Sample records for northwest ky ak

  1. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Northwest Plume, Paducah, KY, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Northwest Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of this interim remedial action is to initiate a first phase remedial action, as an interim action to initiate control of the source and mitigate the spread of contamination in the Northwest plume. This operable unit addresses a portion of the contaminated ground water. Additional interim actions associated with this integrator operable unit are being considered, as well as for other areas of contaminated ground water.

  2. ?? / Kagaku / ?? /Ky?ri: Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsukahara, T?go

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    question when considering science and technology in Japanese?? /Kagaku / ?? /Ky?ri: Science Tsukahara T?go Translationto incorporate and develop science and technology from the

  3. Climate, Conservation, and Community in Alaska and Northwest Canada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Climate, Conservation, and Community in Alaska and Northwest Canada is a joint Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and Alaska Climate Science Center (AK CSC) conference scheduled for November...

  4. Evolution of depositional and slope instability processes on Bryant Canyon area, Northwest Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripsanas, Efthymios

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . At about 11 ky B.P. the melt water discharges of the North America switched from Mississippi River to St Lawrence Seaway, causing the domination of hemipelagic sedimentation on the continental slope of the northwest Gulf of Mexico....

  5. Evolution of depositional and slope instability processes on Bryant Canyon area, Northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripsanas, Efthymios

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . At about 11 ky B.P. the melt water discharges of the North America switched from Mississippi River to St Lawrence Seaway, causing the domination of hemipelagic sedimentation on the continental slope of the northwest Gulf of Mexico....

  6. Energy Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    corporate alternative minimum taxable income. See "TAX MATTERS" herein. 664,515,000 ENERGY NORTHWEST 155,390,000 Project 1 Electric Revenue Refunding Bonds, Series 2012-A...

  7. Energy Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    103 of the Code. See "TAX MATTERS-SERIES 2012-E (TAXABLE) BONDS" herein. 782,655,000 ENERGY NORTHWEST 34,140,000 Columbia Generating Station Electric Revenue Bonds, Series...

  8. Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Natural Resources Defense Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Natural Resources Defense Council December 9 Coalition [Nancy Hirsh] Renewable Northwest Project[Rachel Shimshak] Natural Resources Defense Council Power Administration in Power Supply The Northwest Energy Coalition, Renewable Northwest Project, Sierra

  9. West KY Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell DirectorThe& FederalPleasePhotoWest KY Regional

  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. Battelle has a unique contract

  11. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

  12. PACIFIC NORTHWEST CYBER SUMMIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Matlock, Gordon W.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.; Smith, Karen S.

    2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 26, 2013, the Snohomish County Public Utility District (PUD) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) jointly hosted the Pacific Northwest Cyber Summit with the DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, the White House, Washington State congressional delegation, Washington State National Guard, and regional energy companies.

  13. Northwest Region Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjoding, David

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the Northwest Clean Energy Application Center (NW CEAC) is to promote and support implementation of clean energy technologies. These technologies include combined heat and power (CHP), district energy, waste heat recovery with a primary focus on waste heat to power, and other related clean energy systems such as stationary fuel cell CHP systems. The northwest states include AK, ID, MT, OR, and WA. The key aim/outcome of the Center is to promote and support implementation of clean energy projects. Implemented projects result in a number of benefits including increased energy efficiency, renewable energy development (when using opportunity fuels), reduced carbon emissions, improved facility economics helping to preserve jobs, and reduced criteria pollutants calculated on an output-based emissions basis. Specific objectives performed by the NW CEAC fall within the following five broad promotion and support categories: 1) Center management and planning including database support; 2) Education and Outreach including plan development, website, target market workshops, and education/outreach materials development 3) Identification and provision of screening assessments & feasibility studies as funded by the facility or occasionally further support of Potential High Impact Projects; 4) Project implementation assistance/trouble shooting; and 5) Development of a supportive clean energy policy and initiative/financing framework.

  14. Energy Northwest, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    minimum taxable income. See "TAX MATTERS-SERIES 2012-A BONDS" herein. 669,115,000 ENERgY NORThWEST 4,600,000 Columbia generating Station Electric Revenue Bonds, Series 2011-C...

  15. Fluidic Optics George M. Whitesides* and Sindy K.Y. Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Fluidic Optics George M. Whitesides* and Sindy K.Y. Tang Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University 12 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 ABSTRACT Fluidic optics is a new class of optical system with real-time tunability and reconfigurability enabled by the introduction of fluidic

  16. Conservation The Northwest ForecastThe Northwest Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Resources Creating Mr. Toad's Wild Ride for the PNW's Energy Efficiency InCreating Mr. Toad's Wild RideNorthwest Power and Conservation Council The Northwest ForecastThe Northwest Forecast ­­ Energy EfficiencyEnergy Efficiency Dominates ResourceDominates Resource DevelopmentDevelopment Tom EckmanTom Eckman

  17. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science. Technology. Innovation. PNNL-SA-34741 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is addressing cognition and learning to the development of student- centered, scenario-based training. PNNL's Pachelbel (PNNL) has developed a cognitive-based, student-centered approach to training that is being applied

  18. The Northwest Wind Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commission Jim Lobdell, Portland General Electric Eric Markell, Puget Sound Energy Louise McCarren, Western Administration Doug Faulkner, Puget Sound Energy Larry Felton, Energy Northwest David Fine, NorthWestern Energy, Inc. Joe Hoerner, Puget Sound Energy Mike Hoffman, Bonneville Power Administration Pamela Jacklin

  19. Finding the largest low-rank clusters with Ky Fan 2-k-norm and l1-norm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan Vinh Doan

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 24, 2014 ... Abstract: We propose a convex optimization formulation with the Ky Fan 2-k-norm and l1-norm to fi nd k largest approximately rank-one ...

  20. NORTHWEST POWER PLANNING COUNCIL BRIEFING BOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Endangered Salmon and the People of the Pacific Northwest, 1995, Page 30. The Northwest Power Act, in theoryNORTHWEST POWER PLANNING COUNCIL BRIEFING BOOK January 2001 #12;2 Northwest Authors Comment. The 1980 Northwest Power Act seem positively prescient in reducing the utility industry's role

  1. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fifth Northwest Power Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fifth Northwest Power Plan Statement of Basis and Purpose for the Fifth Power Plan and Response to Comments on the Draft Fifth Power Plan February 2005 #12;I. Background.........................................................................................................................................3 B. Developing the Fifth Power Plan

  2. Northwest Energy Market Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxideDocumentationThreeNewsfuel combustionNorthwest

  3. Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data UO SOLAR MONITORING LAB Physics Department -- Solar Energy Center 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274 April 1, 1999 #12;Hourly solar radiation data

  4. Fractal Location and Anomalous Diffusion Dynamics for Oil Wells from the KY Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Keith; Andrew, Kevin A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing data available from the Kentucky Geonet (KYGeonet.ky.gov) the fossil fuel mining locations created by the Kentucky Geological Survey geo-locating oil and gas wells are mapped using ESRI ArcGIS in Kentucky single plain 1602 ft projection. This data was then exported into a spreadsheet showing latitude and longitude for each point to be used for modeling at different scales to determine the fractal dimension of the set. Following the porosity and diffusivity studies of Tarafdar and Roy1 we extract fractal dimensions of the fossil fuel mining locations and search for evidence of scaling laws for the set of deposits. The Levy index is used to determine a match to a statistical mechanically motivated generalized probability function for the wells. This probability distribution corresponds to a solution of a dynamical anomalous diffusion equation of fractional order that describes the Levy paths which can be solved in the diffusion limit by the Fox H function ansatz.

  5. BPA Committed to Northwest Values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River has been called the “crown jewel” of the Pacific Northwest. There is no question it is among the region’s greatest assets — supplying low-cost clean hydropower, making deserts bloom thanks to irrigation and providing navigation, recreation and a home for many species of fish and wildlife. The Bonneville Power Administration is proud to be a steward of this great resource. Our mission is to serve the people and environment of the Pacific Northwest. We sell wholesale power from Grand Coulee Dam and 30 other Northwest federal dams to Northwest utilities, including public utility districts, rural electric cooperatives and municipal utility departments, as well as investor-owned utilities. We operate three-fourths of the region’s high voltage transmission system that delivers that power. But, as a federal agency, we are not just a power marketer. We have public responsibilities that include, among many, promoting energy efficiency, facilitating development of renewable power, protecting fish and wildlife affected by hydro development, honoring treaty obligations to tribes and promoting a reliable energy future through collaboration and partnerships. This document describes our responsibilities to citizens in the Pacific Northwest.

  6. Northwest Energy Efficiency Taskforce Executive Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Northwest Energy Efficiency Taskforce Executive Committee Chairs Tom Karier, Washington Member, Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Bill Gaines, Director/Chief Executive Officer, Tacoma Public Utilities, Cowlitz County Public Utility District Cal Shirley, Vice President for Energy Efficiency Service, Puget

  7. The Fifth Northwest Electric Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - generating resources would soon be unable to keep up with the demand for electricity. In the 1970s first plan, the lesson it drew from the experience of the 1970s and early 1980s was that the future can is unique in how it plans its energy future. Through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's power

  8. The relation of coastal water level and postlarval abundance of estuarine-recruiting species of the northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craddock, Patti Powers

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TIIE RELATION OF COASTAL WATER LEVEL AND I'OSTLARVAL ABUNDANCF. OF ESTUAPINE-RECRUITING SPECIES OF THF. NORTIIWEST GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis PATTI POWERS CRADDOCK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Ivlag I988 Major Subject: Civii Engineering THE RELATION OF COASTAL WATER LEVEL AND POSTLARVAL ABUNDANCE OF ESTUARINE-RECRUITING SPECIES OF THE NORTHWEST GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by PATTI POWERS CRADDOCK...

  9. AKS systems and Lepage equivalent problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago Capriotti

    2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrable systems known as "AKS systems" admit a natural formulation in terms of a Hamiltonian picture. The Lagrangian side of these systems are far less known; a version in these terms can be found in a work of Feher et al. The purpose of these notes in to provide a novel description of AKS systems in terms of a variational problem different from the usual in mechanics. Additionally, and using techniques borrowed from an article of M. Gotay, it was possible to build the Hamiltonian side of this variational problem, allowing us to establish the equivalence with the usual approach to these integrable systems.

  10. Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon Energy Northwest, Washington...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon Energy Northwest, Washington; Wholesale Electric Primary Credit Analyst: David N Bodek, New York (1) 212-438-7969; david.bodek@standardandpo...

  11. Energy Northwest, Washington Bonneville Power Administration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northwest, Washington Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon; Wholesale Electric Primary Credit Analyst: David N Bodek, New York (1) 212-438-7969; david.bodek@standardandpoors.com...

  12. Independent Activity Report, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2012 January 2012 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Orientation Visit HIAR-PNNL-2012-01-11 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness...

  13. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Pacific Northwest National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activity Report, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - January 2014 February 2014 PNNL Corrective Actions from the Independent Oversight Review of the Office of Science...

  14. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northwest Region Workshop, held in Seattle July 15, 2011.

  15. Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    approaches. The project is led by Battelle. Project team members include the Bonneville Power Administration, 12 Northwest utilities (listed below, with test sites), and technology...

  16. Pacific Northwest Site Office Jobs

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) Mapping the Impact ofHome Pacific Northwest Site Office

  17. Northwest SEED | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwest Rural Pub Pwr Dist Jump to:SEED Jump

  18. ak gadi gadi: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Noch ist unklar, wie sich Hamburg,.Universitt 72 A.K. Ghosh 2. recurrent 1998 1999 DARPA Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: . , , , . . . ,...

  19. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    August 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority for August 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales...

  20. Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

  1. PACIFIC NORTHWEST ELECTRIC POWER PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to energy conservation, renewable resources, other resources, and protecting, mitigating, and enhancing fish Stat.2697.] 839(1)(8). the development of renewable resources within the Pacific Northwest; [Northwest and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat, of the Columbia River and its tributaries

  2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sustainable PNNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sustainable PNNL Sustainability at Pacific Northwest National the ability of the future generations to meet their needs. At PNNL, we are committed to improving the quality for the organization and our key stakeholders, including our customers, staff, and community. PNNL's commitment

  3. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Briefing Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Briefing Book January 2007 Northwest Power Conservation conservation but has had a more difficult time gaining consensus on saving salmon. -- William Dietrich through measures that impose the least economic and environmental cost on the region, while taking

  4. Now Available: Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Now Available: Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project - Technology Performance Report Volume 1 Now Available: Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project -...

  5. Natural Innovative Renewable Energy formerly Northwest Iowa Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Natural Innovative Renewable Energy formerly Northwest Iowa Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Natural Innovative Renewable Energy (formerly Northwest Iowa...

  6. Demonstration of an Enhanced Geothermal System at the Northwest...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Demonstration of an Enhanced Geothermal System at the Northwest Geysers Geothermal Field, California Demonstration of an Enhanced Geothermal System at the Northwest Geysers...

  7. Research results from the Ashland Exploration, Inc., Ford Motor Company 80 (COOP 2) well, Pike County, KY. Topical report, October 1991-November 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, J.H.; Lancaster, D.E.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes the work performed on the Ashland Exploration, Inc. (AEI) Ford Motor Company 80 (COOP 2) well in Pike County, KY. The COOP 2 was the second well in a three-well research project being conducted by GRI in eastern Kentucky targeting both the Devonian Shales and the Berea Sand; the FMC 80 focused on the Berea. The primary objective of the research was to use and transfer technologies developed in GRI`s Tight Gas Sands and Gas Shales programs to evaluate the Berea in Pike Co., KY.

  8. 1997 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1997 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and (2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. Data detailing Pacific Northwest non-utility generating (NUG) resources is also available upon request. This analysis updates the 1996 pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, published in December 1996. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. This document analyzes the Pacific Northwest`s projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency; and (2) the larger Pacific Northwest regional power system which includes loads and resources in addition to the Federal system. This study presents the Federal system and regional analyses for the medium load forecast. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years (OY) 1998--99 through 2007--08.

  9. 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Loads and Resources Study is presented in three documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; (2) a technical appendix detailing forecasted Pacific Northwest economic trends and loads, and (3) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a range of forecasted electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands -- firm loads -- are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and {open_quotes}contracted for{close_quotes} resources to determine whether Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the region will be surplus or deficit. If resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA can sell to increase revenues. Conversely, if firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity, and additional conservation, contract purchases, or generating resources will be needed to meet load growth. The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study analyzes the Pacific Northwest`s projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency; and (2) the larger Pacific Northwest regional power system, which includes loads and resource in addition to the Federal system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. This study presents the Federal system and regional analyses for five load forecasts: high, medium-high, medium, medium-low, and low. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years (OY) 1994--95 through 2003--04.

  10. VISION 2000 A blueprint for the future of the Northwest Michigan fruit industry created by the Northwest Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VISION 2000 A blueprint for the future of the Northwest Michigan fruit industry created by the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Foundation Introduction The Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station is uniquely situated on the sandy hills of northwest Michigan, surrounded by abundant

  11. 1994 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study presented herein establishes a picture of how the agency is positioned today in its loads and resources balance. It is a snapshot of expected resource operation, contractual obligations, and rights. This study does not attempt to present or analyze future conservation or generation resource scenarios. What it does provide are base case assumptions from which scenarios encompassing a wide range of uncertainties about BPA`s future may be evaluated. The Loads and Resources Study is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources and (2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, published in December 1993. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a range of forecasted electricity consumption. The Federal system and regional analyses for medium load forecast are presented.

  12. Comments of the Northwest Independent Power Producers Coalition Northwest Power & Conservation Council Draft 5th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by primary reliance on conservation and delivery from operating independent power producers (IPP) generation on a long-term basis with coalition members' operating power plants. It is our position that regardlessComments of the Northwest Independent Power Producers Coalition Northwest Power & Conservation

  13. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix A PACIFIC NORTHWEST GENERATING RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and generating capacity of power plants located in the Northwest is shown in Figure A-1 Capacity and primary NORTHWEST GENERATING RESOURCES This Appendix describes the electric power generating resources describing individual projects. GENERATING CAPACITY Over 460 electricity generating projects are located

  14. Pacific Northwest Smart GridPacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration ProjectDemonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    customers to choose to control their energy usage ­ Smart meters ­ Home/building/industrial energy controls and displays · Automated home energy use 4 #12;The End-user is the Centerpiece of the Smart Grid 5Pacific Northwest Smart GridPacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration ProjectDemonstration Project

  15. 1990 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study analyzes the Pacific Northwest's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency; and (2) the larger Pacific Northwest regional profile, which includes loads and resources in addition to the federal system. The loads and resources analysis in this study emulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement as completed by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. This study presents the federal system and regional analyses for five load forecasts: high, medium-high, medium, medium-low, and low. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years 1991--92 through 2010--11. The study shows the federal system's and the region's monthly estimated maximum electrical demand and monthly maximum generating capability -- capacity -- for OY 1991--92, 1996--97, 2001--02 and 2010--11. The federal system and regional monthly capacity surpluses/deficits are summarized for 20 operating years. 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    January 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-01 Utility Company Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) Place Arizona Start Date 2008-01-01...

  17. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority for March 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue...

  18. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    April 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority for April 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and...

  19. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-12 Utility Company Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) Place Arizona Start Date 2008-12-01...

  20. 5""reuniondu GroupeMarocaindu Permien et du Trias El Jadida,26-29Avril2006. Maroc The first 200 ky of the Early Jurassic in eastern North America and Morocco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Paul E.

    5""Ă?reuniondu GroupeMarocaindu Permien et du Trias El Jadida,26-29Avril2006. Maroc The first 200 ky, 26-29 Avril2006, Maroc likewise of low taxonomic diversity at the family level consisting almost

  1. Revamping AK-Ashland gas cleaning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, H.; Koerbel, R. [Mannesmann Demag Corp., Coraopolis, PA (United States); Haberkamp, K. [Mannesmann Demag Huttentechnik, Duisburg (Germany); Keeton, S. [AK Steel Corp., Ashland, KY (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AK Steel`s (formerly Armco) BOF shop was using a static precipitator for the primary collection. The system was designed for full combustion in the gas collecting hoods. No secondary dust collection was in place. A detailed study on alternative solutions led to a completely different system in 1990, and an order was awarded to Mannesmann Demag Corp. (MDC) in Dec. 1990. The new gas collection system is using suppressed combustion with the capability to collect Co at a later stage. The gas cleaning uses the Mannesmann Demag Baumco scrubber with a venturi throat for gas flow control. All auxiliary components, water treatment plant, electric substations and sludge handling were designed and supplied by MDC. The secondary dust collection covers the hot metal and scrap charging into the BOF`s, reladling, desulfurization and deslagging by a pulse jet baghouse. All emission limits set by the EPA and guaranteed by MDC have been met by the systems installed.

  2. Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Request for Proposals to Evaluate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Request for Proposals to Evaluate Existing Consumer Behavioral research, evaluations and behavior change initiatives. The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA interest groups and energy efficiency industry representatives that operate in the states of Idaho, Montana

  3. Northwest Distributed/Community Wind Workgroup Meeting- Seattle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the DOE's Northwest Wind Resource and Action Center, Northwest SEED will facilitate a workgroup meeting for stakeholders involved in the distributed and community wind sector in the...

  4. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Northwest...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Manufactured Home. In this project, the Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program worked with Building America Partnership for Improved Residential...

  5. Pacific Northwest Power Supply Adequacy Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Based on an assessment prepared by the Resource Adequacy Forum, the plan noted that relying only that this assessment is not a substitute for a comprehensive resource acquisition plan. The optimal amount and mixPacific Northwest Power Supply Adequacy Assessment for 2017 Final Report November 21, 2012 Council

  6. Resource Adequacy Standard for the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , recommended by the Resource Adequacy Forum, to assess the adequacy of the Northwest's power supply. The purpose of this assessment is to provide an early warning should resource development fail to keep pace resources are assumed for the assessment. Council staff will collect and maintain resource data, which also

  7. FRANK L. CASSIDY NORTHWEST POWER PLANNING COUNCIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    project budgets through the sequence of provincial review decisions so that the total funding available" of project budgets that received funding recommendations from both the Columbia Basin Fish and WildlifeFRANK L. CASSIDY JR. "Larry" CHAIRMAN Washington Tom Karier Washington NORTHWEST POWER PLANNING

  8. MFR PAPER 1279 The Pacific Northwest Commercial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Ecology of shad and striped bass in coastal rivers and estuaries. Man- age. Res. Div., Fish Comm. OregMFR PAPER 1279 The Pacific Northwest Commercial Fishery for Striped Bass, 1922-74 NORMAN B. PARKS The striped bass, Morone saxatilis, is a native of the east coast and was introduced in Pacific waters

  9. 2013Science Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013Science Frontiers #12;Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Laboratory, is pushing the frontiers of science in areas that are critical to the nation's security, health and prosperity. PNNL's science and technology base ranges from basic research

  10. Northwest Energy Education Institute Lane Community College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commercial Building Energy Audits 2. Trains Students To Install Renewable Energy Systems, Solar Thermal districts, engineering firms, and energy service companies. #12;Northwest Energy Education Institute at Lane - Second Year ­ Electrical Theory 1 & 2 ­ Renewable Energy Systems ­ Solar Thermal Design and Installation

  11. 1999 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to its regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book will not be used in calculations for the 2002 regional power sales contract subscription process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands--firm loads--are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and ''contracted for'' resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA may use or market to increase revenues. Conversely, if Federal system firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity and BPA would add conservation or contract purchases as needed to meet its firm loads. The load forecast is derived by using econometric models and analysis to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract obligations and contract resources, combined with the resource capabilities obtained from public utility and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers through their annual data submittals to the PNUCC, from BPA's Firm Resource Exhibit (FRE Exhibit I) submittals, and through analysis of the Federal hydroelectric power system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. The PNCA defines the planning and operation of the regional hydrosystem. The 1999 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and (2) a technical appendix (available electronically only) detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1998 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years (OY) 2000-01 through 2009-10. The study shows the Federal system's and the region's monthly estimated maximum electricity demand, monthly energy demand, monthly energy generation, and monthly maximum generating capability--capacity--for OY 2000-01, 2004-05, and 2009-10. The Federal system and regional monthly capacity surplus/deficit projections are summarized for 10 operating years. This document analyzes the Pacific Northwest's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for wh

  12. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

  13. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 186,627 customers remain without power. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 6 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below.

  14. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 237,030 customers remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 8 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington.

  15. Serving the People of the Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IF YOU LIVE IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST, CHANCES ARE YOU USE ELECTRICITY THAT’S MARKETED BY THE BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION OR IS TRANSMITTED OVER BPA POWER LINES. ? Headquartered in Portland, Ore., BPA is a federal agency that markets wholesale electricity and transmission to the region’s utilities as well as to some large industries. BPA provides about one-third of the electricity used in the Northwest and operates over three-fourths of the region’s high-voltage transmission. ? BPA does not rely on annual appropriations from Congress for its ? nancing. Instead, the agency recovers all of its costs through sales of electricity and transmission services and repays the U.S. Treasury in full with interest for any money it borrows. ? BPA sells wholesale power at cost rather than charging market prices. The bulk of the power BPA sells is generated at federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River, thus providing some of the lowest-cost electricity in the nation. This low-cost, clean power has been a cornerstone of the Northwest economy for decades, stimulating growth and new jobs. ? As concerns about global climate change are placing a new premium on clean energy, the federal hydro system has become an increasingly valuable resource. In addition to being low cost, electricity produced by the federal hydro system has no greenhouse gas emissions. And this power source is renewable — replenished each year by the region’s rainfall and snowmelt.

  16. Lost films chronicle dawn of hydroelectric power in the Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lost-films-chronicle-dawn-of-hydroelectric-power-in-the-Northwest Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects &...

  17. Study identifies two Northwest basalt rock caverns sites for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and BPA have identified two possible sites in eastern Washington to build compressed air energy storage facilities that could temporarily store the Northwest's excess wind power....

  18. area northwest coast: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ISAB 2011 179 Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Draft Wholesale Power Price Forecasts Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants Websites Summary: 1 Sixth...

  19. altun northwest china: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ISAB 2011 146 Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Draft Wholesale Power Price Forecasts Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants Websites Summary: 1 Sixth...

  20. arid northwest china: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FUR SEAL PROGRAM FIELD OFFICE FUR SEAL PROGRAM FIELD OFFICE AREA OF THE PACIFIC 18 Northwest Campus Master Plan Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

  1. 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the Pacific Northwest Site Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has determined that no new EAs or EISs are expected to commence during the next 12 to 24-month period.

  2. FITCH RATES ENERGY NORTHWEST (WA) ELECTRIC REV REF BONDS 'AA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SECURITY Energy Northwest (ENW) bonds are secured by payments from the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). Bonneville's payment to ENW is made as an operating...

  3. Power Builds Ships Northwest Hydropower Helps Win World War II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power-Builds-Ships-Northwest-Hydropower-Helps-Win-World-War-II Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  4. Ak-Chin Indian Community Biomass Feasiiblity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Moser, RCM Digesters, Inc.; Mark Randall, Daystar Consulting, LLC; Leonard S. Gold, Ak-Chin Energy Services & Utility Strategies Consulting Group

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of the conversion of chicken litter to biogas for the production of energy. There was an additional requirement that after extracting the energy from the chicken litter the nutrient value of the raw chicken litter had to be returned to the Ak-Chin Farms for use as fertilizer in a form and delivery method acceptable to the Farm.

  5. KRNFYSIK AK FKF 011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K�RNFYSIK AK FKF 011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course Antal poäng: 3.0. Obligatorisk för: F3. Valfri för: E4. Kursansvarig: Docent Per Kristiansson, per.kristiansson@nuclear.lu.se Förkunskapskrav. Neutroners egenskaper, framställning och registrering. Kärnreaktioner. Fission och fusion. Acceleratorer

  6. KRNFYSIK AK FKF011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K�RNFYSIK AK FKF011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course Poäng: 3.0 Betygskala: TH Obligatorisk för: F3 Valfri för: E4 Kursansvarig: Docent Per Kristiansson, per.kristiansson@nuclear.lu.se Förkunskapskrav. Neutroners egenskaper, framställning och registrering. Kärnreaktioner. Fission och fusion. Acceleratorer

  7. KY_50mwind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WPC DistributionInformation: ResourceDescription: Downloadable Data StandardOrderProcess: DigitalForm: DigitalTransferInformation: TransferSize: 0.395...

