changing with time. Gas data routinely measured in most geothermal fields; hence fluid-flow plots as presented here can be accomplished with little cost. Gas analytical data, therefore, are useful in developing management procedures for geothermal fields characterized by

122

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes 1 "Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi)" is based on AC electricity consumed during charging events which began during the reporting period and distance driven...

124

Effects of non-condensible gases on fluid recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are performed in order to investigate the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on fluid recovery and matrix depletion in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The model used is that of a well producing at a constant bottomhole pressure from a two-phase fractured reservoir. The results obtained have received a complex fracture-matrix interaction due to the thermodynamics of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures. Although the matrix initially contributes fluids (liquid and gas) to the fractures, later on, the flow directions reverse and the fractures backflow fluids into the matrix. The amount of backflow depends primarily upon the flowing gas saturation in the fractures; the lower the flowing gas saturation in the fractures the more backflow. It is shown that the recoverable fluid reserves depend strongly on the amount of CO/sub 2/ present in the reservoir system.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Gaulke, S.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Seismic response to fluid injection and production in two Salton Trough geothermal fields, southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 12: 221-258patterns in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs: Six case

Lajoie, Lia Joyce

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

On the production behavior of enhanced geothermal systems with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Twenty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,and clay swelling in a fractured geothermal reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.

Pruess, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A COMPILATION OF DATA ON FLUIDS FROM GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. L. Assessment of Geothermal Resources of the UnitedReport on the International Geothermal Information Exchangeon the Development and Use of Geothermal Resources, Lawrence

Cosner, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.the 5-km Deep Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir at Soultz-sous-

Pruess, Karsten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Isotopic Constraints on the Chemical Evolution of Geothermal Fluids, Long Valley, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Sciences and Office of Geothermal Technologies underconcentrations in Long Valley geothermal waters discriminateand wells from the geothermal field and a nearby exploratory

Brown, Shaun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of EnhancedGeothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation is used to evaluate mass flow and heatextraction rates from enhanced geothermal injection-production systemsthat are operated using either CO2 or water as heat transmission fluid.For a model system patterned after the European hot dry rock experimentat Soultz, we find significantly greater heat extraction rates for CO2 ascompared to water. The strong dependence of CO2 mobility (=density/viscosity) upon temperature and pressure may lead to unusualproduction behavior, where heat extraction rates can actually increasefor a time, even as the reservoir is subject to thermaldepletion.

Pruess, Karsten

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

131

Arsenic speciation and transport associated with the release of spent geothermal fluids in Mutnovsky field (Kamchatka, Russia)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of geothermal fluids for the production of electricity poses a risk of contaminating surface waters when spent fluids are discharged into (near) surface environments. Arsenic (As) in particular is a common component in geothermal fluids and leads to a degradation of water quality when present in mobile and bioavailable forms. We have examined changes in arsenic speciation caused by quick transition from high temperature reducing conditions to surface conditions, retention mechanisms, and the extent of transport associated with the release of spent geothermal fluids at the Dachny geothermal fields (Mutnovsky geothermal region), Kamchatka, Russia -- a high temperature field used for electricity production. In the spent fluids, the arsenic concentration reaches 9 ppm, while in natural hot springs expressed in the vicinity of the field, the As concentration is typically below 10 ppb. The aqueous phase arsenic speciation was determined using Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled to an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The arsenic speciation in the bottom sediments (geothermal source fluids is predominantly found as As(III), while a mixture of As(III)/As(V) is found in the water and sediment of the Falshivaia River downstream from the power plant. The extent of elevated arsenic concentrations in water is limited by adsorption to the bottom sediment and dilution, as determined using Cl{sup -} from the deep well fluids as a tracer. Analysis of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra shows that sediment phase arsenic is associated with both Al- and Fe-rich phases with a bi-dentate corner sharing local geometry. The geothermal waste fluids released in the surface water create a localized area of arsenic contamination. The extent of transport of dissolved As is limited to {approx}7 km downstream from the source, while As associated with bottom sediment travels {approx}3 km farther.

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Rychagov, Sergey N.; Trainor, Thomas P. (Alaska Fairbanks); (Russ. Acad. Sci.)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in EnhancedGeothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in the novel concept of operating Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that CO{sub 2} will achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. Fluid-rock interactions in EGS operated with CO{sub 2} are expected to be vastly different in zones with an aqueous phase present, as compared to the central reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical CO{sub 2}. Our numerical simulations of chemically reactive transport show a combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects in the peripheral zone of the systems. These could impact reservoir growth and longevity, with important ramifications for sustaining energy recovery, for estimating CO{sub 2} loss rates, and for figuring tradeoffs between power generation and geologic storage of CO{sub 2}.

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

Organometallic Polymer Coatings for Geothermal-Fluid-Sprayed Air-Cooled Condensers: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 * NREL/CP-550-32148 2 * NREL/CP-550-32148 Organometallic Polymer Coatings for Geothermal- Fluid-Sprayed Air-Cooled Condensers Preprint K. Gawlik National Renewable Energy Laboratory T. Sugama Brookhaven National Laboratory D. Jung Two Phase Engineering & Research, Inc. To be presented at the Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting Reno, Nevada September 22-25, 2002 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US

134

MIXTURES OF CO2-SF6 AS WORKING FLUIDS FOR GEOTHERMAL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, mixtures of CO2 and SF6 were evaluated as working fluids for geothermal plants based on property measurements, molecular dynamics modeling, thermodynamic cycle analysis, and materials compatibility assessment. The CO2 - SF6 was evaluated for a reservoir temperature of 160 oC. Increasing the efficiency for these low reservoir sources will increase the options available for geothermal energy utilization in more sites across the country. The properties for the mixtures were obtained either from thermodynamic property measurements and molecular dynamics simulations. Optimum compositions of the CO2 - SF6 were identified for a well reservoir temperature and a given water-cooling condition. Concerning the global warming potential, it was estimated that the equivalent CO2 emissions per 1kWh for a Rankine cycle operating with 100% SF6 would be approximately of 7.6% than those for a coal-fired power plant.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluation of ammonia as a working fluid for a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts considered in this study involve various arrangments of the binary geothermal power cycle with advanced dry cooling schemes. Brief descriptions of the binary cycle and advanced cooling schemes are included. Also included are descriptions of the base case concept and the ammonia working fluid concept. Performance and cost estimates were developed for a wet-cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet/dry cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet-cooled ammonia cycle plant, and a wet/dry cooled ammonia cycle plant. The performance and cost estimates were calculated using the GEOCOST computer code developed at PNL. Inputs for GEOCOST were calculated based on the Heber sites. The characteristics of the wet/dry cooling system were determined using the BNWGEO computer code developed at PNL. Results of the cooling system analysis are presented, followed by results of the geothermal plant analysis. Conclusions and comments also are included.

Drost, M.K.; Huber, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Mixtures of SF6 CO2 as working fluids for geothermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, supercritical/transcritical thermodynamic cycles using mixtures of SF6 CO2 as working fluids were investigated for geothermal power plants. The system of equations that described the thermodynamic cycle was solved using a Newton-Raphson method. This approach allows a high computational efficiency even when thermophysical properties of the working fluid depend strongly on the temperature and pressure. The thermophysical properties of the mixtures were obtained from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) REFPROP software and constituent cubic equations. The local heat transfer coefficients in the heat exchangers were calculated based on the local properties of the working fluid, geothermal brine, and cooling water. The heat exchanger areas required were calculated. Numerical simulation results presented for different cycle configurations were used to assess the effects of the SF6 fraction in CO2, brine temperature, and recuperator size on the cycle thermal efficiency, and size of heat exchangers for the evaporator and condenser. Optimal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies were calculated to be approximately 13 and 15% mole content of SF6 in a CO2- SF6 mixture for a Brayton cycle and a Rankine cycle, respectively.

Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

Elders, W.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Chemistry and materials in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a geothermal fluid, from its origin as meteoric water precipitating on the earth's surface, as it flows through the soils and rocks of geological formations, to the point where it returns to the surface as a hot spring, geyser, well, etc. is traced. Water of magmatic origin is also included. The tendency of these hydrothermal fluids to form scales by precipitation of a portion of their dissolved solids is noted. A discussion is presented of types of information required for materials selection for energy systems utilizing geothermal fluids, including pH, temperature, the speciation of the particular geothermal fluid (particularly chloride, sulfide and carbon dioxide content) and various types of corrosive attack on common materials. Specific examplers of materials response to geothermal fluid are given.

Miller, R.L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earths crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earths crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and/or injected fluids is critical to predict important chemical behaviors affecting fluid flow, such as mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. We successfully achieved the project goal and objectives by demonstrating the ability of our modeling technology to correctly predict the complex pH dependent solution chemistry of the Al3+ cation and its hydrolysis species: Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)30, and Al(OH)4- as well as the solubility of common aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals in aqueous brines containing components (Na, K, Cl) commonly dominating hydrothermal fluids. In the sodium chloride system, where experimental data for model parameterization are most plentiful, the model extends to 300C. Determining the stability fields of aluminum species that control the solubility of aluminum-containing minerals as a function of temperature and composition has been a major objective of research in hydrothermal chemistry.

Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

140

Notes  

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Notes Notes Track Reconstruction with Cosmic Ray Data at the Tracker Integration Facility (pdf format) CMS Tracker Alignment at the Integration Facility (pdf format) Silicon Strip Tracker Detector Performance with Cosmic Ray Data at the Tracker Integration Facility (pdf format) Tracker Operation and Performance at the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (pdf format) CMS Silicon Tracker Module Assembly and Testing at FNAL (pdf format) Silicon Tracker Module Assembly at UCSB (pdf format) CT and test beam results of irradiated magnetic Czochralski silicon (MCz-Si) detectors Nuclear Inst. and Methods in Physics Research, A 604 (2009), pp 254-25 Silicon Beam Telescope for LHC Upgrade Tests Nuclear Inst. and Methods in Physics Research, A 593 (2008), pp. 523-529 SiTracker Home Page

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Zeotropic mixtures of halocarbons as working fluids in binary geothermal power generation cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of Rankine cycle binary systems for geothermal power generation using a hydrothermal resource has been investigated. To date, in addition to many pure fluids, mixtures of Paraffin-type hydrocarbons and water-ammonia mixtures have been investigated. This paper gives the results of consideration of mixtures of halocarbons as working fluids in these power cycles. The performance of mixtures of Refrigerant-114 (R-114) and Refrigerant-22 (R-22) in combinations from pure R-114 to pure R-22 was calculated for such cycles. Various alternatives were considered: (1) minimum geofluid outlet temperature constraint/no constraint, (2) dry turbine expansion/expansion through vapor dome, and (3) use of turbine exhaust gas recuperator/no recuperator. Results of the study indicate that the halocarbon mixtures are at least as good as the hydrocarbon mixtures previously analyzed for a 360 F resource. The magnitude of the net geofluid effectiveness (net energy produced per unit mass geofluid flow) for the R-114/R-22 mixtures is the same as for the best hydrocarbon mixture previously analyzed. The percentage improvement in effectiveness in using mixtures over using the pure fluids as working fluids is comparable for both classes of working fluids.

Bliem, C.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

THE NATURAL THERMODYNAMIC STATE OF THE FLUIDS IN THE LOS AZUFRES GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have devised a simple method to assess the natural thermodynamic state of two-phase reservoirs. This is usually a complex task. The method is based on inferring sandface flowing pressures and enthalpies from production output (deliverability) curves, and then extrapolating to shutin conditions in the pressure-enthalpy plane. The method was applied to data from 10 wells of the Los Azufres geothermal field. Comparison of the results with measured pressures and temperatures showed that the method is reliable. We present detailed thermodynamic properties of the unperturbed reservoir fluid in the neighborhood of the wells studied, in tabular form. Moreover, we present a match to these results with a very simple model that allows reasonable estimates of natural thermodynamic conditions as functions of height above sea level. The present results have important implications for the assessment of the fluid reserves, which are suggested to be greater than previously thought.

Iglesias, E.R.; Arellano, V.M.; Gardias, A.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A thermo-economic model has been built and validated for prediction of project economics of Enhanced Geothermal Projects. The thermo-economic model calculates and iteratively optimizes the LCOE (levelized cost of electricity) for a prospective EGS (Enhanced Geothermal) site. It takes into account the local subsurface temperature gradient, the cost of drilling and reservoir creation, stimulation and power plant configuration. It calculates and optimizes the power plant configuration vs. well depth. Thus outputs from the model include optimal well depth and power plant configuration for the lowest LCOE. The main focus of this final report was to experimentally validate the thermodynamic properties that formed the basis of the thermo-economic model built in Phase 2, and thus build confidence that the predictions of the model could be used reliably for process downselection and preliminary design at a given set of geothermal (and/or waste heat) boundary conditions. The fluid and cycle downselected was based on a new proprietary fluid from a vendor in a supercritical ORC cycle at a resource condition of 200?C inlet temperature. The team devised and executed a series of experiments to prove the suitability of the new fluid in realistic ORC cycle conditions. Furthermore, the team performed a preliminary design study for a MW-scale turbo expander that would be used for a supercritical ORC cycle with this new fluid. The following summarizes the main findings in the investigative campaign that was undertaken: 1. Chemical compatibility of the new fluid with common seal/gasket/Oring materials was found to be problematic. Neoprene, Viton, and silicone materials were found to be incompatible, suffering chemical decomposition, swelling and/or compression set issues. Of the materials tested, only TEFLON was found to be compatible under actual ORC temperature and pressure conditions. 2. Thermal stability of the new fluid at 200?C and 40 bar was found to be acceptable after 399 hours of exposure?only 3% of the initial charge degraded into by products. The main degradation products being an isomer and a dimer. 3. In a comparative experiment between R245fa and the new fluid under subcritical conditions, it was found that the new fluid operated at 1 bar lower than R245fa for the same power output, which was also predicted in the Aspen HSYSY model. As a drop-in replacement fluid for R245fa, this new fluid was found to be at least as good as R245fa in terms of performance and stability. Further optimization of the subcritical cycle may lead to a significant improvement in performance for the new fluid. 4. For supercritical conditions, the experiment found a good match between the measured and model predicted state point property data and duties from the energy balance. The largest percent differences occurred with densities and evaporator duty (see Figure 78). It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the state point model was experimentally validated with a realistic ORC system. 5. The team also undertook a preliminary turbo-expander design study for a supercritical ORC cycle with the new working fluid. Variants of radial and axial turbo expander geometries went through preliminary design and rough costing. It was found that at 15MWe or higher power rating, a multi-stage axial turbine is most suitable providing the best performance and cost. However, at lower power ratings in the 5MWe range, the expander technology to be chosen depends on the application of the power block. For EGS power blocks, it is most optimal to use multi-stage axial machines. In conclusion, the predictions of the LCOE model that showed a supercritical cycle based on the new fluid to be most advantageous for geothermal power production at a resource temperature of ~ 200C have been experimentally validated. It was found that the cycle based on the new fluid is lower in LCOE and higher in net power output (for the same boundary conditions). The project, therefore has found a new optimal configuration for low temperature geothermal power production in the form of a su

Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research; Sevincer, Edip; Chen, Huijuan; Hardy, Ajilli; Wickersham, Paul; Kalra, Chiranjeev; Laursen, Anna Lis; Vandeputte, Thomas

2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

GeoSys.Chem: Estimate of reservoir fluid characteristics as first step in geochemical modeling of geothermal systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer code GeoSys.Chem for the calculation of deep geothermal reservoir fluid characteristics from the measured physical-chemical parameters of separated water and condensed vapor samples obtained from drilled wells is presented. It was written ... Keywords: GeoChem, GeoSys.Chem, Geochemical modeling, Los Azufres, VB.NET

Mahendra P. Verma

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Geothermal component test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the East Mesa geothermal facility and the services provided. The facility provides for testing various types of geothermal energy-conversion equipment and materials under field conditions using geothermal fluids from three existing wells. (LBS)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Modeling Fluid Flow and Electrical Resistivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase change of pore fluid (boiling/condensing) in rock cores under conditions representative of geothermal reservoirs results in alterations of the electrical resistivity of the samples. In fractured samples, phase change can result in resistivity changes that are more than an order of magnitude greater than those measured in intact samples. These results suggest that electrical resistivity monitoring may provide a useful tool for monitoring the movement of water and steam within fractured geothermal reservoirs. We measured the electrical resistivity of cores of welded tuff containing fractures of various geometries to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. We then used the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport model (NUFT) (Nitao, 1998) to simulate the propagation of boiling fronts through the samples. The simulated saturation profiles combined with previously reported measurements of resistivity-saturation curves allow us to estimate the evolution of the sample resistivity as the boiling front propagates into the rock matrix. These simulations provide qualitative agreement with experimental measurements suggesting that our modeling approach may be used to estimate resistivity changes induced by boiling in more complex systems.

