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1

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Northeast Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Northeast Region Northeast Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Northeast Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Canadian Imports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty interstate natural gas pipeline systems operate within the Northeast Region (Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and West Virginia). These interstate pipelines deliver natural gas to several intrastate natural gas pipelines and at least 50 local distribution companies in the region. In addition, they also serve large industrial concerns and, increasingly, natural gas fired electric power generation facilities.

2

Price of Northeast Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Northeast Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

3

Price of Northeast Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Trinidad...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

and Tobago (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Northeast Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

4

Price of Northeast Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Northeast Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

5

Algonquin, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Algonquin, Illinois: Energy Resources Algonquin, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1655801°, -88.2942493° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1655801,"lon":-88.2942493,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Northeast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When European settlers arrived in the land that is now the northeastern United States, they found a vast forest with rich living resources. Stretching from the Coastal Plains to the Mississippi River was an environment shaped by trees. The climate, soils, and glacial history produced a forest that was unique in the world. In the 300 years since the arrival of Europeans, however, human activities have drastically changed this landscape. Still, as immense as the changes have been, they largely altered the appearance, but not the processes, of the ecosystems of the Northeast. A comparison of pictures of the Northeast from the 1700s with the 1900s would reveal striking differences. Early Europeans encountered great forests of American beeches, maples, birches, eastern hemlocks, and spruces from New England to northern Pennsylvania, and oaks, hickories, American chestnuts, and pines from Maryland through Ohio. Inhabiting these great forests were many wildlife populations:

unknown authors

7

Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury and radon emanometry sampling conducted in the Keaau prospect were similarly unable to define any anomalies that could reasonably be interpreted to be due to subsurface thermal effects. References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Mauna_Loa_Northeast_Rift_Area_(Thomas,_1986)&oldid=389039"

8

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24, 2013 | Release Date: July 25, 24, 2013 | Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release: August 1, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Northeast Heat Last Week Bumps Up Power Burn and Gas Prices Extreme heat in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions last week caused spikes in the price of wholesale natural gas and electric power, as well as near-record consumption of natural gas for power generation. Although recent pipeline capacity additions have helped ease movement of natural gas supplies in the area, constraints continue to limit gas flow to the region, particularly in times of high demand so typical of July and August. The day-ahead price of natural gas at the Algonquin Citygate, which serves

9

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Links to U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Links Links About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Links to U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Information - The links below will either direct the user to a narrative describing the system, a pipeline system map, a FERC prescribed "Informational Postings" page, or a FERC Tariff Sheet. Pipeline Name Type of System Regions of Operations Acadian Gas Pipeline System Intrastate Southwest Algonquin Gas Transmission Co Interstate Northeast Alliance Pipeline Co Interstate Central, Midwest Anaconda Pipeline System Gathering Gulf of Mexico ANR Pipeline Co Interstate Midwest ANR Storage Co Interstate Midwest Arkansas Oklahoma Gas Co Intrastate Southwest Arkansas Western Pipeline Co Intrastate

10

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2012 | Release Date: July 12, 1, 2012 | Release Date: July 12, 2012 | Next Release: July 19, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Prices Increase in Northeast due to Heat, Imports and LNG Help Meet Demand. The heat wave affecting the northeast United States eased over the past few days, reducing demand from electric power generators for natural gas to meet air conditioning needs. Pipeline constraints in the Northeast often create price spikes during very cold or very hot weather; on June 21, the price at the Algonquin Citygate (which serves Boston consumers) rose to $8.87 per million British thermal units (MMBtu), compared to $2.60 per MMBtu at the Henry Hub the same day. Since then, a few more notable price

11

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 29) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 29) Since Wednesday, July 14, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub remained at $5.91 per MMBtu. Yesterday (July 21), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.931 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 5 cents or less than 1 percent since last Wednesday (July 14). Natural gas in storage was at 2,227 Bcf as of July 16, which is 2.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell 35 cents per barrel or less than 1 percent on the week to $40.63 per barrel or $7.005 per MMBtu. Prices: Strengthening weather fundamentals and increasing power generation loads since Monday, July 19, contributed to rebounding gas prices at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. The growing potential for a supply-side disturbance also contributed to rising prices on Wednesday, July 21, as the first tropical depression of the Atlantic hurricane season may be gathering south of Hispaniola. The largest gains in spot prices since last Wednesday, July 14, principally occurred west of the Rockies as increases in the California and Rocky Mountains regions averaged 21 and 19 cents per MMBtu, respectively. Prices in the Northeast gained 11 cents per MMBtu on average with prices at the Algonquin and New York City citygates climbing 19 and 17 cents per MMBtu, respectively. Gains elsewhere were less pronounced with prices in the Midcontinent, Midwest, and Texas regions increasing less than a dime on average. In contrast to the general pattern of rising prices in the Lower 48 States, prices in Florida fell on average 8 cents per MMBtu. Prices continue to exceed last year's levels by almost a dollar. As of July 21, 2004, prices at the Henry Hub are 90 cents or 17 percent above last year's level.

12

Northeast | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 80, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power New York Northeast projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 259.1 KiB)

13

Northeast Solar Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Northeast Solar Energy Northeast Solar Energy Research Center (NSERC) A multi-purpose research facility on the BNL campus Solar PV Array Size and Type * ~1.0 MW total - Area 1 sized for testing utility-scale inverters * System voltage level of 1,000V * Connected to BNL electrical distribution system * Capability to test multiple panel technologies with crystalline silicon PV modules making up the bulk of the array * Capability to re-configure the array into

14

NORTHEAST REGIONAL REFINED PETROLEUM PRODUCT RESERVE | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NORTHEAST REGIONAL REFINED PETROLEUM PRODUCT RESERVE NORTHEAST REGIONAL REFINED PETROLEUM PRODUCT RESERVE The Northeast region of the U.S. is particularly vulnerable to gasoline...

15

Constitutional Implications of Regional CO2 Cap-and-Trade Programs: The Northeast Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative as a Case in Point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the purchase of out-of- RGGI electricity generating CO 2CONSTITUTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF RGGI "(i) to study state andGas Initiative, About RGGI, http://www.rggi. org/about (last

Funk, William

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The northeast Georgia hydroelectric plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Northeast Georgia hydroelectric plants are important cultural resources to the state of Georgia and the communities immediately adjacent. If the early technology of these (more)

Kelly, Nancy Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Northeast Clean Energy Application Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2013 (contract period), the Northeast Clean Energy Application Center (NE-CEAC) worked in New York and New England (Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine) to create a more robust market for the deployment of clean energy technologies (CETs) including combined heat and power (CHP), district energy systems (DES), and waste heat recovery (WHR) systems through the provision of technical assistance, education and outreach, and strategic market analysis and support for decision-makers. CHP, DES, and WHR can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce electrical and thermal energy costs, and provide more reliable energy for users throughout the United States. The NE-CEACs efforts in the provision of technical assistance, education and outreach, and strategic market analysis and support for decision-makers helped advance the market for CETs in the Northeast thereby helping the region move towards the following outcomes: Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutants Improvements in energy efficiency resulting in lower costs of doing business Productivity gains in industry and efficiency gains in buildings Lower regional energy costs Strengthened energy security Enhanced consumer choice Reduced price risks for end-users Economic development effects keeping more jobs and more income in our regional economy Over the contract period, NE-CEAC provided technical assistance to approximately 56 different potential end-users that were interested in CHP and other CETs for their facility or facilities. Of these 56 potential end-users, five new CHP projects totaling over 60 MW of install capacity became operational during the contract period. The NE-CEAC helped host numerous target market workshops, trainings, and webinars; and NE-CEAC staff delivered presentations at many other workshops and conferences. In total, over 60 different workshops, conferences, webinars, and presentation were hosted or delivered during the contract period. The NE-CEAC also produced publically available educational materials such as CHP project profiles. Finally, the NE-CEAC worked closely with the relevant state agencies involved with CHP development. In New York, the NE-CEAC played an important role in securing and maintaining funding for CHP incentive programs administered by the New York State Energy Research Development Authority. NE-CEAC was also involved in the NYC Mayor's Office DG Collaborative. The NECEAC was also named a strategic resource for the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protections innovative Microgrid Pilot Program.

Bourgeois, Tom

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy Information Administration publications, such as the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Terminal Operator Location (Thousand Barrels) Hess Corp. Groton, CT 500*

19

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...

20

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive...

22

State and Local Code Implementation: Northeast Region - 2014...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Northeast Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review State and Local Code Implementation: Northeast Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Carolyn Sarno, Northeast Energy Efficiency...

23

Northeast United States U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of the Adequacy of Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis Division November 2013 Northeast U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Adequacy Assessment, 2013 2 Preface In 2005-06, the U.S. DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for select market areas in the Northeast under a range of different weather conditions. The study then determined how interstate pipeline flow patterns could

24

"Table HC11.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 1.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total U.S.",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,20.3,14.9,5.4 "1.",103.3,18.7,13.6,5.2 "2 or More",6.2,1.6,1.4,0.2 "Do Not Use an Oven",1.5,0.2,"Q","Q" "Most-Used Oven Fuel" "Electric",67.9,9.7,6.2,3.6 "Natural Gas",36.4,9.4,7.9,1.5

25

Magnetic anomalies northeast of Shatsky Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAGNETIC ANOMALIES NORTHEAST OF SHATSKY PLATEAU A Thesis by DAVID LAWRENCE RISCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject...: Oceanography MAGNETIC ANOMALIES NORTHEAST OF SHATSKY PLATEAU A Thesis by DAVID LAWRENCE RISCH Approved as to style and content by: C rman Committee Member Member Head of Department May 198Z ABSTRACT Magnetic Anomalies Northeast of Shatsky Plateau...

Risch, David Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

Northeast Climate Science Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall to Assess Climate Vulnerability Northeast Climate Science Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall to Assess Climate Vulnerability November 12,...

27

SWMU ASSESSMENT REPORT NUMBER: NAME: Northeast Groundwater Plume  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NUMBER: NAME: Northeast Groundwater Plume DATE: July 21 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Inside and outside security fence east, northeast ofplant operations. See attached map for...

28

COLLIER, ROBERT W. Molybdenum in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molybdenum in the Northeast Pacific Ocean'. Abstract-The concentration of dissolved mo- lybdenum has been determined in several profiles from the Northeast...

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

29

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release The Energy Policy and Conservation...

30

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2012 | Release Date: December 20, 9, 2012 | Release Date: December 20, 2012 | Next Release: January 10, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: AGT pipeline receipts from Millennium Pipeline and Tennessee Gas Pipeline increased 56 percent in December 2012 compared to December 2011, while total receipts remained unchanged over the same period. Natural gas receipts at all points on the Algonquin Gas Transmission (AGT) pipeline, extending from New York/New Jersey to Boston, for the first 19 days of December 2012 averaged 1.2 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d), essentially equal to receipts for the first 19 days of December 2011, according to data from BENTEK Energy LLC (Bentek). However, combined

31

Net carbon fluxes at stand and landscape scales from wood bioenergy harvests in the US Northeast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net carbon fluxes at stand and landscape scales from wood bioenergy harvests in the US Northeast gas emissions implications of wood biomass (`bioenergy') harvests are highly uncer- tain yet of great bioenergy is only one of many products. We used field data to formulate bioenergy harvest scenarios, applied

Vermont, University of

32

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 25, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 17, 2010) Natural gas prices continued their decline across much of the country for the week ended February 17. Even prices in the Northeast, which registered large increases during the previous week, fell as of yesterday. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered net decreases at almost all locations in the lower 48 States. The significant price increases for the week ended February 10 in the Northeast occurred in response to the two major snow storms that slammed the Mid-Atlantic and parts of the Northeast. However, with average temperatures this report week resembling historical normals, prices in the

33

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area (Redirected from New York Area - NY NJ CT PA) Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

34

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

35

NORTHEAST REGIONAL REFINED PETROLEUM PRODUCT RESERVE  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Northeast region of the U.S. is particularly vulnerable to gasoline disruptions as a result of hurricanes and other natural events. Hurricane Sandy in 2012 caused widespread issues related to...

36

Diurnal Rainfall Variation in Northeast Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The diurnal rainfall variation in northeast Brazil is investigated for the period 196170. Most coastal areas are found to experience a nocturnal maximum in rainfall activity. probably due to convergence between the mean onshore flow and the ...

Vernon E. Kousky

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

AWEA Wind Energy Regional Summit: Northeast  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The AWEA Wind Energy Northeast Regional Summit will connect you with New England-area wind energy professionals and offers the opportunity to discuss significant issues related to land-based and...

38

2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northeast Region Workshop, held in Philadelphia, May 1920, 2011.

39

Challenges and Opportunities for Regulating Greenhouse Gas Emissions at the State, Regional and Local Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

house Gas Initiative (RGGI). Shortly thereafter, Westernof Northeast states for the RGGI and Western states for theperspective. .For example, the RGGI states have already ad-

Doyle, Jim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Northeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Northeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Intense Currents in the Deep Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of deep currents in the northeast Pacific Ocean are reported that indicate that although the eddy kinetic energy level is, as expected, generally low, the deep northeast Pacific is subject to occasional intensely energetic events. ...

Howard J. Freeland

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Tidal triggering of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean William S. D. Wilcock School...of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, a region of high-amplitude...interaction|forecasting|prediction|Pacific Ocean| Introduction For more than a......

William S. D. Wilcock

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Explosive Cyclogenesis over the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on explosively developing extratropical cyclones over the northeast portion of the Pacific Ocean have been compiled. A climatology of those events which deepened by 1 Bergeron (24 mb day?1 deepening at 60N) or more is discussed. The maximum ...

T. S. Murty; G. A. McBean; B. McKee

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline Systems  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Systems, 2008 (Ranked by system capacity) Pipeline Name Market Regions Served Primary Supply Regions States in Which Pipeline Operates Transported in 2007 (million dekatherm)1 System Capacity (MMcf/d) 2 System Mileage Columbia Gas Transmission Co. Northeast Southwest, Appalachia DE, PA, MD, KY, NC, NJ, NY, OH, VA, WV 1,849 9,350 10,365 Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Co. Northeast, Southeast Southwest AL, GA, LA, MD, MS, NC, NY, SC, TX, VA, GM 2,670 8,466 10,450 Northern Natural Gas Co. Central, Midwest Southwest IA, IL, KS, NE, NM, OK, SD, TX, WI, GM 1,055 7,442 15,874 Texas Eastern Transmission Corp.

45

Northeast Sustainable Energy Association | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Energy Association Sustainable Energy Association Name Northeast Sustainable Energy Association Address 50 Miles Street Place Greenfield, Massachusetts Zip 01301 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Website http://www.nesea.org/ Notes Regional membership organization promoting sustainable energy solutions Coordinates 42.5864°, -72.6025° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5864,"lon":-72.6025,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Part-Time Farming in Northeast Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JANUARY THE AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION. TEXAS IN COOPERATION WITH THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 632320 - This analysis of part-the farming... is part of a broad the income levels, income sources and farm and human patterns of the.88,W rural o area of Northeast Texas (Tearas Agricultural Bulletin 940, Incomes of Rural Families in No A major farm adjustmen part-time farming, or a greater...

Martin, James R.; Southern, John H.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve March 14, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy, through its agent, DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation for new contracts to store two million barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in New York Harbor and New England. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m. EDT on March 29, 2011. Of the U.S. households that use heating oil to heat their homes, 69% reside in the Northeast. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve was established by the Energy Policy Act of 2000 to provide an emergency buffer that can supplement commercial fuel supplies in the event of an actual or imminent severe supply disruption. The Reserve can provide supplemental supplies for

48

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Updated: November 25, 2013 For prior report data see Natural Gas Year-in-Review archives EIA's Natural Gas Issues and Trends highlights timely information and analyses on natural gas markets. Natural gas prices reflect decreasing seasonality. Today in Energy, November 20, 2013 Increased Northeast natural gas production reduces net inflow of supply from other areas. Today in Energy, November 19, 2013 Gas pipeline expansions reduce Marcellus backup, New York gas prices. Natural Gas Weekly Update, November 13, 2013 EIA projects lower natural gas use this winter. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 31, 2013 Northeast net imports from Canada plummet, driven by export growth at Niagara Falls. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 10, 2013

49

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa...

50

Northeast Climate Science Center Webinar - Making Decision in...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Management Across Multiple Agencies Using Structured Decision Making Northeast Climate Science Center Webinar - Making Decision in Complex Landscapes: Headwater Stream Management...

51

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Proposals for Nuclear Cooperation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Henry S. Rowen, "Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Proliferation -Northeast Asian nuclear energy cooperation advanced byAsia). 2 Cooperation on nuclear energy would have a direct

Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Choi, Jor-Shan; Fei, Edward

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Impact of Shale Gas Development on Regional Water Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...human health and environmental impacts associated with the release...inadequately treated wastewater to the environment (66). In addition, spills...assess potential water quality impacts in the northeast (78, 79...shale gas extraction (54). Impacts from casing leakage, well...

R. D. Vidic; S. L. Brantley; J. M. Vandenbossche; D. Yoxtheimer; J. D. Abad

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - area northeast japan Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

earthquakes in northeast Japan may have been... underesti- mated due to the low Q in the ocean outside northeast Japan. Residuals between 2 and 2 are used... ) and northeast Japan...

54

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: March 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 25, 2009) Natural gas spot prices continued to decrease this week. The return of frigid temperatures for much of the report week in the Northeast, Southeast, and part of the Midwest did little to support any upward price movements in these regions. In fact, spot prices at all trading locations covered by this report either decreased or remained unchanged. Spot prices in the Northeast dipped below $5 per million Btu (MMBtu) for the first time in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) the near-month futures contract barely remained above $4 per MMBtu this week. The futures contract

55

"Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ," U.S. Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Census...

56

Northeast Biofuels Collaborative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Collaborative Collaborative Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Northeast Biofuels Collaborative Name Northeast Biofuels Collaborative Address 101 Tremont Street Place Boston, Massachusetts Zip 02108 Region Greater Boston Area Website http://www.nebiofuels.org/ Notes Public/private partnership dedicated to educating the general public about the economic and environmental benefits of increased biofuel production and use Coordinates 42.3571456°, -71.0612794° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3571456,"lon":-71.0612794,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Watson, Montgomery

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 102, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Northeast Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

59

Clean Cities: Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) Coalition Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) Coalition The Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation (Cleveland) coalition Contact Information Elaine Barnes 216-281-6468 x223 ebarnes@earthdaycoalition.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Elaine Barnes Elaine Barnes joined Earth Day Coalition (EDC) as the Northeast Ohio Clean Transportation Director early in 2012. As the region¿s Clean Cities coordinator, Barnes will work to develop a robust stakeholder community and program initiatives; support, market and expand our area clean fleets; collaborate with local agencies and organizations to promote a diversified

60

Second Anniversary of Northeast Blackout Marked with Progress | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Anniversary of Northeast Blackout Marked with Progress Anniversary of Northeast Blackout Marked with Progress Second Anniversary of Northeast Blackout Marked with Progress August 12, 2005 - 2:41pm Addthis Electric Reliability Standards Made Clearer and Enforceable WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today marked the second anniversary of the Northeast blackout during which 50 million Americans lost electricity by highlighting important progress that has been made to make North American electricity grids more reliable. "Two years ago, American families and businesses throughout the Northeast were plunged into darkness because of multiple factors leading to the failure of the power grid. Since that time, we've made significant improvements, but more work remains to be done," Secretary Bodman said. "As

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 77, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northeast projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 259.2 KiB)

62

Northeast Kansas Bioenergy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas Bioenergy LLC Kansas Bioenergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Northeast Kansas Bioenergy LLC Place Hiawatha, Kansas Zip 66434 Product Developing and integrated Bioethanol / Biodiesel refinery near Hiawatha, Kansas Coordinates 39.853465°, -95.527144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.853465,"lon":-95.527144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

63

Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (Massachusetts) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Association (Massachusetts) Association (Massachusetts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Northeast Sustainable Energy Association Address 50 Miles Street Place Greenfield, Massachusetts Zip 01301 Region Greater Boston Area Website http://www.nesea.org/ Notes Regional membership organization promoting sustainable energy solutions Coordinates 42.5870043°, -72.6029703° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5870043,"lon":-72.6029703,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

Geothermometry At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Geothermometry At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A reexamination of all groundwater sources in the Keaau area was undertaken in an effort to confirm the chemical and temperature anomalies that formed the primary basis on which the Keaau area was identified during the preliminary assessment survey. The data generated by this survey (Table 9) determined that all of the anomalous data present in the earlier data base were spurious and that the groundwater chemistry and temperatures in this

65

DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 18, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that new contracts have been awarded for commercial storage of 650,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate (ULSD) for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Awards were made to two companies for storage in New England--Hess Corporation in Groton, CT for 400,000 barrels, and Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA for 250,000 barrels. The procurement was conducted by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA Energy), acting as the agent for DOE. Acquisition of storage services for an additional 350,000 barrels is planned to complete the establishment of a

66

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

67

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve September 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the acquisition of commercial storage services for the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Two awards totaling 350,000 barrels have been made to companies that had earlier received storage contracts totaling 650,000 barrels. Hess Corporation in Groton, CT has been awarded a second contract for 100,000 barrels, increasing its storage obligation to 500,000 barrels. Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA was awarded a second contract for 250,000 barrels, increasing its obligation to 500,000 barrels.