  8. 2 Breakthroughs | Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Published by: Pacific Northwest National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communications Toll-free: 1-888-375-PNNL (7665) E-mail: inquiry@pnl.gov Web site: http://www.pnl.gov Direct media and demand challenges head-on 9 PNNL positioned to meet nation's energy challenges 10 Fuel cell prototypes to seconds 13 Operations center is the real deal 13 A closer look at the Northwest hydro system 14 PNNL

  9. 2030 Northwest Arkansas Regional Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning Commission

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    united front. B. Regional Transportation History An early road was established through Northwest Arkansas in the 1830s linking Fort Smith to points in southern Missouri and on to St. Louis. By the mid 1800s many roads crossed the growing region including... the historic Butterfield Overland Coach Road that linked St. Louis and San Francisco. The Civil War brought troop movements through the area with major battles being fought at Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove. The University of Arkansas was established in 1872...

  10. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 134,868 customers remain without power. The number of outages is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent less than 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy and Seattle City Light.

  11. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 468,200 customers, including Canada, remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 16 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below. The Olympic pipeline reports that the pipeline is operational; however, pipeline throughput remains reduced since one substation along the line remains without power. Complete power restoration is expected later today. There are no reports of problems regarding fuel distribution and production.

  12. Northwest Iowa Power Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth America DrillingCaliforniaNorthernNorthingtonNorthwest

  13. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006 resulting in major power outagesin the region. The storm is now moving off into southern Canada. A new weather disturbance nearing the Northwest coast may generate a few rain and snow showers across the Seattle and Portland areas today, but widespread active weather is not expected. There are roughly 950,000 customers in the region (including Canada) without power as a result of the Pacific Northweststorms, down from a peak of 1.8 million customers. This represents about 26 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. As of 12:30 PM EST, the Renton Control Center for the Olympic Pipeline (petroleum products) had power restored. The pipeline, serviced by Puget Sound Energy, was shut down after it lost power during the storm. According to a pipeline official, the pipeline is expected to restart in approximately 2-3 hours with some reduced throughput later today. SeaTac International Airport receives jet fuel from the pipeline; however, it’s been reported that the airport has approximately eight days of jet fuel inventories on hand. There are no reports of problems regarding fuel production. There are some temporary and minor distribution at retail gas stations due to lack of power. Fuel delivery is also slowed in some areas due to delays on some roads. ESF #12 has not been deployed

  14. Date: June 12, 2007 To: Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Date: June 12, 2007 To: Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project From: Rich Sedano/RAP and Chuck, 2007 meeting of the Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project, we agreed to form three Working Groups for the evaluation of cost-effectiveness of Demand Response resources. One potential outcome would be for state

  15. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th, 2011 To: Bruce Measure, Chair, Northwest Power and Conservation Council From: Eric Loudenslager, ISRP lamprey behavior and vulnerability to predation may affect abundance estimates. The proponents' submittal

  16. FRANK L. CASSIDY JR. NORTHWEST POWER PLANNING COUNCIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the base budget. #12;Issue summary for the Northwest Power Planning Council'sColumbia Plateau provincial future project budgets through the sequence of provincial review decisions so that the total fundingFRANK L. CASSIDY JR. "Larry" CHAIRMAN Washington Tom Karier Washington NORTHWEST POWER PLANNING

  17. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue memorandum, the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) requested that the ISRP conduct additional review in which TPL would purchase the property from the developer, convey the conservation easement to WDFW

  18. 2004 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of BPA and/or the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These deficits could be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs, permanent loss of loads due to economic conditions or closures, additional contract purchases, and/or the addition of new generating resources. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the current Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The PNCA defines the planning and operation of seventeen U.S. Pacific Northwest utilities and other parties with generating facilities within the region's hydroelectric (hydro) system. The hydroregulation study used for the 2004 White Book incorporates measures from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) Biological Opinion dated December 2000, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's 2000 Biological Opinion (2000 FCRPS BiOps) for the Snake River and Columbia River projects. These measures include: (1) Increased flow augmentation for juvenile fish migrations in the Snake and Columbia rivers in the spring and summer; (2) Mandatory spill requirements at the Lower Snake and Columbia dams to provide for non-turbine passage routes for juvenile fish migrants; and (3) Additional flows for Kootenai River white sturgeon in the spring; The hydroregulation criteria for this analysis includes the following: (1) Detailed Operation Plan operation for Treaty reservoirs for Operating Year (OY) 2004; (2) PNCA planning criteria for OY 2004; and (3) Juvenile fish bypass spill levels for 2000 FCRPS BiOps implementation. The 2004 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary document of Federal system and PNW region loads and resources, and (2) a technical appendix which presents regional loads, grouped by major PNW utility categories, and detailed contract and resource information. The technical appendix is available only in electronic form. Individual customer information for marketer contracts is not detailed due to confidentiality agreements. The 2004 White Book analysis updates the 2003 White Book. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for the study period, OY 2006 through 2015. The study shows the Federal s

  19. 2006 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of both the Federal system and the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This surplus energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These energy deficits will be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs, permanent loss of loads due to economic conditions or closures, additional contract purchases, and/or the addition of new generating resources. This study incorporates information on Pacific Northwest (PNW) regional retail loads, contract obligations, and contract resources. This loads and resources analysis simulates the operation of the power system in the PNW. The simulated hydro operation incorporates plant characteristics, streamflows, and non-power requirements from the current Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). Additional resource capability estimates were provided by BPA, PNW Federal agency, public agency, cooperative, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers furnished through annual PNUCC data submittals for 2005 and/or direct submittals to BPA. The 2006 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary document of Federal system and PNW region loads and resources, and (2) a technical appendix which presents regional loads, grouped by major PNW utility categories, and detailed contract and resource information. The technical appendix is available only in electronic form. Individual customer information for marketer contracts is not detailed due to confidentiality agreements. The 2006 White Book analysis updates the 2004 White Book. This analysis shows projections of the Federal system and region's yearly average annual energy consumption and resource availability for the study period, OY 2007-2016. The study also presents projections of Federal system and region expected 1-hour monthly peak demand, monthly energy demand, monthly 1-hour peak generating capability, and monthly energy generation for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. BPA is investigating a new approach in capacity planning depicting the monthly Federal system 120-hour peak generating capability and 120-hour peak surplus/deficit for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. This document analyzes the PNW's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency;

  20. Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Sierra Club Natural Resources Defense Council Citizens' Utility Board of Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Sierra Club Natural Resources Defense and renewable resources will be acquired and by whom. Strong accountability for results through measurement; second to renewable resources..." [16 U.S. Code section 839b(e)(1)] BPA's utility customers have released

  1. Recovery Act: Waste Energy Project at AK Steel Corporation Middletown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, Jeffrey

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (“Air Products”) began development of a project to beneficially utilize waste blast furnace “topgas” generated in the course of the iron-making process at AK Steel Corporation’s Middletown, Ohio works. In early 2010, Air Products was awarded DOE Assistance Agreement DE-EE002736 to further develop and build the combined-cycle power generation facility. In June 2012, Air Products and AK Steel Corporation terminated work when it was determined that the project would not be economically viable at that time nor in the foreseeable future. The project would have achieved the FOA-0000044 Statement of Project Objectives by demonstrating, at a commercial scale, the technology to capture, treat, and convert blast furnace topgas into electric power and thermal energy.

  2. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite a small storm that came through the area last night with wind gusts peaking at 45 MPH, progress continues to be made in restoring power to customers who lost power during the December 14-15 storms which hit the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 95,971 customers remain without power, down from 1.8 million customers. The wind storm which affected the area yesterday was not as bad as previously expected, with the majority of the customer outages in the BC Hydro region, and 3,000 additional customer outages in the Puget Sound Energy service area. The customers without power represent 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy, BC Hydro, and Seattle City Light.

  3. Kursplan fr lsret 2001/2002 KRNFYSIK AK FKF011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kursplan för läsåret 2001/2002 K�RNFYSIK AK FKF011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course Poäng: 3.0 Betygskala: TH. Obligatorisk för: F3. Valfri för: E4. Kursansvarig: Docent Per Kristiansson, per.kristiansson@nuclear fusion. Acceleratorer, reaktorer, astrofysik, tillämpad kärnfysik. Litteratur: Johansson, S

  4. The role of the N*(1535) resonance and the pi^- p --> KY amplitudes in the OZI forbidden pi N --> phi N reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Döring; E. Oset; B. S. Zou

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the pi N --> phi N reaction close to the phi N threshold within the chiral unitary approach, by combining the pi^- p --> K^+ Sigma^-, pi^- p --> K^0 Sigma^0 and pi^- p --> K^0 Lambda amplitudes with the coupling of the phi to the K components of the final states of these reactions via quantum loops. We obtain a good agreement with experiment when the dominant pi^- p --> K^0 Lambda amplitude is constrained with its experimental cross section. We also evaluate the coupling of the N*(1535) to phi N and find a moderate coupling as a consequence of partial cancellation of the large KY components of the N*(1535). We also show that the N*(1535) pole approximation is too small to reproduce the measured cross section for the pi N --> phi N reaction.

  5. The Pricing of Electricity to Aluminum Smelters in the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, T. J.

    rate for electricity recogniZing the alternative value of electricity in other markets. The alternative revenue Bonneville could receive for this power on a nonfirm baSIS is estimated to be 13.8 mills/kWh in the peflod March through July and 18..." THE PRICING OF ELECTRICITY,TO ALUMINUM SMELTERS IN THE NORTHWEST Thomas J. Foley Northwest Power Planning Counc'l Portland, Oregon The Bonneville Power Administration IS a federal agency marketing electriC power in the Pacific Northwest...

  6. Northwest Energy Innovations (TRL 5 6 System)- WETNZ MtiMode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Northwest Energy Innovations (TRL 5 6 System) - WETNZ MtiMode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project

  7. AVI SOU PRATIK UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI HEALTH SYSTEM POU ITILIZASYON AK DIVILGASYON ENFMASYON PRIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    Dat avi a anvigč: 1ye desanm 2007 AVI SA A DEKRI FASON NOU KAPAB ITILIZE AK DIVILGE ENFŇMASYON MEDIKAL A APLIKE Avi sa a rezime pratik pou itilize an divilge enfňmasyon prive nan University of Miami Health ki anvigč nan moman an. FASON NOU KAPAB ITILIZE AK DIVILGE ENFŇMASYON MEDIKAL YO Lč ou resevwa sčvis

  8. Transport of lead and diesel fuel through a peat soil near Juneau, AK: a pilot study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Transport of lead and diesel fuel through a peat soil near Juneau, AK: a pilot study Julian Deissa potential of lead (Pb) and diesel range organics (DRO) in palustrine slope wetlands near Juneau, AK; Lead (Pb); Diesel range organic (DRO); Macropore; Rifle range; Wetland 0169-7722/$ - see front matter D

  9. NORTHWEST NATURALIST Tuesday Sep 25 2007 01:13 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    NORTHWEST NATURALIST Tuesday Sep 25 2007 01:13 PM Allen Press · DTPro System GALLEY 147 nwnt 88_303 Mp_147 File # 03em 147 NORTHWESTERN NATURALIST 88:147­154 WINTER 2007 A COMPARISON OF GROUND

  10. 9 Place-names in north-west Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 9 Length of track 23 minutes Title of track Place-names in north-west Greenland Translation...

  11. 15 Dorti Peterson – life in north-west Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 15 Length of track 40 minutes Title of track Dorti Peterson – life in north-west Greenland...

  12. Northwest public utilities, BPA top five-year energy savings...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    less than the cost of power from a new gas-fired plant. So without energy efficiency, the region would need to generate enough additional electricity to power 3.6 million Northwest...

  13. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2010 To: Bruce Measure, Chair, Northwest Power and Conservation Council From: Eric Loudenslager, ISRP in funding estuary restoration work and how the Trust uses the guidelines in the Council's Fish and Wildlife

  14. BPA supports wind power for the Pacific Northwest - Mar 2009...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northwest wind power boom is continuing, and much of this growth is occurring in the heart of the Bonneville Power Administration system. The agency now has more than 2,000...

  15. 1990 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, Technical Appendix.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study establishes the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) planning basis for supplying electricity to BPA customers. The Loads and Resources Study is presented in three documents: (1) this technical appendix detailing loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility, (2) a summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources, and (3) a technical appendix detailing forecasted Pacific Northwest economic trends and loads. This technical appendix provides utility-specific information that BPA uses in its long-range planning. It incorporates the following for each utility: electrical demand--firm loads--under the medium 1990 Draft Joint Load Forecast; generating resources; and contracts both inside and outside the region.

  16. Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2007 BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2007 BUDGET AND FISCAL YEAR 2006 REVISIONS...................................... 1 B. STABILIZING LONG-TERM FUNDING.................................. 2 BUDGET HISTORY (FIGURE 1)............................................................ 5 BUDGET BY FUNCTION (FIGURE 2) .................................................... 6 BUDGET

  17. Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2008 BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council FISCAL YEAR 2008 BUDGET AND FISCAL YEAR 2007 REVISIONS...................................... 1 B. STABILIZING LONG-TERM FUNDING.................................. 2 BUDGET HISTORY (FIGURE 1)............................................................ 5 BUDGET BY FUNCTION (FIGURE 2) .................................................... 6 BUDGET

  18. Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance- Smart Water Heat Rebate Program (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) is offering a rebate program for homeowners who purchase and install an eligible heat pump water heater. A rebate of $750 is offered for qualifying...

  19. Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance- Smart Water Heat Rebate Program (Idaho)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) is offering a rebate program for homeowners who purchase and install an eligible heat pump water heater. A rebate of $750 is offered for qualifying...

  20. Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance- Smart Water Heat Rebate Program (Oregon)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) is offering a rebate program for homeowners who purchase and install an eligible heat pump water heater. A rebate of $750 is offered for qualifying...

  1. Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance- Smart Water Heat Rebate Program (Washington)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) is offering a rebate program for homeowners who purchase and install an eligible heat pump water heater. A rebate of $750 is offered for qualifying...

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Maintenance Implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bright, J.D.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Maintenance Implementation plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Nuclear Facilities: 306W, 324, 325, 327 and 329NMF. It is based on a graded approach, self-assessment of the existing maintenance program(s) per the requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter II, Change {number_sign}3. The results of this assessment were evaluated to determine needed improvements in PNL Craft Services` current maintenance program. The objective of this implementation plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE 4330.4A, and for needed improvements. The prime consideration in applying a graded approach to the Order has been to maintain safe and reliable operations, environmental compliance, safeguards and security, programmatic mission, facility preservation, and/or other facility-specific requirements. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected nine of the 18 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are Training and Qualification of Maintenance Personnel; Maintenance Procedures; Planning, Scheduling, and Coordination of Maintenance; Control of Maintenance Activities; Post-Maintenance Testing; Facility Condition Inspection; Management Involvement; Maintenance History; and Additional Maintenance Requirements. Based upon graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Maintenance Implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bright, J.D.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Maintenance Implementation plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) Nuclear Facilities: 306W, 324, 325, 327 and 329NMF. It is based on a graded approach, self-assessment of the existing maintenance program(s) per the requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter II, Change {number sign}3. The results of this assessment were evaluated to determine needed improvements in PNL Craft Services' current maintenance program. The objective of this implementation plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE 4330.4A, and for needed improvements. The prime consideration in applying a graded approach to the Order has been to maintain safe and reliable operations, environmental compliance, safeguards and security, programmatic mission, facility preservation, and/or other facility-specific requirements. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected nine of the 18 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are Training and Qualification of Maintenance Personnel; Maintenance Procedures; Planning, Scheduling, and Coordination of Maintenance; Control of Maintenance Activities; Post-Maintenance Testing; Facility Condition Inspection; Management Involvement; Maintenance History; and Additional Maintenance Requirements. Based upon graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/13-AK-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/OrganizationTechProbSolutionsPublicQuanlightR3(2)3-AK-a < RAPID‎ |

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/14-AK-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/OrganizationTechProbSolutionsPublicQuanlightR3(2)3-AK-aNV-a <TX-aa

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/14-AK-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/OrganizationTechProbSolutionsPublicQuanlightR3(2)3-AK-aNV-a <TX-aab

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/20-AK-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche < (1) <AK-a

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/9-AK-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation,c < RAPID‎ |bWY-cAK-a

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/1-AK-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas) Redirect page JumpAK-a <

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/17-AK-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpTX-aAK-a <

  11. Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection permit application for air contaminant source: SRC-I demonstration plant, Newman, Kentucky. Supplement I. [Additional information on 38 items requested by KY/DNREP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Jr., John F.

    1981-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a letter from KY/DNREP, January 19, 1981, ICRC and DOE have prepared the enclosed supplement to the Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Permit Application for Air Contaminant Source for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Each of the 38 comments contained in the letter has been addressed in accordance with the discussions held in Frankfort on January 28, 1981, among representatives of KY/DNREP, EPA Region IV, US DOE, and ICRC. The questions raised involve requests for detailed information on the performance and reliability of proprietary equipment, back-up methods, monitoring plans for various pollutants, composition of wastes to flares, emissions estimates from particular operations, origin of baseline information, mathematical models, storage tanks, dusts, etc. (LTN)

  12. 1998 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study: The White Book.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for inventory planning to determine BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The 1998 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and (2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1997 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

  13. Northwest Energy Innovations (TRL 5 6 System) - WETNZ MtiMode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northwest Energy Innovations (TRL 5 6 System) - WETNZ MtiMode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project Northwest Energy Innovations (TRL 5 6 System) - WETNZ MtiMode Wave Energy...

  14. Results from ORNL Characterization of Zr02-500-AK2 - Surrogate TRISO Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunn, John D [ORNL; Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of the characterization data for the TRISO-coated surrogate particle batch designated ZrO2-500-AK2 that was produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The ZrO2-500-AK2 material contains nominally 500 {micro}m kernels of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coated with all TRISO layers (buffer, inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and outer pyrocarbon). The ZrO2-500-AK2 material was created for: (1) irradiation testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and (2) limited dissemination to laboratories as deemed appropriate to the AGR program. This material was created midway into a TRISO fuel development program to accommodate a sudden opportunity to perform irradiation testing on surrogate material. While the layer deposition processes were chosen based on the best technical understanding at the time, technical progress at ORNL has led to an evolution in the perceived optimal deposition conditions since the createion of ZrO2-500-AK2. Thus, ZrO2-500-AK2 contains a reasonable TRISO microstructure, but does differ significanly from currently produced TRISO surrogates and fuel at ORNL. In this document, characterization data of the ZrO2-500-AK2 surrogate includes: size, shape, coating thickness, and density.

  15. Results from ORNL characterization of ZrO2-500-AK2 - surrogate TRISO material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of the characterization data for the TRISO-coated surrogate particles designated ZrO2-500-AK2 that was produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The ZrO2-500-AK2 material contains nominally 500 {micro}m kernels of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coated with all TRISO layers (buffer, inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and outer pyrocarbon). The ZrO2-500-AK2 material was created for: (1) irradiation testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and (2) limited dissemination to laboratories as deemed appropriate to the AGR program. This material was created midway into a TRISO fuel development program to accommodate a sudden opportunity to perform irradiation testing on surrogate material. While the layer deposition processes were chosen based on the best technical understanding at the time, technical progress at ORNL has led to an evolution in the perceived optimal deposition conditions since the creation of ZrO2-500-AK2. Thus, ZrO2-500-AK2 contains a reasonable TRISO microstructure, but does differ significantly from currently produced TRISO surrogates and fuel at ORNL. In this document, characterization data of the ZrO2-500-AK2 surrogate includes: size, shape, coating thickness, and density.

  16. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix B: Economic Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix B: Economic Forecast Role of the Economic Forecast..................................................................................................................................... 2 Economic Growth Assumptions

  17. Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public Utility District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public paper: Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System, dated September 13, 2007. The Grant done a very thorough job of assessing the current and future carbon dioxide footprints of the Northwest

  18. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). The Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and peer reviewIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th to the Northwest Power Act directed the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council) to appoint an 11-member

  19. Estimating Industrial Electricity Conservation Potential in the Pacific Northwest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limaye, D. R.; Hinkle, B. K.; Lang, K.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and re quires that conservation be considered "co~t-effec? The Pacific Northwest is undergoing a transi tive", even at 110 percent of the cost.o~ conven tion in electricity generation from a predominantly tional energy resources. The Act requH~s BPA...

  20. 2013 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (summary)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2013 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (2013 White Book) is BPA's latest projection of the Pacific Northwest regional retail loads, contract obligations, contract purchases, and resource capabilities. The 2013 White Book is a snapshot of conditions as of October 1, 2013, documenting the loads and resources for the Federal system and region for the 10-year study period OY 2014 through 2023. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). Starting with the 2012 White Book, BPA changed the annual production schedule for future White Books. BPA is scheduled to publish a complete White Book, which includes a Federal System Needs Assessment analysis, every other year (even years). In the odd-numbered years, BPA will publish a biennial summary update (Supplement) that only contains major changes to the Federal System and Regional System analyses that have occurred since the last White Book. http://www.bpa.gov/power/pgp/whitebook/2013/index.shtml.

  1. Sixth Power Plan northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Fired Generating Resources #12;Sixth Power Plan AssessMenT reporT Resource Adequacy 40Sixth Power Plan northwest Power and Conservation Council March 13, 2013 Mid-term assessment report #12;PaGe 2 > Mid-TerM AssessMenT reporT > Sixth Power Plan Contents 04 Executive Summary 06 Situation

  2. Fourth Annual Report to the Northwest Governors on Expenditures of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Administration to Implement the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power, the Bonneville Power Ad- ministration reported total costs of $506.8 million for its Columbia River Basin fish not reflect $1.02 billion Bonneville has received since 1995 for a portion of its expenditures to improve fish

  3. Energy Storage Architecture Northwest Power and Conservation Council Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modular Energy Storage Architecture (MESA) Northwest Power and Conservation Council Symposium: Innovations in Energy Storage Technologies February 13, 2013 Portland, OR #12;2 Agenda 2/13/2013 Renewable energy challenges Vision for energy storage Energy storage barriers MESA ­ Standardization & software

  4. Tropospheric Ozone Satellite Retrievals in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Tropospheric Ozone Satellite Retrievals in the Pacific Northwest Jacqueline Costello1, Farren: Tropospheric ozone is difficult to retrieve from satellites because of the abundance of ozone in the stratosphere. Tropospheric ozone has become a significant environmental issue and can be exacerbated by UT

  5. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 7: Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 7: Transmission Summary of Key, both in operating the existing system and in planning for new major transmission lines. Since then transmission system is an integral part of the regional power system. It functions roughly like the highway

  6. Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest A Scientific Workshop Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-92 #12;#12;Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Service; Justin Klure, Oregon Wave Energy Trust; Greg McMurray, Oregon Department of Land Conservation

  7. California's Renewable Portfolio Standard Northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources are being procured and at what cost? Challenges with renewable integration Challenges target for 33% of energy to be from eligible renewable energy resources Large hydro and rooftop solarCalifornia's Renewable Portfolio Standard Northwest Power and Conservation Council California Power

  8. NORTHWEST ENERGY EFFICIENCY TASKFORCE DEC. 31, 2008 DRAFT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NORTHWEST ENERGY EFFICIENCY TASKFORCE DEC. 31, 2008 DRAFT REPORT APPENDICES Appendix A: Work Group Technology Innovation Roadmapping Invitation 67 Appendix C: Work Group 3 (High Impact Energy Efficiency Initiatives) C-1: Draft Report and Recommendations 68 C-2: Regional Energy Efficiency Program Forum 72 C-3

  9. Establishment of Northwest Building Testbeds: Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stiles, Dennis L.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a short summary of a project jointly funded by the DOE Building Technologies Program and the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance. The report the outcomes achieved in the jointly-funded project, describes major project activities, discusses future plans for the homes and data, and provides details on project costs and schedule performance.

  10. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th are commended for fostering past studies and providing scientific information to develop management approaches be shown by (1) presenting the calculations for quantitative estimates of external phosphorus loading

  11. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th in the original solicitation. Statements about outstanding habitat units (HUs) and calculations from tables, reporting, and acquisitions are sufficiently improved. Those relating to actual management activities

  12. Green Building Features Northwest Center for Engineering, Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Green Building Features Northwest Center for Engineering, Science and Technology RESOURCE for commercial buildings developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) to provide a national consensus in what constitutes a "green" building and to provide market incentives to build green. PSU has received

  13. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 {micro}g/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields.

  14. Saugata Basu - Department of Mathematics, Purdue University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of. Michigan ..... Robotics, K.Y. Goldberg, D. Halperin, J.-C. Latombe, R.H. Wilson, Eds., A.K.. Peters ...

  15. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory institutional plan FY 1997--2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s core mission is to deliver environmental science and technology in the service of the nation and humanity. Through basic research fundamental knowledge is created of natural, engineered, and social systems that is the basis for both effective environmental technology and sound public policy. Legacy environmental problems are solved by delivering technologies that remedy existing environmental hazards, today`s environmental needs are addressed with technologies that prevent pollution and minimize waste, and the technical foundation is being laid for tomorrow`s inherently clean energy and industrial processes. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory also applies its capabilities to meet selected national security, energy, and human health needs; strengthen the US economy; and support the education of future scientists and engineers. Brief summaries are given of the various tasks being carried out under these broad categories.

  16. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2004-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quadrel, Marilyn J.

    2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Institutional Plan for FY 2004-2008 is the principal annual planning document submitted to the Department of Energy's Office of Science by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. This plan describes the Laboratory's mission, roles, and technical capabilities in support of Department of Energy priorities, missions, and plans. It also describes the Laboratory strategic plan, key planning assumptions, major research initiatives, and program strategy for fundamental science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national security.

  17. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory institutional plan: FY 1996--2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the operation and direction plan for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory of the US Department of Energy. The topics of the plan include the laboratory mission and core competencies, the laboratory strategic plan; the laboratory initiatives in molecular sciences, microbial biotechnology, global environmental change, complex modeling of physical systems, advanced processing technology, energy technology development, and medical technologies and systems; core business areas, critical success factors, and resource projections.

  18. WashWise cleans up the Northwest: Lessons learned from the Northwest high-efficiency clothes washer initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, L.M.; Banks, D.L.; Brenneke, M.E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WashWise is a regional market transformation program designed to promote the sale and acceptance or resource-efficient clothes washers (RECWs) in the Northwest through financial incentives, education, and marketing. The Program is sponsored by the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (the Alliance), a non-profit regional consortium of utilities, government, public interest groups, and private sector organizations. WashWise started in May 1997 and will continue through the end of 1999. WashWise works to transform the clothes washer market primarily at the retail level through an in-store instant rebate and a retailer bonus. In addition to financial incentives, WashWise has undertaken a collaborative marketing and promotional campaign to educate consumers about the financial savings and other benefits of RECWs. The program promotes only RECWs that meet strict energy and water savings criteria. WashWise has far exceeded initial expectations; annual program sales goals were met in the first three months. As of June 1998, 30,000 RECWs have been sold through the program (representing approximately 13 percent of the Northwest residential clothes washer market). In addition, over 540 retailers, including national and regional chains, are participating in the program. Preliminary survey results also have also provided evidence of broad customer satisfaction. This paper reviews the key elements that have contributed to the success of the WashWise program. In addition, the paper provides program results and indicates future directions for WashWise and the RECW market.