Detwiler, R L; Roberts, J J; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Task 2 is to develop a numerical method for the efficient and accurate analysis of distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) data for (1) imaging flow profiles and (2) in situ determination of thermal conductivities and heat fluxes. Numerical forward and inverse modeling is employed to: (1) Examine heat and fluid flow processes near a geothermal well under heating and cooling conditions; (2) Demonstrate ability to interpret DTPS thermal profiles with acceptable estimation uncertainty using inverse modeling of synthetic temperature data; and (3) Develop template model and analysis procedure for the inversion of temperature data collected during a thermal perturbation test using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensors. This status report summarizes initial model developments and analyses.

Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Iceland Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_International_Geothermal_Area,_Iceland_(Ranalli_%26_Rybach,_2005)&oldid=510812

149

Optimizations of geothermal cycle shell and tube exchangers of various configurations with variable fluid properties and site specific fouling. [SIZEHX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new heat exchanger program, SIZEHX, is described. This program allows single step multiparameter cost optimizations on single phase or supercritical exchanger arrays with variable properties and arbitrary fouling for a multitude of matrix configurations and fluids. SIZEHX uses a simplified form of Tinker's method for characterization of shell side performance; the Starling modified BWR equation for thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbons; and transport properties developed by NBS. Results of four parameter cost optimizations on exchangers for specific geothermal applications are included. The relative mix of capital cost, pumping cost, and brine cost ($/Btu) is determined for geothermal exchangers illustrating the invariant nature of the optimal cost distribution for fixed unit costs.

Pope, W.L.; Pines, H.S.; Silvester, L.F.; Doyle, P.A.; Fulton, R.L.; Green, M.A.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Advanced Binary Geothermal Power Plancts Working Fluid Property Determination and Heat Exchanger Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of binary geothermal power plants can be improved through the proper choice of a working fluid, and optimization of component designs and operating conditions. This paper reviews the investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which are examining binary cycle performance improvements: for moderate temperature (350 to 400 F) resources with emphasis on how the improvements may be integrated into design of binary cycles. These investigations are examining performance improvements resulting from the supercritical vaporization of mixed hydrocarbon working fluids and achieving countercurrent integral condensation with these fluids, as well as the modification of the turbine inlet state points to achieve supersaturated turbine vapor expansions. For resources where the brine outlet temperature is restricted, the use of turbine exhaust recuperators is examined. The baseline plant used to determine improvements in plant performance (characterized by the increase in the net brine effectiveness, watt-hours per pound of brine) in these studies operates at conditions similar to the 45 MW Heber binary plant. Through the selection of the optimum working fluids and operating conditions, achieving countercurrent integral condensation, and allowing supersaturated vapor expansions in the turbine, the performance of the binary cycle (the net brine effectiveness) can be improved by 25 to 30% relative to the baseline plant. The design of these supercritical Rankine-cycle (Binary) power plants for geothermal resources requires information about the potential working fluids used in the cycle. In addition, methods to design the various components, (e.g., heat exchangers, pumps, turbines) are needed. This paper limits its view of component design methods to the heat exchangers in binary power plants. The design of pumps and, turbines for these working fluids presents no new problems to the turbine manufacturer. However, additional work is proceeding at the Heat Cycle Research Facility to explore metastable expansions within turbines. This work, when completed, should allow the designer more flexibility in the state point selection in the design of these cycles which will potentially increase the system performance. The paper explores the different systems of thermodynamic and transport properties for mixtures of hydrocarbons. Methods include a computer program EXCST developed at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, as well as some of the thermodynamic models available in the chemical process simulation code, ASPEN, which was originally developed by the Department of Energy. The heat exchanger design methodology and computer programs of Heat Transfer Research, Inc. (HTRI) have been used because they represent data which is used throughout the industry by A & E firms as well as most heat exchanger manufacturers. For most cases, some modification of the computer results are necessary for supercritical heater design. When condensation takes place on the inside of enhanced tubes, new methods beyond HTRI's present state are necessary. The paper will discuss both of these modifications.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To characterize the flow patterns of fluid injected into well 68-20RD. Notes A conservative liquid phase tracer, 2-naphthalene sulfonate, and a two-phase tracer, ethanol, were injected into well 68-20RD. Surrounding production wells were sampled over the subsequent 125 days and analyzed for the two tracers. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the simultaneous use of liquid-phase and two-phase tracers in fluid-depleted geothermal

153

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas and Isotopes Geochemistry, Kennedy, van Soest and Shevenell. During FY04, we concentrated on two primary projects. The first was a detailed study of helium isotope systematics throughout Dixie Valley and the inter-relationship between the Dixie Valley geothermal reservoir and local hydrology. The second is the construction of a helium isotope "map" of the

154

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1987) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7) 7) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1987 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Compare multiple theories of the structural control of the geothermal system Notes The geothermal system appears to be associated with at least one dominant north-south-trending feature which extends several miles through the east-central portion of the Coso volcanic field. The identified producing fractures occur in zones which range from 10 - 100s of feet in extent, separated by regions of essentially unfractured rock of similar composition. Wells in the Devil's Kitchen area have encountered fluids in excess of 4500F and flow rates of 1 million lb/hr at depths less than 4000

155

Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6) 6) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine boiling zones and their relation to production zones by developing a fluid model Notes A fluid model for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. Models are created using cross-sections and fence diagrams. References Dilley, L.M.; Norman, D.I.; Moore, J.; McCullouch, J. (1 January 2006) FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Conceptual_Model_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(2006)&oldid=473688

156

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions. The helium isotopic compositions of fluids produced from the Dixie Valley geothermal field range from 0.70 to 0.76 Ra, are among the highest values in the valley, and indicate that _7.5% of the total helium is derived from the

157

Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area New Zealand Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

158

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent

159

Magnetotellurics At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Laney, 2005) (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At International Geothermal Area Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent

160

Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area Philippines (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent cooperative efforts with the Karaha-Bodas Co. LLC (a subsidiary of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1991) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1) 1) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 1991 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the fluid origin by looking at variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids Notes Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the

162

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Using a simple one-dimensional steady-state fluid flow model, the helium content and isotopic composition imply vertical fluid flow rates from the mantle of _7 mm/yr. This is a strict lower limit to the fluid flow rate: the one-dimensional model does not consider diffusive re-distribution of helium or mixing with water containing only a crustal helium component and

163

On the production behavior of enhanced geothermal systems with CO2as working fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation is used to evaluate mass flow and heatextraction rates from enhanced geothermal injection-production systemsthat are operated using either CO2 or water as heat transmission fluid.For a model system patterned after the European hot dry rock experimentat Soultz, we find significantly greater heat extraction rates for CO2 ascompared to water. The strong dependence of CO2 mobility (=density/viscosity) upon temperature and pressure may lead to unusualproduction behavior, where heat extraction rates can actually increasefor a time, even as the reservoir is subject to thermal depletion. Wepresent the first-ever three-dimensional simulations of CO2injection-production systems. These show strong effects of gravity onmass flow and heat extraction, due to the large contrast of CO2 densitybetween cold injection and hot production conditions. The tendency forpreferential flow of cold, dense CO2 along the reservoir bottom can leadto premature thermal breakthrough. The problem can be avoided byproducing from only a limited depth interval at the top of thereservoir.

Pruess, K.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Definition of engineering development and research problems relating to the use of geothermal fluids for electric power generation and nonelectric heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of geothermal fluids for electric power generation and nonelectric purposes causes problems not normally encountered when pure water is used for similar purposes. These problems must be identified and means developed to overcome them before geothermal energy resources can become an important source of electric power or thermal energy in the United States. Research and development projects aimed at solving problems arising from the use of geothermal fluids from known sources in the United States are listed. Problem areas covered are: impact on engineering design caused by chemical, thermodynamic, and transport properties of geothermal fluids; scaling and sludge formation; gases, volatile brine constituents, condensate chemistry; environmental problems. The research projects identified are general in nature and are not site specific. (JGB)

Apps, J.A.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

On the production behavior of enhanced geothermal systems with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature pressure Production/Injection pattern area (Fig.injection pressure (downhole) production pressure (downhole)On the Production Behavior of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

Pruess, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Community Geothermal Technology Program: Media steam pasteurization using geothermal fluid at NELHA, Noi`i O Puna laboratory; Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project was successful in confirming the suitability of shredded coconut husks in potting mix and the acceptability of untreated geothermal steam to pasteurize the mix. The pots were exposed to the steam; the average media temperature was maintained at 160 F for 30 min. The pH levels, which were slightly elevated in virgin media, rose only slightly (< 0.5) after steaming. Salt levels doubled (still safe). Mg solubility increased but not to toxic levels. Test plantings showed no significant differences after 8 months, indicating that coconut fiber can be pasteurized and used to replace imported peat moss. 6 refs, 4 tabs.

NONE

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Italy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Geothermal Area, Italy International Geothermal Area, Italy (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Italy (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Italy Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_International_Geothermal_Area,_Italy_(Ranalli_%26_Rybach,_2005)&oldid=510813

168

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) using CO2 as working fluid - Anovelapproach for generating renewable energy with simultaneoussequestration of carbon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responding to the need to reduce atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide, Donald Brown (2000) proposed a novel enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) concept that would use CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid, and would achieve geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2} as an ancillary benefit. Following up on his suggestion, we have evaluated thermophysical properties and performed numerical simulations to explore the fluid dynamics and heat transfer issues in an engineered geothermal reservoir that would be operated with CO{sub 2}. We find that CO{sub 2} is superior to water in its ability to mine heat from hot fractured rock. CO{sub 2} also has certain advantages with respect to wellbore hydraulics, where larger compressibility and expansivity as compared to water would increase buoyancy forces and would reduce the parasitic power consumption of the fluid circulation system. While the thermal and hydraulic aspects of a CO{sub 2}-EGS system look promising, major uncertainties remain with regard to chemical interactions between fluids and rocks. An EGS system running on CO{sub 2} has sufficiently attractive features to warrant further investigation.

Pruess, Karsten

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants and fluid transmission systems. [GEOCOST  

SciTech Connect

The GEOCOST computer program is a simulation model for evaluating the economics of developing geothermal resources. The model was found to be both an accurate predictor of geothermal power production facility costs and a valid designer of such facilities. GEOCOST first designs a facility using thermodynamic optimization routines and then estimates costs for the selected design using cost models. Costs generated in this manner appear to correspond closely with detailed cost estimates made by industry planning groups. Through the use of this model, geothermal power production costs can be rapidly and accurately estimated for many alternative sites making the evaluation process much simpler yet more meaningful.

Schulte, S.C.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 2007 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the importance of fracture networks for fluid migration in tectonically active regions such as the Coso Range. Notes A finite element analysis is used to establish the 3D state of stress within the tectonic setting of the Coso Range. The mean and differential stress distributions are used to infer fluid flow vectors and second order fracture likelihood and orientation. The results show that the Coso Range

171

Conceptual Model At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (1977) Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine time to cool the geothermal field with reinjection Notes If reinjection and production wells intersect connected fractures, it is expected that reinjected fluid would cool the production well much sooner than would be predicted from calculations of flow in a porous medium. A method for calculating how much sooner that cooling will occur was developed. References Kasameyer, P. W.; Schroeder, R. C. (1 January 1977) Application

172

Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area Philippines (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

173

S-cubed geothermal technology and experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries of ten research projects are presented. They include: equations describing various geothermal systems, geohydrological environmental effects of geothermal power production, simulation of linear bench-scale experiments, simulation of fluid-rock interactions in a geothermal basin, geopressured geothermal reservoir simulator, user-oriented geothermal reservoir simulator, geothermal well test analyses, geothermal seismic exploration, high resolution seismic mapping of a geothermal reservoir, experimental evaluation of geothermal well logging cables, and list of publications. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Vaporization at supercritical pressures and counterflow condensing of pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids for geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research Program has as its objective the development of the technology for effecting improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. Current testing involves supercritical vaporization and counterflow in-tube condensing in an organic Rankine cycle. Results of the experiments are given for both pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids. The heater and condenser behavior predicted by the Heat Transfer Research, Inc. computer codes used for correlation of the data was in excellent agreement with experimental results. A special series of tests, conducted with propane and up to approximately 40% isopentane concentration indicated that a close approach to ''integral'' condensation was occurring in the vertically-oriented condenser.

Bliem, C.J.; Demuth, O.J.; Mines, G.L.; Swank, W.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Preliminary performance estimates and value analyses for binary geothermal power plants using ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids in binary geothermal power generation systems is investigated. The available thermodynamic data is discussed and the methods of extrapolating this data to give the quantities needed to perform analyses of the system is given. Results indicated that for a system without a recuperator and with a working fluid which is 50 percent by mass of each constituent, the geofluid effectiveness (watt-hr/lbm geofluid) is 84 percent of that for the 50MW Heber Plant. The cost of generating electric power for this system was estimated to be 9 percent greater than for the Heber Plant. However, if a recuperator is incorporated in the system (using the turbine exhaust to preheat and partially boil the working fluid) the geofluid effectiveness becomes 102 percent of that for the Heber Plant, and the cost of electricity is 5-1/4 percent lower (relative to the Heber Plant) because of less expensive equipment resulting from lower pressure, better heat transfer, and less working fluid to handle for the ammonia-water plant. These results do not necessarily represent the optimum system. Because of uncertainty in thermodynamic properties, it was felt that detailed optimization was not practical at this point. It was concluded that use of nonazeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons as working fluids should be studied before expending further effort in the investigation of the ammonia-water mixtures.

Bliem, C.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

South Dakota geothermal handbook  

SciTech Connect

The sources of geothermal fluids in South Dakota are described and some of the problems that exist in utilization and materials selection are described. Methods of heat extraction and the environmental concerns that accompany geothermal fluid development are briefly described. Governmental rules, regulations and legislation are explained. The time and steps necessary to bring about the development of the geothermal resource are explained in detail. Some of the federal incentives that encourage the use of geothermal energy are summarized. (MHR)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

178

Stepout-Deepening Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stepout-Deepening Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1986) Stepout-Deepening Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Step-out Well At Coso Geothermal Area (1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Step-out Well Activity Date 1986 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A step-out exploration/production well drilled in 1986 to a depth of 6553 ft located several miles south of the Devil's Kitchen region along the identified north-south feature produced fluids with a temperature greater than 640 F. References Austin, C.F.; Bishop, B.P.; Moore, J. (1 May 1987) Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Stepout-Deepening_Wells_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1986)&oldid=687864"

179

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1968 - 1971 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fumarolic and hot springs activity Notes Snowmelt patterns has the greatest utility in locating areas of presently active thermal fluid leakage References Koenig, J.B.; Gawarecki, S.J.; Austin, C.F. (1 February 1972) Remote sensing survey of the Coso geothermal area, Inyo county, California. Technical publication 1968--1971 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1968-1971)&oldid=473716"

180

Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6) 6) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fracture analysis to determine if sealing or open fractures exist Notes Core samples show diagenesis superimposed on episodic fracturing and fracture sealing. The minerals that fill fractures show significant temporal variations. Fracture sealing and low fracture porosity imply that only the most recently formed fractures are open to fluids. References Michael L. Batzle; Gene Simmons (1 January 1976) Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Analysis_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=47383

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Dixie Valley study suggests that helium isotopes may provide a new tool for mapping zones of deep permeability and therefore the potential for high fluid temperatures. The permeable zones are identified by local enrichments in 3He relative to a regional helium isotope trend. More work needs to be done, but it appears that helium isotopes may provide the best and perhaps

182

Geothermal Environmental Impact Assessment: Subsurface Environmental Assessment for Four Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal systems are described for Imperial Valley and The Geysers, California; Klamath Falls, Oregon; and the Rio Grande Rift Zone, New Mexico; including information on location, area, depth, temperature, fluid phase and composition, resource base and status of development. The subsurface environmental assessment evaluates potential groundwater degradation, seismicity and subsidence. A general discussion on geothermal systems, pollution potential, chemical characteristics of geothermal fluids and environmental effects of geothermal water pollutants is presented as background material. For the Imperial Valley, all publicly available water quality and location data for geothermal and nongeothermal wells in and near the East Mesa, Salton Sea, Heber, Brawley, Dunes and Glamis KGRAs have been compiled and plotted. The geothermal fluids which will be reinjected range in salinity from a few thousand to more than a quarter million ppm. Although Imperial Valley is a major agricultural center, groundwater use in and near most of these KGRAs is minimal. Extensive seismicity and subsidence monitoring networks have been established in this area of high natural seismicity and subsidence. The vapor-dominated Geysers geothermal field is the largest electricity producer in the world. Groundwater in this mountainous region flows with poor hydraulic continuity in fractured rock. Ground and surface water quality is generally good, but high boron concentrations in hot springs and geothermal effluents is of significant concern; however, spent condensate is reinjected. High microearthquake activity is noted around the geothermal reservoir and potential subsidence effects are considered minimal. In Klamath Falls, geothermal fluids up to 113 C (235 F) are used for space heating, mostly through downhole heat exchangers with only minor, relatively benign, geothermal fluid being produced at the surface. Seismicity is low and is not expected to increase. Subsidence is not recognized. Of all geothermal occurrences in the Rio Grande Rift, the Valles Caldera is currently of primary interest. injection of geothermal effluent from hydrothermal production wells should remove any hydrologic hazard due to some potentially noxious constituents. Waters circulating in the LASL Hot Dry Rock experiment are potable. Seismic effects are expected to be minimal. Subsidence effects could develop.