68

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve September 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the acquisition of commercial storage services for the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Two awards totaling 350,000 barrels have been made to companies that had earlier received storage contracts totaling 650,000 barrels. Hess Corporation in Groton, CT has been awarded a second contract for 100,000 barrels, increasing its storage obligation to 500,000 barrels. Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA was awarded a second contract for 250,000 barrels, increasing its obligation to 500,000 barrels.

69

Diagnostic Studies of Rainfall Anomalies in Northeast Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The large-scale atmospheric circulation of the Brazil-Atlantic sector is studied in relation to extreme rainfall anomalies in two large regions of Northeast Brazil (Nordeste). Long-term rainfall series, aerological records of stations in South ...

Pao-Shin Chu

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Wave spectral energy variability in the northeast Peter D. Bromirski  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave spectral energy variability in the northeast Pacific Peter D. Bromirski Integrative January 2005; published 8 March 2005. [1] The dominant characteristics of wave energy variability] s wave spectral energy components are considered separately. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analyses

Bromirski, Peter D.

71

Market power and electricity market reform in Northeast China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Northeast region of China has been used as a testing ground for creation of a functioning wholesale electric power market. We describe the ownership structure of the generation assets for those plants participating in ...

Zhang, Xiaochun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve- Guidelines for Release  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended, sets conditions for the release of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. The Secretary of Energy has the authority to sell, exchange, or...

73

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Petroleum Reserves » Heating Oil Reserve » Northeast Services » Petroleum Reserves » Heating Oil Reserve » Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System The U.S. Department of Energy has developed an on-line bidding system - an anonymous auction program - for the sale of product from the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. We invite prospective bidders and other interested parties to try out this system and give us your views. You must register to use the system to practice or to participate in an actual emergency sale. Registration assures that you will receive e-mail alerts of sales or other pertinent news. You will also have the opportunity to establish a user ID and password to submit bids. If you establish a user ID, you will receive a temporary password by

74

10 Years after the 2003 Northeast Blackout | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 Years after the 2003 Northeast Blackout 10 Years after the 2003 Northeast Blackout 10 Years after the 2003 Northeast Blackout August 14, 2013 - 5:19pm Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Ten years ago today, large portions of the Midwest and Northeast United States and into Canada went dark. The cascading event, which started shortly after 4:00 PM on August 14, 2003, ended up affecting an estimated 50 million people. For some customers, power was not restored for nearly four days. The Department of Energy and Natural Resources Canada jointly commissioned a task force that examined the underlying causes of the blackout and recommended forty-six actions to enhance the reliability of the North American power system. A number of the recommendations were incorporated

75

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

76

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

77

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 In 2005-06, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for select market areas in the Northeast under a range of different weather conditions. The study then determined how interstate pipeline flow patterns could change in the event of a pipeline disruption to one or more of the pipelines serving the region in order to meet the gas demand. The results

78

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" Report Now Available November 27, 2013 - 3:13pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released its "Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States" report. The report is now available for downloading. In 2005-06, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for

79

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

80

Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

82-TAC 82-TAC U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 N0065200 GJO- 2003- 482- TAC GJO- PIN 13.12.10 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report Young - Rainey STAR Center September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13- 02GJ79491 Document Number N0065200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 Page iii

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

BNL | NSERC, the Northeast Solar Energy Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Northeast Solar Energy Research Center Northeast Solar Energy Research Center A multi-purpose research facility on the BNL campus Home Map of the Research Array Project Updates solar array NSERC, a multi-purpose research facility on the Brookhaven campus Brookhaven National Laboratory is developing a new Northeast Solar Energy Research Center (NSERC) on its campus that will serve as a solar energy research and test facility for the solar industry. The NSERC will include laboratories for standardized testing in accordance with industry standards, along with a solar PV research array for field testing existing or innovative new technologies under actual northeastern weather conditions. The NSERC will also include access to unique high-resolution data sets from the 32MW Long Island Solar Farm located at Brookhaven. Our vision is to

82

Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure (April 2013) Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure (April 2013) Two major hurricanes, Irene in 2011 and Sandy in 2012, have impacted the Northeastern United States over the past 2 years, devastating coastal communities and causing widespread impacts to the region's energy infrastructure, supply, and markets. Although Sandy was weaker than Irene at landfall, Sandy brought tropical storm conditions to a larger area of the East Coast, and blizzard conditions as far west as the Central and Southern Appalachians. Ultimately, Sandy had a larger and longer-lasting impact on the region's energy infrastructure and supply than Irene, and these impacts necessitated a greater response from Federal, State, and

83

Final Report Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Northeast Site Area B Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Largo, Pinellas County, Florida April 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1457 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1457-2007 Final Report Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Largo, Pinellas County, Florida April 2007 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

84

Northeast Advanced Vehicle Consortium NAVC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Advanced Vehicle Consortium NAVC Northeast Advanced Vehicle Consortium NAVC Jump to: navigation, search Name Northeast Advanced Vehicle Consortium (NAVC) Place Boston, Massachusetts Zip 2111 Product Association of private and public sector firms focussed on advanced vehicle technologies such as fuel cells and hybrids. Coordinates 42.358635°, -71.056699° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.358635,"lon":-71.056699,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

85

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: May 28, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 20, 2009) Natural gas prices at most trading locations fell on the week because of mild weather as well as continued weakness in the economy. Declines ranged between 37 cents at the Dracut trading area in the Northeast to 90 cents at the El Paso non-Bondad area in the Rocky Mountains. The Henry Hub spot price fell by 67 cents during the week to $3.75 per million Btu (MMBtu). Moving in the opposite direction of natural gas prices, the price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil contract rose on the week to $61.45 per barrel, or $10.59 per MMBtu. Oil prices are now at their highest level since November 10, 2008, having more than doubled since falling to a

86

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 8, 2010) In response to cold weather across much of the United States, natural gas spot prices increased across the board this report week (December 1 – December 8). Though most increases were less than 50 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), prices at a number of trading points (notably in the Northeast and Florida) increased by several dollars. The Henry Hub spot price rose 25 cents, from $4.21 per MMBtu to $4.46 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the natural gas near-month contract (January 2011) also increased, rising from $4.269 per MMBtu on December 1 to $4.606 per MMBtu on December 8.

87

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: November 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 5) Since Wednesday, October 29, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Midwest, Northeast, and Alabama/Mississippi regions, with gains of up to $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) in a week of highly variable prices. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 36 cents per MMBtu or about 5 percent, to $6.94 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (November 5) at $7.249 per MMBtu, climbing 47 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent since last Wednesday, October 29. Natural gas in storage was 3,405 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

88

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

89

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: January 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 7, 2009) Since Wednesday, December 31, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States except in the Northeast region. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 26 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or about 5 percent, to $5.89 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 7) at $5.872 per MMBtu, climbing 22 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since last Wednesday, December 31. Natural gas in storage was 2,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 2, which is about 3 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

90

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 2, 2009) Natural gas spot prices soared this week, following significant, albeit smaller decreases in trading the prior week. Spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States by more than a dollar per million Btu (MMBtu). The only exception occurred at the Leidy location in the Northeast, which rose by 84 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week at $4.67 per MMBtu, $1.35 per MMBtu higher than last Wednesday. Trading at the Henry Hub ended yesterday’s session 14 cents higher than the January 2010 contract. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

91

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2009 16, 2009 Next Release: April 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 15, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with some exceptions including those in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent. Despite this week’s upticks at most locations, natural gas spot prices remain at relatively low levels and have continued to trade within a limited range for the past 4 weeks. The Henry Hub spot market prices gained about 10 cents or 2.9 percent per million Btu (MMBtu), ending trading yesterday at $3.60 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 15) at $3.693

92

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

93

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 25, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 17, 2010) Natural gas prices continued their decline across much of the country for the week ended February 17. Even prices in the Northeast, which registered large increases during the previous week, fell as of yesterday. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered net decreases at almost all locations in the lower 48 States. The significant price increases for the week ended February 10 in the Northeast occurred in response to the two major snow storms that slammed the Mid-Atlantic and parts of the Northeast. However, with average temperatures this report week resembling historical normals, prices in the

94

Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil A: Bronstert 1 Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil A con- straint for development in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil. Quanti cation of natural water

Bronstert, Axel

95

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT Late Holocene paleoenvironmental changes in Northeast Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brazil recorded by organic matter in lacustrine sediments of Lake Boqueirão. Zocatelli, R, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. f LMI "PALEOTRACES" (Paléoclimatologie tropicale: TRACEurs et Variabilité Northeast Brazil represents a key area in terms of Holocene environmental changes in South America due

96

Northeast utilities` energy saver lighting rebate program evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes 1993 evaluation activities conducted by Northeast Utilities (NU) for its major commercial lighting retrofut initiative, the Energy Saver Lighting Rebate (ESLR) program. These evaluations are discussed in context of company information needs and changing market conditions in the NU servcie territory, and specifically address the strengths and waknesses of these evaluation approaches.

Amalfi, J.; Bhagani, D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical policies are warranted if use of degraded lands for bioenergy plantations is desired. 1. Introduction There are two main categories of bioenergy: residues and dedicated plantations. In this paper, we exclusively

98

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview: Monday, June 04, 2001 Stock builds slowed from their recent pace, even though spot prices continued their downward trend to end the week at the Henry Hub at $3.71 per MMBtu, which is a Friday-to-Friday decline of $0.14 per MMBtu. The NYMEX contract price for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled Tuesday at $3.738, the lowest close-out of a near month contract since the May 2000 contract. The July contract price was $3.930 per MMBtu on Friday, $0.103 lower than a week earlier. Mild weather in the Northeast and Midwest continued to suppress prices on the Eastern Seaboard, while a short burst of warm temperatures in southern California early in the week had the opposite effect on prices in that region. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Net injections to storage for the week ended Friday, May 25 were 99 Bcf, breaking a 4-week string of 100-plus net injections.

99

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22) 15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22) Since Wednesday, January 7, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States outside of the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 89 cents or about 13 percent to $5.74 per MMBtu. Despite widespread declines elsewhere, prices in the Northeast region surged to more than seven times last week's levels at some market locations as extreme wintry conditions moved into the region. Yesterday (January 14), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.387 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 49 cents or 7 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,414 Bcf as of January 9, which is 8.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.05 per barrel or about 3 percent since last Wednesday, climbing to $34.62 per barrel or $5.969 per MMBtu.

100

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

27 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 3) 27 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 3) Cold temperatures in parts of the Midwest and the Northeast lifted aggregate demand this week, resulting in higher natural gas spot prices at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 19-26), spot prices at the Henry Hub increased 23 cents per MMBtu, or about 3.7 percent, to $6.44. Prices in the Northeast surged as extreme wintry conditions moved into the region, and constraints on interstate pipelines limited supply options for incremental deliveries. Yesterday (January 26), the price of the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.388 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 10 cents, or 1.5 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,270 Bcf as of January 21, which is 14.0 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.19 per barrel or about 2.5 percent since last Wednesday, climbing to $48.80 per barrel or $8.41 per MMBtu.

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101

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the energy efficiency of your home. Your gas boiler or furnace can be retrofitted to improve its energy efficiency. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline (such as the Northeast) tend to pay higher prices for natural gas.

102

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the energy efficiency of your home. Your gas boiler or furnace can be retrofitted to improve its energy efficiency. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline (such as the Northeast) tend to pay higher prices for natural gas.

103

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 13, 2011) As the story of abundant natural gas supply continued to provide headlines for the market this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 6-13), spot prices at most market locations in the lower 48 States decreased. Moderate temperatures also likely contributed to the price declines by limiting end-use demand and allowing for replenishment of storage supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by 3 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent, to $4.14 per MMBtu. Other market prices also decreased by up to 10 cents per MMBtu, with a few exceptions in the U.S. Northeast.

104

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: July 3, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, June 18-25), with price decreases generally occurring in producing areas in the Gulf of Mexico region and price increases at trading locations in the Rockies, the Midcontinent, and the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.76. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After trading at $13.20 per MMBtu on Monday, the futures contract for July delivery decreased by 45 cents in value over the next 2 days and ended the

105

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2007 to Thursday, January 23, 2008) 16, 2007 to Thursday, January 23, 2008) Released: January 24, 2008 Next release: January 31, 2008 · Since Wednesday, January 16, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, with the exception of the Northeast and Florida, and a few scattered points in Louisiana, Alabama/Mississippi, and the Rocky Mountains. · Prices at the Henry Hub declined 39 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 5 percent, to $7.84 per MMBtu. · The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 23) at $7.621 per MMBtu, falling 51 cents or 6.3 percent since Wednesday, January 16. · Natural gas in storage was 2,536 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 18, which is 7.4 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007).

106

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 28, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 20, 2010) A reprieve from the extreme cold in much of the country during this report week limited space-heating demand, resulting in price declines. The biggest decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (January 13-20), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.07 to $5.54 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for February delivery decreased by $0.24 on the week to $5.496 per MMBtu. As of Friday, January 15, working gas in underground storage was 2,607 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year

107

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 16, 2011) A reprieve from extreme cold in much of the country this week limited space-heating demand, contributing to price declines. The biggest price decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (February 9-16), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.29 to $3.93 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for March delivery decreased by $0.12 on the week to $3.92 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 11, working gas in underground storage was 1,911 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 6.3 percent below the 5-year

108

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2008 0, 2008 Next Release: July 17, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices declined sharply this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 2-9), with the largest decreases generally occurring in consuming regions in the Northeast and Midwest. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.22 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.09. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After the August 2008 contract reached a daily settlement price of $13.578 per MMBtu (a record high for this contract) on July 3, the price decreased by $1.57 per MMBtu over the next three trading sessions and ended the week

109

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: April 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 25, 2009) Spot prices increased at all trading locations this week, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. Many market locations ended the week with spot prices above $4 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.38 to $4.13 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased, climbing by $0.65 to $4.329 for the April 2009 contract. Prices for the April 2009 contract reached their highest levels since February 13, 2009, on March 24. Natural gas in storage was 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

110

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Spring Meeting - May 15, 2012 Hilton Knoxville 501 West Church Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37902-2591 Agenda (Draft #1 - 4/18/12) ______________________________________________________________________________ Tuesday, May 15 - 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM / (need meeting room name) 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast - served in meeting room 9:00 a.m. Task Force Business Meeting - John Giarrusso, MEMA and Rich Pinney, NJDEP Co-chairs presiding  Welcome: Introductions; Agenda Review; Announcements  2012 funding  Co-Chair Election  Rules of Procedure  Membership: members & alternates appointment status  Legislative Liaisons  Staff Regional Meeting Attendance

112

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 78, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power Northeast projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester - Reference Case (xls, 259.2 KiB)

113

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of Northeast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The weather alone was not enough to cause the price spike. The low The weather alone was not enough to cause the price spike. The low stocks left the area vulnerable to sudden changes in the market, such as the weather change. Why do stocks matter in the Northeast? Stocks are normally an important part of PADD 1 winter distillate supply. Over the last 5 years, PADD 1 stocks provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. They are the closest source of supply to the consumer. PADD 1 depends on about 60% of its supply from distant sources such as the Gulf Coast or imports, which can take several weeks to travel to the Northeast. Even product from East Coast refineries, if capacity is available, may take a week before it is produced and delivered to the regions needing new supply. Thus, stocks must be able

114

The Northeast heating fuel market: Assessment and options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a Presidential request, this study examines how the distillate fuel oil market (and related energy markets) in the Northeast behaved in the winter of 1999-2000, explains the role played by residential, commercial, industrial, and electricity generation sector consumers in distillate fuel oil markets and describes how that role is influenced by the structure of tie energy markets in the Northeast. In addition, this report explores the potential for nonresidential users to move away from distillate fuel oil and how this might impact future prices, and discusses conversion of distillate fuel oil users to other fuels over the next 5 years. Because the President's and Secretary's request focused on converting factories and other large-volume users of mostly high-sulfur distillate fuel oil to other fuels, transportation sector use of low-sulfur distillate fuel oil is not examined here.

None

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Northeast Oklahoma Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Oklahoma Electric Coop, Inc Northeast Oklahoma Electric Coop, Inc Place Oklahoma Utility Id 13734 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial Industrial Large Power 1000+ kW Industrial Large Power 301 kW- 1000 kW Industrial Municipal Lighting Rate 175w Lighting Municipal Lighting Rate 400w Lighting Residential Service Residential Seasonal Service Residential Security Light 1500w Metered Lighting Security Light 175w Metered Lighting

116

File:EIA-Williston-NE-Gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Williston-NE-Gas.pdf Williston-NE-Gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Williston Basin, Northeast Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 5.95 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Williston Basin, Northeast Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

117

Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnerships, Inc Partnerships, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships, Inc Name Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships, Inc Address 5 Militia Drive Place Lexington, Massachusetts Zip 02421 Region Greater Boston Area Website http://www.neep.org/ Notes Nonprofit whose mission is to promote the efficient use of energy in homes, buildings and industry in the Northeast United States Coordinates 42.4528°, -71.2368° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4528,"lon":-71.2368,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased during this holiday-shortened report week (Thursday-Wednesday, July 5-11) as weather-related demand emerged in response to the hottest temperatures to date this year in the Northeast and Midwest. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 36 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the story was slightly different with the contract price for August delivery decreasing to $6.600 per MMBtu, which was 1.8 cents lower than last Thursday's (July 5) closing price. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,627 Bcf as of Friday, July 7. This level of working gas in underground storage is 16.6 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.77 per barrel on the week to $72.58 per barrel. On a Btu basis, the crude oil price is now nearly double the price of natural gas at $12.51 per MMBtu. The relative difference in pricing can have a large effect on demand (mostly in the industrial sector and power plants).

119

DOE to Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve June 23, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a solicitation seeking to purchase heating oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) using $3 million in appropriated funds. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve provides an important safety cushion for millions of Americans residing in the Northeast region of the country. Due to the modest volume of heating oil expected to be purchased with the available funds, no impact on market prices is expected. In 2007 a 35,000 barrel sale was conducted to raise funds necessary to award new long-term storage contracts to fill NEHHOR to its authorized

120

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 25, 2007) 18, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 25, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased by $0.07 to $1.05 per MMBtu at nearly all trading locations in the Lower 48 States as space-heating demand remained strong amid very cold temperatures in critical gas-consuming markets. Prices at some market locations in the Northeast peaked at more than $10 per MMBtu on Tuesday and then declined significantly in Wednesday's (yesterday, January 17) trading. The average price in the Northeast remained among the highest of all regions during yesterday's trading. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $0.16 per MMBtu, or 2.5 percent, to $6.57. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub fell approximately 52 cents per MMBtu to settle yesterday at $6.234. Natural gas in storage was 2,936 Bcf as of Friday, January 12, which is 20 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.65 per barrel or about 3 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $52.30 per barrel or $9.02 per MMBtu. The price of crude oil as of yesterday was $14.06 per barrel lower than the year-ago level, and $24.75 less than the all-time high price of $77.05 per barrel reached in early August 2006.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - States Dependent on Interstate  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

States Dependent on Interstate Pipelines States Dependent on Interstate Pipelines About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates States in grey which are at least 85% dependent on the interstate pipeline network for their natural gas supply are: New England - Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont Southeast - Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee Northeast - Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, District of Columbia Midwest - Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin Central - Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota West - Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washington Interstate Natural Gas Supply Dependency, 2007 Map: Interstate Natural Gas Supply Dependency

122

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 5) 9, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 5) Spot prices in most regional markets ended the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 21-28) lower, despite severe cold in the Northeast beginning Friday (January 23) and continuing through the weekend. As a result, prices in the Northeast market proved the major exception to the downward trend, as cash prices moved up sharply at most locations in the region. At the Henry Hub, the spot price was 23 cents per MMBtu lower on the week, or about 4 percent, ending with yesterday's (Wednesday, January 28) level of $6.04. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery showed a modest gain of nearly 6 cents on its final day of trading, closing out at $5.775 per MMBtu. The contract for March delivery assumes the near-month position beginning today (Thursday, January 29). The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories were 2,063 Bcf as of Friday, January 23, which is 8.6 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1999-2003) average. West Texas Intermediate crude oil on the spot market fell $1.90 per barrel, or $0.26 per MMBtu, since last Wednesday (January 21), ending trading yesterday at $33.63 per barrel, or $5.80 per MMBtu.