  19. a154n diavik northwest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ISAB 2011 59 Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Draft Wholesale Power Price Forecasts Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants Websites Summary: 1 Sixth...

  20. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix H: Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix H: Demand Response Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1 Demand Response in the Council's Fifth Power Plan......................................................................................................................... 3 Estimate of Potential Demand Response

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toburen, L.H.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of research conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in the following areas: Dosimetry, measurement science, and radiological and chemical physics. (CBS)

  2. Notices 20 Miles Northwest of Rapid City SD Rapid City SD 57702

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notices 20 Miles Northwest of Rapid City SD Rapid City SD 57702 Landholding Agency: Agriculture Property Number: 15201410016 Status: Excess Comments: off-site removal only; 55 sq....

  3. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory- October 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  4. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Pacific Northwest Site Office- 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This self-assessment evaluated how well the Technical Qualification and Federal Capability Programs were implemented at the Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO).

  5. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute- November 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether Pacific Northwest National Laboratory site is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  6. 1998 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (summary)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts.1 Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for inventory planning to determine BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The 1998 White Book is presented in two documents: 1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and 2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1997 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study. The load forecast is derived by using economic planning models to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract obligations and contract resources, combined with the resource capabilities obtained from public utility and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers through their annual data submittals to the PNUCC, from BPA’s Firm Resource Exhibit (FRE Exhibit 1) submittals, and through analysis of the Federal hydroelectric power system. The 1998 study uses the same economic forecast used for the 1997 study. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands—firm loads—are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and “contracted for” resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA may use or market to increase revenues. Conversely, if Federal system firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity and BPA would add conservation or contract purchases as needed to meet its firm loads.

  7. 2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

    2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified on the PNNL Site.

  8. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2001-2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Pearson, Erik W.

    2000-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2001-2005 sets forth the laboratory's mission, roles, technical capabilities, and laboratory strategic plan. In the plan, major initiatives also are proposed and the transitioning initiatives are discussed. The Programmatic Strategy section details our strategic intent, roles, and research thrusts in each of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission areas. The Operations/Infrastructure Strategic Plan section includes information on the laboratory's human resources; environment, safety, and health management; safeguards and security; site and facilities management; information resources management; managaement procatices and standards; and communications and trust.

  9. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Erik W.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2000-2004 sets forth the laboratory's mission, roles, technical capabilities, and laboratory strategic plan. In the plan, major initiatives also are proposed and the transitioning initiatives are discussed. The Programmatic Strategy section details our strategic intent, roles, and research thrusts in each of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission areas. The Operations/Infrastructure Strategic Plan section includes information on the laboratory's human resources; environment, safety, and health management; safeguards and security; site and facilities management; information resources management; management practices and standards; and communications and trust.

  10. SeaWest Northwest Asset Holdings LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: WindRiegotecSeaScape Energy Ltd Jump to:Northwest

  11. Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to:Would YouHualalai Northwest

  12. Northwest Rural Pub Pwr Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwest Rural Pub Pwr Dist Jump to:

  13. Incorporation of PCI flow measurement/control at AK Steel Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dibert, W.A.; Keaton, D. [AK Steel Corp., Ashland, KY (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement and control system has been developed and implemented to improve the distribution of coal among the tuyere lines on AK Steel Corporation`s Amanda blast furnace at Ashland, Kentucky. This paper discusses the development and design of the system, and briefly reviews operating results achieved.

  14. WRF/Chem Simulations Over Fairbanks, AK Atmospheric Stability and Energy Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    1 WRF/Chem Simulations Over Fairbanks, AK Atmospheric Stability and Energy Correlation Analysis deposition. #12;3 The interactions and cycles of energy, water and trace gas components are also simulated, Alaska, that is characteristic of the Tanana valley; Specifically, Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE

  15. Challenges in determining b value in the Northwest Geysers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saltiel, S.; Boyle, K.; Majer, E.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past analyses of the Gutenberg-Richter b-value in the Geysers and other geothermal settings have revealed a deviation from the assumed linear relationship in log space between magnitude and the number of earthquakes. In this study of the Northwest Geysers, we found a gently-sloping discontinuity in the b-value curve. This is especially apparent when comparing the least-squares fit (LSQ) of the curve to the fit obtained by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), a widely-respected method of analyzing magnitude-frequency relationships. This study will describe the assumptions made when using each of these two methods and will also explore how they can be used in conjunction to investigate the characteristics of the observed b-value curve. To understand whether slope-fit differences in the LSQR and MLE methods is due to physical properties of the system or due to artifacts from errors in sampling, it is extremely important to consider the catalog completeness, magnitude bin size, number of events, and differences in source mechanisms for the events comprising the study volume. This work will hopefully lead to informative interpretations of frequency-magnitude curves for the Northwest Geysers, a geothermal area of ongoing high-volume coldwater injection and steam production. Through this statistical investigation of the catalog contents, we hope to better understand the dominant source mechanisms and the role of injected fluids in the creation of seismic clustering around nearly 60 wells of varying depths and injection volumes.

  16. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  17. Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, Columbia, Northwest Power and Conservation Council Paul Lumley, Executive Director, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish. Communication and understanding of the role that biological diversity plays for people is key to the choices

  18. , J. Geophys. Res., 103, 24469-24486 Stress Coupling Between Earthquakes in Northwest Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubert-Ferrari, Aurélia

    , J. Geophys. Res., 103, 24469-24486 Stress Coupling Between Earthquakes in Northwest Turkey, Istanbul, Turkey Aurélia Hubert and Geoffrey C. P. King Laboratoire de Tectonique et Mécanique de la stress interactions of 29 earthquakes (Ms 6.0) that have occurred in the region of northwest Turkey

  19. Comments of the Renewable Northwest Project And the Natural Resources Defense Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comments of the Renewable Northwest Project And the Natural Resources Defense Council, 2004 The Renewable Northwest Project (RNP) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) appreciate to the recommendations on renewable resources. We agree with many of the comments submitted by the NW Energy coalition

  20. NORTHWEST ENERGY EFFICIENCY TASKFORCE REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE'S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT NORTHWEST ENERGY EFFICIENCY TASKFORCE REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Efficiency IV. Planning that Puts Energy Efficiency First V. The NEET Mission and Work Groups VI. Work Group. Introduction The push for energy efficiency in the Pacific Northwest is facing an unprecedented opportunity

  1. CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE ADOPTION OF AGRICULTURE IN NORTH-WEST EUROPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE ADOPTION OF AGRICULTURE IN NORTH-WEST EUROPE Clive Bonsall Department was triggered by a significant change in climate. This finding may also have implications for understanding: agriculture, climate change, Mesolithic, Neolithic, north-west Europe INTRODUCTION Farming was established

  2. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife.............................................................................................................. 1 Integrating the Fish and Wildlife Program and Power Planning Under the Northwest Power Act 2 Power Resource Planning that Accommodates the Power System Effects of the Fish and Wildlife Program

  3. Review of Conservation Costs and Benefits: Five Years of Experience under the Northwest Power Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheets, E.

    as a resource and that all resources be evaluated against uniform criteria to determine the lowest cost mix of resources to meet the Northwest’s energy needs. Since the passage of the Act, the total regional expenditure on conservation by the federal...

  4. Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -long program will emphasize the design, use and maintenance of irrigation systems. Spend the morning learning/11 Michigan Spring Peach Update Meeting SW Michigan Research & Extension Center 3/12 Northwest MI Irrigation coordinator Dr. Bill Shane at 269-944-1477 ext. 205, 269-208-1652 cell. NORTHWEST MICHIGAN IRRIGATION WORKSHOP

  5. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Project Funding Recommendations to the Bonneville Power Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the Bonneville Power Administration for Fiscal Years 2007 through 2009 October 2006 Programmatic Issues-based obligations into the broader Northwest Power Act program -- it is precisely the fact that Bonneville has to Bonneville that satisfy Bonneville's ESA-based objectives balanced with its broader Northwest Power Act

  6. AK Duisburg/ AK Oberhausen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerwert, Klaus

    Frankfurt Basel Venlo Antwerpen Eindhoven Amsterdam Arnheim Emmerich B 1 Duisburg Essen Gelsenkirchen

  7. 1999 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to its regional power sales contracts.1 Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book will not be used in calculations for the 2002 regional power sales contract subscription process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands—firm loads—are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and “contracted for” resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA may use or market to increase revenues. Conversely, if Federal system firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity and BPA would add conservation or contract purchases as needed to meet its firm loads. The load forecast is derived by using econometric models and analysis to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract obligations and contract resources, combined with the resource capabilities obtained from public utility and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers through their annual data submittals to the PNUCC, from BPA’s Firm Resource Exhibit (FRE Exhibit I) submittals, and through analysis of the Federal hydroelectric power system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. The PNCA defines the planning and operation of the regional hydrosystem.

  8. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

  9. 2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

    2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the upland areas of the PNNL site in 2011. Efforts in 2011 to control noxious weed populations (comprising plant species designated as Class B noxious weeds by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board) discovered in 2009 and initially treated with herbicides in 2010 are described in Appendix B.

  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory institutional plan FY 1998--2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s core mission is to deliver environmental science and technology in the service of the nation and humanity. Through basic research the lab creates fundamental knowledge of natural, engineered, and social systems that is the basis for both effective environmental technology and sound public policy. They solve legacy environmental problems by delivering technologies that remedy existing environmental hazards, they address today`s environmental needs with technologies that prevent pollution and minimize waste, and they are laying the technical foundation for tomorrow`s inherently clean energy and industrial processes. The lab also applies their capabilities to meet selected national security, energy, and human health needs; strengthen the US economy; and support the education of future scientists and engineers. The paper summarizes individual research activities under each of these areas.

  11. PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGIONAL COLLABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FOR SYNERGY VII (2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.; Bolte, John; Guzy, Michael; Woodruff, Dana L.; Humes, Karen; Walden, Von; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Glenn, Nancy; Ames, Dan; Rope, Ronald; Martin, David; Sandgathe, Scott

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During this final year of the Pacific Northwest Regional Collaboratory we focused significantly on continuing the relationship between technical teams and government end-users. The main theme of the year was integration. This took the form of data integration via our web portal and integration of our technologies with the end users. The PNWRC's technical portfolio is based on EOS strategies, and focuses on 'applications of national priority: water management, invasive species, coastal management and ecological forecasting.' The products of our technical approaches have been well received by the community of focused end-users. The objective this year was to broaden that community and develop external support to continue and operationalize product development.

  12. Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ([sup 238]Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, Alaska, since 1964; and at other stations for shorter periods of time. There has been considerable concern over the health hazard presented by these radionuclides, but it has also been recognized that atmospheric mixing and deposition rates can be determined from their measurement. Therefore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the continuous measurement of the atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, and radon and thoron decay. This report will discuss the concentrations of the longer-lived radionuclides (T 1/2 > 12 days). The concentrations of shorter-lived radionuclides measured following Chinese nuclear tests since 1972 are discussed in another report.

  13. Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ({sup 238}Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, Alaska, since 1964; and at other stations for shorter periods of time. There has been considerable concern over the health hazard presented by these radionuclides, but it has also been recognized that atmospheric mixing and deposition rates can be determined from their measurement. Therefore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the continuous measurement of the atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, and radon and thoron decay. This report will discuss the concentrations of the longer-lived radionuclides (T 1/2 > 12 days). The concentrations of shorter-lived radionuclides measured following Chinese nuclear tests since 1972 are discussed in another report.

  14. Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project, Northwest Geysers, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, Mark A.

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project was to drill, test, and confirm the present economic viability of the undeveloped geothermal reservoir in the 870 acre Caldwell Ranch area of the Northwest Geysers that included the CCPA No.1 steam field. All of the drilling, logging, and sampling challenges were met. ? Three abandoned wells, Prati 5, Prati 14 and Prati 38 were re-opened and recompleted to nominal depths of 10,000 feet in 2010. Two of the wells required sidetracking. ? The flow tests indicated Prati 5 Sidetrack 1 (P-5 St1), Prati 14 (P-14) and Prati 38 Sidetrack 2 (P-38 St2) were collectively capable of initially producing an equivalent of 12 megawatts (MWe) of steam using a conversion rate of 19,000 pounds of steam/hour

  15. 1991 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, Technical Appendix: Volume 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides detailed documentation of the load forecast scenarios and assumptions used in preparing BPA's 1991 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (the Study). This is one of two technical appendices to the Study; the other appendix details the utility-specific loads and resources used in the Study. The load forecasts and assumption were developed jointly by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) staff. This forecast is also used in the Council's 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan (1991 Plan).

  16. SciTech Connect:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Portal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, KY (United States) Pantex Plant (PTX), Amarillo, TX...

  17. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Protected Areas Designations, Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of capacity from this study that falls into the protected areas designations, the Northwest Hydroelectric run-of-the-river hydroelectric projects may not be able to be developed within a protected areas

  18. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix D: Wholesale Electricity Price Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix D: Wholesale Electricity Price.................................................................................................................................. 27 INTRODUCTION The Council prepares and periodically updates a 20-year forecast of wholesale to forecast wholesale power prices. AURORAxmp® provides the ability to inco

  19. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 5: Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 5: Demand Response Summary of Key.............................................................................................................. 1 Demand Response in the Fifth Power Plan........................................................................................... 3 Demand Response in the Sixth Power Plan

  20. A climatology of springtime convection systems over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashem, Magda Sami

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Springtime (March 15-June 15) climatology of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) has been established on the basis of satellite imagery and radar reflectivities over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coastal areas during 1985...

  1. From the Tides of Puget Sound to Your Plate: Northwest Shellfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    From the Tides of Puget Sound to Your Plate: Northwest Shellfish Industry Provides Important for Puget Sound's ecosystem. Together with our partners, we are strengthening the health of our ecosystem

  2. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix A: Fuel Price Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................................... 12 Oil Price Forecast Range. The price of crude oil was $25 a barrel in January of 2000. In July 2008 it averaged $127, even approachingSixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix A: Fuel Price Forecast Introduction

  3. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards the model conservation standards should provide reliable savings to the power system. The Council also................................................ 8 Buildings Converting to Electric Space Conditioning or Water Heating Systems

  4. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 2: Key Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at zero and increase to $47 per ton of CO2 emissions by 2030. Higher electricity prices reduce demandSixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 2: Key Assumptions Summary of Key................................................................ 10 Wholesale Electricity Prices

  5. Waste status and transaction record summary for the northwest quadrant of the Hanford 200 Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, S.F.; Corbin, R.A.; Duran, T.B.; Jurgensen, K.A.; Ortiz, T.P.; Young, B.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document contains a database of waste transactions and waste status reports for all the waste tanks in the northwest quadrant of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site.

  6. ForPeerReview Petrology of the Nakhlite (Martian) Meteorite Northwest Africa 998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    ForPeerReview Only Petrology of the Nakhlite (Martian) Meteorite Northwest Africa 998 Journal of Washington, Earth System Sciences Keywords: nakhlite, Martian , NWA 998, petrology Petrology of the Nakhlite (Martian) Meteorite

  7. Regional Field Verification -- Operational Results from Four Small Wind Turbines in the Pacific Northwest: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.; Raker, J.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes four small wind turbines installed in the Pacific Northwest under DOE/NREL's Regional Field Verification Program between 2003 and 2004 and summarizes operational data from each site.

  8. Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management, enacted in 1981, was ratified by Congress in 1985. The Compact is a cooperative effort of the party states to protect...

  9. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Dudley, Junqiao

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) demonstrated and evaluated open automated demand response (OpenADR) communication infrastructure to reduce winter morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in the Seattle City Light (SCL) service territory at five sites: Seattle Municipal Tower, Seattle University, McKinstry, and two Target stores. This report describes the process and results of the demonstration. OpenADR is an information exchange model that uses a client-server architecture to automate demand-response (DR) programs. These field tests evaluated the feasibility of deploying fully automated DR during both winter and summer peak periods. DR savings were evaluated for several building systems and control strategies. This project studied DR during hot summer afternoons and cold winter mornings, both periods when electricity demand is typically high. This is the DRRC project team's first experience using automation for year-round DR resources and evaluating the flexibility of commercial buildings end-use loads to participate in DR in dual-peaking climates. The lessons learned contribute to understanding end-use loads that are suitable for dispatch at different times of the year. The project was funded by BPA and SCL. BPA is a U.S. Department of Energy agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy generation facilities. Created by the citizens of Seattle in 1902, SCL is the second-largest municipal utility in America. SCL purchases approximately 40% of its electricity and the majority of its transmission from BPA through a preference contract. SCL also provides ancillary services within its own balancing authority. The relationship between BPA and SCL creates a unique opportunity to create DR programs that address both BPA's and SCL's markets simultaneously. Although simultaneously addressing both market could significantly increase the value of DR programs for BPA, SCL, and the end user, establishing program parameters that maximize this value is challenging because of complex contractual arrangements and the absence of a central Independent System Operator or Regional Transmission Organization in the northwest.

  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Tilden, Harold T.; Barnett, J. M.; Su-Coker, Jennifer; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Fritz, Brad G.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.; Lowry, Kami L.; Moon, Thomas W.; Becker, James M.; Mendez, Keith M.; Raney, Elizabeth A.; Chamness, Michele A.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science’s 10 national laboratories, provides innovative science and technology development in the areas of energy and the environment, fundamental and computational science, and national security. DOE’s Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) is responsible for oversight of PNNL at its Campus in Richland, Washington, as well as its facilities in Sequim, Seattle, and North Bonneville, Washington, and Corvallis and Portland, Oregon.

  11. Analysis of monoclinal folds associated with the Brittmore fault in northwest Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jayne Ann

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS OF MONOCLINAL FOLDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE BRITTMORE FAULT IN NORTHWEST HOUSTON, TEXAS A Thesis by JAYNE ANN JONES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August t988 Major Subject: Geology ANALYSIS OF MONOCUNAL FOLDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE BRITTMORE FAULT IN NORTHWEST HOUSTON, TEXAS A Thesis by JAYNE AhlN JONES Approved as to style and content by: Christ her C. Mathewson (Chairman...

  12. Timing of structural growth at Northwest Stevens field as evidenced by Stevens channel geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkman, T.A. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stacked upper Miocene Stevens sandstone bodies at Northwest Stevens (Tule Elk) are the product of two coalescing turbidite channels which reflect the influence of growing structure during deposition. One channel can be traced from the south through ARCO's 555 zone unit, the 26R and 2B pools at Elk Hills, and into Northwest Stevens. The 800-ft-thick T' turbidite sands from this channel form offlapping geometries and structural/stratigraphic traps due to deposition across the rising northwest-plunging nose of the Northwest Stevens anticline. They are medium- to coarse-grained with abundant mudstone interbeds and are interpreted to represent a depositional channel fill which grades laterally to less permeable finer grained overbank deposits along the east side of Northwest Stevens. The second coeval channel can be traced from McKittrick through Asphalto and the 24Z pool at Elk Hills into Northwest Stevens, where it forms a 1,700-ft-thick sequence of 80 to 500-ft-thick sand packages at the 7R pool. Sand-shale ratios in these pebbly sandstones are nearly 9 to 1 with abundant conglomeratic interbeds. These channel sands display blocky electric log signatures, have lenticular geometries at the top of the sequence and offlapping geometries at the base, and document deposition in a structural low adjacent to the rising Northwest Stevens structure. The upper Miocene correlation point (UMPC) is sanded out at the 7R pool, indicating that turbidite sand deposition there persisted into lower Reef Ridge time. Well correlations indicate only minor erosive deposition and amalgamation; thus, the sand bodies at Northwest Stevens are additive to the section.

  13. 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, Technical Appendix: Volume 2, Book 1, Energy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study establishes the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) planning basis for supplying electricity to BPA customers. The Loads and Resources Study is presented in three documents: (1) this technical appendix detailing loads and resources for each major Pacific and Northwest generating utility, (2) a summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources, and (3) a technical appendix detailing forecasted Pacific Northwest economic trends and loads. This analysis updates the 1992 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study Technical Appendix published in December 1992. This technical appendix provides utility-specific information that BPA uses in its long-range planning. It incorporates the following for each utility (1) Electrical demand firm loads; (2) Generating resources; and (3) Contracts both inside and outside the region. This document should be used in combination with the 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, published in December 1993, because much of the information in that document is not duplicated here.

  14. Potential environmental effects of energy conservation measures in northwest industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their potential environmental impacts. Energy efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different energy and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe potential conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss potential primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.

  15. Subsidence and infilling patterns during deposition of Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale, northwest Colorado and northeast Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.C. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale of northwest Colorado and northeast Utah was deposited during the Coniacian through the late Campanian in an offshore environment within a broad U-shaped embayment along the western margin of the Cretaceous epeiric seaway. A detailed study of the Mancos using geophysical logs and surface observations reveals several major and minor shifts in source direction. The Coniacian and Santonian part of the Mancos consists of overlapping lobate shale wedges that generally thin and grade to the east and southeast into calcareous shales equivalent to the Niobrara Formation. The shoreline during this period was about 100 to 150 mi west and northwest of the study area. A southern source was a major influence during the early Campanian, when silty and sandy shale sediments, which formed the highly gas-productive Mancos B interval prograded to the north across the study area. The Mancos B interval contains well-developed clinoforms having 400-600 ft of relief, and this unit may represent a prograding shelf edge contemporaneous with the Point Lookout regression occurring about 100 mi to the south. The Mancos B ends abruptly in the northwest part of the study area against a nonprograding, northwest-thickening shale buildup, which may represent the stationary shelf edge along the northwest margin of the embayment. The sandiest part of the Mancos B occurs adjacent to this shale buildup. The supply of southerly derived sediment decreased near the end of the early Campanian, and the younger Mancos section was apparently derived largely from the northwest. This source area shift corresponds roughly to the onset of the Iles regression along the northwest margin of the embayment and the onset of the Lewis transgression along the southwest margin.

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 4, Physical Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toburen, L.H.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of research conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in the following areas: Dosimetry, measurement science, and radiological and chemical physics. (CBS)

  17. Bonneville Power Administration and the Industrial Technologies Program Leverage Support to Overcome Energy Efficiency Barriers in the Northwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study explores how Bonneville Power Administration, a Northwest regional wholesale power provider, rethought how to encourage and promote energy efficiency projects through its utilities.

  18. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance: Best Management Practice Case Studies #4 and #5 - Water Efficient Landscape and Irrigation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practices #4 and #5 Case Study: Overview of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory grounds maintenance program and results.

  19. Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to China (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to

  20. Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Dollars per Thousand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports

  1. Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Dollars per Thousand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas

  2. Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural GasMillion

  3. Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Russia (Dollars per Thousand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural

  4. 3AK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OPERAiEO BY MARTIN MARIE,TA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y. ,J,.- i - 3AK

  5. Energy Efficient and Sustainable HPC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuma, Phil; Marquez, Andres; Sego, Landon H.; Schmidt, Roger; Cader, Tahir

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power consumption in US data centers has been escalating at an alarming rate. In response to Public Law 109-431, EPA reported that electricity usage by US data centers accounted for 1.5% of the total electricity used in the US in 2006. They projected that if current data center operating practices continue, electricity usage will almost double to 2.9% of the total electricity used in the US in 2011 (EPA, 2007). Consequently EPA issued a call to action to both government and industry to collaborate and set aggressive goals to reduce power consumption in data centers. In the spirit of responding to the findings and recommendations of the EPA report, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has teamed with several key organizations including: The Green Grid (TGG), ASHRAE TC9.9, IBM, 3M, and SprayCool. As part of this effort, a highly instrumented liquid-cooled cluster has been installed at PNNL. The cluster is housed in an 800 ft2 data center which resides in a mixed-use data center with a significant amount of instrumentation as well. The eventual objective of the effort is to be able to report the real-time power consumption, energy efficiency, and productivity of the liquid-cooled data center. Preliminary results from the effort at PNNL are reported in this paper. Thermal results are reported for the hottest server components, including the microprocessors and memory DIMMs. Under all conditions tested, the components have not exceeded manufacturers’ specifications. More importantly, the data show that the liquid-cooled servers can be maintained within specifications while rejecting to non-chilled facility water at 78°F (25.6°C). Furthermore, a reasonable extrapolation suggests that the specifications can still be maintained at 86°F (30°C). In an effort to address global warming, work has started on the qualification of a new 3M Fluoroketone fluid that has a Global Warming Potential (GWP) of 1. This GWP is the lowest published value of all commercially available coolants. Details are provided in the body of this paper.

  6. Final Scientific/Technical Report Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest - CCSTNW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Workman, James

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the activities of the Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest (CCSTNW) program 2009 to 2013. The CCSTNW created, implemented, and provided Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) training over the period of the program. With the assistance of an expert advisory board, CCSTNW created curriculum and conducted three short courses, more than three lectures, two symposiums, and a final conference. The program was conducted in five phases; 1) organization, gap analysis, and form advisory board; 2) develop list serves, website, and tech alerts; 3) training needs survey; 4) conduct lectures, courses, symposiums, and a conference; 5) evaluation surveys and course evaluations. This program was conducted jointly by Environmental Outreach and Stewardship Alliance (dba. Northwest Environmental Training Center – NWETC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL).

  7. Preconstruction schedules, costs, and permit requirements for electric power generating resources in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Smith, S.A.; Thurman, A.G.; Watts, R.L.; Weakley, S.A.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for the Generation Programs Branch, Office of Energy Resources, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The principal objective of the report is to assemble in one document preconstruction cost, schedule, and permit information for twelve specific generating resources. The report is one of many documents that provide background information for BPA's Resource Program, which is designed to identify the type and amount of new resources that BPA may have to add over the next twenty years to maintain an adequate and reliable electric power supply in the Pacific Northwest. A predecessor to this report is a 1982 report prepared by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Northwest Power Planning Council (the Council''). The 1982 report had a similar, but not identical, content and format. 306 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  8. A Comprehensive Approach to Bi-National Regional Energy Planning in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matt Morrison

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific NorthWest Economic Region, a statutory organization chartered by the Northwest states of Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Oregon, and the western Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, and the Yukon through its Energy Working Group launched a bi-national energy planning initiative designed to create a Pacific Northwest energy planning council of regional public/private stakeholders from both Canada and the US. There is an urgent need to deal with the comprehensive energy picture now before our hoped for economic recovery results in energy price spikes which are likely to happen because the current supply will not meet predicted demand. Also recent events of August 14th have shown that our bi-national energy grid system is intricately interdependent, and additional planning for future capacity is desperately needed.