Sanyal, Subir; Weiss, Richard

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A COMPILATION OF DATA ON FLUIDS FROM GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2t8 SINCLAIR 3 BOISE, IDAHO NA ME UNKNGWN WI~SON SINCLAIR 4I GEOTHERMAL 3 RAFT RIVER, IDAHO RRGE RRGE RRGE 3 RCO~EVEL TALLEN, C.A. {EG AND G IDAHO, INC.I. T ITLE- SUBSURFACE

Cosner, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A COMPILATION OF DATA ON FLUIDS FROM GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GASES DISSOLVED IN STEAM CONDENSATE. 6.15 PERCENT OF THEOTHER NOTES I N STEAM CONDENSATE PORT ION OF NONCONDENSABLEof sample (water, steam condensate, noncondensable gases) -

Cosner, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Development of Geothermal Binary Cycle Working Fluid Properties Information and Analysis of Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research discussed in this report was performed at the University of Oklahoma during the period January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. Efforts were directed principally to the following tasks: (1) comparisons of mixture and pure fluid cascade cycles, (2) development of guidelines for working fluid selection for single boiler cycles, (3) continued evaluation of mixtures as working fluids, (4) working fluid thermophysical property correlation and presentations of properties information.

Starling, Kenneth E.; Iqbal, K.Z.; Malik, Z.I.; Chu, C.T.; Ramaswamy, S.; Kumar, K.H.; Lee, T. J.; Brule, M.R.; Aly, F.; Brunsman, K.J.; Plumb, P.

1979-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Thermodynamic properties of...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Thermodynamic properties of a geothermal working fluid; 90% isobutane-10% isopentane: Final report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us |...

187

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area, New Zealand Area, New Zealand (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area New Zealand (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area New Zealand Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Lake Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_International_Geothermal_Area,_New_Zealand_(Ranalli_%26_Rybach,_2005)&oldid=510814

188

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

189

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area New Zealand Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

190

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines (Wood, 2002) Philippines (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Philippines (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

191

Supercritical binary geothermal cycle experiments with mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids and a vertical, in-tube, counterflow condenser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. Current testing involves supercritical vaporization and counterflow in-tube condensing in an organic Rankine cycle. This report presents a description of the test facility and results from a part of the program in which the condenser was oriented in a vertical attitude. Results of the experiments for the supercritical heaters and the countercurrent, vertical, in-tube condenser are given for both pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids. The heater and condenser behavior predicted by the Heat Transfer Research, Inc. computer codes used for correlation of the data was in excellent agreement with experimental results. A special series of tests, conducted with propane and up to approximately 40% isopentane concentration, indicated that a close approach to ''integral'' condensation was occurring in the vertically-oriented condenser.

Demuth, O.J.; Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.; Swank, W.D.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips from Coso well 83-16 were analyzed, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by the CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman 1996) show that chips have a high density of homogeneous fluid inclusions. Analyses were averaged and plotted verses depth (Fig. 4), and interpreted. Fluid inclusion gas analyses done on vein minerals from drill hole 68-6 that were earlier analyzed (Adams 2000) were plotted for comparison in order to confirm that similar analyses are obtained from chips and vein

193

Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2006) 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine areas of high permeability using isotope transport and exchange analysis Notes Finite element models of single-phase, variable-density fluid flow, conductive- convective heat transfer, fluid-rock isotope exchange, and groundwater residence times were developed. Using detailed seismic reflection data and geologic mapping, a regional cross-sectional model was constructed that extends laterally from the Sierra Nevada to Wildhorse Mesa, west of the Argus Range. The findings suggest that active faults and seismogenic zones in and around the Coso geothermal area have much higher

194

Prediction of thermal front breakthrough due to fluid reinjection in geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemically reactive tracers can be used to measure reservoir temperature distributions because of their extreme sensitivity to temperature. If a reactive tracer flows through a reservoir from an injection well to a production well, then early in the production history the tracer will contact mostly high temperatures and experience a high percentage of decomposition. As more energy is extracted from the reservoir, subsequent reactive tracer tests will show less decomposition. Tracers must be chosen which have reaction kinetics appropriate to the temperature patterns expected in the reservoir under consideration. If kinetics are too slow, no significant reaction occurs. If kinetics are too fast, essentially all of the tracer will react. In neither case can useful information be obtained. Seventeen chemically reactive tracers have been identified which are appropriate for geothermal reservoirs in the 70 to 275/sup 0/C range. Of the 17 tracer reactions investigated, 5 are hydrolysis of esters, 3 are hydrolysis of amines, and 9 are hydrolysis of aryl halides. A method for choice of the appropriate reactive tracer for a given reservoir is also presented. The method requires measurement of the residence time distribution (from a conservative tracer test), an estimate of reservoir temperature, and some simple geochemistry measurements and calculations. Several examples of choosing reactive tracers for existing geothermal reservoirs are given.

Birdsell, S.A.; Robinson, B.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of saponite and saponite/sepiolite fluids for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rheology and other properties of drilling fluids containing saponite and a saponite-sepiolite mixture as the main vicosifier have been systematically evaluated in the temperature range of 300-600{degree}F under appropriate confining pressures up to 16,000 psi. Saponite represents the magnesium analog of the clay mineral montmorillonite, which is the main constituent in conventional bentonite-based fluids. The fluid with 6% saponite exhibits a prominent viscosity enhancement at temperatures above 250{degree}F. This viscosity enhancement is easily controlled by salts and hydroxides of Na and K. The addition of Na-polyacrylates (low- and high-molecular weight polymers) eliminates the viscosity anomaly of pure saponite fluids. These polymers also increase the filtration control of saponite. The anomalous viscosity enhancement of saponite is significantly reduced by the addition of sepiolite (a clay mineral with a fibrous morphology). 12 refs., 31 figs., 26 tabs.

Guven, N.; Panfil, D.J.; Carney, L.L. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

197

A STUDY OF THE STRUCTURAL CONTROL OF FLUID FLOW WITHIN THE CERRO PRIETO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Herzen, R. P. : "A Major Geothermal Anomaly in the Gulf ofA s s e s s m e n t of Geothermal R e s o u r c e s i n thein the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico", in P r o c e

Noble, John E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Notes on setting up Geothermal Properties Measurement Model Copy the files setup.exe, setup.lst, and gpm.cab to a temporary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2005-121.PDF Randolph, J. and M. Saar. Combining geothermal energy capture with geologic carbon dioxide

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

199

Geothermal Literature Review At Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (1984) Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

200

Geothermal Literature Review At Salton Trough Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Salton Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Trough Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Supercritical binary geothermal cycle experiments with mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids and a near-horizontal in-tube condenser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research Program, which is being conducted for the Department of Energy, has as its objective the development of the technology for effecting improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. Testing at the Heat Cycle Research Facility which was located at the DOE Geothermal Test Facility, East Mesa, California is presently being conducted to meet this objective. The testing effort discussed in this interim report involves a supercritical vaporization and counterflow in-tube condensing system with a near horizontal tube orientation. A previous report explored the supercritical heating, supersaturated turbine expansions and the condenser performance in the vertical orientation. This report presents a description of the test facility and results from a part of the program in which the condenser was oriented in a nearly horizontal orientation. Results of the experiments for the in-tube condenser in a nearly horizontal orientation are given for both pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids. Although most of the data is for a completely active condenser in countercurrent flow, some data is available for a configuration in which half of the tubes were plugged and some data for cocurrent (parallel) flow is analyzed. The horizontal-oriented condenser behavior predicted by the Heat Transfer Research Institute computer codes used for correlation of the data was not in agreement with experimental results at this orientation. Some reasons for this difference are discussed. A special series of tests, conducted with propane and up to approximately 40% isopentane concentration, indicated that a close approach to integral'' condensation has occurred as was the case with the horizontally oriented condenser (similar results were obtained for the vertical condenser). 18 refs., 37 figs., 15 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Modern Geothermal Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modern Geothermal Features Modern Geothermal Features Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Modern Geothermal Features Dictionary.png Modern Geothermal Features: Active geothermal manifestations such as hot springs, fumaroles, steaming ground, mud pots, mud pools, mud volcanoes, or geysers. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle When geothermal systems have conduits available to the surface, they cause surface manifestations (or geothermal features). These features may vary between steam seeps (fumaroles) or pure fluid manifestations (geysers and hot springs) causing spectacular mineral formations (e.g. sinter terraces, tufa mounds). These types of manifestations are clear indications of an underlying geothermal system. Geothermal systems with no modern surface

203

Preliminary performance estimates of binary geothermal cycles using mixed-halocarbon working fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of Rankine cycle binary systems for power generation using a hydrothermal resource has been investigated as a part of the DOE/GTD Heat Cycle Research Program. To date mixtures of paraffin-type hydrocarbons and water-ammonia mixtures have been investigated. This report gives the first results of the consideration of mixtures of halocarbons as working fluids in these power cycles. The performance of mixtures of Refrigerant-114 (R-114) and Refrigerant-22 (R-22) in combinations from pure R-114 to pure R-22 was calculated for such cycles. Various alternatives were considered: (1) minimum geofluid outlet temperature constraint/no constraint, (2) dry turbine expansion/expansion through vapor dome, (3) use of a turbine exhaust gas recuperator/no recuperator. Results of the study indicate that the halocarbon mixtures are at least as good as the hydrocarbon mixtures previously analyzed for a 360/sup 0/F resource. The magnitude of the net geofluid effectiveness (net energy produced per unit mass geofluid flow) for the R-114/R-22 mixtures is the same as for the best hydrocarbon mixtures previously analyzed. The percentage improvement in effectiveness in using mixtures over using the pure fluids as working fluids is comparable for both classes of working fluids. Recommendations are made to continue investigation of the halocarbon mixtures as possible alternatives to the hydrocarbon working fluids.

Bliem, C.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

South Dakota Geothermal Energy Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The sources of geothermal fluids in South Dakota are described and some of the problems that exist in utilization and materials selection are detailed. Methods of heat extraction and the environmental concerns that accompany geothermal fluid development are briefly described. Governmental rules, regulations and legislation are explained. The time and steps necessary to bring about the development of the geothermal resources are explained in detail. Some of the federal incentives that encourage the use of geothermal energy are summarized.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Improving Water Loop Heat Pump Performance by Using Low Temperature Geothermal Fluid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water-loop heat pump (WLHP) systems are an important option for space conditioning of commercial buildings. They provide the opportunity of saving energy through heat recovery and thermal balancing when heating and cooling occur simultaneously. WLHP systems typically operate with loop water temperature between 16 C and 32 C. When cooling loads dominate, loop water temperatures are maintained below 32 C by rejecting excess heat with a cooling tower. When heating dominates, loop water temperatures are maintained above 16 C by a heater input. The capacity and efficiency of water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in both operating modes are strong functions of the inlet water temperature. The emphasis of this paper is on the analysis of system performances, energy savings of the mixed cooling and heating mode of the WLHP systems for it is a unique operating mode in the air-conditioning and space heating systems. The energy saving effect by using low temperature geothermal as the heat input for WLHP systems was examined.

Xinguo, Li

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Solvent extraction of methane from simulated geopressured-geothermal fluids: sub-pilot test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extraction of methane dissolved in 15 wt % sodium chloride solution at 150/sup 0/C and 1000 psi has been demonstrated using n-hexadecane as the solvent in a sub-pilot scale extraction column operated in a continuous, countercurrent flow mode. Greater than 90% recovery of methane was obtained with solvent/brine mass flow ratios in the range of .040 to .045. The height of an ideal stage in this experimental Elgin-type spray column is estimated to be 1.5 ft. Application of this process on actual geopressured fluids is technically feasible, and when combined with direct drive injection disposal is economically attractive. Design and operation of a methane saturated-brine supply system to provide simulated geopressured fluid continuously at 150/sup 0/C and 1000 psi are also described.

Quong, R.; Otsuki, H.H.; Locke, F.E.

1982-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Stratigraphy, petrology, and geochemistry of the Spurr Volcanic Complex, eastern Aleutian Arc, Alaska. [(Appendix for geothermal fluid chemistry)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spurr Volcanic Complex (SVC) is a calcalkaline, medium-K, sequence of andesites erupted over the last quarter of a million years by the easternmost currently active volcanic center in the Aleutian Arc. The ancestral Mt. Spurr was built mostly of andesites of uniform composition (58 to 60% SiO/sub 2/), although andesite production was episodically interrupted by the introduction of new batches of more mafic magma. Near the end of the Pleistocene the ancestral Mt. Spurr underwent Bezyianny-type avalanche caldera formation, resulting in the production of a volcanic debris avalanche with overlying ashflows. Immediately afterward, a large dome (the present Mt. Spurr) was emplaced in the caldera. Both the ashflows and dome are made of acid andesite more silicic than any analyzed lavas from the ancestral Mt. Spurr (60 to 63% SiO/sub 2/), yet contain olivine and amphibole xenocrysts derived from more mafic magma. The mafic magma (53 to 57% SiO/sub 2/) erupted during and after dome emplacement, forming proto-Crater Peak and Crater Peak. Hybrid pyroclastic flows and lavas were also produced. Proto-Crater Peak underwent glacial dissection prior to the formation of Crater Peak in approximately the same location. Appendices II through VIII contain a summary of mineral compositions; Appendix I contains geochemical data. Appendix IX by R.J. Motyka and C.J. Nye describes the chemistry of geothermal fluids. 78 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Nye, C.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Testing EQ3/6 and GEMBOCHS using fluid-mineral equilibria in the wairakei geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability of the EQ3 and EQ6 geochemical modeling codes and the GEMBOCHS thermodynamic data bases to simulate geochemical changes in the post-emplacement environment at the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository is being tested using observed mineral-fluid relations in the Taupo Volcanic Zone of New Zealand. In this report, comparisons between observed equilibria and simulations of field relations in the Wairakei geothermal system are used to test the codes and data bases in high temperature systems. Analysis of trends in water and gas chemistries and well discharge characteristics with time were used to identify a set of representative water and gas analyses from zones producing at about 250{degrees}C. The most common vein minerals at this temperature are: wairakite, adularia, epidote, quartz, albite, chlorite, calcite, prehnite, and pyrite. Calculations were carried out using version 7.2a R134 of EQ3 and version 7.2a R130 of EQ6 and the SUPCRT and COM subsets of the R24 version of GEMBOCHS. Thermodynamic data bases using different data for Al aqueous species were sued to identify the data set which produced the best matches between observed and calculated equilibria. The simulations described in this paper suggest that EQ6 can be used to identify facies of minerals that will be stable in various environments, but can not be used to predict the exact phase assemblage that is in equilibrium with a given water.

Bruton, C.J.

1995-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at the Aidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling of mineral-water-gas Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breakthrough observed in geothermal systems (e.g. , Shook,recharge project, Geysers geothermal field, California, USA,media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO 2

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) using CO2 as working fluid - A novelapproach for generating renewable energy with simultaneous sequestration of carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, of the

Pruess, Karsten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Economics of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A selected summary is presented of the resource, technical, and financial considerations which influence the economics of geothermal energy in the US. Estimates of resource base and levelized busbar cost of base load power for several types of geothermal resources are compared with similar estimates for more conventional energy resources. Current geothermal electric power plants planned, under construction, and on-line in the US are noted.