123

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2002 1, 2002 Lingering low temperatures last week prompted spot prices at the Henry Hub to start the week up sharply gaining 19 cents to trade on Monday at $2.68 per MMBtu. Prices then declined sharply before rebounding on Thursday and Friday to end the week at $2.81 per MMBtu-32 cents higher than the previous Friday. Prices on the NYMEX futures market moved up most days to end the week up almost $0.45 per MMBtu at $2.800. Temperatures moderated in many parts of the country last week and rose to the 60s and 70s on Friday and Saturday in much of the Northeast. The latest National Weather Service (NWS) 6- to 10-day forecast calls for cool temperatures in the Midwest but for above normal temperatures to return to the Northeast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Net withdrawals from stocks increased to132 Bcf during the last week of February, which is more than double the level of a week earlier. Even though natural gas stocks continue to be 45 percent, or 577 Bcf, above the previous 5-year average, reports of the increase in storage withdrawals may have contributed to last week's spot and futures contract price rise. The price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose above $23 per barrel on Tuesday and ended trading on Friday at its highest level since September 21, 2001--$23.87 per barrel, or $4.15 per MMBtu.

124

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to:...

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - agostinho pernambuco northeast Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

McBryde 136 Summary: Sciences, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil "Reconstructing Quaternary Landscapes... in the Semi-arid Northeast of Brazil: A...

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - aracaju northeast brazil Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alain - Laboratoire Geosciences, Universit Montpellier II Collection: Geosciences 22 Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Summary: Bioenergy and land-use...

127

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the distribution of the additional 1.325 Bcfd coming into the Chicago market on the Alliance Pipline System. In the Northeast, the Maritimes and Northeast pipeline got approval...

128

Volume Scattering?Strength Profiles in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A technique is described that permits the determination of the acoustic scattering strength of the ocean volume in terms of depth frequency and time. A pod of charges is lowered together with a hydrophone to various depths in the ocean and by observing the amount of scattered energy produced by detonating units of the explosive charge pod a profile of good resolution of the scattering strength versus depths obtained. The broad?band acoustic characteristics of the charges permit the spectral characteristics of the scattered returns to be determined. Observations made over an extended time period yield the time dependence of scattering. Measurements made in the northeast Pacific Ocean are given.

J. A. Scrimger; R. G. Turner

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 16, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 6, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 15, 2010) Extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country boosted demand for space heating this report week (December 8-15). Spot prices nonetheless decreased in most markets (with the exception of several in the Northeast), likely influenced by storage for winter usage remaining near historical highs and very strong current supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.24 to $4.22 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also decreased with expectations of ample supply levels for this

130

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Next Release: January 8, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, December 10, to Wednesday, December 17, 2008) The coldest temperatures of the season to date covered much of the northern half of the country this report week, boosting demand related to space heating on both coasts and across the Northern Plains and Midwest population centers. Prices increased throughout the country outside the Northeast, with the biggest increases occurring for supplies from the Rocky Mountains (particularly for delivery into the Northwest). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.11 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.79. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices

131

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 31, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 23, 2011) Colder weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices moved higher at all trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.33 to $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased significantly as the weather outlook suggested higher consumption for the remaining days of March. The futures contract for April delivery

132

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2012 | Release Date: June 21, 0, 2012 | Release Date: June 21, 2012 | Next Release: June 28, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Imports from Canada to the Northeast United States Rise this Week to Meet Demand Weather-related demand from hot temperatures over the past few days has led imports of natural gas from Canada to jump in the Northeast United States. On Wednesday, imports into the Northeast rose to their highest level since March, according to data from BENTEK Energy LLC (Bentek). Overall tightness in supply from high demand in the Northeast, which also faces pipeline infrastructure constraints, has led prices in New England to rise to above $8 per million British thermal units (MMBtu).

133

90Sr Internal Irradiation of Population Residing in North-East Region of Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Internal Irradiation of Population Residing in North-East Region of Ukraine L. Kalmykov G. Paschenko E. Gur The 90Sr content was investigated for residents of north-east Ukraine (Kharkov region) before (in 1963-1973) and after (in 1992-1993......

L. Kalmykov; G. Paschenko; E. Gur

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Centrality and vulnerability in liner shipping networks: revisiting the Northeast Asian port hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Centrality and vulnerability in liner shipping networks: revisiting the Northeast Asian port@parisgeo.cnrs.fr Sung-Woo LEE Korea Maritime Institute Shipping, Port & Logistics Research Department KBS media Center: revisiting the Northeast Asian port hierarchy Abstract This paper is essentially an empirical investigation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

135

The Younger Dryas cooling in northeast Germany: summer temperature and environmental changes in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Younger Dryas cooling in northeast Germany: summer temperature and environmental changes, Germany Received 9 December 2011; Revised 7 March 2012; Accepted 9 March 2012 ABSTRACT: A lake sediment record from the Friedla¨nder Grobe Wiese in northeast Germany was studied to reconstruct summer

Bern, Universität

136

Economic Impacts of the World Golf Village Development for Northeast Florida and St. Johns County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Impacts of the World Golf Village Development for Northeast Florida and St. Johns County Sciences, Food and Resource Economics Department Gainesville, Florida October 17, 2006 Food and Resource Economics Department #12;i Economic Impacts of the World Golf Village Development for Northeast Florida

Florida, University of

137

Quaternary Science Reviews 20 (2001) 15611576 Millennial scale climate variability of the northeast Pacific Ocean and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the northeast Pacific Ocean and northwest North America based on radiolaria and pollen N.G. Pisiasa, *, A in the Northeast Pacific and the northwestern United States. 2. Study region 2.1. Ocean climate and biota.C. Mixa , L. Heusserb a College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 Ocean

Kurapov, Alexander

138

Solar Radiation Estimated Through Mesoscale Atmospheric Modeling over Northeast Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of renewable energy sources like solar wind and biomass is rapidly increasing in recent years with solar radiation as a particularly abundant energy source over Northeast Brazil. A proper quantitative knowledge of the incoming solar radiation is of great importance for energy planning in Brazil serving as basis for developing future projects of photovoltaic power plants and solar energy exploitation. This work presents a methodology for mapping the incoming solar radiation at ground level for Northeast Brazil using a mesoscale atmospheric model (Regional Atmospheric Modeling SystemRAMS) calibrated and validated using data from the network of automatic surface stations from the State Foundation for Meteorology and Water Resources from Cear (Fundao Cearense de Meteorologia e Recursos Hdricos? FUNCEME). The results showed that the model exhibits systematic errors overestimating surface radiation but that after the proper statistical corrections using a relationship between the model?predicted cloud fraction the ground?level observed solar radiation and the incoming solar radiation estimated at the top of the atmosphere a correlation of 0.92 with a confidence interval of 13.5? W / m 2 is found for monthly data. Using this methodology we found an estimate for annual average incoming solar radiation over Cear of 215? W / m 2 (maximum in October: 260? W / m 2 ).

Otacilio Leandro de Menezes Neto; Alexandre Arajo Costa; Fernando Pinto Ramalho; Paulo Henrique Santiago de Maria

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Northeast Waste Management Alliance (NEWMA). Annual report FY 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Funding was provided to Brookhaven National Laboratory in the fourth quarter of FY93 to establish a regional alliance as defined by Dr. Clyde Frank during his visit to BNL on March 7, 1993. In collaboration with the Long Island Research Institute (LIRI), BNL developed a business plan for the Northeast Waste Management Alliance (NEWMA). Concurrently, informal discussions were initiated with representatives of the waste management industry, and meetings were held with local and state regulatory and governmental personnel to obtain their enthusiasm and involvement. A subcontract to LIRI was written to enable it to formalize interactions with companies offering new waste management technologies selected for their dual value to the DOE and local governments in the Northeast. LIRI was founded to develop and coordinate economic growth via introduction of new technologies. As a not-for-profit institution it is in an ideal position to manage the development of NEWMA through ready access to venture capital and strong interactions with the business community, universities, and BNL. Another subcontract was written with a professor at SUNY/Stony Brook to perform an evaluation of new pyrolitic processes, some of which may be appropriate for development by NEWMA. Independent endorsement of the business plan recently by another organization, GETF, with broad knowledge of DOE/EM-50 objectives, provides a further incentive for moving rapidly to implement the NEWMA strategy. This report describes progress made during the last quarter of FY93.

Goland, A.N.; Kaplan, E.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Economics of Climate Change and Low Carbon Growth Strategies in Northeast  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Growth Strategies in Northeast Low Carbon Growth Strategies in Northeast Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Economics of Climate Change and Low Carbon Growth Strategies in Northeast Asia Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank Partner Government of Republic of Korea Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning Program Start 2009 Country China, Japan, Mongolia, South Korea Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia References Economics of Climate Change and Low Carbon Growth Strategies in Northeast Asia[1] Overview The Asian Development Bank (ADB) is planning a study entitled the Economics of Climate Change and Low Carbon Growth Strategies in Northeast Asia, covering the People's Republic of China (PRC), Japan, the Republic of Korea, and Mongolia. The Government of the Republic of Korea will cofinance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast

142

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve, a total of approximately 2 million barrels, and

143

Mercury Vapor At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury and radon emanometry sampling conducted in the Keaau prospect were similarly unable to define any anomalies that could reasonably be interpreted to be due to subsurface thermal effects. References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mercury_Vapor_At_Mauna_Loa_Northeast_Rift_Area_(Thomas,_1986)&oldid=390060

144

Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects of ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean: a study including the effects. Here we present a set of regional climate scenarios of sea level rise for the northeast Atlantic Ocean best estimate of twenty-first century sea level rise in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, given the current

Drijfhout, Sybren

145

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 29) 2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 29) Natural gas spot prices increased 10 to 60 cents per MMBtu at nearly all major trading locations in the Lower 48 States as space-heating demand remained strong amid very cold temperatures in critical gas-consuming markets. However, elevated prices of $40 per MMBtu and more in the Northeast eased closer to historical norms over the course of the week following at least a temporary reprieve from the extreme cold in the region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $0.53 per MMBtu, or 9 percent, to $6.27. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub fell approximately 24 cents per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, January 21) at $6.150. Natural gas in storage was 2,258 Bcf as of Friday, January 16, which is 9.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.91 per barrel or about 2.6 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $35.53 per barrel or $6.13 per MMBtu.

146

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) 10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 2-9) as a late season cold front moved into major gas-consuming regions of the country, bringing a reminder that the end of winter is still two weeks away. Spot prices climbed 17 to 76 cents per MMBtu at trading locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday. Price changes in the Northeast were at the higher end of the range, while trading in the West resulted in gains at the lower end. The Henry Hub spot price increased 38 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.99. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery gained 16.3 cents per MMBtu, settling at $6.880 on Wednesday, March 9. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, March 4, decreased to 1,474 Bcf, which is 25.7 percent above the 5-year (2000-2004) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded at near-record highs, rising $1.75 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $54.75 per barrel, or $9.44 per MMBtu.

147

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, to Wednesday, April 2) 26, to Wednesday, April 2) Released: April 3, 2008 Next release: April 10, 2008 · Natural gas spot prices increased in all trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 26-April 2). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.34 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $9.59. Frigid temperatures continued for a portion of the week in the Northeast and for most of the week in the West, likely boosting space-heating demand. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered increases, albeit less than in spot markets. The futures contract for May delivery rose about 15 cents per MMBtu on the week to $9.832. · With the traditional heating season not quite over, natural gas withdrawals from underground storage continued through last week. As of Friday, March 28, working gas in storage was 1,248 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 0.5 percent above the 5-year (2003-2007) average.

148

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 1, 2007) 25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 1, 2007) Natural gas spot prices across the country surged this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 17-24) as a blast of Arctic cold covered the Lower 48 States, reaching as far south as Texas. Prices in some gas-consuming markets in the Northeast were the highest in the country at more than $10 per MMBtu by the end of the week. But price effects from the increased heating demand registered in production areas as well. On the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.89 per MMBtu to an average of $7.46 yesterday (Wednesday, January 24). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for February delivery ended trading on Wednesday at $7.421 per MMBtu, which was $1.187 higher than last Wednesday's price. As of January 19, natural gas in storage was 2,757 Bcf, or 20.7 percent above the 5-year average for this week. Crude oil prices climbed $1.94 per barrel since last Wednesday to an average of $54.24, or $9.35 per MMBtu.

149

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) 24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) Since Wednesday, August 16, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations with the exception of a few locations in the Northeast. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 17 cents to $7.19 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 23), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $6.875 per MMBtu, increasing about 11 cents or about 2 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,857 Bcf as of August 18, which is 13.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 19 cents per barrel, or about 0.3 percent, on the week to $71.45 per barrel, or $12.32 per MMBtu. Prices: Despite the lower cooling load across much of the Lower 48 States and a diminished threat from Tropical Storm Debby, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations on the week. The increases, however, were moderate, as they were mostly limited to less than 15 cents per MMBtu. With the exception of the southern United States, power loads have been steadily diminishing in the past couple of weeks. Gas demand for electric power generation was much lower compared with the week ending August 5, when the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) reported record-high weekly electricity demand, leading to the 12 Bcf net withdrawal for the storage week ended August 4, 2006. On a regional basis, market locations in East Texas recorded the largest increases since Wednesday, August 16, averaging 18 cents per MMBtu, followed by Louisiana (16 cents per MMBtu). Most locations along the Gulf Coast recorded increases between 3 and 18 cents, while major consuming areas in the Midwest recorded an average increase of 14 cents per MMBtu. Despite the general increases this week, a few market locations in the Northeast recorded decreases since last Wednesday, the largest one of which was the 10-cent decrease at the Dracut, MA, trading point. Even with the overall increases in recent weeks, as of August 23, 2006, spot prices at market locations in the Lower 48 States are 17 to 30 percent lower than last year's levels.

150

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upstate New York Upstate New York Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 105, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Upstate New York Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

151

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of Northeast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 of 15 1 of 15 Notes: Why do stocks matter in the Northeast? Stocks are normally an important part of PADD 1 winter distillate supply. Over the last 5 years, they provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. One of the biggest stock draws we have seen was in January 1994, when a prolonged severe cold spell required 666 MB/D of stocks, covering almost 36% of demand for that month. PADD 1 refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other PADDs -- mostly PADD 3 -- supply 45-50% of the region’s needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak months, with most of the product coming from Canada, the Virgin Islands and Venezuela. Percentages do not tell the whole story. Stocks supply close to 300

152

Northeast Nebraska P P D | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D D Jump to: navigation, search Name Northeast Nebraska P P D Place Nebraska Utility Id 13739 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Annual Single Phase Commercial Annual Three Phase Commercial Farm Single Phase Commercial Farm Three Phase Commercial General Service 3phase Commercial General Service single phase Commercial Irrigation - No Control Option Industrial Irrigation Pumping ToU Industrial LP2 Large Power Service - Sub-Transmission Lines Industrial LP2 Large Power Service - Sub-Transmission Substation Industrial

153

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Long Island Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 104, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Long Island Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Long Island- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

154

Northeast Sustainable Energy Association NESEA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Energy Association NESEA Sustainable Energy Association NESEA Jump to: navigation, search Name Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA) Place Greenfield, Massachusetts Zip MA 01301 Sector Renewable Energy Product A regional membership organization focused on promoting the understanding, development, and adoption of energy conservation and non-polluting, renewable energy technologies. Coordinates 42.966011°, -88.005049° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.966011,"lon":-88.005049,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

155

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

156

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde … Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration July 2004 Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program -- Grande Ronde-Imnaha Spring Chinook Project i Table of Contents Page Chapter 1: Updated Summary and Project Description 1.1 Introduction..............................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Purpose and Need for the Proposed Action .............................................................1-2 1.3 Decisions to be Made and Responsible Officials ....................................................1-3 1.4 Summary of Public Involvement, Consultation, and Coordination.........................1-3

157

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2013 | Release Date: September 12, 1, 2013 | Release Date: September 12, 2013 | Next Release: September 19, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: REX gas deliveries to the Northeast fall as Appalachian production grows Data for this week show that deliveries of natural gas to northeastern consumers via the Rockies Express Pipeline (REX) continue to decline markedly from last year as Northeast customers procure more natural gas from the Appalachian Basin. This increased gas supply comes predominantly from the basin's Marcellus Shale play, where dry gas production through the first half of 2013 rose by 50% over year-ago levels, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) calculations based on LCI Energy

158

ARM - Field Campaign - 1999 Northeast Corridor Ozone & Particulate...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Order Data Hubbe Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Order Data Hubbe Infrared Thermometer Order Data Hubbe Nephelometer Order Data Hubbe Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer...

159

"Table HC11.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,4,2.4,1.7 "Have Coolling Equipment",93.3,16.5,12.8,3.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,16.3,12.6,3.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.3,"Q","Q" "Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2 " "Central System",65.9,6,5.2,0.8 "Without a Heat Pump",53.5,5.5,4.8,0.7

160

DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve May 24, 2007 - 4:16pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will sell approximately 35,000 barrels of home heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). The Reserve's current 5-year storage contracts expire on September 30, 2007 and market conditions have caused new storage costs to rise to a level that exceeds available funds. Revenue from the sale will be used to supplement funds for the award of new long-term storage contracts that will begin on October 1, 2007. The Department will work with Congress to resolve these funding issues in order

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Comments of the Northeast Power Coordinating Council FE Docket No. 99-1 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Northeast Power Coordinating Council FE Docket No. the Northeast Power Coordinating Council FE Docket No. 99-1 Comments of the Northeast Power Coordinating Council FE Docket No. 99-1 On July 21, 1999 the Department of Energy, hereinafter "DOE" or the "Department" issued its Notice of Proposed Amendment to the Predidential Permits and Export Authorizations and Delegation and Assignment to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Comments of the Northeast Power Coordinating Council FE Docket No. 99-1 More Documents & Publications Joint comments of consumers energy company and the detriot edison company on notice of proposed amendment. FE Docket No. 99-1 Motion to Intervene and Comments of Public Utility District No. 1 (Pend Oreille County, Washington) on PP 99-1 Notice of Intent to Amend

162

DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to three companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 984,253 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Awardee Amount Morgan Stanley 500,000 barrels Shell Trading U.S. Company 250,000 barrels George E. Warren Corporation 234,253 barrels Today's sale was the first held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the current 1,984,253-barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. Contracts for the heating oil will be executed upon final payment to DOE; final payment is required no later than

163

Table HC1-9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 20.3 14.8 5.4 NF New England ............................................. 5.4 5.4 Q 5.4 NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 14.8 14.8 Q NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 -- -- -- NF East North Central ..................................... 17.1 -- -- -- NF

164

ARM - Field Campaign - 1996 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE) 6 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 1996 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE) 1996.07.01 - 1996.07.28 Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Description The DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed in the New York City metropolitan area as part of the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone-Northeast effort to determine the causes of elevated ozone levels in the northeastern United States. Measurements of ozone, ozone precursors, and other photochemically active trace gases were made upwind and downwind of New York City with the objective of characterizing the ozone formation process and its dependence on ambient levels of NOx and volatile organic

165

"Table HC11.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,16.8,12.2,4.6 "1.",28.6,5,3.5,1.5 "2.",29.5,6.2,4.8,1.4 "3.",14.7,2.5,1.7,0.8 "4.",9.3,1.5,1.1,0.4 "5 or More",9.7,1.6,1.1,0.5 "Energy-Efficient Bulbs Used",31.1,5.2,3.6,1.6

166

DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to four companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 1,000,000 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve storage sites in Groton and New Haven, CT. Hess Groton Terminal, Groton, CT Shell Trading U.S. Company 150,000 barrels Sprague Energy Corp. 100,000 barrels Magellan New Haven Terminal, New Haven, CT Hess Corporation 300,000 barrels Morgan Stanley 450,000 barrels Today's sale was the second held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the 1,984,253 barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning

167

Aeromagnetic Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Aeromagnetic data (Godson et al., 1981) for the lower northeast rift of Mauna Loa tend to substantiate this conclusion as well. The lower extension of the rift zone does not exhibit any significant magnetic features that would correspond to a thermal source within the inferred trace of the rift zone. References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Aeromagnetic_Survey_At_Mauna_Loa_Northeast_Rift_Area_(Thomas,_1986)&oldid=40242

168

"Table HC11.2 Living Space Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.9,0.5,0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,4.6,3.6,1.1 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,2.8,2.2,0.6 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,1.9,1.4,0.5 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,2.3,1.7,0.5 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,2.2,1.7,0.6 "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,1.6,1,0.6

169

DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve May 24, 2007 - 4:16pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will sell approximately 35,000 barrels of home heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). The Reserve's current 5-year storage contracts expire on September 30, 2007 and market conditions have caused new storage costs to rise to a level that exceeds available funds. Revenue from the sale will be used to supplement funds for the award of new long-term storage contracts that will begin on October 1, 2007. The Department will work with Congress to resolve these funding issues in order to restore the inventory of the Reserve to its full authorized size.