  9. FY 1999 Annual Self-Evaluation Report of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy R. LaBarge

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (Pacific Northwest's) FY1999 Annual Self-Evaluation Report. This report summarizes our progress toward accomplishment of the critical outcomes, objectives, and performance indicators as delineated in the FY1999 Performance Evaluation & Fee Agreement. It also summarizes our analysis of the results of Pacific Northwest's Division and Directorate annual self-assessments, and the implementation of our key operational improvement initiatives. Together, these provide an indication of how well we have used our Integrated Assessment processes to identify and plan improvements for FY2000. As you review the report you will find areas of significantly positive progress; you will also note areas where I believe the Laboratory could make improvements. Overall, however, I believe you will be quite pleased to note that we have maintained, or exceeded, the high standards of performance we have set for the Laboratory.

  10. 1995 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, Technical Appendix: Volume 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (WhiteBook), is published annually by BPA, and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the, information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. Aside from these purposes, the White Book is used for input to BPA`s resource planning process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC).

  11. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program: High Performance Manufactured Home Prototyping and Construction Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewes, T.; Peeks, B.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program (NEEM) administrator, have been collaborating to conduct research on new specifications that would improve on the energy requirements of a NEEM home. In its role as administrator, NEW administers the technical specs, performs research and engineering analysis, implements ongoing construction quality management procedures, and maintains a central database with home tracking. This project prototyped and assessed the performances of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that are not commonly deployed in the manufacturing setting. The package of measures is able to reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50 percent over typical manufactured homes produced in the northwest.

  12. Ecosystem Approaches for Fisheries Management 609 Alaska Sea Grant College Program AK-SG-99-01, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Approaches for Fisheries Management 609 Alaska Sea Grant College Program · AK-SG-99-01, 1999 Ecosystem Considerations and the Limitations of Ecosystem Models in Fisheries Management: Insights for the implementation of ecosystem approaches. The major criticism of single- species models is that they cannot predict

  13. State Sea Grant Program Federal Funding Match Funding Project Titles AK Alaska Sea Grant $255,010 $40,543

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Social Dimensions of Offshore Wind Power Development off the Delmarva Peninsula Extending modelsState Sea Grant Program Federal Funding Match Funding Project Titles AK Alaska Sea Grant $255 to Integrate Sea-Level Rise Adaptation into Existing Land Use Plans Marine Extension and Education Graduate

  14. 1994 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, Technical Appendix: Volume 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study establishes the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) planning basis for supplying electricity t6 BPA customers. The Loads and Resources Study is presented in two documents: (1) this technical appendix detailing loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility; and (2) a summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources. This analysis updates the 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study Technical Appendix published in December 1993. This technical appendix provides utility specific information that BPA uses in its long-range planning. It incorporates the following for each utility: (1) electrical demand-firm loads; (2) generating resources; and (3) contracts both inside and outside the region. This document should be used in combination with the 1994 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, published in December 1994, because much of the information in that document is not duplicated here. This BPA planning document incorporates Pacific Northwest generating resources and the 1994 medium load forecast prepared by BPA. Each utility`s forecasted future firm loads are subtracted from its existing resources to determine whether it will be surplus or deficit. If a utility`s resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which the utility can sell to increase revenues. Conversely, if its firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity, and additional conservation, contract purchases, or generating resources will be needed to meet the utility`s load.

  15. Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program Year Book; 1992-1993 Yearbook with 1994 Activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy administers five Regional Bioenergy Programs to encourage regionally specific application of biomass and municipal waste-to-energy technologies to local needs, opportunities and potentials. The Pacific Northwest and Alaska region has taken up a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided its five participating state energy programs. This report describes the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program, and related projects of the state energy agencies, and summarizes the results of technical studies. It also considers future efforts of this regional program to meet its challenging assignment.

  16. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 4, Comments and Responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) contains public comments addressing the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Draft EIS, August 1990 and Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) responses. The Introduction provides information about the process BPA follows in addressing these comments. Part I contains a listing of the Alternative Actions evaluated in the Final EIS; Part II is organized by Alternatives and includes summaries of the comments and BPA responses; Part III provides copies of the original comments letters, and, for ease of identification, are coded in the margins according to the alternative(s) addressed.

  17. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix B HYDROPOWER AVAILABILITY IN RESPONSE TO SALMON RECOVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    addresses only those measures that affect the operation of the Northwest's hydroelectric power system of the hydroelectric power system. Some energy is lost when it is spilled and some energy is shifted out of winterB-1 Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix B APPENDIX B HYDROPOWER

  18. Northwest Regional Technology Center, nwrtc@pnl.gov, (888) 347-6983 Department of Energy National Labs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center, nwrtc@pnl.gov, (888) 347-6983 Department of Energy National to partner with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, specifically the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Idaho National Laboratory, to help identify technology needs and requirements

  19. Guidelines for Selection of University Libraries' Materials for Transfer to the Northwest Ohio Regional Book Depository, Bowling Green State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Regional Book Depository, Bowling Green State University Materials in the Wm. T. Jerome LibraryGuidelines for Selection of University Libraries' Materials for Transfer to the Northwest Ohio and in the Ogg Science Library are subject to an ongoing process for selection and transfer to the Northwest Ohio

  20. Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Lee Hall, BPA Smart Grid Program Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Lee Hall, BPA Smart Grid Program Manager February 14 utilities to invest in DR Regional situational analysis ­ issues to address #12;Nationally ­ Demand ResponseSource: FERC Demand Response & Advanced Metering Report, February 2011 Peak DR 65,000 MW 1,062 MW Peak DR

  1. Dating of coal fires in Xinjiang, north-west China Xiangmin Zhang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Dating of coal fires in Xinjiang, north-west China Xiangmin Zhang,1 Salomon B. Kroonenberg2 and Cor, the Netherlands Introduction Coal fires are one of the most serious problems for the Chinese coal indus- try. The estimated annual loss of coal by fires in China ranges from about 10­20 million tonnes (Guan et al., 1998

  2. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix L: Climate Change and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demand for electricity and production of hydroelectric generation. Global climate change models all seem. There are at least two ways in which climate can affect the power plan. First, warming trends will alter electricitySixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix L: Climate Change and Power Planning

  3. Northwest Regional Technology Center, May 2013 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response Events Next-Generation Communications Inoperability Virtual Workshop PNNL hosted a Next including Lync, LiveWall and Twitter. The purpose of the workshop, organized by PNNL's Jon Barr, Jessica

  4. Northwest Regional Technology Center, April 2014 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response priorities, interests and goals. This article is the first in a series about the IAB. PNNL: This year marks partnerships and projects that we're working on. PNNL: Who makes up the IAB? JH: What we are is a voluntary

  5. Northwest Regional Technology Center, November 2012 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency Responders to effectively counter a potential threat to our Nation. PNNL, in collaboration with DHS S. To better determine the requirements and needs of First Responders in a daily operational context, PNNL held

  6. Northwest Regional Technology Center, July 2014 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response for the Seattle (WA) Fire Department. This article is the last in a three-part series about the IAB. PNNL: How. PNNL: What are the next major steps or objectives the IAB would like to achieve in 2014 or beyond? JH

  7. Northwest Regional Technology Center, May 2014 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response Department. This article is the second in a three-part series about the IAB. PNNL: Do you think the nation in grant programs. PNNL: What can the first responder community do today to help prepare themselves? JH

  8. Modeling to discern nitrogen fertilization impacts on carbon sequestration in a Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling to discern nitrogen fertilization impacts on carbon sequestration in a Pacific Northwest A R K J O H N S O N } *LREIS Institute of Geographic Sciences & Nature Resources Research, Chinese of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4, zBiometeorology and Soil Physics

  9. Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Request for Proposals for Evaluation of the Regional Technical Forum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Request for Proposals for Evaluation of the Regional Technical Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) will issue a time-and-materials contract, not to exceed $75,000. NEEA governments, public interest groups and energy efficiency industry representatives that operate in the states

  10. The Effects of an Increasing Surplus of Energy Generating Capability in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generation can substitute wind generation with relatively low-cost hydro power. System operators have had the unique characteristics of wind generation on the Northwest power system. 2 Renewable energy credits (RECs of the effects of incremental wind generation on the frequency of excess energy events and on the costs and other

  11. Organochlorine Pollutants and Stable Isotopes in Resident and Migrant Passerine Birds from Northwest Michoacan, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mora, Miguel A.

    Organochlorine Pollutants and Stable Isotopes in Resident and Migrant Passerine Birds from Northwest Michoaca´n, Mexico Miguel A. Mora Received: 22 October 2007 / Accepted: 20 December 2007 to assess if resident and migrant birds wintering in western Michoaca´n, Mexico accumulated elevated

  12. 3. Fluvial Processes in Puget Sound Rivers and the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3. Fluvial Processes in Puget Sound Rivers and the Pacific Northwest John M. Buffington*, Richard D and response potential in the Puget Sound region. We also review the influence of different channel types or costly to maintain. *Author corrections shown in blue. in Restoration of Puget Sound Rivers, edited by D

  13. 3. Fluvial Processes in Puget Sound Rivers and the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    3. Fluvial Processes in Puget Sound Rivers and the Pacific Northwest John M. Buffington, Richard D and response potential in the Puget Sound region. We also review the influence of different channel types ambitious program for river restoration is develop- ing in the Puget Sound region driven by concerns over

  14. Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind Integration and Conservation Council Wind Integration Costs · Reserving capacity for within-hour balancing is costly the system without the need to reserve flexible capacity for within-hour balancing of wind generation #12;3 5

  15. Thermodynamics of tropical cyclogenesis in the northwest Pacific D. J. Raymond,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond, David J.

    Thermodynamics of tropical cyclogenesis in the northwest Pacific D. J. Raymond,1 S. L. Sessions,1 and thermodynamic products were derived from dropsonde and airborne Doppler radar data, with the goal of increasing: Raymond, D. J., S. L. Sessions, and C. López Carrillo (2011), Thermodynamics of tropical cyclogenesis

  16. Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measure, Chair, Northwest Power and Conservation Council Paul Lumley, Executive Director, Columbia River of the FPC's analytical products. The FPC Oversight Board, ISAB, and FPC director have established guidelines for this regular review. The guidelines specify that the ISAB will examine FPC and CSS draft annual reports when

  17. Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measure, Chair, Northwest Power and Conservation Council Paul Lumley, Executive Director, Columbia River, on matters related to water management, spill, and other passage measures. The Program also calls guidelines for this regular review. The guidelines specify that a subgroup of the ISAB will "initiate

  18. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

  19. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Sixth Power Plan Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    portfolio standards, improved efficiency will help delay investments in more expensive and less clean forms or renewable energy opportunities. The plan encourages investment in these resources when cost development of energy efficiency could constitute a resource comparable in size to the Northwest federal

  20. Cleanup Verification Package for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits waste site. This waste site consisted of two earthen trenches thought to have received both radioactive and nonradioactive material related to the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm.

  1. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix I ENVIRONMENTAL COST METHODOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I-1 Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix I APPENDIX I ENVIRONMENTAL COST METHODOLOGY METHOD FOR DETERMINING QUANTIFIABLE ENVIRONMENTAL COSTS AND BENEFITS Priority or measure is cost-effective. Quantifiable environmental costs and benefits are among the direct costs

  2. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 10: Resource Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 10: Resource Strategy Key Findings, and preserve its existing electric infrastructure and research and develop technologies for the long-term improvement of the region's electricity supply. Scenario analysis showed that the electric power sector

  3. UTILITY PLANNING ISSUES Northwest Power and Conservation Council August 9, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to jointly purchase NEMS ­ John Saven No one else needs much power either Only 1 other I-937 utility in groupUTILITY PLANNING ISSUES Northwest Power and Conservation Council August 9, 2011 #12;Inland Overview - Power Don't need a lot of additional power 3 MW by 2016; 8 by 2020 Formed group of 20 smaller utilities

  4. Northwest Power and Conservation Council NW Power Markets Symposium Morgan Stanley Commodities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council ­ NW Power Markets Symposium Morgan Stanley Commodities in a fiduciary capacity. This information was prepared by Morgan Stanley sales, trading, banking or other non as independent of the interests of Morgan Stanley trading desks. To the extent any prices or price levels

  5. Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Draft Wholesale Power Price Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higher Coal Prices Medium Long-term Trend Forecasts for PNW Zones 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1 Mexico Arizona Utah Nevada North Alberta Baja California North Nevada South PNW Westside 10 Northwest

  6. Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center Weekly Update, Grand Rapids 2015 1/13-14 NW Michigan Orchard & Vineyard Show Grand Traverse Resort, Acme, MI 2 ­ Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center 3/4-6 Michigan Grape & Wine Conference MSU ­ Kellogg Hotel & Conference

  7. his report summarizes the results of an analysis of CO2 production from the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    produced about 520 pounds of CO2 for each megawatt-hour of electricity generated, com- pared to 900 pounds for the Northwest to maintain or reduce its average per-megawatt-hour CO2 emission rate. In the base case of this study, which assumes implementation of the Council's Fifth Power Plan, the WECC CO2 emission rate

  8. Impact of Moisture Flux and Freezing Level on Simulated Orographic Precipitation Errors over the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuter, Sandra

    the Pacific Northwest YANLUAN LIN Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Center System Modeling, Center of Earth System Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. E microphysical Corresponding author address: Dr. Yanluan Lin, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth

  9. Phlebotomus perfiliewi transcaucasicus is circulating both Leishmania donovani and L. infantum in northwest Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in northwest Iran Mohammad Ali Oshaghi a,*, Naseh Maleki Ravasan b , Mallorie Hide c , Ezat-Aldin Javadian-6446, Iran b Department of Medical Parasitology and Entomology, College of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran c G'en'etique et Evolution des Maladies Infectieuses, IRD/CNRS (UMR 2724), F-34394

  10. Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Geospatial Information Technologies at the National Academy of Sciences; Lead for the Spatial ApplicationNorthwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System (IBIS) for the Columbia River Basin(IBIS) for the Columbia

  11. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas....................................................................... 1 Analysis of the Direct Use of Natural Gas for the Sixth Power Plan electricity to natural gas for residential space and water heating a lower-cost and lower-risk alternative

  12. Council Document 2006-11July 2006 Fifth Annual Report to the Northwest Governors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Bonneville Power Administration to Implement the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Bonneville Power Administration 1 In Fiscal Year 2004, the Bonneville Power Admin- istration spent a total of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 1978 - 2005 #12;#12;Fifth Annual Report on Expenditures

  13. Council Document 2008-03April 2008 Seventh Annual Report to the Northwest Governors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Bonneville Power Administration to Implement the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Bonneville Power Administration 1 In Fiscal Year 2007, the Bonneville Power Ad- ministration spent a total. Summary 1 Section 4(h)(10)(C) of the Northwest Power Act established a reimbursement to Bonneville in form

  14. Large-Scale Errors and Mesoscale Predictability in Pacific Northwest Snowstorms DALE R. DURRAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large-Scale Errors and Mesoscale Predictability in Pacific Northwest Snowstorms DALE R. DURRAN The development of mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) models over the last two decades has made- search communities. Nevertheless, the predictability of the mesoscale features captured in such forecasts

  15. Oceanographic Observations Off the Pacific Northwest Following the 1982 EI Nino Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oceanographic Observations Off the Pacific Northwest Following the 1982 EI Nino Event R. K. REED that EI Nino events in the equatorial Pacific are frequently ac- companied by significant warming be important (Chelton and Davis, 1982). The EI Nino events do produce strik- ing visual coherence in sea level

  16. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz ISRP 2012-16 October 3, 2012 #12;ISRP Review of the Flathead Lake Draft EIS Contents Background .................................................................................................................................... 17 #12;1 ISRP Review of the Flathead Lake Draft EIS Background In response to the Northwest Power Fish Species Flathead Lake, Montana (hereafter Flathead Lake draft EIS or draft EIS). The draft EIS

  17. The push for increased coal injection rates -- Blast furnace experience at AK Steel Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dibert, W.A.; Duncan, J.H.; Keaton, D.E.; Smith, M.D. [AK Steel Corp., Middletown, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An effort has been undertaken to increase the coal injection rate on Amanda blast furnace at AK Steel Corporation`s Ashland Works in Ashland, Kentucky to decrease fuel costs and reduce coke demand. Operating practices have been implemented to achieve a sustained coal injection rate of 140 kg/MT, increased from 100--110 kg/MT. In order to operate successfully at the 140 kg/MT injection rate; changes were implemented to the furnace charging practice, coal rate control methodology, orientation of the injection point, and the manner of distribution of coal to the multiple injection points. Additionally, changes were implemented in the coal processing facility to accommodate the higher demand of pulverized coal; grinding 29 tonnes per hour, increased from 25 tonnes per hour. Further increases in injection rate will require a supplemental supply of fuel.

  18. Fact #788: July 15, 2013 State and Private Consumer Incentives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Residents with a Separate Meter for PEV Charging AK, AL, AZ, CA, GA, HI, IN, KY, MI, MN, NV, TX, VA Charging EquipmentInstallation Incentive AZ, CA, CO, IL, IN, MD, MI, TN,...

  19. LATA KY WEA-2012-01

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction to Energy PerformanceJohn CymbalskyKristina Johnson About Us Dr.TRIBALLANL

  20. External Assurance Letter from Sustainable Business Consulting Sustainable Business Consulting evaluated Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) sustainability report to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    evaluated Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) sustainability report to establish specific suggestions for improvement. We found that PNNL meets the guidelines and reported the information representation of information concerning boundary setting, quality, report content, and material indicators. PNNL

  1. External Assurance Letter from Sustainable Business Consulting Sustainable Business Consulting evaluated Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) sustainability report to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    evaluated Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) sustainability report to establish specific suggestions for improvement. We found that PNNL satisfactorily meets the guidelines and reported representation of information concerning report content, quality, boundary setting and material indicators. PNNL

  2. Energy Storage for Power Systems Applications: A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Balducci, Patrick J.; Jin, Chunlian; Nguyen, Tony B.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Guo, Xinxin; Tuffner, Francis K.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind production, which has expanded rapidly in recent years, could be an important element in the future efficient management of the electric power system; however, wind energy generation is uncontrollable and intermittent in nature. Thus, while wind power represents a significant opportunity to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), integrating high levels of wind resources into the power system will bring great challenges to generation scheduling and in the provision of ancillary services. This report addresses several key questions in the broader discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid. More specifically, it addresses the following questions: a) how much total reserve or balancing requirements are necessary to accommodate the simulated expansion of intermittent renewable energy resources during the 2019 time horizon, and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting load balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP).

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory facilities radionuclide inventory assessment CY 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sula, M.J.; Jette, S.J.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments for evaluating compliance with airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subparts H and I) were performed for 33 buildings at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory on the Hanford Site, and for five buildings owned and operated by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, Washington. The assessments were performed using building radionuclide inventory data obtained in 1992 and 1993. Results of the assessments are summarized in Table S.1 for DOE-PNL buildings and in Table S.2 for Battelle-owned buildings. Based on the radionuclide inventory assessments, four DOE-PNL buildings (one with two emission points) require continuous sampling for radionuclides per 40 CFR 61. None of the Battelle-owned buildings require continuous emission sampling.

  4. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energy’s Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

  5. IRIS Reactor a Suitable Option to Provide Energy and Water Desalination for the Mexican Northwest Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, C.; Viais, J.

    2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northwest region of Mexico has a deficit of potable water, along this necessity is the region growth, which requires of additional energy capacity. The IRIS reactor offers a very suitable source of energy given its modular size of 300 MWe and it can be coupled with a desalination plant to provide the potable water for human consumption, agriculture and industry. The present paper assess the water and energy requirements for the Northwest region of Mexico and how the deployment of the IRIS reactor can satisfy those necessities. The possible sites for deployment of Nuclear Reactors are considered given the seismic constraints and the closeness of the sea for external cooling. And in the other hand, the size of the desalination plant and the type of desalination process are assessed accordingly with the water deficit of the region.

  6. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Appendices A--L.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of appendices A-L of the final environmental impact statement for the Bonneville Power Administration. The appendices provide information on the following: Ninth circuit Court opinion in Forelaws on Board v. Johnson; guide to Northwest Power act contracts; guide to hydro operations; glossary; affected environment supporting documentation; environmental impacts of generic resource types; information on models used; technical information on analysis; public involvement activities; bibliography; Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act; and biological assessment. (CBS)

  7. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix R: Pacific Northwest Coordination agreement (PNCA).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, the Federal government coordinates the planning and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) with projects owned and operated by the region`s non-Federal hydrogenerating utilities pursuant to the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), the Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are parties to the PNCA on behalf of the government of the United States. The PNCA is a complex agreement that provides an opportunity for the region`s power producers to maximize the power system`s reliability and economy while meeting their multiple-use objectives. The PNCA does not dictate the operation of the resources it coordinates. It is essentially an accounting mechanism that exchanges the power produced among the parties in order to improve the reliability of the system and reduce regional power costs. Project owners retain complete autonomy to operate as needed to meet their multiple-use requirements. The PNCA was executed in 1964 as an important component of regional plans to maximize the Northwest`s hydro resource capability. Maximization also included the development of storage projects on the Columbia River in Canada pursuant to the terms of the 1964 Columbia River Treaty. Because of the link between power coordination and Treaty issues, the current parties to the PNCA, currently are contemplating entering into a replacement or renewed power coordination agreement. Because the power coordination agreement is a consensual arrangement, its ultimate provisions must be acceptable to all of its signatories. This Appendix R to the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Columbia River System is a presentation of the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement.

  8. Linear depressions and collapse features in the Northwest Hueco Basin, West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Scott D

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LINEAR DEPRESSIONS AND COLLAPSE FEATURES IN THE NORTHWEST HUECO BASIN, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by SCOTT D. HENDERSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1997 Major Subject: Geology LINEAR DEPRESSIONS AND COLLAPSE FEATURES IN THE NORTHVKST HUECO BASIN, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by SCOTT D. HENDERSON Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fultlllment of the requirements...

  9. Hardwood supply in the Pacific northwest: A policy perspective. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raettig, T.L.; Connaughton, K.P.; Ahrens, G.R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy framework for the hardwood resource and hardwood industry in western Oregon and Washington is examined. Harvesting trends, harvesting behavior of public and private landowners, and harvesting regulation are presented to complete the analysis of factors affecting short-run hardwood supply. In the short term, the supply of hardwoods is generally favorable, but in the long term, the supply is uncertain and cause for concern. Hardwoods need to be recognized in forest management in the Pacific Northwest.

  10. Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 3. Question-by-question results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tabulations are presented of responses to approximately 105 questions. Results are tabulated by 9 geographic regions: the four states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington; four climate zones in the region; and a weighted Pacific Northwest total. A description of the tabulated data is given in the Introduction. Tabulated data deal with questions on dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning systems; water heating; appliances; demographic and swelling characteristics; and insulation.

  11. Proceedings: Second Annual Pacific Northwest Alternative and Renewable Energy Resources Conference.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers presented at the conference are published in this volume. The purpose of the conference was to solicit regional cooperation in the promoting of near-term development of such alternative and renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest as: cogeneration; biomass; wind; small hydro; solar end-use applications; and geothermal direct heat utilization. Separate abstracts of selected papers were prepared for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  12. Choosing an electrical energy future for the Pacific Northwest: an alternative scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beers, J.R.; Cavanagh, R.C.; Lash, T.R.; Mott, L.

    1980-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A strategy is presented for averting the short-term energy supply uncertainties that undermine prospects for stable economic development in the Pacific Northwest. This strategy is based on: an analysis of the present electric power consumption by various end-use sectors; comparison of incentives to promote energy conservation and lower demand growth; analysis of alternatives to current dependency on hydro power; and a study of the cost of planning and implementing future power supply programs. (LCL)

  13. Pacific Northwest Site Office EA / EIS | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO Website Directory PPPOLarson.CherylPacific Northwest

  14. Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufactured, or HUD-Code, homes comprise a growing share of the housing stock in the Northwest, as well as nationally. Their relatively low cost has made them especially attractive to lower income families, first-time home-buyers, and retired persons. The characteristics of manufactured home (MH) buyers, the unique energy consumption characteristics of the homes, and their increasing market share make this market an especially critical one for energy consumption and conservation planning in the Northwest. This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that can potentially assist the design of a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. This study has the objective of assisting BPA in the development of a regional approach in which numerous organizations and parties would participate to achieve conservation in new manufactured homes. A previous survey and information collected for this study from regional dealers and manufacturers provide an indication of the energy conservation options being sold to manufactured home buyers in the PNW. Manufacturers in the Northwest appear to sell homes that usually exceed the HUD thermal requirements. Manufacturers typically offer efficiency improvements in packages that include fixed improvements in insulation levels, glazing, and infiltration control. Wholesale costs of these packages range from about $100 to $1500. Typical packages include significant upgrades in floor insulation values with modest upgrades in ceilings and walls. This study identifies trends and impacts that a marketing plan should consider to adequately address the financial concerns of manufactured home buyers.

  15. Photometric analysis of overcontact binaries AK Her, HI Dra, V1128 Tau and V2612 Oph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caliskan, S; Djurasevic, G; Ozavci, I; Basturk, O; Cseki, A; Senavci, H V; Kilicoglu, T; Yilmaz, M; Selam, S O

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze new, high quality multicolor light curves of four overcontact binaries: AK Her, HI Dra, V1128 Tau and V2612 Oph, and determine their orbital and physical parameters using the modeling program of G. Djurasevic and recently published results of radial velocity studies. The achieved precision in absolute masses is between 10 and 20%, and in absolute radii between 5 and 10%. All four systems are W UMa type binaries with bright or dark spots indicative of mass and energy transfer or surface activity. We estimate the distances and the ages of the systems using the luminosities computed through our analysis, and perform an O-C study for V1128 Tau, which reveals a complex period variation that can be interpreted in terms of mass loss/exchange and either the presence of the third body, or the magnetic activity on one of the components. We conclude that further observations of these systems are needed to deepen our understanding of their nature and variability.

  16. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Apatite Investigation at the 100-NR-2 Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by staff working on the 100-NR-2 Apatite Project. The U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at 100-N would include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment. The scope of this project covers the technical support needed before, during, and after treatment of the targeted subsurface environment using a new high-concentration formulation.