Morris, G.E.; Tester, J.W.; Graves, G.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Geothermal Area International Geothermal Area Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent cooperative efforts with the Karaha-Bodas Co. LLC (a subsidiary of Caithness Energy) at Karaha-Telaga Bodas, Indonesia and with Philippine

213

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine time to cool the geothermal field with reinjection Notes If reinjection and production wells intersect connected fractures, it is expected that reinjected fluid would cool the production well much sooner than would be predicted from calculations of flow in a porous medium. A method for calculating how much sooner that cooling will occur was developed. References Kasameyer, P. W.; Schroeder, R. C. (1 January 1977) Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Conceptual_Model_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=473822

214

Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 2005 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop a conceptual model of the Coso area Notes Investigation of the Coso Range using seismicity, gravity, and geochemistry of rocks and fluids, supports the interpretation that the structure hosting the geothermal resource is a nascent metamorphic core complex. The structural setting is a releasing bend in a dextral strike-slip system that extends from the Indian Wells Valley northward into the Owens Valley. This tectonic setting results in NW-directed transtension, which is accommodated by normal and strike-slip faulting of the brittle upper 4-6 km of the

215

Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Geothermal Area International Geothermal Area Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent cooperative efforts with the Karaha-Bodas Co. LLC (a subsidiary of Caithness Energy) at Karaha-Telaga Bodas, Indonesia and with Philippine

216

Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area Philippines (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent cooperative efforts with the Karaha-Bodas Co. LLC (a subsidiary of Caithness Energy) at Karaha-Telaga Bodas, Indonesia and with Philippine

217

Working fluid selection for an increased efficiency hybridized geothermal-solar thermal power plant in Newcastle, Utah.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Renewable sources of energy are of extreme importance to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from traditional power plants. Such renewable sources include geothermal and solar thermal (more)

Carnell, John Walter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heattransmission fluids  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes our research to date into operatingEGS with CO2. Our modeling studies indicate that CO2 would achieve morefavorable heat extraction than aqueous fluids. The peculiarthermophysicalproperties of CO2 give rise to unusual features in the dependence ofenergy recovery on thermodynamic conditions and time. Preliminarygeochemical studies suggest that CO2 may avoid unfavorable rock-fluidinteractions that have been encountered in water-basedsystems. To morefully evaluate the potential of EGS with CO2 will require an integratedresearch programme of model development, and laboratory and fieldstudies.

Pruess, Karsten

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Results of fluid-circulation experiments: LASL hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first large-scale field experiment to investigate the extraction of heat from hot dry rock is now in progress on the Jemez Plateau in northern New Mexico. The experimental system consists of two holes about 3 km deep, from each of which hydraulic fractures have been made. The two major fractures appear to be approximately vertical and parallel, and separated by about 9 m of granodiorite through which fluid is transmitted probably along a distributed set of secondary fractures. Experiments to this point have demonstrated that the surface area of each hydraulic fracture is sufficient to accomplish effective heat transfer from the rock, at about 200/sup 0/C, to water circulated through the system; that there is no significant short-circuiting of the water within the fractures; but that the impedance to fluid flow through the rock between the fractures is too high to permit the rate of heat extraction (initially about 10 MWt) desired of the experimental system. An attempt to reduce impedance by leaching with dilute sodium carbonate solution was unsuccessful. Therefore an attempt is now being made to reduce it by re-drilling from near the bottom of one hole in order to produce a simple system geometry in which the two holes are connected directly through a single hydraulic fracture.

Smith, M.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Chemical Impact of Elevated CO2 on Geothermal Energy Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a heat transfer fluid yields significantly greater heat extraction rates for geothermal energy. If this technology is implemented successfully, it could increase geothermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Sampling and analysis methods...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Sampling and analysis methods for geothermal fluids and gases Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

222

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid...

223

Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984) Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow

224

Experimentally determined rock-fluid interactions applicable to a natural hot-dry-rock geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field program cnsists of experiments in which hot rock of low permeability is hydraulically fractured between two wellbores. Water is circulated from one well to the other through the fractured hot rock. Our field experiments are designed to test reservoir engineering parameters such as heat-extraction rates, water-loss rates, flow characteristics including impedance and buoyancy, seismic activity, and fluid chemistry. Laboratory experiments were designed to provide information on the mineral-water reactivity encountered during the field program. Two experimental circulation systems tested the rates of dissolution and alteration during dynamic flow. Solubility of rock in agitated systems was studied. Moreover, pure minerals, samples of the granodiorite from the actual reservoir, and Tijeras Canyon granite have been reacted with distilled water and various solutions of NaCl, NaOH, and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The results of these experimental systems are compared to the observations made in field experiments done within the hot dry rock reservoir at a depth of approximately 3 km where the initial rock temperature was 150 to 200/sup 0/C.

Charles, R.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Holley, C.E. Jr.; Tester, J.W.; Blatz, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The objectives of the resistivity measurements were to determine if measureable changes could be observed and whether they could be used to infer the direction of fluid flow. Most of the apparent resistivity changes observed after the injection phase of Test 5 are smaller than the estimated standard deviation of the measurements. However, the contour map of the changes suggest an anomalous trend to the northeast which is similar to the

226

Water Sampling At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

227

Aerial Photography At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1971) 1971) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Aerial Photography Activity Date 1968 - 1971 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fumarolic and hot springs activity Notes Color photography has the greatest utility in locating areas of presently active thermal fluid leakage and in facilitating geologic interpretation References Koenig, J.B.; Gawarecki, S.J.; Austin, C.F. (1 February 1972) Remote sensing survey of the Coso geothermal area, Inyo county, California. Technical publication 1968--1971 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Aerial_Photography_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1968-1971)&oldid=473677"

228

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Van Soest, Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions. The helium isotopic compositions of fluids produced from the Dixie Valley geothermal field range from 0.70 to 0.76 Ra, are among the highest values in the valley, and indicate that _7.5% of the total helium is derived from the mantle. A lack of recent volcanics or other potential sources requires flow

229

Geothermal induced seismicity program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal(Redirected from Leasing) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties,

231

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties, Nevada (May 2008)

232

TRACER STABILITY AND CHEMICAL CHANGES IN AN INJECTED GEOTHERMAL FLUID DURING INJECTION-BACKFLOW TESTING AT THE EAST MESA GEOTHERMAL FIELD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stabilities of several tracers were tested under geothermal conditions while injection-backflow tests were conducted at East Mesa. The tracers I and Br were injected continuously while SCN (thiocyanate), B, and disodium fluorescein were each injected as a point source (slug). The tracers were shown to be stable, except where the high concentrations used during slug injection induced adsorption of the slug tracers. However, adsorption of the slug tracers appeared to ''armor'' the formation against adsorption during subsequent tests. Precipitation behavior of calcite and silica as well as Na/K shifts during injection are also discussed.

Adams, M.C.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

Property:AvgGeoFluidTemp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgGeoFluidTemp AvgGeoFluidTemp Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgGeoFluidTemp Property Type Temperature Description Average temperature of geofluid in a geothermal area. Subproperties This property has the following 15 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area S cont. Soda Lake Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Stillwater Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "AvgGeoFluidTemp" Showing 10 pages using this property.

234

Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

Nancy Moller Weare

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

235

Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Rainier Area Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Rainier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Rainier Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples collected during field investigations in 1982-1985 (Frank, 1985), whereas

236

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To characterize the magma beneath melt zones Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters were analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems. These were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1984)&oldid=510800"

237

Geothermal Generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geothermal Generation This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Geothermal Energy Generation Global Geothermal Electricity Generation in 2007 (in millions of kWh):[1] United States: 14,637 Philippines: 12,080 Indonesia: 6,083 Mexico: 5,844 (Note: Select countries are listed; this is not an exhaustive list.) United States Geothermal Energy Generation U.S. geothermal energy generation remained relatively stable from 2000 to 2006, with more than 3% growth in 2007 and 2008.[1] U.S. geothermal electricity generation in 2008 was 14,859 GWh.[1] References ↑ 1.0 1.1 1.2 (Published: July 2009) "US DOE 2008 Renewable Energy Data Book" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Generation&oldid=599391"

238

Figure 4.17 Geothermal Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 4.17 Geothermal Resources 124 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Notes: Data are for locations of identified hydrothermal ...

239

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fluid temperature of feed water Notes Cation and sulfate isotope geothermometers indicate that the reservoir feeding water to the Coso Hot Spring well has a temperature of about 240 -250 C, and the reservoir feeding the CGEH well has a temperature of about 205 C. The variation in the chemical composition of water from the two wells suggests a model in which water-rock chemical equilibrium is maintained as a convecting solution cools from about 245-205 C by conductive heat loss. References Fournier, R.O.; Thompson, J.M.; Austin, C.F. (10 May 1980)

240

Acoustic Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Acoustic Logs Activity Date 2005 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Well bore fracture analysis Notes Electrical and acoustic image logs have been collected from well 58A-10 in crystalline rock on the eastern margin. Electrical image logs appear to be sensitive to variations in mineralogy, porosity, and fluid content that highlight both natural fractures and rock fabrics. These fabric elements account for about 50% of the total population of planar structures seen in the electrical image log, but locally approach 100%. Acoustic image logs reveal a similar natural fracture population, but generally image slightly fewer fractures, and do not reveal rock fabric. Both logs also record

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Flow tests of well CGEH No. 1 were conducted. LBL performed eight temperature surveys after completion of the well to estimate equilibrium reservoir temperatures. Downhole fluid samples were obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), and a static pressure profile was obtained. The first test began September 5, 1978 using nitrogen stimulation to initiate flow; this procedure resulted in small flow and subsequent filling of the bottom hole with drill cuttings. The second test, on November 2, 1978, utilized a nitrogen-foam-water mixture to clean residual particles from bottom hole,

242

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Maps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

243

Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the cost of a new geothermal power plant is in the wells that must be drilled. Compared to the majority of oil and gas wells, geothermal wells are more difficult and costly to drill for several reasons. First, most U.S. geothermal resources consist of hot, hard crystalline rock formations which drill much slower than the relatively soft sedimentary formations associated with most oil and gas production. Second, high downhole temperatures can greatly shorten equipment life or preclude the use of some technologies altogether. Third, producing viable levels of electricity from geothermal fields requires the use of large diameter bores and a high degree of fluid communication, both of which increase drilling and completion costs. Optimizing fluid communication often requires creation of a directional well to intersect the best and largest number of fracture capable of producing hot geothermal fluids. Moineau motor stators made with elastomers cannot operate at geothermal temperatures, so they are limited to the upper portion of the hole. To overcome these limitations, Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) has developed a turbodrill that does not use elastomers and therefore can operate at geothermal temperatures. This new turbodrill uses a special gear assembly to reduce the output speed, thus allowing a larger range of bit types, especially tri-cone roller bits, which are the bits of choice for drilling hard crystalline formations. The Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) represents a significant improvement for drilling geothermal wells and has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs while increasing production, thereby making geothermal energy less expensive and better able to compete with fossil fuels. The final field test of the AGT will prepare the tool for successful commercialization.

W. C. Maurer

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) using CO2 as working fluid - A novelapproach for generating renewable energy with simultaneous sequestration of carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of GeothermalApproach for Generating Renewable Energy with Simultaneous

Pruess, Karsten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5) 5) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Need to develop a reservoir model for Coso Notes Analysis of complex geothermal system was done by looking at the available data on the Coso Geothermal Field References Austin, C.F.; Durbin, W.F. (1 September 1985) Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1985)&oldid=510801" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers

247

Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Geysers_Geothermal_Area_(1984)&oldid=510811

248

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2001-2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-2003) -2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2001-2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 2001 - 2003 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine structural control on permeability and fluid production Notes New multifold seismic reflection data from the Coso geothermal field in the central Coso Range, eastern California, image brittle faults and other structures in a zone of localized crustal extension between two major strike-slip faults. Production in the Coso field primarily occurs in the hanging walls of the listric faults. References Unruh, J. (1 January 2001) NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO

249

Geothermal well stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at theAidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling ofmineral-water-gas Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reactive-transport model for 14C was developed to test its applicability to the Aidlin geothermal system. Using TOUGHREACT, we developed a 1-D grid to evaluate the effects of water injection and subsequent water-rock-gas interaction on the compositions of the produced fluids. A dual-permeability model of the fracture-matrix system was used to describe reaction-transport processes in which the permeability of the fractures is many orders of magnitude higher than that of the rock matrix. The geochemical system included the principal minerals (K-feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, silica polymorphs) of the metagraywackes that comprise the geothermal reservoir rocks. Initial simulation results predict that the gas-phase CO2 in the reservoir will become more enriched in 14C as air-equilibrated injectate water (with a modern carbon signature) is incorporated into the system, and that these changes will precede accompanying decreases in reservoir temperature. The effects of injection on 14C in the rock matrix will be lessened somewhat because of the dissolution of matrix calcite with ''dead'' carbon.

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Engineering and economic analysis for the utilization of geothermal fluids in a cane sugar processing plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of geothermal resource utilization at the Puna Sugar Company cane sugar processing plant, located in Keaau, Hawaii. A proposed well site area was selected based on data from surface exploratory surveys. The liquid dominated well flow enters a binary thermal arrangement, which results in an acceptable quality steam for process use. Hydrogen sulfide in the well gases is incinerated, leaving sulfur dioxide in the waste gases. The sulfur dioxide in turn is recovered and used in the cane juice processing at the sugar factory. The clean geothermal steam from the binary system can be used directly for process requirements. It replaces steam generated by the firing of the waste fibrous product from cane sugar processing. The waste product, called bagasse, has a number of alternative uses, but an evaluation clearly indicated it should continue to be employed for steam generation. This steam, no longer required for process demands, can be directed to increased electric power generation. Revenues gained by the sale of this power to the utility, in addition to other savings developed through the utilization of geothermal energy, can offset the costs associated with hydrothermal utilization.

Humme, J.T.; Tanaka, M.T.; Yokota, M.H.; Furumoto, A.S.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Unearthing Geothermal's Potential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unearthing Geothermal's Potential Unearthing Geothermal's Potential Unearthing Geothermal's Potential September 16, 2010 - 12:33pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Our latest geothermal technologies awards are for those who think outside of the box (and below the surface). Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced $20 million towards the research and development of non-conventional geothermal energy technologies in three areas: low temperatures fluids, geothermal fluids recovered from oil and gas wells and highly pressurized geothermal fluids. As the Secretary said, these innovative projects have the potential to expand the use of geothermal energy to more areas around the country. Low temperature resources are widely available across the country and offer

253

Geothermal development in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

San Kampaeng and Fang geothermal areas are considered areas of interest for exploitation of geothermal energy. The technologies of exploration and development have been studied by Thai scientists and engineers during the past four years. The first geothermal deep exploration well was drilled, in cooperation with Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), in the San Kampaeng geothermal area. In 1985, supplementary work is planned to define the deep structural setting in greater detail before starting to drill the next deep exploration well. In Fang geothermal area some shallow exploitation wells have been drilled to obtain fluid to feed a demonstration binary system of 120 kWe, with the technical cooperation of BRGM and GEOWATT, France.

Praserdvigai, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Working/Functional Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power cycle except that it uses an organic working fluid instead of water to allow operation at lower temperatures, including geothermal or solar ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

255

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified...

256

Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electrical conductivity (FEC), to determine the fracture surface area, heat content and heat transfer, flow rates, and chemistry of the geothermal fluids encountered by the...

257

Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972) Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date 1972 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Identify drilling sites for exploration Notes Electrical resistivity studies outline areas of anomalously conductive ground that may be associated with geothermal activity and assist in locating drilling sites to test the geothermal potential. References Ferguson, R. B. (1 June 1973) Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California

258

Chemical logging of geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

Allen, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID); McAtee, Richard E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used various geochemical techniques to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the history/evolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether useful for exploration purposes. References Art F. White, Nancy J. Chuma, Fraser Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System,

260

Geothermal: About  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - About Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geothermal: Publications  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Publications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

262

Geothermal Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The word geothermal comes from the Greek words geo (earth) and therme (heat). So, geothermal energy is heat from within the Earth.