170

Photosynthesis, Transpiration, and Water Use Efficiency in Two Divergent Leymus Chinensis Populations from Northeast China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The net photosynthetic rate (P N), transpiration rate (E), and water use efficiency (WUE) of two divergent Leymus chinensis populations from the grassland region of Northeast China were compared. ...

R.Z. Wang; Q. Gao

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Towards green energy cooperation in Northeast Asia: implications from European experiences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Faced with the dual challenge of depletion of fossil fuels and climate change, three Northeast Asian countriesChina, Japan and Koreaintroduced green energy initiatives in recent years. Even though the portion o...

Jae-Seung Lee

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Extension's Role as an Information Source and Channel among Northeast Texas Farmers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to explore the preferred information sources and delivery channels for farm-related information among selected northeast Texas farmers and describe these results in a manner which might enable the Texas Agri...

Triplett, Brian Lee 1968-

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

173

"Table HC11.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,6.9,5.3,1.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,13.7,9.8,3.9 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,9.3,6.8,2.5 "2.",16.2,2.9,1.9,1 "3 or More",9,1.5,1.1,0.4 "Number of Laptop PCs" "1.",22.5,4.7,3.5,1.2 "2.",4,0.6,0.4,0.2

174

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Complete Fill of Northeast Home to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 26, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE), through its agent DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation seeking commercial storage contracts for the remaining 350,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate needed to complete the fill of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m., August 31, 2011. Earlier this year, DOE sold its entire inventory of heating oil stocks with plans to replace it with cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. New storage contracts were awarded in August 2011 for 650,000 barrels, and awards from this solicitation will complete the fill of the one million

175

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 17) 10, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 17) Unlikely wintry weather in key market areas this week boosted aggregate demand, lifting natural gas spot prices $0.20 per MMBtu or more at most trading location in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday, April 2-Wednesday, April 9), the Henry Hub spot price increased 22 cents per MMBtu, while spot price gains in the still-frigid Northeast were generally between $0.70 and $1.00. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub rose $0.13 per MMBtu, or 2.6 percent, to settle at $5.195 yesterday (April 9). Natural gas in storage decreased to 671 Bcf as of Friday, April 4, which is about 44 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 38 cents per barrel or 1.3 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $28.93 per barrel or $4.99 per MMBtu.

176

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, December 29 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 8) Monday, December 29 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 8) A trend of increasing natural gas spot prices since mid-November abruptly halted late in the week before Christmas, owing to mild temperatures across the country during the first week of the holiday season. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, December 17-24), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.06 per MMBtu to $5.50, while declines in Midwest and Northeast market centers were even greater at between $1.10-$1.40. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery fell slightly more than $0.61 per MMBtu to $6.379. As of December 19, natural gas in storage had decreased to 2,699 Bcf, which is 0.1 percent below the 5-year average. Although the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased slightly in trading before the holiday, the spot price fell $1.33 on the week to $32.03, or $5.52 per MMBtu.

177

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 24) 17 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 24) Since Wednesday, March 9, natural gas spot prices have risen at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, while declining in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 9 cents, or about 1 percent, to $7.08 per MMBtu. Yesterday (March 16), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.192 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 31 cents, or about 5 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,379 Bcf as of March 11, which is about 24 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.76 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $56.50 per barrel or $8.741 per MMBtu.

178

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) 14, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) Natural gas spot prices climbed 25 to 55 cents across the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday, August 6-Wednesday, August 13). Increases were highest in sun-drenched California, but also significant in the Northeast and Midwest as this summer's hottest weather to date occurred in parts of the two regions. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 43 cents or roughly 9 percent to $5.17 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub similarly increased, gaining just over 43 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $5.179 per MMBtu yesterday (August 13). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,188 Bcf as of Friday, August 8, which is about 8.5 percent below the 5-year average inventory level for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.92 per barrel or 2.9 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $30.85 per barrel, or $5.32 per MMBtu.

179

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 17) 0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 17) The threat of production interruptions from a tropical storm and increased cooling demand contributed to natural gas spot prices climbing 35 to 70 cents per MMBtu at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, July 2. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price climbed 51 cents to $5.56 per MMBtu, while spot prices in the Northeast were slightly higher with gains of nearly 60 cents in response to regional cooling demand. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery gained just over 32 cents per MMBtu to a close of $5.52 on Wednesday, July 9. Working gas in storage as of Friday, July 4 increased to 1,773 Bcf, which is 15.2 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.58 per barrel on the week to $30.87, or $5.32 per MMBtu.

180

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2001 13, 2001 Spot prices for natural gas appeared to stabilize just above the $3.00 mark during the week ended August 10, 2001, as the price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana varied between $3.14 and $2.98 per million Btu. Net injections of natural gas into storage for the previous week again fell within the range of market expectations reported in the trade press and contributed to the stability of the price level. However, due to warmer-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast, Midwest, and parts of the Southwest and Southeast, prices at the Henry Hub increased early in the week before decreasing and finishing over 2 percent lower than the previous week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil finished the week at $28.10 per barrel or $4.84 per million Btu, an increase of almost 2 percent above the previous Friday.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) Natural gas spot prices weakened in the opening days of June as concerns lingered over high storage inventories levels and mild weather limited gas demand in the key market areas of the Midwest and Northeast. Net storage injections for the week ending May 31 were 105 Bcf, bringing the total inventory level in the country to 1,893 Bcf, according to EIA estimates. Since Wednesday, May 29, prices at most trading locations have dropped by 16 cents or less. At the NYMEX, prices for futures contracts have declined more sharply. In the first week of trading as the near-month contract, the price for a futures contract for July delivery fell to $3.260 per MMBtu by yesterday's close, a drop of $0.245 per MMBtu since the previous Wednesday. Crude oil prices provided little impetus for price advances. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell $0.62 per barrel for the week, trading on Wednesday, June 5 at $25.02 per barrel, or $4.31 per MMBtu.

182

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 3, 2007) 26, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 3, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased slightly at most market locations outside the Northeast and the Rockies since Wednesday, April 18, 2007. For the week (Wednesday, April 18, to Wednesday, April 25), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 5 cents, or less than 1 percent, to $7.59 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery settled at $7.689 per MMBtu yesterday (April 25), which is 19 cents or about 3 percent more than last Wednesday's level. As of Friday, April 20, 2007, natural gas in storage was 1,564 Bcf, which is 17.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $65.33 per barrel or $11.26 per MMBtu as of yesterday. This is $2.19 per barrel more than the price last week, an increase of about 3 percent.

183

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) Natural gas spot prices across the country surged to record highs this week as yet another Arctic blast of cold arrived, this time reaching as far south as Texas. Prices in the Northeast were the highest in the country at more than $20 per MMBtu for much of the week, but prices also tripled since last Wednesday to $18 and more at production-area trading locations along the Gulf Coast and in Texas. On the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub had a net change of $4.26 per MMBtu to an average of $10.36 yesterday (Wednesday, February 26). The NYMEX contract for March delivery ended its run as the near-month futures contract on Wednesday, settling at just over $9.13 per MMBtu, or $3 higher on the week. As of February 21, natural gas in storage was 1,014 Bcf, or 33.4 percent below the 5-year average for this week. Crude oil prices climbed $1.90 per barrel yesterday to an average of $37.96, or $6.54 per MMBtu, which is near a 12-year high.

184

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 11) 4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 11) Colder-than-expected weather over the Thanksgiving weekend that continued into this week resulted in higher natural gas spot prices at most trading locations since Wednesday, November 26. While prices at several Northeast trading locations climbed more than $0.70 per MMBtu, prices along the Gulf Coast increased a more modest $0.50-$0.60. On the week (Wednesday, November 26-Wednesday, December 3), the Henry Hub spot price rose $0.59 per MMBtu to $5.45, closing above $5 for the first time since late August. At the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for January delivery increased $0.83 per MMBtu, or 12 percent, to $5.756 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 28, decreased by 59 Bcf to 3,095 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 3.9 percent. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $0.13 per barrel in trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 3), but rose a modest $0.28 on the week, settling at $30.61 per barrel, or $5.28 per MMBtu.

185

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 10) March 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 10) Following the cold weather trend, natural gas prices have increased since Wednesday, February 23 at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the exception of some Northeast trading points. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), spot prices at the Henry Hub increased 59 cents per MMBtu, or 9.8 percent, to $6.61. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub rose approximately 30 cents per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, March 2) at $6.717. Natural gas in storage was 1,613 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, which is 28.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.27 per barrel or about 2.5 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $53.00 per barrel or $9.14 per MMBtu, the highest price since the October 26, 2004, record price of $56.37 per barrel.

186

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 6, 2007) 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 6, 2007) Since Wednesday, June 20, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Rocky Mountains and Northeast regions. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 65 cents per MMBtu, or 9 percent, since Wednesday, June 20, to $6.74 per MMBtu, posting its lowest level since March 19. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (June 27) at $6.929 per MMBtu, falling 46 cents per MMBtu, or 6 percent since last Wednesday, June 20. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub posted a decline of $1.012 per MMBtu or nearly 13 percent. Natural gas in storage was 2,443 Bcf as of June 22, which is 18 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $0.48 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $68.98 per barrel or $11.89 per MMBtu.

187

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 1) 25 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 1) Since Wednesday, August 17, changes to natural gas spot prices were mixed, decreasing in major consuming areas in the Northeast and Midwest, while increasing at most markets in the Rocky Mountains, California, and West Texas regions. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 2 cents to $10 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 24), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $9.984 per MMBtu, increasing about 59 cents or more than 6 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,575 Bcf as of August 19, which is 5.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.81 per barrel, or about 6 percent, on the week to a record high price of $67.10 per barrel, or $11.57 per MMBtu.

188

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 12) 5 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 12) Cold weather over the Thanksgiving weekend and early this week lifted natural gas spot prices in many regions of the country. While prices at several Northeast trading locations climbed more than $1 per MMBtu since Wednesday, November 27, prices along the Gulf Coast and other producing areas increased by a more modest 4 to 25 cents per MMBtu. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price rose $0.04 per MMBtu to $4.24. At the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for January delivery climbed just under a dime to $4.298 per MMBtu. Cold weather throughout the final full week in November also resulted in the season's largest withdrawal from storage. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 29, decreased by 91 Bcf to 2,956 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 0.9 percent. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $0.54 per barrel in trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 4), settling at $26.80, or $4.62 per MMBtu.,

189

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 5) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 5) Since Wednesday, April 20, natural gas spot prices have remained relatively unchanged, increasing less than 12 cents per MMBtu at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, while declining less than 12 cents in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub were virtually unchanged, climbing 1 cent, to $7.11 per MMBtu. Yesterday (April 27), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $6.748 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 31 cents, or about 4 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,416 Bcf as of April 22, which is about 29 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.08 per barrel, or about 2 percent, on the week to $51.37 per barrel or $8.857 per MMBtu.

190

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 3) 24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 3) Since Wednesday, February 16, natural gas spot prices have declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, while increasing in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 9 cents, or about 1 percent, to $6.02 per MMBtu. Yesterday (February 23), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.311 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 20 cents, or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,720 Bcf as of February 18, which is about 26 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.38 per barrel, or about 4 percent, on the week to $51.73 per barrel or $8.919 per MMBtu.

191

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 30) 23 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 30) Since Wednesday, June 15, changes to natural gas spot prices were mixed, declining at most markets in the Gulf of Mexico and Northeast regions while increasing at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub edged up 1 cent, to $7.40 per MMBtu. Yesterday (June 22), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.442 per MMBtu, roughly equal to last Wednesday's settlement price of $7.441 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 2,031 Bcf as of June 17, which is about 15 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.74 per barrel, or about 5 percent, on the week to $58.27 per barrel or $10.047 per MMBtu.

192

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 31) 24, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 31) A second early season cold front caused heating demand that increased prices at key market centers in the Northeast and West Coast up to 42 cents per MMBtu since October 16. The higher aggregate demand lifted natural gas spot prices 10 to 25 cents at most production-area trading locations. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the average Henry Hub price climbed $0.14 per MMBtu to $4.24. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub increased a more moderate $0.033 per MMBtu to a $4.260 settlement yesterday (October 23). Natural gas in storage increased to 3,161 Bcf for the week ending October 18, which exceeds the 5-year average by 7.4 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.09 per barrel to $28.19, or $4.86 per MMBtu.

193

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) 23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) Natural gas spot and futures prices trended down for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 15-22). The cold front that moved into major gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast for the weekend and lingered into the first part of this week had minimal impact on prices. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price fell 24 cents for the week to $3.38 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the near-month contract (June delivery) declined for 5 straight trading sessions before recording a small increase of $0.064 per MMBtu in May 22 trading, to settle at $3.459. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which had held at or above $28 per barrel since last Thursday, fell nearly $1 on Tuesday, May 21, following the American Petroleum Institute's announcement of an unexpected build in crude oil stocks of 5.5 million barrels for the week ended Friday, May 17. For the week (May 15-22), the WTI price was down $0.99, at $27.01 per barrel, or $4.66 per MMBtu.

194

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 23) 16, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 23) Natural gas spot prices have climbed 10 to 30 cents per MMBtu at most trading locations since Wednesday, January 8. Strong space-heating demand in Northeast and Midwest population centers boosted prices throughout much of the country, but particularly where several interstate pipelines notified shippers of restrictions on their systems. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price climbed 15 cents to an average of $5.22 per MMBtu, while the New York citygate price registered a much steeper increase of $1.20 to an average of $7.46. The NYMEX futures contract for February delivery gained just under 27 cents per MMBtu to a close of $5.43 on Wednesday, January 15. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, January 10, decreased to 2,195 Bcf, which is 0.8 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded near two-year highs, rising $2.57 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $33.23 per barrel, or $5.29 per MMBtu.

195

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 25, 2006) 18 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 25, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, May 10-17) at virtually all market locations, partly because of weak weather-related demand and a decrease in the price of crude oil. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 34 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, while some other market locations in Louisiana noted decreases of up to 65 cents on the week. East and South Texas trading locations, as well as locations in the Northeast, experienced slightly less dramatic decreases, averaging 31 cents per MMBtu. Yesterday (May 17), the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.129 per MMBtu, decreasing 77 cents or about 11 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, May 12, increased 91 Bcf to 2,080 Bcf, which is 53.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $3.50 per barrel, or almost 5 percent on the week (Wednesday - Wednesday), to $68.65 per barrel or about $11.84 per MMBtu.

196

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 15) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 15) Natural gas spot prices climbed 15 to 62 cents per MMBtu across the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday, June 30-Wednesday, July 7). Increases were highest in the sun-drenched Southwest and California, but also significant in the Northeast and Midwest. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 23 cents or roughly 4 percent to $6.28 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub similarly increased, gaining 21.5 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $6.370 per MMBtu yesterday (July 7). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,047 Bcf as of Friday, July 2, which is about 1.2 percent above the 5-year average inventory level for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.26 per barrel, or 6.1 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $39.18 per barrel, or $6.76 per MMBtu.

197

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 22, 2007) 15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 22, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week at most market locations as frigid temperatures and winter storms blanketed the United States, particularly in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 7 to February 14), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased $1.02 per MMBtu, or about 13 percent, to trade at $8.91 per MMBtu yesterday (February 14). In contrast, the price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 6 percent this week to settle yesterday at $7.241 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, February 9, was 2,088 Bcf, which is 14.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 25 cents per barrel, or less than 1 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $58 per barrel or $10 per MMBtu.

198

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 8) 1, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 8) Since Wednesday, July 24, natural gas spot prices have registered gains between 5 and 20 cents at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States. A heat wave rolling through most of the East supported production area prices during the week and prompted a surge in Northeast prices to highs for the season. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price gained $0.13 per MMBtu to an average price of $3.04 yesterday (July 31). The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.954 per MMBtu yesterday, 8.6 cents less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,546 Bcf as of July 26, which exceeds the 5-year average by 16.9 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.24 cents per barrel since last Wednesday, trading at $27.02 per barrel or $4.66 per MMBtu.

199

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 8) May 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 8) Spot natural gas prices at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States dropped $0.25-$0.50 per MMBtu this week (Wednesday, April 23-Wednesday, April 30) as springtime temperatures prevailed in most areas. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 33 cents per MMBtu to $5.25, while spot price declines in the Northeast were generally greater at between $0.36 and $0.50. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery, which became the near-month contract on Tuesday, April 29, has declined 29 cents since last Wednesday. The June contract settled at $5.385 yesterday (April 30). Natural gas in storage increased to 741 Bcf as of Friday, April 25, which is about 43.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.95 per barrel or about 7 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $26.09 per barrel or $4.50 per MMBtu.

200

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Notice: Holiday Notice: Due to the federal holiday in observance of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21, 2002, the next issue of the Natural Gas Weekly Update will be published on Tuesday, January 22, 2002. Overview: Monday, January 14, 2002 Natural gas prices were generally lower last week as the fundamentals of ample working gas in storage and very little temperature-driven swing demand dominated the market. With little in the way of market-changing developments, trading in both the spot and futures markets tended to occur in relatively small price ranges throughout the week. The warming trend begun late in the previous week continued nearly unabated through last week, with the heavy gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast recording many of the greatest deviations above daily normal temperatures. Philadelphia, New York City, and Buffalo, NY had at least 3 days of temperatures that were 10 or more degrees above normal; Chicago's temperature reached an unusually warm 26 degrees above normal on Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Spot prices at the Henry Hub moved down moderately from the previous week, ending trading on Friday at $2.31, down 5 cents from the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.071 from the previous Friday, settling on Friday, January 11 at $2.204 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil also fell, dipping below $20 per barrel for the first time in the New Year, ending trading last Friday at $19.67 per barrel, or $3.39 per MMBtu, down $1.80 per barrel, or $0.31 per MMBtu, from Friday, January 4.

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201

Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, June 4. On the week (Wednesday, June 4-Wednesday, June 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 35 cents per MMBtu to $6.06. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 16 cents per MMBtu to $6.213. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 6, increased to 1,324 Bcf, which is 25.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.36 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (June 11) closing price of $32.17 per barrel, or $5.55 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas spot prices at many market locations in the Lower 48 States have declined for three consecutive trading days from Friday peaks as key market areas in the Midwest and the Eastern seaboard have experienced unseasonably cool weather. Although prices remain elevated, the slackened demand for natural gas for electric generation has contributed to prices generally softening across the board. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub dropped about 6 percent to $6.06 per MMBtu, while other pricing points on the Gulf Coast showed slightly greater declines and fell below the $6-mark. The overall easing of prices may reflect also the slightly improving storage picture as injections in 7 of the past 8 weeks have exceeded the 5-year average with a record net addition reported last Thursday. Although the storage refill season started slowly, injections have increased considerably, with at least one major interstate pipeline serving the Northeast, Tennessee Gas Pipeline, announcing restrictions to shippers due to injection nominations exceeding capacity. The spot price at Tennessee Gas Pipeline's Zone 6, which serves major citygates in New York and other Northeastern states, this week fell 47 cents per MMBtu to $6.30. In contrast to the East, prices in the West moved higher early in the week, as maintenance on El Paso Natural Gas in the San Juan Basin restricted deliveries from the region and a heat wave sparked buying at pricing locations in California and New Mexico. The spot price at the Southern California border surged 61 cents per MMBtu on Monday to $5.78, but has since dropped to $5.51, which is a net decline of 51 cents since Wednesday, June 4.

203

SOFAR propagation conditions in the Subarctic Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis of two extensive sound speed profile surveys (winter and summer) of the subarctic region (above 40 N) in the Northeast Pacific Ocean shows that the depth of the deep sound channel axis is symmetric about the Alaskan Gyre (centered at 53 N 153 W). The axis depth ranges from 100 m or less in the Gyre to 400 m or more along the coast of North America. A model for axis depth contours is developed which has some interesting results. For example a north?south track along 140 W has little change of axis depth with latitude while an east?west track along 53 N would have a significant change in axis depth. An estimate of the yearly variability of the model is made from long?term oceanographic data obtained at weather station Papa (50 N 145 W). Sound propagation loss is computed for selected tracks using a range?dependent acoustic prediction model and these results are compared to experimental data.