  17. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  18. Shallow meteoric alteration and burial diagenesis of massive dolomite in the Castle Reef Formation, northwest Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitsitt, Philip Mark

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), Sawmill Creek (SC), Half Dome Crag (HDC), Morningstar Mountain (MM), Mount Field (MF), Gateway Pass (GP), North Fork of Dupuyer Creek (NFD), South Fork of Dupuyer Creek (SFD), Volcano Reef (VR), North Fork of Teton River (NFT), Teton River (TR), Cave...SHALLOW METEORIC ALTERATION AND BURIAL DIAGENESIS OF MASSIVE DOLOM I TE I N THE CASTLE REEF FORMAT I ON ~ NORTHWEST MONTANA A Thesis by PHILIP MARK WHITSITT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  19. Annotated bibliography of the Northwest Territories action on water component of the Arctic environmental strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, R.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-related research conducted under the 1991--97 Arctic Environmental Strategy resulted in the production of 215 publications listed in this bibliography. The main section sorts citations by author and then by title. All citations are annotated and are keyed to the database of the Arctic Science and Technology Information System (ASTIS). The bibliography has three indexes that refer back to the main section: Subject, geographic area, and title. Topics covered include Northwest Territories hydrology, environmental fate of contaminants, water quality, snow, the water cycle, modelling, and limnology.

  20. PURPA Resource Development in the Pacific Northwest : Case Studies of Ten Electricity Generating Powerplants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State Energy Office.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The case studies in this document describe the Public Utilities, Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) development process for a variety of generating technologies. Developer interactions with regulatory agencies and power purchasers are described in some detail. Equipment, installation, and maintenance costs are identified; power marketing considerations are taken into account; and potential environmental impacts, with corresponding mitigation approaches and practices are summarized. The project development case studies were prepared by the energy agencies of the four Northwest states, under contract to the Bonneville Power Administration.

  1. Pacific northwest region vegetation and inventory monitoring system. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max, T.A.; Schreuder, H.T.; Hazard, J.W.; Oswald, D.D.; Teply, J.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grid sampling strategy was adopted for broad-scale inventory and monitoring of forest and range vegetation on National Forest System lands in the Pacific Northwest Region, USDA Forest Service. This paper documents the technical details of the adopted design and discusses alternative sampling designs that were considered. The design is flexible and can be used with many types of maps. The theory of point and change estimation is described, as well as estimates of variation that assess the statistical precision of estimates.

  2. EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPA’s proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

  3. Concept selection northwest boundary containment system. Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, B.L.; Bergeron, P.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RMA and USATHAMA have been tasked with developing a preliminary conceptual design for the Northwest Boundary Contamination Control System. Specific tasks included in this program follow: (1) Provide a Concept Selection with supporting Rationale for the recommended control system. This design will include the number of dewatering and recharge wells, the type of treatment system, the monitoring well requirements, the spacing of wells, the location of the barrier and wells, and the expected performance of the system components; (2) Provide a buy versus lease analysis for the treatment system; and (3) Prepare a 1391C and PDB-1 Document for submission from the technical operations directorate to the installation service directorate at RMA.

  4. Energy and Water Conservation Assessment of the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Stephanie R.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of an energy and water conservation assessment of the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The assessment was performed in October 2013 by engineers from the PNNL Building Performance Team with the support of the dedicated RPL staff and several Facilities and Operations (F&O) department engineers. The assessment was completed for the Facilities and Operations (F&O) department at PNNL in support of the requirements within Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007.

  5. DOE and Northwest Partners Host Three-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Portland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 270 attendees gathered in Portland, OR to participate in the "Voices for SSL Efficiency" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on July 9-11, 2008. The workshop, hosted by DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Energy Trust of Oregon, Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, and Puget Sound Energy, was the third DOE meeting to explore how Federal, State, and private-sector organizations can work together to guide market introduction of high-performance SSL products. The workshop brought together a diverse gathering of participants – energy efficiency organizations, utilities, government, and industry – to share insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

  6. Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

    2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the lab’s total carbon footprint.

  7. Pacific Northwest Site Office Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) Mapping the Impact ofHome Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO)

  8. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts Regions NationalScienceofOregonPacific Northwest

  9. Energy Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 AvailableD Bonds: In the

  10. Energy Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 AvailableD Bonds: In

  11. Energy Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 AvailableD Bonds: InB

  12. Energy Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 AvailableD Bonds:

  13. Energy Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavy DutyDistrict |Consumption1EnergyMatters:In

  14. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program -- FY 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weeks, Regan S.

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year (FY) 2010, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Protection and Regulatory Programs Division (before March 1, 2011 known as the Environmental Management Services Department) staff performed a number of activities as part of PNNL’s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program. These activities helped to verify U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) and Richland Operations Office (RL) compliance with NEPA requirements and streamline the NEPA process for federal activities conducted at PNNL. Self-assessments were performed to address NEPA compliance and cultural and biological resource protection. The NEPA self-assessments focused on implementation within the PNNL Energy and Environment Directorate and routine maintenance activities conducted during the previous calendar year. The cultural and biological resource self-assessments were conducted in accordance with the PNSO Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan, which specifies annual monitoring of important resources to assess and document the status of the resources and the associated protective mechanisms in place to protect sensitive resources.

  15. Implementing PURPA : Renewable Resource Development in the Pacific Northwest : Executive Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State Energy Office.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities (QFs) and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided cost of providing both capacity and energy. Facilities that qualify for PURPA benefits include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. The mandate of PURPA, coupled with the electrical energy deficits projected to occur in the Pacific Northwest by the mid 1980s, led to resurgence of interest in the development of small, decentralized, non-utility owned and operated generating stations. A variety of would-be developers conducted feasibility studies and initiated environmental permitting and power marketing discussions with appropriate authorities. While many proposed PURPA projects fill by the wayside, others were successfully brought on-line. A variety of public and private sector developers, including cities, counties, irrigation districts, utilities, ranchers, timber companies, and food processing plants, successfully negotiated PURPA-based, or share-the-savings'' power purchase contracts. Other developers run their meter backwards'' or provide energy to their local utilities at the same rate that would otherwise be paid to Bonneville. This document provides a summary resource development of these renewable projects in the Pacific Northwest.

  16. Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program : Five Year Report, 1985-1990.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.)

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This five-year report describes activities of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program between 1985 and 1990. Begun in 1979, this Regional Bioenergy Program became the model for the nation's four other regional bioenergy programs in 1983. Within the time span of this report, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program has undertaken a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided the work of its five participating state energy programs. During this period, the Regional Bioenergy Program has brought together public- and private-sector organizations to promote the use of local biomass and municipal-waste energy resources and technologies. This report claims information on the mission, goals and accomplishments of the Regional Bioenergy Program. It describes the biomass projects conducted by the individual states of the region, and summarizes the results of the programs technical studies. Publications from both the state and regional projects are listed. The report goes on to consider future efforts of the Regional Bioenergy Program under its challenging assignment. Research activities include: forest residue estimates; Landsat biomass mapping; woody biomass plantations; industrial wood-fuel market; residential space heating with wood; materials recovery of residues; co-firing wood chips with coal; biomass fuel characterization; wood-boosted geothermal power plants; wood gasification; municipal solid wastes to energy; woodstove study; slash burning; forest depletion; and technology transfer. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emissions Units and Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Brown, Jason H.; Walker, Brian A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development (R and D) laboratories in Richland, WA, including those associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Hanford Site and PNNL Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all emission units that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually by PNNL staff members. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission unit system performance, operation, and design information. For sampled systems, a description of the buildings, exhaust units, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered emission unit. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided. Deregistered emission unit details are provided as necessary for up to 5 years post closure.

  18. BPA/Puget Power Northwest Washington Transmission Project : Summary of the Supplemental Draft Environmental Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA and Puget Sound Power and Light (Puget Power) are proposing to upgrade the existing electric transmission power system in the Whatcom and Skagit County area of northwest Washington to increase the capacity of the US-Canada Intertie transmission system. The project would satisfy the need to provide more ability to store and return energy with Canada, would provide additional capacity on the Intertie for anticipated increases in power transactions, and would increase flexibility in operation of the US and Canadian hydroelectric system. It would protect Puget Power`s local system against thermal overloads, and improve local reliability. In November 1993, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Whatcom County (Washington) published a draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) for the proposed Northwest Washington Transmission Project. In order to present some shifts in need for the project and to permit additional review, BPA and Whatcom County have elected to issue a Supplemental Draft EIS. This Summary presents background material, explains project needs and purposes, and then focuses on alternatives and the possible effects.

  19. Choosing an electrical energy future for the Pacific Northwest: an Alternative Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavanagh, R.C.; Mott, L.; Beers, J.R.; Lash, T.L.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Alternative Scenario for the electric energy future of the Pacific Northwest is presented. The Scenario includes an analysis of each major end use of electricity in the residential, commercial, manufacturing, and agricultural sectors. This approach affords the most direct means of projecting the likely long-term growth in consumption and the opportunities for increasing the efficiency with which electricity is used in each instance. The total demand for electricity by these end uses then provides a basis for determining whether additional central station generation is required to 1995. A projection of total demand for electricity depends on the combination of many independent variables and assumptions. Thus, the approach is a resilient one; no single assumption or set of linked assumptions dominates the analysis. End-use analysis allows policymakers to visualize the benefits of alternative programs, and to make comparison with the findings of other studies. It differs from the traditional load forecasts for the Pacific Northwest, which until recently were based largely on straightforward extrapolations of historical trends in the growth of electrical demand. The Scenario addresses the supply potential of alternative energy sources. Data are compiled for 1975, 1985, and 1995 in each end-use sector.

  20. Published by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States 3535 College Road Suite 101 Fairbanks, AK 99709 Arctic Research at the University of Northern British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    · Fairbanks, AK 99709 Arctic Research at the University of Northern British Columbia Establishedin1994 Columbia Prince George Campus 3333 University Way Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9 Canada 250-960-5555 sderywithconsiderablepublicendorsementandenthusiasm,theUniver- sity of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) has grown into one of Canada's premier

  1. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 12TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH AvEnuE, Su

  2. Recommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to operate the FCRPS to maximize energy revenue so Bonneville can pay its nuclear power plant gambling debtsRecommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power to the Northwest Power Planning Council's March 14, 2001 request for recommended amendments to the mainstem

  3. EIS-0066: The Role of Bonneville Power Administration in the Pacific Northwest Power Supply System- including its Participation in a Hydro-Thermal Power Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepared this EIS to examine the environmental impacts of the Pacific Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act, which will foster regional electric power planning in the four Northwest states, as well as increase BPA’s authority to address future power needs.

  4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY UPGRADES FOR SANITATION FACILITIES IN SELAWIK, AK FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POLLIS, REBECCA

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Native Village of Selawik is a federally recognized Alaskan tribe, located at the mouth of the Selawik River, about 90 miles east of Kotzebue in northwest Alaska. Due to the community’s rural location and cold climate, it is common for electric rates to be four times higher than the cost urban residents pay. These high energy costs were the driving factor for Selawik pursuing funding from the Department of Energy in order to achieve significant energy cost savings. The main objective of the project was to improve the overall energy efficiency of the water treatment/distribution and sewer collection systems in Selawik by implementing the retrofit measures identified in a previously conducted utility energy audit. One purpose for the proposed improvements was to enable the community to realize significant savings associated with the cost of energy. Another purpose of the upgrades was to repair the vacuum sewer system on the west side of Selawik to prevent future freeze-up problems during winter months.

  5. TO: Northwest Energy Efficiency Taskforce (NEET) Executive Committee FROM: Teri Duncan, Work Group 4 Co-Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 of 1 MEMO TO: Northwest Energy Efficiency Taskforce (NEET) Executive Committee FROM: Teri Duncan by enhancing local energy efficiency initiatives and motivating consumers to adopt more energy efficient. That effort would include additional research to develop targeted messaging that motivates energy efficiency

  6. Ancient DNA Analysis of Mid-Holocene Individuals from the Northwest Coast of North America Reveals Different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    ) were generated from four ancient and three living individuals of the northern Northwest Coast of North Island, Alaska, and may have gone extinct, as it has not been observed in any living individuals, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone

  7. Northwest Regional Technology Center, April 2011 Page 1 of 2 Around The R egion In Homeland S ecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response activities related to homeland security in the region, and this issue highlights PNNL technologies for a biological incident A new guide to legal issues in disasters. PNNL Technologies Monitoring R adiation from J

  8. Relating spatial and temporal scales of climate and ocean variability to survival of Pacific Northwest Chinook salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relating spatial and temporal scales of climate and ocean variability to survival of Pacific Oregon St, Suite 200, Portland, OR 97232, U.S.A. 2 Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-5020, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Pacific Northwest Chinook, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, have

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 2 supplement, ecological sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, B.E.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This supplement replaces the list of Publications and Presentations in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1980 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, PNL-3700 PT2, Ecological Sciences. The listings in the report as previously distributed were incomplete owing to changeovers in the bibliographic-tracking system.

  10. QuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Summer 2013 According to the report,"BPA's analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Summer 2013 According to the report long-term value through the avoided costs of developing new resources or having to purchase Recommendations In a recently released analysis, the Bonneville Power Administration set out to answer a simple

  11. GENETIC POPULATION STRUCTURE OF PSEUDO-NITZSCHIA PUNGENS (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE) FROM THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AND THE NORTH SEA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ex Cleve) Hasle is a cosmopolitan diatom commonly occurring in the waters of the Pacific Northwest at least 12 of the 30 described species pro- duce measurable amounts of the neurotoxin DA (Hasle and Syvertsen 1997, Bates 2000, Fryxell and Hasle 2003, Lundholm et al. 2003, Trainer et al. 2008). Molecular

  12. Diagram of the Biofuel Production Process (SPORL -Alcohol Production):Introduction: The Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA) is an organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Diagram of the Biofuel Production Process (SPORL - Alcohol Production):Introduction: The Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA) is an organization that aims to create a sustainable aviation biofuels to determine the atmospheric emissions and emission sources that may be released from proposed NARA biofuels

  13. PACIFIC NORTHWEST NUTRIA PROGRAM SUMMARY 2013 In 2007 the Center for Lakes and Reservoirs and Aquatic Bioinvasions Research and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in numerous management activities. The Center for Lakes and Reservoirs-Aquatic Bioinvasions Research at several integrated pest management education workshops and helped launch a citizen bounty program in Polk1 PACIFIC NORTHWEST NUTRIA PROGRAM SUMMARY 2013 In 2007 the Center for Lakes and Reservoirs

  14. 19 HASTINGS WEST NORTHWEST J. ENVTL. L. & POL'Y 463 (2013) COMBATING SEA-LEVEL RISE IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    19 HASTINGS WEST NORTHWEST J. ENVTL. L. & POL'Y 463 (2013) 1 COMBATING SEA-LEVEL RISE IN SOUTHERN governments will make choices that will shape the region's resilience to sea-level rise. To implement of adaptation actions and sea-level rise itself. This article identifies how local governments can harness legal

  15. The impact of varying environmental conditions on the spatial and temporal patterns of orographic precipitation over the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuter, Sandra

    and forecast models, case studies from field projects, and the analysis of radar and precipitation-gauge Operational radar data from three winter seasons (2003­2006) in Portland, OR, in the U.S. Pacific Northwest). For unblocked flow, the strength and depth of ascent over the windward slope depends on the size and shape

  16. IX. IMPACT OF AEROSOLS FROM THE ERUPTION OF EL CHICHN ON BEAM RADIATION IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    of 25 kilometers [1]. The effect of this dense cloud upon the atmosphere and climate in the Northern around the earth from 5 degrees to about 30 degrees north latitude. The cloud has had an effect upon in the Pacific Northwest due to the effects of the stratospheric cloud from El Chichón. By looking at quantities

  17. The Northwest Infrared (NWIR) gas-phase spectral database of industrial and environmental chemicals: Recent updates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Blake, Thomas A.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Tonkyn, Russell G.

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    With continuing improvements in both standoff- and point-sensing techniques, there is an ongoing need for high-quality infrared spectral databases. The Northwest Infrared Database (NWIR) contains quantitative, gas-phase infrared spectra of nearly 500 pure chemical species that can be used for a variety of applications such as atmospheric monitoring, biomass burning studies, etc. The data, recorded at 0.1 cm-1 resolution, are pressure broadened to one atmosphere (N2) in order to mimic atmospheric conditions. Each spectrum is a composite composed of multiple individual measurements. Recent updates to the database include over 60 molecules that are known or suspected biomass-burning effluents. Examples from this set of measurements will be presented and experimental details will be discussed in the context of the utility of NWIR for environmental applications.

  18. Pacific Northwest GridWise™ Testbed Demonstration Projects; Part I. Olympic Peninsula Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Ambrosio, Ron; Carlon, Teresa A.; DeSteese, John G.; Horst, Gale R.; Kajfasz, Robert; Kiesling, Laura L.; Michie, Preston; Pratt, Robert G.; Yao, Mark; Brous, Jerry; Chassin, David P.; Guttromson, Ross T.; Jarvegren, Olof M.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Le, N. T.; Oliver, Terry V.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the implementation and results of a field demonstration wherein residential electric water heaters and thermostats, commercial building space conditioning, municipal water pump loads, and several distributed generators were coordinated to manage constrained feeder electrical distribution through the two-way communication of load status and electric price signals. The field demonstration took place in Washington and Oregon and was paid for by the U.S. Department of Energy and several northwest utilities. Price is found to be an effective control signal for managing transmission or distribution congestion. Real-time signals at 5-minute intervals are shown to shift controlled load in time. The behaviors of customers and their responses under fixed, time-of-use, and real-time price contracts are compared. Peak loads are effectively reduced on the experimental feeder. A novel application of portfolio theory is applied to the selection of an optimal mix of customer contract types.

  19. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

    2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the PNNL Radiological Control Program Description, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2005 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program

  20. Area monitoring dosimeter program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, S.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an are monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

  1. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

    2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the PNNL Radiological Control Program Description, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2005 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

  2. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

    2001-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the DOE Standard Radiological Control, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2000 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

  3. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

    2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the PNNL Radiological Control Program Description, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2001 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

  4. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory FY96 Annual Self-Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research and development efforts are concentrated on DOE`s environmental quality mission and the scientific research required to support that mission. The Laboratory also supports the energy resources and national security missions in areas where an overlap between our core competencies and DOE`s goals exists. Fiscal year 1996 saw the Laboratory focus its efforts on the results necessary for us to meet DOE`s most important needs and expectations. Six Critical Outcomes were established in partnership with DOE. The Laboratory met or exceeded performance expectations in most areas, including these outcomes and the implementation of the Laboratory`s Integrated Assessment Program. We believe our overall performance for this evaluation period has been outstanding. A summary of results and key issues is provided.

  5. FY 1996 performance evaluation and incentive fee agreement for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, specific detail on incentive fee, and agreements concerning the evaluation of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s FY 1996 Self-Assessment. This information will be the basis for the evaluation of the Laboratory`s performance as required by Articles H-24 and H-25 of the Contract. For the period October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996, the Parties have agreed to measure and evaluate the individual areas of Laboratory activities identified herein. This reflects the fact that the Contractor will be evaluated on two dimensions, namely (1) accomplishment of critical outcomes and (2) the effectiveness of the Contractor`s self-assessment program. Each area will receive its own evaluation rating and they will be combined to determined an overall rating with the first area weighted at 75% and the second area weighted at 25%.

  6. FY2000 Annual Self-Evaluation Report for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RR Labarge

    2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This self-evaluation report offers a summary of results from FY2000 actions to achieve Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's strategy and provides an analysis of the state of their self-assessment process. The result of their integrated planning and assessment process identifies Laboratory strengths and opportunities for improvement. Critical elements of that process are included in this report; namely, a high-level summary of external oversight activities, progress against Operations Improvement Initiatives, and a summary of Laboratory strengths and areas for improvement developed by management from across the laboratory. Some key areas targeted for improvement in FY2001 are: systems approach to resource management; information protection; integrated safety management flow-down to the benchtop; cost management; integrated assessment; Price Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Program; and travel risk mitigation.

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1990 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faust, L.G.; Moraski, R.V.; Selby, J.M.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 5 of the 1990 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Environmental Guidance, the Office of Environmental Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance, the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Safety Compliance, and the Office of Policy and Standards. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, there is an article describing progress made during fiscal year 1990. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

  8. Technology development at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory high-level waste management history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, J.L. [Geosafe Corp., Richland, WA (United States); Platt, A.M.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During WWII and the post-WWII years, until the late 1950`s, plutonium production was Hanford`s primary mission. This mission produced an enormous legacy of wastes that have themselves become the new mission at Hanford. Waste management, as practiced at Hanford, during the defense production years was in many ways unique to Hanford, taking advantage of the dry climate, distance from the Columbia river and depth to the water table. Near-surface storage in tanks, ion exchange in seepage trenches and cribs, and near surface burial were the norm. Isolation of the wastes by the high and dry nature of the 200 Area plateau, where reprocessing and waste management took place, was one of the reasons Hanford had been selected for it`s nuclear mission. Thus, location was a significant aspect of the initial waste management program at Hanford. Treatment, other than simple chemical steps such as neutralization and ion exchange, had not been considered necessary to the mission and was therefore not developed. To support the development of commercial nuclear power and to provide improved means of handling nuclear wastes, new waste management programs were initiated in the 1950`s by the Atomic Energy Commission. The programs focused on high level waste. They included `spray calcination/vitrification` at Hanford Laboratories. Hanford Labs later became Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) when Battelle Memorial Institute became the Operating Contractor in 1965. In 1996, it was renamed Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The purpose of this paper is to describe the HLW projects and programs that followed from this early HLW R&D at PNNL.

  9. Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based model in Gansu Province, Northwest China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Peijuan; Xie, Donghui; Zhou, Yuyu; E, Youhao; Zhu, Qijiang

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ecological structure in the arid and semi-arid region of Northwest China with forest, grassland, agriculture, Gobi, and desert, is complex, vulnerable, and unstable. It is a challenging and sustaining job to keep the ecological structure and improve its ecological function. Net primary productivity (NPP) modeling can help to improve the understanding of the ecosystem, and therefore, improve ecological efficiency. The boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS) model provides the possibility of NPP modeling in terrestrial ecosystem, but it has some limitations for application in arid and semi-arid regions. In this paper we improve the BEPS model, in terms of its water cycle by adding the processes of infiltration and surface runoff, to be applicable in arid and semi-arid regions. We model the NPP of forest, grass, and crop in Gansu Province as an experimental area in Northwest China in 2003 using the improved BEPS model, parameterized with moderate resolution remote sensing imageries and meteorological data. The modeled NPP using improved BEPS agrees better with the ground measurements in Qilian Mountain than that with original BEPS, with a higher R2 of 0.746 and lower root mean square error (RMSE) of 46.53 gC/m2 compared to R2 of 0.662 and RMSE of 60.19 gC/m2 from original BEPS. The modeled NPP of three vegetation types using improved BEPS show evident differences compared to that using original BEPS, with the highest difference ratio of 9.21% in forest and the lowest value of 4.29% in crop. The difference ratios between different vegetation types lie on the dependence on natural water sources. The modeled NPP in five geographic zones using improved BEPS are higher than those with original BEPS, with higher difference ratio in dry zones and lower value in wet zones.

  10. Stratigraphic evolution of Mesozoic continental margin and oceanic sequences northwest Australia and north Himalayas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gradstein, F.M. (Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia (Canada)); Von Rad, U. (Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (West Germany))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors are investigating continental margin to ocean sequences of the incipient Indian Ocean as it replaced central Tethys. Objectives of this study are the dynamic relation between sedimentation, tectonics, and paleogeography. Principal basins formation along the northern edge of eastern Gondwana started in the Late Permian to the Triassic. By the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic, platform carbonates with thin, organic-rich lagoonal shales were laid down in a subtropical climate. This unit, which harbors some of the oldest known nannofossils, shows repeated shallowing-upward sequences. Subsequent southward drift of the Gondwana margin during the Middle Jurassic increased siliciclastic input in Nepal, when widespread sediment starvation or erosion during local uplift took place off parts of northwest Australia. A middle Callovian-early Oxfordian hiatus in Nepal is submarine and appears global in extent. The overlying 250-m-thick organic-rich black shales, correlative to the Oxford/Kimmeridge clays of circum-Atlantic petroleum basins, may be traced along the northern Himalayan Range, and probably represent an extensive continental slope deposit formed under an oxygen minimum layer in southern Tethys. The deposit's diverse foraminiferal microfauna was previously only known from boreal Laurasia. The Callovian breakup unconformity, off northwest Australia, precedes onset of sea-floor spreading at least 15-25 Ma. Sea-floor spreading, leading to the present Indian Ocean started in the Argo Abyssal Plain around 140 Ma, at the end of the Jurassic, was about 15 m.y. later than previously postulated. Australia and Greater India separated as early as the Late Valanginian, about 130 Ma. Mafic volcaniclastics in Nepalese deltaic sediments probably testify to concurrent continental margin volcanic activity, which may be a precursor to the slightly younger Rajmahal traps in eastern India.

  11. The age of the martian meteorite Northwest Africa 1195 and the differentiation history of the shergottites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Symes, S; Borg, L; Shearer, C; Irving, A

    2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Samarium-neodymium isotopic analyses of unleached and acid-leached mineral fractions from the recently identified olivine-bearing shergottite Northwest Africa 1195 yield a crystallization age of 348 {+-} 19 Ma and an {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value of +40.1 {+-} 1.3. Maskelynite fractions do not lie on the Sm-Nd isochron and appear to contain a martian surface component with low {sup 147}Sm/{sup 144}Nd and {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios that was added during shock. The Rb-Sr system is disturbed and does not yield an isochron. Terrestrial Sr appears to have affected all of the mineral fractions, although a maximum initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of 0.701614 {+-} 16 is estimated by passing a 348 Ma reference isochron through the maskelynite fraction that is least affected by contamination. The high initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value and the low initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio, combined with the geologically young crystallization age, indicate that Northwest Africa 1195 is derived from a source region characterized by a long-term incompatible element depletion. The age and initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of Northwest Africa 1195 are very similar to those of Queen Alexandra Range 94201, indicating these samples were derived from source regions with nearly identical Sr-Nd isotopic systematics. These similarities suggest that these two meteorites share a close petrogenetic relationship and might have been erupted from a common volcano. The meteorites Yamato 980459, Dar al Gani 476, Sayh al Uhaymir 005/008, and Dhofar 019 also have relatively old ages between 474-575 Ma and trace element and/or isotopic systematics that are indicative of derivation from incompatible-element-depleted sources. This suggests that the oldest group of meteorites is more closely related to one another than they are to the younger meteorites that are derived from less incompatible-element-depleted sources. Closed-system fractional crystallization of this suite of meteorites is modeled with the MELTS algorithm using the bulk composition of Yamato 980459 as a parent. These models reproduce many of the major element and mineralogical variations observed in the suite. In addition, the rare-earth element systematics of these meteorites are reproduced by fractional crystallization using the proportions of phases and extents of crystallization that are calculated by MELTS. The combined effects of source composition and fractional crystallization are therefore likely to account for the major element, trace element, and isotopic diversity of all shergottites. Thus, assimilation of a martian crustal component is not required to explain the geochemical diversity of the shergottites.