263

Geothermal Energy Program overview  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained with the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost- effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy -- the heat of the Earth -- is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40% of the total US energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma ( the four types of geothermal energy) still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Imperial County geothermal development annual meeting: summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All phases of current geothermal development in Imperial County are discussed and future plans for development are reviewed. Topics covered include: Heber status update, Heber binary project, direct geothermal use for high-fructose corn sweetener production, update on county planning activities, Brawley and Salton Sea facility status, status of Imperial County projects, status of South Brawley Prospect 1983, Niland geothermal energy program, recent and pending changes in federal procedures/organizations, plant indicators of geothermal fluid on East Mesa, state lands activities in Imperial County, environmental interests in Imperial County, offshore exploration, strategic metals in geothermal fluids rebuilding of East Mesa Power Plant, direct use geothermal potential for Calipatria industrial Park, the Audubon Society case, status report of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, East Brawley Prospect, and precision gravity survey at Heber and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields. (MHR)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Fluid-inclusion gas composition from an active magmatic-hydrothermal system: a case study of The Geysers, California geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modem-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modem vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum temperatures and salinities ranged from 440 C and 44 wt. percent NaCl equivalent in the biotite hornfels adjacent to the pluton to 305 C and 5 wt. percent NaCl equivalent at distances of 1730 m from the intrusive contact. The major, minor, and noble gas compositions of fluid inclusions in the hydrothermally altered rocks were integrated with microthermometric and mineralogic data to determine their sources and the effects of mixing and boiling. Major and minor gaseous species were released from the inclusions by crushing or thermal decrepitation; noble gases were released by crushing. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The analyses document the presence of magmatic, crustal, and meteoric components in the trapped fluids. Hydrothermal fluids present during the liquid-dominated phase of the system contained gaseous species derived mainly from crustal and magmatic sources. At The Geysers, N-2/Ar ratios greater than 525 and He-3/He-4 ratios of 6-10.7 Ra are diagnostic of a magmatic component. Crustal gas has CO2/CH4 ratios less than 4, N-2/Ar ratios between 45 and 525, and low 3He/4He ratios (0.5 Ra). Meteoric fluids have CO2/CH4 ratios greater than 4 and N2/Ar ratios between 38 (air-saturated water) and 84 (air). However, N-2/Ar ratios between 15 and 110 can result from boiling. Ratios less than 15 reflect the incorporation of N-2 into NH3-bearing clay minerals. In the central Geysers, the incursion of meteoric fluids occurred during the transition from the liquid- to vapor-dominated regime. Variations in the relative CH4, CO2, and H-2 contents of the gas analyses demonstrate that boiling took place under open-system conditions. The gas data indicate that the inclusions have remained closed to the diffusion of He and H-2 since their formation.

Moore, Joseph N.; Norman, David I.; Kennedy, B. Mack.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geothermal Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The first geothermal power generation in the world was started at Larderello, Italy in 1904. Then, New Zealand succeeded in the geothermal power generating country. These developments were then followed by the United States, Mexico, Japan and the Soviet Union, and at present, about 25 countries are utilizing geothermal power, or investigating geothermal resources.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Geothermal energy: tomorrow's alternative today. A handbook for geothermal-energy development in Delaware  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a general procedure guide to various technical, economic, and institutional aspects of geothermal development in Delaware. The following are covered: geothermal as an alternative, resource characteristics, geology, well mechanics and pumping systems, fluid disposal, direct heat utilization-feasibility, environmental and legal issues, permits and regulations, finance and taxation, and steps necessary for geothermal development. (MHR)

Mancus, J.; Perrone, E.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program, Status Report: Foreign Research on Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) research outside the United States. The term ''enhanced geothermal systems'' refers to the use of advanced technology to extract heat energy from underground in areas with higher than average heat flow but where the natural permeability or fluid content is limited. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from low permeability hydrothermal to hot dry rock.

McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=692525

270

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Redondo_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=692533"

271

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=692539"

272

Ground Gravity Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The...

273

Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The gravity data are...

274

Cuttings Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Notes Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals. References Galbraith, R. M. (1 May 1978) Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole...

275

Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Area (Ranalli & Rybach...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Notes re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

276

Aeromagnetic Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 2002 a high-resolution...

277

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Only weak hydrothermal alteration was noted in these rocks. Drillhole surveys and drilling rate data indicate that the geothermal system is structurally controlled and that the...

278

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approach for Generating Renewable Energy with SimultaneousCombining Recovery of Renewable Energy with Geologic Storageof this abundant and renewable resource, geothermal energy

Pruess, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Materials selection guidelines for geothermal energy utilization systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual includes geothermal fluid chemistry, corrosion test data, and materials operating experience. Systems using geothermal energy in El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and the United States are described. The manual provides materials selection guidelines for surface equipment of future geothermal energy systems. The key chemical species that are significant in determining corrosiveness of geothermal fluids are identified. The utilization modes of geothermal energy are defined as well as the various physical fluid parameters that affect corrosiveness. Both detailed and summarized results of materials performance tests and applicable operating experiences from forty sites throughout the world are presented. The application of various non-metal materials in geothermal environments are discussed. Included in appendices are: corrosion behavior of specific alloy classes in geothermal fluids, corrosion in seawater desalination plants, worldwide geothermal power production, DOE-sponsored utilization projects, plant availability, relative costs of alloys, and composition of alloys. (MHR)

Ellis, P.F. II; Conover, M.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Kamchatka geothermal resources development: Problems and perspectives  

SciTech Connect

There are four long-term exploited geothermal fields in Kamchatka: one steam-water field Pauzhetka (south of Kamchatka peninsula) and three hot water fields: Paratunka (near by town of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky) and Esso and Anavgay (center of peninsula). Pauzhetka and Paratunka fields are exploited during almost 28 years. Esso and Anavgay fields are exploited during 25 years. In Pauzhetka 11 MWe geothermal power plant work and on the other fields thermal energy of hot water is directly used. Kamchatka region satisfies energetic demands mainly by organic imported fuels. At the same time electricity produced by geothermal fluids constitutes less than 2 per cent of total region electricity production, and thermal energy produced by geothermal fluids constitutes less than 3 per cent of total region thermal energy production. The main reasons of small geothermal portion in the energy production balance of Kamchatka are briefly discussed. The geothermal development reserves and perspectives of geothermal energy use increase in Kamchatka are outlined.

Pashkevich, Roman I.

1966-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

Geothermal pipeline: Progress and development update from the geothermal progress monitor  

SciTech Connect

This article is a progress and development update of new prospects for the utilization of geothermal energy. The city of San Bernadino, California uses high-quality geothermal fluids for laundry processes without the need for water softening or heating. Four geothermal prospects in Oregon including exploration work by Amadarko, CE Exploration Company, Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, and Vulcan Power Company are also reviewed.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

None

1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

284

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Technologies Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean, sustainable heat from the Earth. Geothermal...

285

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, presented atTHC) Modeling Based on Geothermal Field Data, Geothermics,and Silica Scaling in Geothermal Production-Injection Wells

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Application Of Electrical Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application Of Electrical Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The electrical resistivity method has been proven applicable to geothermal exploration because of the direct relationship between fluid and rock temperatures on the one hand electrical conductivity on the other. The problem of exploitation of a surface technique, such as resistivity, to the determination of geothermal gradients or 'hot spots' is complicated by the other geological parameters which affect resistivity: porosity, fluid salinity, cementation factor and clay content. However, by rational

287

Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal field, Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal field are investigated using seismicity, focal mechanisms and stress analysis. Comparison of hypocenters of microearthquakes with locations of development wells indicates that microseismic activity has increased since the commencement of fluid injection and circulation. Microearthquakes in the geothermal field are proposed as indicators of shear fracturing associated with fluid injection and circulation along major pre-existing

288

Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry onInjectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic StrengthFluids  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies suggest that mineral dissolution/precipitation and clay swelling effects could have a major impact on the performance of hot dry rock (HDR) and hot fractured rock (HFR) reservoirs. A major concern is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths. A Pitzer ionic interaction model has been introduced into the publicly available TOUGHREACT code for solving non-isothermal multi-phase reactive geochemical transport problems under conditions of high ionic strength, expected in typical HDR and HFR systems. To explore chemically-induced effects of fluid circulation in these systems, we examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance. We performed a number of coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical simulations in which the fractured medium was represented by a one-dimensional MINC model (multiple interacting continua). Results obtained with the Pitzer activity coefficient model were compared with those using an extended Debye-Hueckel equation. Our simulations show that non-ideal activity effects can be significant even at modest ionic strength, and can have major impacts on permeability evolution in injection-production systems. Alteration of injection water chemistry, for example by dilution with fresh water, can greatly alter precipitation and dissolution effects, and can offer a powerful tool for operating hot dry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs in a sustainable manner.

Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

290

Health impacts of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus is on electric power production using geothermal resources greater than 150/sup 0/C because this form of geothermal energy utilization has the most serious health-related consequences. Based on measurements and experience at existing geothermal power plants, atmospheric emissions of noncondensing gases such as hydrogen sulfide and benzene pose the greatest hazards to public health. Surface and ground waters contaminated by discharges of spent geothermal fluids constitute another health hazard. It is shown that hydrogen sulfide emissions from most geothermal power plants are apt to cause odor annoyances among members of the exposed public - some of whom can detect this gas at concentrations as low as 0.002 parts per million by volume. A risk assessment model is used to estimate the lifetime risk of incurring leukemia from atmospheric benzene caused by 2000 MW(e) of geothermal development in California's Imperial Valley. The risk of skin cancer due to the ingestion of river water in New Zealand that is contaminated by waste geothermal fluids containing arsenic is also assessed. Finally, data on the occurrence of occupational disease in the geothermal industry are summarized briefly.

Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Geothermal guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The guidebook contains an overview, a description of the geothermal resource, statutes and regulations, and legislative policy concerns. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are discussed: areas of ''normal'' geothermal gradient, large areas of higher-than-''normal'' geothermal gradient, hot spring areas, hydrothermal systems of composite type, general problems of utilization, and domestic and world resources of geothermal energy. Almost all estimates and measurements of total heat flow published through 1962 for hot spring areas of the world are tabulated. (MHR)

White, D.E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AND PDM SYSTEMS IMPROVE DRILLING PERFORMANCE IN A CALIFORNIA GEOTHERMAL WELL Dennis Lovett, Terra system allows data transmission without a continuous fluid column. Operating the Coso geothermal field

Stanford University

295

Idaho Geothermal Commercialization Program. Idaho geothermal handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: geothermal resources in Idaho, market assessment, community needs assessment, geothermal leasing procedures for private lands, Idaho state geothermal leasing procedures - state lands, federal geothermal leasing procedures - federal lands, environmental and regulatory processes, local government regulations, geothermal exploration, geothermal drilling, government funding, private funding, state and federal government assistance programs, and geothermal legislation. (MHR)

Hammer, G.D.; Esposito, L.; Montgomery, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geothermal well log interpretation midterm report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir types are defined according to fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, and salinity and fluid chemistry. Improvements are needed in lithology and porosity definition, fracture detection, and thermal evaluation for more accurate interpretation. Further efforts are directed toward improving diagnostic techniques for relating rock characteristics and log response, developing petrophysical models for geothermal systems, and developing thermal evaluation techniques. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated only on hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. Other geothermal reservoirs (hot dry rock, geopressured, etc.) are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Geothermal Energy Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following is complete draft.Geothermal Summary for AAPG Explorer J. L. Renner, Idaho National Laboratory Geothermal energy is used to produce electricity in 24 countries. The United States has the largest capacity (2,544 MWe) followed by Philippines (1,931 MWe), Mexico (953 MWe), Indonesia (797 MWe), and Italy (791 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). When Chevron Corporation purchased Unocal Corporation they became the leading producer of geothermal energy worldwide with projects in Indonesia and the Philippines. The U. S. geothermal industry is booming thanks to increasing energy prices, renewable portfolio standards, and a production tax credit. California (2,244 MWe) is the leading producer, followed by Nevada (243 MWe), Utah (26 MWe) and Hawaii (30 MWe) and Alaska (0.4 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). Alaska joined the producing states with two 0.4 KWe power plants placed on line at Chena Hot Springs during 2006. The plant uses 30 liters per second of 75C water from shallow wells. Power production is assisted by the availability of gravity fed, 7C cooling water (http://www.yourownpower.com/) A 13 MWe binary power plant is expected to begin production in the fall of 2007 at Raft River in southeastern Idaho. Idaho also is a leader in direct use of geothermal energy with the state capital building and several other state and Boise City buildings as well as commercial and residential space heated using fluids from several, interconnected geothermal systems. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 modified leasing provisions and royalty rates for both geothermal electrical production and direct use. Pursuant to the legislation the Bureau of Land management and Minerals Management Service published final regulations for continued geothermal leasing, operations and royalty collection in the Federal Register (Vol. 72, No. 84 Wednesday May 2, 2007, BLM p. 24358-24446, MMS p. 24448-24469). Existing U. S. plants focus on high-grade geothermal systems located in the west. However, interest in non-traditional geothermal development is increasing. A comprehensive new MIT-led study of the potential for geothermal energy within the United States predicts that mining the huge amounts of stored thermal energy in the Earths crust not associated with hydrothermal systems, could supply a substantial portion of U.S. electricity with minimal environmental impact (Tester, et al., 2006, available at http://geothermal.inl.gov). There is also renewed interest in geothermal production from other non-traditional sources such as the overpressured zones in the Gulf Coast and warm water co-produced with oil and gas. Ormat Technologies, Inc., a major geothermal company, recently acquired geothermal leases in the offshore overpressured zone of Texas. Ormat and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center recently announced plans to jointly produce geothermal power from co-produced water from the Teapot Dome oilfield (Casper Star-Tribune, March 2, 2007). RMOTC estimates that 300 KWe capacity is available from the 40,000 BWPD of 88C water associated with oil production from the Tensleep Sandstone (Milliken, 2007). The U. S. Department of Energy is seeking industry partners to develop electrical generation at other operating oil and gas fields (for more information see: https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/50D3734745055A73852572CA006665B1?OpenDocument). Several web sites offer periodically updated information related to the geothermal industry and th

J. L. Renner

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Design features and equilibrium flash modeling of direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchangers for use with geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Baseline and preliminary tests of a 500 kW pilot plant were conducted during 1980. The DCHX evaporator, which combines an equilibrium-flash boiler with a countercurrent preheater, met and exceeded the performance of its predecessors, the volumetric and surface type boilers, although only its essential features had been installed. Additional tests to be conducted during 1981 are designed to improve overall tower performance and to create modular designs for a 20-foot diameter column, thereby replacing the plurality of DCHX units otherwise required for commercial-size (>50 MWe) installations. For the preheater-boiler combination, the recommended criterion of performance is the classical steam distillation efficiency, E/sub v/, defined as the ratio of the partial pressure actually exerted by the hydrocarbon to its saturation pressure at the vapor exit temperature. As presently installed, the 500 kW DCHX unit typically generates a working-fluid vapor composed of 5 mole % water and 95% isobutane at 415 psia and 254.2/sup 0/F bubble point. E/sub v/ is 87.6%. However, with the additional improvements planned, 95% should be attainable.

Rapier, P.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and is in a 250-260 °C range. Under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions the geothermal fluid plant to 15 MWe (GB1+GB2) and was put into service in 2003. The consequent increase in geothermal fluid the geothermal fluid supplied to GB1. Over this period, the well-head pressures were monitored for each well

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

300

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Applications of Geothermally...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels Geothermal Technologies...

302

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (White, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (White, Et Al., Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used various geochemical techniques to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the history/evolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether useful for exploration purposes. References Art F. White, Nancy J. Chuma, Fraser Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System,

303

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. Analyses are in progress on inclusions from the Salton Sea, Valles Caldera, Geysers, and Coso geothermal systems. Author(s): Mckibben, M. A.

304

Geothermal chemical control and monitoring instrumentation: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of the geothermal fluid chemistry at operating temperature is needed to optimize operation, prevent corrosion, increase equipment service life and maximize profit and use. Available electrochemical sensors do not survive at the temperatures encountered in geothermal fluids; and new developments in this area are required. Chemical control and monitoring instruments for measuring in situ characteristics of geothermal fluids are under development. Progress in the development of electrochemical sensors to measure pH, carbonate and sulfide-sulfur is discussed.