R. K. Chow; J. W. Powell; D. G. Browning

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Sound propagation over Dickins Seamount in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustic propagation losses between a 230?Hz cw source and a multi?hydrophone receiving system were measured over Dickins Seamount in the Northeast Pacific. The source was towed at depths of 18 and 184 m. The receiving system had hydrophones spaced in depth from 323 to 633 m. The measurements were made to a maximum range of 130 km with the receiver located at a range of 60 km from the seamount peak. The results show that the seamount cast an acoustic shadow over the receiver increasing the propagation loss by up to 15 dB when the source was shallow and in a position which enabled the seamount to intercept all of the deep refracted source energy. Back reflections from the seamount with levels 6 to 13 dB below the direct signal level were present when the shallow source was 3 to 5 km from the seamount peak. Downslope reflections enhanced the direct signal by up to 10 dB when the shallow source was within 3 km of the peak. Acoustic shadowing and reflection effects were minimal in the results for the deep source because most of the source energy propagated along the sound?channel axis above the seamount peak. The analysis indicates that ray theory is adequate for describing the reflection effects of the acoustic propagation but does not account for all of the acoustic energy in the shadow zone.

Gordon R. Ebbeson; R. Glenn Turner

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: March 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 25, 2009) Natural gas spot prices continued to decrease this week. The return of frigid temperatures for much of the report week in the Northeast, Southeast, and part of the Midwest did little to support any upward price movements in these regions. In fact, spot prices at all trading locations covered by this report either decreased or remained unchanged. Spot prices in the Northeast dipped below $5 per million Btu (MMBtu) for the first time in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) the near-month futures contract barely remained above $4 per MMBtu this week. The futures contract

206

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 5, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22) Since Wednesday, January 7, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States outside of the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 89 cents or about 13 percent to $5.74 per MMBtu. Despite widespread declines elsewhere, prices in the Northeast region surged to more than seven times last week's levels at some market locations as extreme wintry conditions moved into the region. Yesterday (January 14), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.387 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 49 cents or 7 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,414 Bcf as of January 9, which is 8.3 percent

207

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 25, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased by $0.07 to $1.05 per MMBtu at nearly all trading locations in the Lower 48 States as space-heating demand remained strong amid very cold temperatures in critical gas-consuming markets. Prices at some market locations in the Northeast peaked at more than $10 per MMBtu on Tuesday and then declined significantly in Wednesday's (yesterday, January 17) trading. The average price in the Northeast remained among the highest of all regions during yesterday's trading. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $0.16 per MMBtu, or 2.5 percent, to $6.57. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub fell approximately 52 cents per

208

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Table 50. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources (Billion barrels) Printer Friendly Version Crude Oil Resource Category As of January 1, 2002 Undiscovered 56.02 Onshore 19.33 Northeast 1.47 Gulf Coast 4.76 Midcontinent 1.12 Southwest 3.25 Rocky Moutain 5.73 West Coast 3.00 Offshore 36.69 Deep (>200 meter W.D.) 35.01 Shallow (0-200 meter W.D.) 1.69 Inferred Reserves 49.14 Onshore 37.78 Northeast 0.79 Gulf Coast 0.80 Midcontinent 3.73 Southwest 14.61 Rocky Mountain 9.91 West Coast 7.94

210

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 9) October 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 9) A cold front moved through the Midwest and parts of the Northeast this week, but it failed to bring sustained higher prices. Seasonally mild temperatures in most other areas of the country and little in the way of tropical storm activity resulted in prices easing 20 cents per MMBtu or less since Wednesday, September 24. On the week (Wednesday, September 24-Wednesday, October 1), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 12 cents per MMBtu to $4.47. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery expired on Friday, September 26, at $4.430, while the contract for November lost about 8 cents on the week to close at $4.677 yesterday (October 1). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 26, increased to 2,788 Bcf, which is 1.9 percent below the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.24 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (October 1) closing price of $29.43 per barrel, or $5.07 per MMBtu.

211

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 29, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 5) August 29, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 5) Despite sizeable drops in both spot and futures contract prices in the past two days, week-on-week (Wednesday, August 21 to Wednesday August 28) increases were recorded in both cash and futures markets. Temperatures which had begun to moderate even before Thursday, August 22, particularly in the Northeast and West regions, seemed finally to begin exerting downward pressure on prices. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub gained $0.11 per MMBtu to average $3.33 yesterday (Wednesday, August 28). The NYMEX futures contract for September delivery expired yesterday at the closing price of $3.288 per MMBtu, up only $0.014 from the previous Wednesday's settlement. The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report showed total stocks of 2,716 Bcf for the week ended Friday, August 23, which is 13 percent above the 5-year average. The run-up in the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil that resulted in an increase of $2.18 per barrel over the previous week was almost completely offset this past week, as the WTI spot price fell $2.06 per barrel to end trading on Wednesday, August 28 at an average price of $28.31 per barrel, or $4.88 per MMBtu.

212

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 22) 15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 22) An early spring chill in the Northeast kept natural gas spot prices firm this week until yesterday (April 14), when warmer temperatures resulted in sharp price declines at most trading locations for the day and moderately lower prices on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 7-14). The Henry Hub spot price declined 3 cents per MMBtu on the week to $5.73. After climbing above $6.00 per MMBtu earlier in the week, the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub dropped in the last two trading sessions to yesterday's closing price of $5.744, which represents a net decline of 13 cents per MMBtu on the week. There was a second consecutive week of injections into storage with stocks as of Friday, April 9, at 1,049 Bcf, which is 5.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose 34 cents per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $36.62 per barrel, or $6.31 per MMBtu.

213

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 19) 12 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 19) Spot prices generally moved higher for the week (Wednesday, December 4 to Wednesday, December 11) with exceptions at several Northeast locations, while futures prices experienced robust gains, particularly for contracts for delivery through the end of the heating season. Unusually cold temperatures accompanied the heating season's first significant and widespread snow storm late last week, and temperatures plunged again ahead of the ice storm of Tuesday and Wednesday. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price gained 41 cents for the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 11) at $4.64 per MMBtu. Since last Wednesday, the NYMEX futures contract for delivery in January 2003 gained $0.411 per MMBtu, settling yesterday at $4.709. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, December 6, decreased to 2,794 Bcf, which is 2.9 percent below the 5-year average. The price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil gained 69 cents per barrel for the week, ending trading yesterday at $27.49 per barrel, or $4.74 per MMBtu.

214

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wednesday, January 02, 2002 Wednesday, January 02, 2002 Spot prices in the Midwest and the East moved up most days during the holiday period as cold weather blanketed much of the area. .(See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) (Temperature map) (Temperature Deviation Map). Prices in Chicago moved close to $3.00 per MMBtu last week, while prices in the New York City area approached $5.00 on the last day of the year. Daytime temperatures early this week in the Northeast remained in the 20s and 30s from Washington, DC to Boston. The National Weather Service is calling for the wintry temperatures to continue through the end of the week in most areas in the eastern two thirds of the country. On the NYMEX, the daily settlement price for the futures contract for February delivery has declined in recent trading as the higher-than-average storage levels continue to be the main contributor to the current strong natural gas supply situation. An estimated 2,992 Bcf remains in storage as of December 21, 2001. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down in last week's trading and ended the year at $19.96 per barrel or $3.44 per MMBtu on Monday.

215

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 16) 9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 16) Spot prices overall showed strong gains since Tuesday, December 31. Futures prices were mixed, with the February and March contracts retreating slightly from their levels of Thursday, January 2 (the first day of trading in the New Year), while out-month contracts had slight gains. Temperatures were relatively warm throughout most of the nation for a third consecutive week, while at the same time a weekend snow storm in the Middle Atlantic and Northeast helped push spot prices higher at the end of last week. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 47 cents for the week (prices for Wednesday, January 1, deliveries were established in trading on December 31), to end trading yesterday (Wednesday, January 8) at $5.07 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for February delivery declined 9 cents per MMBtu, settling yesterday at $5.161. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, January 3 decreased to 2,331 Bcf, which is just 2 Bcf below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which had reached $33.26 per barrel on Friday, fell to $30.66 per barrel, or $5.29 per MMBtu yesterday.

216

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 2, 2002 May 2, 2002 Spot and futures prices have rebounded strongly through yesterday's (Wednesday, May 1) trading from their 3-day slide at the end of last week, as lingering cold temperatures in parts of the Midwest and Northeast teamed with unseasonably warm temperatures in the Southeast and Southwest to boost gas demand. At the Henry Hub, 3 days of double-digit price increases brought the average spot price there to $3.79 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX futures market, the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub closed its tenure as the near-month contract on Friday, April 26 at $3.319 per MMBtu, a net increase of just $0.055 per MMBtu since becoming the near-month contract on March 26. Taking over as the near-month contract this past Monday (April 29), the June contract gained nearly 20 cents on its first day as the near-month contract, and by yesterday had risen to $3.735 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil, which had held above $27 per barrel since last Friday, declined by 74 cents yesterday, falling to $26.58 per barrel, or $4.58 per MMBtu, as tensions in the Middle East gradually ease.

217

Northeast Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Massachusetts Regions » Northeast Regional Massachusetts Regions » Northeast Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Massachusetts Regions Northeast Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Kevin McLaughlin Email: kjm@engr.uconn.edu Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014

218

Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reductions in Northeast Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets December 2011 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy

219

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Rock samples-collected from a recent deep-water exploration well drilled in the Faeroe-Shetland Channel, northwest of the UK-confirm that a distinctive high-amplitude seismic reflector that crosscuts the Upper Palaeogene and Neogene succession and covers an area of 10 000 km(2) is an example of a fossilized Opal A to Opal C/T (Cristobalite/Tridymite)

220

New Markets, Outmoded Manufacturing: The Transition from Manufactured Gas to Natural Gas by Northeastern Utilities after World War II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For more than a century, large manufactured gas plants dotted the industrial landscape of the urban Northeast. Using a variety of technologies, these factories applied heat and pressure to coke, coal, and oil to produce a gas suitable for use in space heating and cooking. Yet this well-established, vital industry literally ceased to exist in the two decades after World War II, as natural gas transported from the southwestern United States replaced manufactured gas in all of the major markets in the Northeast. This abrupt victory of a new product was a modem variant of "creative destruction " as described by Joseph Schumpeter in his classic study Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy [10]. While creating a more efficient fuel supply, the coming of natural gas also destroyed the existing system for the production and distribution of manufactured gas. Yet this mid-20th century case of creative destruction differed sharply from Schumpeter's descriptions of the same process during the era of high capitalism in the late 19th century. In that dynamic period, innovations took place in a largely unfettered

Chris Castaneda; Joseph Pratt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

"1. Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1247 "2. Granite Ridge","Gas","Granite Ridge Energy LLC",678  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire" Hampshire" "1. Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1247 "2. Granite Ridge","Gas","Granite Ridge Energy LLC",678 "3. NAEA Newington Power","Gas","NAEA Newington Energy LLC",525 "4. Merrimack","Coal","Public Service Co of NH",485 "5. Newington","Gas","Public Service Co of NH",400 "6. S C Moore","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",194 "7. Schiller","Coal","Public Service Co of NH",156 "8. Comerford","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",145 "9. Berlin Gorham","Hydroelectric","Great Lakes Hydro America LLC",30

222

Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2002  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

700 700 GJO-2003-411-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2002 January 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107 Document Number N0057700 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site NAPL Interim Measures Progress Report January 2003 Page ii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

223

NETL: News Release - Robot Successfully Inspects Live Natural Gas Pipeline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

22, 2004 22, 2004 Robot Successfully Inspects Live Natural Gas Pipeline in New York Field Test is a First for Natural Gas Industry BROCKPORT, NY - In a recent field demonstration filled with "firsts," a self-powered robot developed by the Northeast Gas Association, Carnegie Mellon University, and the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory successfully inspected a mile of a live natural gas distribution main in Brockport, New York. Known as EXPLORER, the remote-controlled robot was launched and retrieved four times on October 8 with no interruption in customer service. The system successfully made its way through an 8-inch diameter pipeline owned and operated by Rochester Electric & Gas, and maneuvered several 70- to 90-degree bends.

224

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 15, 2007) 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 15, 2007) Natural gas spot price movements varied this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 31-November 7). Prices in Lower 48 market areas in the West and the Midcontinent decreased significantly on the week. Other regions, however, most notably the high-demand areas of the Northeast and the Midwest, as well as Gulf Coast production areas, recorded price increases. The spot price at the Henry Hub gained 16 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $7.42 per MMBtu. In contrast to the spot market, prices of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) for the next 12 months uniformly decreased, with the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub decreasing about 71 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday (November 7) at $7.624 per MMBtu. Working gas stocks as of Friday, November 2, again hit a record high with 3,545 Bcf in storage, which is 8.9 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.30 per barrel, or 2.4 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $96.46 per barrel or $16.63 per MMBtu. Yesterday's crude oil price was $37.52 per barrel higher than the year-ago level, when crude oil traded at $58.94 per barrel on November 7, 2006.

225

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 8) July 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 8) Since Wednesday, June 23, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 24 cents or about 4 percent to $6.05 per MMBtu. Yesterday (June 30), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.155 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 33 cents or about 5 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,938 Bcf as of June 25 which is 0.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell 64 cents per barrel or nearly 2 percent on the week to $36.92 per barrel or $6.37 per MMBtu. Prices: Widespread moderate temperature conditions and falling crude oil prices contributed to price declines of between 10 and 49 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday, June 2, with declines exceeding 30 cents per MMBtu at most market locations. After prices climbed 10 to 20 cents per MMBtu at most market locations on Thursday, June 24, they then fell during the next four trading days. The steepest declines occurred principally in the Northeast, Louisiana, and Texas regions, where prices fell more than 35 cents per MMBtu since last week. Despite these widespread declines, prices remain high relative to last year's levels, exceeding last year's level by more than 8 percent. For example, prices at the Henry Hub are 70 cents or 13 percent above last year's level.

226

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2012 | Release Date: November 15, 14, 2012 | Release Date: November 15, 2012 | Next Release: November 29, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: New pipeline expansions come online in the Northeast. Two major northeast pipeline infrastructure expansion projects came into service at the beginning of this month. The Tennessee Gas Pipeline (TGP) Supply Diversification Project and the National Fuel Gas Northern Access Project together will add about 0.4 billion cubic feet per day of incremental volumes to TransCanada's Niagara export trading point, according to recent reports by BENTEK Energy LLC (Bentek). The National Fuel Gas Northern Access Project included 320 million cubic feet (MMcf) per day of capacity, while the TGP Supply Diversification Project included 250

227

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2013 | Release Date: July 11, 0, 2013 | Release Date: July 11, 2013 | Next Release: July 18, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Northeast and Southeast spur growth in Lower 48 natural gas power burn Increased consumption of natural gas for electric generation in the northeastern and southeastern United States drove national growth through the second quarter (April-June) of 2013, a trend that continues into July. During the second quarter, power plant gas consumption in the Lower 48 states averaged 21.4 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d), a 1.1 Bcf/d increase over the average for this period from 2008 to 2012, according to data from Bentek Energy Services. States in the Northeast and Southeast

228

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

MERCURY IN FISH AND SHELLFISH OF THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC. II. SABLEFISH, ANOPLOPOMA FIMBRIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MERCURY IN FISH AND SHELLFISH OF THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC. II. SABLEFISH, ANOPLOPOMA FIMBRIA ALICE S several locations in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and California were analyzed for their mercury content. Mean mercury level in this species varied with the geographical location of catch, showing a gradual

230

Potential benefits of and barriers to inter-country power grid connections in Northeast Asia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current state and prospects of the power industry in Northeast Asia (NEA) are outlined. The potential benefits from power system interconnection in the region, in particular capacity saving, decreasing electricity production costs and tariffs, reliability improvement and environmental effect are considered. Specific estimates of the benefits for the region are given. Barriers to power system interconnection in NEA are analysed.

L.S. Belyaev; G.F. Kovalev; S.V. Podkovalnikov

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Northeast regional biomass program. Second & third quarterly reports, October 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is comprised of the following states: Connecticut. Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont. It is managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the CONEG Policy Research Center, Inc. The Northeast states face several near-term barriers to the expanded use of biomass energy. Informational and technical barriers have impeded industrial conversions, delaying the development of a wood energy supply infrastructure. Concern over the environmental impacts on resources are not well understood. Public awareness and concern about safety issues surrounding wood energy use has also grown to the point of applying a brake to the trend of increases in residential applications of biomass energy. In addition, many residential, industrial, and commercial energy users are discouraged from using biomass energy because of the convenience factor. Regardless of the potential for cost savings, biomass energy sources, aside from being perceived as more esoteric, are also viewed as more work for the user. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is designed to help the eleven Northeastern states overcome these obstacles and achieve their biomass energy potentials. The objective of this program in the current and future years is to increase the role of biomass fuels in the region`s energy mix by providing the impetus for states and the private sector to develop a viable Northeast biomass fuels market.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA: EVIDENCE island on the Bering Shelf between Russia andAlaska and was the subject of reconnaissance investigations a syenite pluton at Cape Dezhnev on the Chukotka Peninsula of Russia. These geochemical data are used

Amato, Jeff

233

POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA: EVIDENCE island on the Bering Shelf between Russia andAlaska and was the subject of reconnaissance investigations a syenite pluton at Cape Dezhnev on the Chukotka Peninsula of Russia. These geo-chemical data are used

Toro, Jaime

234

The Northeast Forest Bio-products Puzzle David T. Damery and Jeff Benjamin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to manufacture Levulinic Acid (LA). LA can then be used as a "building block" for bio-diesel, polymers, plasticsThe Northeast Forest Bio-products Puzzle David T. Damery and Jeff Benjamin Forest products industry, landowners, universities, equipment manufacturers and governments share an interest in the emerging bio

Schweik, Charles M.

235

Project Information Form Project Title Intercity Travel in Northeaster Non-metropolitan Regions: What Roles do  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) USDOT $73,000 Total Project Cost $73,000 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start and End DatesProject Information Form Project Title Intercity Travel in Northeaster Non-metropolitan Regions September 2014 to August 2016 Brief Description of Research Project Little is known about intercity travel

California at Davis, University of

236

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Northeast Regional Headquarters and Service Center  

High Performance Buildings Database

Green Bay, WI This project consolidated the main Northeast Regional Headquarters and three leased offices onto a single site, allowing public access to all DNR staff and programs at one location and allowing cooperating programs to be managed from a single facility. The new office, designed for environmental responsibility and service, provides a healthy, efficient space for employees and visitors.

237

Does Transferring Water Present an Efficient Way of Solving Water Scarcity in China's Northeast?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faced by a severe water scarcity, in 2002 the Chinese government initiated the large- scale South-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP), which was estimated at 62 billion U.S. dollars in cost and which presumably would solve China's northeast water...

Markosov, Artem Igorevich

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

The impact of climate change on rainfall extremes over Northeast Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of climate change on rainfall extremes over Northeast Africa Bas de Boer August 6, 2007.2 GEV extreme statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.3 Selection of the two future climate scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 4 Analysis of rainfall extremes in ERA-40 18 4

Stoffelen, Ad

239

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional Definitions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions Map Definitions Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Regional Definitions The regions defined in the above map are based upon the 10 Federal Regions of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The State groupings are as follows: Northeast Region - Federal Region 1: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region 2: New Jersey, and New York. Federal Region 3:Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Southeast Region - Federal Region 4: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Midwest Region - Federal Region 5: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

242

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

243

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

244

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

245

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

246

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

247

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

248

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

249

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

250

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

251

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

252

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

253

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

254

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

255

DOE/EIS-0372; Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Northeast Reliability Interconnect (August 2005)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sheet Northeast Reliability Interconnect DEIS Sheet Northeast Reliability Interconnect DEIS iii COVER SHEET Responsible Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) Title: Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Northeast Reliability Interconnect Location: Hancock, Penobscot, and Washington Counties, Maine. Contacts: For additional information on this Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), contact: Dr. Jerry Pell, Project Manager Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy

256

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased during this holiday-shortened report week (Thursday-Wednesday, July 5-11) as weather-related demand emerged in response to the hottest temperatures to date this year in the Northeast and Midwest. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 36 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the story was slightly different with the contract price for August delivery decreasing to $6.600 per MMBtu, which was 1.8 cents lower than last Thursday's (July 5) closing price. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,627 Bcf as of Friday, July 7. This level of working gas in underground storage is 16.6

257

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Notice: Holiday Notice: Due to the federal holiday in observance of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21, 2002, the next issue of the Natural Gas Weekly Update will be published on Tuesday, January 22, 2002. Overview: Monday, January 14, 2002 Natural gas prices were generally lower last week as the fundamentals of ample working gas in storage and very little temperature-driven swing demand dominated the market. With little in the way of market-changing developments, trading in both the spot and futures markets tended to occur in relatively small price ranges throughout the week. The warming trend begun late in the previous week continued nearly unabated through last week, with the heavy gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast recording many of the greatest deviations above daily normal

258

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

259

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

260

Oil and gas entrapment, Louisiana shelf, offshore Gulf Coast region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil and gas accumulations in the Louisiana offshore are caused by vertical hydrocarbon migration. Source beds for both thermal gas and oil lie considerably deeper than reservoirs. The required vertical pathways are steeply dipping faults and salt structures (ridges and diapirs). Faults and salt structures indicate the continuing presence of rift structures that began along a normal passive continental margin during the Pennsylvanian. Tectonic trends are northeast, northwest, north, and west-east; they follow well-established regional stress systems. Listric and growth faults commonly are too shallow for vertical hydrocarbon migration and require connection with vertical faults. Vertical oil and gas migration is predictable in its directions. The underlying geological, geophysical, and geochemical processes are understood and are not different from such processes in other productive basins. Secondary salt layers at shallower levels cause interruptions of vertical oil and gas migration; at the same time these interruptions seem to indicate a large future exploration potential on the Louisiana shelf.

