Sample records for northwood ha6 2jr

  1. Northwood, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence Seed LLC JumpNewInformationPower ActNorthwood,

  2. Northwoods | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence Seed LLC JumpNewInformationPowerOhio:

  3. Northwood, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence Seed LLC JumpNewInformationPowerOhio: Energy

  4. City of Northwood, North Dakota (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban TransportMartinsville,Minidoka,CityCityCityCity

  5. Northwood, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence Seed LLC JumpNewInformationPower

  6. Undergraduate Student Employment Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    opportunities for networking and professional development, and student researchers are expected to takeUndergraduate Student Employment Opportunities Are you interested in spending your summer doing research in the Northwoods? Bioeconomics of Aquatic Invasive Species Our NSF-funded research project

  7. The Economic Value of Biomass Implications for policy and practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ heat1 28* 5.3 Renewable energy strategy ­ electricity2 69* 13.1 1 ­ Central growth scenario for the UK for Renewable Heat, 2009 #12;Demand and Supply Policy Input (TWh) Fuel reqd (Modt) Renewable energy strategy at the European Environment Agency, Copenhagen presentation available at www.northwoods.org.uk/presentations * #12

  8. 6th International Microbeam Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Kevin M. Prise

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.

  9. Released on receipt but intended f o r use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Hence i n the year 1906 the International Commission f o r Scientific AeronatltScs, at a meeting held i current scien- t i f i c literature, but the hundredth case ha6 l a t e l y become prominent enough t o '!The Aerologist", in accordanco of the term, and t h i s journal is now i n i t s third volume, ( A l l

  10. The growth and survival of brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) and blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) in ponds receiving heated bay water from an electric power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Robert Andrew

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In the 6 month experiment survival was 3-27/G, growth was 15. 8-18. 5 mm per month, yields were 7. 8-80. 5 kg per ha (6. 9-71. 0 pounds per acre), and food conversion rates were 32. 1-328. 0 g of feed per gram increase of crab. Eleven 0. 1-ha ponds were... separating the north ends of Galveston Bay and Trinity Bay, draws cooling water from the former via Cedar Bayou and an intake canal and discharges it into Trinity Bay through a 9. 8 km (6. 1 mile) canal (Fig. 1). Prior to Z7 April 1972 the discharge canal...

  11. The growth and survival of brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) and blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) in ponds receiving heated bay water from an electric power plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Robert Andrew

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In the 6 month experiment survival was 3-27/G, growth was 15. 8-18. 5 mm per month, yields were 7. 8-80. 5 kg per ha (6. 9-71. 0 pounds per acre), and food conversion rates were 32. 1-328. 0 g of feed per gram increase of crab. Eleven 0. 1-ha ponds were... 14 Arrangement of ponds at research facility 15 Hydrological data for pond 22 31 Hydrological data, pond 23, with power plant intake and di charge water temperature . 32 Hydrological data for pond 8 Hydrological data for pond 9 Hydrological...

  12. Vascular flora of the Rocky Flats area, Jefferson County, Colorado, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Jody K. [JGMS Inc., Westminster, CO (United States)

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Flats Site (Site) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility near Golden, Colorado that produced nuclear weapons components during the Cold War. Like many federal properties that have been off-limits to public access for decades, it has become a refugia for biodiversity as surrounding landscapes have been lost to agriculture and urbanization. A floristic study of the area was conducted on approximately 2,505 ha (6,189 ac) and includes the parcels currently managed and operated by DOE and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge). A flora of 630 species of vascular plants in 84 families and 340 genera was documented, including 12 species endemic to the southern Rocky Mountains and seven species considered rare or imperiled by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program. The flora of the Site is characterized by a predominantly Western North American floristic element, however, an Adventive floristic element contributes the greatest number of species. The vegetation is dominated by xeric tallgrass prairie and mixed grass prairie, with areas of wetland, shrubland, and riparian woodland.

  13. Wetlands mitigation: Parnership between an electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, M.C.; Sibrel, C.B.; Gough, G.A. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine hectares (23 acres) of a degraded section of Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland, USA, were converted to wetland habitat by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in 1994. The wetlands were created as mitigation for 5.7 ha (14 acres) of wetlands that were impacted as part o the construction of 8.5-km (5.3-mile) 500-kV over-head transmission line on the refuge. The area consists of a created forested wetland of 5.5 ha(13.5 acres), a seasonally inundated green-free reservoir of 7.6 ha (6.5 acres), and an impounded pond wetland of 1.2 ha (3 acres). Construction included the planting of 6131 trees, 4276 shrubs, and 15,102 emergent plants. Part of the site has been studied intensively since completion and survival of trees and shrubs after two years was 88%. Measurements of these transplants have shown growth greater than on other created sites in Maryland. Grasses and other herbaceous vegetation were dominant plants in the meter-square plots in the first two years of sampling of the created forested wetland. Wildlife surveys for birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles have revealed diverse communities. Although these communities represent species consistent with open habitat, more typical forest species should colonize the area as it undergoes succession into a more mature forested wetland. The creation, management, and research of this mitigation site represents an excellent example of a partnership between a private electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge. This partnership has increased local biodiversity and improved regional water quality of the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.