Jensen, G.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Geothermal materials development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

Kukacka, L.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Geothermal Literature Review (Goldstein, 1977) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Goldstein, 1977) Goldstein, 1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review (Goldstein, 1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review of effectiveness of several geothermal exploration tools. References N. E. Goldstein (1977) Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_(Goldstein,_1977)&oldid=510791" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

307

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanic National Park Geothermal Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop parameters to identify geothermal region Notes Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related

308

Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Geothermal Area, Indonesia International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area Indonesia (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes GIs also facilitates grid data (raster) analysis and visualization. For example, a raster GIs layer, derived from an enhanced Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper (TM) image of the Karaha-Telaga Bodas area, Indonesia, is shown in Figure 2. References Gregory D. Nash, Christopher Kesler, Michael C. Adam (2002) Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers

309

Geothermal water may be used for heavy crude recovery  

SciTech Connect

A brief article reports a statement from the USSR on the use of 158 -212/sup 0/F geothermal water in order to increase the yield of high paraffin or waxy oil. The article suggests the conclusion that wherever geothermal resources are close to heavy crude fields, geothermal steam might be used for heavy crude production. It notes that geothermal hot water pipelines in Iceland, transport hot water for municipal heating over a distance of 24 miles.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Silicates In The Larderello Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

these two fluids occurred locally. Author(s): Eleonora Petrucci, Giovanni Gianelli, Mariano Puxeddu, Paola Iacumin Published: Geothermics, 1994 Document Number: Unavailable DOI:...

311

Microseismicity, stress, and fracture in the Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microearthquakes in the geothermal field are proposed as indicators of shear fracturing associated with fluid injection and circulation along major pre-existing fractures....

312

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane...

313

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

314

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been active for several years and has focused on developing, enhancing and applying mathematical modeling capabilities for fractured geothermal systems. The emphasis of our work has recently shifted towards enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and hot dry rock (HDR), and FY05 is the first year that the DOE-AOP actually lists this project under Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Our overall purpose is to develop new engineering tools and a better understanding of the coupling between fluid flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and rock-mechanical deformation, to demonstrate new EGS technology through field applications, and to make technical information and computer programs available for field applications. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Improve fundamental understanding and engineering methods for geothermal systems, primarily focusing on EGS and HDR systems and on critical issues in geothermal systems that are difficult to produce. (2) Improve techniques for characterizing reservoir conditions and processes through new modeling and monitoring techniques based on ''active'' tracers and coupled processes. (3) Improve techniques for targeting injection towards specific engineering objectives, including maintaining and controlling injectivity, controlling non-condensable and corrosive gases, avoiding scale formation, and optimizing energy recovery. Seek opportunities for field testing and applying new technologies, and work with industrial partners and other research organizations.

Pruess, Karsten; Xu, Tianfu; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Yingqi; Wu,Yu-Shu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zhang,Guoxiang; Kennedy, Mack

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Electricity Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

316

Geothermal Technologies Office: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologi...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

317

Geothermal Technologies Office: Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

318

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Land Use Geothermal/Land Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

319

OIT geothermal system improvements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three geothermal wells drilled during the original campus construction vary from 396 m (1,300 ft) to 550 m (1,800 ft). These wells supply all of the heating and part of the cooling needs of the 11-building, 62,200 m{sup 2} (670,000 ft{sup 2}) campus. The combined capacity of the well pumps is 62 L/s(980 gpm) of 89{degrees}C (192{degrees}F) geothermal fluids. Swimming pool and domestic hot water heating impose a small but nearly constant year-round flow requirement. In addition to heating, a portion of the campus is also cooled using the geothermal resource. This is accomplished through the use of an absorption chiller. The chiller, which operates on the same principle as a gas refrigerator, requires a flow of 38 L/s (600 gpm) of geothermal fluid and produces 541 kW (154 tons) of cooling capacity (Rafferty, 1989). The annual operating costs for the system is about $35,000 including maintenance salary, equipment replacement and cost of pumping. This amounts to about $0.05 per square foot per year.

Lienau, P.J. [Geo-Heat Center, Klamath Falls, OR (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Study of Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump systems often combine a traditional geothermal system with either a cooling tower or fluid cooler for heat rejection and a boiler or solar heat collector for heat addition to the loop. These systems offer the same energy efficiency benefits as full geothermal systems to utilities and their customers but at a potentially lower first cost. Many hybrid systems have materialized to resolve heat buildup in full geothermal system loops where loop temperatures continue to rise as ...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect

The following subjects are discussed: areas of ''normal'' geothermal gradient, large areas of higher-than-''normal'' geothermal gradient, hot spring areas, hydrothermal systems of composite type, general problems of utilization, and domestic and world resources of geothermal energy. Almost all estimates and measurements of total heat flow published through 1962 for hot spring areas of the world are tabulated. (MHR)

White, D.E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Geothermal Literature Review (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review (Laney, 2005) Geothermal Literature Review (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Field Case Studies, Marcelo Lippmann. This on-going project has collected a large set of publications on EGS activities, particularly in foreign geothermal fields, continues to search for news on current projects and on plans for future EGS activities. Information has been e-mailed to DOE and U.S. geothermal organizations like the Geothermal Energy Association, the Geothermal Resources Council and DOE contractors. References Patrick Laney (2005) Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2004 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_(Laney,_2005)&oldid=510792"

323

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7) 7) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 4, RRGE-4 drilled. During this time Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C also completed. References Kunze, J. F.; Stoker, R. C.; Allen, C. A. (14 December 1977) Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Covington, H.R. (1 January 1978) Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Exploratory_Well_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=473847"

324

Geothermal Literature Review (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review (Majer, 2003) Geothermal Literature Review (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

325

Geothermal Well Stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Geothermal Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Geothermal Energy: A Glance Back and a Leap Forward http://energy.gov/eere/articles/geothermal-energy-glance-back-and-leap-forward geothermal-energy-glance-back-and-leap-forward" class="title-link"> Geothermal Energy: A Glance Back and a Leap Forward

327

Geothermal News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System http://energy.gov/articles/nevada-deploys-first-us-commercial-grid-connected-enhanced-geothermal-system geothermal-system" class="title-link">Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System

328

Geothermal Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook is intended to assist the physicist, chemist, engineer, and geologist engaged in discovering and developing geothermal energy resources. This first section contains a glossary of the approximately 500 most frequently occurring geological, physical, and engineering terms, chosen from the geothermal literature. Sections 2 through 8 are fact sheets that discuss such subjects as geothermal gradients, rock classification, and geological time scales. Section 9 contains conversion tables for the physical quantities of interest for energy research in general and for geothermal research in particular.

Leffel, C.S., Jr.; Eisenberg, R.A.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Geothermal Literature Review At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Goff & Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=511314"

330

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of the Beowawe geothermal field, and to compute the subsurface distributions of temperature and salinity which were in turn employed to calculate pore-fluid resistivity. Archie's law, which relates formation resistivity to porosity and pore-fluid resistivity, was adopted to infer formation resistivity distribution. Subsequently, DC, MT and SP postprocessors were used to compute the expected response corresponding to

331

Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume I. Review and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The history of geothermal exploration in Hawaii is reviewed briefly. The nature and occurrences of geothermal resources are presented island by island. An overview of geothermal markets is presented. Other topies covered are: potential markets of the identified geothermal areas, well drilling technology, hydrothermal fluid transport, overland and submarine electrical transmission, community aspects of geothermal development, legal and policy issues associated with mineral and land ownership, logistics and infrastructure, legislation and permitting, land use controls, Regulation 8, Public Utilities Commission, political climate and environment, state plans, county plans, geothermal development risks, and business planning guidelines.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Workshop on geothermal drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thirteen papers and abstracts are included. Seven papers were abstracted and six abstracts were listed by title. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months.

Steele, B.C.; Pichiarella, L.S. [eds.; Kane, L.S.; Henline, D.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geothermal: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links News DOE Geothermal Technologies Program News Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection September 30, 2008 Update: "Hot Docs" added to the Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection. A recent enhancement to the geothermal legacy site is the addition of "Hot Docs". These are documents that have been repeatedly searched for and downloaded more than any other documents in the database during the previous month and each preceding month. "Hot Docs" are highlighted for researchers and stakeholders who may find it valuable to learn what others in their field are most interested in. This enhancement could serve, for

335

Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description This proposed study will involve studying the impacts associated with jobs, energy and environment (as a result of investments in geothermal industry and specific EGS technologies) through the creation of a Geothermal Economic Calculator tool (GEC). The study will cover Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. The GEC created will be capable of helping end users (public and the industry) perform region specific economic impact analyses using a web platform that will be hosted by EGI for different geothermal technologies under EGS that will be used for electric power production.

336

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and is in a 250-260 °C range. Under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions the geothermal fluid plant to 15 MWe (GB1+GB2) and was put into service in 2003. The consequent increase in geothermal fluid the geothermal fluid supplied to GB1. Over this period, the well-head pressures were monitored for each well

Stanford University

337

Geothermal initiatives in Central America  

SciTech Connect

The US Agency for International Development is supporting a new project in energy and resources exploitation for Central America. One of the largest components of the project involves exploration and reservoir development investigations directed at enhancing the production of electricity from the region's geothermal resources. An assessment of the geothermal resources of Honduras is in progress, and interesting geothermal regions in the Guanacaste Province of Costa Rica are being explored. Well-logging activities are in progress in the production wells at the Miravalles geothermal field in Costa Rica, and preparations are being made for logging critical wells at Ahuachapan in El Salvador. A self-contained logging truck, complete with high-temperature logging cable and logging tools designed for geothermal service, is being fabricated and will be made available for dedicated use throughout Central America. Geochemical and isotopic analyses of water samples collected in Panama are being evaluated to select a high-priority geothermal site in that country. Application of low- and medium-enthalpy geothermal fluids for industrial and agricultural processes is being investigated in Guatemala.

Hanold, R.J.; Loose, V.W.; Laughlin, A.W.; Wade, P.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Property:Geothermal/Impacts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impacts Impacts Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/Impacts Property Type Text Description Impacts Pages using the property "Geothermal/Impacts" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + If successful, this would mark a major advance in our ability to image potentially productive fluid pathways in fracture-dominated systems. A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + Successful application of techniques could allow replication to buildings across campus and in City of Butte, including county court house, the Federal court building, World Museum of Mining, and numerous privately owned historic buildings.

339

Cuttings Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (1976) Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the geologic environment of the geothermal area Notes The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cuttings_Analysis_At_Marysville_Mountain_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=473911"

340

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1976 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperatures have been obtained to depths up to 133 m in 22 boreholes with measurements being made at least four times in each borehole. Geothermal gradients ranged from 240C/km to 450 0C/km. References Combs, J. (1 December 1976) Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=511217"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cuttings Analysis At Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area (1976) Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the geologic environment of the geothermal area Notes The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cuttings_Analysis_At_Bacca_Ranch_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=473907"

342

Cuttings Analysis At Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the geologic environment of the geothermal area Notes The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cuttings_Analysis_At_Jemez_Mountain_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=473910

343

Neutron imaging for geothermal energy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal systems extract heat energy from the interior of the earth using a working fluid, typically water. Three components are required for a commercially viable geothermal system: heat, fluid, and permeability. Current commercial electricity production using geothermal energy occurs where the three main components exist naturally. These are called hydrothermal systems. In the US, there is an estimated 30 GW of base load electrical power potential for hydrothermal sites. Next generation geothermal systems, named Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), have an estimated potential of 4500 GW. EGSs lack in-situ fluid, permeability or both. As such, the heat exchange system must be developed or engineered within the rock. The envisioned method for producing permeability in the EGS reservoir is hydraulic fracturing, which is rarely practiced in the geothermal industry, and not well understood for the rocks typically present in geothermal reservoirs. High costs associated with trial and error learning in the field have led to an effort to characterize fluid flow and fracturing mechanisms in the laboratory to better understand how to design and manage EGS reservoirs. Neutron radiography has been investigated for potential use in this characterization. An environmental chamber has been developed that is suitable for reproduction of EGS pressures and temperatures and has been tested for both flow and precipitations studies with success for air/liquid interface imaging and 3D reconstruction of precipitation within the core.

Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

UWC geothermal resource exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program was developed to explore the strength of the geothermal and hot dry rock (HDR) resource at the Montezuma Hot Springs at the United World College (UWC). The purpose of the UWC {number_sign}1 well is to obtain hydrologic, geologic, and temperature information for ongoing geothermal evaluation of the Montezuma Hot Springs area. If sufficient fluids are encountered, the hole will be cased with a 4 1/2 inch production casing and re-permitted as a geothermal low-temperature well. If no fluid is encountered, the well will be abandoned per Oil Conservation Division regulation. The objectives of the exploration are to evaluate the resource potential to provide space heating for the entire campus of the United World College, determine the effect of a well on the Hot Springs outflow, accurately measure the UWC heating loads versus time, evaluate the potential to support local thermal industry development, assess the feasibility of HDR development, and create an educational program from the collection of data derived from the research effort.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1976) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the geologic environment of the geothermal area Notes The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical

346

Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1990 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To develop an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection to regional groundwater and thermal source Notes An interpreted, conceptually balanced regional cross section that extends from the Sierra Nevada through the geothermal reservoir to the Panamint Mountains is presented. The cross section is constrained by new reflection and refraction seismic data, gravity and magnetic modeling, drilling data from the geothermal reservoir, and published regional geologic mapping. The

347

Cuttings Analysis At Imperial Valley Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Cuttings Analysis At Imperial Valley Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Imperial Valley Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Imperial Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the geologic environment of the geothermal area Notes The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters

348

Earth Tidal Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1984 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine porosity of the reservoir Notes The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be

349

SWIR at Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SWIR at Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) SWIR at Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: SWIR At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique SWIR Activity Date Spectral Imaging Sensor MASTER, ASTER, AVIRIS Usefulness useful DOE-funding none Notes Analysis of the SWIR MASTER/ASTER data allow mapping of characteristic minerals associated with hot springs/mineral deposits, including carbonate, kaolinite, alunite, buddingtonite, muscovite, and hydrothermal silica. Mineral identification and the general distribution of specific minerals were verified utilizing ground spectral measurements and mineral maps produced from AVIRIS hyperspectral data.

350

Energy Basics: Geothermal Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

351

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

352

Geothermal Energy Resources (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Louisiana developed policies regarding geothermal stating that the state should pursue the rapid and orderly development of geothermal resources.

353

Idaho: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM, Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Idaho available as of December 1981 is maintained on GEOTHERM, computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Idaho. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Nevada: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Nevada available as of December 1981 are maintained on GEOTHERM, a computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Nevada. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Geothermal Progress Monitor 12  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the more interesting articles in this GPM are: DOE supporting research on problems at The Geysers; Long-term flow test of Hot Dry Rock system (at Fenton Hill, NM) to begin in Fiscal Year 1992; Significant milestones reached in prediction of behavior of injected fluids; Geopressured power generation experiment yields good results. A number of industry-oriented events and successes are reported, and in that regard it is noteworthy that this report comes near the end of the most active decade of geothermal power development in the U.S. There is a table of all operating U.S. geothermal power projects. The bibliography of research reports at the end of this GPM is useful. (DJE 2005)

None

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The proposed two-year project supports the DOE GTP's goal of promoting the development and commercial application of energy production from low-temperature geothermal fluids, i.e., between 150°F and 300°F. State Nevada Objectives Demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of electricity generation from nonconventional geothermal resources of 205°F using the first commercial use of a cycle at a geothermal power plant inlet temperature of less than 300°F.

357

Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of geothermal energy for future electric power generation in New York State is evaluated using estimates of temperatures of geothermal reservoir rocks. Bottom hole temperatures from over 2000 oil and gas wells in the region were integrated into subsurface maps of the temperatures for specific geothermal reservoirs. The Theresa/Potsdam formation provides the best potential for extraction of high volumes of geothermal fluids. The evaluation of the Theresa/Potsdam geothermal reservoir in upstate New York suggests that an area 30 miles east of Elmira, New York has the highest temperatures in the reservoir rock. The Theresa/Potsdam reservoir rock should have temperatures about 136 {degrees}C and may have as much as 450 feet of porosity in excess of 8%. Estimates of the volumes of geothermal fluids that can be extracted are provided and environmental considerations for production from a geothermal well is discussed.

Hodge, D.S. [SUNY, Buffalo, NY (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation Mt/Galvanic Array Profiling, Phillip Wannamaker. A new-generation MT/DC array resistivity measurement system was applied at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as indicated by low resistivity;

359

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method currently being developed for use in geothermal systems to identify fractures and fluid types. This paper is the third in a series of papers on the development of FIS. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow and reservoir seals. Previously we showed that FIS analyses identify fluid types and

360

Geothermal energy geopressure subprogram  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed action will consist of drilling one geopressured-geothermal resource fluid well for intermittent production testing over the first year of the test. During the next two years, long-term testing of 40,000 BPD will be flowed. A number of scenarios may be implemented, but it is felt that the total fluid production will approximate 50 million barrels. The test well will be drilled with a 22 cm (8.75 in.) borehole to a total depth of approximately 5185 m (17,000 ft). Up to four disposal wells will provide disposal of the fluid from the designated 40,000 BPD test rate. The following are included in this assessment: the existing environment; probable environmental impacts-direct and indirect; probable cumulative and long-term environmental impacts; accidents; coordination with federal, state, regional, and local agencies; and alternative actions. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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361

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Fairbanks Geothermal Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

362

Decision Analysis for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description The result of the proposed...