Pratsch, J.C.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2001 2, 2001 The overall decline in spot prices accelerated last week, as continued below-normal temperatures in significant portions of the country suppressed electricity demand for air-conditioning use and storage injections once again hit record-setting levels. Temperatures averaged in the 80s for most of the eastern half of the nation, with slightly cooler temperatures prevailing along much of the populous West coast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Futures market prices reinforced the general price weakness, with contracts for future deliveries falling 5 days in a row. NYMEX Natural Gas Futures Near Month Contract Settlement Price, Henry Hub Spot Price, and West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Price Prices: The key factors of increased supply and very little weather-generated swing demand sent prices lower in spot markets throughout the country, with the majority showing declines every day of the week. Average temperatures last week were as much as 7 degrees below normal in the usually high summertime electricity demand areas of the Midwest, Southeast, Gulf Coast, and eastern Texas. In addition, temperatures were normal to slightly below normal in southern California, and cooler still in northern California. By Friday, the low end of the common trading range for spot gas at the Henry Hub fell below $3.00 per MMBtu for the first time since April 2000, and by the end of Friday trading, the Henry Hub midpoint price had dropped $0.69 per MMBtu from the previous Friday to an even $3. Spot prices under $2 per MMBtu were seen at some Rockies trading points on Friday. Only in the Northeast were prices able to buck the downward trend, where hot, muggy weather early in the week had New York citygate prices rising for several days to the week's high point on Wednesday of $4.34 per MMBtu-up 27 cents from the previous Friday. But by Thursday, with temperatures beginning to moderate, Northeast prices joined in the overall downward trend so that by Friday, the price at TRANSCO Zone 6 for New York delivery had fallen to $3.50 per MMBtu. While spot prices jumped on Monday on both SOCAL and PG&E as these systems lifted their respective weekend high-inventory operational flow orders (OFO), the over $2 increase on SOCAL (to around $6.06 per MMBtu) and nearly 25-cent increase on PG&E (to about $4.00) were easily overwhelmed by the week-long demand weakness. By Friday, the spot price on SOCAL had fallen to $3.83 per MMBtu, while on PG&E, spot prices fell nearly a dollar from the previous Friday, dipping below $3 at $2.79 per MMBtu.

262

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2001 30, 2001 Prices rose slightly mid-week with the return of summer weather and a reported slowing of net injections to storage for the prior week. Temperatures for the week reverted close to normal in the Northeast and as much as 3 degrees above normal in the Midwest. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) In a pattern typical for this summer, spot prices declined toward the end of the week as a cool front pervaded the eastern half of the country. However, the spot price at the Henry Hub was able to hold onto a 12-cent gain over the week to close at $3.07 per MMBtu on Friday. The August contract finished as the near-month contract on a slightly higher note on the last day of trade to close at $3.167 per MMBtu due to short-covering and a forecast for warmer weather in the upcoming week. The August contract ended less than 2 cents lower than the July contract for the lowest closure since May of last year. On the West Coast, the cancellation of high-linepack operational flow orders allowed prices to buoy upward by about $1 per MMBtu early in the week. As coastal areas remained cool though, price declines offset much of the gain. For only the third week in the last 2 months, the American Gas Association (AGA) estimated net injections to storage at less than 100 Bcf as they reported 84 Bcf for the week ended Friday, July 20. An OPEC agreement to reduce production quotas by 1 million barrels per day helped prop-up crude oil prices. As of Friday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate was $27.05 per barrel, or $4.66 per MMBtu, $1.45 per barrel more than a week earlier.

263

"Table HC11.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,20.5,15.1,5.4 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,20.5,15.1,5.4 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","N","N" "Space Heating Usage During 2005"

264

"Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ," U.S. Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1.2,1,0.2 "2 Times A Day",24.6,4,2.7,1.2 "Once a Day",42.3,7.9,5.4,2.5 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,6,4.8,1.2 "About Once a Week",3.9,0.6,0.5,"Q" "Less Than Once a Week",4.1,0.6,0.4,"Q"

265

"Table HC11.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,6.9,5.3,1.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,13.7,9.8,3.9 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,10.4,7.3,3.1 "Laptop Model",16.9,3.3,2.6,0.7 "Hours Turned on Per Week" "Less than 2 Hours",13.6,2.4,1.8,0.6

266

"Table HC11.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,4,2.4,1.7 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,16.5,12.8,3.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,16.3,12.6,3.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.3,"Q","Q" "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,6,5.2,0.8 "Without a Heat Pump",53.5,5.5,4.8,0.7

267

The bottom currents in the area of abyssal hills in the north-east tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of simultaneous measurements of the bottom (6.25 and 35 m above the bottom) currents, deep currents, and surface currents made at three points in the north-east tropical Pacific Ocean are given. The b...

T. A. Demidova; E. A. Kontar'; A. V. Sokov; A. M. Belyaev

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Two Contrasting Severe Seasonal Extremes in Tropical South America in 2012: Flood in Amazonia and Drought in Northeast Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two simultaneous extreme events affected tropical South America to the east of the Andes during the austral summer and fall of 2012: a severe drought in Northeast Brazil and intense rainfall and floods in Amazonia, both considered records for the ...

Jose A. Marengo; Lincoln M. Alves; Wagner R. Soares; Daniel A. Rodriguez; Helio Camargo; Marco Paredes Riveros; Amelia Diaz Pabl

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1997, the Texas Water Development Board identified George Parkhouse I on the South Sulphur River in northeast Texas as a potential reservoir site. This aquatic survey of a future reservoir site is designed to provide information about stream fish...

Gelwick, Frances P.; Burgess, Christine C.

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Total......................................................................... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported) City....................................................................... 47.1 6.9 4.7 2.2 Town..................................................................... 19.0 6.0 4.2 1.9 Suburbs................................................................ 22.7 4.4 4.0 0.5 Rural..................................................................... 22.3 3.2 2.3 0.9 Climate Zone 1 Less than 2,000 CDD and-- Greater than 7,000 HDD.................................... 10.9 1.9 Q 1.3 5,500 to 7,000 HDD........................................... 26.1 9.8 5.7 4.1 4,000 to 5,499 HDD...........................................

271

Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report-January through March 2003  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4-TAC 4-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project January through March 2003 Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April 2003 Grand Junction Office U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. N0060900 GJO-2003-434-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report January through March 2003 April 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107

272

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The vertical electrical sounding surveys encountered few difficulties and were able to resolve basement resistivities in all locations. The resistivity sections derived indicated a 3000- 20,000 ohm.m surface layer underlain by a 500- 900 ohm-m cold freshwatersaturated layer and a basement layer of less than 100 ohm.m (Kauahikaua and Mattice, 1981). The depth of penetration of these soundings was estimated to be about 800 m to 900 m b.s.1. and thus the basement resistivities probably correspond to basalts

273

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2013 | Release Date: July 18, 7, 2013 | Release Date: July 18, 2013 | Next Release: July 25, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: FERC approves service on first segment of Northeast Supply Link Expansion project The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) last week approved the start of service on the first segment of the Transcontinental Gas Supply Co (Transco) Northeast Supply Link Expansion project. This project is designed to ease pipeline congestion out of the Marcellus shale play, increasing the diversity and reliability of natural gas supply to northeastern demand markets. The segment completed last week is known as the Palmerton Loop, and represents 3 of approximately 12 miles of loops - or pipelines

274

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2013 | Release Date: October 10, 9, 2013 | Release Date: October 10, 2013 | Next Release: October 17, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Northeast net imports from Canada plummet, driven by export growth at Niagara Falls Northeast U.S. net natural gas imports from Canada declined by more than half for the first nine months of 2013 compared to the same period in 2012, from 939 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) to 438 MMcf/d, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) calculations using data from Bentek Energy LLC. Most of this 502 MMcf/d decrease resulted from a 433 MMcf/d decrease in net imports at Kinder Morgan's Tennessee Gas Pipeline (TGP) and TransCanada Pipeline's border crossing between Niagara Falls,

275

The distribution and ecology of benthic Foraminifera and associated meiofauna in the Northeast Water Polynya, Greenland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DISTRIBUTION AND ECOLOGY OF BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA AND ASSOCIATED MEIOFAUNA IN THE NORTHEAST WATER POLYNYA, GREENLAND A Thesis by ADRIAN CHARLES NEWTON Submitted to Texas ASSAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Gilbert T. Rowe (Chair of Committee) Niall Slowe (Member) R, 'rt . ta n (Member John atm uth (Head of Department) August 1994 Major Subject: Oceanography ABSTRACT...

Newton, Adrian Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

277

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

278

Northeast regional biomass program: Second and Third quarterlies and final report, January 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is comprised of the following states: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island and Vermont. It is managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the CONEG Policy Research Center, Inc. The Northeast states face several near-term barriers to the expanded use of biomass energy. Informational and technical barriers have impeded industrial conversions, delaying the development of a wood energy supply infrastructure. Concern over the environmental impacts on resources are not well understood. Public awareness and concern about safety issues surrounding wood energy use has also grown to the point of applying a brake to the trend of increases in residential applications of biomass energy. In addition, many residential, commercial, industrial, and commercial energy users are discouraged from using biomass energy because of the convenience factor. Regardless of the potential for cost savings, biomass energy sources, aside from being perceived as more esoteric, are also viewed as more work for the user. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is designed to help the eleven states overcome obstacles and achieve biomass energy potentials.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Northeast Regional Biomass Program first and second quarter reports, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northeast states face several near-term barriers to the expanded use of biomass energy. Informational and technical barriers have impeded industrial conversions, delaying the development of a wood energy supply infrastructure. Concern over the environmental impacts on resources are not well understood. Public awareness and concern about safety issues surrounding wood energy use has also grown to the point of applying a brake to the trend of increases in residential applications of biomass energy. In addition, many residential commercial, industrial, and commercial energy users are discouraged from using biomass energy because of the convenience factor. Regardless of the potential for cost savings, biomass energy sources, aside from being perceived as more esoteric, are also viewed as more work for the user. The Northeast Regional biomass Program (NRBP) is designed to help the eleven Northeastern states overcome these obstacles and achieve their biomass energy potentials. The objective of this program in the current and future years is to increase the role of biomass fuels in the region`s energy mix by providing the impetus for states and the private sector to develop a viable Northeast biomass fuels market. This paper contains a management report, state program summaries, technical project status report, and technology transfer activities.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 27) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 27) Since Wednesday, May 12, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 21 cents or about 3 percent to $6.18 per MMBtu. Yesterday (May 19), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.455 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 5 cents or less than 1 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,388 Bcf as of May 14, which is 1.1 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil climbed $1.31 per barrel or 3 percent on the week to $41.61 per barrel or $7.174 per MMBtu. Prices: Moderating temperatures led to price declines of 12 to 48 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday, May 12. The steepest declines occurred principally west of the Rockies, where prices fell more than 35 cents per MMBtu at most markets. In California, prices fell more than 40 cents per MMBtu, while declines in the Rocky Mountains region averaged roughly 36 cents per MMBtu. East of the Rockies, price decreases were widespread with declines ranging between 20 and 35 cents per MMBtu at most markets. These declines were more pronounced along the northern tier with declines averaging 28, 27, and 23 cents per MMBtu in the Midcontinent, Northeast and Midwest regions, respectively. In the south, including Texas, Louisiana, and Florida, price decreases were less than 23 cents per MMBtu on average. Despite these widespread declines, prices nevertheless remain somewhat high relative to historical trends and exceed last year's levels by 3 to 5 percent. For example, prices at the New York citygate are 34 cents or 5 percent above last year's level. Principal contributing factors sustaining the higher price levels likely include higher oil prices this year as the price of crude oil exceeds last year's level by more than 42 percent.

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281

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

282

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 8, 2010) In response to cold weather across much of the United States, natural gas spot prices increased across the board this report week (December 1 – December 8). Though most increases were less than 50 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), prices at a number of trading points (notably in the Northeast and Florida) increased by several dollars. The Henry Hub spot price rose 25 cents, from $4.21 per MMBtu to $4.46 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the natural gas near-month contract (January 2011) also increased, rising from $4.269 per MMBtu on December 1 to $4.606 per MMBtu on December 8.

283

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: May 28, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 20, 2009) Natural gas prices at most trading locations fell on the week because of mild weather as well as continued weakness in the economy. Declines ranged between 37 cents at the Dracut trading area in the Northeast to 90 cents at the El Paso non-Bondad area in the Rocky Mountains. The Henry Hub spot price fell by 67 cents during the week to $3.75 per million Btu (MMBtu). Moving in the opposite direction of natural gas prices, the price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil contract rose on the week to $61.45 per barrel, or $10.59 per MMBtu. Oil prices are now at their highest level since November 10, 2008, having more than doubled since falling to a

284

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

285

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: November 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 5) Since Wednesday, October 29, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Midwest, Northeast, and Alabama/Mississippi regions, with gains of up to $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) in a week of highly variable prices. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 36 cents per MMBtu or about 5 percent, to $6.94 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (November 5) at $7.249 per MMBtu, climbing 47 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent since last Wednesday, October 29. Natural gas in storage was 3,405 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

286

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 2, 2009) Natural gas spot prices soared this week, following significant, albeit smaller decreases in trading the prior week. Spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States by more than a dollar per million Btu (MMBtu). The only exception occurred at the Leidy location in the Northeast, which rose by 84 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week at $4.67 per MMBtu, $1.35 per MMBtu higher than last Wednesday. Trading at the Henry Hub ended yesterday’s session 14 cents higher than the January 2010 contract. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

287

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: January 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 7, 2009) Since Wednesday, December 31, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States except in the Northeast region. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 26 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or about 5 percent, to $5.89 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 7) at $5.872 per MMBtu, climbing 22 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since last Wednesday, December 31. Natural gas in storage was 2,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 2, which is about 3 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

288

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, to Wednesday, March 5) 7, to Wednesday, March 5) Released: March 6, 2008 Next release: March 13, 2008 · Since Wednesday, February 27, natural gas prices increased on both the spot and futures markets. There were a few scattered exceptions to the increases, but these were mostly confined to the Northeast. · The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 16 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or 1.7 percent on the week, averaging $9.37 per MMBtu yesterday, the highest price since January 2006. · Boosted by record-high crude oil prices and declining working gas in storage, the prices of natural gas futures contracts increased on the week, reaching levels not seen in the market in more than 2 years. The price of the futures contract for April 2008 delivery increased 68 cents per MMBtu to $9.741.

289

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2009 16, 2009 Next Release: April 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 15, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with some exceptions including those in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent. Despite this week’s upticks at most locations, natural gas spot prices remain at relatively low levels and have continued to trade within a limited range for the past 4 weeks. The Henry Hub spot market prices gained about 10 cents or 2.9 percent per million Btu (MMBtu), ending trading yesterday at $3.60 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 15) at $3.693

290

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

291

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

292

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

293

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

294

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

295

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

296

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

297

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

298

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

299

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

300

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

302

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

303

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

304

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

305

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

307

The onshore northeast Brazilian rift basins: An early Neocomian aborted rift system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early Cretaceous rift basins of northeastern Brazil illustrate key three-dimensional geometries of intracontinental rift systems, controlled mainly by the basement structures. These basins were formed and then abandoned during the early extension associated with the north-south-propagating separation of South America and Africa. During the early Neocomian, extensional deformation jumped from the easternmost basins (group 1: Sergipe Alagoas and Gabon basins; group 2: Reconcavo, Tucano, and Jatoba basins) to the west, forming a series of northeast-trending intracratonic basins (group 3: Araripe, Rio do Peixe, Iguatu, Malhada Vermelha, Lima Campos, and Potiguar basins). The intracratonic basins of groups 2 and 3 consist of asymmetric half-grabens separated by basement highs, transfer faults, and/or accommodation zones. These basins are typically a few tens of kilometers wide and trend northeast-southwest, roughly perpendicular to the main extension direction during the early Neocomian. Preexisting upper crustal weakness zones, like the dominantly northeast-southwest-trending shear zones of the Brazilian orogeny, controlled the development of intracrustal listric normal faults. Internal transverse structures such as transfer faults (Reconcavo basin and onshore Potiguar basin) and accommodation zones (onshore Potiguar basin and Araripe basin) were also controlled by the local basement structural framework. Transverse megafaults and lithostructural associations controlled the three main rift trends. The megashear zones of Pernanbuco (Brazil)-Ngaundere (Africa) apparently behaved like a huge accommodation zone, balancing extensional deformation along the Reconcavo-Jatoba/Sergipe Alagoas-Gabon trends with simultaneous extension along the Araripe-Potiguar trend. The Sergipe Alagoas-Gabon trend and the Potiguar basin represent the site of continued evolution into a marginal open basin following early Neocomian deformation.

Matos, R. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

309

Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B4. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings, 1999" B4. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West" ,,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific" "All Buildings ................",4657,208,479,782,406,748,396,618,315,705 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,99,206,390,230,368,189,360,155,351 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,41,128,200,72,194,80,139,80,175

310

DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships Host Two-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Boston  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Over 100 attendees gathered in Boston, MA to participate in the "Voices for SSL Efficiency" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on July 16-17, 2007. The workshop, hosted by DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP), was the second DOE meeting to explore how Federal, State, and private-sector organizations can work together to guide market introduction of high-performance SSL products. The first workshop, hosted by DOE and Southern California Edison, was held in Pasadena in April 2007. In both workshops, a diverse gathering of participants energy efficiency organizations, utilities, government, and industry shared insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

311

Low frequency deep ocean ambient noise trend in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concern about effects of anthropogenic noise on marine life has stimulated new studies to establish present-day oceannoise levels and compare them to noise levels from previous times. This paper reports on the trend in low-frequency (10400 Hz) ambient noise levels and presents measurements made using a calibrated multi-element volume array at deep ocean sites in the Northeast Pacific from 1978 to 1986. The experiments provided spectral noise levels as well as horizontal and vertical noise directionality. The data presented here provide evidence that the trend derived from 1960s data extended to around 1980 but has since continued at a lower rate.

N. Ross Chapman; Andrea Price

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace, 1999" B5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West" ,,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific" "All Buildings ................",67338,3735,8625,11205,5556,11001,5220,7264,4579,10152 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,287,614,1186,648,1006,514,1015,493,1009 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,287,1015,1480,566,1430,644,983,612,1222

313

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

314

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2013 | Release Date: November 21 0, 2013 | Release Date: November 21 2013 | Next Release: December 5, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Natural gas storage sees first net withdrawal of season EIA earlier today reported the first net natural gas withdrawal of the heating season from Lower 48 storage facilities. This report covered the week ending November 15, following several days of cold weather-driven gas demand in the Northeast and Midwest. Stock levels recorded on November 8 of 3,834 billion cubic feet (Bcf) would mark the 2013 natural gas inventory peak if storage withdrawals continue in the coming weeks. Working natural gas inventory levels on November 8 were 84 Bcf below year ago inventories,

315

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

316

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

317

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

318

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

319

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

320

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

322

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

323

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

324

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

325

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

326

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

327

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

328

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

329

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

330

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 3) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 3) Cold temperatures in parts of the Midwest and the Northeast lifted aggregate demand this week, resulting in higher natural gas spot prices at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 19-26), spot prices at the Henry Hub increased 23 cents per MMBtu, or about 3.7 percent, to $6.44. Prices in the Northeast surged as extreme wintry conditions moved into the region, and constraints on interstate pipelines limited supply options for incremental deliveries. Yesterday (January 26), the price of the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.388 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 10 cents, or 1.5 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,270 Bcf as of January 21, which is 14.0 percent above the

334

Wood pellets production costs and energy consumption under different framework conditions in Northeast Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of cleaner and renewable energy sources are needed in order to reduce dependency and global warming. Wood pellets are a clean renewable fuel and has been considered as one of the substitutes for fossil fuels. In Argentina, large quantities of sawmill residues are still unused and wood pellets production could be seen as both, as an environmental solution and an extra economical benefit. The general aim of this study was to determine the wood pellets production costs and energy consumption under different framework conditions in northeast Argentina. The specific costs of wood pellets for the different scenarios showed relative lower costs comparing to the ones reported in other studies, ranging from 35 to 47 /Mgpellets. Raw material costs represented the main cost factor in the calculation of the total pellets production costs. A lower specific production cost was observed when 50% of the raw material input was wood shavings. The specific electricity consumption per metric ton of pellet was lower in scenarios with higher production rate. Lower heat energy consumption was observed in scenarios that have a mixed raw material input. The most promising framework condition for Northeast Argentina, in terms of costs effectiveness and energy consumption could be acquired with production rates of 6Mg/h with sawdust and wood shavings as raw material. However, simultaneous increment of the electricity by 50% and raw material price by 100% may increase the specific costs up to 50%.