  12. NEW EARLY CAMBRIAN OLENELLINE TRILOBITES FROM THE SEKWI FORMATION, MACKENZIE MOUNTAINS, NORTHWEST TERRITORIES, CANADA, AND NEW INSIGHTS INTO OLENELLINID EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY AND BIOGEOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gapp, Ian Wesley

    2009-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The olenellinid trilobites of the Early Cambrian are a diverse clade that has been an ideal group used in phylogenetic analyses. Recently, new specimens from the Sekwi Formation of the Mackenzie Mountains, Northwest ...

  13. EA-1958: Future Development in proximity to the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with proposed future development on the South Federal Campus of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site, in Benton County, Washington.

  14. StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Information Network, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Bruce (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland, OR); Roger, Phil (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Butterfield, Bart (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    StreamNet is a cooperative data compilation, development, and distribution project involving the state, tribal and federal fish and wildlife agencies in the Columbia River basin. It is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), and is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). The project is organized to perform three broad functions: Agency support: The project supports staff in the Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington state fish and wildlife agencies; the Columbia River Inter Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC); and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) who locate, obtain, quality check and format specific types of fish related data. They convert these data into a standard data exchange format (DEF) and submit them, with references, to the regional StreamNet office. Regional Support: The regional component of StreamNet at PSMFC administers the project, coordinates with the FWP and other regional entities, and disseminates data regionally. As data are received from cooperators they are again quality checked then imported into the StreamNet database. Access to the data is provided on-line via a tabular data query system and interactive map applications at www.streamnet.org. The web site also provides access to independent data sets from other projects, pre-sorted data sets useful for specific purposes (such as for a recent pesticide spraying ruling or subbasin assessments), and general fish information for education purposes. Reference Support: The StreamNet Library, located at CRITFC, maintains access to all reference documents supporting the data in the StreamNet database, and provides full library services for patrons interested in fish and wildlife in the Pacific Northwest. The StreamNet Library also maintains probably the largest collection of agency gray literature related to fish and wildlife resources in the basin. The library participates in the Inter Library Loan program, and can exchange literature worldwide. This report summarizes StreamNet Project activities during fiscal year 2004 (FY-04). Detailed descriptions of accomplishments by individual objective and task are provided in the Project's quarterly progress reports, available on the reports and publications page of the StreamNet web site.

  15. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Edwards; KD Shields; MJ Sula; MY Ballinger

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP--US Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H). In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Pacific Northwest) on the Hanford Site. Two of the facilities evaluated, 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, and 331 Building Life Sciences Laboratory met state and federal criteria for continuous sampling of airborne radionuclide emissions. One other building, the 3720 Environmental Sciences Laboratory, was recognized as being in transition with the potential for meeting the continuous sampling criteria.

  16. The distribution of potentially toxic heavy metals in the sediments of San Antonio Bay and the northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trefry, John Harold

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total of 123 sediment samples from 48 locations in the northwest Gulf of Mexico, including San Antonio Bay and the Mississippi River Delta, were acid leached and analyzed for iron, manganese, lead, zinc, cadmium, copper, and nickel by atomic... of the river mouths, also showed slightly higher than expected levels of nickel, lead, and cadmium. The proposition that shell dredging operations in the bay remobilize significant quantities of toxic metals and make them available to the biota of the area...

  17. Compendium of Low-Cost Pacific Salmon and Steelhead Trout Production Facilities and Practices in the Pacific Northwest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senn, Harry G.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose was to research low capital cost salmon and steelhead trout production facilities and identify those that conform with management goals for the Columbia Basin. The species considered were chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), sockeye salmon (O. nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This report provides a comprehensive listing of the facilities, techniques, and equipment used in artificial production in the Pacific Northwest. (ACR)

  18. Sequence stratigraphic and sedimentologic analysis of the Permian San Andres Formation (upper Leonardian-lower Guadalupian), Northwest Shelf, Permian Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beserra, Troy Brett

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC AND SEDIMENTOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF THE PERMIAN SAN ANDRES FORMATION (UPPER LEONARDIAN-LOWER GUADALUPIAN), NORTHWEST SHELF, PERMIAN BASIN A Thesis by TROY BRETT BESERRA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Geology SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC AND SEDIMENTOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF THE PERMIAN SAN ANDRES FORMATION (UPPER LEONARDIAN-LOWER GUADALUPIANl...

  19. Energy Storage for Variable Renewable Energy Resource Integration - A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Guo, Xinxin; Nguyen, Tony B.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid: a) what will be the future balancing requirement to accommodate a simulated expansion of wind energy resources from 3.3 GW in 2008 to 14.4 GW in 2019 in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP), and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting the balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP). A life-cycle analysis was performed to assess the least-cost technology option for meeting the new balancing requirement. The technologies considered in this study include conventional turbines (CT), sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries, lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid concepts that combine 2 or more of the technologies above are also evaluated. This analysis was performed with collaboration by the Bonneville Power Administration and funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, D.A. (ed.)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1991. Each project in the PNL research program is a component in an integrated laboratory, intermediate-scale, and field approach designed to examine multiple phenomena at increasing levels of complexity. Examples include definition of the role of fundamental geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in the deep subsurface, and determination of the controls on nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and their response to stress at the landscape scale. The Environmental Science Research Center has enable PNL to extend fundamental knowledge of subsurface science to develop emerging new concepts for use in natural systems and in environmental restoration of DOE sites. New PNL investments have been made in developing advanced concepts for addressing chemical desorption kinetics, enzyme transformations and redesign, the role of heterogeneity in contaminant transport, and modeling of fundamental ecological processes.

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1990 to the DOE Office of Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in the environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Office of Health and Environment Research in FY 1990. Research is directed toward developing the knowledge needed to guide government policy and technology development for two important environmental problems: environmental restoration and global change. The report is organized by major research areas contributing to resolution of these problems. Additional sections summarize exploratory research, educational institutional interactions, technology transfer, and publications. The PNL research program continues make contributions toward defining and quantifying processes that effect the environment at the local, regional, and global levels. Each research project forms a component in an integrated laboratory, intermediate-scale, and field approach designed to examine multiple phenomena at increasing levels of complexity. This approach is providing system-level insights into critical environmental processes. University liaisons continue to be expanded to strengthen the research and to use PNL resources to train the scientists needed to address long-term environmental problems.

  2. The 1992 Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey: Phase 1 : Book 1 : Getting Started.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Applied Management & Planning Group (firm); United States. Bonneville Power Administration. End-Use Research Section.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Executive Summary outlines the general processes employed in and the major findings from the conduct of Phase I of the Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey (PNWRES92-I) during the last quarter of 1992. This study was Bonneville`s third comprehensive residential survey of the region, conducted to provide data on energy usage, conservation awareness and behaviors, and associated consumer characteristics for use in forecasting and planning. The summary is divided into four sections: Background sets the stage with respect to the need for the survey, relates it to previous work, outlines the implementation processes, and summarizes the data products. Profiling the respondents summarizes the survey results under these six categories: Demographics; Housing Units; Room Inventory; Appliance Inventory; Air-Conditioning/Heating; Water-Heating; and Opinion. Reports and cross-tabulations describes the various individual documents. Bonneville Power Plus provides a short description of an Excel-spreadsheet-based software program that contains all of the tabulated material in a format that encourages browsing among the tables and charts, with special feature that they can be copied directly into other Windows-based documents.

  3. The 1992 Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey : Phase 1 : Book 3 : Item-by-item Crosstabulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. End-Use Research Section; Applied Management & Planning Group (Firm)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book constitutes a portion of the primary documentation for the 1992 Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey, Phase I. The complete 33-volume set of primary documentation provides information needed by energy analysts and interpreters with respect to planning, execution, data collection, and data management of the PNWRES92-I process. Thirty of these volumes are devoted to different ``views`` of the data themselves, with each view having a special purpose or interest as its focus. Analyses and interpretations of these data will be the subjects of forthcoming publications. Conducted during the late summer and fall months of 1992, PNWRES92-I had the over-arching goal of satisfying basic requirements for a variety of information about the stock of residential units in Bonneville`s service region. Surveys with a similar goal were conducted in 1979 and 1983. This volume discerns the information by the particular Bonneville Area Office. ``Selected crosstabulations`` refers to a set of nine survey items of wide interest (Dwelling Type, Ownership Type, Year-of-Construction, Dwelling Size, Primary Space-Heating Fuel, Primary Water-Heating Fuel, Household Income for 1991, Utility Type, and Space-Heating Fuels: Systems and Equipment) that were crosstabulated among themselves.

  4. Restoring Resiliency: Case Studies from Pacific Northwest Estuarine Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Vavrinec, John; Borde, Amy B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of many ecological restoration projects is to establish an ecosystem with fully developed structure and function that exhibits resistance to and resilience from disturbances. Coastal restoration projects in the Pacific Northwest provide opportunities to understand what is required to restore the resilience of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) populations. Factors influencing resilience observed in three case studies of eelgrass restoration include minimum viable population, adaptations of transplant populations, and natural and anthropogenic disturbances at restoration sites. The evaluation of resiliency depends on selecting appropriate monitoring metrics and the frequency and duration of monitoring. Eelgrass area, cover and shoot density provide useful and reliable metrics for quantifying resilience of restored meadows. Further, five years of monitoring of these metrics provides data that can reasonably predict the long-term viability of a planted plot. Eelgrass appears to be a resilient ecosystem in general, though one that data suggest may exhibit tipping points brought about by compounded environmental conditions outside of its tolerance ranges. Explicit inclusion of resilience in the planning and practice of habitat restoration may reduce uncertainties and improve the performance of restored systems by increasing buffering capacity, nurturing sources of renewal (e.g., seeds and rhizomes), and managing for habitat forming and maintaining processes (e.g., sediment dynamics) at multiple scales.

  5. Preliminary survey report: control technology for brake lining at Northwest Local School District, Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, T.C.; McGlothlin, J.D.; Godbey, F.W.; Sheehy, J.W.; O'Brien, D.M.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A walk-through survey of control technology for reducing asbestos exposure during maintenance and repair of vehicular brakes was conducted at Northwest Local School District, Cincinnati, Ohio in January, 1986. The primary method for controlling and collecting dust during brake servicing was a wet-washing technique and good work practices, ensuring that exposure to hazardous physical or chemical agents was reduced or eliminated. Also available was an enclosed-type brake assembly cleaner designed to be connected to the shop air and a vacuum system. The brake assembly cleaner did not have a viewing port to examine the area being cleaned. The operator had to remove the unit to inspect the cleaned area potentially exposing himself to any dust remaining on the brake shoes or hub. The unit itself was a potential dust source as it was designed to fit 16-inch wheels and did not form a tight seal on the smaller 15-inch wheels of the newer buses. The authors conclude that the wet wash technique is an excellent method for controlling asbestos emissions during brake maintenance. The vacuum brake-assembly cleaner is inadequate and potentially hazardous. An in-depth survey of the wet technique is recommended.

  6. NORTHWEST RUSSIA AS A LENS FOR CHANGE IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seward, Amy M.

    2009-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The region of Northwest Russia – encompassing the Kola Peninsula and the Arctic seas to its north – offers a lens through which to view the political, economic, ecological and cultural change occurring in the Russian Federation (RF) today. Amidst the upheaval that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union, this region was left to address the legacy of a Cold War history in which it was home to the Soviet (and now Russian) Navy’s Northern Fleet. This paper addresses the naval nuclear legacy from an ecological and environmental and perspective, first addressing the situation of radioactive contamination of the region. The focus then turns to one of the largest problems facing the RF today: the management and disposal of SNF and RW, much of which was produced by the Northern Fleet. Through the international programs to address these issues, and Russia's development of a national infrastructure to support spent nuclear fuel and waste management, the author discusses political, economic, environmental and cultural change in Russia.

  7. CASCADES: An Ultra-Low-Background Germanium Crystal Array at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keillor, M. E.; Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J. E.; Glasgow, B. D.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Miley, H. S.; Myers, A. W.; Seifert, A.; Stavenger, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    State-of-the-art treaty verification techniques, environmental surveillance, and physics experiments require increased sensitivity for detecting and quantifying radionuclides of interest. This can be accomplished with new detector designs that establish high detection efficiency and reduced instrument backgrounds. Current research is producing an intrinsic germanium (HPGe) array designed for high detection efficiency, ultra-low-background performance, and sensitive {gamma}--{gamma} coincidence detection. The system design is optimized to accommodate filter paper samples, e.g. samples collected by the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer. The system will provide high sensitivity for weak collections on atmospheric filter samples (e.g.<10{sup 5} fissions) as well as offering the potential to gather additional information from higher activity filters using gamma cascade coincidence detection. The first of two HPGe crystal arrays in ultra-low-background vacuum cryostats has been assembled, with the second in progress. Traditional methods for constructing ultra-low-background detectors were followed, including use of materials known to be low in radioactive contaminants, use of ultra-pure reagents, and clean room assembly. The cryostat is constructed mainly from copper electroformed into near-final geometry at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Details of the detector assembly and initial background and spectroscopic measurement results are presented; also a description of the custom analysis package used by this project is given.

  8. CASCADES: An Ultra-Low-Background Germanium Crystal Array at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keillor, Martin E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Erikson, Luke E.; Fast, James E.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Miley, Harry S.; Myers, Allan W.; Seifert, Allen; Stavenger, Timothy J.

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    State-of-the-art treaty verification techniques, environmental surveillance, and physics experiments require increased sensitivity for detecting and quantifying radionuclides of interest. This can be accomplished with new detector designs that establish high detection efficiency and reduced instrument backgrounds. Current research is producing an intrinsic germanium (HPGe) array designed for high detection efficiency, ultra-low-background performance, and sensitive {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence detection. The system design is optimized to accommodate filter paper samples, e.g., samples collected by the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer. The system will provide high sensitivity for weak collections on atmospheric filter samples (e.g., < 10{sup 5} fissions), as well as offering the potential to gather additional information from higher activity filters using gamma cascade coincidence detection. The first of two HPGe crystal arrays in ultra-low-background vacuum cryostats has been assembled, with the second in progress. Traditional methods for constructing ultra-low-background detectors were followed, including use of materials known to be low in radioactive contaminants, use of ultra-pure reagents, and clean room assembly. The cryostat is constructed mainly from copper electroformed into near-final geometry at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Details of the detector assembly and initial background and spectroscopic measurement results are presented; also a description of the custom analysis package used by this project is given.

  9. Customer Satisfaction Survey of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Technical Assistance Partners -- FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conger, Robin L.; Spanner, Gary E.

    2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The businesses that have utilized PNNL's Technology Assistance Program were sent a survey to solicit feedback about the program and to determine what, if any, outcomes resulted from the assistance provided. As part of its small business outreach, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) offers technology assistance to businesses with fewer than 500 employees throughout the nation and to businesses of any size in the 2 counties that contain the Hanford site. Upon request, up to 40 staff-hours of a researcher's time can be provided to address technology issues at no charge to the requesting firm. During FY 2011, PNNL completed assistance for 54 firms. Topics of the technology assistance covered a broad range, including environment, energy, industrial processes, medical, materials, computers and software, and sensors. In FY 2011, PNNL's Technology Assistance Program (TAP) was funded by PNNL Overheads. Over the past 16 years, the Technology Assistance Program has received total funding of nearly $2.8 million from several federal and private sources.

  10. Impact of conservation measures on Pacific Northwest residential energy consumption. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moe, R.J.; Owzarski, S.L.; Streit, L.P.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to estimate the relationship between residential space conditioning energy use and building conservation programs in the Pacific Northwest. The study was divided into two primary tasks. In the first, the thermal relationship between space conditioning energy consumption under controlled conditions and the physical characteristics of the residence was estimated. In this task, behavioral characteristics such as occupant schedules and thermostat settings were controlled in order to isolate the physical relationships. In the second task, work from the first task was used to calculate the thermal efficiency of a residence's shell. Thermal efficiency was defined as the ability of a shell to prevent escapement of heat generated within a building. The relationship between actual space conditioning energy consumption and the shell thermal efficiency was then estimated. Separate thermal equations for mobile homes, single-family residences, and multi-family residences are presented. Estimates of the relationship between winter electricity consumption for heating and the building's thermal shell efficiency are presented for each of the three building categories.

  11. Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

  13. STP K Basin Sludge Sample Archive at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory FY2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Smoot, Margaret R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) currently houses 88 samples (~10.5 kg) of K Basin sludge (81 wet and seven dry samples) on behalf of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), which is managed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). Selected samples are intended to serve, in part, as sentinels to enhance understanding of sludge properties after long-term storage, and thus enhance understanding of sludge behavior following transfer to sludge transfer and storage containers (STSCs) and storage at the Hanford 200 Area central plateau. In addition, remaining samples serve in contingency for future testing requirements. At PNNL, the samples are tracked and maintained under a prescriptive and disciplined monthly sample-monitoring program implemented by PNNL staff. This report updates the status of the K Basin archive sludge sample inventory to April 2014. The previous inventory status report, PNNL 22245 (Fiskum et al. 2013, limited distribution report), was issued in February of 2013. This update incorporates changes in the inventory related to repackaging of 17 samples under test instructions 52578 TI052, K Basin Sludge Sample Repackaging for Continued Long Term Storage, and 52578 TI053, K Basin Sludge Sample Repackaging Post-2014 Shear Strength Measurements. Note that shear strength measurement results acquired in 2014 are provided separately. Specifically, this report provides the following: • a description of the K Basin sludge sample archive program and the sample inventory • a summary and images of the samples that were repackaged in April 2014 • up-to-date images and plots of the settled density and water loss from all applicable samples in the inventory • updated sample pedigree charts, which provide a roadmap of the genesis and processing history of each sample in the inventory • occurrence and deficiency reports associated with sample storage and repackaging

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grove, L.K. (ed.)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1992 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year 1992. This report consists of four volumes oriented to particular segments of the PNL program, describing research performed for the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in the Office of Energy Research. The parts of the 1992 Annual Report are: Biomedical Sciences; Environmental Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences; and Physical Sciences. This Report is Part II: Environmental Sciences. Included in this report are developments in Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development, Interactions with Educational Institutions, Technology Transfer, Publications, and Presentations. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. The Technology Transfer section of this report describes a number of examples in which fundamental research is laying the groundwork for the technology needed to resolve important environmental problems. The Interactions with Educational Institutions section of the report illustrates the results of a long-term, proactive program to make PNL facilities available for university and preuniversity education and to involve educational institutions in research programs. The areas under investigation include the effect of geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in deep subsurface environments, ways to address subsurface heterogeneity, and ways to determine the key biochemical and physiological pathways (and DNA markers) that control nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and the response of these systems to disturbance and climatic change.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF PRESOLAR MATERIAL IN THE CR CHONDRITE NORTHWEST AFRICA 852

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, J.; Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, P.O. Box 3060, 55020 Mainz (Germany); Vollmer, C. [Institut fuer Mineralogie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Zipfel, J., E-mail: jan.leitner@mpic.de [Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum Senckenberg, Sektion Meteoritenforschung, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the inventory of presolar silicate, oxide, and silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the CR2 chondrite Northwest Africa (NWA) 852. Thirty-one O-anomalous grains were detected: 24 were identified as silicates ({approx}78 ppm); the remaining 7 are Al-rich oxides ({approx}38 ppm). NWA 852 is the first C2 chondrite containing O-anomalous presolar dust in concentrations comparable to other more primitive meteorites. Eight presolar SiC grains have been found, representing the highest abundance ({approx}160 ppm) observed so far in primitive meteorites. {sup 15}N-enriched matter is also present, although very heterogeneously distributed. Twenty-six of the O-anomalous grains are enriched in {sup 17}O, originating from the outflows of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We calculate a silicate/oxide abundance ratio of {approx}2, which indicates a higher degree of aqueous alteration than observed for other presolar-grain-rich meteorites. NWA 852 thus stands between the presolar-grain-rich CR3 chondrites (MET 00426, QUE 99177) and CR2 chondrites with low presolar grain abundances (Renazzo, NWA 530). We calculate an initial presolar silicate abundance of {approx}800 ppm for NWA 852, if silicate destruction by aqueous alteration is taken into account. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) investigation of one presolar Al-rich grain of an AGB star origin revealed that the grain mainly consists of a single crystal of hibonite with slightly varying orientations. A distinct subgrain (d < 100 nm) with a Ca/Ti ratio of {approx}1 is located in the central region, most likely indicating a perovskite-like phase. Our data suggest this phase to be a primary condensate and not an alteration product.

  16. Reservoir compartmentalization caused by mass transport deposition Northwest Stevens pool, Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, M.D.; McJannet, G.S. [Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States); Shiflett, D.W. [Intera Petroleum Technology, Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States); Deutsch, H.A. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} sands of the Northwest Stevens Pool consist of six major subdivisions (A1-A6) and numerous sublayers. These sands are above the {open_quotes}N Point{close_quotes} stratigraphic marker, making them much younger than most other Stevens sands at Elk Hills. Cores show the A1-A3 sands to be possibly mass transport deposition, primarily debris flows, slumps, and sand injection bodies. The A4-A6 sands are characterized by normally graded sheet-like sand bodies Hospital of traditional outer fan turbidite lithofacies. Most current production from the A1-A2 interval comes from well 373A-7R, are completed waterflood wells that came on line in 1992 at 1400 BOPD. Well 373A-7R is an anomaly in the A1-A2 zone, where average production from the other ten wells is 200 BOPD. Other evidence for compartmentalization in the A1-A2 interval includes sporadic oil-water contacts and drawdown pressures, difficult log correlations, and rapid thickness changes. In 1973, well 362-7R penetrated 220 ft of wet Al sand. The well was redrilled updip and successfully completed in the A1, where the oil-water contact is more than 130 ft lower than the original hole and faulting is not apparent. In 1992, horizontal well 323H-7R unexpectedly encountered an entirely wet Al wedge zone. Reevaluation of the A1-A3 and other sands as mass transport origin is important for modeling initialization and production/development strategies.

  17. Reservoir compartmentalization caused by mass transport deposition Northwest Stevens pool, Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, M.D.; McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States)); Shiflett, D.W. (Intera Petroleum Technology, Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Deutsch, H.A. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)) (and others)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The [open quotes]A[close quotes] sands of the Northwest Stevens Pool consist of six major subdivisions (A1-A6) and numerous sublayers. These sands are above the [open quotes]N Point[close quotes] stratigraphic marker, making them much younger than most other Stevens sands at Elk Hills. Cores show the A1-A3 sands to be possibly mass transport deposition, primarily debris flows, slumps, and sand injection bodies. The A4-A6 sands are characterized by normally graded sheet-like sand bodies Hospital of traditional outer fan turbidite lithofacies. Most current production from the A1-A2 interval comes from well 373A-7R, are completed waterflood wells that came on line in 1992 at 1400 BOPD. Well 373A-7R is an anomaly in the A1-A2 zone, where average production from the other ten wells is 200 BOPD. Other evidence for compartmentalization in the A1-A2 interval includes sporadic oil-water contacts and drawdown pressures, difficult log correlations, and rapid thickness changes. In 1973, well 362-7R penetrated 220 ft of wet Al sand. The well was redrilled updip and successfully completed in the A1, where the oil-water contact is more than 130 ft lower than the original hole and faulting is not apparent. In 1992, horizontal well 323H-7R unexpectedly encountered an entirely wet Al wedge zone. Reevaluation of the A1-A3 and other sands as mass transport origin is important for modeling initialization and production/development strategies.

  18. Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

  19. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 1993 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US DOE describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year (FY) 1993. The report is divided into four parts, each in a separate volume. This part, Volume 2, covers Environmental Sciences. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. There are sections on Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Technology Transfer, Interactions with Educational Institutions, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development.

  20. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Gulfstream I measurements of the Kuwait oil-fire plume, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busness, K M; Hales, J M; Hannigan, R V; Thorp, J M; Tomich, S D; Warren, M J [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Al-Sunaid, A A [Saudi ARAMCO, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Daum, P H; Mazurek, M [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of aircraft measurements to determine pollutant and radiative properties of the smoke plume from oil fires in Kuwait. This work was sponsored by the US Department emanating of Energy, in cooperation with several other agencies as part of an extensive effort coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization, to obtain a comprehensive data set to assess the characteristics of the plume and its environmental impact. This report describes field measurement activities and introduces the various data collected, but provides only limited analyses of these data. Results of further data analyses will be presented in subsequent open-literature publications.

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1986. The program is focused on terrestrial, subsurface, and coastal marine systems, and this research forms the basis, in conjunction with remote sensing, for definition and quantification of processes leading to impacts at the global level. This report is organized into sections devoted to Detection and Management of Change in Terrestrial Systems, Biogeochemical Phenomena, Subsurface Microbiology and Transport, Marine Sciences, and Theoretical (Quantitative) Ecology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual projects.

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 4, Physical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toburen, L.H.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 1986 annual report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1986. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. Part 4 includes those programs funded under the title ''Physical and Technological Research.'' The Field Task Program Studies reports in this document are grouped by budget category and each section is introduced by an abstract that indicates the Field Task Proposal/Agreement reported in that section. These reports only briefly indicate progress made during 1985.

  3. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Edwards, Daniel L.

    2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the assessment performed in 2003.

  4. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  5. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 4. Physical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toburen, L.H.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research includes those programs funded under the title ''Physical and Technological Research.'' The Field Task Program Studies reports in this document are grouped by budget category and each section is introduced by an abstract that indicates the Field Task Proposal/Agreement reported in that section. These reports only briefly indicate progress made during 1985. The reader should contact the principal investigators named or examine the publications cited for more details.

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory, annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 4. Physical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1983 to the Office of Energy Research, includes those programs funded under the title Physical and Technological Research. The Field Task Program Studies reports in this document are grouped under the subheadings and each section is introduced by a divider page that indicates the Field Task Agreement reported in that section. These reports only briefly indicate progress made during 1983. The reader should contact the principal investigators named or examine the publications cited for more details.

  8. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB. (MDF)

  9. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

    2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  10. AK Hartmann, Thermodynamik und Statistische Physik 103 Auf Koexistenzkurve p(T): 1(T, p(T)) -2(T, p(T)) = 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Alexander K.

    AK Hartmann, Thermodynamik und Statistische Physik 103 26.1.2006 Auf Koexistenzkurve p(T): µ1(T, p(T)) - µ2(T, p(T)) = 0 totale Ableitung d dT = 0: 0 ! = dµ1(T) dT - dµ2(T) dT = µ1 T p - µ2 T p + µ1 p T - µ2 p T dp dT = 1 N S - 1 N V dp dT (S = 0, V = 0) dp dT = S V = Ql TV (14.3) Gleichung von Clausius

  11. Economic Impact of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the State of Washington in Fiscal Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a large economic entity, with $1.06 billion in annual funding, $936 million in total spending, and 4,344 employees in fiscal year (FY) 2013. Four thousand, one hundred and one (4,101) employees live in Washington State. The Laboratory directly and indirectly supports almost $1.31 billion in economic output, 6,802 jobs, and $514 million in Washington State wage income from current operations. The state also gains more than $1.21 billion in output, more than 6,400 jobs, and $459 million in income through closely related economic activities, such as visitors, health care spending, spending by resident retirees, and spinoff companies. PNNL affects Washington’s economy through commonly recognized economic channels, including spending on payrolls and other goods and services that support Laboratory operations. Less-commonly recognized channels also have their own impacts and include company-supported spending on health care for its staff members and retirees, spending of its resident retirees, Laboratory visitor spending, and the economic activities in a growing constellation of “spinoff” companies founded on PNNL research, technology, and managerial expertise. PNNL also has a significant impact on science and technology education and community nonprofit organizations. PNNL is an active participant in the future scientific enterprise in Washington with the state’s K-12 schools, colleges, and universities. The Laboratory sends staff members to the classroom and brings hundreds of students to the PNNL campus to help train the next generation of scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and technicians. This investment in human capital, though difficult to measure in terms of current dollars of economic output, is among the important lasting legacies of the Laboratory. Finally, PNNL contributes to the local community with millions of dollars’ worth of cash and in-kind corporate and staff contributions, all of which strengthen the economy. This report quantifies these effects, providing detailed information on PNNL’s revenues and expenditures, as well as the impacts of its activities on the rest of the Washington State economy. This report also describes the impacts of the four closely related activities: health care spending, spinoff companies with roots in PNNL, visitors to the Laboratory, and PNNL retirees.

  12. A Distributed Database Server for Continuous Media W.G. Aref, A.C. Catlin, A.K. Elmagarmid, J. Fan, J. Guo, M. Hammad, I.F. Ilyas, M.S. Marzouk,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yicheng

    A Distributed Database Server for Continuous MediaÂŁ W.G. Aref, A.C. Catlin, A.K. Elmagarmid, J. Fan://www.cs.purdue.edu/icds 1. Introduction In our project, we adopt a new approach for handling video data. We view the video as a well-defined data type with its own description, parameters, and applicable methods. The system

  13. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are located downstream of control technologies and just before discharge to the atmosphere. The need for monitoring airborne emissions of hazardous chemicals is established in the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit and in notices of construction. Based on the current potential-to-emit, the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit does not contain general monitoring requirements for BOP facilities. However, the permit identifies monitoring requirements for specific projects and buildings. Needs for future monitoring will be established by future permits issued pursuant to the applicable state and federal regulations. A number of liquid-effluent discharge systems serve the BOP facilities: sanitary sewer, process sewer, retention process sewer, and aquaculture system. Only the latter system discharges to the environment; the rest either discharge to treatment plants or to long-term storage. Routine compliance sampling of liquid effluents is only required at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Liquid effluents from other BOP facilities may be sampled or monitored to characterize facility effluents or to investigate discharges of concern. Effluent sampling and monitoring for the BOP facilities depends on the inventories, activities, and environmental permits in place for each facility. A description of routine compliance monitoring for BOP facilities is described in the BOP FEMP.

  14. West KY Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advance to DOE's National Science Bowl Subscribe to EM News Email Updates Gov Delivery logo To receive the latest news and updates about the Office of Environmental Management,...

  15. High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY -

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy CompletingPresentedGenerationBuildingBuilding

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - KY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CTOregon Metallurgical Corp -Oxnard01

  17. High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnologyHighLouisiana

  18. EIS-0030-S: Bonneville Power Administration Proposed FY 1980 Program, Facility Location Supplement, Northwest Montana/North Idaho Support and Libby Integration, Supplemental

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this supplemental statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of proposed alternative actions to alternative actions intended to address the need for reliability of electrical service to loads in Northwest Montana and North Idaho and the need for integrating the generation being added at Libby Dam into the Federal Columbia River Power System.

  19. DISCOVER-AQ Outlook for Friday, July 1, 2011 Flights Friday will still be dominated by relatively clean northwesterly flow at low levels. However, winds will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    clean northwesterly flow at low levels. However, winds will be light as the center of the large high -- NW winds, still relatively clean Sat., July 2: Fly, hot -- possible high clouds in afternoon Sun, 78°, calm winds, 1017mb #12;Friday: Clear and calm under high pressure #12;Saturday: Clear under

  20. QuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and federal agency, and energy groups together to discuss the challenges surrounding this key planning issue on recommendations from state and federal fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes in the Northwest,but anyone of natural gas-fired generation, as well as an emphasis on energy efficiency and development of renewable

  1. Recommendations of the State of Oregon for the Mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers to be Adopted as Amendments to the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the federal agencies regarding long-term configuration of the hydrosystem have been deferred for at least-term, alternative strategies such as breaching of dams identified by the federal agencies may be necessary to meet Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Power Act) mitigation requirements. In the long

  2. Northwest Straits Commission, 10441 Bayview Edison Rd., Mt. Vernon WA 98273 phone: 360.428-1064 e-mail: info@nwstraits.org web: www.nwstraits.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean acidification is a change in seawater chemistry due to the absorption of carbon dioxide. It is a local and global problem; a consequence of man-made carbon emissions. In Puget Sound, shellfish-mail: info@nwstraits.org web: www.nwstraits.org Ocean Acidification: Local action in the Northwest Straits

  3. Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, D.E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 1, Biomedical Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.F.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress on OHER biomedical and health-effects research conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in FY 1987. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health-effects risk estimates from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies through an increased understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause health effects. The report is arranged to reflect PNL research relative to OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health effects, concerns statistical and epidemiological studies for assessing health risks. The next section, which contains reports of health-effects research in biological systems, includes research with radiation and chemicals. The last section is related to medical applications of nuclear technology.

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1986, atmospheric research examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain and participated in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, during 1986, a special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity occurred after the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual projects.

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1: Biomedical Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, C.C. [ed.; Park, J.F.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes FY 1993 progress in biological and general life sciences research programs conducted for the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental REsearch (OHER) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This research provides knowledge of fundamental principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of exposure to energy-related radiation and chemicals. The Biological Research section contains reports of studies using laboratory animals, in vitro cell systems, and molecular biological systems. This research includes studies of the impact of radiation, radionuclides, and chemicals on biological responses at all levels of biological organization. The General Life Sciences Research section reports research conducted for the OHER human genome program.

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1985, this research has examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain, summarized the field studies and analyses of dry deposition and resuspension conducted in past years, and begun participation in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' The description of atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain; Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants; and Processing of Emissions by Clouds and Precipitation (PRECP).

  8. Northwest Plume Groundwater System Green-sand Media Removal and Waste Packaging Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troutman, M.T.; Richards, C.J.; Tarantino, J.J. [CDM Federal Programs Corporation, 325 Kentucky Avenue, Kevil, KY 42053 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northwest Plume Groundwater System (NWPGS) was temporarily shut down due to high differential pressures across the green-sand filters. Increased levels of suspended solids were introduced into the system from monitoring well development water, equipment decontamination water, and secondary containment water. These waters were treated for suspended solids through a groundwater pretreatment system but were suspected of causing the high differential pressures in the green-sand filters. Prior to the system being shutdown, the NWPGS had been experiencing increasingly shorter run times between filter backwashes indicating that the normal backwash cycle was not adequately removing the fines. This condition led to the removal and replacement of green-sand media from two filter vessels. Discussions include problems with the removal process, waste packaging specifications, requirements for the disposition of green-sand media, and lessons learned. (authors)

  9. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Northwest): Ghost shrimp and blue mud shrimp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horning, S.; Sterling, A.; Smith, S.D.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. The profiles are prepared to assist in environmental impact assessments. The ghost shrimp (Callianassa californiensis) and blue mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis) are common residents of intertidal mudflats of the Pacific Northwest, as well as of the entire West Coast of the contiguous United States. These species are decapod crustaceans, but not true shrimp. They are harvested as bait by recreational and commercial oyster-growing operations. Ghost shrimp larvae develop in summer in nearshore coastal waters and settle to the substrate surface, where they rapidly metamorphose; the life cycle of the blue mud shrimp is presumed to be similar. Both species spend their lives in burrows in the mudflat, where the ghost shrimp is primarily a deposit feeder and the blue mud shrimp is a suspension feeder.

  10. Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao H.

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There are growing strains on the electric grid as cooling peaks grow and equipment ages. Increased penetration of renewables on the grid is also straining electricity supply systems and the need for flexible demand is growing. This paper summarizes results of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest. The objective of the research was two fold. One objective was to evaluate the use demand response automation technologies. A second objective was to evaluate control strategies that could change the electric load shape in both winter and summer conditions. Winter conditions focused on cold winter mornings, a time when the electric grid is often stressed. The summer test evaluated DR strategies in the afternoon. We found that we could automate both winter and summer control strategies with the open automated demand response communication standard. The buildings were able to provide significant demand response in both winter and summer events.

  11. Vanderbilt Center for Nashville Studies CULTURAL TAX DISTRICT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmeri, Thomas

    .....................................................................................................11 Paducah, KY.............................................................................11 Seattle

  12. Saugata Basu - Purdue University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 15, 2009 ... July 1996. Doctoral Student at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sci- ... School Faculty Fellowship for Research, University of. Michigan .... Robotics, K.Y. Goldberg, D. Halperin, J.-C. Latombe, R.H. Wilson, Eds., A.K.. Peters ...

  13. Evaluation of Carrying Capacity : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 1 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of four that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared to address Measure 7.1A in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (Council) Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) dated december 1994 (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.1A calls for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund an evaluation of salmon survival, ecology, carrying capacity, and limiting factors in freshwater, estuarine, and marine habitats. Additionally, the Measure asks for development of a study plan based on critical uncertainties and research needs identified during the evaluation. This report deals with the evaluation of carrying capacity. It describes the analysis of different views of capacity as it relates to salmon survival and abundance. The report ends with conclusions and recommendations for studying carrying capacity.

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 4: Physical Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toburen, L.H.; Stults, B.R.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains 20 papers. Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report of 1989 to the DOE Office of Energy Research includes those programs funded under the title Physical and Technological Research.'' The Field Task Program Studies reported in this document are grouped by budget category and each Field Task proposal/agreement is introduced by an abstract that describes the projects reported in that section. These reports only briefly indicate progress made during 1989. 74 refs., 29 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, D.A. [ed.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1991. Each project in the PNL research program is a component in an integrated laboratory, intermediate-scale, and field approach designed to examine multiple phenomena at increasing levels of complexity. Examples include definition of the role of fundamental geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in the deep subsurface, and determination of the controls on nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and their response to stress at the landscape scale. The Environmental Science Research Center has enable PNL to extend fundamental knowledge of subsurface science to develop emerging new concepts for use in natural systems and in environmental restoration of DOE sites. New PNL investments have been made in developing advanced concepts for addressing chemical desorption kinetics, enzyme transformations and redesign, the role of heterogeneity in contaminant transport, and modeling of fundamental ecological processes.

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1988 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 2, Environmental Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1988. Research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of processes controlling the long-term fate and biological effects of fugitive chemicals and other stressors resulting from energy development. The PNL research program continues to make important contributions to the resolution of important national environmental problems. The research, focused principally on subsurface contaminant transport and detection and management of human-induced changes in biological systems, forms the basis for defining and quantifying processes that affect humans and the environment at the regional and global levels. Each research project forms a component in an integrated laboratory- intermediated scale field approach designed to examine multiple phenomena at increasing levels of complexity. This approach is providing system-level insights into critical environmental processes. Strong university liaisons now in existence are being markedly expanded so that PNL resources and the specialized technical capabilities in the university community can be more efficiently integrated. Building on PNL technical strengths in geochemistry, environment microbiology, hydrodynamics, and statistical ecology, research in the environmental sciences is in an exciting phase, and new investments have been made in molecular sciences, chemistry, biotechnology, use of remote imagery, and theoretical ecology. The section on exploratory research provides unique insight into the value of these investments and into the future of PNL environmental sciences programs.

  17. Annotated bibliography of radioactive waste management publications at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, January 1978 through July 1982. [831 abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography lists publications (831 abstracts) from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Department of Energy sponsored research and development programs from January 1978 through July of 1982. The abstracts are grouped in subject categories, as shown in the table of contents. Entries in the subject index also facilitate access by subject, e.g., High-Level Radioactive Wastes. Three indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: personal author, subject, and report number. Cited are research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers. Excluded are technical progress reports. Since 1978 the Nuclear Waste Management Quarterly Progress Report has been published under the series number PNL-3000. Beginning in 1982, this publication has been issued semiannually, under the series number PNL-4250. This bibliography is the successor to two others, BNWL-2201 (covering the years 1965-1976) and PNL-4050 (1975-1978). It is intended to provide a useful reference to literature in waste management written or compiled by PNL staff.

  18. Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Annual progress report, May 1982-May 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Opitz, B.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.; Serne, R.J.; Hartley, J.N.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.; Walters, W.H.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently conducting research for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on uranium recovery process wastes for both active and inactive operations. NRC-sponsored uranium recovery research at PNL is focused on NRC regulatory responsibilities for uranium-recovery operations: license active milling and in situ extraction operations; concur on the acceptability of DOE remedial-action plans for inactive sites; and license DOE to maintain inactive sites following remedial actions. PNL's program consists of four coordinated projects comprised of a program management task and nine research tasks that address the critical technical and safety issues for uranium recovery. Specifically, the projects endeavor to find and evaluate methods to: prevent erosion of tailings piles and prevent radon release from tailings piles; evaluate the effectiveness of interim stabilization techniques to prevent wind erosion and transport of dry tailings from active piles; estimate the dewatering and consolidation behavior of slurried tailings to promote early cover placement; design a cover-protection system to prevent erosion of the cover by expected environmental stresses; reduce seepage into ground water and prevent ground-water degradation; control solution movement and reaction with ground water in in-situ extraction operations; evaluate natural and induced restoration of ground water in in-situ extraction operations; and monitor releases to the environment from uranium recovery facilities.

  19. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Director`s overview of research performed for DOE Office of Health And Environmental Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant portion of the research undertaken at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on the strategic programs of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER). These programs, which include Environmental Processes (Subsurface Science, Ecosystem Function and Response, and Atmospheric Chemistry), Global Change (Climate Change, Environmental Vulnerability, and Integrated Assessments), Biotechnology (Human Genome and Structural Biology), and Health (Health Effects and Medical Applications), have been established by OHER to support DOE business areas in science and technology and environmental quality. PNL uses a set of critical capabilities based on the Laboratory`s research facilities and the scientific and technological expertise of its staff to help OHER achieve its programmatic research goals. Integration of these capabilities across the Laboratory enables PNL to assemble multidisciplinary research teams that are highly effective in addressing the complex scientific and technical issues associated with OHER-sponsored research. PNL research efforts increasingly are focused on complex environmental and health problems that require multidisciplinary teams to address the multitude of time and spatial scales found in health and environmental research. PNL is currently engaged in research in the following areas for these OHER Divisions: Environmental Sciences -- atmospheric radiation monitoring, climate modeling, carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry, ecological research, subsurface sciences, bioremediation, and environmental molecular sciences; Health Effects and Life Sciences -- cell/molecular biology, and biotechnology; Medical Applications and Biophysical Research -- analytical technology, and radiological and chemical physics. PNL`s contributions to OHER strategic research programs are described in this report.

  20. An exploratory investigation of the translation of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's print manuals system to an on-line manuals system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heubach, J.G.; Hunt, S.T.; Pond, L.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information management technology has proliferated in the past decade in response to the information explosion. As documentation accumulates, the need to access information residing in manuals, handbooks and regulations conveniently, accurately, and quickly has increased. However, studies show that only fractions of the available information is read (Martin, 1978). Consequently, one of the biggest challenges in linking information and electronic management of information is to use the power of communication technology to meet the information needs of the audience. Pacific Northwest Laboratories' (PNL) investigation of translating its print manual system to an on-line system fits this challenge precisely. PNL's manuals contain a tremendous amount of information for which manual holders are responsible. To perform their tasks in compliance with policy and procedure guidelines, users need to access information accurately, conveniently, and quickly. In order to select and use information management tools wisely, answers must be sought to a few basic questions. Communication experts cite four key questions: What do users want What do users need What characteristics of an on-line information system affect its usefulness Who are the users whose wants and needs are to be met Once these questions are answered, attention can be focused on finding the best match between user requirements and technology characteristics and weighing the costs and benefits of proposed options.

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE office of energy research: Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1987. Research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of processes controlling the long-term fate and biological effects of fugitive chemicals and other stressors resulting from energy development. The research, focused on terrestrial, subsurface, and coastal marine systems, forms the basis for defining and quantifying processes that affect humans and the environment at the regional and global levels. Research is multidisciplinary and multitiered, providing integrated system-level insights into critical environmental processes. Research initiatives in subsurface microbiology and transport, global change, radon, and molecular sciences are building on PNL technical strengths in biogeochemistry, hydrodynamics, molecular biology, and theoretical ecology. Unique PNL facilities are used to probe multiple phenomena complex relationships at increasing levels of complexity. Intermediate-scale experimental systems are used to examine arid land watershed dynamics, aerosol behavior and effects, and multidimensional subsurface transport. In addition, field laboratories (the National Environmental Research Park and Marine Research Laboratory) are used in conjunction with advanced measurement techniques to validate concepts and models, and to extrapolate the results to the system and global levels. Strong university liaisons now in existence are being markedly expanded so that PNL resources and the specialized technical capabilities in the university community can be more efficiently integrated.

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. For several years, studies of transport and diffusion have been extended to mesoscale areas of complex terrain. Atmospheric cleansing research has expanded to a regional scale, multilaboratory investigation of precipitation scavenging processes involving the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, the redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. A few long-range tracer experiments conducted in recent years and the special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity following the Chernobyl reactor accident of April 1986 offer important initial data bases for studying atmospheric processes at these super-regional scales.

  3. Structural foam-core panels in Northwest HUD-code manufactured housing: A preliminary assessment of opportunities and obstacles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durfee, D.L.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation of structural foam-core panels (foam panels) in manufactured housing was initiated during the Super Good Cents (SGC) program. The SGC program limited allowable glazing area because of the relatively high thermal losses associated with most windows. Due to their superior thermal performance, foam panels appeared to be a viable option to allow increased glazing area without compromising the thermal integrity of the wall. With the inception of the Manufactured-Housing Acquisition Program (MAP), however, the focus of this study has shifted. MAP permits unlimited glazing area if expensive, super-efficient, vinyl-framed, argon-gas-filled, low-emissivity coated windows are installed. Although MAP permits unlimited glazing area, a foam panel wall could allow the use of less expensive windows, larger window area, or less insulation and still provide the required thermal performance for the building. Bonneville contracted with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the feasibility of using foam panels in HUD-code manufactured housing. This study presents the results from a product and literature search. The potential barriers and benefits to the use of foam panels are determined from a regional survey of the HUD-code manufacturers and foam panel producers.

  4. Final Report for DOE Project: Climate Effects on Plant Range Distributions and Community Structure of Pacific Northwest Prairies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridgham, Scott D. [University of Oregon; Johnson, Bart [University of Oregon

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) prairies are an imperiled ecosystem that contain a large number of plant species with high fidelity to this habitat. The few remaining high-quality PNW prairies harbor a number of sensitive, rare, and endangered plant species that may be further at-risk with climate change. Thus, PNW prairies are an excellent model system to examine how climate change will affect the distribution of native plant species in grassland sites. Our experimental objectives were to determine: (i) how climate change will affect the range distribution of native plant species; (ii) what life history stages are most sensitive to climate change in a group of key indicator native species; (iii) the robustness of current restoration techniques and suites of species to changing climate, and in particular, the relative competitiveness of native species versus exotic invasive species; and (iv) the effects of climate change on carbon and nutrient cycling and soil-microbial-plant feedbacks. We addressed these objectives by experimentally increasing temperature 2.5 to 3.0 şC above ambient with overhead infrared lamps and increasing wet-season precipitation by 20% above ambient in three upland prairie sites in central-western Washington, central-western Oregon, and southwestern Oregon from fall 2010 through 2012. Additional precipitation was applied within 2 weeks of when it fell so precipitation intensity was increased, particularly during the winter rainy season but with minimal additions during the summer dry season. These three sites also represent a 520-km natural climate gradient of increasing degree of severity of Mediterranean climate from north to south. After removing the extant vegetation, we planted a diverse suite of 12 native species that have their northern range limit someplace within the PNW in each experimental plot. An additional 20 more wide-spread native species were also planted into each plot. We found that recruitment of plant species within their ranges was negatively impacted by increased temperatures, but for species planted north of their current range, increased temperature was neutral. However, for surviving plants climate treatments and site-specific factors (e.g., nutrient availability) were the strongest predictors of plant growth and seed set. When recruitment and plant growth are considered together, increased temperatures are negative within a species current range but beyond this range they become positive. Germination was the most critical stage for plant response across all sites and climate treatments. Our results underscore the importance of including plant vital rates into models that are examining climate change effects on plant ranges. Warming altered plant community composition, decreased diversity, and increased total cover, with warmed northern communities over time becoming more like ambient communities further south. In particular, warming increased the cover of annual introduced species, suggesting that the observed biogeographic pattern of increasing invasion by this plant functional group in US West Coast prairies as one moves further south is at least in part due to climate. Our results suggest that with the projected increase in drought severity with climate change, Pacific Northwest prairies may face an increase of invasion by annuals, similar to what has been observed in California, resulting in novel species assemblages and shifts in functional composition, which in turn may alter ecosystem function. Warming generally increased nutrient availability and plant productivity across all sites. The seasonality of soil respiration responses to heating were strongly dependent on the Mediterranean climate gradient in the PNW, with heating responses being generally positive during periods of adequate soil moisture and becoming neutral to negative during periods of low soil moisture. The asynchrony between temperature and precipitation may make soils less sensitive to warming. Precipitation effects were minimal for all measured responses indicating the importance of increased temperature

  5. The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grove, L.K. [ed.; Wildung, R.E.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1992 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year 1992. This report consists of four volumes oriented to particular segments of the PNL program, describing research performed for the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in the Office of Energy Research. The parts of the 1992 Annual Report are: Biomedical Sciences; Environmental Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences; and Physical Sciences. This Report is Part 2: Environmental Sciences. Included in this report are developments in Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development, Interactions with Educational Institutions, Technology Transfer, Publications, and Presentations. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. The Technology Transfer section of this report describes a number of examples in which fundamental research is laying the groundwork for the technology needed to resolve important environmental problems. The Interactions with Educational Institutions section of the report illustrates the results of a long-term, proactive program to make PNL facilities available for university and preuniversity education and to involve educational institutions in research programs. The areas under investigation include the effect of geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in deep subsurface environments, ways to address subsurface heterogeneity, and ways to determine the key biochemical and physiological pathways (and DNA markers) that control nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and the response of these systems to disturbance and climatic change.

  7. Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

  8. Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act : Legislative History of the Act to Assist the Electrical Consumers of the Pacific Northwest through use of the Federal Columbia River Power System to Achieve Cost-Effective Energy Conservation : P.L. 96-501, 94 Stat. 2697.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act became effective when it was signed into law by President Carter on December 5, 1980. This ended a four-year debate over legislation designed to plan and coordinate the region's energy future. This legislative history is an abbreviated version taken from the larger historical file maintained by the BPA Law Library. It is intended to assist BPA personnel and others who are studying the Northwest Power Act and working on its implementation. The documents included were selected for their value in determining what Congress meant in enacting the statute and to provide the researcher with a starting point for further investigation. These documents include: a history of the Act, a chronology of the legislative action leading to passage of the law; a section-by-section analysis of the Act; the Congressional Records of Senate and House debates on the bill and its amendments, and a list of Congressional committee hearings.

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health: Part 5: Environment, safety, health, and quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faust, L.G.; Steelman, B.L.; Selby, J.M.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 5 of the 1987 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Environmental Guidance and Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, and the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, articles describe progress made during fiscal year 1987. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

  10. CRADA with International Polyol Chemicals, Inc. (IPCI) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-053): Process Optimization for Polyols Production from Glucose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this CRADA is to provide sufficient process development to allow a decision for commercialization of the International Polyol Chemicals, Inc. (IPCI) process for production of polyols from glucose. This cooperative research allowed Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to focus its aqueous processing systems expertise on the IPCI process to facilitate process optimization. The project was part of the Department of Energy's (DOE/EE-OIT) Alternative Feedstocks Program (AFP). The project was a demonstration of the cooperative effort between the AFP and the Department of Agriculture's Alternative Agriculture Research Center, which was also funding IPCI research.

  11. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

  12. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

  13. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1998 mid-year progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996 and six (6) in Fiscal Year 1997. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health: Part 5, Nuclear and operational safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faust, L.G.; Kennedy, W.E.; Steelman, B.L.; Selby, J.M.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 5 of the 1986 Annual Report to the Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Operational Safety, and for the Office of Environmental Analysis. For each project, as identified by the Field Task Proposal/Agreement, articles describe progress made during fiscal year 1986. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from three of the seven research departments of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

  15. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards-Fiscal Year 1999 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peurrung, L.M.

    1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, and eight in fiscal year 1998. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in five areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Clean Up, and Health Effects.

  16. Species composition and population levels of scleractinean corals within the Diploria-Montastrea-Porites Zone of the East Flower Garden Bank, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viada, Stephen Tomas

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levels of Scleractinean Corals Within the Diploria-Montastrea-Porites Zone of the East Flower Garden Bank, Northwest Gulf of Mexico. (December 1980) Stephen Tomas Viada, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas J. Bright... Population levels of scleractinean corals at "top-reef" and "reef edge" sites within the Di ploria-Montastrea-Pori tes Zone of the East Flower Garden Bank were determined at two sites by means of a series of 34 stratified random photographic line transects...

  17. Northwest Region Undergraduate Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    F2F 147 Sept 13, 20, 27; Oct 4, 11; Nov 8, 15, 22, 29; Dec 6 Thursday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm 50883 EDUC2F 147 Sept 14, 21, 28; Oct 5, 12; Nov 9, 16, 23, 30: Dec 7 Friday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm 50887 EDUC 4352F 147 Sept 12, 19, 26; Oct 3, 10; Nov 7, 14, 21, 28; Dec 5 Wednesday 10:30 am - 1:00 pm 50886 EDUC

  18. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science. Technology. Innovation. PNNL's innovative -Learning approach enriches the learning experience by problem-solving aims to use real-world contexts that require the learner to actively apply knowledge. PNNL and enable the training application to respond effectively and adapt to the learner's performance. PNNL

  19. Northwest Passage Volume 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, TM

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    upon the bodies of dead Inuit hundreds of years old, preserved in ice. The Arc tic acts like a kind of deep-freeze, you see, and?" "Okay, thanks, BillNye," Raycut him off impatiently. "I think I just found another piece of dead guy and you wanna... across northern Canada's frozen tundra, frightened Fraser far more than the delirious Raywho, seven months ago, nearly died from expo sure on a field of ice. Fraser had been hesitant to ask his friend about the reason for his silence. In the two...

  20. Northwest, the Bonneville Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and vegetation or other objects connected to the ground that are up to 15 feet away. Preventive maintenance: A new national requirement After the big blackout in the Northeast...

  1. Hydropower in the Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)Hydrogen Storage in CarbonLaboratories'

  2. Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of »Writers: Sue Chin,

  3. Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of »Writers: Sue Chin,

  4. Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of »Writers: Sue Chin,

  5. Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of »Writers: Sue

  6. Northwest, the Bonneville Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigtoDepartment of »Writers: Sue6 and

  7. Energy Northwest, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 AvailableD Bonds:C

  8. Energy Northwest, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 AvailableD Bonds:CA Bonds:

  9. Energy Northwest, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 AvailableD Bonds:CA

  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO Website Directory PPPOLarson.Cheryl AandadVancing

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than histone30518 PREPRINTTHIRDPRRC

  12. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are hereNewsOur siteFeatured Research

  13. Renewable Northwest Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/)RenewableRenewable EnergyForecast

  14. Heart of America Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment of EnergyHearings Hearings

  15. The Influence of Climate Variation and Change on Structure and Processes in Nearshore Vegetated Communities of Puget Sound and other Northwest Estuaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Blanton, Susan L.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Williams, Gregory D.

    2001-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have been investigating the potential for variations in ocean temperature and carbon dioxide to affect nearshore vegetated communities in the Pacific Northwest. Experimental studies as well as long-term monitoring suggest that these communities will respond to climate change and that alterations in their functions may impact fisheries resources. This paper addresses the effects of sea level rise on coastal communities; temperature variations on eelgrass; carbon dioxide-enriched seawater on photosynthetic rates of mudflats, seagrasses, and bull kelp; and of increased climate variability on primary production. Conclusions show there is a clear need to focus investigations on the potential effects of a warmer and CO2-rich environment on Puget Sound's nearshore ecosystem. Experimental data as well as filed studies strongly indicate that temperature is a major factor controlling benthic primary production, respiration and community production in Pacific Northwest estuarine ecosystems. A shift in temperature will predictably affect these processes. The actual amount of effect, the complexities of change and the ultimate impact on fisheries resources are unquantified and highly speculative at this time.

  16. Optical Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts, the Discovery of Supernovae 2005bv, 2005ee, and 2006ak, and Searches for Transients Using the "MASTER" Robotic Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Lipunov; V. G. Kornilov; A. V. Krylov; N. V. Tyurina; A. A. Belinski; E. S. Gorbovskoy; D. A. Kuvshinov; P. A. Gritsyk; G. A. Antipov; G. V. Borisov; A. V. Sankovich; V. V. Vladimirov; V. I. Vybornov; A. S. Kuznetsov

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of observations obtained using the MASTER robotic telescope in 2005 - 2006, including the earliest observations of the optical emission of the gamma-ray bursts GRB 050824 and GRB 060926. Together with later observations, these data yield the brightness-variation law t^{-0.55+-0.05} for GRB 050824. An optical flare was detected in GRB 060926 - a brightness enhancement that repeated the behavior observed in the X-ray variations. The spectrum of GRB 060926 is found to be F_E ~ E^-\\beta, where \\beta = 1.0+-0.2. Limits on the optical brightnesses of 26 gamma-ray bursts have been derived, 9 of these for the first time. Data for more than 90% of the accessible sky down to $19^m$ were taken and reduced in real time during the survey. A database has been composed based on these data. Limits have been placed on the rate of optical flares that are not associated with detected gamma-ray bursts, and on the opening angle for the beams of gamma-ray bursts. Three new supernovae have been discovered: SN 2005bv (type Ia) - the first to be discovered on Russian territory, SN 2005ee - one of the most powerful type II supernovae known, and SN 2006ak (type Ia). We have obtained an image of SN 2006X during the growth stage and a light curve that fully describes the brightness maximum and exponential decay. A new method for searching for optical transients of gamma-ray bursts detected using triangulation from various spacecraft is proposed and tested.

  17. Minutes of February 14, 2013 meeting of the Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project (PNDRP) Presentations are linked in the meeting agenda at www.nwcouncil.org/energy/dr/meetings/2013_02/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Minutes of February 14, 2013 meeting of the Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project (PNDRP be working on demand response issues but in other areas including wind integration, the development PGE's treatment of demand response in their integrated resource plan (www.nwcouncil.org/media/4476948

  18. Fixed Price General Provisions for Supplies/Services -Foreign Battelle Memorial Institute Page 1 of 23 Form A-110-Foreign-FP-R8 (March 2013) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price General Provisions for Supplies/Services - Foreign Battelle Memorial Institute Page 1 of 23 Form A Supplies and Services ­ Foreign For the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operated by Battelle Memorial Institute Battelle Memorial Institute has executed and is engaged in the performance of Prime Contract DE

  19. Measurement and calculation of doses in and around north-west labyrinth in TFTR test cell shielding for D-T operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A.; Eggleston, J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Kugel, H.W.; Ascione, G.; Elwood, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    TFTR test cell has a major penetration that exists on the inner side of the north-west corner of the test cell wall. There is no known direct line of sight from the plasma source to the door. The biological doses were measured at various locations inside both the legs of the labyrinth, in addition to, scattered locations on outer segments of the labyrinth facing the TFTR D-T plasma. In addition, six sets of activation foil detectors were placed covering the south-to-north leg, labyrinth entrance, and west-to-east leg. The doses have been calculated using 3-D monte carlo code MCNP with ENDF/B-VI. The calculations reproduce the broad features of the measured data. However, the authors find significant differences in the calculations for a number of locations. The possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  20. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value ofWind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and theNorthwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this report, we use wind speed data modeled by TrueWind Solutions, LLC (now AWS Truewind) to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwest. (Data from this dataset are referred to as ''TrueWind data'' throughout this report.) The intra-annual wind speed variations reported in the TrueWind datasets have not previously been used in published work, however, so we also compare them to a collection of anemometer wind speed measurements and to a limited set of actual wind farm production data. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in the Northwest and California with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. Based on our research, we reach three key conclusions. (1) Temporal patterns have a moderate impact on the wholesale market value of wind power and a larger impact on the capacity factor during peak hours. The best-timed wind power sites have a wholesale market value that is up to 4 percent higher than the average market price, while the worst-timed sites have a market value that is up to 11 percent below the average market price. The best-timed wind sites could produce as much as 30-40 percent more power during peak hours than they do on average during the year, while the worst timed sites may produce 30-60 percent less power during peak hours. (2) Northwestern markets appear to be well served by Northwestern wind and poorly served by California wind; results are less clear for California markets. Both the modeled TrueWind data and the anemometer data indicate that many Northwestern wind sites are reasonably well-matched to the Northwest's historically winter-peaking wholesale electricity prices and loads, while most California sites are poorly matched to these prices and loads. However, the TrueWind data indicate that most California and Northwestern wind sites are poorly matched to California's summer-afternoon-peaking prices and loads, while the anemometer data suggest that many of these same sites are well matched to California's wholesale prices and loads. (3) TrueWind and anemometer data agree about wind speeds in most times and places, but disagree about California's summer afternoon wind speeds: The TrueWind data indicate that wind speeds at sites in California's coastal mountains and some Northwestern locations dip deeply during summer days and stay low through much of the afternoon. In contrast, the anemometer data indicate that winds at these sites begin to rise during the afternoon and are relatively strong when power is needed most. At other times and locations, the two datasets show good agreement. This disagreement may be due in part to time-varying wind shear between the anemometer heights (20-25m) and the TrueWind reference height (50m or 70m), but may also be due to modeling errors or data collection inconsistencies.

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baalman, R.W.; Hays, I.D. (eds.)

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community impacts; environmental and safety engineering for LNG, oil spills, LPG, shale oil waste waters, geothermal liquid waste disposal, compressed air energy storage, and nuclear/fusion fuel cycles; operational and environmental safety studies of decommissioning, environmental monitoring, personnel dosimetry, and analysis of criticality safety; health physics studies; and epidemiological studies. Also included are an author index, organization of PNL charts and distribution lists of the annual report, along with lists of presentations and publications. (DLS)

  2. Testimony by J. William Currie, Ph.D Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs Washington D.C.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, J.W.

    1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of the testimony by J. William Currie, Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, Washington, DC on February 18, 1992. He states ``It is a pleasure to have the opportunity to talk with this distinguished committee about energy conservation technologies and policies, especially as they relate to federal energy use and the commercialization of energy-efficiency technologies. Clearly, using energy more efficiently offers the potential for tremendous cost savings and environmental benefits in the United States and throughout the rest of the world. The challenge, especially with regard to the federal sector, is to lay the foundation for ensuring that the citizens of our nation realize the maximum savings and environmental benefit over the long run. This is the primary focus of my comments today.``

  3. Testimony by J. William Currie, Ph. D Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs Washington D. C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, J.W.

    1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of the testimony by J. William Currie, Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, Washington, DC on February 18, 1992. He states It is a pleasure to have the opportunity to talk with this distinguished committee about energy conservation technologies and policies, especially as they relate to federal energy use and the commercialization of energy-efficiency technologies. Clearly, using energy more efficiently offers the potential for tremendous cost savings and environmental benefits in the United States and throughout the rest of the world. The challenge, especially with regard to the federal sector, is to lay the foundation for ensuring that the citizens of our nation realize the maximum savings and environmental benefit over the long run. This is the primary focus of my comments today.''

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 2: Environmental Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PBL) for the Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1989. Research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of processes controlling the long-term fate and biological effects of fugitive chemicals and other stressors resulting from energy development. The report is organized by major research areas. Within this division, individual reports summarize the progress of projects in these areas. Additional sections summarize exploratory research, educational institutional interactions, technology transfer, and publications. The research, focused principally on subsurface contaminant transport and detection and management of human-induced changes in biological systems, forms the basis for defining and quantifying processes that affect humans and the environment at the local, regional, and global levels.

  5. Northwest Stevens A4, A5, and A6 reservoirs, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California. General reservoir study: evaluation and MER determination. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary conclusion is that historically, and particularly in the last four months, the Northwest Stevens A4-A6 Sand waterflood has operated in a state of underinjection. Injection should immediately be increased as necessary to replace current reservoir withdrawals and, as soon as possible, injection rates should be increased to around 26,000 BWPD to accelerate the project and maximize its economic returns. Meanwhile, a MER value of 7243 barrels of oil per day is recommended for the remainder of 1986. This report contains backup data, tables, exhibits, and calculations to support the conclusions and recommendations that are presented. Appended items are included in Appendix Book 1 and Appendix Book 2. 20 figs.

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health - Part 5: Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faust, L.G.; Doctor, P.G.; Selby, J.M.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 5 of the 1989 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Environmental Guidance and Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance, the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Safety Compliance, and the Office of Policy and Standards. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, there is an article describing progress made during fiscal year 1989. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work. 35 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards -- Fiscal Year 2002 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bredt, Paul R.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Brockman, Fred J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Egorov, Oleg B.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Grate, Jay W.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Mattigod, Shas V.; McGrail, B. Peter; Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Christopher J.; Panetta, Paul D.; Pfund, David M.; Rai, Dhanpat; Su, Yali; Sundaram, S. K.; Weber, William J.; Zachara, John M.

    2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been awarded a total of 80 Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants since the inception of the program in 1996. The Laboratory has collaborated on an additional 14 EMSP awards with funding received through other institution. This report describes how each of the projects awarded in 1999, 2000, and 2001 addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in the individual project reports included in this document. Projects are under way in three main areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  8. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CD Carlson; SQ Bennett

    2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998, and seven in fiscal year 1999. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have been completed and will publish final reports, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation; Decontamination and Decommissioning; Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials; and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  9. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Clark D.; Bennett, Sheila Q.

    2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998 and seven in fiscal year 1999.(a) All of the fiscal year 1996 awards have been completed and the Principal Investigators are writing final reports, so their summaries will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  10. StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Resource Information Network - Status of Salmon and Steelhead in the Columbia River Basin, 1995 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Duane A.; Beamesderfer, Raymond C. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Enterprise, OR (United States); Woodard, Bob [Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on fish populations, fisheries, and fish habitat is crucial to the success of ongoing program to protect, recover, enhance, and manage fish resources in the Columbia River Basin. However, pertinent data are often difficult to locate because it is scattered among many agencies and is often unpublished. The goal of this annual report is to bring many diverse data types and sources into a single comprehensive report on the status of anadromous fish runs in the Columbia River Basin and the environmental conditions that may affect that status. Brief summaries are provided to identify the type and scope of available information. This synopsis is intended to complement other more detailed reports to which readers are referred for comprehensive treatment of specific subjects. This first report focuses mainly on anadromous salmon and steelhead (primarily through 1994) but the authors intend to expand the scope of future issues to include resident species. This is the first of what the authors intend to be an annual report. They welcome constructive suggestions for improvements. This report is a product of the StreamNet (formerly Coordinated Information System and Northwest Environmental Data Base) project which is a part of the Bonneville Power Administration`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The project is called for in the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The project`s objective is to promote exchange and dissemination of information in a standardized electronic format throughout the basin. This project is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission with active participation by tribal, state, and federal fish and wildlife agencies.

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons of metal, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, 12 companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants. Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Issues: Domestic primary aluminum production decreased owing in large part to the smelter production cutbacks caused by increased energy costs, particularly in the Pacific Northwest. Domestic smelters aluminum smelter in Hawesville, KY. The acquisition was subject to the completion of a labor agreement

  12. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 1150{degrees}C volume 2: Chapters 12-16 and appendices A-K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity ({eta}), electrical conductivity ({epsilon}), glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), thermal expansion of solid glass ({alpha}{sub s}) and molten glass ({alpha}{sub m}), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T{sub L}), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r{sub mi}) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r{sub pi}), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T{sub L}) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria.

  13. Evaluation of natural attenuation processes for trichloroethylene and technetium-99 in the Northeast and Northwest plumes at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clausen, J.L.; Sturchio, N.C.; Heraty, L.J.; Huang, L.; Abrajano,T.

    1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    NA processes such as biodegradation, sorption, dilution dispersion, advection, and possibly sorption and diffusion are occurring in the Northeast and Northwest plumes. However, the overall biological attenuation rate for TCE within the plumes is not sufficiently rapid to utilize as remedial option. The mobility and toxicity of {sup 99}Tc is not being reduced by attenuating processes within the Northwest Plume. The current EPA position is that NA is not a viable remedial approach unless destructive processes are present or processes are active which reduce the toxicity and mobility of a contaminant. Therefore, active remediation of the dissolved phase plumes will be necessary to reduce contaminant concentrations before an NA approach could be justified at PGDP for either plume. Possible treatment methods for the reduction of dissolved phase concentrations within the plumes are pump-and-treat bioaugmentation, biostimulation, or multiple reactive barriers. Another possibility is the use of a regulatory instrument such as an Alternate Concentration Limit (ACL) petition. Biodegradation of TCE is occurring in both plumes and several hypothesis are possible to explain the apparent conflicts with some of the geochemical data. The first hypothesis is active intrinsic bioremediation is negligible or so slow to be nonmeasurable. In this scenario, the D.O., chloride, TCE, and isotopic results are indicative of past microbiological reactions. It is surmised in this scenario, that when the initial TCE release occurred, sufficient energy sources were available for microorganisms to drive aerobic reduction of TCE, but these energy sources were rapidly depleted. The initial degraded TCE has since migrated to downgradient locations. In the second scenario, TCE anaerobic degradation occurs in organic-rich micro-environments within a generally aerobic aquifer. TCE maybe strongly absorbed to organic-rich materials in the aquifer matrix and degraded by local Immunities of microbes, perhaps even under anaerobic conditions. Chloride, generated by degradation in such microenvironment is released rapidly into the water, as is CO{sub 2}, from respiration of the microorganisms. TCE and its organic degradation products are retained on the aquifer matrix by sorption, and released more slowly into the groundwater. In this process, chloride produced from the microbial reaction may become separated in the plume from the residual TCE. This may explain why the chloride isotope ratio and dissolved TCE do not correlate with the DIC isotope ratio. The relationship between the {delta}{sup 37}Cl values of TCE and dissolved inorganic chloride is consistent with what would be expected from the degradation of TCE, but is complicated by the elevated levels of background chloride, presumably due to agriculture practice, and complex behavior of TCE in the aquifer.

  14. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plants The path to energy security for the United States includes responsible coal combustion. Half of our nation's electricity is produced from coal, and the country has...

  15. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science....

  16. Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region Background Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO2 emissions without...

  17. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins Background Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer...

  18. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including oil and gas fields, unmineable deep coal seams, brine formations, and natural gas hydrates. The data obtained from laboratory tests of various rock types under a...

  19. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that can be directly applied to individual wells using measurements from borehole logging tools. Models for leakage risk of wells can be developed that use collected data...

  20. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PARTNERS Geological Survey of Alabama Rice University Schlumberger SECARB Alabama Power Company Southern Company PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 12082009 08142013 COST...

  1. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - is developing a comprehensive reservoir simulator for modeling non-isothermal multiphase flow and transport of CO 2 in saline aquifers under varying temperature and pressure...

  2. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will identify specific risks such as induced seismicity and seismic hazards, caprock integrity, lateral CO 2 migration and existing well leakage paths. FE0001922 August 2012...

  3. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA), as well as computer simulation and risk assessment, of possible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leakage at CO 2 geologic storage sites....

  4. WDR-PK-AK-018

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollister, R

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Method - CES SOP-HW-P556 'Field and Bulk Gamma Analysis'. Detector - High-purity germanium, 40% relative efficiency. Calibration - The detector was calibrated on February 8, 2006 using a NIST-traceable sealed source, and the calibration was verified using an independent sealed source. Count Time and Geometry - The sample was counted for 20 minutes at 72 inches from the detector. A lead collimator was used to limit the field-of-view to the region of the sample. The drum was rotated 180 degrees halfway through the count time. Date and Location of Scans - June 1,2006 in Building 235 Room 1136. Spectral Analysis Spectra were analyzed with ORTEC GammaVision software. Matrix and geometry corrections were calculated using OR TEC Isotopic software. A background spectrum was measured at the counting location. No man-made radioactivity was observed in the background. Results were determined from the sample spectra without background subtraction. Minimum detectable activities were calculated by the Nureg 4.16 method. Results - Detected Pu-238, Pu-239, Am-241 and Am-243.

  5. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effective application of these MVA technologies will ensure the safety of geologic storage projects with respect to both human health and the environment, and can provide the...

  6. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    successful in furthering an understanding of the mechanisms controlling CO 2 extended coal bed methane recovery (ECBM) as a byproduct of CO 2 storage in deep, unmineable coal...

  7. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO 2 Storage Background Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer the...

  8. Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Triassic Newark Basin of New York & New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide Background Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for reducing...

  9. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), which was enacted to create new jobs, spur economic activity, and promote long-term economic growth. This research...

  10. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    injection zone(s); (3) improving efficiency of storage operations; and (4) developing Best Practices Manuals (BPMs). The overall project objective is to characterize the RSU and...

  11. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data and modeling tools needed to predict and quantify potential risks associated with oil and gas resources in shale reservoirs that require hydraulic fracturing or other...

  12. The 1992 Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey : Phase 1 (PNWRES92-I) : Book 6 : Selected Crosstabulations for Publicly-Owned Generating Utilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. End-Use Research Section; Applied Management & Planning Group (Firm)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book constitutes a portion of the primary documentation for the 1992 Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey, Phase I. The complete 33-volume set of primary documentation provides information needed by energy analysts and interpreters with respect to planning, execution, data collection, and data management of the PNWRES92-I process. Thirty of these volumes are devoted to different ``views`` of the data themselves, with each view having a special purpose or interest as its focus. Analyses and interpretations of these data will be the subjects of forthcoming publications. Conducted during the late summer and fall months of 1992, PNWRES92-I had the over-arching goal of satisfying basic requirements for a variety of information about the stock of residential units in Bonneville`s service region. Surveys with a similar goal were conducted in 1979 and 1983. This volume is comprised of selected crosstabulations for publicly-owned generating utilities in Eastern Washington, Western Washington, and Western Oregon. ``Selected crosstabulations`` refers to a set of nine survey items of wide interest (Dwelling Type, Ownership Type, Year-of-Construction, Dwelling Size, Primary Space-Heating Fuel, Primary Water-Heating Fuel, Household Income for 1991, Utility Type, and Space-Heating Fuels: Systems and Equipment) that were crosstabulated among themselves.

  13. An exploratory investigation of the translation of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s print manuals system to an on-line manuals system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heubach, J.G.; Hunt, S.T.; Pond, L.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information management technology has proliferated in the past decade in response to the information explosion. As documentation accumulates, the need to access information residing in manuals, handbooks and regulations conveniently, accurately, and quickly has increased. However, studies show that only fractions of the available information is read (Martin, 1978). Consequently, one of the biggest challenges in linking information and electronic management of information is to use the power of communication technology to meet the information needs of the audience. Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) investigation of translating its print manual system to an on-line system fits this challenge precisely. PNL`s manuals contain a tremendous amount of information for which manual holders are responsible. To perform their tasks in compliance with policy and procedure guidelines, users need to access information accurately, conveniently, and quickly. In order to select and use information management tools wisely, answers must be sought to a few basic questions. Communication experts cite four key questions: What do users want? What do users need? What characteristics of an on-line information system affect its usefulness? Who are the users whose wants and needs are to be met? Once these questions are answered, attention can be focused on finding the best match between user requirements and technology characteristics and weighing the costs and benefits of proposed options.

  14. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-GeneratedElectricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this paper, we use wind speed data from three different sources to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwestern United States. By ''value'', we refer to either the contribution of wind power to meeting the electric system's peak loads, or the financial value of wind power in electricity markets. Sites for wind power projects are often screened or compared based on the annual average power production that would be expected from wind turbines at each site (Baban and Parry 2001; Brower et al. 2004; Jangamshetti and Rau 2001; Nielsen et al. 2002; Roy 2002; Schwartz 1999). However, at many locations, variations in wind speeds during the day and year are correlated with variations in the electric power system's load and wholesale market prices (Burton et al. 2001; Carlin 1983; Kennedy and Rogers 2003; Man Bae and Devine 1978; Sezgen et al. 1998); this correlation may raise or lower the value of wind power generated at each location. A number of previous reports address this issue somewhat indirectly by studying the contribution of individual wind power sites to the reliability or economic operation of the electric grid, using hourly wind speed data (Fleten et al.; Kahn 1991; Kirby et al. 2003; Milligan 2002; van Wijk et al. 1992). However, we have not identified any previous study that examines the effect of variations in wind timing across a broad geographical area on wholesale market value or capacity contribution of those different wind power sites. We have done so, to determine whether it is important to consider wind-timing when planning wind power development, and to try to identify locations where timing would have a more positive or negative effect. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in California and the Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming) with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. We also assess whether modeled wind data from TrueWind Solutions, LLC, can help answer such questions, by comparing results found using the TrueWind data to those found using anemometers or wind farm power production data. This paper summarizes results that are presented in more detail in a recent report from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Fripp and Wiser 2006). The full report is available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/re-pubs.html.

  15. Inert Electrodes Program: Characterization of the reaction layer or film on PNL (Pacific Northwest Laboratory) inert anodes: Progress Report for April-December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Stice, N.D.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report addresses activities conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) between April 1989 and December 1989 to characterize the reaction layer or film previously proposed by PNL to form on cermet anodes during the electrolytic production of aluminum in Hall-Heroult cells. Formation of this resistive film was thought to protect the cermet anode from corrosion reactions that would otherwise occur in the molten cryolite electrolyte. The results of potential-step studies, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and post-mortem microscopic analysis of polarized anodes suggest that the processes of corrosion of the metallic phase of the anode and the production of oxygen gas are separable and exhibit very different kinetic behavior. The corrosion reactions occur predominantly at low anode potentials, appear to show diffusion control, and may be related to the porosity of the anode. The oxygen production reaction is the predominant reaction above 2.2 V, exhibits activation control, occurs primarily on the surface of the anode, and is accompanied by an increase in surface roughness at higher current densities. Evidence presented in this report indicates that the production of oxygen shuts down the corrosion reactions, possibly through a pore-blocking mechanism. In addition, roughness effects may help explain some of the impedance relationships previously observed by PNL for these anodes. Although the present results do not rule out the formation of a protective layer or film, they strongly indicate mechanisms other than the formation of a macroscopic protective film for the apparent attenuation of corrosion reactions at typical operating current densities. 11 refs.

  16. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Northwest Energy Efficiency Taskforce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Slide 1 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Northwest Energy Efficiency Project Slide 2 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N What is Meant by "Smart Grid ­ User information interfaces and support tools #12;2 Slide 3 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I

  17. COMPUTER SCIENCE North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SX Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    ever whole-body computational solution for flow over a submarine (incorporating hull, lifting surface-realistic computer graphics: The Last Starfighter, as well as a variety of Clio and NCGA award-winning television

  18. Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and 76 Field, Clinton Co., KY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPE 36651 Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and enhanced recovery, production operations in fracture- dominated oil and gas reservoirs. Borehole geophones to study reservoir fracture systems. Methods currently applied to study fracture systems include tilt

  19. COMPUTER SCIENCE North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SX Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    grid, demand response will help accommodate fluctuating energy sources such as solar and wind vulnerabilities is hard. Energy companies want fine-grained consumption data but this may contravene European privacy law. And there are many incentive problems: smart meters will be operated by energy companies, who

  20. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site, Paducah, KY, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decision document presents the selected interim action for the North-South Diversion Ditch (NSDD) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of this interim remedial action is to initiate control of the source of continued contaminant releases into the NSDD and mitigate the spread of contamination from the NSDD.