363

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Alaska geothermal bibliography  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Alaska geothermal bibliography Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

364

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Fourteenth workshop geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

365

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

366

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Engineered Geothermal Systems...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Engineered Geothermal Systems Energy Return On Energy Investment Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

367

Geothermal Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Technologies Geothermal Technologies August 14, 2013 - 1:45pm Addthis Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean,...

368

List of Geothermal ARRA Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ARRA Projects ARRA Projects Jump to: navigation, search List of Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects CSV State Project Type Topic 2 Awardees Funding Location of Project A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project Nevada Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Magma Energy 5,000,000 Soda Lake, Nevada A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project Montana Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Montana Tech of The University of Montana 1,072,744 Butte, Montana A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project New Mexico Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology 1,999,990 Socorro, New Mexico

369

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources for electric power generation. i. Plant size ii.SYSTEMS Electric Power Generation Systems NonelectricFLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid (i .e. , steam, condensate, noncondensable gases,interactions between steam, condensate, and off-gas.Air stripping or steam stripping the condensate d. Periodic

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

EA-1893: Canby Cascaded Geothermal Development System, Canby, California |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93: Canby Cascaded Geothermal Development System, Canby, 93: Canby Cascaded Geothermal Development System, Canby, California EA-1893: Canby Cascaded Geothermal Development System, Canby, California Summary This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal by Modoc Contracting Company to use DOE grant funds to fulfill its plan to expand its reliance on geothermal resources by producing more hot water and using it to produce power as well as thermal energy. The goal of the project is to complete a cascaded geothermal system that generates green power for the local community, provides thermal energy to support greenhouse and aquaculture operation, provide sustainable thermal energy for residential units, and eliminate the existing geothermal discharge to a local river. NOTE: NOTE: This EA has been cancelled.

372

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

active. Note that produced water should be disposed of, not36.5 years, the water content in produced CO 2 is 0.012 %.when CO 2 -water mixtures are produced. After the production

Pruess, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-mail:john.lund@nrel.gov ABSTRACT A geothermal direct-use project utilizes a natural resource, a flow of geothermal fluid, aquaculture ponds, and industrial processes. Geothermal utilization requires matching the varied needs

Stanford University

374

Property:Notes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Notes Notes Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Notes Property Type Text Pages using the property "Notes" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + More than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + More than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + At Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada, additional 2m measurements better defined the shape of a blind, shallow thermal anomaly; also at this location deeper temperature measurements were used to develop a near-surface temperature gradient.

375

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Cost Share PIER Questions and Answers from the Geothermal Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Geothermal Workshop NOTE: It is suggested that interested persons also read the Questions and Answers from. No, but it would be helpful. 5. The scoring criteria appear not to favor geothermal analysis solicitation package. 9. If an applicant plans to use proprietary software in a geothermal project, does

376

Session: Geopressured-Geothermal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Overview of Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Allan J. Jelacic; ''Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market'' by Ben A. Eaton; ''Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir'' by G. Michael Shook; ''Survey of California Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Kelly Birkinshaw; and ''Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources'' by Jane Negus-de Wys.

Jelacic, Allan J.; Eaton, Ben A.; Shook, G. Michael; Birkinshaw, Kelly; Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

2003-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

378

Materials for geothermal production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials continue to be made in the geothermal materials project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, work was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems. Efforts to transfer the technologies developed in these efforts to other energy-related sectors of the economy continued and considerable success was achieved.

Kukacka, L.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geophysical Techniques Activity Date 1975 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic and geophysics studies were completed at the Raft River valley. References Williams, P.L.; Mabey, D.R.; Pierce, K.L.; Zohdy, A.A.R.; Ackermann, H.; Hoover, D.B. (1 May 1975) Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geophysical_Method_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1975)&oldid=59434

380

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date 1989 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the crustul structure of the Coso geothermal system Notes In mid-1989 the authors designed and collected four seismic reflection/refraction profiles that addressed the crustal structure of the Coso geothermal field. The two main east-west and north-south profiles crossed at the southeastern most base of Sugar Loaf Mountain. Both in-line and cross-line Vibroseis and explosion data were recorded on each of these

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Chemical Logging Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To use new methods to assist geothermal well drilling. Notes Chemical logging resulted in the development of a technique to assist in geothermal well drilling and resource development. Calcium-alkalinity ratios plotted versus drill depth assisted in defining warm and hot water aquifers. Correlations between the calcium-alkalinity log and lithologic logs were used to determine aquifer types and detection of hot water zones

382

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR Site References D. G. Brookins, A. W. Laughlin (1983) Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep Geothermal Drill Holes, Fenton Hill, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Brookins_%26_Laughlin,_1983)&oldid=511281"

383

Image Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Image Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Image Logs Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis EGS potential of Coso Geothermal Region Notes During the second year of this project, wellbore logs and stress data were acquired in a new production well drilled in the Coso Geothermal Field, 38C-9. The image analysis results include the discrimination of natural from drilling induced fractures in wellbore image data, natural fracture characterization, and wellbore failure analysis References Sheridan, J.; Hickman, S.H. (1 January 2004) IN SITU STRESS,

384

Stress Test At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stress Test At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Stress Test At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Stress Test At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Stress Test Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis EGS potential of Coso Geothermal Region Notes A hydraulic fracturing stress test at 3,703 feet TVD was used to constrain a normal faulting and strike-slip faulting stress tensor for this reservoir. The shear and normal stresses resolved on the fracture and fault planes were calculated and used to identify the subset of critically stressed planes that act to maintain permeability within the Coso Geothermal Field. References

385

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 2006 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine impact of brittle faulting and seismogenic deformation on permeability in geothermal reservoir Notes New mapping documents a series of late Quaternary NNE-striking normal faults in the central Coso Range that dip northwest, toward and into the main production area of the Coso geothermal field. The faults exhibit geomorphic features characteristic of Holocene activity, and locally are associated with fumaroles and hydothermal alteration. The active faults

386

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5) 5) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1975 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis First exploratory well Notes Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1) is drilled. References Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, Nev. (USA) (1 October 1975) Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Kunze, J.F. (1 May 1977) Geothermal R and D project report, October 1, 1976--March 31, 1977 Oriel, S. S.; Williams, P. L.; Covington, H. R.; Keys, W. S.; Shaver, K. C. (1 January 1978) Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal

387

Acoustic Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Acoustic Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Acoustic Logs Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Acoustic logs indicate fractured rock and potentially permeable zones. References Galbraith, R. M. (1 May 1978) Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Goranson, C.; Schroeder, R. (1 June 1978) Static downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China Lake, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Acoustic_Logs_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=510216"

388

Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geophysical Techniques Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Borehole geophysics were completed at the Raft River valley, Idaho. References Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. (1 February 1977) Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geophysical_Method_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=594349" Category: Exploration Activities

389

Telluric Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Telluric Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Telluric Survey Activity Date 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Infer the structure and the general lithology underlying the valley Notes The relative ellipse area contour map compiled from the telluric current survey generally conforms to the gravity map except for lower values in the area of the geothermal system. References Mabey, D.R.; Hoover, D.B.; O'Donnell, J.E.; Wilson, C.W. (1 December 1978) Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern Raft River Valley, Idaho

390

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

50) 50) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1950 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Agricultural Wells Notes The geothermal resource at Raft River was discovered sometime prior to 1950 when two shallow agricultural wells, the Bridge and Crank wells, encountered boiling water. References Diek, A.; White, L.; Roegiers, J.-C.; Moore, J.; McLennan, J. D. (1 January 2012) BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Exploratory_Well_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1950)&oldid=473844

391

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding GRED II Notes Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Raft River (GRED II): Re-assessment and testing of previously abandoned production wells. The objective of the U.S. Geothermal effort is to re-access the available wellbores, assess their condition, perform extensive testing of the reservoir to determine its productive capacity, and perform a resource utilization assessment. At the time of this paper, all five wells had been

392

Gamma Log At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gamma Log At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Gamma Log At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gamma Log At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Gamma Log Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted: natural gamma and neutron porosity logs indicate gross rock type References Galbraith, R. M. (1 May 1978) Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Goranson, C.; Schroeder, R. (1 June 1978) Static downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China Lake, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gamma_Log_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=510780"

393

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization and Conceptual Modeling of Magmatically-Heated and Deep-Circulation, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Systems in the Basin and Range and Cordilleran United States, Moore, Nash, Nemcok, Lutz, Norton, Kaspereit, Berard, van de Putte, Johnson and Deymonaz. Utilizing a wealth of formerly proprietary subsurface samples and datasets for exemplary high-temperature western U.S. geothermal systems, develop and publish detailed and refined new conceptual and numerical hydrothermal-history

394

Geothermal pilot study final report: creating an international geothermal energy community  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Pilot Study under the auspices of the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) was established in 1973 to apply an action-oriented approach to international geothermal research and development, taking advantage of the established channels of governmental communication provided by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The Pilot Study was composed of five substudies. They included: computer-based information systems; direct application of geothermal energy; reservoir assessment; small geothermal power plants; and hot dry rock concepts. The most significant overall result of the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study, which is now complete, is the establishment of an identifiable community of geothermal experts in a dozen or more countries active in development programs. Specific accomplishments include the creation of an international computer file of technical information on geothermal wells and fields, the development of studies and reports on direct applications, geothermal fluid injection and small power plants, and the operation of the visiting scientist program. In the United States, the computer file has aready proven useful in the development of reservoir models and of chemical geothermometers. The state-of-the-art report on direct uses of geothermal energy is proving to be a valuable resource document for laypersons and experts in an area of increasing interest to many countries. Geothermal fluid injection studies in El Salvador, New Zealand, and the United States have been assisted by the Reservoir Assessment Substudy and have led to long-range reservoir engineering studies in Mexico. At least seven small geothermal power plants are in use or have been planned for construction around the world since the Small Power Plant Substudy was instituted--at least partial credit for this increased application can be assigned to the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study. (JGB)

Bresee, J.C.; Yen, W.W.S.; Metzler, J.E. (eds.)

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

396

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Financing Geothermal Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Thumbnail of the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance NREL's Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance provides an overview of the strategies used to raise capital for geothermal power projects that: Use conventional, proven technologies Are located in the United States Produce utility power (roughly 10 megawatts or more). Learn more about the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance. NREL's Financing Geothermal Power Projects website, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program, provides information for geothermal power project developers and investors interested in financing utility-scale geothermal power projects. Read an overview of how financing works for geothermal power projects, including

397

Aeromagnetic Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80) 80) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Dense, magnetic rocks associated with a complex mafic pluton 9 km in diameter form a relatively impermeable north border of the Pleistocene volcanic field. A heat flow high nearly coincides with the west half of a 6-km-diameter magnetic low. A 2-km-diameter outcrop of a pre-Cenozoic silicic pluton, which has low magnetization compared to the surrounding metamorphic rocks, presumably typifies the rocks that underlie the magnetic low and heat flow high. Hydrothermal fluids may have destroyed some magnetite in the more magnetic wall rock, further reducing the magnetic intensity. References

398

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously operated

Stanford University

399

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

400

Resource assessment for geothermal direct use applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the topic geothermal resource assessment and its importance to laymen and investors for finding geothermal resources for direct-use applications. These are applications where the heat from lower-temperature geothermal fluids, 120 to 200/sup 0/F, are used directly rather than for generating electricity. The temperatures required for various applications are listed and the various types of geothermal resources are described. Sources of existing resource data are indicated, and the types and suitability of tests to develop more data are described. Potential development problems are indicated and guidance is given on how to decrease technical and financial risk and how to use technical consultants effectively. The objectives of this report are to provide: (1) an introduction low-temperature geothermal resource assessment; (2) experience from a series of recent direct-use projects; and (3) references to additional information.

Beer, C.; Hederman, W.F. Jr.; Dolenc, M.R.; Allman, D.W.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Therefore, knowledge of the conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fractures are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result, it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have developed advanced poro-thermo-chemo-mechanical fracture models for rock fracture research in support of EGS design. The fracture propagation models are based on a regular displacement discontinuity formulation. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two-dimensional solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate the impact of pro-thermo-chemical processes on fracture permeability and reservoir pressure. Fracture permeability variation is studied using a coupled thermo-chemical model with quartz reaction kinetics. The model is applied to study quartz precipitation/dissolution, as well as the variation in fracture aperture and pressure. Also, a three-dimensional model of injection/extraction has been developed to consider the impact poro- and thermoelastic stresses on fracture slip and injection pressure. These investigations shed light on the processes involved in the observed phenomenon of injection pressure variation (e.g., in Coso), and allow the assessment of the potential of thermal and chemical stimulation strategies.

Ahmad Ghassemi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Geothermal district piping - A primer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transmission and distribution piping constitutes approximately 40 -60% of the capital costs of typical geothermal district heating systems. Selections of economical piping suitable for the fluid chemistry is critical. Presently, most piping (56%) in geothermal systems is of asbestos cement construction. Some fiberglass (19%) and steel (19%) is also in use. Identification of an economical material to replace asbestos cement is important to future project development. By providing information on relative costs, purchase considerations, existing material performance and new products, this report seeks to provide a background of information to the potential pipe purchaser. A brief discussion of the use of uninsulated piping in geothermal district heating systems is also provided. 5 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Rafferty, K.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Property:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name GeothermalRegion Property Name GeothermalRegion Property Type Page Pages using the property "GeothermalRegion" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + Adak Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Aidlin Geothermal Facility + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + Akun Strait Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Akutan Geothermal Project + Alaska Geothermal Region + Alum Geothermal Area + Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region + Alum Geothermal Project + Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region + Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region +

404

Geothermal emissions data base, Wairakei geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A database subset on the gaseous emissions from the Wairakei geothermal field is presented. Properties and states of the reservoir fluid such as flow rates, wellhead pressure, and enthalpy are included in the file along with the well name and constituent measurement. This subset is the result of an initial screening of the data covering 1965 to 1971, and new additions will be appended periodically to the file. The data is accessed by a database management system as are all other subsets in the file. Thereby, one may search the database for specific data requirements and print selective output. For example, one may wish to locate reservoir conditions for cases only when the level of the constituent exceeded a designated value. Data output is available in the form of numerical compilations such as the attached, or graphical displays disposed to paper, film or magnetic tape.

Schwartz, S.R. (comp.)

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Geothermal turbine  

SciTech Connect

A turbine for the generation of energy from geothermal sources including a reaction water turbine of the radial outflow type and a similar turbine for supersonic expansion of steam or gases. The rotor structure may incorporate an integral separator for removing the liquid and/or solids from the steam and gas before the mixture reaches the turbines.

Sohre, J.S.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

Explanatory Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Explanatory Notes Explanatory Notes Survey Methodology Description of Survey Form The Form EIA-820, "Annual Refinery Report," is the primary source of data in the "Refinery Capacity Report" tables. The form collects data on the consumption of purchased steam, electricity, coal, and natural gas; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; operable capacity for atmospheric crude oil distillation units and downstream units; and production capacity for crude oil and petroleum products. Frame The respondent frame consists of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction), located in the 50 States, the District of

407

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Jacinto Fault Geothermal Area (1982) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fault Geothermal Area (1982) Fault Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Jacinto Fault Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location San Jacinto Fault Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop parameters to identify geothermal region Notes Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times.

408

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description Using mass-produced chiller equipment for "reverse refrigeration" to generate electricity: This approach allows Johnson Controls to take advantage of the economies of scale and manufacturing experience gained from current products while minimizing performance risks. Process efficiencies will be increased over the current state of the art in two ways: better working fluids and improved cycle heat management.