Augusto Uasuf; Gero Becker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

337

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

338

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

339

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2001 13, 2001 Spot prices for natural gas appeared to stabilize just above the $3.00 mark during the week ended August 10, 2001, as the price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana varied between $3.14 and $2.98 per million Btu. Net injections of natural gas into storage for the previous week again fell within the range of market expectations reported in the trade press and contributed to the stability of the price level. However, due to warmer-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast, Midwest, and parts of the Southwest and Southeast, prices at the Henry Hub increased early in the week before decreasing and finishing over 2 percent lower than the previous week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil finished the week at

340

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2009 15, 2009 Next Release: January 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 14, 2009) In the eastern half of the Lower 48 States, temperatures were significantly lower this report week, resulting in sharp price increases in the Northeast as space-heating demand rose. In the West and in the producing regions along the Gulf coast, however, a respite from cold weather provided some softening in natural gas spot prices. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.42 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.47. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract decreased in four out of the five trading sessions this report week. The futures contract for February delivery fell during the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) 4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) Natural gas spot prices climbed 25 to 55 cents across the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday, August 6-Wednesday, August 13). Increases were highest in sun-drenched California, but also significant in the Northeast and Midwest as this summer's hottest weather to date occurred in parts of the two regions. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 43 cents or roughly 9 percent to $5.17 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub similarly increased, gaining just over 43 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $5.179 per MMBtu yesterday (August 13). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,188 Bcf as of Friday, August 8, which is about 8.5 percent below the

342

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 0 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 6) Natural gas spot and futures prices tumbled this week as storage levels rose above the 5-year average and forecasts called for continued moderate temperatures into the official start of the winter heating season (November 1). For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 22-29), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 38 cents or about 8 percent to $4.50 per MMBtu. Prices in market areas along the Gulf Coast and Texas similarly fell between 30-45 cents per MMBtu, while Northeast prices slid more than 50 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery expired at $4.459 on October 29, after declining roughly 47 cents per MMBtu or slightly more than 9 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage

343

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2008 0, 2008 Next Release: July 17, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices declined sharply this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 2-9), with the largest decreases generally occurring in consuming regions in the Northeast and Midwest. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.22 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.09. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After the August 2008 contract reached a daily settlement price of $13.578 per MMBtu (a record high for this contract) on July 3, the price decreased by $1.57 per MMBtu over the next three trading sessions and ended the week

344

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 15) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 15) Natural gas spot prices climbed 15 to 62 cents per MMBtu across the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday, June 30-Wednesday, July 7). Increases were highest in the sun-drenched Southwest and California, but also significant in the Northeast and Midwest. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 23 cents or roughly 4 percent to $6.28 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub similarly increased, gaining 21.5 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $6.370 per MMBtu yesterday (July 7). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,047 Bcf as of Friday, July 2, which is about 1.2 percent above the 5-year average inventory level for the report week. The spot price for West Texas

345

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 5 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 12) Cold weather over the Thanksgiving weekend and early this week lifted natural gas spot prices in many regions of the country. While prices at several Northeast trading locations climbed more than $1 per MMBtu since Wednesday, November 27, prices along the Gulf Coast and other producing areas increased by a more modest 4 to 25 cents per MMBtu. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price rose $0.04 per MMBtu to $4.24. At the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for January delivery climbed just under a dime to $4.298 per MMBtu. Cold weather throughout the final full week in November also resulted in the season's largest withdrawal from storage. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 29,

346

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 10) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 10) Since Wednesday, January 26, natural gas spot price movements have been mixed, increasing at most market locations in the Lower 48 States while decreasing in the Northeast and Louisiana regions. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 6 cents, or about 1 percent, to $6.38 per MMBtu Yesterday (February 2), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.376 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 5 cents, or about 1 percent, since last Wednesday (January 26). Natural gas in storage was 2,082 Bcf as of January 28, which is about 15 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.15 per barrel, or about 4 percent, on the week to $46.65

347

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2007 to Thursday, January 23, 2008) 16, 2007 to Thursday, January 23, 2008) Released: January 24, 2008 Next release: January 31, 2008 · Since Wednesday, January 16, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, with the exception of the Northeast and Florida, and a few scattered points in Louisiana, Alabama/Mississippi, and the Rocky Mountains. · Prices at the Henry Hub declined 39 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 5 percent, to $7.84 per MMBtu. · The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 23) at $7.621 per MMBtu, falling 51 cents or 6.3 percent since Wednesday, January 16. · Natural gas in storage was 2,536 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 18, which is 7.4 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007).

348

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 16, 2011) A reprieve from extreme cold in much of the country this week limited space-heating demand, contributing to price declines. The biggest price decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (February 9-16), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.29 to $3.93 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for March delivery decreased by $0.12 on the week to $3.92 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 11, working gas in underground storage was 1,911 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 6.3 percent below the 5-year

349

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) Natural gas spot prices weakened in the opening days of June as concerns lingered over high storage inventories levels and mild weather limited gas demand in the key market areas of the Midwest and Northeast. Net storage injections for the week ending May 31 were 105 Bcf, bringing the total inventory level in the country to 1,893 Bcf, according to EIA estimates. Since Wednesday, May 29, prices at most trading locations have dropped by 16 cents or less. At the NYMEX, prices for futures contracts have declined more sharply. In the first week of trading as the near-month contract, the price for a futures contract for July delivery fell to $3.260 per MMBtu by yesterday's close, a drop of $0.245 per MMBtu since the

350

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 25, 2006) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 25, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, May 10-17) at virtually all market locations, partly because of weak weather-related demand and a decrease in the price of crude oil. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 34 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, while some other market locations in Louisiana noted decreases of up to 65 cents on the week. East and South Texas trading locations, as well as locations in the Northeast, experienced slightly less dramatic decreases, averaging 31 cents per MMBtu. Yesterday (May 17), the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.129 per MMBtu, decreasing 77 cents or about 11 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, May

351

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 5, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 22, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week at most market locations as frigid temperatures and winter storms blanketed the United States, particularly in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 7 to February 14), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased $1.02 per MMBtu, or about 13 percent, to trade at $8.91 per MMBtu yesterday (February 14). In contrast, the price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 6 percent this week to settle yesterday at $7.241 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, February 9, was 2,088 Bcf, which is 14.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

352

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 13, 2011) As the story of abundant natural gas supply continued to provide headlines for the market this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 6-13), spot prices at most market locations in the lower 48 States decreased. Moderate temperatures also likely contributed to the price declines by limiting end-use demand and allowing for replenishment of storage supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by 3 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent, to $4.14 per MMBtu. Other market prices also decreased by up to 10 cents per MMBtu, with a few exceptions in the U.S. Northeast.

353

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 18) November 10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 18) Natural gas spot and futures prices declined this week as prices for competing fuels decreased and temperatures were moderate. For the week (Tuesday-Tuesday, November 2-9), the spot price at the Henry Hub decreased $1.03 per MMBtu, or about 15 percent, to $5.85. Prices at trading locations along the Gulf Coast and Texas similarly fell between $1.00 and $1.60 per MMBtu, while declines at Northeast trading locations were generally more moderate as cooler air moved into the region. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for December delivery settled at $7.471 per MMBtu on Tuesday, November 9, a decline of roughly $1.10 per MMBtu or 13 percent since last Tuesday. Natural gas in storage

354

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(next release 2:00 p.m. on March 10) (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 10) Following the cold weather trend, natural gas prices have increased since Wednesday, February 23 at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the exception of some Northeast trading points. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), spot prices at the Henry Hub increased 59 cents per MMBtu, or 9.8 percent, to $6.61. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub rose approximately 30 cents per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, March 2) at $6.717. Natural gas in storage was 1,613 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, which is 28.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.27 per barrel or about 2.5 percent since last Wednesday to

355

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 1) 5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 1) Since Wednesday, August 17, changes to natural gas spot prices were mixed, decreasing in major consuming areas in the Northeast and Midwest, while increasing at most markets in the Rocky Mountains, California, and West Texas regions. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 2 cents to $10 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 24), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $9.984 per MMBtu, increasing about 59 cents or more than 6 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,575 Bcf as of August 19, which is 5.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.81 per barrel, or about 6 percent, on the week

356

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 5) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 5) Since Wednesday, April 20, natural gas spot prices have remained relatively unchanged, increasing less than 12 cents per MMBtu at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, while declining less than 12 cents in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub were virtually unchanged, climbing 1 cent, to $7.11 per MMBtu. Yesterday (April 27), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $6.748 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 31 cents, or about 4 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,416 Bcf as of April 22, which is about 29 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.08

357

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 28, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 20, 2010) A reprieve from the extreme cold in much of the country during this report week limited space-heating demand, resulting in price declines. The biggest decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (January 13-20), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.07 to $5.54 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for February delivery decreased by $0.24 on the week to $5.496 per MMBtu. As of Friday, January 15, working gas in underground storage was 2,607 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year

358

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 4, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 31) A second early season cold front caused heating demand that increased prices at key market centers in the Northeast and West Coast up to 42 cents per MMBtu since October 16. The higher aggregate demand lifted natural gas spot prices 10 to 25 cents at most production-area trading locations. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the average Henry Hub price climbed $0.14 per MMBtu to $4.24. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub increased a more moderate $0.033 per MMBtu to a $4.260 settlement yesterday (October 23). Natural gas in storage increased to 3,161 Bcf for the week ending October 18, which exceeds the 5-year average by 7.4 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI)

359

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: April 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 25, 2009) Spot prices increased at all trading locations this week, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. Many market locations ended the week with spot prices above $4 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.38 to $4.13 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased, climbing by $0.65 to $4.329 for the April 2009 contract. Prices for the April 2009 contract reached their highest levels since February 13, 2009, on March 24. Natural gas in storage was 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

360

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

362

Declining Oxygen in the Northeast Pacific* STEPHEN D. PIERCE, JOHN A. BARTH, R. KIPP SHEARMAN, AND ANATOLI Y. EROFEEV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Declining Oxygen in the Northeast Pacific* STEPHEN D. PIERCE, JOHN A. BARTH, R. KIPP SHEARMAN a decrease in oceanic dissolved oxygen and a thickening of the oxygen minimum zone, associated with global warming. Comprehensive observational analyses of oxygen decline are chal- lenging, given generally sparse

Pierce, Stephen

363

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

365

Statement of David P. Russ Regional Executive for the Northeast, U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geologicallybased energy resources, including unconventional resources such as shale gas and shale oil. USGS a new assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Marcellus Shale. Results from Subcommittee To Examine Shale Gas Production and Water Resources in the Eastern United States October 20

Torgersen, Christian

366

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lahaina-Kaanapali Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry patterns observed for the Lahaina prospect were similar to those found in Olowalu. Several localized zones of high mercury concentration or enhanced radon emanation were observed, but showed little relationship to each other or to the recognized geologic structure in the area. The data were interpreted to suggest that there might be a small thermal anomaly to the northeast of the

368

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

369

Matrix of Marine Data Management Systems Element of System Northeast Ocean Data Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Matrix of Marine Data Management Systems Matrix of Marine Data Management Systems Element of System Northeast Ocean Data Portal Website(s) http://northeastoceandata.org/ Mapping application http://www.northeastoceanviewer.org/ Blog or discussion forum Point(s) of contact Daniel Martin, Nick Napoli Geographic area covered Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut Data sources Federal, State Number of data sets 62 Available formats File downloads Web-enabled services http://northeastoceandata.org/data-catalog/web-mapping-services/ Type of server ArcGIS 10 Client Adobe Flex Database File-based Hosting Commercial with plans for Amazon Web Services Cloud Data sharing standards Interfaces supported Meta data catalogs Collaborations with other systems MarineCadastre.gov, MARCO Portal

370

Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC). Volume 7. Automatic photointerpretation. Final report, Sep 84-Dec 89  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC) was created by the Air Force Systems Command, Rome Air Development Center, and the Office of Scientific Research. Its purpose was to conduct pertinent research in artificial intelligence and to perform activities ancillary to this research. This report describes progress during the existence of the NAIC on the technical research tasks undertaken at the member universities. The topics covered in general are: versatile expert system for equipment maintenance, distributed AI for communications system control, automatic photointerpretation, time-oriented problem solving, speech understanding systems, knowledge base maintenance, hardware architectures for very large systems, knowledge-based reasoning and planning, and a knowledge acquisition, assistance, and explanation system. The specific topics for this volume are the use of expert systems for automated photo interpretation and other AI techniques to image segmentation and region identification.

Modestino, J.; Sanderson, A.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Site insolation and wind power characteristics, technical report northeast region. Vol. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This phase of the Site Insolation and Wind Power Characteristics Study was performed to provide statistical information on the expected future availability of solar and wind power at various sites in the Northeast Region of the US Historic data (SOLMET), at 8 National Weather Service stations with hourly solar insolation and collateral meteorological information, were interrogated to provide an estimate of future trends. Solar data are global radiation incident on a horizontal surface, and wind data represent wind power normal to the air flow. Selected insolation and wind power conditions were investigated for their occurrence and persistence, for defined periods of time, on a monthly basis. Global horizontal insolation are related to inclined surfaces at each site. Ratios are provided, monthly, for multiplying global insolation to obtain insolation estimates on south-facing surfaces inclined at different angles with respect to the horizontal.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Attenuation of low?frequency sound in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Long?range propagation losses were measured at frequencies from 0.025 to 0.8 kHz to the north and south of a receiver at 46?N 14330?W in the Northeast Pacific. To the south of the station the attenuation losses experienced a pronounced minimum near 50 Hz and approached the one?half Thorp value at 0.8 kHz. An examination of the behavior of the attenuation coefficient as a function of range indicated that a range of at least 700 km would be required to make meaningful measurements of attenuation in this area. To the north of the receiving station focusing of the sound due to a rapidly shallowing sound channel prevented reliable measurement of the attenuation coefficient at any range.

R. K. Chow; R. G. Turner

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The status of US, Russian and Chinese nuclear forces in Northeast Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current and future deployment of nuclear weapons in Northeast Asia by the United States, Russia, and most particularly, China - each with vital interests in the region - will play a critical role in determining how the region`s smaller or weaker states respond. The calculus of deterrence and defense postures of the three declared nuclear-weapon states with interests in the region are inextricably interrelated and will also affect the way security planners in the states of East Asia, which are increasingly able to afford expensive new weapons systems, make budgetary and military calculations. As with so many things in that dynamic region, US, Chinese and Russian nuclear strategies, programs and force deployments have been in a state of transition in recent years. The nuclear policies and deployments of all three states will have a major impact on prospects for stability and possible arms control efforts in East Asia.

Lockwood, D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Buildings*","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" . Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West" ,,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,233,493,696,571,874,348,553,299,580 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,127,237,369,356,457,215,294,165,333 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,48,101,117,97,189,56,116,56,110

375

Advancing the Deployment of Utility-Scale Photovoltaic Plants in the Northeast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As one of the premier research laboratories operated by the Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is pursuing an energy research agenda that focuses on renewable energy systems and will help to secure the nation's energy security. A key element of the BNL research is the advancement of grid-connected utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) plants, particularly in the northeastern part of the country where BNL is located. While a great deal of information has been generated regarding solar PV systems located in mostly sunny, hot, arid climates of the southwest US, very little data is available to characterize the performance of these systems in the cool, humid, frequently overcast climates experienced in the northeastern portion of the country. Recognizing that there is both a need and a market for solar PV generation in the northeast, BNL is pursuing research that will advance the deployment of this important renewable energy resource. BNL's research will leverage access to unique time-resolved data sets from the 37MWp solar array recently developed on its campus. In addition, BNL is developing a separate 1MWp solar research array on its campus that will allow field testing of new PV system technologies, including solar modules and balance of plant equipment, such as inverters, energy storage devices, and control platforms. These research capabilities will form the cornerstone of the new Northeast Solar Energy Research Center (NSERC) being developed at BNL. In this paper, an overview of BNL's energy research agenda is given, along with a description of the 37MWp solar array and the NSERC.

Lofaro R.; Villaran, M; Colli, A.

2012-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - algonquin park streams Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

). CH4 initially reacts... to the CH4Ar stream. All reactants were >99.9% purity (Praxair and Matheson); they were passed over a 13X Source: Iglesia, Enrique - Department of...

377

The Cabot Head Archipelago: evidence of glacial Lake Algonquin on the Northern Bruce Peninsula, Ontario  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...through both bedrock units, is an important control...associated with the bedrock units exposed in the shoreline...lithological dolostone units and significant fetch...wish to acknowledge the Crawford, Johnson, and Greiling...also thank Bob Grey, retired ecologist, Owen Sound...

Philip S.G. Kor; Daryl W. Cowell; Paul F. Karrow; F.J. Rik Kristjansson

378

Queens University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College Solar Decathlon 2011 Construction Drawings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C D E 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C D E SHEET TITLE LOT NUMBER: DRAWN BY: COPYRIGHT: CLIENT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2013 WWW.SOLARDECATHLON.GOV TEAM NAME: ADDRESS: CONTACT: ARCHITECTURAL: R. BRIGINSHAW CONSULTANTS STRUCTURAL: B. WEATHERDON CONSTRUCTION: M. BELL NONE: PROJECT IS PUBLIC DOMAIN MECHANICAL: DR.C CRUIKSHANK & DR.S HARRISON 115i BEAMISH-MUNRO HALL 45 UNION ST. QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY KINGSTON, ON, K7L 3N6 W.KLASSEN & G.BERGA 01 02 03 04 05 80% DOE/NREL SUBMISSION 10/11/12 11/20/12 80% DOE/NREL RESUBMISSION 02/14/13 95% DOE/NREL SUBMISSION 07/04/13 STRUCTURAL SET STAMPED 08/22/13 AS-BUILT DRAWING SUBMISSION 8/22/2013 3:33:56 PM G-001 TABLE OF CONTENTS 120 TEAM ONTARIO INFO@ONTARIOSD.CA WWW.ONTARIOSD.CA MARK DATE DESCRIPTION INDEX OF DRAWINGS SHEET NO SHEET NAME M-201 MECHANICAL ELEVATIONS

379

Queens University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College Solar Decathlon 2011 Menu and Recipes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D.O.E. Solar Decathlon 2013 Table of Contents | Page 2 D.O.E. Solar Decathlon 2013 Table of Contents | Page 2 ECHO by TEAM ONTARIO Dinner Party Menus and Recipes TABLE OF CONTENTS Dinner Party Menu.............................................................................................................................3 Dinner 1 ..................................................................................................................................................... 3 Dinner 2 ..................................................................................................................................................... 3 Recipes ..............................................................................................................................................4 Stuffed Peppers ......................................................................................................................................... 4

380

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geology of Bravo Dome carbon dioxide gas field, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bravo Dome carbon dioxide gas field is located in Union and Harding Counties of northeast New Mexico. The Bravo Dome field covers approximately 800,000 acres, but areal boundaries of the field have not been fully defined. Production in 1989 was 113 bcf of gas from 272 wells. Cumulative production at the end of 1989 was 626 bcf. Estimated recoverable reserves are more than 10 tcf. The gas is 98-99% CO{sub 2}. Most CO{sub 2} produced from Bravo Dome is used for enhanced oil recovery in the Permian basin. The Bravo Dome is a faulted, southeast-plunging, basement-cored anticlinal nose. It is bordered on the east and south by large high-angle faults of Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian (Early Permian) age. The principal reservoir in the Bravo Dome field is the Tubb sandstone (Leonardian-Permian) at depths of 1,900 to 2,950 ft. The Tubb consists of 0-400 ft of fine- to medium-grained, well-sorted, orange feldspathic sandstone. It rests unconformably on Precambrian basement on the highest parts of the Bravo Dome and is not offset by late Paleozoic faults that form the dome. The Cimmaron Anhydrite (Leonardian-Permian) conformably overlies the Tubb and is a vertical seal. The trap at Bravo Dome has structural and stratigraphic aspects. Drape of Tubb sandstone over the dome created structural closure on the northeast, southeast, and southwest flanks of the field. Trapping on the northwest flank of the field is associated with regional northwest thinning of the Tubb.

Broadhead, R.F. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Microsoft Word - Energy Market Alert Jan 25 2013 - Northeast _public version_ final.docx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Northeastern Winter Natural Gas and Electricity Alert Friday January 25, 2013 Current status of natural gas and electricity markets in New York and New England For questions or comments about this report, please contact Christopher.Peterson@eia.gov. Temperature: Both NYC and Boston expect continuing cold temperatures during the day today. Beginning tonight, temperatures are forecast to be moderate, with lows of 18°F in NYC and 15°F in Boston. Next week is expected to be milder. Natural gas demand: Bentek forecasts that demand will remain at high levels through today. Natural gas constraints & LNG: Most pipelines from the west and south

383

Genetic similarity between samples of the orange roughyHoplostethus atlanticus from the Tasman Sea, South-west Pacific Ocean and North-east Atlantic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gel electrophoresis was used to measure genetic variation in the orange roughyHoplostethus atlanticus.... Samples were collected on the continental slope in the Tasman Sea, South-west Pacific Ocean and North-east...

P. J. Smith

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Perceptions of livestock producers, forage producers, wildlife managers, and forage-based service providers concerning extension and technology-transfer activities in south Texas and northeast Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of northeast Mexico. The researcher from Texas A&M University and a co-principal investigator from Tamaulipas, Mexico worked together to conduct the study on both sides of the border. Conclusions were drawn to provide suggestions about opportunities...

Folsom, Wendy Ann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

DOE/EIS-0372; Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Northeast Reliability Interconnect (August 2005)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Northeast Reliability Interconnect DEIS Northeast Reliability Interconnect DEIS S-1 August 2005 SUMMARY S.1 BACKGROUND S.1.1 Purpose and Need for National Environmental Policy Act Review Executive Order (E.O.) 10485 (September 9, 1953), as amended by E.O. 12038 (February 7, 1978), requires that a Presidential permit be issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) before electric transmission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the U.S. international border. Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) has applied to DOE to amend Presidential Permit PP-89, which authorizes BHE to construct a single-circuit, 345,000-volt (345-kV) alternating-current (AC) electric transmission line across the U.S. international border in the vicinity of Baileyville, Maine.

387

A COMPARISON OF ACOUSTIC THERMOMETRY, XBT, TOPEX, AND HOT OBSERVATIONS OF OCEAN TEMPERATURE IN THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC OCEAN Brian D. DUSHAW and the ATOC Group* Applied Physics Laboratory, College of Ocean of a climate signal of order 0.01 °C/yr and high-wavenumber (mesoscale) noise of order 1 °C rms, spa- tial low-pass to undersampling in space or time by the XBTs, errors in the XBT maps as a result of such things as fall rate

Dushaw, Brian

388

Gas Main Sensor and Communications Network System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automatika, Inc. was contracted by the Department of Energy (DOE) and with co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), to develop an in-pipe natural gas prototype measurement and wireless communications system for assessing and monitoring distribution networks. This projected was completed in April 2006, and culminated in the installation of more than 2 dozen GasNet nodes in both low- and high-pressure cast-iron and steel mains owned by multiple utilities in the northeastern US. Utilities are currently logging data (off-line) and monitoring data in real time from single and multiple networked sensors over cellular networks and collecting data using wireless bluetooth PDA systems. The system was designed to be modular, using in-pipe sensor-wands capable of measuring, flow, pressure, temperature, water-content and vibration. Internal antennae allowed for the use of the pipe-internals as a waveguide for setting up a sensor network to collect data from multiple nodes simultaneously. Sensor nodes were designed to be installed with low- and no-blow techniques and tools. Using a multi-drop bus technique with a custom protocol, all electronics were designed to be buriable and allow for on-board data-collection (SD-card), wireless relaying and cellular network forwarding. Installation options afforded by the design included direct-burial and external polemounted variants. Power was provided by one or more batteries, direct AC-power (Class I Div.2) and solar-array. The utilities are currently in a data-collection phase and intend to use the collected (and processed) data to make capital improvement decisions, compare it to Stoner model predictions and evaluate the use of such a system for future expansion, technology-improvement and commercialization starting later in 2006.

Hagen Schempf

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

391

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about $3.49 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.76 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released November 7, 2002). Natural gas prices were higher than expected in October as storms in the Gulf of Mexico in late September temporarily shut in some gas production, causing spot prices at the Henry Hub and elsewhere to rise above $4.00 per million Btu for most of October. In addition, early winter-like temperatures, particularly in the Midwest and Northeast, increased demand for natural gas, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.84 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.56 per MMBtu, which is about $1.20 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.81 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. In 2003, wellhead prices are projected to average $3.28 per MMBtu, or about $0.44 per MMBtu more than in 2002, owing to expectations of increasing economic growth, little or no change in the annual average crude oil price for 2003, and lower storage levels for most of 2003 compared with 2002 levels.

392

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2013 | Release Date: May 30, 9, 2013 | Release Date: May 30, 2013 | Next Release: June 6, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Island gas production returns in May, but remains below prior levels After planned outage for maintenance that began on April 23, natural gas production resumed on May 6 at northeastern Canada's Sable Island Offshore production field, which is located 125 miles off the coast of Nova Scotia. Spectra Energy's Maritimes and Northeast Pipeline subsidiary Maritimes Canada announced the completion of the planned outage and a return to production on May 5. Spectra's pipeline brings offshore, onshore, and liquid natural gas to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the northeastern United States.

393

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

394

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

395

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

396

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

397

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

398

Fin whale song characteristics recorded on ocean bottom seismometers in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fin whales produce low frequency sequences of vocalizations that can be detected opportunistically on ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs). Using an automatic detection algorithm we have analyzed fin whale calls recorded on OBSs in the Northeast Pacific Ocean over broad spatial and temporal scales. The Cascadia Initiative experiment consists of 70 OBSs deployed for a total of four years (20112015). It extends from Vancouver Island to Cape Mendocino and several hundred kilometers offshore. Additional OBS data that overlap spatially with the northern portion of the Cascadia Initiative instruments are available from the Neptune Canada cabled observatory which has been online since 2009 and from standalone deployments between 2003 and 2006. With this study we examine call characteristics and seasonal call counts for patterns that might indicate migratory movements or distinct acoustic populations. Both frequency and inter-pulse interval (IPI) are automatically extracted for each detected call and seasonal and inter-annual calling patterns are examined using daily binned call count histograms. Preliminary analysis of a subset of Cascadia Initiative data from 2011 to 2013 shows a dominant sequence of alternating classic and backbeat calls at center frequencies of 20 and 18.5 Hz respectively and preceding IPIs of 16 and 18 s respectively.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cetacean high-use habitats of the northeast United States continental shelf  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of the Cetacean and Turtle Assessment Program previously demonstrated at a qualitative level that specific areas of the continental shelf waters off the northeastern US coast consistently showed high-density utilization by several cetacean species. They have quantified, on a multispecies basis and with adjustment for level of survey effort, the intensity of habitat use by whales and dolphins, and defined areas of especially high-intensity utilization. The results demonstrate that the area off the northeast US, which is used most intensively as cetacean habitat, is the western margin of the Gulf of Maine, from the Great South Channel to Stellwagen Bank and Jeffreys Ledge. Secondary high-use areas include the continental shelf edge and the region around the eastern end of Georges Bank. High-use areas for piseivorous cetaceans are concentrated mainly in the western Gulf of Maine and secondarily at mid-shelf east of the Chesapeake region, for planktivores in the western Gulf of Maine and the southwestern and eastern portions of Georges Bank, and for teuthivores in the western Gulf of Maine and the southwestern and eastern portions of Georges Bank, and for teuthivores along the edge of the shelf. In general, habitat use by cetaceans is highest in spring and summer, and lowest in fall and winter.

Kenney, R.D.; Winn, H.E.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 19) Spot prices generally moved higher for the week (Wednesday, December 4 to Wednesday, December 11) with exceptions at several Northeast locations, while futures prices experienced robust gains, particularly for contracts for delivery through the end of the heating season. Unusually cold temperatures accompanied the heating season's first significant and widespread snow storm late last week, and temperatures plunged again ahead of the ice storm of Tuesday and Wednesday. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price gained 41 cents for the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 11) at $4.64 per MMBtu. Since last Wednesday, the NYMEX futures contract for delivery in January 2003 gained $0.411 per MMBtu, settling yesterday at $4.709. Natural gas in storage as of Friday,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 9) , 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 9) A cold front moved through the Midwest and parts of the Northeast this week, but it failed to bring sustained higher prices. Seasonally mild temperatures in most other areas of the country and little in the way of tropical storm activity resulted in prices easing 20 cents per MMBtu or less since Wednesday, September 24. On the week (Wednesday, September 24-Wednesday, October 1), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 12 cents per MMBtu to $4.47. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery expired on Friday, September 26, at $4.430, while the contract for November lost about 8 cents on the week to close at $4.677 yesterday (October 1). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 26, increased to 2,788 Bcf, which is 1.9

402

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 16, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 6, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 15, 2010) Extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country boosted demand for space heating this report week (December 8-15). Spot prices nonetheless decreased in most markets (with the exception of several in the Northeast), likely influenced by storage for winter usage remaining near historical highs and very strong current supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.24 to $4.22 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also decreased with expectations of ample supply levels for this

403

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, to Wednesday, April 2) 26, to Wednesday, April 2) Released: April 3, 2008 Next release: April 10, 2008 · Natural gas spot prices increased in all trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 26-April 2). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.34 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $9.59. Frigid temperatures continued for a portion of the week in the Northeast and for most of the week in the West, likely boosting space-heating demand. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered increases, albeit less than in spot markets. The futures contract for May delivery rose about 15 cents per MMBtu on the week to $9.832. · With the traditional heating season not quite over,

404

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 31, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 23, 2011) Colder weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices moved higher at all trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.33 to $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased significantly as the weather outlook suggested higher consumption for the remaining days of March. The futures contract for April delivery

405

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

408

Development of gas-bearing reservoirs in the Trenton Llimestone Formation of New York. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Authority completed a study of the natural gas-bearing potential of New York State's Trenton Limestone Formation. The report includes an analysis of existing gas-well information and geological maps covering 33 counties in western and central New York State. The Trenton Limestone Formation is a limestone sequence with zones of shale interbeds that, when jointed and fractured, form reservoirs for natural gas. These reservoirs appear to be large and capable of sustained production, providing the production rates are carefully monitored to maintain reservoir pressure. Test wells have shown evidence of natural gas in all areas where the formation is present. The areas with the greatest reservoir potential trend from northeast to southwest beginning near the Adirondack foothills in Oneida County. When reservoir volumes are matched with a high success rate of discovery and minimum drilling costs, the northeastern part of central New York State appears to be the most likely region for both local use and commercial exploration. The Trenton formation in this area of the State generally contains gas at above-normal hydrostatic pressure. This indicates that the gas reservoirs are extensive and reach considerable depths. Due to the geophysical conditions of the reservoirs, however, it is important to carefully manage production and maintain pre-production pressure for optimum gas recovery.

Robinson, J.E.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

ASSESSMENT OF HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE DETECTION METHODS ON THE FORT PECK RESERVATION, NORTHEAST MONTANA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, Head Gas and Thermal Desorption methods best match production; other methods also map depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, Head Gas along with Microbial, Iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, that could represent micro-seepage chimneys, results are inconclusive. Reconnaissance mapping using Magnetic Susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent Soil Gas and Head Gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential. In the final year of this project the principle contractor, the Fort Peck Tribes, completed a second survey in the Wicape 3D Seismic Prospect Area (also known as Area 6 in Phase I of the project) and sampled several Landsat image features contained in the Smoke Creek Aeromag Anomaly Area (also known as Area 1 in Phase II of the project). Methods determined to be most useful in Phases I and II, were employed in this final Phase III of the study. The Southwest Wicape seismic anomaly was only partially confirmed. The abundant curvilinears proposed to be possible hydrocarbon micro-seepage chimneys in the Smoke Creek Area were not conclusively verified as such. Insufficient sampling of background data precludes affirmative identification of these mostly topographic Landsat features as gas induced soil and vegetation anomalies. However relatively higher light gas concentrations were found associated with some of the curvilinears. Based on the findings of this work the Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation intend to utilize surface hydrocarbon exploration techniques for future identification and confirmation of oil and gas prospects.

Lawrence M. Monson

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

412

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

413

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

414

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

415

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

416

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

417

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

418

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

419

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

420

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

422

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

423

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

424

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

425

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

426

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

427

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

428

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 29) Natural gas spot prices increased 10 to 60 cents per MMBtu at nearly all major trading locations in the Lower 48 States as space-heating demand remained strong amid very cold temperatures in critical gas-consuming markets. However, elevated prices of $40 per MMBtu and more in the Northeast eased closer to historical norms over the course of the week following at least a temporary reprieve from the extreme cold in the region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $0.53 per MMBtu, or 9 percent, to $6.27. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub fell approximately 24 cents per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, January 21) at $6.150. Natural gas in storage was 2,258 Bcf as of Friday, January 16, which is 9.3

429

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the rest of the winter and the first part of spring, with prices averaging $5.19 per MMBtu through March and $4.58 in April (Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2004). Wellhead prices for the current heating season (November 2003 through March 2004) are expected to average $4.99 per MMBtu, or about 7 percent higher than last winter's level. Spot prices at the Henry Hub averaged $5.90 per MMBtu in January as cold temperatures (6 percent colder than normal nationally and 19 percent colder than normal in the Northeast) kept natural gas prices and heating demand high. Despite the severe weather, natural gas storage stocks were 3 percent above average as of January 30 and spot prices in early February have moved down somewhat. Overall in 2004, spot prices are expected to average about $4.90 per MMBtu and wellhead prices are expected to average $4.63 per MMBtu, declining moderately from the 2003 levels. In 2005, natural gas spot prices are projected to average about $5.00 per MMBtu, under the assumption that domestic and imported supply can continue to grow by about 1 percent per year.

430

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 2-9) as a late season cold front moved into major gas-consuming regions of the country, bringing a reminder that the end of winter is still two weeks away. Spot prices climbed 17 to 76 cents per MMBtu at trading locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday. Price changes in the Northeast were at the higher end of the range, while trading in the West resulted in gains at the lower end. The Henry Hub spot price increased 38 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.99. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery gained 16.3 cents per MMBtu, settling at $6.880 on Wednesday, March 9. Natural gas in storage as

431

Microsoft Word - Energy Market Alert Jan 24 2013 - Northeast _public version_.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thursday January 24, 2013 Thursday January 24, 2013 Current status of natural gas and electricity markets in New York and New England For questions or comments about this report, please contact Charles.Whitmore@eia.gov. Temperature: Both NYC and Boston expect low temperatures through the day on Friday. Tonight's lows expected to be 12°F in NYC and 7°F in Boston. Friday night is forecast to be slightly milder than previous nights this week. Natural gas demand: Bentek forecasts that demand will remain at high levels through Friday. In New England, Monday's load may be slightly higher than Friday's. Natural gas constraints & LNG: Most pipelines from the west and south

432

Microsoft Word - Energy Market Alert Jan 23 2013 - Northeast _public version_.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wednesday January 23, 2013 Wednesday January 23, 2013 Current status of natural gas and electricity markets in New York and New England For questions or comments about this report, please contact Christopher.Peterson@eia.gov. Temperature: Both NYC and Boston expect low temperatures through the day on Friday. Tonight's lows expected to be 11°F in NYC and 7°F in Boston. Natural gas demand: Bentek forecasts that demand will remain stable at high levels through Thursday. Natural gas constraints & LNG: All pipelines from the west and south into New England remain constrained today (all over 95% of capacity). Flows on the marginal pipeline into NYC (Texas Eastern - TETCo) are constrained at

433

Microsoft Word - Energy Market Alert Jan 22 2013 - Northeast _public version_.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tuesday January 22, 2013 Tuesday January 22, 2013 Current status of natural gas and electricity markets in New York and New England For questions or comments about this report, please contact Christopher.Peterson@eia.gov. Temperature: Both New York and Boston are expecting quite low temperatures through Thursday - lows may reach 6°F in Boston. Higher temperatures are forecast on Friday. Natural gas demand: Bentek forecasts that demand will be highest on Thursday. Today, New England forecast demand is about 3% higher than last Friday. In NYC, it is about 10% higher. Natural gas constraints & LNG: All pipelines from the west and south into New England are at constraint levels today (all over 95% of capacity).

434

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

436

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

438

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

439

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

440

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Gas-Turbine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This book focuses on the design of regenerators for high-performance regenerative gas turbines. The ways in which gas-turbine regenerators can be designed for high system performance can be understood by studying...

Douglas Stephen Beck; David Gordon Wilson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

446

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

447

Natural Gas in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a recent meeting of the Institution of Gas Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe ... Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe Gas Council, stated that an intensive, large-scale search for ...

1953-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

448

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

449

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

450

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage rack, a wall mounted cylinder rack, anchored to a fixed bench top, vented gas cabinet, or other

452

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

453

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

454

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Estimating household fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and LPG prices by census region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to estimate individual fuel prices within the residential sector. The data from four US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, residential energy consumption surveys were used to estimate the models. For a number of important fuel types - fuel oil, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas - the estimation presents a problem because these fuels are not used by all households. Estimates obtained by using only data in which observed fuel prices are present would be biased. A correction for this self-selection bias is needed for estimating prices of these fuels. A literature search identified no past studies on application of the selectivity model for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. This report describes selectivity models that utilize the Dubin/McFadden correction method for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas in the Northeast, Midwest, South, and West census regions. Statistically significant explanatory variables are identified and discussed in each of the models. This new application of the selectivity model should be of interest to energy policy makers, researchers, and academicians.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Natural Gas Reforming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

458

Fuel: Bargain Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council has done well to agree on low prices for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The ... for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The price finally agreed is both much less than the two companies wanted and much less than ...

1968-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

459

Gas Cylinders: Proper Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

460

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Static gas expansion cooler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

463

Geological controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate from core, downhole log, and seismic data in the Shenhu area, South China Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Multi-channel seismic reflection data, well logs, and recovered sediment cores have been used in this study to characterize the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in the Shenhu area of the South China Sea. The concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system has allowed for the systematic analysis of the impact of gas source, geologic controls on gas migration, and the role of the host sediment in the formation and stability of gas hydrates as encountered during the 2007 Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey Gas Hydrate Expedition (GMGS-1) in the Shenhu area. Analysis of seismic and bathymetric data identified seventeen sub-linear, near-parallel submarine canyons in this area. These canyons, formed in the Miocene, migrated in a northeasterly direction, and resulted in the burial and abandonment of canyons partially filled by coarse-grained sediments. Downhole wireline log (DWL) data were acquired from eight drill sites and sediment coring was conducted at five of these sites, which revealed the presence of suitable reservoirs for the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate accumulations. Gas hydrate-bearing sediment layers were identified from well log and core data at three sites mainly within silt and silt clay sediments. Gas hydrate was also discovered in a sand reservoir at one site as inferred from the analysis of the DWL data. Seismic anomalies attributed to the presence of gas below the base of gas hydrate stability zone, provided direct evidence for the migration of gas into the overlying gas hydrate-bearing sedimentary sections. Geochemical analyses of gas samples collected from cores confirmed that the occurrence of gas hydrate in the Shenhu area is controlled by the presence thermogenic methane gas that has migrated into the gas hydrate stability zone from a more deeply buried source.

Xiujuan Wang; Timothy S. Collett; Myung W. Lee; Shengxiong Yang; Yiqun Guo; Shiguo Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

465

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

466

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

467

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

468

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

469

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

470

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

471

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

472

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

473

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

474

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

475

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

476

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

477

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

478

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

479

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

480

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "northeast algonquin gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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481

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

482

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

483

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

484

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

485

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

486

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

487

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

488

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

489

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

490

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

491

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

492

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

493

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

495

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

496

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

497

Northeast regional biomass program. First quarter report, October--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report presents summaries of various projects which were in operation or being planned during this quarter period. Projects included testing the efficiency of using wood chips as fuel in heating systems, barriers to commercial development of wood pellet fuels, studies of more efficient and less polluting wood stoves, work on landfill gas utilization, directories of facilities using biomass fuels, surveys of biomass conversion processes to liquid fuels, for commercial development, etc.

NONE

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

499

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

500

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...