410

Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. A key resource management issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient (Q) data at The Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of waveforms from approximately 300

411

Second workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Arab oil embargo of 1973 focused national attention on energy problems. A national focus on development of energy sources alternative to consumption of hydrocarbons led to the initiation of research studies of reservoir engineering of geothermal systems, funded by the National Science Foundation. At that time it appeared that only two significant reservoir engineering studies of geothermal reservoirs had been completed. Many meetings concerning development of geothermal resources were held from 1973 through the date of the first Stanford Geothermal Reservoir Engineering workshop December 15-17, 1975. These meetings were similar in that many reports dealt with the objectives of planned research projects rather than with results. The first reservoir engineering workshop held under the Stanford Geothermal Program was singular in that for the first time most participants were reporting on progress inactive research programs rather than on work planned. This was true for both laboratory experimental studies and for field experiments in producing geothermal systems. The Proceedings of the December 1975 workshop (SGP-TR-12) is a remarkable document in that results of both field operations and laboratory studies were freely presented and exchanged by all participants. With this in mind the second reservoir engineering workshop was planned for December 1976. The objectives were again two-fold. First, the workshop was designed as a forum to bring together researchers active in various physical and mathematical branches of the developing field of geothermal reservoir engineering, to give participants a current and updated view of progress being made in the field. The second purpose was to prepare this Proceedings of Summaries documenting the state of the art as of December 1976. The proceedings will be distributed to all interested members of the geothermal community involved in the development and utilization of the geothermal resources in the world. Many notable occurrences took place between the first workshop in December 1975 and this present workshop in December 1976. For one thing, the newly formed Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) has assumed the lead role in geothermal reservoir engineering research. The second workshop under the Stanford Geothermal Program was supported by a grant from ERDA. In addition, two significant meetings on geothermal energy were held in Rotarua, New Zealand and Taupo, New Zealand. These meetings concerned geothermal reservoir engineering, and the reinjection of cooled geothermal fluids back into a geothermal system. It was clear to attendees of both the New Zealand and the December workshop meetings that a great deal of new information had been developed between August and December 1976. Another exciting report made at the meeting was a successful completion of a new geothermal well on the big island of Hawaii which produces a geothermal fluid that is mainly steam at a temperature in excess of 600 degrees F. Although the total developed electrical power generating capacity due to all geothermal field developments in 1976 is on the order of 1200 megawatts, it was reported that rapid development in geothermal field expansion is taking place in many parts of the world. Approximately 400 megawatts of geothermal power were being developed in the Philippine Islands, and planning for expansion in production in Cerro Prieto, Mexico was also announced. The Geysers in the United States continued the planned expansion toward the level of more than 1000 megawatts. The Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford December 1976 with 93 attendees from 4 nations, and resulted in the presentation of 44 technical papers, summaries of which are included in these Proceedings. The major areas included in the program consisted of reservoir physics, well testing, field development, well stimulation, and mathematical modeling of geothermal reservoirs. The planning forth is year's workshop and the preparation of the proceedings was carried out mainly by my associate Paul

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr. (eds.)

1976-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

412

Corrosion engineering in the utilization of the Raft River geothermal resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic impact of corrosion and the particular problems of corrosion in the utilization of geothermal energy resources are noted. Corrosion is defined and the parameters that control corrosion in geothermal systems are discussed. A general background of corrosion is presented in the context of the various forms of corrosion, in relation to the Raft River geothermal system. A basic reference for mechanical design engineers involved in the design of geothermal energy recovery systems is provided.

Miller, R.L.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Texas: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compilation identities all locations of potential source of geothermal fluids in Texas available as of December 1981. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geothermal reservoir management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optimal management of a hot water geothermal reservoir was considered. The physical system investigated includes a three-dimensional aquifer from which hot water is pumped and circulated through a heat exchanger. Heat removed from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a building complex or other facility for space heating. After passing through the heat exchanger, the (now cooled) geothermal fluid is reinjected into the aquifer. This cools the reservoir at a rate predicted by an expression relating pumping rate, time, and production hole temperature. The economic model proposed in the study maximizes discounted value of energy transferred across the heat exchanger minus the discounted cost of wells, equipment, and pumping energy. The real value of energy is assumed to increase at r percent per year. A major decision variable is the production or pumping rate (which is constant over the project life). Other decision variables in this optimization are production timing, reinjection temperature, and the economic life of the reservoir at the selected pumping rate. Results show that waiting time to production and production life increases as r increases and decreases as the discount rate increases. Production rate decreases as r increases and increases as the discount rate increases. The optimal injection temperature is very close to the temperature of the steam produced on the other side of the heat exchanger, and is virtually independent of r and the discount rate. Sensitivity of the decision variables to geohydrological parameters was also investigated. Initial aquifer temperature and permeability have a major influence on these variables, although aquifer porosity is of less importance. A penalty was considered for production delay after the lease is granted.

Scherer, C.R.; Golabi, K.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Geothermal chemical control and monitoring instrumentation - an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors must have accurate knowledge of the geothermal fluid chemistry at operating temperature if they are to optimize operation, prevent corrosion, increase equipment service life and maximize profit and use. Available electrochemical sensors do not survive at the temperatures encountered in geothermal fluids; and new developments in this area are required. In order to fill this gap in technology, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing chemical control and monitoring instruments for measuring in situ characteristics of geothermal fluids. Progress in the development of electrochemical sensors to measure pH, carbonate and sulfide-sulfur is discussed.

Jensen, G.A.

1982-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

Geothermal Technologies Program: Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Technologies Program Utah fact sheet describes the geothermal areas and use in Utah, focusing on power generation as well as direct use, including geothermally heated greenhouses, swimming pools, and therapeutic baths.

Not Available

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The United Nations' Approach To Geothermal Resource Assessment | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Nations' Approach To Geothermal Resource Assessment United Nations' Approach To Geothermal Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The United Nations' Approach To Geothermal Resource Assessment Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Although the emphasis of United Nations' assisted geothermal projects has been on demonstrating the feasibility of producing geothermal fluids, the potential capacity of individual fields has been estimated by both the energy in place and decline curve methods. The energy in place method has been applied to three geothermal fields resulting in total resource estimates ranging from 380 to 16,800 MW-yr. The results of these studies must be considered highly tentative, however, due to inadequate reservoir data and a poor knowledge of producing mechanisms. The decline

418

United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies performed by personnel from the Geothermal Program Office (GPO) strongly suggested that there is a geothermal resource beneath lands controlled by the Hawthorne Ammunition Depot. The geothermal fluid is thought to be convecting meteoric water that is derived from precipitation within the

419

Property:Geothermal/OtherPrincipalInvestigator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OtherPrincipalInvestigator OtherPrincipalInvestigator Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/OtherPrincipalInvestigator Property Type String Description Other Principal Investigators Subproperties This property has the following 2 subproperties: A A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project D Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2 and Fluid, Rocks in EGS Reservoirs Geothermal Project Pages using the property "Geothermal/OtherPrincipalInvestigator" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + John Louie, University of Nevada and Lisa Shevenell, University of Nevada +

420

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Abstract Surface indicators of geothermal activity are often present above blind or concealed geothermal systems in the Great Basin, but their expressions are sometimes subtle. When mapped in detail, these indicators yield valuable information on the location, structural controls, and potential subsurface reservoir temperatures of geothermal fluids. An example is provided by the Salt Wells geothermal system in Churchill County, Nevada, USA, where

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Exploration-Exploitation Tool Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Exploration-Exploitation Tool Details Activities (32) Areas (17) Regions (0) Abstract: The goal of this four-year project was to provide a database by which to judge the utility of the rare earth elements (REE) in the exploration for and exploitation of geothermal fields in the United States. Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: (1) the North Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); (2) the Cascades of Oregon; (3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; (4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields

422

Advanced geothermal hydraulics model -- Phase 1 final report, Part 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced geothermal well hydraulics model (GEODRIL) is being developed to accurately calculate bottom-hole conditions in these hot wells. In Phase 1, real-time monitoring and other improvements were added to GEODRIL. In Phase 2, GEODRIL will be integrated into Marconi's Intelligent Drilling Monitor (IDM) that will use artificial intelligence to detect lost circulation, fluid influxes and other circulation problems in geothermal wells. This software platform has potential for significantly reducing geothermal drilling costs.

W. Zheng; J. Fu; W. C. Maurer

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Geothermal Literature Review (Mcnitt, 1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mcnitt, 1978) Mcnitt, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review (Mcnitt, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes "A literature search found 46 geothermal fields for which reservoir temperatures in excess of 180degrees C have been proven by drilling and for which there is either drilling or geophysical data on which to base an estimate of field area. These fields are ranked according to area in Table 1 and their frequency distribution is shown in Fig. 2." "Sufficient information was found in the literature search to calculate an empirical

425

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1988) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1988) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1988 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Use geophysical logs to determine the reservoir transmissivity Notes Seven fracture orientation sets are recognized in the sedimentary and metamorphic rock units. Although the conventional geophysical logs showed

426

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop parameters to identify geothermal region Notes Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. from the temporal characteristics of the seismicity associated with these

427

Heating the New Mexico Tech Campus with geothermal energy. Final report, July 1, 1978-October 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An area between the base of Socorro Peak and the New Mexico Tech Campus (located in central New Mexico) has been proposed as a site for geothermal exploratory drilling. The existing site environment is summarized, a program for site monitoring is proposed, impacts of geothermal production and reinjection are listed, and problems associated with geothermal development are examined. The most critical environmental impact is the increased seismic activity that may be associated with geothermal fluid migration resulting from geothermal production and reinjection.

LeFebre, V.; Miller, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1976) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1976) Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date 1974 - 1976 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Reconnaissance geothermal exploration Notes A TIR survey of the Raft River geothermal area prospect in Idaho where thermal waters move laterally in an alluvial plain and have no visible surface manifestations was undertaken as part of geothermal exploration. References K. Watson (1974) Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery

429

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications NREL's geothermal team develops publications, including technical reports and conference papers, about geothermal resource assessments, market and policy analysis, and geothermal research and development (R&D) activities. In addition to the selected documents available below, you can find resources on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program Web site or search the NREL Publications Database. For additional geothermal documents, including those published since 1970, please visit the Office of Science and Technology Information Geothermal Legacy Collection. Policymakers' Guidebooks Five steps to effective policy. Geothermal Applications Market and Policy Analysis Program Activities R&D Activities Geothermal Applications

430

Geothermal: Promotional Video  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Promotional Video Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

431

Geothermal: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Site Map Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

432

Geothermal: Bibliographic Citation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Bibliographic Citation Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

433

Geothermal: Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Related Links Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

434

Geothermal: Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Home Page Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced...

435

Geothermal: Contact Us  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Contact Us Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

436

Geothermal: Hot Documents Search  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Hot Documents Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

437

Geothermal: Basic Search  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Basic Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

438

Geothermal: Educational Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Educational Zone Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

439

Energy Basics: Geothermal Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Resources Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production facilities in the United States are...

440

Geothermal Resources Council's ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Resources Council's 36 th Annual Meeting Reno, Nevada, USA September 30 - October 3, 2012 Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "notes geothermal fluids" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Geothermal News...

442

Models of Geothermal Brine Chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many significant expenses encountered by the geothermal energy industry are related to chemical effects. When the composition, temperature of pressure of the fluids in the geological formation are changed, during reservoir evolution, well production, energy extraction or injection processes, the fluids that were originally at equilibrium with the formation minerals come to a new equilibrium composition, temperature and pressure. As a result, solid material can be precipitated, dissolved gases released and/or heat lost. Most geothermal energy operations experience these phenomena. For some resources, they create only minor problems. For others, they can have serious results, such as major scaling or corrosion of wells and plant equipment, reservoir permeability losses and toxic gas emission, that can significantly increase the costs of energy production and sometimes lead to site abandonment. In future operations that exploit deep heat sources and low permeability reservoirs, new chemical problems involving very high T, P rock/water interactions and unknown injection effects will arise.

Nancy Moller Weare; John H. Weare

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

443

Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The team of university and industry engineers, scientists, and project developers will evaluate the power capacity, efficiency, and economics of five commercially available ORC engines in collaboration with the equipment manufacturers. The geothermal ORC system will be installed at an oil field operated by Continental Resources, Inc. in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. Data and experience acquired can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

444

Geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect

Dry hot rock in the Earth's crust represents the largest and most broadly distributed reservoir of usable energy accessible to man. The engineering equipment and methods required to extract and use this energy appear to exist and are now being investigated actively at LASL. At least for deep systems in relatively impermeable rock, not close to active faults, the extraction of energy frtom dry geothermal resertvoirs should involve no significant environmental hazards. The principal environmental effects of such energy systems will be those associated with the surface facilities that use the geothermal heat; these will be visual, in land use, and in the thermal-pollution potential of low-temperature power plants. The energy extraction system itself should be clean; safe, unobtrusive, and economical. (auth)

Smith, M.C.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Useful for a whole variety of particular reservoir characterization goals, i.e.: "Isotopic values for the thermal waters become lighter with distance eastward from Casa Diablo, suggesting dilution with nonthermal ground waters from more easterly sources. In the Casa Diablo area, the effects of near-surface boiling cause the observed isotopic shift (along the line

446

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff, Et Al., 1991) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff, Et Al., 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Fraser Goff, Harold A. Wollenberg, D. C. Brookins, Ronald W. Kistler (1991) A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Goff,_Et_Al.,_1991)&oldid=692527"

447

Report Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes 1 "Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)" is based on AC electricity consumed during charging events which began during the reporting period and distance driven during all trips in the reporting period. 2 "Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)" is based on net DC electricity discharged from or charged to the plug-in battery pack and distance driven during all trips in the reporting period. DC Wh/mi may not be comparable to AC Wh/mi if AC electricity charged prior to the reporting period was discharged during driving within the reporting period, or if AC electricity charged during the reporting period was not discharged during driving within the reporting period. 3 Trips when the plug-in battery pack charge was depleted to propel the vehicle throughout

448

Materials selection guidelines for geothermal power systems. First edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine potential power cycles are defined and diagrammed for the generation of electricity from geothermal fluids. General fluid properties that influence the applicability of power cycles to a particular geothermal resource are discussed. The corrosivity of individual process streams in power cycles is described based on variations in chemical composition and temperature. Results of materials performance tests are analyzed based on the chemical composition of the corrosive medium and physical factors such as temperature, duration of exposure, and fluid velocity. The key chemical components in geothermal fluids that are significant in determining corrosivity are identified. Both summarized and detailed results of materials performance tests in U.S. liquid-dominated resources are given. Seven U.S. liquid-dominated KGRA's are classified according to relative corrosiveness and their key chemical components are defined. The various forms and mechanisms of corrosive attack that can occur in geothermal process streams are described. The application of nonmetallic materials in geothermal environments is discussed. The appendices contain information on (1) operating experience at geothermal power plants, (2) corrosion in desalination facilities, (3) reliability of geothermal plants, (4) elastomeric materials, (5) comparative alloy costs, and (6) geothermal equipment manufacturers. (MHR)

DeBerry, D.W.; Ellis, P.F.; Thomas, C.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Honey Lake Geothermal Project, Lassen County, California. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the drilling, completion, and testing of deep well WEN-2 for a hybrid electric power project which will use the area's moderate temperature geothermal fluids and locally procured wood fuel. The project is located within the Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Project development plan for East Mesa Geothermal Test Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans for a test facility for geothermal energy systems and components designed for moderate temperature/low salinity geothermal fluids available at the East Mesa site in the Imperial Valley of California are discussed. Details of the following phases of development are given: technical plan; management plan; procurement and contracting plan; technology transfer and utilization plan; and resource requirements. (JGB)

Not Available

1975-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California...

452

Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, Nevada, Inferred from 3d Magnetotelluric Surveying Jump to: navigation, search...

453

Development of New Biphasic Metal Organic Working Fluids for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

extracted from the geothermal source brine. Enthalpy gain of the working fluid in the heat exchanger occurs principally from sensible heat gained while passing through the heat...

454

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cotton City, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

455

Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Cooperative geochemical investigation of geothermal resources in the Imperial Valley and Yuma areas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary studies indicate that the Imperial Valley has a large geothermal potential. In order to delineate additional geothermal systems a chemical and isotopic investigation of samples from water wells, springs, and geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley and Yuma areas was conducted. Na, K, and Ca concentrations of nearly 200 well water, spring water, hot spring, and geothermal fluid samples from the Imperial Valley area were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Fournier and Truesdell's function was determined for each water sample. Suspected geothermal areas are identified. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope abundances were determined in order to determine and to identify the source of the water in the Mesa geothermal system. (JGB)

Coplen, T.B.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webmaster Webmaster Please enter your name and email address in the boxes provided, then type your message below. When you are finished, click "Send Message." NOTE: If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Geothermal Technologies Home Capabilities Projects Publications Data & Resources Research Staff Working with Us News Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback. Would you like to take a moment to tell us how we can improve this page? Submit We value your feedback. Thanks! We've received your feedback. Something went wrong. Please try again later. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

458

Geothermal Today: 2005 Geothermal Technologies Program Highlights  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This DOE/EERE Geothermal Technologies Program publication highlights accomplishments and activities of the program during the last two years.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown