National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for normals simple arithmetic

  1. Measuring Arithmetic Intensity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home » For Users » Application Performance » Measuring Arithmetic Intensity Measuring Arithmetic Intensity Arithmetic intensity is a measure of floating-point operations (FLOPs) performed by a given code (or code section) relative to the amount of memory accesses (Bytes) that are required to support those operations. It is most often defined as a FLOP per Byte ratio (F/B). This application note provides a methodology for determining arithmetic intensity using Intel's Software Development

  2. High-precision arithmetic in mathematical physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2015-05-12

    For many scientific calculations, particularly those involving empirical data, IEEE 32-bit floating-point arithmetic produces results of sufficient accuracy, while for other applications IEEE 64-bit floating-point is more appropriate. But for some very demanding applications, even higher levels of precision are often required. Furthermore, this article discusses the challenge of high-precision computation, in the context of mathematical physics, and highlights what facilities are required to support future computation, in light of emerging developments in computer architecture.

  3. Arithmetic functions in torus and tree networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-12-25

    Methods and systems for performing arithmetic functions. In accordance with a first aspect of the invention, methods and apparatus are provided, working in conjunction of software algorithms and hardware implementation of class network routing, to achieve a very significant reduction in the time required for global arithmetic operation on the torus. Therefore, it leads to greater scalability of applications running on large parallel machines. The invention involves three steps in improving the efficiency and accuracy of global operations: (1) Ensuring, when necessary, that all the nodes do the global operation on the data in the same order and so obtain a unique answer, independent of roundoff error; (2) Using the topology of the torus to minimize the number of hops and the bidirectional capabilities of the network to reduce the number of time steps in the data transfer operation to an absolute minimum; and (3) Using class function routing to reduce latency in the data transfer. With the method of this invention, every single element is injected into the network only once and it will be stored and forwarded without any further software overhead. In accordance with a second aspect of the invention, methods and systems are provided to efficiently implement global arithmetic operations on a network that supports the global combining operations. The latency of doing such global operations are greatly reduced by using these methods.

  4. Quantifying the Impact of Single Bit Flips on Floating Point Arithmetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Quantifying the Impact of Single Bit Flips on Floating Point Arithmetic Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantifying the Impact of Single Bit Flips on Floating Point Arithmetic In high-end computing, the collective surface area, smaller fabrication sizes, and increasing density of components have led to an increase in the number of observed bit flips. If mechanisms are not in place to detect them, such flips produce silent errors, i.e. the code

  5. Normal Conducting CLIC Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Erk

    2006-01-03

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) multi-lateral study group based at CERN is studying the technology for an electron-positron linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy up to 5 TeV. In contrast to the International Linear Collider (ILC) study which has chosen to use super-conducting cavities with accelerating gradients in the range of 30-40 MV/m to obtain centre-of-mass collision energies of 0.5-1 TeV, the CLIC study aims to use a normal-conducting system based on two-beam technology with gradients of 150 MV/m. It is generally accepted that this change in technology is not only necessary but the only viable choice for a cost-effective multi-TeV collider. The CLIC study group is studying the technology issues of such a machine, and is in particular developing state-of-the-art 30 GHz molybdenum-iris accelerating structures and power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The accelerating structure has a new geometry which includes fully-profiled RF surfaces optimised to minimize surface fields, and hybrid damping using both iris slots and radial waveguides. A newly-developed structure-optimisation procedure has been used to simultaneously balance surface fields, power flow, short and long-range transverse wakefields, RF-to-beam efficiency and the ratio of luminosity to input power. The slotted irises allow a simple structure fabrication by high-precision high-speed 3D milling of just four pieces, and an even easier bolted assembly in a vacuum chamber.

  6. Simple Lookup Service

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-05-01

    Simple Lookup Service (sLS) is a REST/JSON based lookup service that allows users to publish information in the form of key-value pairs and search for the published information. The lookup service supports both pull and push model. This software can be used to create a distributed architecture/cloud.

  7. Simple Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Energy AgencyCompany Organization: Simple Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Softwaremodeling tools User...

  8. Year Global Normal Irradiance Direct Normal Irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Year Global Normal Irradiance Direct Normal Irradiance (TMY3 = 6.7) Global Horizontal Irradiance** (TMY3 = 5.43) Latitude Tilt Irradiance** Diffuse Horizontal Irradiance (TMY3 = 1.46) Peak GNI (1-hr avg) Peak DNI (1-hr avg) Peak GHI (1-hr avg) Peak Lat.Tilt (1-hr avg) TMY2 8.8 6.7 5.6 6.4 1.6 - - - - 2015 8.26 6.58 5.29 6.07 1.34 1167 1067 1090 1208 2014 8.85 7.10 5.54 6.40 1.28 1176 1083 1098 1196 2013 8.82 7.23 5.59 6.63 1.24 1192 1076 1093 1182 2012 9.17 7.41 5.69 6.65 1.21 1177 1080 1091

  9. A Comparative Study of the Harmonic and Arithmetic Averaging of Diffusion Coefficients for Non-linear Heat Conduction Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samet Y. Kadioglu; Robert R. Nourgaliev; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2008-03-01

    We perform a comparative study for the harmonic versus arithmetic averaging of the heat conduction coefficient when solving non-linear heat transfer problems. In literature, the harmonic average is the method of choice, because it is widely believed that the harmonic average is more accurate model. However, our analysis reveals that this is not necessarily true. For instance, we show a case in which the harmonic average is less accurate when a coarser mesh is used. More importantly, we demonstrated that if the boundary layers are finely resolved, then the harmonic and arithmetic averaging techniques are identical in the truncation error sense. Our analysis further reveals that the accuracy of these two techniques depends on how the physical problem is modeled.

  10. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldeira, K.; Hoffert, M.I.; Siegenthaler, U.

    1994-02-01

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  11. α -cluster asymptotic normalization coefficients for nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    -cluster asymptotic normalization coefficients for nuclear astrophysics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: -cluster asymptotic normalization coefficients for nuclear ...

  12. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  13. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  14. Simple cost model for EV traction motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca, R.M.

    1995-02-01

    A simple cost model has been developed that allows the calculation of the OEM cost of electric traction motors of three different types, normalized as a function of power in order to accommodate different power and size. The model includes enough information on the various elements integrated in the motors to allow analysis of individual components and to factor-in the effects of changes in commodities prices. A scalable cost model for each of the main components of an electric vehicle (EV) is a useful tool that can have direct application in computer simulation or in parametric studies. For the cost model to have wide usefulness, it needs to be valid for a range of values of some parameter that determines the magnitude or size of the component. For instance, in the case of batteries, size may be determined by energy capacity, usually expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh), while in the case of traction motors, size is better determined by rated power, usually expressed in kilowatts (kW). The simplest case is when the cost of the component in question is a direct function of its size; then cost is simply the product of its specific cost ($/unit size) and the number of units (size) in the vehicle in question. Batteries usually fall in this category (cost = energy capacity x $/kWh). But cost is not always linear with size or magnitude; motors (and controllers), for instance, become relatively less expensive as power rating increases. Traction motors, one of the main components for EV powertrains are examined in this paper, and a simplified cost model is developed for the three most popular design variations.

  15. Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-02-17

    This program is used to compute the predicted normalized elution time (NET) for a list of peptide sequences. It includes the Kangas/Petritis neural network trained model, the Krokhin hydrophobicity model, and the Mant hydrophobicity model. In addition, it can compute the predicted strong cation exchange (SCX) fraction (on a 0 to 1 scale) in which a given peptide will appear.

  16. Note: A simple model for thermal management in solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, E. M. Ellis, J.

    2013-11-15

    We describe a model of the dynamical temperature evolution in a solenoid winding. A simple finite element analysis is calibrated by accurately measuring the thermally induced resistance change of the solenoid, thus obviating the need for accurate knowledge of the mean thermal conductivity of the windings. The model predicts quasi thermal runaway for relatively modest current increases from the normal operating conditions. We demonstrate the application of this model to determine the maximum current that can be safely applied to solenoids used for helium spin-echo measurements.

  17. Simple Energies LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Simple Energies LLC Place: California Sector: Renewable Energy Product: California-based hybrid renewable energy project developer for...

  18. Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Authors: Madsen, Anders ; Leheny, Robert L. ; Guo, Hongyu ; ...

  19. Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2013-11-15

    A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

  20. Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method PDF icon ...

  1. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband direct normal irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4mum, that comes ...

  2. APPLYING SIMPLE TECHNOLOGY ACCOMPLISHES VISUAL INSPECTION CHALLENGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, C

    2007-07-21

    This paper discusses the successful implementation of simple video technologies at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to perform complex visual inspection, monitoring, and surveillance tasks. Because SRS facilities are similar to those of an industrial plant, the environmental and accessibility considerations for remote viewing are the primary determining factors in the selection of technology. The constraints and challenges associated with remote viewing are discussed, and examples of applications are given.

  3. Design of Spintronic Materials with Simple Structures (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design of Spintronic Materials with Simple Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design of Spintronic Materials with Simple Structures A brief comparison of ...

  4. Simple Example of Backtest Overfitting (SEBO)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-01-06

    In the field of mathematical finance, a "backtest" is the usage of historical market data to assess the performance of a proposed trading strategy. It is a relatively simple matter for a present-day computer system to explore thousands, millions or even billions of variations of a proposed strategy, and pick the best performing variant as the "optimal" strategy "in sample" (i.e., on the input dataset). Unfortunately, such an "optimal" strategy often performs very poorly "outmore » of sample" (i.e. on another dataset), because the parameters of the invest strategy have been oversit to the in-sample data, a situation known as "backtest overfitting". While the mathematics of backtest overfitting has been examined in several recent theoretical studies, here we pursue a more tangible analysis of this problem, in the form of an online simulator tool. Given a input random walk time series, the tool develops an "optimal" variant of a simple strategy by exhaustively exploring all integer parameter values among a handful of parameters. That "optimal" strategy is overfit, since by definition a random walk is unpredictable. Then the tool tests the resulting "optimal" strategy on a second random walk time series. In most runs using our online tool, the "optimal" strategy derived from the first time series performs poorly on the second time series, demonstrating how hard it is not to overfit a backtest. We offer this online tool, "Simple Example of Backtest Overfitting (SEBO)", to facilitate further research in this area.« less

  5. Vortices in normal part of proximity system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, V. G.

    2015-05-26

    It is shown that the order parameter ? induced in the normal part of superconductor-normal-superconductor proximity system is modulated in the magnetic field differently from vortices in bulk superconductors. Whereas ? turns zero at vortex centers, the magnetic structure of these vortices differs from that of Abrikosov's.

  6. Vortices in normal part of proximity system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kogan, V. G.

    2015-05-26

    It is shown that the order parameter Δ induced in the normal part of superconductor-normal-superconductor proximity system is modulated in the magnetic field differently from vortices in bulk superconductors. Whereas Δ turns zero at vortex centers, the magnetic structure of these vortices differs from that of Abrikosov's.

  7. Local energy landscape in a simple liquid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iwashita, T.; Egami, Takeshi

    2014-11-26

    It is difficult to relate the properties of liquids and glasses directly to their structure because of complexity in the structure that defies precise definition. The potential energy landscape (PEL) approach is a very insightful way to conceptualize the structure-property relationship in liquids and glasses, particularly the effect of temperature and history. However, because of the highly multidimensional nature of the PEL it is hard to determine, or even visualize, the actual details of the energy landscape. In this article we introduce a modified concept of the local energy landscape (LEL), which is limited in phase space, and demonstrate itsmore » usefulness using molecular dynamics simulation on a simple liquid at high temperatures. The local energy landscape is given as a function of the local coordination number, the number of the nearest-neighbor atoms. The excitation in the LEL corresponds to the so-called β-relaxation process. The LEL offers a simple but useful starting point to discuss complex phenomena in liquids and glasses.« less

  8. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in broad bands of wavelengths ...

  9. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    direct normal irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave...

  10. Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-09-09

    SLURM is an open source, fault-tolerant, and highly scalable cluster management and job scheduling system for large and small computer clusters. As a cluster resource manager, SLURM has three key functions. First, it allocates exclusive and/or non exclusive access to resources (compute nodes) to users for some duration of time so they can perform work. Second, it provides a framework for starting, executing, and monitoring work (normally a parallel job) on the set of allciatedmore » nodes. Finally, it arbitrates conflicting requests for resouces by managing a queue of pending work.« less

  11. Simple, Ethanol-Driven Synthesis of Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Simple, Ethanol-Driven Synthesis of Core-Shell ... This "green" synthesis method uses ethanol - a simple solvent for metal precursors "as the ...

  12. Computing Instantaneous Frequency by normalizing Hilbert Transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Norden E.

    2005-05-31

    This invention presents Normalized Amplitude Hilbert Transform (NAHT) and Normalized Hilbert Transform(NHT), both of which are new methods for computing Instantaneous Frequency. This method is designed specifically to circumvent the limitation set by the Bedorsian and Nuttal Theorems, and to provide a sharp local measure of error when the quadrature and the Hilbert Transform do not agree. Motivation for this method is that straightforward application of the Hilbert Transform followed by taking the derivative of the phase-angle as the Instantaneous Frequency (IF) leads to a common mistake made up to this date. In order to make the Hilbert Transform method work, the data has to obey certain restrictions.

  13. Keeping It Simple from the Customer's Perspective - Residential Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design | Department of Energy It Simple from the Customer's Perspective - Residential Program Design Keeping It Simple from the Customer's Perspective - Residential Program Design Provides information on residential program design, target audiences, marketing strategies, and community partnerships, from the Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance. PDF icon Keeping It Simple from the Customer's Perspective More Documents & Publications Streamline Service Delivery via Customer Communication and

  14. Normal butane/iso-butane separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volles, W.K.; Cusher, N.A.

    1986-08-26

    This patent describes an improved pressure swing adsorption process for the separation of iso-butane from normal butane in an adsorption system having at least three adsorbent beds, each bed of which undergoes, on a cyclic basis and a processing sequence comprising: introducing a feed gas mixture of iso-butane and normal butane at an upper adsorption pressure to the feed end of the bed capable of selectively adsorbing normal butane as the more selectivity adsorbable component of the gas mixture. The iso-butane as the less readily adsorbable component passes through the bed and is discharged from the discharge end. The feed gas introduction is continued as a normal butane adsorption front is formed in the bed and passes through the bed from the feed end and breaks through at the discharge end of the bed, a portion of the iso-butane effluent stream thus discharged being diverted for passage as purge gas to another bed in the system; and countercurrently depressurizing the bed with release of gas from the feed end.

  15. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  16. Plasmoid Formation in Current Sheet with Finite Normal Magnetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plasmoid Formation in Current Sheet with Finite Normal Magnetic Component Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plasmoid Formation in Current Sheet with Finite Normal Magnetic ...

  17. Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

  18. Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC Document explains how to use estimated ...

  19. Hot Electron Photovoltaics Using Low Cost Materials and Simple...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hot Electron Photovoltaics Using Low Cost Materials and Simple Cell Design Lawrence ... Similarly, complex cell designs or designs that feature nano-architectures such as quantum ...

  20. Keeping It Simple from the Customer's Perspective - Residential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Keeping It Simple from the Customer's Perspective - Residential Program Design Provides information on residential program design, target audiences, marketing strategies, and ...

  1. Solar Install Mount Production Labor Equipment Simple Balance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The SIMPLE BoS project utilizes systems engineering for designing, testing, and manufacturing the project designs. The transition from stakeholder requirements and conceptual ideas ...

  2. How a Geothermal Power Plant Works (Simple) - Text Version |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geothermal Power Plant Works. This animation is meant to convey in simple terms what happens in the operation of a geothermal power plant. Aspects such as exploration, resource...

  3. A Simple, Fast Method of Estimating Fractured Reservoir Geometry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fractured Reservoir Geometry from Tracer Tests Abstract A simple method of estimating flow geometry and pore geometry from conservative tracer tests in single phase geothermal...

  4. Simple Interactive Models for better air quality (SIM-air) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interactive Models for better air quality (SIM-air) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Interactive Models (SIM-air) AgencyCompany Organization:...

  5. Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made by electron beam melting and direct laser metal sintering Citation Details In-Document Search ...

  6. Overview Report: Normal and Emergency Operation Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2011-05-01

    This is an overview report to document and illustrate methods used in a project entitled “Normal and Emergency Operations Visualization” for a utility company, conducted in 2009-2010 timeframe with funding from the utility company and the U.S. Department of Energy. The original final report (about 180 pages) for the project is not available for distribution because it alludes to findings that assessed the design of an operational system that contained proprietary information; this abridged version contains descriptions of methods and some findings to illustrate the approach used, while avoiding discussion of sensitive or proprietary information. The client has approved this abridged version of the report for unlimited distribution to give researchers and collaborators the benefit of reviewing the research concepts and methods that were applied in this study.

  7. Using a Simple Binomial Model to Assess Improvement in Predictive...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    simulation codes and uses a simple binomial model for the probability, theta, that, in an experiment chosen at random, the new code will provide a better prediction than the old. ...

  8. Smart, simple energy-saving tips to beat the heat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Tribal Affairs Newsroom Search News Articles... Search Smart, simple energy-saving tips to beat the heat 7292015 2:02 PM Tweet Page Content BPA and its electric...

  9. Simple Model Representations of Transport in a Complex Fracture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It is common, however, to represent the complex fracture by much simpler models consisting ... Simple-model properties are often inferred from the analysis of short-term (one to a few ...

  10. Simple Model Representations of Transport in a Complex Fracture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects on Long-Term Predictions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simple Model Representations of Transport in a Complex Fracture and Their Effects on Long-Term ...

  11. Simple Modular LED Cost Model | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tools » Simple Modular LED Cost Model Simple Modular LED Cost Model The LED Cost Model, developed by the DOE Cost Modeling Working Group, provides a simplified method for analyzing the manufacturing costs of an LED package. The model focuses on the major cost elements and includes preliminary raw data and manufacturing process flow, which provide a starting point and can be customized by the user to model different processes, materials, and equipment. The tool enables those involved in the

  12. Simple Analysis of Flame Dynamics via Flexible Convected Disturbance Models

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Simple Analysis of Flame Dynamics via Flexible Convected Disturbance Models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simple Analysis of Flame Dynamics via Flexible Convected Disturbance Models Authors: Ranalli, Joseph A. ; Ferguson, Donald ; Martin, Christopher Publication Date: 2012-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1160232 Report Number(s): A-NETL-PUB-020 Journal ID: ISSN 0748-4658 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name:

  13. Simple benign aqueous-based amination of polycarbonate surfaces. (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Simple benign aqueous-based amination of polycarbonate surfaces. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simple benign aqueous-based amination of polycarbonate surfaces. Abstract not provided. Authors: Bachand, George David ; Vandelinder, Virginia Starke ; Wheeler, David Roger ; Small, Leo J ; Henderson, Ian M. ; Spoerke, Erik David Publication Date: 2014-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1183152 Report Number(s): SAND2014-17759J 537562 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000

  14. How a Geothermal Power Plant Works (Simple) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Geothermal Power Plant Works (Simple) How a Geothermal Power Plant Works (Simple) Most power plants-whether fueled by coal, gas, nuclear power, or geothermal energy-have one feature in common: they convert heat to electricity. Heat from the Earth, or geothermal - Geo (Earth) + thermal (heat) - energy is accessed by drilling water or steam wells in a process similar to drilling for oil. Geothermal power plants have much in common with traditional power-generating stations. They use many of the

  15. ORISE: Collaboration with the CDC yields Radiation Basics Made Simple

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    online training module Collaboration with CDC Yields Radiation Basics Made Simple Training Module Online training designed to help public health and emergency medical professionals learn fundamentals of radiation How ORISE is Making a Difference Radiation Basics Made Simple, the first in a series of online training modules developed by the Radiation Studies Branch (RSB) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), delivers foundational knowledge about radiation to its audiences.

  16. Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Authors: Madsen, Anders ; Leheny, Robert L. ; Guo, Hongyu ; Sprung, Michael ; Czakkel, Orsolya [1] ;

  17. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing Wave Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing ...

  18. Simple and accurate correlation of experimental redox potentials and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DFT-calculated HOMO/LUMO energies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Simple and accurate correlation of experimental redox potentials and DFT-calculated HOMO/LUMO energies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Authors: Méndez-Hernández, D.D,, Tarakeshwar, P., Gust, D,. Moore,T.A., Moore, A.L., Mujica, V. Title: Simple and accurate correlation of experimental redox potentials and DFT-calculated HOMO/LUMO energies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Source: Journal of Molecular modeling Year:

  19. Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs : numerical supplement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2012-04-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide, GaAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz and O.A. von Lilienfeld, 'Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs', Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci Eng., Vol. 17, 084007 (2009), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models. The numerical results for density functional theory calculations of properties of simple intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide are presented.

  20. A simple correlation to predict the hydrate quadruple point temperature for LPG mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousif, M.H.

    1997-12-31

    A simple correlation to predict the hydrate upper quadruple point temperature, T{sub Q2B} for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) mixtures was developed. It was developed for use as a part of a modeling and control system for a LPG pipeline in Russia. For performance reasons, a simple hydrate prediction correlation was required that could be incorporated into the real-time and predictive pipeline simulation models. The operating company required both real time and predictive simulation tools be developed to assist in preventing hydrate blockages while minimizing the use of methanol. In this particular pipeline, LPG fluid moves through the pipeline as a single phase liquid above its bubble point pressure. Because of the very low flow rates, the trace amount of water present in the LPG drops out and creates water pools at low points in the pipeline. The pipeline pressure and seasonal temperatures are conducive for hydrate formation in these pools. Methanol and monoethylene glycol (MEG) are injected in the pipeline to help prevent hydrate formation. The newly developed correlation predicts the hydrate quadruple point temperature using only the composition and the molecular weight of the LPG mixture while retaining an accuracy comparable to the statistical thermodynamic models throughout the range of normal operating conditions.

  1. Simple procedure for schematic design of passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, W.O.; Kosiewicz, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple procedure for use during the schematic phase of passive solar building design is presented in this article. The procedure is quantitative and accurate enough to insure that designs based on the provided starting point values of the primary building parameters will be cost effective.

  2. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013 Rocke,...

  3. Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology-...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  4. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and ...

  5. Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly. McConnell, Paul E.; Wauneka, Robert; Saltzstein, Sylvia J.; Sorenson, Ken B. Abstract not provided. Sandia...

  6. Fluctuations and intermittent poloidal transport in a simple toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goud, T. S.; Ganesh, R.; Saxena, Y. C.; Raju, D. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhi nagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhi nagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2013-07-15

    In a simple magnetized toroidal plasma, fluctuation induced poloidal flux is found to be significant in magnitude. The probability distribution function of the fluctuation induced poloidal flux is observed to be strongly non-Gaussian in nature; however, in some cases, the distribution shows good agreement with the analytical form [Carreras et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2664 (1996)], assuming a coupling between the near Gaussian density and poloidal velocity fluctuations. The observed non-Gaussian nature of the fluctuation induced poloidal flux and other plasma parameters such as density and fluctuating poloidal velocity in this device is due to intermittent and bursty nature of poloidal transport. In the simple magnetized torus used here, such an intermittent fluctuation induced poloidal flux is found to play a crucial role in generating the poloidal flow.

  7. Simple filtered repetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chekh, Yu.; Zhirkov, I. S.; Delplancke-Ogletree, M. P.

    2010-02-15

    A very simple design of cathodic filtered vacuum arc plasma source is proposed. The source without filter has only four components and none of them require precise machining. The source operates in a repetitively pulsed regime, and for laboratory experiments it can be used without water cooling. Despite the simple construction, the source provides high ion current at the filter outlet reaching 2.5% of 400 A arc current, revealing stable operation in a wide pressure range from high vacuum to oxygen pressure up to more than 10{sup -2} mbar. There is no need in complicated power supply system for this plasma source, only one power supply can be used to ignite the arc, to provide the current for the arc itself, to generate the magnetic field in the filter, and provide its positive electric biasing without any additional high power resistance.

  8. Response of Simple, Model Systems to Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Lang, Maik

    2015-07-30

    The focus of the research was on the application of high-pressure/high-temperature techniques, together with intense energetic ion beams, to the study of the behavior of simple oxide systems (e.g., SiO2, GeO2, CeO2, TiO2, HfO2, SnO2, ZnO and ZrO2) under extreme conditions. These simple stoichiometries provide unique model systems for the analysis of structural responses to pressure up to and above 1 Mbar, temperatures of up to several thousands of kelvin, and the extreme energy density generated by energetic heavy ions (tens of keV/atom). The investigations included systematic studies of radiation- and pressure-induced amorphization of high P-T polymorphs. By studying the response of simple stoichiometries that have multiple structural “outcomes”, we have established the basic knowledge required for the prediction of the response of more complex structures to extreme conditions. We especially focused on the amorphous state and characterized the different non-crystalline structure-types that result from the interplay of radiation and pressure. For such experiments, we made use of recent technological developments, such as the perforated diamond-anvil cell and in situ investigation using synchrotron x-ray sources. We have been particularly interested in using extreme pressures to alter the electronic structure of a solid prior to irradiation. We expected that the effects of modified band structure would be evident in the track structure and morphology, information which is much needed to describe theoretically the fundamental physics of track-formation. Finally, we investigated the behavior of different simple-oxide, composite nanomaterials (e.g., uncoated nanoparticles vs. core/shell systems) under coupled, extreme conditions. This provided insight into surface and boundary effects on phase stability under extreme conditions.

  9. Simple flash evaporator for making thin films of compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemanadhan, M.; Bapanayya, Ch.; Agarwal, S. C. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2010-07-15

    A simple and compact arrangement for flash evaporation is described. It uses a cell phone vibrator for powder dispensing that can be incorporated into a vacuum deposition chamber without any major alterations. The performance of the flash evaporation system is checked by making thin films of the optical memory chalcogenide glass Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST). Energy dispersive x-ray analysis shows that the flash evaporation preserves the stoichiometry in thin films.

  10. Simple characterization of electronic processes in perovskite photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyano, Kenjiro Yanagida, Masatoshi; Tripathi, Neeti; Shirai, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-02

    Electronic properties of perovskite lead-halide photovoltaic cells have been studied. The dc current/voltage characteristics were found to be well fitted by a standard diode equation under optical excitation and in the dark, while the impedance spectroscopy revealed a pronounced slow process under light illumination, which is absent in the dark. A simple model is proposed, which can explain all aspects of the observed behavior quantitatively and consistently.

  11. Simple, benign, aqueous-based amination of polycarbonate surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    VanDelinder, Virginia; Wheeler, David R.; Small, Leo J.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spoerke, Erik D.; Henderson, Ian; Bachand, George D.

    2015-03-18

    Here we report a simple, safe, environmentally-friendly aqueous method that uses diamines to functionalize a polycarbonate surface with amino groups. We demonstrate the ability of this facile method to serve as a foundation upon which other functionalities may be attached, including anti-fouling coatings and oriented membrane proteins. The use of water as the solvent for the functionalization ensures that solvent induced swelling does not affect the optical or mechanical properties of the polycarbonate.

  12. Autogenic pressure reactors provide simple, rapid means of producing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    battery materials - Energy Innovation Portal Energy Storage Energy Storage Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Autogenic pressure reactors provide simple, rapid means of producing battery materials Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology Spherical carbon particles prepared in an autogenic reaction Spherical carbon particles prepared in an autogenic reaction Technology Marketing Summary Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries have become

  13. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  14. Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer Presents lessons learned from Tennessee Valley Authority's home ...

  15. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  16. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  17. Simple Coupling of Reactor Physics Effects and Uncertain Nuances

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-27

    The "Simple Coupling of Reactor Physics Effects and Uncertain Nuances" (SCORPEUN) code is a simple r-z 1-group neutron diffusion code where each r-mesh is coupled to a single-flow-channel model that represents all flow-channels in that r-mesh. This 1-D model assesses q=m*Cp*deletaT for each z-mesh in that channel. This flow channel model is then coupled to a simple 1-D heat conduction model for ascertaining the peak center-line fuel temperature in a hypothetical pin assigned to thatmore » flow channel. The code has property lookup capability for water, Na, Zirc, HT9, metalic fuel, oxide fuel, etc. It has linear interpolation features for micro-scopic cross-sections with respect to coolant density and fuel temperature. ***This last feature has not been fully tested and may need development***. The interpolated microscopic cross-sections are then combined (using the water density from the T/H calculation) to generate macroscopic diffusion coefficient, removal cross-section and nu-sigmaF for each r-z mesh of the neutron diffusion code.« less

  18. Interpretation of simulated global warming using a simple model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watterson, I.G.

    2000-01-01

    A simple energy balance model with two parameters, an effective heat capacity and an effective climate sensitivity, is used to interpret six GCM simulations of greenhouse gas-induced global warming. By allowing the parameters to vary in time, the model can be accurately calibrated for each run. It is found that the sensitivity can be approximated as a constant in each case. However, the effective heat capacity clearly varies, and it is important that the energy equation is formulated appropriately, and thus unlike many such models. For simulations with linear forcing and from a cold start, the capacity is in each case close to that of a homogeneous ocean with depth initially 200 m, but increasing some 4.3 m each year, irrespective of the sensitivity and forcing growth rate. Analytic solutions for t his linear capacity function are derived, and these reproduce the GCM runs well, even for cases where the forcing is stabilized after a century or so. The formation of a subsurface maximum in the mean ocean temperature anomaly is a significant feature of such cases. A simple model for a GCM run with a realistic forcing scenario starting from 1,880 is constructed using component results for forcing segments. Given this, an estimate of the cold start error of a simulation of the warming due to forcing after the present would be given by the negative of the temperature drift of the anomaly due to the past forcing. The simple model can evidently be used to give an indication of likely warming curves, at lest for this range of scenarios and GCM sensitivities.

  19. Simple reactor model simulation of a LOFT ATWS event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1983-04-01

    A simple real-time model of the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) reactor is derived and used to predict reactor performance during an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS). The developed model consists of only six nonlinear differential equations. Model states are precursor concentrations of two delayed neutron groups, average fuel and cladding temperatures, average core coolant temperature, and measured reactor outlet temperature. Ancillary dynamic descriptions of a hot fuel rod allow computation of peak rod temperatures. Comparing model calculations to actual LOFT ATWS measurements demonstrates the model's phenomenological accuracy.

  20. A simple line wave generator using commercial explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, John S; Jackson, Scott I; Hill, Larry G

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple and inexpensive explosive line wave generator has been designed using commercial sheet explosive and plane wave lens concepts. The line wave generator is constructed using PETN and RDX based sheet explosive for the slow and fast components respectively. The design permits the creation of any desired line width. A series of experiments were performed on a 100 mm design, measuring the detonation arrival time at the output of the generator using a streak camera. An iterative technique was used to adjust the line wave generator's slow and fast components, so as to minimize the arrival time deviation. Designs, test results, and concepts for improvements will be discussed.

  1. Simple methods solve vacuum column problems using plant data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golden, S.W.; Sloley, A.W. )

    1992-09-14

    This paper reports that simple methods can be used to evaluate common vacuum column problems using actual field measurements. All that is required is an enthalpy table, a calculator, and an absolute pressure manometer, which can be purchased for about $100. The key to troubleshooting refinery crude or lube vacuum columns is basic plant data. Although many techniques may be used to increase cutpoint, many times the largest yield improvements can be achieved on existing units simply by eliminating such problems, as leaking collector trays or overflowing liquid distributors.

  2. Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal ferroelectric

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal ferroelectric polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on April 5, 2017 Title: Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal ferroelectric polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings Authors: Qian,

  3. Off-Normal Patterned Etching Through Suspended Membranes. (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Off-Normal Patterned Etching Through Suspended Membranes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Off-Normal Patterned Etching Through Suspended Membranes. Abstract not provided. Authors: Burckel, David Bruce ; Jarecki, Robert L., ; Resnick, Paul James ; Henry, Michael David ; Finnegan, Patrick Sean Publication Date: 2014-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1140777 Report Number(s): SAND2014-0767C 498657 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource

  4. Plasmoid Formation in Current Sheet with Finite Normal Magnetic Component

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Plasmoid Formation in Current Sheet with Finite Normal Magnetic Component Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plasmoid Formation in Current Sheet with Finite Normal Magnetic Component Authors: Zhu, P. ; Raeder, J. Publication Date: 2013-06-07 OSTI Identifier: 1102825 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 23; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007 Publisher:

  5. Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    between chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through a crystal-chemical lens. (Conference) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay between chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through a crystal-chemical lens. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay between chromium, vanadium, and

  6. Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    between chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through a crystal-chemical lens. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay between chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through a crystal-chemical lens. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay between chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through

  7. Normal Force and Drag Force in Magnetorheological Finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao, C.; Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2010-01-13

    The material removal in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is known to be controlled by shear stress, tau, which equals drag force, Fd, divided by spot area, As. However, it is unclear how the normal force, Fn, affects the material removal in MRF and how the measured ratio of drag force to normal force Fd/Fn, equivalent to coefficient of friction, is related to material removal. This work studies, for the first time for MRF, the normal force and the measured ratio Fd/Fn as a function of material mechanical properties. Experimental data were obtained by taking spots on a variety of materials including optical glasses and hard ceramics with a spot-taking machine (STM). Drag force and normal force were measured with a dual load cell. Drag force decreases linearly with increasing material hardness. In contrast, normal force increases with hardness for glasses, saturating at high hardness values for ceramics. Volumetric removal rate decreases with normal force across all materials. The measured ratio Fd/Fn shows a strong negative linear correlation with material hardness. Hard materials exhibit a low coefficient of friction. The volumetric removal rate increases with the measured ratio Fd/Fn which is also correlated with shear stress, indicating that the measured ratio Fd/Fn is a useful measure of material removal in MRF.

  8. Simple Colorimetric Determination of the Manganese Content in Photosynthetic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semin, B. K.; Seibert, M.

    2009-01-01

    The functional Mn content of intact photosystem II membrane fragments was measured as 4.06 {+-} 0.13 Mn/reaction center when determined using a simple, sensitive colorimetric assay that will also work with thylakoids and core complexes. This procedure requires minimal sample material, does not need expensive assay equipment, requires four simple steps, and only takes 20-30 min to perform. These include (a) removal of the adventitious Mn ions by CaCl{sub 2} treatment of the membranes, (b) extraction of the Mn from the O{sub 2}-evolving complex with hydrochloric acid, (c) purification of the extract by centrifugation followed by filtration of the supernatant through an Acrodisc syringe filter (0.2 {micro}m nylon membrane), and (d) colorimetric determination of Mn in the extract using the reaction of the chromogenic agent, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine, with previously oxidized Mn(II) cations carried out at high pH. The colorimetric assay itself has been used previously by Serrat (Mikrochim Acta 129:77-80, 1998) for assaying Mn concentrations in sea water and drinking water.

  9. A simple route to synthesize manganese germanate nanorods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z. Yang, Y.; Yuan, C.Z.; Duan Taike; Zhang Qianfeng

    2011-06-15

    Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple route using germanium dioxide and manganese acetate as the source materials. X-ray diffraction observation shows that the nanorods are composed of orthorhombic and monoclinic manganese germanate phases. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations display that the manganese germanate nanorods have flat tips with the length of longer than 10 micrometers and diameter of 60-350 nm, respectively. The role of the growth conditions on the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods shows that the proper selection and combination of the growth conditions are the key factor for controlling the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods. The photoluminescence spectrum of the manganese germanate nanorods exhibits four fluorescence emission peaks centered at 422 nm, 472 nm, 487 nm and 530 nm showing the application potential for the optical devices. - Research Highlights: {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. {yields} The formation of manganese germanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods exhibit good PL emission ability for optical device.

  10. A simple cohesive zone model that generates a mode-mixity dependent toughness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reedy, Jr., E. D.; Emery, J. M.

    2014-07-24

    A simple, mode-mixity dependent toughness cohesive zone model (MDGc CZM) is described. This phenomenological cohesive zone model has two elements. Mode I energy dissipation is defined by a traction–separation relationship that depends only on normal separation. Mode II (III) dissipation is generated by shear yielding and slip in the cohesive surface elements that lie in front of the region where mode I separation (softening) occurs. The nature of predictions made by analyses that use the MDGc CZM is illustrated by considering the classic problem of an elastic layer loaded by rigid grips. This geometry, which models a thin adhesive bondmore » with a long interfacial edge crack, is similar to that which has been used to measure the dependence of interfacial toughness on crack-tip mode-mixity. The calculated effective toughness vs. applied mode-mixity relationships all display a strong dependence on applied mode-mixity with the effective toughness increasing rapidly with the magnitude of the mode-mixity. The calculated relationships also show a pronounced asymmetry with respect to the applied mode-mixity. As a result, this dependence is similar to that observed experimentally, and calculated results for a glass/epoxy interface are in good agreement with published data that was generated using a test specimen of the same type as analyzed here.« less

  11. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, C.; Potts, I.; Reeks, M. W.

    2015-05-15

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. In this way, we are able to account directly for the influence of ejection and sweeping events as others have done but without resorting to the use of adjustable parameters. Deposition rate predictions for a wide range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition, deposition rates are compared with those obtained from continuous random walk models and Langevin equation based ejection and sweep models which noticeably give significantly lower deposition rates. Various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented. Finally, we consider the model limitations in using the model to calculate deposition in more complex flows where the near wall turbulence may be significantly different.

  12. A simple method for rapidly processing HEU from weapons returns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    A method based on the use of a high temperature fluidized bed for rapidly oxidizing, homogenizing and down-blending Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from dismantled nuclear weapons is presented. This technology directly addresses many of the most important issues that inhibit progress in international commerce in HEU; viz., transaction verification, materials accountability, transportation and environmental safety. The equipment used to carry out the oxidation and blending is simple, inexpensive and highly portable. Mobile facilities to be used for point-of-sale blending and analysis of the product material are presented along with a phased implementation plan that addresses the conversion of HEU derived from domestic weapons and related waste streams as well as material from possible foreign sources such as South Africa or the former Soviet Union.

  13. Simple stressed-skin composites using paper reinforcement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the composite reinforcement concept in a hands-on manner, using readily available materials; to demonstrate the consequences of certain defects in these structures; and to quantify the gains made by engineering composite construction, using a simple measurement of Young's modulus of electricity. The materials used were foam rubber beams, beams reinforced on one side by bonding with heavy paper, a beam reinforced on both sides by bonding with heavy paper, and a beam with a defect caused by using a piece of waxed paper midway to prevent bonding of the paper. The experiment is designed to teach students at the high school level or above the concept of Young's modulus, a measure of a material's stiffness. 2 figs. (BM)

  14. Simple, rapid method for the preparation of isotopically labeled formaldehyde

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hooker, Jacob Matthew; Schonberger, Matthias; Schieferstein, Hanno; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-10-04

    Isotopically labeled formaldehyde (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O) is prepared from labeled methyl iodide (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.3I) by reaction with an oxygen nucleophile having a pendant leaving group. The mild and efficient reaction conditions result in good yields of *C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O with little or no *C isotopic dilution. The simple, efficient production of .sup.11CH.sub.2O is described. The use of the .sup.11CH.sub.2O for the formation of positron emission tomography tracer compounds is described. The reaction can be incorporated into automated equipment available to radiochemistry laboratories. The isotopically labeled formaldehyde can be used in a variety of reactions to provide radiotracer compounds for imaging studies as well as for scintillation counting and autoradiography.

  15. Simple and compact expressions for neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2015-05-07

    We reformulate perturbation theory for neutrino oscillations in matter with an expansion parameter related to the ratio of the solar to the atmospheric ?m2 scales. Unlike previous works, use a renormalized basis in which certain first-order effects are taken into account in the zeroth-order Hamiltonian. Using this perturbation theory we derive extremely compact expressions for the neutrino oscillations probabilities in matter. We find, for example, that the ?e disappearance probability at this order is of a simple two flavor form with an appropriately identified mixing angle and ?m2. Furthermore, despite exceptional simplicity in their forms they accommodate all order effects ?13 and the matter potential.

  16. Screening magnetic fields by superconductors: A simple model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caputo, J.-G.; Gozzelino, L.; Laviano, F.; Ghigo, G.; Gerbaldo, R.; Noudem, J.; Thimont, Y.; Bernstein, P.

    2013-12-21

    We introduce a simple approach to evaluate the magnetic field distribution around superconducting samples, based on the London equations; the elementary variable is the vector potential. This procedure has no adjustable parameters, only the sample geometry and the London length, λ, determine the solution. This approach was validated by comparing the induction field calculated to the one measured above MgB{sub 2} disks of different diameters, at 20 K and for applied fields lower than 0.4 T. The model can be applied if the flux line penetration inside the sample can be neglected when calculating the induction field distribution outside the superconductor. We conclude by showing on a cup-shape geometry how one can design a magnetic shield satisfying a specific constraint.

  17. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries.

  18. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1998-11-03

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries. 19 figs.

  19. Optical based tactile shear and normal load sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salisbury, Curt Michael

    2015-06-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to a tactile sensor that senses normal load and/or shear load. The tactile sensor includes a first layer and an optically transparent layer bonded together. At least a portion of the first layer is made of optically reflective material. The optically transparent layer is made of resilient material (e.g., clear silicone rubber). The tactile sensor includes light emitter/light detector pair(s), which respectively detect either normal load or shear load. Light emitter(s) emit light that traverses through the optically transparent layer and reflects off optically reflective material of the first layer, and light detector(s) detect and measure intensity of reflected light. When a normal load is applied, the optically transparent layer compresses, causing a change in reflected light intensity. When shear load is applied, a boundary between optically reflective material and optically absorptive material is laterally displaced, causing a change in reflected light intensity.

  20. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1996-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  1. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1996-01-09

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form. The method comprises: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  2. Nonlinear normal modes modal interactions and isolated resonance curves

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuether, Robert J.; Renson, L.; Detroux, T.; Grappasonni, C.; Kerschen, G.; Allen, M. S.

    2015-05-21

    The objective of the present study is to explore the connection between the nonlinear normal modes of an undamped and unforced nonlinear system and the isolated resonance curves that may appear in the damped response of the forced system. To this end, an energy balance technique is used to predict the amplitude of the harmonic forcing that is necessary to excite a specific nonlinear normal mode. A cantilever beam with a nonlinear spring at its tip serves to illustrate the developments. Furthermore, the practical implications of isolated resonance curves are also discussed by computing the beam response to sine sweepmore » excitations of increasing amplitudes.« less

  3. Nonlinear normal modes modal interactions and isolated resonance curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuether, Robert J.; Renson, L.; Detroux, T.; Grappasonni, C.; Kerschen, G.; Allen, M. S.

    2015-05-21

    The objective of the present study is to explore the connection between the nonlinear normal modes of an undamped and unforced nonlinear system and the isolated resonance curves that may appear in the damped response of the forced system. To this end, an energy balance technique is used to predict the amplitude of the harmonic forcing that is necessary to excite a specific nonlinear normal mode. A cantilever beam with a nonlinear spring at its tip serves to illustrate the developments. Furthermore, the practical implications of isolated resonance curves are also discussed by computing the beam response to sine sweep excitations of increasing amplitudes.

  4. Closeness to spheres of hypersurfaces with normal curvature bounded below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisenko, A A; Drach, K D

    2013-11-30

    For aRiemannian manifold M{sup n+1} and acompact domain ??M{sup n+1} bounded by ahypersurface ?? with normal curvature bounded below, estimates are obtained in terms of the distance from O to ?? for the angle between the geodesic line joining afixed interior point O in ? to apoint on ?? and the outward normal to the surface. Estimates for the width of aspherical shell containing such ahypersurface are also presented. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  5. Statistical properties of an iterated arithmetic mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feix, M.R.; Rouet, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    We study the (3x = 1)/2 problem from a probabilistic viewpoint and show a forgetting mechanism for the last k binary digits of the seed after k iterations. The problem is subsequently generalized to a trifurcation process, the (lx + m)/3 problem. Finally the sequence of a set of seeds is empirically shown to be equivalent to a random walk of the variable log{sub 2}x (or log{sub 3} x) though computer simulations.

  6. SPUF - a simple polyurethane foam mass loss and response model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Lemmon, Gordon H.

    2003-07-01

    A Simple PolyUrethane Foam (SPUF) mass loss and response model has been developed to predict the behavior of unconfined, rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. The model, developed for the B61 and W80-0/1 fireset foam, is based on a simple two-step mass loss mechanism using distributed reaction rates. The initial reaction step assumes that the foam degrades into a primary gas and a reactive solid. The reactive solid subsequently degrades into a secondary gas. The SPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE [1] and CALORE [2], which support chemical kinetics and dynamic enclosure radiation using 'element death.' A discretization bias correction model was parameterized using elements with characteristic lengths ranging from 1-mm to 1-cm. Bias corrected solutions using the SPUF response model with large elements gave essentially the same results as grid independent solutions using 100-{micro}m elements. The SPUF discretization bias correction model can be used with 2D regular quadrilateral elements, 2D paved quadrilateral elements, 2D triangular elements, 3D regular hexahedral elements, 3D paved hexahedral elements, and 3D tetrahedron elements. Various effects to efficiently recalculate view factors were studied -- the element aspect ratio, the element death criterion, and a 'zombie' criterion. Most of the solutions using irregular, large elements were in agreement with the 100-{micro}m grid-independent solutions. The discretization bias correction model did not perform as well when the element aspect ratio exceeded 5:1 and the heated surface was on the shorter side of the element. For validation, SPUF predictions using various sizes and types of elements were compared to component-scale experiments of foam cylinders that were heated with lamps. The SPUF predictions of the decomposition front locations were compared to the front locations determined from real-time X-rays. SPUF predictions of the 19 radiant heat experiments were also compared to a more complex chemistry model (CPUF) predictions made with 1-mm elements. The SPUF predictions of the front locations were closer to the measured front locations than the CPUF predictions, reflecting the more accurate SPUF prediction of mass loss. Furthermore, the computational time for the SPUF predictions was an order of magnitude less than for the CPUF predictions.

  7. Microwaving of normally opaque and semi-opaque substances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-07-17

    Disclosed is a method of heating small particles using microwave radiation which are not normally capable of being heated by microwaves. The surfaces of the particles are coated with a material which is transparent to microwave radiation in order to cause microwave coupling to the particles and thus accomplish heating of the particles.

  8. Deep Borehole Disposal Remediation Costs for Off-Normal Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, John T.; Cochran, John R.; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-08-17

    This memo describes rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) cost estimates for a set of off-normal (accident) scenarios, as defined for two waste package emplacement method options for deep borehole disposal: drill-string and wireline. It summarizes the different scenarios and the assumptions made for each, with respect to fishing, decontamination, remediation, etc.

  9. SIMPLE TRANSIENT CALCULATIONS OF CELL FLAMMABLE GAS CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    , J; David Allison , D; John Mccord, J

    2009-05-06

    The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) mixes low-level radiological liquid waste with grout for permanent disposal as cement in vault cells. The grout mixture is poured into each cell in approximately 17 batches (8 to 10 hours duration). The grout mixture contains ten flammable gases of concern that are released from the mixture into the cell. Prior to operations, simple parametric transient calculations were performed to develop batch parameters (including schedule of batch pours) to support operational efficiency while ensuring that a flammable gas mixture does not develop in the cell vapor space. The analysis demonstrated that a nonflammable vapor space environment can be achieved, with workable operational constraints, without crediting the ventilation flow as a safety system control. Isopar L was identified as the primary flammable gas of concern. The transient calculations balanced inflows of the flammable gases into the vapor space with credited outflows of diurnal breathing through vent holes and displacement from new grout pours and gases generated. Other important features of the analyses included identifying conditions that inhibited a well-mixed vapor space, the expected frequency and duration of such conditions, and the estimated level of stratification that could develop.

  10. Simple rules help select best hydrocarbon distillation scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchezllanes, M.T.; Perez, A.L.; Martinez, M.P.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Rosal, R. del )

    1993-12-06

    Separation economics depend mainly on investment for major equipment and energy consumption. This relationship, together with the fact that, in most cases, many alternative schemes will be proposed, make it essential to find an optimum scheme that minimizes overall costs. Practical solutions are found by applying heuristics -- exploratory problem-solving techniques that eliminate alternatives without applying rigorous mathematical procedures. These techniques have been applied to a case study. In the case study, a hydrocarbon mixture will be transported through a pipeline to a fractionation plant, where it will be separated into commercial products for distribution. The fractionation will consist of a simple train of distillation columns, the sequence of which will be defined by applying heuristic rules and determining the required thermal duties for each column. The facility must separate ethane, propane and mixed butanes, natural gasoline (light straight-run, or LSR, gasoline), and condensate (heavy naphtha). The ethane will be delivered to an ethylene plant as a gaseous stream, the propane and butanes will be stored in cryogenic tanks, and the gasoline and heavy naphtha also will be stored.

  11. A Simple Demonstration of Concrete Structural Health Monitoring Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Agarwal, Vivek; Cai, Guowei; Nath, Paromita; Bao, Yanqing; Bru Brea, Jose Maria; Koester, David; Adams, Douglas; Kosson, David

    2015-03-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This ongoing research project is seeking to develop a probabilistic framework for health diagnosis and prognosis of aging concrete structures in a nuclear power plant subjected to physical, chemical, environment, and mechanical degradation. The proposed framework consists of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report describes a proof-of-concept example on a small concrete slab subjected to a freeze-thaw experiment that explores techniques in each of the four elements of the framework and their integration. An experimental set-up at Vanderbilt University’s Laboratory for Systems Integrity and Reliability is used to research effective combination of full-field techniques that include infrared thermography, digital image correlation, and ultrasonic measurement. The measured data are linked to the probabilistic framework: the thermography, digital image correlation data, and ultrasonic measurement data are used for Bayesian calibration of model parameters, for diagnosis of damage, and for prognosis of future damage. The proof-of-concept demonstration presented in this report highlights the significance of each element of the framework and their integration.

  12. Wind Power Curve Modeling in Simple and Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Wharton, S.; Irons, Z.; Qualley, G.

    2015-02-09

    Our previous work on wind power curve modeling using statistical models focused on a location with a moderately complex terrain in the Altamont Pass region in northern California (CA). The work described here is the follow-up to that work, but at a location with a simple terrain in northern Oklahoma (OK). The goal of the present analysis was to determine the gain in predictive ability afforded by adding information beyond the hub-height wind speed, such as wind speeds at other heights, as well as other atmospheric variables, to the power prediction model at this new location and compare the results to those obtained at the CA site in the previous study. While we reach some of the same conclusions at both sites, many results reported for the CA site do not hold at the OK site. In particular, using the entire vertical profile of wind speeds improves the accuracy of wind power prediction relative to using the hub-height wind speed alone at both sites. However, in contrast to the CA site, the rotor equivalent wind speed (REWS) performs almost as well as the entire profile at the OK site. Another difference is that at the CA site, adding wind veer as a predictor significantly improved the power prediction accuracy. The same was true for that site when air density was added to the model separately instead of using the standard air density adjustment. At the OK site, these additional variables result in no significant benefit for the prediction accuracy.

  13. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Benesch, Jay F.; Franklin, Gregg B.; Quinn, Brian P.; Paschke, Kent D.

    2015-11-30

    Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Labs Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5moreT. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR) from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.less

  14. Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer Presents lessons learned from Tennessee Valley Authority's home performance program, including ideas for a follow-up tool. PDF icon Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer More Documents & Publications Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Keep It Simple: Learning How to Think Like the Customer SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE - April

  15. Simple Dynamic Gasifier Model That Runs in Aspen Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, P.J.; Luyben, W.L.

    2008-10-15

    Gasification (or partial oxidation) is a vital component of 'clean coal' technology. Sulfur and nitrogen emissions can be reduced, overall energy efficiency is increased, and carbon dioxide recovery and sequestration are facilitated. Gasification units in an electric power generation plant produce a fuel for driving combustion turbines. Gasification units in a chemical plant generate gas, which can be used to produce a wide spectrum of chemical products. Future plants are predicted to be hybrid power/chemical plants with gasification as the key unit operation. The widely used process simulator Aspen Plus provides a library of models that can be used to develop an overall gasifier model that handles solids. So steady-state design and optimization studies of processes with gasifiers can be undertaken. This paper presents a simple approximate method for achieving the objective of having a gasifier model that can be exported into Aspen Dynamics. The basic idea is to use a high molecular weight hydrocarbon that is present in the Aspen library as a pseudofuel. This component should have the same 1:1 hydrogen-to-carbon ratio that is found in coal and biomass. For many plantwide dynamic studies, a rigorous high-fidelity dynamic model of the gasifier is not needed because its dynamics are very fast and the gasifier gas volume is a relatively small fraction of the total volume of the entire plant. The proposed approximate model captures the essential macroscale thermal, flow, composition, and pressure dynamics. This paper does not attempt to optimize the design or control of gasifiers but merely presents an idea of how to dynamically simulate coal gasification in an approximate way.

  16. A SIMPLE TECHNIQUE FOR PREDICTING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Silk, Joseph

    2015-01-20

    We show that the ratio of galaxies' specific star formation rates (SSFRs) to their host halos' specific mass accretion rates (SMARs) strongly constrains how the galaxies' stellar masses, SSFRs, and host halo masses evolve over cosmic time. This evolutionary constraint provides a simple way to probe z > 8 galaxy populations without direct observations. Tests of the method with galaxy properties at z = 4 successfully reproduce the known evolution of the stellar mass-halo mass (SMHM) relation, galaxy SSFRs, and the cosmic star formation rate (CSFR) for 5 < z < 8. We then predict the continued evolution of these properties for 8 < z < 15. In contrast to the nonevolution in the SMHM relation at z < 4, the median galaxy mass at fixed halo mass increases strongly at z > 4. We show that this result is closely linked to the flattening in galaxy SSFRs at z > 2 compared to halo SMARs; we expect that average galaxy SSFRs at fixed stellar mass will continue their mild evolution to z ? 15. The expected CSFR shows no breaks or features at z > 8.5; this constrains both reionization and the possibility of a steep falloff in the CSFR at z = 9-10. Finally, we make predictions for stellar mass and luminosity functions for the James Webb Space Telescope, which should be able to observe one galaxy with M {sub *} ? 10{sup 8} M {sub ?} per 10{sup 3}Mpc{sup 3} at z = 9.6 and one such galaxy per 10{sup 4}Mpc{sup 3} at z = 15.

  17. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonaldo, M.D.; Soares, M.B.

    1997-12-30

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 1 fig.

  18. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonaldo, Maria DeFatima; Soares, Marcelo Bento

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  19. A comparison of normal and worst case cement plant emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodford, J.; Gossman, D.; Johnson, N.

    1996-12-31

    Lone Star Industries, Inc. in Cape Girardeau, Missouri conducted a trial burn in October, 1995. Two metals emissions test days were conducted. One of the test days was a worst case metals spiking day and one of the test days was a normal emissions day. This paper examines and compares the emissions from these two test days. Much has been made of metals emissions from hazardous waste burning cement kilns, but for the most part, this has been due to the worst case metals emissions data that became available from the 1992 BIF compliance testing performed and reported by 24 cement plants. By comparison, very little data exists on normal cement kiln emissions. This paper provides one comparison.

  20. B-2 Bomber During In-flight Refueling Normal Heart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Bomber During In-flight Refueling Normal Heart Image Technology to Detect Concealed Nuclear Material in Trucks and Cargo Containers Single Abnormality Possible Heart Attack Disc Drive Computer Chip MP3 Player Protein Structure Energy Research Energy Security As part of the nation's energy security strategy, there is renewed focus on nuclear energy. It is critical that fuel elements and the construction materials for new reactors be well characterized. LAN- SCE is developing the Materials Test

  1. Is the assumption of normality or log-normality for continuous response data critical for benchmark dose estimation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Kan; Gift, Jeffrey S.; Setzer, R. Woodrow

    2013-11-01

    Continuous responses (e.g. body weight) are widely used in risk assessment for determining the benchmark dose (BMD) which is used to derive a U.S. EPA reference dose. One critical question that is not often addressed in doseresponse assessments is whether to model the continuous data as normally or log-normally distributed. Additionally, if lognormality is assumed, and only summarized response data (i.e., mean standard deviation) are available as is usual in the peer-reviewed literature, the BMD can only be approximated. In this study, using the hybrid method and relative deviation approach, we first evaluate six representative continuous doseresponse datasets reporting individual animal responses to investigate the impact on BMD/BMDL estimates of (1) the distribution assumption and (2) the use of summarized versus individual animal data when a log-normal distribution is assumed. We also conduct simulation studies evaluating model fits to various known distributions to investigate whether the distribution assumption has influence on BMD/BMDL estimates. Our results indicate that BMDs estimated using the hybrid method are more sensitive to the distribution assumption than counterpart BMDs estimated using the relative deviation approach. The choice of distribution assumption has limited impact on the BMD/BMDL estimates when the within dose-group variance is small, while the lognormality assumption is a better choice for relative deviation method when data are more skewed because of its appropriateness in describing the relationship between mean and standard deviation. Additionally, the results suggest that the use of summarized data versus individual response data to characterize log-normal distributions has minimal impact on BMD estimates. - Highlights: We investigate to what extent the distribution assumption can affect BMD estimates. Both real data analysis and simulation study are conducted. BMDs estimated using hybrid method are more sensitive to distribution assumption. Summarized continuous data are adequate for BMD estimation.

  2. Normal and abnormal evolution of argon metastable density in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    A controversial problem on the evolution of Ar metastable density as a function of electron density (increasing trend versus decreasing trend) was resolved by discovering the anomalous evolution of the argon metastable density with increasing electron density (discharge power), including both trends of the metastable density [Daltrini et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Later, by virtue of an adequate physical explanation based on a simple global model, both evolutions of the metastable density were comprehensively understood as part of the abnormal evolution occurring at low- and high-density regimes, respectively, and thus the physics behind the metastable evolution has seemed to be clearly disclosed. In this study, however, a remarkable result for the metastable density behavior with increasing electron density was observed: even in the same electron density regime, there are both normal and abnormal evolutions of metastable-state density with electron density depending on the measurement position: The metastable density increases with increasing electron density at a position far from the inductively coupled plasma antenna but decreases at a position close to the antenna. The effect of electron temperature, which is spatially nonuniform in the plasma, on the electron population and depopulation processes of Argon metastable atoms with increasing electron density is a clue to understanding the results. The calculated results of the global model, including multistep ionization for the argon metastable state and measured electron temperature, are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Normal waves in media with light-induced anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, L.I.; Gancherenok, I.I.

    1986-03-01

    The structure of normal waves for arbitrary directions of light beams is studied within the framework of standard nonlinear-polarization spectroscopy. A connection is found between the polarization of these waves and the polarization of the intense field and the mechanism for the creation of the induced anisotropy. The feasibility of the spectroscopic application of these results is considered, and a method is proposed for the use of a noncollinear pump. Analysis of the possibility of achieving dual-mode lasing with orthogonal mode polarization is made based on the formalism developed.

  4. Electromagnetic fluctuations and normal modes of a drifting relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruyer, C.; Gremillet, L.; Bénisti, D.; Bonnaud, G.

    2013-11-15

    We present an exact calculation of the power spectrum of the electromagnetic fluctuations in a relativistic equilibrium plasma described by Maxwell-Jüttner distribution functions. We consider the cases of wave vectors parallel or normal to the plasma mean velocity. The relative contributions of the subluminal and supraluminal fluctuations are evaluated. Analytical expressions of the spatial fluctuation spectra are derived in each case. These theoretical results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, showing a good reproduction of the subluminal fluctuation spectra.

  5. Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electron beam melting and direct laser metal sintering (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made by electron beam melting and direct laser metal sintering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made by electron beam melting and direct laser metal sintering Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of

  6. #MySmallAct: Simple Actions that Have a Big Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simple Actions that Have a Big Impact #MySmallAct: Simple Actions that Have a Big Impact April 24, 2015 - 2:16pm Addthis Earth Day was earlier this week. Read a recap below of how people are taking simple actions to make a big difference. | Photo courtesy of NASA. Earth Day was earlier this week. Read a recap below of how people are taking simple actions to make a big difference. | Photo courtesy of NASA. Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #MySmallAct:

  7. Simple Synthesis of Pore Highways Inside of Catalysts | U.S....

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Repetitive branching, a novel and simple synthesis method, produces crystals of zeolite, an important industrial chemical, with large-pore "highways" that improve transport and ...

  8. A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy savings from cooler surfaces Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on ...

  9. Phenomenology of electrostatically charged droplet combustion in normal gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Eric K.; Koch, Jeremy A.; Kyritsis, Dimitrios C.

    2008-08-15

    Experimental findings are provided on the effect of electrostatically charging a fuel on single-burning droplet combustion in normal gravity. It was established that significant modification of the flame morphology and the droplet burning time could be achieved, solely by the droplet charge, without the application of external electric fields. Negative charging of the droplets of mixtures of isooctane with either ethanol or a commercially available anti-static additive generated intense motion of the flame and abbreviated the droplet burning time by as much as 40% for certain blend compositions. Positive charging of the droplets generated almost spherical flames, because electrostatic attraction toward the droplets countered the effect of buoyancy. By comparing combustion of droplets of the same conductivity but different compositions, coupling of electrostatics with combustion chemistry was established. (author)

  10. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  11. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-raymore » fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.« less

  12. Direct normal irradiance related definitions and applications: The circumsolar issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanc, P.; Espinar, B.; Geuder, N.; Gueymard, C.; Meyer, R.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Reinhardt, B.; Renne, D.; Segupta, M.; Wald, L.; Wilbert, S.

    2014-10-21

    The direct irradiance received on a plane normal to the sun, called direct normal irradiance (DNI), is of particular relevance to concentrated solar technologies, including concentrating solar thermal plants and concentrated photovoltaic systems. Following various standards from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the DNI definition is related to the irradiance from a small solid angle of the sky, centered on the position of the sun. Half-angle apertures of pyrheliometers measuring DNI have varied over time, up to ≈10°. The current recommendation of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for this half-angle is 2.5°. Solar concentrating collectors have an angular acceptance function that can be significantly narrower, especially for technologies with high concentration ratios. The disagreement between the various interpretations of DNI, from the theoretical definition used in atmospheric physics and radiative transfer modeling to practical definitions corresponding to specific measurements or conversion technologies is significant, especially in the presence of cirrus clouds or large concentration of aerosols. Under such sky conditions, the circumsolar radiation—i.e. the diffuse radiation coming from the vicinity of the sun—contributes significantly to the DNI ground measurement, although some concentrating collectors cannot utilize the bulk of it. These issues have been identified in the EU-funded projects MACC-II (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate-Interim Implementation) and SFERA (Solar Facilities for the European Research Area), and have been discussed within a panel of international experts in the framework of the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) program of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA’s) Task 46 “Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting”. In accordance with these discussions, the terms of reference related to DNI are specified here. The important role of circumsolar radiation is evidenced, and its potential contribution is evaluated for typical atmospheric conditions. Thus, thorough analysis of performance of concentrating solar systems, it is recommended that, in addition to the conventional DNI related to 2.5° half-angle of today’s pyrheliometers, solar resource data sets also report the sunshape, the circumsolar contribution or the circumsolar ratio (CSR).

  13. Direct normal irradiance related definitions and applications: The circumsolar issue

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blanc, P.; Espinar, B.; Geuder, N.; Gueymard, C.; Meyer, R.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Reinhardt, B.; Renne, D.; Segupta, M.; Wald, L.; et al

    2014-10-21

    The direct irradiance received on a plane normal to the sun, called direct normal irradiance (DNI), is of particular relevance to concentrated solar technologies, including concentrating solar thermal plants and concentrated photovoltaic systems. Following various standards from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the DNI definition is related to the irradiance from a small solid angle of the sky, centered on the position of the sun. Half-angle apertures of pyrheliometers measuring DNI have varied over time, up to ≈10°. The current recommendation of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for this half-angle is 2.5°. Solar concentrating collectors have an angular acceptancemore » function that can be significantly narrower, especially for technologies with high concentration ratios. The disagreement between the various interpretations of DNI, from the theoretical definition used in atmospheric physics and radiative transfer modeling to practical definitions corresponding to specific measurements or conversion technologies is significant, especially in the presence of cirrus clouds or large concentration of aerosols. Under such sky conditions, the circumsolar radiation—i.e. the diffuse radiation coming from the vicinity of the sun—contributes significantly to the DNI ground measurement, although some concentrating collectors cannot utilize the bulk of it. These issues have been identified in the EU-funded projects MACC-II (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate-Interim Implementation) and SFERA (Solar Facilities for the European Research Area), and have been discussed within a panel of international experts in the framework of the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) program of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA’s) Task 46 “Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting”. In accordance with these discussions, the terms of reference related to DNI are specified here. The important role of circumsolar radiation is evidenced, and its potential contribution is evaluated for typical atmospheric conditions. Thus, thorough analysis of performance of concentrating solar systems, it is recommended that, in addition to the conventional DNI related to 2.5° half-angle of today’s pyrheliometers, solar resource data sets also report the sunshape, the circumsolar contribution or the circumsolar ratio (CSR).« less

  14. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  15. Persistent Fe moments in the normal state of the pressure-induced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the normal state of the pressure-induced superconductor Ca0.67Sr0.33Fe2As2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Persistent Fe moments in the normal state of the ...

  16. A Simple Approach of Tuning Catalytic Activity of MFI-Zeolites...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Simple Approach of Tuning Catalytic Activity of MFI-Zeolites for Low-Temperature SCR of NOx Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research ...

  17. Two-Step Process Converts Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Two-Step Process Converts Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Lignin is a major component of non-edible biomass. It is a cheap byproduct of pulp and biofuel production and is one of the few naturally occurring sources of valuable aromatic compounds. Converting lignin's complex biopolymer structure into simple organic chemicals has attracted major interest. For example,

  18. Structural complexity of simple Fe[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] at high

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pressures and temperatures (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Structural complexity of simple Fe[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] at high pressures and temperatures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural complexity of simple Fe[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] at high pressures and temperatures Authors: Bykova, E. ; Dubrovinsky, L. ; Dubrovinskaia, N. ; Bykov, M. ; McCammon, C. ; Ovsyannikov, S. V. ; Liermann, H. -P. ; Kupenko, I. ; Chumakov, A. I. ; Rüffer, R. ;

  19. Reaction chemistry of nitrogen species in hydrothermal systems: Simple reactions, waste simulants, and actual wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dell`Orco, P.; Luan, L.; Proesmans, P.; Wilmanns, E.

    1995-02-01

    Results are presented from hydrothermal reaction systems containing organic components, nitrogen components, and an oxidant. Reaction chemistry observed in simple systems and in simple waste simulants is used to develop a model which presents global nitrogen chemistry in these reactive systems. The global reaction path suggested is then compared with results obtained for the treatment of an actual waste stream containing only C-N-0-H species.

  20. Notes on power of normality tests of error terms in regression models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Střelec, Luboš

    2015-03-10

    Normality is one of the basic assumptions in applying statistical procedures. For example in linear regression most of the inferential procedures are based on the assumption of normality, i.e. the disturbance vector is assumed to be normally distributed. Failure to assess non-normality of the error terms may lead to incorrect results of usual statistical inference techniques such as t-test or F-test. Thus, error terms should be normally distributed in order to allow us to make exact inferences. As a consequence, normally distributed stochastic errors are necessary in order to make a not misleading inferences which explains a necessity and importance of robust tests of normality. Therefore, the aim of this contribution is to discuss normality testing of error terms in regression models. In this contribution, we introduce the general RT class of robust tests for normality, and present and discuss the trade-off between power and robustness of selected classical and robust normality tests of error terms in regression models.

  1. Simple extrapolation method to predict the electronic structure of conjugated polymers from calculations on oligomers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Larsen, Ross E.

    2016-04-12

    In this study, we introduce two simple tight-binding models, which we call fragment frontier orbital extrapolations (FFOE), to extrapolate important electronic properties to the polymer limit using electronic structure calculations on only a few small oligomers. In particular, we demonstrate by comparison to explicit density functional theory calculations that for long oligomers the energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), and of the first electronic excited state are accurately described as a function of number of repeat units by a simple effective Hamiltonian parameterized from electronic structure calculations on monomers, dimers and, optionally,more » tetramers. For the alternating copolymer materials that currently comprise some of the most efficient polymer organic photovoltaic devices one can use these simple but rigorous models to extrapolate computed properties to the polymer limit based on calculations on a small number of low-molecular-weight oligomers.« less

  2. Experimental Support for the Evolution of Symmetric Protein Architecture from a Simple Peptide Motif

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Lee; M Blaber

    2011-12-31

    The majority of protein architectures exhibit elements of structural symmetry, and 'gene duplication and fusion' is the evolutionary mechanism generally hypothesized to be responsible for their emergence from simple peptide motifs. Despite the central importance of the gene duplication and fusion hypothesis, experimental support for a plausible evolutionary pathway for a specific protein architecture has yet to be effectively demonstrated. To address this question, a unique 'top-down symmetric deconstruction' strategy was utilized to successfully identify a simple peptide motif capable of recapitulating, via gene duplication and fusion processes, a symmetric protein architecture (the threefold symmetric {beta}-trefoil fold). The folding properties of intermediary forms in this deconstruction agree precisely with a previously proposed 'conserved architecture' model for symmetric protein evolution. Furthermore, a route through foldable sequence-space between the simple peptide motif and extant protein fold is demonstrated. These results provide compelling experimental support for a plausible evolutionary pathway of symmetric protein architecture via gene duplication and fusion processes.

  3. #MySmallAct: 10 Simple Ways to Go Green and Save Green This Earth Day |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 10 Simple Ways to Go Green and Save Green This Earth Day #MySmallAct: 10 Simple Ways to Go Green and Save Green This Earth Day April 20, 2015 - 4:10pm Addthis Energy Department employee Bill Vandermeer tunes a bicycle as part of Earth Day events at National Renewable Energy Laboratory last year. Biking to work can help you reduce carbon emissions and save money. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Energy Department employee Bill Vandermeer

  4. A Simple Radionuclide-Driven Single-Ion Source (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect A Simple Radionuclide-Driven Single-Ion Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Simple Radionuclide-Driven Single-Ion Source Authors: Montero Diez, M. ; Twelker, K. ; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. ; Fairbank, W., Jr. ; /Colorado State U. ; Gratta, G. ; Barbeau, P.S. ; Barry, K. ; DeVoe, R. ; Dolinski, M.J. ; Green, M. ; LePort, F. ; Muller, A.R. ; Neilson, R. ; O'Sullivan, K. ; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. ; Ackerman, N. ; /SLAC ; Aharmin, B. ; /Laurentian U. more »; Auger, M.

  5. Ar-40/Ar-39 Age Constraints for the Jaramillo Normal Subchron...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    oxygen isotope, climate record calibration of the astronomical timescale proposed by Johnson (1982) and Shackleton et al. (1990). Ar-40Ar-39 ages of a normally magnetized...

  6. Pentose fermentation of normally toxic lignocellulose prehydrolysate with strain of Pichia stipitis yeast using air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Jr., Fred A.; Nguyen, Quang A.

    2002-01-01

    Strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis NPw9 (ATCC PTA-3717) useful for the production of ethanol using oxygen for growth while fermenting normally toxic lignocellulosic prehydrolysates.

  7. Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document explains how to use estimated energy rates and normalized weather data in determining an energy service company's (ESCO's) payments under a Federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

  8. Calculation of grain boundary normals directly from 3D microstructure images

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lieberman, E. J.; Rollett, A. D.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Kober, E. M.

    2015-03-11

    The determination of grain boundary normals is an integral part of the characterization of grain boundaries in polycrystalline materials. These normal vectors are difficult to quantify due to the discretized nature of available microstructure characterization techniques. The most common method to determine grain boundary normals is by generating a surface mesh from an image of the microstructure, but this process can be slow, and is subject to smoothing issues. A new technique is proposed, utilizing first order Cartesian moments of binary indicator functions, to determine grain boundary normals directly from a voxelized microstructure image. In order to validate the accuracymore » of this technique, the surface normals obtained by the proposed method are compared to those generated by a surface meshing algorithm. Specifically, the local divergence between the surface normals obtained by different variants of the proposed technique and those generated from a surface mesh of a synthetic microstructure constructed using a marching cubes algorithm followed by Laplacian smoothing is quantified. Next, surface normals obtained with the proposed method from a measured 3D microstructure image of a Ni polycrystal are used to generate grain boundary character distributions (GBCD) for Σ3 and Σ9 boundaries, and compared to the GBCD generated using a surface mesh obtained from the same image. Finally, the results show that the proposed technique is an efficient and accurate method to determine voxelized fields of grain boundary normals.« less

  9. Calculation of grain boundary normals directly from 3D microstructure images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieberman, E. J.; Rollett, A. D.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Kober, E. M.

    2015-03-11

    The determination of grain boundary normals is an integral part of the characterization of grain boundaries in polycrystalline materials. These normal vectors are difficult to quantify due to the discretized nature of available microstructure characterization techniques. The most common method to determine grain boundary normals is by generating a surface mesh from an image of the microstructure, but this process can be slow, and is subject to smoothing issues. A new technique is proposed, utilizing first order Cartesian moments of binary indicator functions, to determine grain boundary normals directly from a voxelized microstructure image. In order to validate the accuracy of this technique, the surface normals obtained by the proposed method are compared to those generated by a surface meshing algorithm. Specifically, the local divergence between the surface normals obtained by different variants of the proposed technique and those generated from a surface mesh of a synthetic microstructure constructed using a marching cubes algorithm followed by Laplacian smoothing is quantified. Next, surface normals obtained with the proposed method from a measured 3D microstructure image of a Ni polycrystal are used to generate grain boundary character distributions (GBCD) for Σ3 and Σ9 boundaries, and compared to the GBCD generated using a surface mesh obtained from the same image. Finally, the results show that the proposed technique is an efficient and accurate method to determine voxelized fields of grain boundary normals.

  10. A simple, low-cost, data logging pendulum built from a computer mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gintautas, Vadas; Hubler, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Lessons and homework problems involving a pendulum are often a big part of introductory physics classes and laboratory courses from high school to undergraduate levels. Although laboratory equipment for pendulum experiments is commercially available, it is often expensive and may not be affordable for teachers on fixed budgets, particularly in developing countries. We present a low-cost, easy-to-build rotary sensor pendulum using the existing hardware in a ball-type computer mouse. We demonstrate how this apparatus may be used to measure both the frequency and coefficient of damping of a simple physical pendulum. This easily constructed laboratory equipment makes it possible for all students to have hands-on experience with one of the most important simple physical systems.

  11. Simple rule can be used to calculate friction loss in piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durand, A.A.

    1997-05-26

    A simple rule for calculating friction loss in piping has been developed. Called the Rule of Fours, it is designed to be easily memorized for use in the field. For determining pressure loss in piping, friction-loss tables are often more convenient than calculating the Reynolds number or finding the friction factor on a Moody chart, then calculating the friction loss by the Darcy or Fanning relationships. Friction-loss tables can be found in the Crane Technical Paper, Hydraulic Institute Engineering Data Book, and several other references. There are occasions, however, when such tables are not readily available to the engineer trying to estimate pressure drop in fluid flowing through pipelines. Because friction loss is essentially a point function, it is only necessary to determine the pressure drop for a given set of conditions. The author has developed a simple rule for such calculations.

  12. Precise orientation of single crystals by a simple x-ray diffraction rocking curve method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doucette, L.D.; Pereira da Cunha, M.; Lad, R.J.

    2005-03-01

    A simple method has been developed for accurately measuring the crystallographic orientation of a single crystal boule, employing a conventional four-circle x-ray diffraction arrangement in the rocking curve mode which relaxes the need for precise instrument and/or reference alignment. By acquiring a total of eight rocking curve measurements at specific orientations about the specimen azimuth, the absolute miscut angle between a crystal surface and the desired crystallographic plane can be resolved to within {+-}0.01 deg.

  13. Simple description of light W, Os, and Pt nuclei in the interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCutchan, E.A.; Zamfir, N.V.

    2005-05-01

    A simple, two-parameter IBA-1 Hamiltonian is applied to light W, Os, and Pt nuclei with N {<=} 104. Equal emphasis is placed on fitting all low-lying positive parity excitations resulting in a good description of energy levels and electromagnetic transition rates. A mapping of these parameters into the IBA symmetry triangle finds that these nuclei lie rather central in the triangle and close to the phase transition region of the IBA model.

  14. Simple thermodynamics of strongly coupled one-component-plasma in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Khrapak, Alexey G.

    2014-10-15

    Simple analytical approximations for the internal energy of the strongly coupled one-component-plasma in two and three dimensions are discussed. As a result, new practical expressions for the internal energy in the fluid phase are proposed. Their accuracy is checked by evaluating the location of the fluid-solid phase transition from the free energy consideration. Possible applications to other related systems are briefly discussed.

  15. Using ARM TWP Nauru Observations to Evaluate a Simple Thermodynamic Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Subcloud Layer Under Fair-Weather Cumulus Conditions Using ARM TWP Nauru Observations to Evaluate a Simple Thermodynamic Model of the Subcloud Layer Under Fair-Weather Cumulus Conditions Albrecht, Bruce University of Miami Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Category: Modeling Marine boundary layer clouds are fundamental in regulating the vertical structure of water vapor and entropy in the lowest 2 km of the Earth's atmosphere. The observations from the ARM TWP-Nauru site

  16. Density- and wavefunction-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ? 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, J. Robert; Volkov, Anatoliy

    2015-03-01

    The widely used pseudoatom formalism in experimental X-ray charge-density studies makes use of real spherical harmonics when describing the angular component of aspherical deformations of the atomic electron density in molecules and crystals. The analytical form of the density-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonic functions for up to l ? 7 and the corresponding normalization coefficients were reported previously by Paturle & Coppens. It was shown that the analytical form for normalization coefficients is available primarily forl ? 4. Only in very special cases it is possible to derive an analytical representation of the normalization coefficients for 4 < l ? 7. In most cases for l > 4 the density normalization coefficients were calculated numerically to within seven significant figures. In this study we review the literature on the density-normalized spherical harmonics, clarify the existing notations, use the PaturleCoppens method in the Wolfram Mathematicasoftware to derive the Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ? 20 and determine the density normalization coefficients to 35 significant figures, and computer-generate a Fortran90 code. The article primarily targets researchers who work in the field of experimental X-ray electron density, but may be of some use to all who are interested in Cartesian spherical harmonics.

  17. Density- and wavefunction-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ≤ 20

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michael, J. Robert; Volkov, Anatoliy

    2015-03-01

    The widely used pseudoatom formalism in experimental X-ray charge-density studies makes use of real spherical harmonics when describing the angular component of aspherical deformations of the atomic electron density in molecules and crystals. The analytical form of the density-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonic functions for up to l ≤ 7 and the corresponding normalization coefficients were reported previously by Paturle & Coppens. It was shown that the analytical form for normalization coefficients is available primarily forl ≤ 4. Only in very special cases it is possible to derive an analytical representation of the normalization coefficients for 4 < l ≤ 7.more » In most cases for l > 4 the density normalization coefficients were calculated numerically to within seven significant figures. In this study we review the literature on the density-normalized spherical harmonics, clarify the existing notations, use the Paturle–Coppens method in the Wolfram Mathematicasoftware to derive the Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ≤ 20 and determine the density normalization coefficients to 35 significant figures, and computer-generate a Fortran90 code. The article primarily targets researchers who work in the field of experimental X-ray electron density, but may be of some use to all who are interested in Cartesian spherical harmonics.« less

  18. Density- and wavefunction-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ≤ 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, J. Robert; Volkov, Anatoliy

    2015-03-01

    The widely used pseudoatom formalism in experimental X-ray charge-density studies makes use of real spherical harmonics when describing the angular component of aspherical deformations of the atomic electron density in molecules and crystals. The analytical form of the density-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonic functions for up to l ≤ 7 and the corresponding normalization coefficients were reported previously by Paturle & Coppens. It was shown that the analytical form for normalization coefficients is available primarily forl ≤ 4. Only in very special cases it is possible to derive an analytical representation of the normalization coefficients for 4 < l ≤ 7. In most cases for l > 4 the density normalization coefficients were calculated numerically to within seven significant figures. In this study we review the literature on the density-normalized spherical harmonics, clarify the existing notations, use the Paturle–Coppens method in the Wolfram Mathematicasoftware to derive the Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ≤ 20 and determine the density normalization coefficients to 35 significant figures, and computer-generate a Fortran90 code. The article primarily targets researchers who work in the field of experimental X-ray electron density, but may be of some use to all who are interested in Cartesian spherical harmonics.

  19. Evaluation of Simple Causal Message Logging for Large-Scale Fault Tolerant HPC Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronevetsky, G; Meneses, E; Kale, L V

    2011-02-25

    The era of petascale computing brought machines with hundreds of thousands of processors. The next generation of exascale supercomputers will make available clusters with millions of processors. In those machines, mean time between failures will range from a few minutes to few tens of minutes, making the crash of a processor the common case, instead of a rarity. Parallel applications running on those large machines will need to simultaneously survive crashes and maintain high productivity. To achieve that, fault tolerance techniques will have to go beyond checkpoint/restart, which requires all processors to roll back in case of a failure. Incorporating some form of message logging will provide a framework where only a subset of processors are rolled back after a crash. In this paper, we discuss why a simple causal message logging protocol seems a promising alternative to provide fault tolerance in large supercomputers. As opposed to pessimistic message logging, it has low latency overhead, especially in collective communication operations. Besides, it saves messages when more than one thread is running per processor. Finally, we demonstrate that a simple causal message logging protocol has a faster recovery and a low performance penalty when compared to checkpoint/restart. Running NAS Parallel Benchmarks (CG, MG and BT) on 1024 processors, simple causal message logging has a latency overhead below 5%.

  20. SU-E-T-168: Evaluation of Normal Tissue Damage in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate normal tissue toxicity in patients with head and neck cancer by calculating average survival fraction (SF) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for normal tissue cells. Methods: 20 patients with head and neck cancer were included in this study. IMRT plans were generated using EclipseTM treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The average SF for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from dose spectrum acquired from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Finally, EUDs for three types of normal tissue of each structure were calculated from average SF. Results: The EUDs of the brainstem, spinal cord, parotid glands, brachial plexus and etc were calculated. Our analysis indicated that the brainstem can absorb as much as 14.3% of prescription dose to the tumor if the cell line is radiosensitive. In addition, as much as 16.1% and 18.3% of prescription dose were absorbed by the brainstem for moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant cells, respectively. For the spinal cord, the EUDs reached up to 27.6%, 35.0% and 42.9% of prescribed dose for the three types of radiosensitivities respectively. Three types of normal cells for parotid glands can get up to 65.6%, 71.2% and 78.4% of prescription dose, respectively. The maximum EUDs of brachial plexsus were calculated as 75.4%, 76.4% and 76.7% of prescription for three types of normal cell lines. Conclusion: The results indicated that EUD can be used to quantify and evaluate the radiation damage to surrounding normal tissues. Large variation of normal tissue EUDs may come from variation of target volumes and radiation beam orientations among the patients.

  1. Fuel cell system logic for differentiating between rapid and normal shutdown commands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    A method of controlling the operation of a fuel cell system wherein each shutdown command for the system is subjected to decision logic which determines whether the command should be a normal shutdown command or rapid shutdown command. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a normal shutdown command, then the system is shutdown in a normal step-by-step process in which the hydrogen stream is consumed within the system. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a rapid shutdown command, the hydrogen stream is removed from the system either by dumping to atmosphere or routing to storage.

  2. Operating Experience Level 3, Dangers of Objects Falling into Normally Occupied Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to the dangers of items falling from heights into spaces normally occupied by workers at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities.

  3. Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crissman, H.A.; Gadbois, D.M.; Tobey, R.A.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1993-02-09

    A G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G[sub 1] cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G[sub 1] phase, suggesting that such G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

  4. Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crissman, Harry A.; Gadbois, Donna M.; Tobey, Robert A.; Bradbury, E. Morton

    1993-01-01

    A G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G.sub.1 cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G.sub.1 phase, suggesting that such G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

  5. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  6. Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes a test of an instrumented surrogate PWR fuel assembly on a truck trailer conducted to simulate normal conditions of truck transport.   The purpose of the test was to measure...

  7. Normal Modes of Black Hole Accretion Disks (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Technical Report: Normal Modes of Black Hole Accretion Disks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal Modes of Black Hole Accretion Disks × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also

  8. Influence of Transcontinental arch on Cretaceous listric-normal faulting, west flank, Denver basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, T.L.

    1983-08-01

    Seismic studies along the west flank of the Denver basin near Boulder and Greeley, Colorado illustrate the interrelationship between shallow listric-normal faulting in the Cretaceous and deeper basement-controlled faulting. Deeper fault systems, primarily associated with the Transcontinental arch, control the styles and causative mechanisms of listric-normal faulting that developed in the Cretaceous. Three major stratigraphic levels of listric-normal faulting occur in the Boulder-Greeley area. These tectonic sensitive intervals are present in the following Cretaceous formations: Laramie-Fox Hills-upper Pierre, middle Pierre Hygiene zone, and the Niobrara-Carlile-Greenhorn. Documentation of the listric-normal fault style reveals a Wattenberg high, a horst block or positive feature of the greater Transcontinental arch, was active in the east Boulder-Greeley area during Cretaceous time. Paleotectonic events associated with the Wattenberg high are traced through analysis of the listric-normal fault systems that occur in the area. These styles are important to recognize because of their stratigraphic and structural influence on Cretaceous petroleum reservoir systems in the Denver basin. Similar styles of listric-normal faulting occur in the Cretaceous in many Rocky Mountain foreland basins.

  9. 2008-05 "Develop a Simple Project Status Reporting Format for Environmental Projects"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approved July 30, 2008 The intent of this recommendation is to support an evaluation of what may be considered an effective management practice by LANL management to enhance communication of information to the NNMCAB and thus the public sector. It appears to NNMCAB that a simple reporting tool as recommended herein would be of value in our monitoring of Consent Order deliverables and accordingly in our goal to maintain an informed interface with NMED management. It would also be of value in our support of funding to the baseline budget level.

  10. Simple interpretation of shape evolution in Pt isotopes without intruder states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCutchan, E.A.; Casten, R.F.; Zamfir, N.V.

    2005-06-01

    The most commonly accepted interpretation of the light Pt isotopes invokes the coexistence and mixing with proton intruder states from above the Z = 82 shell gap. Using an alternative description, interacting boson model (IBA) calculations are performed for the Pt isotopes with a simple, single configuration, two-parameter Hamiltonian. Excellent agreement is obtained for energies and electromagnetic transition strengths over the entire isotopic chain, spanning a wide variety of structures, and suggesting that these nuclei can be described more simply without the introduction of an intruder configuration. The Pt nuclei close to midshell are found to lie close to a region of phase/shape coexistence.

  11. Simple, field portable colorimetric detection device for organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pagoria, Philip F.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Whipple, Richard E.; Carman, M. Leslie; Reynolds, John G.; Nunes, Peter; Shields, Sharon J.

    2010-11-09

    A simple and effective system for the colorimetric determination of organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide. A peroxide pen utilizing a swipe material attached to a polyethylene tube contains two crushable vials. The two crushable vials contain a colorimetric reagent separated into dry ingredients and liquid ingredients. After swiping a suspected substance or surface the vials are broken, the reagent is mixed thoroughly and the reagent is allowed to wick into the swipe material. The presence of organic peroxides or hydrogen peroxide is confirmed by a deep blue color.

  12. A simple model of gas flow in a porous powder compact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Robinson, David B.

    2014-04-01

    This report describes a simple model for ideal gas flow from a vessel through a bed of porous material into another vessel. It assumes constant temperature and uniform porosity. Transport is treated as a combination of viscous and molecular flow, with no inertial contribution (low Reynolds number). This model can be used to fit data to obtain permeability values, determine flow rates, understand the relative contributions of viscous and molecular flow, and verify volume calibrations. It draws upon the Dusty Gas Model and other detailed studies of gas flow through porous media.

  13. A SIMPLE PHYSICAL MODEL FOR THE GAS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patej, Anna; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    The dominant baryonic component of galaxy clusters is hot gas whose distribution is commonly probed through X-ray emission arising from thermal bremsstrahlung. The density profile thus obtained has been traditionally modeled with a ?-profile, a simple function with only three parameters. However, this model is known to be insufficient for characterizing the range of cluster gas distributions and attempts to rectify this shortcoming typically introduce additional parameters to increase the fitting flexibility. We use cosmological and physical considerations to obtain a family of profiles for the gas with fewer parameters than the ?-model but which better accounts for observed gas profiles over wide radial intervals.

  14. Turbulence and bias-induced flows in simple magnetized toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, B.; Rogers, B. N.; Ricci, P.; Gentle, K. W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2011-05-15

    Turbulence and bias-induced flows in simple magnetized toroidal plasmas are explored with global three-dimensional fluid simulations, focusing on the parameters of the Helimak experiment. The simulations show that plasma turbulence and transport in the regime of interest are dominated by the ideal interchange instability. The application of a bias voltage alters the structure of the plasma potential, resulting in the equilibrium sheared flows.These bias-induced vertical flows located in the gradient region appear to reduce the radial extent of turbulent structures,and thereby lower the radial plasma transport on the low field side.

  15. A method for estimating direct normal solar irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janjai, Serm

    2010-09-15

    In order to investigate a potential use of concentrating solar power technologies and select an optimum site for these technologies, it is necessary to obtain information on the geographical distribution of direct normal solar irradiation over an area of interest. In this work, we have developed a method for estimating direct normal irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment. The method starts with the estimation of global irradiation on a horizontal surface from MTSAT-1R satellite data and other ground-based ancillary data. Then a satellite-based diffuse fraction model was developed and used to estimate the diffuse component of the satellite-derived global irradiation. Based on this estimated global and diffuse irradiation and the solar radiation incident angle, the direct normal irradiation was finally calculated. To evaluate its performance, the method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation at seven pyrheliometer stations in Thailand. It was found that values of monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation from the measurements and those estimated from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement, with a root mean square difference of 16% and a mean bias of -1.6%, with respect to mean measured values. After the validation, this method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation over Thailand by using MTSAT-1R satellite data for the period from June 2005 to December 2008. Results from the calculation were displayed as hourly and yearly irradiation maps. These maps reveal that the direct normal irradiation in Thailand was strongly affected by the tropical monsoons and local topography of the country. (author)

  16. Simple interpretation of nuclear orientation for Coulomb barrier distributions derived from a realistic effective interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, M.; Seif, W. M.

    2010-03-15

    A simple straightforward method has been presented to predict the dependence of barrier distributions at arbitrary orientations on different deformations. The proposed interpretation is developed independently of the complicated numerical calculations. It is related to the change of half-density radius of the deformed nucleus, in the direction of the separation vector. The microscopic calculations of Coulomb barrier are carried out by using a realistic density dependent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction, BDM3Y, for the interaction between spherical, {sup 48}Ca, and deformed, {sup 244}Pu, nuclei, as an example. To do so, the double-folding model for the interaction of spherical-deformed nuclei is put in a suitable computational form for the calculation of the potential at several separation distances and orientation angles using the density dependent NN force without consuming computational time. We found that the orientation distributions of the Coulomb barrier parameters show similar patterns to those of the interacting deformed nucleus radius. It is found that the orientation distribution of the Coulomb barrier radius follows the same variation of the deformed nucleus radius while the barrier height distribution follows it inversely. This correlation (anticorrelation) allows a simple evaluation of the orientation barrier distribution which would be very helpful to estimate when the barrier parameters will increase or decrease and at which orientations they will be independent of the deformation. This also allows us to estimate the compact and elongated configurations of the interacting nuclei which lead to hot and cold fusion, respectively.

  17. Bubble nucleation in simple and molecular liquids via the largest spherical cavity method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Abascal, José L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal; Bresme, Fernando

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we propose a methodology to compute bubble nucleation free energy barriers using trajectories generated via molecular dynamics simulations. We follow the bubble nucleation process by means of a local order parameter, defined by the volume of the largest spherical cavity (LSC) formed in the nucleating trajectories. This order parameter simplifies considerably the monitoring of the nucleation events, as compared with the previous approaches which require ad hoc criteria to classify the atoms and molecules as liquid or vapor. The combination of the LSC and the mean first passage time technique can then be used to obtain the free energy curves. Upon computation of the cavity distribution function the nucleation rate and free-energy barrier can then be computed. We test our method against recent computations of bubble nucleation in simple liquids and water at negative pressures. We obtain free-energy barriers in good agreement with the previous works. The LSC method provides a versatile and computationally efficient route to estimate the volume of critical bubbles the nucleation rate and to compute bubble nucleation free-energies in both simple and molecular liquids.

  18. A Simple and Efficient Diffuse Interface Method for Compressible Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray A. Berry; Richard Saurel; Fabien Petitpas

    2009-05-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. For many reasons, to be discussed, there is growing interest in the application of two-phase flow models to provide diffuse, but nevertheless resolved, simulation of interfaces between two immiscible compressible fluids diffuse interface method (DIM). Because of its ability to dynamically create interfaces and to solve interfaces separating pure media and mixtures for DNS-like (Direct Numerical Simulation) simulations of interfacial flows, we examine the construction of a simple, robust, fast, and accurate numerical formulation for the 5-equation Kapila et al. [1] reduced two-phase model. Though apparently simple, the Kapila et al. model contains a volume fraction differential transport equation containing a nonlinear, non-conservative term which poses serious computational challenges. To circumvent the difficulties encountered with the single velocity and single pressure Kapila et al. [1] multiphase flow model, a 6-equation relaxation hyperbolic model is built to solve interface problems with compressible fluids. In this approach, pressure non-equilibrium is first restored, followed by a relaxation to an asymptotic solution which is convergent to the solutions of the Kapila et al. reduced model. The apparent complexity introduced with this extended hyperbolic model actually leads to considerable simplifications regarding numerical resolution, and the various ingredients used by this method are general enough to consider future extensions to problems involving complex physics.

  19. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  20. Comparing of Normal Stress Distribution in Static and Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kholdebarin, Alireza; Massumi, Ali; Davoodi, Mohammad; Tabatabaiefar, Hamid Reza

    2008-07-08

    It is important to consider the vertical component of earthquake loading and inertia force in soil-structure interaction analyses. In most circumstances, design engineers are primarily concerned about the analysis of behavior of foundations subjected to earthquake-induced forces transmitted from the bedrock. In this research, a single rigid foundation with designated geometrical parameters located on sandy-clay soil has been modeled in FLAC software with Finite Different Method and subjected to three different vertical components of earthquake records. In these cases, it is important to evaluate effect of footing on underlying soil and to consider normal stress in soil with and without footing. The distribution of normal stress under the footing in static and dynamic states has been studied and compared. This Comparison indicated that, increasing in normal stress under the footing caused by vertical component of ground excitations, has decreased dynamic vertical settlement in comparison with static state.

  1. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Eun Young; Zhang Xin; Yan Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo; Corry, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  2. Persistent Fe moments in the normal state of the pressure-induced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    superconductor Ca0.67Sr0.33Fe2As2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Persistent Fe moments in the normal state of the pressure-induced superconductor Ca0.67Sr0.33Fe2As2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Persistent Fe moments in the normal state of the pressure-induced superconductor Ca0.67Sr0.33Fe2As2 Authors: Jeffries, J R ; Butch, N P ; Lipp, M J ; Bradley, J A ; Kirshenbaum, K ; Saha, S R ; Paglione, J ; Kenney-Benson, C ; Xiao, Y ; Chow, P ; Evans, W J Publication Date:

  3. Persistent Fe moments in the normal-state collapsed-tetragonal phase of the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pressure-induced superconductor Ca 0.67 Sr 0.33 Fe 2 As 2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Persistent Fe moments in the normal-state collapsed-tetragonal phase of the pressure-induced superconductor Ca 0.67 Sr 0.33 Fe 2 As 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Persistent Fe moments in the normal-state collapsed-tetragonal phase of the pressure-induced superconductor Ca 0.67 Sr 0.33 Fe 2 As 2 Authors: Jeffries, J. R. ; Butch, N. P. ; Lipp, M. J. ; Bradley, J. A. ;

  4. Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scattering from the Reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry in

  5. Beam-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetries in Electron Scattering | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Beam-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetries in Electron Scattering May 16, 2016 3:30PM to 4:30PM Presenter Buddhini Waidyawansa (PHY) Location Building 203, Room R150 Type Seminar Series Physics Division Seminar Abstract: A beam-normal single-spin asymmetry is generated by the scattering of transversely polarized electrons from unpolarized targets. This parity-conserving observable provides direct access to the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange amplitude. Because it can

  6. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-11-04

    We report the results of ongoing high power tests of single-cell standing wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the maximum gradient possibilities for normal-conducting rf powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode launchers and short test structures powered by SLACs XL-4 klystron. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested at the SLAC klystron test laboratory.

  7. Bifurcation and chaos in the simple passive dynamic walking model with upper body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qingdu; Guo, Jianli; Yang, Xiao-Song

    2014-09-01

    We present some rich new complex gaits in the simple walking model with upper body by Wisse et al. in [Robotica 22, 681 (2004)]. We first show that the stable gait found by Wisse et al. may become chaotic via period-doubling bifurcations. Such period-doubling routes to chaos exist for all parameters, such as foot mass, upper body mass, body length, hip spring stiffness, and slope angle. Then, we report three new gaits with period 3, 4, and 6; for each gait, there is also a period-doubling route to chaos. Finally, we show a practical method for finding a topological horseshoe in 3D Poincar map, and present a rigorous verification of chaos from these gaits.

  8. Epitaxial Growth of GaN-based LEDs on Simple Sacrificial Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Ferguson; Chris Summers

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce alternative substrate technologies for GaN-based LEDs by developing an ALD interlayer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on sacrificial substrates such as ZnO and Si. A sacrificial substrate is used for device growth that can easily be removed using a wet chemical etchant leaving only the thin GaN epi-layer. After substrate removal, the GaN LED chip can then be mounted in several different ways to a metal heat sink/reflector and light extraction techniques can then be applied to the chip and compared for performance. Success in this work will lead to high efficiency LED devices with a simple low cost fabrication method and high product yield as stated by DOE goals for its solid state lighting portfolio.

  9. A simple scanning spectrometer based on a stretchable elastomeric reflective grating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghisleri, C.; Milani, P., E-mail: paolo.milani@mi.infn.it [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); WISE srl, Piazza Duse 2, 20122 Milano (Italy); Potenza, M. A. C.; Bellacicca, A. [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ravagnan, L. [WISE srl, Piazza Duse 2, 20122 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-10

    We report a scanning optical spectrometer based on the use of a stretchable elastomeric reflective grating. The grating is obtained by supersonic cluster beam implantation of silver nanoparticles on polydimethylsiloxane previously grooved by molding to create a replica of a commercial digital versatile disk grating. The use of a stretchable grating allows the spectrometer spanning the whole optical wavelength range by solely extending the diffraction element by more than 100% of its original dimensions. The stretchable reflective optical grating shows excellent performances and stability upon thousands of stretching cycles. The use of this elastomeric element makes the optical layout and the mechanics of the spectrometer extremely simple and advantageous for those applications where spectral resolution is not a major requirement. As a proof of principle, we present the absorption spectrum of Rhodamine B in solution obtained by our spectrometer and compared to commercial instruments.

  10. Efficiency and accuracy aspects of a full-multigrid SIMPLE algorithm for three-dimensional flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lilek, Z.; Muzaferija, S.; Peric, M.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports on the analysis of efficiency and accuracy of a full-multigrid SIMPLE algorithm for three-dimensional flows using co-located grids and central difference discretization for both convective and diffusive fluxes. It is shown that the central differencing scheme--contrary to common belief--offers both good convergence properties and high accuracy, even at large Peclet numbers. Accurate solutions, with discretization errors below 0.5%, were obtained for lid-driven flows in a cubic cavity using grids with up to 128{sup 3} (nearly 2.1 million) control volumes. For a grid with 64{sup 3} (262,114) control volumes, solution can be obtained on a personal computer in 5--10 min. The computer code used for the calculations reported here is available from authors on request (free of charge).

  11. Simple protocols for oblivious transfer and secure identification in the noisy-quantum-storage model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaffner, Christian

    2010-09-15

    We present simple protocols for oblivious transfer and password-based identification which are secure against general attacks in the noisy-quantum-storage model as defined in R. Koenig, S. Wehner, and J. Wullschleger [e-print arXiv:0906.1030]. We argue that a technical tool from Koenig et al. suffices to prove security of the known protocols. Whereas the more involved protocol for oblivious transfer from Koenig et al. requires less noise in storage to achieve security, our ''canonical'' protocols have the advantage of being simpler to implement and the security error is easier control. Therefore, our protocols yield higher OT rates for many realistic noise parameters. Furthermore, a proof of security of a direct protocol for password-based identification against general noisy-quantum-storage attacks is given.

  12. Topography and Mechanical Property Mapping of International Simple Glass Surfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Nanomechanical Peak Force (PF-QNM) TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy measurements are presented for the first time on polished glass surfaces. The PF-QNM technique allows for topography and mechanical property information to be measured simultaneously at each pixel. Results for the international simple glass which represents a simplified version of SON68 glass suggests an average Young s modulus of 78.8 15.1 GPa is within the experimental error of the modulus measured for SON68 glass (83.6 2 GPa) with conventional approaches. Application of the PF-QNM technique will be extended to in situ glass corrosion experiments with the goal of gaining atomic-scale insights into altered layer development by exploiting the mechanical property differences that exist between silica gel (e.g., altered layer) and pristine glass surface.

  13. A simple route to the synthesis of single crystalline copper metagermanate nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z.; Zhao, H.S.; Tan, W.; Yu, H.Y.; Chen, Y.W.; Zhang Qianfeng; Fan, C.G.

    2009-12-15

    Single crystalline copper metagermanate (CuGeO{sub 3}) nanowires with the diameter of 30-300 nm and length of longer than 100 {mu}m have been prepared by a simple hydrothermal deposition route. X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman analyses confirm that the nanowires are orthorhombic single crystals with a main growth direction along <101>. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows a strong blue emission peak at 442 nm with a broad emission band. The blue emission may be ascribed to radiative recombination of oxygen vacancies and oxygen-germanium vacancies. The formation process of CuGeO{sub 3} nanowires is also discussed.

  14. A simple model for a zinc/bromine flow cell and associated storage tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, G.D.; White, R.E. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1990-06-01

    A simple model for a parallel plate, zinc/bromine flow cell and associated storage tanks is presented and used to make time-dependent predictions for various quantities in the system. The model is based on a previously published algebraic model of the cell at steady-state and time-dependent, first-order differential equations for the storage tanks. The Butler--Volmer equation is used for the electrochemical reactions, and the homogeneous reaction between bromine and bromide is included. The model predictions indicate that the charging operation of a zinc/bromine battery can be significantly improved by using a storage tank with a larger residence time for the bromine side of the system.

  15. Note: A simple charge neutralization method for measuring the secondary electron yield of insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Ming Cao, Meng; Zhao, Hong-Juan; Zhang, Hai-Bo

    2014-03-15

    We report on a simple and effective charge neutralization method for measuring the total electron-induced secondary electron yield of insulators in a measurement system with a single pulsed electron gun. In this method, the secondary electron collector is negatively biased with respect to the sample to force some emitted secondary electrons to return to the sample surface and therefore to neutralize positive charges accumulated in the sample during the previous measurement. The adequate negative bias is determined and the equilibrium state of negative charging is discussed. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by the measured electron yields in the cases with and without charge neutralization and by comparison with existing electron yield data of polyimide.

  16. Development of a simple 2.45 GHz microwave plasma with a repulsive double hexapole configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arciaga, Marko; Ulano, April; Lee, Henry Jr.; Lledo, Rumar; Ramos, Henry; Tumlos, Roy

    2008-09-15

    A simple and inexpensive 2.45 GHz microwave plasma source with a repulsive double hexapole configuration is described and characterized. In this work, the operation of the source is shown to be flexible in terms of electron density, electron temperature, and plasma uniformity even at low-pressures (approximately millitorr). It allows for easy control of the electron temperature (2-3.8 eV) and density ({approx}10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) by removing either of the two hexapoles or by varying the separation distance between the two hexapoles. Characterization was done via information gathered from the usual Langmuir probe measurements for electron temperature and density. The source makes a resonant surface with its repulsive double hexapole magnetic configuration providing an additional longitudinal confinement near the walls midway between the two hexapoles. Magnetic field maps are presented for varying double hexapole distances. Power delivery for various settings is also presented.

  17. A simple grand canonical approach to compute the vapor pressure of bulk and finite size systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Factorovich, Matas H.; Scherlis, Damin A.

    2014-02-14

    In this article we introduce a simple grand canonical screening (GCS) approach to accurately compute vapor pressures from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. This procedure entails a screening of chemical potentials using a conventional grand canonical scheme, and therefore it is straightforward to implement for any kind of interface. The scheme is validated against data obtained from Gibbs ensemble simulations for water and argon. Then, it is applied to obtain the vapor pressure of the coarse-grained mW water model, and it is shown that the computed value is in excellent accord with the one formally deduced using statistical thermodynamics arguments. Finally, this methodology is used to calculate the vapor pressure of a water nanodroplet of 94 molecules. Interestingly, the result is in perfect agreement with the one predicted by the Kelvin equation for a homogeneous droplet of that size.

  18. SU-E-T-291: Sensitivity of a Simple 2D EPID in Vivo Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peca, S; Brown, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: As radiotherapy (RT) increases in complexity, so does motivation for in vivo dosimetry (IVD), which may detect errors such as: setup, beam shaping and dose delivered. We have recently developed an easy-toimplement method for two-dimensional IVD based on images taken with the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) in cine mode during treatment. The purpose of this work is to characterize its sensitivity to possible RT delivery errors. Methods: We introduced a series of modifications to a simple RT field (1010, 100MU, 300RR, 20cm homogeneous phantom) to simulate errors. These modifications included multi-leaf collimator (MLC) position, number of MUs, and collimator angle. We quantified the sensitivity to inhomogeneities by inserting variable amounts of solid lung and bone. Finally we delivered realistic fields to an anthropomorphic phantom to estimate sensitivity to gantry angle and setup errors. Results: Our EPIDIVD is sensitive to MLC positioning errors of 1mm and 3mm in the closed and open directions respectively, and to 3% MU variations. Sensitivity to collimator angle depends on field shape irregularity; in the case of a 10x10 field, we are sensitive to errors of 0.8. The sensitivity to inhomogeneities is limited by the nature of MV imaging: approximately 1% signal change is noted when switching 5cm of water to equal amounts of bone or lung. This suggests that the EPID-IVD is likely not sensitive to small setup or gantry angle errors, as confirmed by anthropomorphic tests. Conclusion: We have characterized a simple method of 2D dose reconstruction at isocenter depth inside the patient, which is sensitive to possible RT delivery errors. This method may be useful as a secondary safety check, to prevent large errors from being carried on to following fractions, and to record delivered dose. By using readily available hardware, it is easily implemented and may prove especially useful in centers with limited resources.

  19. Data Collection and Normalization for the Development of Cost Estimating Relationships

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Cost estimating relationships or parametric equations are mathematical statements that indicate that the cost is proportional to a physical commodity. Parametric estimating requires that the statistical analysis be performed on data points to correlate the cost drivers and other system parameters. This chapter discusses considerations for data collection and normalization.

  20. Evaluation of Geometrically Nonlinear Reduced Order Models with Nonlinear Normal Modes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuether, Robert J.; Deaner, Brandon J.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.; Allen, Matthew S.

    2015-09-15

    Several reduced-order modeling strategies have been developed to create low-order models of geometrically nonlinear structures from detailed finite element models, allowing one to compute the dynamic response of the structure at a dramatically reduced cost. But, the parameters of these reduced-order models are estimated by applying a series of static loads to the finite element model, and the quality of the reduced-order model can be highly sensitive to the amplitudes of the static load cases used and to the type/number of modes used in the basis. Our paper proposes to combine reduced-order modeling and numerical continuation to estimate the nonlinearmore » normal modes of geometrically nonlinear finite element models. Not only does this make it possible to compute the nonlinear normal modes far more quickly than existing approaches, but the nonlinear normal modes are also shown to be an excellent metric by which the quality of the reduced-order model can be assessed. Hence, the second contribution of this work is to demonstrate how nonlinear normal modes can be used as a metric by which nonlinear reduced-order models can be compared. Moreover, various reduced-order models with hardening nonlinearities are compared for two different structures to demonstrate these concepts: a clamped–clamped beam model, and a more complicated finite element model of an exhaust panel cover.« less

  1. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  2. Evaluation of Geometrically Nonlinear Reduced Order Models with Nonlinear Normal Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuether, Robert J.; Deaner, Brandon J.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.; Allen, Matthew S.

    2015-09-15

    Several reduced-order modeling strategies have been developed to create low-order models of geometrically nonlinear structures from detailed finite element models, allowing one to compute the dynamic response of the structure at a dramatically reduced cost. But, the parameters of these reduced-order models are estimated by applying a series of static loads to the finite element model, and the quality of the reduced-order model can be highly sensitive to the amplitudes of the static load cases used and to the type/number of modes used in the basis. Our paper proposes to combine reduced-order modeling and numerical continuation to estimate the nonlinear normal modes of geometrically nonlinear finite element models. Not only does this make it possible to compute the nonlinear normal modes far more quickly than existing approaches, but the nonlinear normal modes are also shown to be an excellent metric by which the quality of the reduced-order model can be assessed. Hence, the second contribution of this work is to demonstrate how nonlinear normal modes can be used as a metric by which nonlinear reduced-order models can be compared. Moreover, various reduced-order models with hardening nonlinearities are compared for two different structures to demonstrate these concepts: a clamped–clamped beam model, and a more complicated finite element model of an exhaust panel cover.

  3. ADS support for Hardy Oil`s subsea projects: Simple and cost effective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, N.; McCullough, G.; Subik, D.

    1996-12-31

    The use of Atmospheric Diving Systems in support of the Shasta and Mustique Subsea Field Developments for Hardy Oil and Gas and Texaco is reviewed as a simple and cost-effective solution to the subsea intervention requirements of underwater completion tiebacks. The design and installation of the pull-tube system for dual flowlines and a control umbilical on Texaco`s Green Canyon 6A Platform is reviewed as an example of how Atmospheric Diving Systems can be utilized to perform the difficult subsea construction of a pull-tube system on an existing deepwater platform. The design and installation of the flexible flowline jumpers and umbilical flying leads connecting the three subsea trees to the flowline termination skids and the umbilical termination assemblies is reviewed as an example of how Atmospheric Diving Systems can be utilized to connect flowlines and control umbilicals to subsea trees with standard bolted flanged connections and flying leads using the well completion drill rig as a work platform.

  4. A simple growth method for Nb2O5 films and their optical properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dash, J. K.; Chen, L.; Topka, Michael R.; Dinolfo, Peter H.; Zhang, L. H.; Kisslinger, K.; Lu, T. -M.; Wang, G. -C.

    2015-04-13

    A simple method for the synthesis of Nb₂O₅ films of thicknesses ranging from tens to several hundreds of nanometers on amorphous silicon dioxide or quartz substrates is presented. Nb₂O₅ films were formed by annealing the sputter deposited Nb films under an Ar flow and without oxygen plasma in a quartz tube within a furnace at 850 °C. The structural, compositional, optical, and vibrational properties were characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, and Raman scattering. Each of the Nb₂O₅ films is polycrystalline with an orthorhombic crystal structure. We observed vibrational modes includingmore » longitudinal optical, transverse optical, and triply degenerate modes, and measured the indirect optical band gap to be ~3.65 eV. The transmittance spectrum of the ~20 nm thick Nb₂O₅ film shows over 90% transmittance below the band gap energy in the visible wavelength range and decreases to less than 20% in the ultraviolet regime. As a result, the optical properties of the films in the UV-vis range show potential applications as UV detectors.« less

  5. A simple method for enzymatic synthesis of unlabeled and radiolabeled Hydroxycinnamate-CoA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautergarten, Carsten; Baidoo, Edward; Keasling, Jay; Vibe Scheller, Henrik

    2011-07-20

    Hydroxycinnamate coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters are substrates for biosynthesis of lignin and hydroxycinna- mate esters of polysaccharides and other polymers. Hence, a supply of these substrates is essential for investigation of cell wall biosynthesis. In this study, three recombinant enzymes, caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase, 4-coumarate- CoA ligase 1, and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase 5, were cloned from wheat, tobacco, and Arabidopsis, respectively, and were used to synthesize {sup 14}C-feruloyl-CoA, caffeoyl-CoA, p-coumaroyl-CoA, feruloyl-CoA, and sinapoyl-CoA. The corresponding hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA thioesters were high-performance liquid chromatography purified, the only extraction/purification step necessary, with total yields between 88-95%. Radiolabeled {sup 14}C-feruloyl-CoA was generated from caffeic acid and S-adenosyl-{sup 14}C-methionine under the combined action of caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase 1. About 70% of {sup 14}C-methyl groups from S-adenosyl methionine were incorporated into the final product. The methods presented are simple, fast, and efficient for the preparation of the hydroxycinnamate thioesters.

  6. The terminator "toy" chemistry test: A simple tool to assess errors in transport schemes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lauritzen, P. H.; Conley, A. J.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Vitt, F.; Taylor, M. A.

    2015-05-04

    This test extends the evaluation of transport schemes from prescribed advection of inert scalars to reactive species. The test consists of transporting two interacting chemical species in the Nair and Lauritzen 2-D idealized flow field. The sources and sinks for these two species are given by a simple, but non-linear, "toy" chemistry that represents combination (X+X → X2) and dissociation (X2 → X+X). This chemistry mimics photolysis-driven conditions near the solar terminator, where strong gradients in the spatial distribution of the species develop near its edge. Despite the large spatial variations in each species, the weighted sum XT = X+2X2more » should always be preserved at spatial scales at which molecular diffusion is excluded. The terminator test demonstrates how well the advection–transport scheme preserves linear correlations. Chemistry–transport (physics–dynamics) coupling can also be studied with this test. Examples of the consequences of this test are shown for illustration.« less

  7. The terminator "toy" chemistry test: A simple tool to assess errors in transport schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauritzen, P. H.; Conley, A. J.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Vitt, F.; Taylor, M. A.

    2015-05-04

    This test extends the evaluation of transport schemes from prescribed advection of inert scalars to reactive species. The test consists of transporting two interacting chemical species in the Nair and Lauritzen 2-D idealized flow field. The sources and sinks for these two species are given by a simple, but non-linear, "toy" chemistry that represents combination (X+X → X2) and dissociation (X2 → X+X). This chemistry mimics photolysis-driven conditions near the solar terminator, where strong gradients in the spatial distribution of the species develop near its edge. Despite the large spatial variations in each species, the weighted sum XT = X+2X2 should always be preserved at spatial scales at which molecular diffusion is excluded. The terminator test demonstrates how well the advection–transport scheme preserves linear correlations. Chemistry–transport (physics–dynamics) coupling can also be studied with this test. Examples of the consequences of this test are shown for illustration.

  8. Performance of improved magnetostrictive vibrational power generator, simple and high power output for practical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, Toshiyuki

    2015-05-07

    Vibration based power generation technology is utilized effectively in various fields. Author has invented novel vibrational power generation device using magnetostrictive material. The device is based on parallel beam structure consisting of a rod of iron-gallium alloy wound with coil and yoke accompanied with permanent magnet. When bending force is applied on the tip of the device, the magnetization inside the rod varies with induced stress due to the inverse magnetostrictive effect. In vibration, the time variation of the magnetization generates voltage on the wound coil. The magnetostrictive type is advantageous over conventional such using piezoelectric or moving magnet types in high efficiency and high robustness, and low electrical impedance. Here, author has established device configuration, simple, rigid, and high power output endurable for practical applications. In addition, the improved device is lower cost using less volume of Fe-Ga and permanent magnet compared to our conventional, and its assembly by soldering is easy and fast suitable for mass production. Average power of 3 mW/cm{sup 3} under resonant vibration of 212 Hz and 1.2 G was obtained in miniature prototype using Fe-Ga rod of 2 × 0.5× 7 mm{sup 3}. Furthermore, the damping effect was observed, which demonstrates high energy conversion of the generator.

  9. The hydrophobic effect in a simple isotropic water-like model: Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huš, Matej; Urbic, Tomaz

    2014-04-14

    Using Monte Carlo computer simulations, we show that a simple isotropic water-like model with two characteristic lengths can reproduce the hydrophobic effect and the solvation properties of small and large non-polar solutes. Influence of temperature, pressure, and solute size on the thermodynamic properties of apolar solute solvation in a water model was systematically studied, showing two different solvation regimes. Small particles can fit into the cavities around the solvent particles, inducing additional order in the system and lowering the overall entropy. Large particles force the solvent to disrupt their network, increasing the entropy of the system. At low temperatures, the ordering effect of small solutes is very pronounced. Above the cross-over temperature, which strongly depends on the solute size, the entropy change becomes strictly positive. Pressure dependence was also investigated, showing a “cross-over pressure” where the entropy and enthalpy of solvation are the lowest. These results suggest two fundamentally different solvation mechanisms, as observed experimentally in water and computationally in various water-like models.

  10. A simple growth method for Nb?O? films and their optical properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dash, J. K.; Kisslinger, K.; Chen, L.; Topka, Michael R.; Dinolfo, Peter H.; Zhang, L. H.; Lu, T. -M.; Wang, G. -C.

    2015-04-13

    A simple method for the synthesis of Nb?O? films of thicknesses ranging from tens to several hundreds of nanometers on amorphous silicon dioxide or quartz substrates is presented. Nb?O? films were formed by annealing the sputter deposited Nb films under an Ar flow and without oxygen plasma in a quartz tube within a furnace at 850 C. The structural, compositional, optical, and vibrational properties were characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, and Raman scattering. Each of the Nb?O? films is polycrystalline with an orthorhombic crystal structure. We observed vibrational modes includingmorelongitudinal optical, transverse optical, and triply degenerate modes, and measured the indirect optical band gap to be ~3.65 eV. The transmittance spectrum of the ~20 nm thick Nb?O? film shows over 90% transmittance below the band gap energy in the visible wavelength range and decreases to less than 20% in the ultraviolet regime. The optical properties of the films in the UV-vis range show potential applications as UV detectors.less

  11. Formation of a new archetypal Metal-Organic Framework from a simple monatomic liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metere, Alfredo Oleynikov, Peter; Dzugutov, Mikhail; OKeeffe, Michael

    2014-12-21

    We report a molecular-dynamics simulation of a single-component system of particles interacting via a spherically symmetric potential that is found to form, upon cooling from a liquid state, a low-density porous crystalline phase. Its structure analysis demonstrates that the crystal can be described by a net with a topology that belongs to the class of topologies characteristic of the Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs). The observed net is new, and it is now included in the Reticular Chemistry Structure Resource database. The observation that a net topology characteristic of MOF crystals, which are known to be formed by a coordination-driven self-assembly process, can be reproduced by a thermodynamically stable configuration of a simple single-component system of particles opens a possibility of using these models in studies of MOF nets. It also indicates that structures with MOF topology, as well as other low-density porous crystalline structures can possibly be produced in colloidal systems of spherical particles, with an appropriate tuning of interparticle interaction.

  12. Methods for estimating wake flow and effluent dispersion near simple block-like buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    This report is intended as an interim guide for those who routinely face air quality problems associated with near-building exhaust stack placement and height, and the resulting concentration patterns. Available data and methods for estimating wake flow and effluent dispersion near isolated block-like structures are consolidated. The near-building and wake flows are described, and quantitative estimates for frontal eddy size, height and extent of roof and wake cavities, and far wake behavior are provided. Concentration calculation methods for upwind, near-building, and downwind pollutant sources are given. For an upwind source, it is possible to estimate the required stack height, and to place upper limits on the likely near-building concentration. The influences of near-building source location and characteristics relative to the building geometry and orientation are considered. Methods to estimate effective stack height, upper limits for concentration due to flush roof vents, and the effect of changes in rooftop stack height are summarized. Current wake and wake cavity models are presented. Numerous graphs of important expressions have been prepared to facilitate computations and quick estimates of flow patterns and concentration levels for specific simple buildings. Detailed recommendations for additional work are given.

  13. Biologically Relevant Mechanism For Catalytic Removal of Superoxide by Simple Manganese Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnese K.; Cabelli D.; Gralla, E.B.; Valentine, J.S.

    2012-05-01

    Nonenzymatic manganese was first shown to provide protection against superoxide toxicity in vivo in 1981, but the chemical mechanism responsible for this protection subsequently became controversial due to conflicting reports concerning the ability of Mn to catalyze superoxide disproportionation in vitro. In a recent communication, we reported that low concentrations of a simple Mn phosphate salt under physiologically relevant conditions will indeed catalyze superoxide disproportionation in vitro. We report now that two of the four Mn complexes that are expected to be most abundant in vivo, Mn phosphate and Mn carbonate, can catalyze superoxide disproportionation at physiologically relevant concentrations and pH, whereas Mn pyrophosphate and citrate complexes cannot. Additionally, the chemical mechanisms of these reactions have been studied in detail, and the rates of reactions of the catalytic removal of superoxide by Mn phosphate and carbonate have been modeled. Physiologically relevant concentrations of these compounds were found to be sufficient to mimic an effective concentration of enzymatic superoxide dismutase found in vivo. This mechanism provides a likely explanation as to how Mn combats superoxide stress in cellular systems.

  14. Simple method for highlighting the temperature distribution into a liquid sample heated by microwave power field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surducan, V.; Surducan, E.; Dadarlat, D.

    2013-11-13

    Microwave induced heating is widely used in medical treatments, scientific and industrial applications. The temperature field inside a microwave heated sample is often inhomogenous, therefore multiple temperature sensors are required for an accurate result. Nowadays, non-contact (Infra Red thermography or microwave radiometry) or direct contact temperature measurement methods (expensive and sophisticated fiber optic temperature sensors transparent to microwave radiation) are mainly used. IR thermography gives only the surface temperature and can not be used for measuring temperature distributions in cross sections of a sample. In this paper we present a very simple experimental method for temperature distribution highlighting inside a cross section of a liquid sample, heated by a microwave radiation through a coaxial applicator. The method proposed is able to offer qualitative information about the heating distribution, using a temperature sensitive liquid crystal sheet. Inhomogeneities as smaller as 1°-2°C produced by the symmetry irregularities of the microwave applicator can be easily detected by visual inspection or by computer assisted color to temperature conversion. Therefore, the microwave applicator is tuned and verified with described method until the temperature inhomogeneities are solved.

  15. Simple Limits on Achieving A Quasi-Linear Magnetic Compression for an FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Free electron lasers (FEL) need a very bright electron beam in three dimensions and a high peak charge density. In order to compress an initially longer electron bunch generated from the photoinjector, magnetic bunch compression systems are widely employed. In this paper, first harmonic RF linearization and its associated requirements are reviewed. Meanwhile it is also briefly discussed what is the relation between a proper initial bunch length and main RF frequency, when a harmonic RF linearization is included. Then given a reasonable bunch compression ratio, a proper initial bunch length as a function of the main RF frequency and RF phase is estimated analytically by several approaches, assuming that no harmonic RF section is needed to linearize the energy modulation introduced during main RF acceleration, and at the same time still linearly compress the bunch length. Next the upper limit of the bunch compression ratio in a single stage is evaluated analytically. The analytical relations derived on choosing a proper initial bunch length as a function of main RF frequency are confirmed by numerical simulation. These simple limit provide rough estimations and may be beneficial for choosing bunch compression ratios in different stages of an FEL driver, especially in a first stage bunch compression where there is usually a harmonic RF linearization applied. It may also be useful in evaluating the possibility of low charge operation mode without any harmonic RF linearization, where a shorter initial bunch length can be achieved from the photoinjector.

  16. HIGH AVERAGE CURRENT LOW EMITTANCE BEAM EMPLOYING CW NORMAL CONDUCTING GUN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KEWISCH, J.; PAI, C.

    2007-06-25

    CW normal conducting guns usually do not achieve very high field gradient and waste much RF power at high field gradient compared to superconducting cavities. But they have less trapped modes and wakefields compared to the superconducting cavities due to their low Q. The external bucking coil can also be applied very close to the cathode to improve the beam quality. By using a low frequency gun with a recessed cathode and a carefully designed beam line we can get a high average current and a high quality beam with acceptable RF power loss on the cavity wall. This paper shows that the CW normal conducting gun can be a backup solution for those projects which need high peak and average current, low emittance electron beams such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) e-cooling project and Energy Recovery Linac (Em) project.

  17. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helps to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.

  18. Induced supersolidity in a mixture of normal and hard-core bosons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Tapan; Das, B. P.; Pai, Ramesh V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a scenario where a supersolid is induced in one of the components of a mixture of two species bosonic atoms where there are no long-range interactions. We study a system of normal and hard-core boson mixture with only the former possessing long-range interactions. We consider three cases: the first where the total density is commensurate and the other two where it is incommensurate to the lattice. By suitable choices of the densities of normal and hard-core bosons and the interaction strengths between them, we predict that the charge density wave and the supersolid orders can be induced in the hard-core species as a result of the competing interatomic interactions.

  19. Regulation of bcl-2 proto-oncogene expression during normal human lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, J.C.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Alpers, J.D.; Croce, C.M.; Nowell, P.C.

    1987-06-05

    The bcl-2 and c-myc proto-oncogenes are brought into juxtaposition with the immuno-globulin heavy chain locus in particular B-cell lymphomas, resulting in high levels of constitutive accumulation of their messenger RNAs. Precisely how the products of the bcl-2 and c-myc genes contribute to tumorigenesis is unknown, but observations that c-myc expression is rapidly induced in nonneoplastic lymphocytes upon stimulation of proliferation raise the possibility that this proto-oncogene is involved in the control of normal cellular growth. In addition to c-myc, the bcl-2 proto-oncogene also was expressed in normal human B and T lymphocytes after stimulation with appropriate mitogens. Comparison of the regulation of the expression of these proto-oncogenes demonstrated marked differences and provided evidence that, in contrast to c-myc, levels of bcl-2 messenger RNA are regulated primarily though transcriptional mechanisms. 10 references, 3 figures.

  20. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helpsmore » to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.« less

  1. Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

    2006-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

  2. FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION MODELS OF THE MITRAL VALVE: FUNCTION IN NORMAL AND PATHOLOGIC STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunzelman, K. S.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Cochran, R. P.

    2007-08-29

    Successful mitral valve repair is dependent upon a full understanding of normal and abnormal mitral valve anatomy and function. Computational analysis is one such method that can be applied to simulate mitral valve function in order to analyze the roles of individual components, and evaluate proposed surgical repair. We developed the first three-dimensional, finite element (FE) computer model of the mitral valve including leaflets and chordae tendineae, however, one critical aspect that has been missing until the last few years was the evaluation of fluid flow, as coupled to the function of the mitral valve structure. We present here our latest results for normal function and specific pathologic changes using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Normal valve function was first assessed, followed by pathologic material changes in collagen fiber volume fraction, fiber stiffness, fiber splay, and isotropic stiffness. Leaflet and chordal stress and strain, and papillary muscle force was determined. In addition, transmitral flow, time to leaflet closure, and heart valve sound were assessed. Model predictions in the normal state agreed well with a wide range of available in-vivo and in-vitro data. Further, pathologic material changes that preserved the anisotropy of the valve leaflets were found to preserve valve function. By contrast, material changes that altered the anisotropy of the valve were found to profoundly alter valve function. The addition of blood flow and an experimentally driven microstructural description of mitral tissue represent significant advances in computational studies of the mitral valve, which allow further insight to be gained. This work is another building block in the foundation of a computational framework to aid in the refinement and development of a truly noninvasive diagnostic evaluation of the mitral valve. Ultimately, it represents the basis for simulation of surgical repair of pathologic valves in a clinical and educational setting.

  3. Analyzing the Contribution of Aerosols to an Observed Increase in Direct Normal Irradiance in Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Vignola, F.; Long, Charles N.

    2009-01-22

    Annual average total irradiance increases by 1-2% per decade at three mon- itoring stations in Oregon over the period from 1980 to 2007. Direct normal irradiance measurements increase by 5% per decade over the same time pe- riod. The measurements show no sign of a dimming before 1990. The impact of high concentrations of stratospheric aerosols following the volcanic erup- tions of El Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo are clearly seen in the measurements. Removing these years from the annual average all-sky time series reduces the trends in both total and direct normal irradiance. Clear-sky periods from this long direct normal time series are used in conjunction with radiative trans- fer calculations to test whether part of the increase could be caused by an- thropogenic aerosols. All three sites show relatively low clear-sky measure- ments before the eruption of El Chichon in 1982, suggesting higher aerosol loads during this period. After removing the periods most strongly impacted by volcanic eruptions, two of the sites show statistically signicant increases in clear-sky direct normal irradiance from 1987 to 2007. Radiative transfer calculations of the impact of volcanic aerosols and tropospheric water vapor indicate that only about 20% of that clear-sky increase between background aerosol periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo can be explained by these two factors. Thus, a statistically signicant clear-sky trend remains between 1987 and 2007 that is consistent with the hypothesis that at least some of the increase in surface irradiance could be caused by a reduction of anthropogenic aerosols. D

  4. Capacitor energy needed to induce transitions from the superconducting to the normal state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhard, P.H.; Ross, R.R.

    1985-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a technique to turn a long length of superconducting wire normal by dumping a charged capacitor into it and justify some formulae needed in the design. The physical phenomenon is described. A formula for the energy to be stored in the capacitor is given. There are circumstances where the dc in an electrical circuit containing superconducting elements has to be turned off quickly and where the most convenient way to switch the current off is to turn a large portion or all of the superconducting wire normal. Such was the case of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) superconducting magnet as soon as a quench was detected. The technique used was the discharge of a capacitor into the coil center tap. It turned the magnet winding normal in ten milliseconds or so and provided an adequate quench protection. The technique of discharging a capacitor into a superconducting wire should have many other applications whenever a substantial resistance in a superconducting circuit has to be generated in that kind of time scale. The process involves generating a pulse of large currents in some part of the circuit and heating the wire up by ac losses until the value of the wire critical current is smaller than the dc current. Use of low inductance connections to the circuit is necessary. Then the dc gets turned off due to the resistance of the wire as in a magnet quench.

  5. Normal ground state of dense relativistic matter in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbar, E. V.; Miransky, V. A.; Shovkovy, I. A.

    2011-04-15

    The properties of the ground state of relativistic matter in a magnetic field are examined within the framework of a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. The main emphasis of this study is the normal ground state, which is realized at sufficiently high temperatures and/or sufficiently large chemical potentials. In contrast to the vacuum state, which is characterized by the magnetic catalysis of chiral symmetry breaking, the normal state is accompanied by the dynamical generation of the chiral shift parameter {Delta}. In the chiral limit, the value of {Delta} determines a relative shift of the longitudinal momenta (along the direction of the magnetic field) in the dispersion relations of opposite chirality fermions. We argue that the chirality remains a good approximate quantum number even for massive fermions in the vicinity of the Fermi surface and, therefore, the chiral shift is expected to play an important role in many types of cold dense relativistic matter, relevant for applications in compact stars. The qualitative implications of the revealed structure of the normal ground state on the physics of protoneutron stars are discussed. A noticeable feature of the {Delta} parameter is that it is insensitive to temperature when T<<{mu}{sub 0}, where {mu}{sub 0} is the chemical potential, and increases with temperature for T>{mu}{sub 0}. The latter implies that the chiral shift parameter is also generated in the regime relevant for heavy ion collisions.

  6. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  7. Solubilities of Solutes in Ionic Liquids from a SimplePerturbed-Hard-Sphere Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Yuan; Prausnitz, John M.

    2005-09-20

    In recent years, several publications have provided solubilities of ordinary gases and liquids in ionic liquids. This work reports an initial attempt to correlate the experimental data using a perturbed-hard-sphere theory; the perturbation is based on well-known molecular physics when the solution is considered as a dielectric continuum. For this correlation, the most important input parameters are hard-sphere diameters of the solute and of the cation and anion that constitute the ionic liquid. In addition, the correlation uses the solvent density and the solute's polarizability and dipole and quadrupole moments, if any. Dispersion-energy parameters are obtained from global correlation of solubility data. Results are given for twenty solutes in several ionic liquids at normal temperatures; in addition, some results are given for gases in two molten salts at very high temperatures. Because the theory used here is much simplified, and because experimental uncertainties (especially for gaseous solutes) are often large, the accuracy of the correlation presented here is not high; in general, predicted solubilities (Henry's constants) agree with experiment to within roughly {+-} 70%. As more reliable experimental data become available, modifications in the characterizing parameters are likely to improve accuracy. Nevertheless, even in its present form, the correlation may be useful for solvent screening in engineering design.

  8. Exploration of Simple Analytical Approaches for Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salma Rahman

    2005-12-17

    Many of the current methods for pathogenic bacterial detection require long sample-preparation and analysis time, as well as complex instrumentation. This dissertation explores simple analytical approaches (e.g., flow cytometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy) that may be applied towards ideal requirements of a microbial detection system, through method and instrumentation development, and by the creation and characterization of immunosensing platforms. This dissertation is organized into six sections. In the general Introduction section a literature review on several of the key aspects of this work is presented. First, different approaches for detection of pathogenic bacteria will be reviewed, with a comparison of the relative strengths and weaknesses of each approach, A general overview regarding diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is then presented. Next, the structure and function of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed from organosulfur molecules at gold and micrometer and sub-micrometer patterning of biomolecules using SAMs will be discussed. This section is followed by four research chapters, presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 describes the efforts and challenges towards the creation of imunosensing platforms that exploit the flexibility and structural stability of SAMs of thiols at gold. 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyl-1-thiol SAM (PFDT) and dithio-bis(succinimidyl propionate)-(DSP)-derived SAMs were used to construct the platform. Chapter 2 describes the characterization of the PFDT- and DSP-derived SAMs, and the architectures formed when it is coupled to antibodies as well as target bacteria. These studies used infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), Chapter 3 presents a new sensitive, and portable diffuse reflection based technique for the rapid identification and quantification of pathogenic bacteria. Chapter 4 reports research efforts in the construction and evaluation of a prototype flow cytometry based cell detector and enumerator. This final research chapter is followed by a general summation and future prospectus section that concludes this dissertation.

  9. Gene expression profiles in rainbow trout, Onchorynchus mykiss, exposed to a simple chemical mixture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hook, Sharon E.; Skillman, Ann D.; Gopalan, Banu; Small, Jack A.; Schultz, Irvin R.

    2008-03-01

    Among proposed uses for microarrays in environmental toxiciology is the identification of key contributors to toxicity within a mixture. However, it remains uncertain whether the transcriptomic profiles resulting from exposure to a mixture have patterns of altered gene expression that contain identifiable contributions from each toxicant component. We exposed isogenic rainbow trout Onchorynchus mykiss, to sublethal levels of ethynylestradiol, 2,2,4,4 tetrabromodiphenyl ether, and chromium VI or to a mixture of all three toxicants Fluorescently labeled cDNA were generated and hybridized against a commercially available Salmonid array spotted with 16,000 cDNAs. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p < 0.05) with a Benjamani-Hochberg multiple test correction (Genespring (Agilent) software package) to identify up and down regulated genes. Gene clustering patterns that can be used as “expression signatures” were determined using hierarchical cluster analysis. The gene ontology terms associated with significantly altered genes were also used to identify functional groups that were associated with toxicant exposure. Cross-ontological analytics (XOA) approach was used to assign functional annotations to genes with "unknown" function. Our analysis indicates that transcriptomic profiles resulting from the mixture exposure resemble those of the individual contaminant exposures, but are not a simple additive list. However, patterns of altered genes representative of each component of the mixture are clearly discernible, and the functional classes of genes altered represent the individual components of the mixture. These findings indicate that the use of microarrays to identify transcriptomic profiles may aid in the identification of key stressors within a chemical mixture, ultimately improving environmental assessment.

  10. Simple shearing flow of dry soap foams with TCP structure[Tetrahedrally Close-Packed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REINELT,DOUGLAS A.; KRAYNIK,ANDREW M.

    2000-02-16

    The microrheology of dry soap foams subjected to large, quasistatic, simple shearing deformations is analyzed. Two different monodisperse foams with tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) structure are examined: Weaire-Phelan (A15) and Friauf-Laves (C15). The elastic-plastic response is evaluated by calculating foam structures that minimize total surface area at each value of strain. The minimal surfaces are computed with the Surface Evolver program developed by Brakke. The foam geometry and macroscopic stress are piecewise continuous functions of strain. The stress scales as T/V{sup 1/3} where T is surface tension and V is cell volume. Each discontinuity corresponds to large changes in foam geometry and topology that restore equilibrium to unstable configurations that violate Plateau's laws. The instabilities occur when the length of an edge on a polyhedral foam cell vanishes. The length can tend to zero smoothly or abruptly with strain. The abrupt case occurs when a small increase in strain changes the energy profile in the neighborhood of a foam structure from a local minimum to a saddle point, which can lead to symmetry-breaking bifurcations. In general, the new foam topology associated with each stable solution branch results from a cascade of local topology changes called T1 transitions. Each T1 cascade produces different cell neighbors, reduces surface energy, and provides an irreversible, film-level mechanism for plastic yield behavior. Stress-strain curves and average stresses are evaluated by examining foam orientations that admit strain-periodic behavior. For some orientations, the deformation cycle includes Kelvin cells instead of the original TCP structure; but the foam does not remain perfectly ordered. Bifurcations during subsequent T1 cascades lead to disorder and can even cause strain localization.

  11. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu Haoyang; Chen Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J.; Liu Tian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group. Patients with RTOG Grade 1 or 2 had greater ultrasound-assessed toxicity percentage changes than patients with RTOG Grade 0. Conclusion: Early and late radiation-induced effects on normal tissue can be reliably assessed using quantitative ultrasound.

  12. Nonlinear surface plasma wave induced target normal sheath acceleration of protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K. Shao, Xi; Liu, T. C.

    2015-02-15

    The mode structure of a large amplitude surface plasma wave (SPW) over a vacuum–plasma interface, including relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities, is deduced. It is shown that the SPW excited by a p-polarized laser on a rippled thin foil target can have larger amplitude than the transmitted laser amplitude and cause stronger target normal sheath acceleration of protons as reported in a recent experiment. Substantial enhancement in proton number also occurs due to the larger surface area covered by the SPW.

  13. An implementation of Hill's theory of normal anisotropic plasticity for explicit shell analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1991-08-20

    This paper summarizes the formulation and numerical implementation of a general anisotropic elastic-plastic material model for shell analysis. The 1948 Hill yield function is presented and specialized to conditions of plane stress. Next, an unconditionally stable and fully vectorized numerical algorithm for this constitutive model is presented. Finally, the model is specialized to conditions of normal anisotropy, and the implementation in DYNA3D is discussed. This development in material modeling should substantially extend the applicability of DYNA3D for many sheet metal forming applications. Several large-scale sheet metal forming examples are presented to illustrate these new analysis capabilities. 9 refs.

  14. An implementation of Hill`s theory of normal anisotropic plasticity for explicit shell analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1991-08-20

    This paper summarizes the formulation and numerical implementation of a general anisotropic elastic-plastic material model for shell analysis. The 1948 Hill yield function is presented and specialized to conditions of plane stress. Next, an unconditionally stable and fully vectorized numerical algorithm for this constitutive model is presented. Finally, the model is specialized to conditions of normal anisotropy, and the implementation in DYNA3D is discussed. This development in material modeling should substantially extend the applicability of DYNA3D for many sheet metal forming applications. Several large-scale sheet metal forming examples are presented to illustrate these new analysis capabilities. 9 refs.

  15. Spin transport in normal metal/insulator/topological insulator coupled to ferromagnetic insulator structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, Kenji

    2014-05-07

    In this study, we investigate the spin transport in normal metal (NM)/insulator (I)/topological insulator (TI) coupled to ferromagnetic insulator (FI) structures. In particular, we focus on the barrier thickness dependence of the spin transport inside the bulk gap of the TI with FI. The TI with FI is described by two-dimensional (2D) Dirac Hamiltonian. The energy profile of the insulator is assumed to be a square with barrier height V and thickness d along the transport-direction. This structure behaves as a tunnel device for 2D Dirac electrons. The calculation is performed for the spin conductance with changing the barrier thickness and the components of magnetization of FI layer. It is found that the spin conductance decreases with increasing the barrier thickness. Also, the spin conductance is strongly dependent on the polar angle ?, which is defined as the angle between the axis normal to the FI and the magnetization of FI layer. These results indicate that the structures are promising candidates for novel tunneling magnetoresistance devices.

  16. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  17. SU-D-18A-04: Quantifying the Ability of Tumor Tracking to Spare Normal Tissue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, A; Buzurovic, I; Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Lewis, J; Mishra, P; Seco, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumor tracking allows for smaller tissue volumes to be treated, potentially reducing normal tissue damage. However, tumor tracking is a more complex treatment and has little benefit in some scenarios. Here we quantify the benefit of tumor tracking for a range of patients by estimating the dose of radiation to organs at risk and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for both standard and tracking treatment plans. This comparison is performed using both patient 4DCT data and extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) digital phantoms. Methods: We use 4DCT data for 10 patients. Additionally, we generate digital phantoms with motion derived from measured patient long tumor trajectories to compare standard and tracking treatment plans. The standard treatment is based on the average intensity projection (AIP) of 4DCT images taken over a breath cycle. The tracking treatment is based on doses calculated on images representing the anatomy at each time point. It is assumed that there are no errors in tracking the target. The NTCP values are calculated based on RTOG guidelines. Results: The mean reduction in the mean dose delivered was 5.5% to the lungs (from 7.3 Gy to 6.9 Gy) and 4.0% to the heart (from 12.5 Gy to 12.0 Gy). The mean reduction in the max dose delivered was 13% to the spinal cord (from 27.6 Gy to 24.0 Gy), 2.5% to the carina (from 31.7 Gy to 30.9 Gy), and 15% to the esophagus (from 69.6 Gy to 58.9 Gy). The mean reduction in the probability of 2nd degree radiation pneumonitis (RP) was 8.7% (3.1% to 2.8%) and the mean reduction in the effective volume was 6.8% (10.8% to 10.2%). Conclusions: Tumor tracking has the potential to reduce irradiation of organs at risk, and consequentially reduce the normal tissue complication probability. The benefits vary based on the clinical scenario. This study is supported by Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  18. Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints for Normal-Tissue Effects of Radiation Therapy: The Importance of Dose-Volume Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentzen, Soren M.; Parliament, Matthew; Deasy, Joseph O.; Dicker, Adam; Curran, Walter J.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2010-03-01

    Biomarkers are of interest for predicting or monitoring normal tissue toxicity of radiation therapy. Advances in molecular radiobiology provide novel leads in the search for normal tissue biomarkers with sufficient sensitivity and specificity to become clinically useful. This article reviews examples of studies of biomarkers as predictive markers, as response markers, or as surrogate endpoints for radiation side effects. Single nucleotide polymorphisms are briefly discussed in the context of candidate gene and genomewide association studies. The importance of adjusting for radiation dose distribution in normal tissue biomarker studies is underlined. Finally, research priorities in this field are identified and discussed.

  19. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baptiste, Kenneth; Corlett, John; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Lidia, Steven; Qiang, Ji; Sannibale, Fernando; Sonnad, Kiran; Staples, John; Virostek, Steven; Wells, Russell

    2008-10-08

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx} 1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mmmrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx} 1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  20. Symmetric structure of field algebra of G-spin models determined by a normal subgroup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xin, Qiaoling Jiang, Lining

    2014-09-15

    Let G be a finite group and H a normal subgroup. D(H; G) is the crossed product of C(H) and CG which is only a subalgebra of D(G), the double algebra of G. One can construct a C*-subalgebra F{sub H} of the field algebra F of G-spin models, so that F{sub H} is a D(H; G)-module algebra, whereas F is not. Then the observable algebra A{sub (H,G)} is obtained as the D(H; G)-invariant subalgebra of F{sub H}, and there exists a unique C*-representation of D(H; G) such that D(H; G) and A{sub (H,G)} are commutants with each other.

  1. Environmental dose assessment methods for normal operations at DOE nuclear sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strenge, D.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Corley, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. The report includes a discussion of environmental doses to be calculated, a review of currently available environmental pathway models and a set of recommended models for use when environmental pathway modeling is necessary. Currently available models reviewed include those used by DOE contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other organizations involved in environmental assessments. General modeling areas considered for routine releases are atmospheric transport, airborne pathways, waterborne pathways, direct exposure to penetrating radiation, and internal dosimetry. The pathway models discussed in this report are applicable to long-term (annual) uniform releases to the environment: they do not apply to acute releases resulting from accidents or emergency situations.

  2. Automatic coke oven heating control system at Burns Harbor for normal and repair operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, E.T.; Chen, K.L.

    1997-12-31

    An automatic heating control system for coke oven batteries was developed in 1985 for the Burns Harbor No. 1 battery and reported in the 1989 Ironmaking Conference Proceedings. The original system was designed to maintain a target coke temperature at a given production level under normal operating conditions. Since 1989, enhancements have been made to this control system so that it can also control the battery heating when the battery is under repair. The new control system has improved heating control capability because it adjusts the heat input to the battery in response to anticipated changes in the production schedule. During a recent repair of this 82 oven battery, the pushing schedule changed from 102 ovens/day to 88 ovens/day, then back to 102 ovens/day, then to 107 ovens/day. During this repair, the control system was able to maintain the coke temperature average standard deviation at 44 F, with a maximum 75 F.

  3. Light trapping for emission from a photovoltaic cell under normally incident monochromatic illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko Iizuka, Hideo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kajino, Tsutomu; Ichiki, Akihisa; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2014-09-28

    We have theoretically demonstrated a new light-trapping mechanism to reduce emission from a photovoltaic (PV) cell used for a monochromatic light source, which improves limiting conversion efficiency determined by the detailed balance. A multilayered bandpass filter formed on the surface of a PV cell has been found to prevent the light generated inside by radiative recombination from escaping the cell, resulting in a remarkable decrease of the effective solid angle for the emission. We have clarified a guide to design a suitable configuration of the bandpass filter and achieved significant reduction of the emission. The resultant gain in monochromatic conversion efficiency in the radiative limit due to the optimally designed 18-layerd bandpass filters is as high as 6% under normally incident 1064 nm illumination of 10 mW/cm~ 1 kW/cm, compared with the efficiency for the perfect anti-reflection treatment to the surface of a conventional solar cell.

  4. Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2004-12-19

    Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: (1) fluorescence excitation spectra of MF680 and confocal microscopy images of thin sliced tissues incubated with MF680 confirm the site-specificity of the probe molecules in the cellular systems. (2) Tunneling parameters, {lambda}{sub 0} and {sigma}{sub {lambda}}, as well as the standard hole burning parameters (namely, {gamma} and S), have been determined for the tissue samples by hole growth kinetics (HGK) analyses. Unlike the preliminary cultured cell studies, these parameters have not shown the ability to distinguish tissue cellular matrices surrounding the chromophores. (3) Effects of an external electric (Stark) field on the nonphotochemical holes have been used to determine the changes in permanent dipole moment (f{Delta}{mu}) for MF680 in tissue samples when burn laser polarization is parallel to the Stark field. Differences are detected between f{Delta}{mu}s in the two tissue samples, with the cancerous tissue exhibiting a more pronounced change (1.35-fold increase) in permanent dipole moment change relative to the normal analogs. It is speculated that the difference may be related to differences in mitochondrial membrane potentials in these tissue samples. (4) In the HGK mode, hole burning imaging (HBI) of cells adhered to coverslips and cooled to liquid helium temperatures in the complete absence of cryopreservatives, shows the ability to distinguish between carcinoma and analogous normal cells on the single-cell level. In future applications, this system has the potential to be used with smears of tissue samples for single-layer HBI analysis. These conclusions demonstrate that HBI has the potential of providing detailed information about localized intracellular environments and for detecting changes in the physical characteristics (e.g., electrical properties) of cells which constitute the in vitro tissue samples. For the latter, the long-term goal will be to develop NPHB into a diagnostic technique for the early detection of cancer by exploiting the physical differences between normal and cancerous cells and tissues. Moreover, because of the aforementioned HBI's capability to detect cellular anomalies, it has the potential of being used in conjunction with studies involving photodynamic therapy, assuming the chromophore is carefully selected.

  5. Probability of Future Observations Exceeding One-Sided, Normal, Upper Tolerance Limits

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Edwards, Timothy S.

    2014-10-29

    Normal tolerance limits are frequently used in dynamic environments specifications of aerospace systems as a method to account for aleatory variability in the environments. Upper tolerance limits, when used in this way, are computed from records of the environment and used to enforce conservatism in the specification by describing upper extreme values the environment may take in the future. Components and systems are designed to withstand these extreme loads to ensure they do not fail under normal use conditions. The degree of conservatism in the upper tolerance limits is controlled by specifying the coverage and confidence level (usually written inmore » “coverage/confidence” form). Moreover, in high-consequence systems it is common to specify tolerance limits at 95% or 99% coverage and confidence at the 50% or 90% level. Despite the ubiquity of upper tolerance limits in the aerospace community, analysts and decision-makers frequently misinterpret their meaning. The misinterpretation extends into the standards that govern much of the acceptance and qualification of commercial and government aerospace systems. As a result, the risk of a future observation of the environment exceeding the upper tolerance limit is sometimes significantly underestimated by decision makers. This note explains the meaning of upper tolerance limits and a related measure, the upper prediction limit. So, the objective of this work is to clarify the probability of exceeding these limits in flight so that decision-makers can better understand the risk associated with exceeding design and test levels during flight and balance the cost of design and development with that of mission failure.« less

  6. The onset of shear modes in the high frequency spectrum of simple disordered systems: Current knowledge and perspectives

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cunsolo, Alessandro; Suvorov, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.

    2015-10-20

    In this study, nearly two decades of thorough Inelastic X Ray Scattering (IXS) studies of transverse-like excitation in the spectrum simple amorphous materials are reviewed. A particular attention is given to the case of liquid water and other prototypical samples, through a discussion of both solved and still open issues. Finally, the perspectives opened up by the development of next generation IXS instruments with unprecedented contrast and resolution bandwidth are briefly illustrated.

  7. La-doped ZnO nanoparticles: Simple solution-combusting preparation and applications in the wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Tingting; Ni, Yonghong; Ma, Xiang; Hong, Jianming

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: La-doped ZnO nanoparticles have been successfully prepared by a simple solution combustion route and exhibit good adsorption for Cu and Pb ion from water systems. - Highlights: • La-doped ZnO nanoparticles were successfully prepared via a simple solution-combustion route. • The integration of La{sup 3+} ions into ZnO decreased the band-gap of ZnO nanoparticles. • La-doped ZnO nanoparticles could remove more Pb and Cu ions from water resources than undoped ZnO. - Abstract: La-doped ZnO nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by a simple solution combustion method via employing a mixture of ethanol and ethyleneglycol (v/v = 60/40) as the solvent. Zinc acetate and oxygen gas in the atmosphere were used as zinc and oxygen sources, and La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} as the doping reagent. The as-obtained product was characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Experiments showed that La-doped ZnO nanoparticles exhibited the higher capacities for the removal of Pb{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} ions in water resource than undoped ZnO nanoparticles.

  8. EA-1123: Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium to the United Kingdom; thus,...

  9. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elasticplastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model is based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elasticplastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.

  10. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elastic–plastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model ismore » based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elastic–plastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.« less

  11. Impact of Millimeter-Level Margins on Peripheral Normal Brain Sparing for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun; Larson, David A.; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Fogh, Shannon; Barani, Igor; Nakamura, Jean; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate how millimeter-level margins beyond the gross tumor volume (GTV) impact peripheral normal brain tissue sparing for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A mathematical formula was derived to predict the peripheral isodose volume, such as the 12-Gy isodose volume, with increasing margins by millimeters. The empirical parameters of the formula were derived from a cohort of brain tumor and surgical tumor resection cavity cases (n=15) treated with the Gamma Knife Perfexion. This was done by first adding margins from 0.5 to 3.0 mm to each individual target and then creating for each expanded target a series of treatment plans of nearly identical quality as the original plan. Finally, the formula was integrated with a published logistic regression model to estimate the treatment-induced complication rate for stereotactic radiosurgery when millimeter-level margins are added. Results: Confirmatory correlation between the nominal target radius (ie, R{sub T}) and commonly used maximum target size was found for the studied cases, except for a few outliers. The peripheral isodose volume such as the 12-Gy volume was found to increase exponentially with increasing Δ/R{sub T}, where Δ is the margin size. Such a curve fitted the data (logarithmic regression, R{sup 2} >0.99), and the 12-Gy isodose volume was shown to increase steeply with a 0.5- to 3.0-mm margin applied to a target. For example, a 2-mm margin on average resulted in an increase of 55% ± 16% in the 12-Gy volume; this corresponded to an increase in the symptomatic necrosis rate of 6% to 25%, depending on the Δ/R{sub T} values for the target. Conclusions: Millimeter-level margins beyond the GTV significantly impact peripheral normal brain sparing and should be applied with caution. Our model provides a rapid estimate of such an effect, particularly for large and/or irregularly shaped targets.

  12. Initial experimental evidence of self-collimation of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam in a stack of conducting foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, P. A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Logan, B. G.; Lund, S. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Bellei, C.; Cohen, R. H.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; Kim, J.; Alexander, N.; Aurand, B.; Brabetz, C.; Neumayer, P.; Roth, M.

    2013-08-15

    Phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons was experimentally observed for the first time, in a specially engineered structure (lens) consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50 ?m vacuum gaps. The experiments were carried out in a passive environment, i.e., no external fields applied, neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. Experiments were performed at the petawatt PHELIX laser user facility (E = 100 J, ?t = 400 fs, ? = 1062 nm) at the Helmholtzzentrum fr SchwerionenforschungGSI in Darmstadt, Germany. The observed rms beam spot reduction depends inversely on energy, with a focusing degree decreasing monotonically from 2 at 5.4 MeV to 1.5 at 18.7 MeV. The physics inside the lens is complex, resulting in a number of different mechanisms that can potentially affect the particle dynamics within the structure. We present a plausible simple interpretation of the experiment in which the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the foils are the dominant mechanisms responsible for the observed focusing/collimation. This focusing technique could be applied to a wide variety of space-charge dominated proton and heavy ion beams and impact fields and applications, such as HEDP science, inertial confinement fusion in both fast ignition and heavy ion fusion approaches, compact laser-driven injectors for a Linear Accelerator (LINAC) or synchrotron, medical therapy, materials processing, etc.

  13. Neutronics and Fuel Performance Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Fuel under Normal Operation Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Wu; Piyush Sabharwall; Jason Hales

    2014-07-01

    This report details the analysis of neutronics and fuel performance analysis for enhanced accident tolerance fuel, with Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent and INL’s fuel performance code BISON, respectively. The purpose is to evaluate two of the most promising candidate materials, FeCrAl and Silicon Carbide (SiC), as the fuel cladding under normal operating conditions. Substantial neutron penalty is identified when FeCrAl is used as monolithic cladding for current oxide fuel. From the reactor physics standpoint, application of the FeCrAl alloy as coating layer on surface of zircaloy cladding is possible without increasing fuel enrichment. Meanwhile, SiC brings extra reactivity and the neutron penalty is of no concern. Application of either FeCrAl or SiC could be favorable from the fuel performance standpoint. Detailed comparison between monolithic cladding and hybrid cladding (cladding + coating) is discussed. Hybrid cladding is more practical based on the economics evaluation during the transition from current UO2/zircaloy to Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) system. However, a few issues remain to be resolved, such as the creep behavior of FeCrAl, coating spallation, inter diffusion with zirconium, etc. For SiC, its high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, low thermal neutron absorption cross section, irradiation stability (minimal swelling) make it an excellent candidate materials for future nuclear fuel/cladding system.

  14. Normal conditions of transport thermal analysis and testing of a Type B drum package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerrell, J.W.; Alstine, M.N. van; Gromada, R.J.

    1995-11-01

    Increasing the content limits of radioactive material packagings can save money and increase transportation safety by decreasing the total number of shipments required to transport large quantities of material. The contents of drum packages can be limited by unacceptable containment vessel pressures and temperatures due to the thermal properties of the insulation. The purpose of this work is to understand and predict the effects of insulation properties on containment system performance. The type B shipping container used in the study is a double containment fiberboard drum package. The package is primarily used to transport uranium and plutonium metals and oxides. A normal condition of transport (NCT) thermal test was performed to benchmark an NCT analysis of the package. A 21 W heater was placed in an instrumented package to simulate the maximum source decay heat. The package reached thermal equilibrium 120 hours after the heater was turned on. Testing took place indoors to minimize ambient temperature fluctuations. The thermal analysis of the package used fiberboard properties reported in the literature and resulted in temperature significantly greater than those measured during the test. Details of the NCT test will be described and transient temperatures at key thermocouple locations within the package will be presented. Analytical results using nominal fiberboard properties will be presented. Explanations of the results and the attempt to benchmark the analysis will be presented. The discovery that fiberboard has an anisotropic thermal conductivity and its effect on thermal performance will also be discussed.

  15. Analytical energy gradient for the two-component normalized elimination of the small component method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Wenli; Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2015-06-07

    The analytical gradient for the two-component Normalized Elimination of the Small Component (2c-NESC) method is presented. The 2c-NESC is a Dirac-exact method that employs the exact two-component one-electron Hamiltonian and thus leads to exact Dirac spin-orbit (SO) splittings for one-electron atoms. For many-electron atoms and molecules, the effect of the two-electron SO interaction is modeled by a screened nucleus potential using effective nuclear charges as proposed by Boettger [Phys. Rev. B 62, 7809 (2000)]. The effect of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on molecular geometries is analyzed utilizing the properties of the frontier orbitals and calculated SO couplings. It is shown that bond lengths can either be lengthened or shortened under the impact of SOC where in the first case the influence of low lying excited states with occupied antibonding orbitals plays a role and in the second case the jj-coupling between occupied antibonding and unoccupied bonding orbitals dominates. In general, the effect of SOC on bond lengths is relatively small (≤5% of the scalar relativistic changes in the bond length). However, large effects are found for van der Waals complexes Hg{sub 2} and Cn{sub 2}, which are due to the admixture of more bonding character to the highest occupied spinors.

  16. Localization and proliferation of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane in normal state and regeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyashita, Takenori; Burford, James L.; Hong, Young-Kwon; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Mori, Nozomu; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •We newly developed the whole-mount imaging method of the tympanic membrane. •Lymphatic vessel loops were localized around the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. •In regeneration, abundant lymphatic vessels were observed in the pars tensa. •Site-specific lymphatic vessels may play an important role in the tympanic membrane. -- Abstract: We clarified the localization of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane and proliferation of lymphatic vessels during regeneration after perforation of the tympanic membrane by using whole-mount imaging of the tympanic membrane of Prox1 GFP mice. In the pars tensa, lymphatic vessel loops surrounded the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. Apart from these locations, lymphatic vessel loops were not observed in the pars tensa in the normal tympanic membrane. Lymphatic vessel loops surrounding the malleus handle were connected to the lymphatic vessel loops in the pars flaccida and around the tensor tympani muscle. Many lymphatic vessel loops were detected in the pars flaccida. After perforation of the tympanic membrane, abundant lymphatic regeneration was observed in the pars tensa, and these regenerated lymphatic vessels extended from the lymphatic vessels surrounding the malleus at day 7. These results suggest that site-specific lymphatic vessels play an important role in the tympanic membrane.

  17. PCI-related cladding failures during off-normal events - draft. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Houten, R.; Tokar, M.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1984-05-01

    Pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) has long been identified as a fuel rod failure mechanism during power increases in both pressurized and boiling water reactors, and commercial guidelines have practically eliminated such failures during standard operations. A question remains regarding the possible formation of through-wall cladding cracks during several types of postulated off-normal reactor events involving power increases. This report includes preliminary findings for reactor events of the type addressed by Chapter 15 of the NRC Standard Review Plan. Specifically, the BWR turbine trip without bypass, PWR control rod withdrawal error, subcritical PWR control rod withdrawal error, BWR control blade withdrawal error, and the PWR steamline break are analyzed on the joint bases of peak rod power, power increase, ramp rate, and duration at elevated power. These Chapter 15 events are compared to numerous test reactor results and to other relevant investigations, and tentative conclusions on transient severity and data base adequacy are presented. Progress in developing computer codes for predicting PCI-induced fuel rod failures is also discussed. 49 references.

  18. Spin and charge pseudogaps following Kondo effect in the normal state of the underdoped cuprates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mojumder, M.A.

    1999-10-30

    A study of experimental results on various parameters of underdoped cuprates in the normal state combined with analytic calculation of Hall parameters assuming a two-channel Kondo model for the system leads to the conclusion that the spin and charge pseudogaps are, respectively, a Kondo hybridization gap and an incipient d-wave superconducting gap. The former occurs due to resonant scattering of doped holes by the magnetic Cu{sup 2+} ions while the latter occurs due to incoherent Cooper pairing of Kondo-compensated quasi-itinerant Cu d-orbitals via exchange of spin excitations. The author comments on the essential similarity of the high-T{sub c} and heavy fermion superconductors and a certain crossover at lower temperatures from the two-channel to the one-channel Kondo model. An expression has been derived for the Kondo contribution to the spectral function of the charge pseudogap. The author believes this work unravels the long-standing conundrum of the high-T{sub c} cuprates.

  19. Generalized Dix equation and analytic treatment of normal-movement velocity for anisotropic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grechka, V.; Tsvankin, I.; Cohen, J.K.

    1999-03-01

    Despite the complexity of wave propagation in anisotropic media, reflection moveout on conventional common-midpoint (CMP) spreads is usually well described by the normal-moveout (NMO) velocity defined in the zero-offset limit. In their recent work, Grechka and Tsvankin showed that the azimuthal variation of NMO velocity around a fixed CMP location generally has an elliptical form (i.e., plotting the NMO velocity in each azimuthal direction produces an ellipse) and is determined by the spatial derivatives of the slowness vector evaluated at the CMP location. This formalism is used here to develop exact solutions for the NMO velocity in anisotropic media of arbitrary symmetry. The high accuracy of the NMO expressions is illustrated by comparison with ray-traced reflection traveltimes in piecewise-homogeneous, azimuthally anisotropic models. The authors also apply the generalized Dix equation to field data collected over a fractured reservoir and show that P-wave moveout can be used to find the depth-dependent fracture orientation and to evaluate the magnitude of azimuthal anisotropy.

  20. Mixing characteristics of compressible vortex rings interacting with normal shock waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetegen, B.M. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Hermanson, J.C. )

    1995-01-01

    Current interest in the interaction between compressible vortical flows and shock waves is largely motivated by the need to promote rapid, loss-effective mixing and combustion of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels for supersonic combustor applications. The instability mechanisms and mixing enhancement arising from the interaction of a compressible vortex ring with a normal shock wave were studied in a colinear, dual-shock tube. This flow geometry simulates features of the interaction of a shock wave with a jet containing streamwise vorticity, a configuration of significant interest for supersonic combustion applications. Flow visualization and quantitative concentration measurements were performed by planar laser Rayleigh scattering. For a given primary shock strength, interfacial instability is more evident in a weak vortex ring than in a strong vortex ring. In all cases, the identity of the vortex ring is lost after a sufficiently long time of interaction. The probability density function of the mixed fluid changes rapidly from a bimodal distribution to a single peak upon processing by a shock wave. The most probable concentration decreases with time, indicating a rapid increase in mixing and dilution of the vortex fluid. The mixing enhancement is most rapid for the case of a strong vortex ring interacting with a strong shock wave, somewhat slower for a weak vortex ring and a strong shock wave, and significantly slower for the case of a strong vortex ring and a weaker shock wave. These observations are consistent with the earlier numerical predictions.

  1. Assessment of CCFL model of RELAP5/MOD3 against simple vertical tubes and rod bundle tests. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, S.; Arne, N.; Chung, B.D.; Kim, H.J.

    1993-06-01

    The CCFL model used in RELAP5/MOD3 version 5m5 has been assessed against simple vertical tubes and bundle tests performed at a facility of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The effect of changes in tube diameter and nodalization of tube section were investigated. The roles of interfacial drags on the flooding characteristics are discussed. Differences between the calculation and the experiment are also discussed. A comparison between model assessment results and the test data showed that the calculated value lay well on the experimental flooding curve specified by user, but the pressure jump before onset of flooding was not calculated.

  2. The Status of Normal Conducting RF (NCRF) Guns, a Summary of the ERL2005 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D.H.; Lewellen, J.W.; Nguyen, D.; Rimmer, R.; /Jefferson Lab

    2006-03-13

    The 32nd Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL2005) was held at Jefferson Laboratory, March 20 to 23, 2005. A wide range of ERL-related topics were presented and discussed in several working groups with Working Group 1 concentrated upon the physics and technology issues for DC, superconducting RF (SRF) and normal conducting RF (NCRF) guns. This paper summarizes the NCRF gun talks and reviews the status of NCRF gun technology. It begins with the presentations made on the subject of low-frequency, high-duty factor guns most appropriate for ERLs. One such gun at 433MHz was demonstrated at 25%DF in 1992, while the CW and much improved version is currently being constructed at 700MHz for LANL. In addition, the idea of combining the NCRF gun with a SRF linac booster was presented and is described in this paper. There was also a talk on high-field guns typically used for SASE free electron lasers. In particular, the DESY coaxial RF feed design provides rotationally symmetric RF fields and greater flexibility in the placement of the focusing magnetic field. While in the LCLS approach, the symmetric fields are obtained with a dual RF feed and racetrack cell shape. Although these guns cannot be operated at high-duty factor, they do produce the best quality beams. With these limitations in mind, a section with material not presented at the workshop has been included in the paper. This work describes a re-entrant approach which may allow NCRF guns to operate with simultaneously increased RF fields and duty factors. And finally, a novel proposal describing a high-duty factor, two-frequency RF gun using a field emission source instead of a laser driven photocathode was also presented.

  3. The status of normal conducting RF (NCRF) guns; a summary of the ERL2005 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.H. Dowell; J.W. Lewellen; D. Nguyen; R.A. Rimmer

    2005-03-19

    The 32nd Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL2005) was held at Jefferson Laboratory, March 20 to 23, 2005. A wide range of ERL-related topics were presented and discussed in several working groups with Working Group 1 concentrated upon the physics and technology issues for DC, superconducting RF (SRF) and normal conducting RF (NCRF) guns. This paper summarizes the NCRF gun talks and reviews the status of NCRF gun technology. It begins with the presentations made on the subject of low-frequency, high-duty factor guns most appropriate for ERLs. One such gun at 433MHz was demonstrated at 25%DF in 1992, while the CW and much improved version is currently being constructed at 700MHz for LANL. In addition, the idea of combining the NCRF gun with a SRF linac booster was presented and is described in this paper. There was also a talk on high-field guns typically used for SASE free electron lasers. In particular, the DESY coaxial RF feed design provides rotationally symmetric RF fields and greater flexibility in the placement of the focusing magnetic field. While in the LCLS approach, the symmetric fields are obtained with a dual RF feed and racetrack cell shape. Although these guns cannot be operated at high-duty factor, they do produce the best quality beams. With these limitations in mind, a section with material not presented at the workshop has been included in the paper. This work describes a re-entrant approach which may allow NCRF guns to operate with simultaneously increased RF fields and duty factors. And finally, a novel proposal describing a high-duty factor, two-frequency RF gun using a field emission source instead of a laser driven photocathode was also presented.

  4. Survival of tumor and normal cells upon targeting with electron-emitting radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajon, Didier; Bolch, Wesley E.; Howell, Roger W.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that the mean absorbed dose to a tissue element may not be a suitable quantity for correlating with the biological response of cells in that tissue element. Cell survival can depend strongly on the distribution of radioactivity at the cellular and multicellular levels. Furthermore, when cellular absorbed doses are examined, the cross-dose from neighbor cells can be less radiotoxic than the self-dose component. To better understand how the nonuniformity of activity among cells can affect the dose response, a computer model of a 3D tissue culture was previously constructed and showed that activity distribution among cells is significantly more relevant than the mean absorbed dose for low-energy-electron emitters. The present work greatly expands upon those findings. Methods: In the present study, we used this same computer model but restricted the number of labeled cells to a fraction of the whole cell population (50%, 10%, and 1%, respectively). The labeled cells were randomly distributed among the whole cell population. Results: While the activity distribution is an important factor in determining the tissue response for low-energy-electron emitters, the fraction of labeled cells has an even more pronounced effect on survival response. For all electron energies studied, reducing the percentage of cells labeled significantly increases the surviving fraction of the whole population. Conclusions: This study provides abundant information on killing tumor and normal cells under some conditions relevant to targeted radionuclide therapy of isolated tumor cells and micrometastases. The percentage of cells labeled, activity distribution among the labeled cells, and electron energy play key roles in determining their response. Most importantly, and not previously demonstrated, lognormal activity distributions can have a profound impact on the response of the tumor cells even when the radionuclide emits high-energy electrons.

  5. Grouping normal type Ia supernovae by UV to optical color differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milne, Peter A.; Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Bufano, Filomena; Gehrels, Neil

    2013-12-10

    Observations of many Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) for multiple epochs per object with the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope instrument have revealed that there exists order to the differences in the UV-optical colors of optically normal supernovae (SNe). We examine UV-optical color curves for 23 SNe Ia, dividing the SNe into four groups, and find that roughly one-third of 'NUV-blue' SNe Ia have bluer UV-optical colors than the larger 'NUV-red' group. Two minor groups are recognized, 'MUV-blue' and 'irregular' SNe Ia. While we conclude that the latter group is a subset of the NUV-red group, containing the SNe with the broadest optical peaks, we conclude that the 'MUV-blue' group is a distinct group. Separating into the groups and accounting for the time evolution of the UV-optical colors lowers the scatter in two NUV-optical colors (e.g., u v and uvw1 v) to the level of the scatter in b v. This finding is promising for extending the cosmological utilization of SNe Ia into the NUV. We generate spectrophotometry of 33 SNe Ia and determine the correct grouping for each. We argue that there is a fundamental spectral difference in the 2900-3500 wavelength range, a region suggested to be dominated by absorption from iron-peak elements. The NUV-blue SNe Ia feature less absorption than the NUV-red SNe Ia. We show that all NUV-blue SNe Ia in this sample also show evidence of unburned carbon in optical spectra, whereas only one NUV-red SN Ia features that absorption line. Every NUV-blue event also exhibits a low gradient of the Si II ?6355 absorption feature. Many NUV-red events also exhibit a low gradient, perhaps suggestive that NUV-blue events are a subset of the larger low-velocity gradient group.

  6. Energetic deposition of metal ions: Observation of self-sputtering and limited sticking for off-normal angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hongchen; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-15

    The deposition of films under normal and off-normal angle of incidence has been investigated to show the relevance of non-sticking of and self-sputtering by energetic ions, leading to the formation of neutral atoms. The flow of energetic ions was obtained using a filtered cathodic arc system in high vacuum and therefore the ion flux had a broad energy distribution of typically 50-100 eV per ion. The range of materials included Cu, Ag, Au, Ti, and Ni. Consistent with molecular dynamics simulations published in the literature, the experiments show, for all materials, that the combined effects of non-sticking and self-sputtering are very significant, especially for large off-normal angles. Modest heating and intentional introduction of oxygen background affect the results.

  7. First-principles binary diffusion coefficients for H, H2 and four normal alkanes + N2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jasper, Ahren W.; Kamarchik, Eugene; Miller, James A.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2014-09-30

    Collision integrals related to binary (dilute gas) diffusion are calculated classically for six species colliding with N2. The most detailed calculations make no assumptions regarding the complexity of the potential energy surface, and the resulting classical collision integrals are in excellent agreement with previous semiclassical results for H + N2 and H2 + N2 and with recent experimental results for C n H2n+2 + N2, n = 2–4. The detailed classical results are used to test the accuracy of three simplifying assumptions typically made when calculating collision integrals: (1) approximating the intermolecular potential as isotropic, (2) neglecting the internal structuremore » of the colliders (i.e., neglecting inelasticity), and (3) employing unphysical R–12 repulsive interactions. The effect of anisotropy is found to be negligible for H + N2 and H2 + N2 (in agreement with previous quantum mechanical and semiclassical results for systems involving atomic and diatomic species) but is more significant for larger species at low temperatures. For example, the neglect of anisotropy decreases the diffusion coefficient for butane + N2 by 15% at 300 K. The neglect of inelasticity, in contrast, introduces only very small errors. Approximating the repulsive wall as an unphysical R–12 interaction is a significant source of error at all temperatures for the weakly interacting systems H + N2 and H2 + N2, with errors as large as 40%. For the normal alkanes in N2, which feature stronger interactions, the 12/6 Lennard–Jones approximation is found to be accurate, particularly at temperatures above –700 K where it predicts the full-dimensional result to within 5% (although with somewhat different temperature dependence). Overall, the typical practical approach of assuming isotropic 12/6 Lennard–Jones interactions is confirmed to be suitable for combustion applications except for weakly interacting systems, such as H + N2. For these systems, anisotropy and inelasticity can safely be neglected but a more detailed description of the repulsive wall is required for quantitative predictions. Moreover, a straightforward approach for calculating effective isotropic potentials with realistic repulsive walls is described. An analytic expression for the calculated diffusion coefficient for H + N2 is presented and is estimated to have a 2-sigma error bar of only 0.7%.« less

  8. Quantifying Unnecessary Normal Tissue Complication Risks due to Suboptimal Planning: A Secondary Study of RTOG 0126

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Kevin L.; Schmidt, Rachel; Moiseenko, Vitali; Olsen, Lindsey A.; Tan, Jun; Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James; Pugh, Stephanie; Seider, Michael J.; Dicker, Adam P.; Bosch, Walter; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the frequency and clinical severity of quality deficiencies in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol. Methods and Materials: A total of 219 IMRT patients from the high-dose arm (79.2 Gy) of RTOG 0126 were analyzed. To quantify plan quality, we used established knowledge-based methods for patient-specific dose-volume histogram (DVH) prediction of organs at risk and a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model for grade ≥2 rectal complications to convert DVHs into normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). The LKB model was validated by fitting dose-response parameters relative to observed toxicities. The 90th percentile (22 of 219) of plans with the lowest excess risk (difference between clinical and model-predicted NTCP) were used to create a model for the presumed best practices in the protocol (pDVH{sub 0126,top10%}). Applying the resultant model to the entire sample enabled comparisons between DVHs that patients could have received to DVHs they actually received. Excess risk quantified the clinical impact of suboptimal planning. Accuracy of pDVH predictions was validated by replanning 30 of 219 patients (13.7%), including equal numbers of presumed “high-quality,” “low-quality,” and randomly sampled plans. NTCP-predicted toxicities were compared to adverse events on protocol. Results: Existing models showed that bladder-sparing variations were less prevalent than rectum quality variations and that increased rectal sparing was not correlated with target metrics (dose received by 98% and 2% of the PTV, respectively). Observed toxicities were consistent with current LKB parameters. Converting DVH and pDVH{sub 0126,top10%} to rectal NTCPs, we observed 94 of 219 patients (42.9%) with ≥5% excess risk, 20 of 219 patients (9.1%) with ≥10% excess risk, and 2 of 219 patients (0.9%) with ≥15% excess risk. Replanning demonstrated the predicted NTCP reductions while maintaining the volume of the PTV receiving prescription dose. An equivalent sample of high-quality plans showed fewer toxicities than low-quality plans, 6 of 73 versus 10 of 73 respectively, although these differences were not significant (P=.21) due to insufficient statistical power in this retrospective study. Conclusions: Plan quality deficiencies in RTOG 0126 exposed patients to substantial excess risk for rectal complications.

  9. Audits Made Simple

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belangia, David Warren

    2015-04-09

    A company just got notified there is a big external audit coming in 3 months. Getting ready for an audit can be challenging, scary, and full of surprises. This Gold Paper describes a typical audit from notification of the intent to audit through disposition of the final report including Best Practices, Opportunities for Improvement (OFI), and issues that must be fixed. Good preparation can improve the chances of success. Ensuring the auditors understand the environment and requirements is paramount to success. It helps the auditors understand that the enterprise really does think that security is important. Understanding and following a structured process ensures a smooth audit process. Ensuring follow-up on OFIs and issues in a structured fashion will also make the next audit easier. It is important to keep in mind that the auditors will use the previous report as a starting point. Now the only worry is the actual audit and subsequent report and how well the company has done.

  10. Simple Electric Vehicle Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-07-29

    SIMPLEV2.0 is an electric vehicle simulation code which can be used with any IBM compatible personal computer. This general purpose simulation program is useful for performing parametric studies of electric and series hybrid electric vehicle performance on user input driving cycles.. The program is run interactively and guides the user through all of the necessary inputs. Driveline components and the traction battery are described and defined by ASCII files which may be customized by themore » user. Scaling of these components is also possible. Detailed simulation results are plotted on the PC monitor and may also be printed on a printer attached to the PC.« less

  11. Simple Summer Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There are many tips for saving energy and energy costs in the upcoming months of unending heat and humidity.

  12. Interfacing relativistic and nonrelativistic methods. I. Normalized elimination of the small component in the modified Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyall, K.G.

    1997-06-01

    The introduction of relativistic terms into the nonrelativistic all-electron Schr{umlt o}dinger equation is achieved by the method of normalized elimination of the small component (ESC) within the matrix representation of the modified Dirac equation. In contrast to the usual method of ESC, the method presented retains the correct relativistic normalization, and permits the construction of a single matrix relating the large and small component coefficient matrices for an entire set of positive energy one-particle states, thus enabling the whole set to be obtained with a single diagonalization. This matrix is used to define a modified set of one- and two-electron integrals which have the same appearance as the nonrelativistic integrals, and to which they reduce in the limit {alpha}{r_arrow}0. The normalized method corresponds to a projection of the Dirac{endash}Fock matrix onto the positive energy states. Inclusion of the normalization reduces the discrepancy between the eigenvalues of the ESC approach and the Dirac eigenvalues for a model problem from order {alpha}{sup 2} to order {alpha}{sup 4}, providing a closer approximation to the original, uneliminated solutions. The transition between the nonrelativistic and relativistic limits is achieved by simply scaling the fine structure constant {alpha}. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made by electron beam melting and direct laser metal sintering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Payzant, E Andrew; Cornwell, Paris A; Watkins, Thomas R; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Dehoff, Ryan R; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of Inconel 718: one fabricated with electron beam melting and the other with direct laser sintering. Spatially indexed stress-free cubes were obtained by EDM sectioning equivalent prisms of similar shape. The (311) interplanar spacing examined for the EDM sectioned sample was compared to the interplanar spacings calculated to fulfill force and moment balance. We have shown that Applying force and moment balance is a necessary supplement to the measurements for the stress-free cubes with respect to accurate stress calculations in additively manufactured components. In addition, our workmore » has shown that residual stresses in electron beam melting parts are much smaller than that of direct laser metal sintering parts.« less

  14. Temperature dependent DC electrical conductivity studies of ZnO nanoparticle thick films prepared by simple solution combustion method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naveen, C. S. Jayanna, H. S. Lamani, Ashok R. Rajeeva, M. P.

    2014-04-24

    ZnO nanoparticles of different size were prepared by varying the molar ratio of glycine and zinc nitrate hexahydrate as fuel and oxidizer (F/O = 0.8, 1.11, 1.7) by simple solution combustion method. Powder samples were characterized by UV-Visible spectrophotometer, X-ray diffractometer, Scanning electron microscope (SEM). DC electrical conductivity measurements at room temperature and in the temperature range of 313-673K were carried out for the prepared thick films and it was found to increase with increase of temperature which confirms the semiconducting nature of the samples. Activation energies were calculated and it was found that, F/O molar ratio 1.7 has low E{sub AL} (Low temperature activation energy) and high E{sub AH} (High temperature activation energy) compared to other samples.

  15. Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made by electron beam melting and direct laser metal sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolbus, Lindsay M; Payzant, E Andrew; Cornwell, Paris A; Watkins, Thomas R; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Dehoff, Ryan R; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of Inconel 718: one fabricated with electron beam melting and the other with direct laser sintering. Spatially indexed stress-free cubes were obtained by EDM sectioning equivalent prisms of similar shape. The (311) interplanar spacing examined for the EDM sectioned sample was compared to the interplanar spacings calculated to fulfill force and moment balance. We have shown that Applying force and moment balance is a necessary supplement to the measurements for the stress-free cubes with respect to accurate stress calculations in additively manufactured components. In addition, our work has shown that residual stresses in electron beam melting parts are much smaller than that of direct laser metal sintering parts.

  16. Dielectric spectroscopy at the nanoscale by atomic force microscopy: A simple model linking materials properties and experimental response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miccio, Luis A. Colmenero, Juan; Kummali, Mohammed M.; Alegra, ngel; Schwartz, Gustavo A.

    2014-05-14

    The use of an atomic force microscope for studying molecular dynamics through dielectric spectroscopy with spatial resolution in the nanometer scale is a recently developed approach. However, difficulties in the quantitative connection of the obtained data and the material dielectric properties, namely, frequency dependent dielectric permittivity, have limited its application. In this work, we develop a simple electrical model based on physically meaningful parameters to connect the atomic force microscopy (AFM) based dielectric spectroscopy experimental results with the material dielectric properties. We have tested the accuracy of the model and analyzed the relevance of the forces arising from the electrical interaction with the AFM probe cantilever. In this way, by using this model, it is now possible to obtain quantitative information of the local dielectric material properties in a broad frequency range. Furthermore, it is also possible to determine the experimental setup providing the best sensitivity in the detected signal.

  17. A Simple and Efficient Methodology To Improve Geometric Accuracy in Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery: Implementation in Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karaiskos, Pantelis; Moutsatsos, Argyris; Pappas, Eleftherios; Georgiou, Evangelos; Roussakis, Arkadios; Torrens, Michael; Seimenis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To propose, verify, and implement a simple and efficient methodology for the improvement of total geometric accuracy in multiple brain metastases gamma knife (GK) radiation surgery. Methods and Materials: The proposed methodology exploits the directional dependence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-related spatial distortions stemming from background field inhomogeneities, also known as sequence-dependent distortions, with respect to the read-gradient polarity during MRI acquisition. First, an extra MRI pulse sequence is acquired with the same imaging parameters as those used for routine patient imaging, aside from a reversal in the read-gradient polarity. Then, “average” image data are compounded from data acquired from the 2 MRI sequences and are used for treatment planning purposes. The method was applied and verified in a polymer gel phantom irradiated with multiple shots in an extended region of the GK stereotactic space. Its clinical impact in dose delivery accuracy was assessed in 15 patients with a total of 96 relatively small (<2 cm) metastases treated with GK radiation surgery. Results: Phantom study results showed that use of average MR images eliminates the effect of sequence-dependent distortions, leading to a total spatial uncertainty of less than 0.3 mm, attributed mainly to gradient nonlinearities. In brain metastases patients, non-eliminated sequence-dependent distortions lead to target localization uncertainties of up to 1.3 mm (mean: 0.51 ± 0.37 mm) with respect to the corresponding target locations in the “average” MRI series. Due to these uncertainties, a considerable underdosage (5%-32% of the prescription dose) was found in 33% of the studied targets. Conclusions: The proposed methodology is simple and straightforward in its implementation. Regarding multiple brain metastases applications, the suggested approach may substantially improve total GK dose delivery accuracy in smaller, outlying targets.

  18. WARM MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION IN NORMAL EDGE-ON GALAXIES NGC 4565 AND NGC 5907

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laine, Seppo; Appleton, Philip N.; Gottesman, Stephen T.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Garland, Catherine A. E-mail: apple@ipac.caltech.ed E-mail: mashby@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-09-15

    We have observed warm molecular hydrogen in two nearby edge-on disk galaxies, NGC 4565 and NGC 5907, using the Spitzer high-resolution infrared spectrograph. The 0-0 S(0) 28.2 {mu}m and 0-0 S(1) 17.0 {mu}m pure rotational lines were detected out to 10 kpc from the center of each galaxy on both sides of the major axis, and in NGC 4565 the S(0) line was detected at r = 15 kpc on one side. This location is beyond the transition zone where diffuse neutral atomic hydrogen starts to dominate over cold molecular gas and marks a transition from a disk dominated by high surface-brightness far-infrared (far-IR) emission to that of a more quiescent disk. It also lies beyond a steep drop in the radio continuum emission from cosmic rays (CRs) in the disk. Despite indications that star formation activity decreases with radius, the H{sub 2} excitation temperature and the ratio of the H{sub 2} line and the far-IR luminosity surface densities, {Sigma}(L{sub H{sub 2}})/{Sigma}(L{sub TIR}), change very little as a function of radius, even into the diffuse outer region of the disk of NGC 4565. This suggests that the source of excitation of the H{sub 2} operates over a large range of radii and is broadly independent of the strength and relative location of UV emission from young stars. Although excitation in photodissociation regions is the most common explanation for the widespread H{sub 2} emission, CR heating or shocks cannot be ruled out. At r = 15 kpc in NGC 4565, outside the main UV- and radio-continuum-dominated disk, we derived a higher than normal H{sub 2} to 7.7 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission ratio, but this is likely due to a transition from mainly ionized PAH molecules in the inner disk to mainly neutral PAH molecules in the outer disk. The inferred mass surface densities of warm molecular hydrogen in both edge-on galaxies differ substantially, being 4(-60) M{sub sun} pc{sup -2} and 3(-50) M{sub sun} pc{sup -2} at r = 10 kpc for NGC 4565 and NGC 5907, respectively. The higher values represent very unlikely point-source upper limits. The point-source case is not supported by the observed emission distribution in the spectral slits. These mass surface densities cannot support the observed rotation velocities in excess of 200 km s{sup -1}. Therefore, warm molecular hydrogen cannot account for dark matter in these disk galaxies, contrary to what was implied by a previous Infrared Space Observatory study of the nearby edge-on galaxy NGC 891.

  19. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2015-11-26

    This study introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretationmore » of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tappingmode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Lastly, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.« less

  20. A simple growth method for Nb2O5 films and their optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, J. K.; Chen, L.; Topka, Michael R.; Dinolfo, Peter H.; Zhang, L. H.; Kisslinger, K.; Lu, T. -M.; Wang, G. -C.

    2015-04-13

    A simple method for the synthesis of Nb?O? films of thicknesses ranging from tens to several hundreds of nanometers on amorphous silicon dioxide or quartz substrates is presented. Nb?O? films were formed by annealing the sputter deposited Nb films under an Ar flow and without oxygen plasma in a quartz tube within a furnace at 850 C. The structural, compositional, optical, and vibrational properties were characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, and Raman scattering. Each of the Nb?O? films is polycrystalline with an orthorhombic crystal structure. We observed vibrational modes including longitudinal optical, transverse optical, and triply degenerate modes, and measured the indirect optical band gap to be ~3.65 eV. The transmittance spectrum of the ~20 nm thick Nb?O? film shows over 90% transmittance below the band gap energy in the visible wavelength range and decreases to less than 20% in the ultraviolet regime. As a result, the optical properties of the films in the UV-vis range show potential applications as UV detectors.

  1. New simple A{sub 4} neutrino model for nonzero {theta}{sub 13} and large {delta}{sub CP}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishimori, Hajime

    2013-05-23

    In a new simple application of the non-Abelian discrete symmetry A{sub 4} to charged-lepton and neutrino mass matrices, we show that for the current experimental central value of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.1, leptonic CP violation is necessarily large, i.e. Double-Vertical-Line tan{delta}{sub CP} Double-Vertical-Line > 1.3. We also consider T{sub 7} model with one parameter to be complex, thus allowing for one Dirac CP phase {delta}{sub CP} and two Majorana CP phases {alpha}{sub 1,2}. We find a slight modification to this correlation as a function of {delta}{sub CP}. For a given set of input values of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 21}, {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 12}, and {theta}{sub 13}, we obtain sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} and m{sub ee} (the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay) as functions of tan {delta}{sub CP}. We find that the structure of this model always yields small Double-Vertical-Line tan {delta}{sub CP} Double-Vertical-Line .

  2. SU-E-J-126: Respiratory Gating Quality Assurance: A Simple Method to Achieve Millisecond Temporal Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, B; Wiersma, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Low temporal latency between a gating on/off signal and a linac beam on/off during respiratory gating is critical for patient safety. Although, a measurement of temporal lag is recommended by AAPM Task Group 142 for commissioning and annual quality assurance, there currently exists no published method. Here we describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to precisely measure gating lag at millisecond resolutions. Methods: A Varian Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) gating simulator with rotating disk was modified with a resistive flex sensor (Spectra Symbol) attached to the gating box platform. A photon diode was placed at machine isocenter. Output signals of the flex sensor and diode were monitored with a multichannel oscilloscope (Tektronix™ DPO3014). Qualitative inspection of the gating window/beam on synchronicity were made by setting the linac to beam on/off at end-expiration, and the oscilloscope's temporal window to 100 ms to visually examine if the on/off timing was within the recommended 100-ms tolerance. Quantitative measurements were made by saving the signal traces and analyzing in MatLab™. The on and off of the beam signal were located and compared to the expected gating window (e.g. 40% to 60%). Four gating cycles were measured and compared. Results: On a Varian TrueBeam™ STx linac with RPM gating software, the average difference in synchronicity at beam on and off for four cycles was 14 ms (3 to 30 ms) and 11 ms (2 to 32 ms), respectively. For a Varian Clinac™ 21EX the average difference at beam on and off was 127 ms (122 to 133 ms) and 46 ms (42 to 49 ms), respectively. The uncertainty in the synchrony difference was estimated at ±6 ms. Conclusion: This new gating QA method is easy to implement and allows for fast qualitative inspection and quantitative measurements for commissioning and TG-142 annual QA measurements.

  3. Retrieval of Areal-averaged Spectral Surface Albedo from Transmission Data Alone: Computationally Simple and Fast Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Michalsky, Joseph; Hodges, G. B.

    2014-10-25

    We introduce and evaluate a simple retrieval of areal-averaged surface albedo using ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission alone at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870nm), under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line semi-analytical equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties, such as cloud optical depth and asymmetry parameter, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. To illustrate the performance of our retrieval, we use as input measurements of spectral atmospheric transmission from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). These MFRSR data are collected at two well-established continental sites in the United States supported by the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The areal-averaged albedos obtained from the MFRSR are compared with collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) white-sky albedo. In particular, these comparisons are made at four MFRSR wavelengths (500, 615, 673 and 870nm) and for four seasons (winter, spring, summer and fall) at the ARM site using multi-year (2008-2013) MFRSR and MODIS data. Good agreement, on average, for these wavelengths results in small values (?0.01) of the corresponding root mean square errors (RMSEs) for these two sites. The obtained RMSEs are comparable with those obtained previously for the shortwave albedos (MODIS-derived versus tower-measured) for these sites during growing seasons. We also demonstrate good agreement between tower-based daily-averaged surface albedos measured for nearby overcast and non-overcast days. Thus, our retrieval originally developed for overcast conditions likely can be extended for non-overcast days by interpolating between overcast retrievals.

  4. A simple method to quantify the coincidence between portal image graticules and radiation field centers or radiation isocenter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Weiliang; Yang, James; Luo Dershan; Martel, Mary

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a computerized method to quantify the coincidence between portal image graticules and radiation field centers or radiation isocenter. Three types of graticules were included in this study: Megavoltage (MV) mechanical graticule, MV electronic portal imaging device digital graticule, and kilovoltage (kV) on-board imaging digital graticule. Methods: A metal ball bearing (BB) was imaged with MV and kV x-ray beams in a procedure similar to a Winston-Lutz test. The radiation fields, graticules, and BB were localized in eight portal images using Hough transform-based computer algorithms. The center of the BB served as a static reference point in the 3D space so that the distances between the graticule centers and the radiation field centers were calculated. The radiation isocenter was determined from the radiation field centers at different gantry angles. Results: Misalignments of MV and kV portal imaging graticules varied with the gantry or x-ray source angle as a result of mechanical imperfections of the linear accelerator and its imaging system. While the three graticules in this study were aligned to the radiation field centers and the radiation isocenter within 2.0 mm, misalignments of 1.5-2.0 mm were found at certain gantry angles. These misalignments were highly reproducible with the gantry rotation. Conclusions: A simple method was developed to quantify the alignments of portal image graticules directly against the radiation field centers or the radiation isocenter. The advantage of this method is that it does not require the BB to be placed exactly at the radiation isocenter through a precalibrated surrogating device such as room lasers or light field crosshairs. The present method is useful for radiation therapy modalities that require high-precision portal imaging such as image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy.

  5. Insight from simulations of single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests on simple and complex fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, C.-F.; Doughty, C.

    2009-08-06

    The single-well injection withdrawal (SWIW) test, a tracer test utilizing only one well, is proposed as a useful contribution to site characterization of fractured rock, as well as providing parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. The usual conceptual model of flow and solute transport through fractured rock with low matrix permeability involves solute advection and dispersion through a fracture network coupled with diffusion and sorption into the surrounding rock matrix. Unlike two-well tracer tests, results of SWIW tests are ideally independent of advective heterogeneity, channeling and flow dimension, and, instead, focus on diffusive and sorptive characteristics of tracer (solute) transport. Thus, they can be used specifically to study such characteristics and evaluate the diffusive parameters associated with tracer transport through fractured media. We conduct simulations of SWIW tests on simple and complex fracture models, the latter being defined as having two subfractures with altered rock blocks in between and gouge material in their apertures. Using parameters from the Aspo site in Sweden, we calculate and study SWIW tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) from a test involving four days of injection and then withdrawal. By examining the peak concentration C{sub pk} of the SWIW BTCs for a variety of parameters, we confirm that C{sub pk} is largely insensitive to the fracture advective flow properties, in particular to permeability heterogeneity over the fracture plane or to subdividing the flow into two subfractures in the third dimension orthogonal to the fracture plane. The peak arrival time t{sub pk} is not a function of fracture or rock properties, but is controlled by the time schedule of the SWIW test. The study shows that the SWIW test is useful for the study of tracer diffusion-sorption processes, including the effect of the so-called flow-wetted surface (FWS) of the fracture. Calculations with schematic models with different FWS values are conducted and the possibility of direct in situ measurement of FWS with SWIW tests is demonstrated.

  6. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing White Matter in Patients With Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagesh, Vijaya Tsien, Christina I.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Junick, Larry; Cao Yue

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing white matter before, during, and after radiotherapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma, or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. The temporal changes were assessed before, during, and to 45 weeks after the start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water (), fractional anisotropy of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular ({lambda}{sub perpendicular}) and parallel ({lambda}{sub parallel}) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, fractional anisotropy decreased and , {lambda}{sub parallel}, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} increased linearly and significantly with time (p < 0.01). At 45 weeks after the start of RT, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} had increased {approx}30% in the genu and splenium, and {lambda}{sub parallel} had increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting that demyelination is predominant. The increases in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} were dose dependent, starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} was not sustained after 32 weeks, indicating the transition from focal to diffuse effects. Conclusion: The acute and subacute changes in normal-appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging is potentially a biomarker for the assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury.

  7. Individualized Radical Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Normal Tissue Dose Constraints: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baardwijk, Angela van Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Wanders, Stofferinus; Dekker, Andre; Dingemans, Anne Marie C.; Bootsma, Gerben; Geraedts, Wiel; Pitz, Cordula; Simons, Jean; Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence is a major problem after (chemo-)radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that for each individual patient, the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, delivered within 5 weeks. We report first results of a prospective feasibility trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with medically inoperable or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, World Health Organization performance score of 0-1, and reasonable lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 50%) were analyzed. All patients underwent irradiation using an individualized prescribed TTD based on normal tissue dose constraints (mean lung dose, 19 Gy; maximal spinal cord dose, 54 Gy) up to a maximal TTD of 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions twice daily. No concurrent chemoradiation was administered. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria. An {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed to evaluate (metabolic) response 3 months after treatment. Results: Mean delivered dose was 63.0 {+-} 9.8 Gy. The TTD was most often limited by the mean lung dose (32.1%) or spinal cord (28.6%). Acute toxicity generally was mild; only 1 patient experienced Grade 3 cough and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 dysphagia. One patient (3.6%) died of pneumonitis. For late toxicity, 2 patients (7.7%) had Grade 3 cough or dyspnea; none had severe dysphagia. Complete metabolic response was obtained in 44% (11 of 26 patients). With a median follow-up of 13 months, median overall survival was 19.6 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 57.1%. Conclusions: Individualized maximal tolerable dose irradiation based on normal tissue dose constraints is feasible, and initial results are promising.

  8. Brain Tumor Therapy-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing Brainstem Measured With Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hua Chiaho; Merchant, Thomas E.; Gajjar, Amar; Broniscer, Alberto; Zhang, Yong; Li Yimei; Glenn, George R.; Kun, Larry E.; Ogg, Robert J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize therapy-induced changes in normal-appearing brainstems of childhood brain tumor patients by serial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 109 DTI studies from 20 brain tumor patients, aged 4 to 23 years, with normal-appearing brainstems included in the treatment fields. Those with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (n = 10) received postoperative craniospinal irradiation (23.4-39.6 Gy) and a cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy to the primary site, followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy. Patients with high-grade gliomas (n = 10) received erlotinib during and after irradiation (54-59.4 Gy). Parametric maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were computed and spatially registered to three-dimensional radiation dose data. Volumes of interest included corticospinal tracts, medial lemnisci, and the pons. Serving as an age-related benchmark for comparison, 37 DTI studies from 20 healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 25 years, were included in the analysis. Results: The median DTI follow-up time was 3.5 years (range, 1.6-5.0 years). The median mean dose to the pons was 56 Gy (range, 7-59 Gy). Three patterns were seen in longitudinal FA and apparent diffusion coefficient changes: (1) a stable or normal developing time trend, (2) initial deviation from normal with subsequent recovery, and (3) progressive deviation without evidence of complete recovery. The maximal decline in FA often occurred 1.5 to 3.5 years after the start of radiation therapy. A full recovery time trend could be observed within 4 years. Patients with incomplete recovery often had a larger decline in FA within the first year. Radiation dose alone did not predict long-term recovery patterns. Conclusions: Variations existed among individual patients after therapy in longitudinal evolution of brainstem white matter injury and recovery. Early response in brainstem anisotropy may serve as an indicator of the recovery time trend over 5 years after radiation therapy.

  9. Normal-mode coupling of rare-earth-metal ions in a crystal to a macroscopic optical cavity mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichimura, Kouichi; Goto, Hayato

    2006-09-15

    We demonstrated coupling of rare-earth-metal ions in a crystal to a macroscopic cavity mode by observing optical bistability and normal-mode peaks due to sweeping-laser-induced population redistribution of the ions. The experimentally evaluated coupling constant between the individual ions and the single cavity mode is 15 kHz, which is comparable with or larger than the dissipation of the ions and will exceed the cavity dissipation with a narrowing of the mode waist of the cavity to the wavelength. The results advance the application of a coupled system of rare-earth-metal ions in a crystal and an optical cavity for quantum information processing.

  10. Commissioning the neutron production of a Linac: Development of a simple tool for second cancer risk estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero-Expsito, M.; Snchez-Nieto, B.; Terrn, J. A.; Lopes, M. C.; Ferreira, B. C.; Grishchuk, D.; Sandn, C.; Moral-Snchez, S.; Melchor, M.; Domingo, C.; and others

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Knowing the contribution of neutron to collateral effects in treatments is both a complex and a mandatory task. This work aims to present an operative procedure for neutron estimates in any facility using a neutron digital detector. Methods: The authors previous work established a linear relationship between the total second cancer risk due to neutrons (TR{sup n}) and the number of MU of the treatment. Given that the digital detector also presents linearity with MU, its response can be used to determine the TR{sup n} per unit MU, denoted as m, normally associated to a generic Linac model and radiotherapy facility. Thus, from the number of MU of each patient treatment, the associated risk can be estimated. The feasibility of the procedure was tested by applying it in eight facilities; patients were evaluated as well. Results: From the reading of the detector under selected irradiation conditions, m values were obtained for different machines, ranging from 0.25 10{sup ?4}% per MU for an Elekta Axesse at 10 MV to 6.5 10{sup ?4}% per MU for a Varian Clinac at 18 MV. Using these values, TR{sup n} of patients was estimated in each facility and compared to that from the individual evaluation. Differences were within the range of uncertainty of the authors methodology of equivalent dose and risk estimations. Conclusions: The procedure presented here allows an easy estimation of the second cancer risk due to neutrons for any patient, given the number of MU of the treatment. It will enable the consideration of this information when selecting the optimal treatment for a patient by its implementation in the treatment planning system.

  11. Solubility and spectroscopic studies of the interaction of palladium with simple carboxylic acids and fulvic acid at low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, S.A. (Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)); Tait, C.D.; Janecky, D.R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)); Vlassopoulos, D. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of Pd with some O-donor organic acid anions has been investigated using solubility measurements and a variety of spectroscopic techniques (UV-visible, Raman, FTIR, [sup 13]C NMR). Some of the ligands investigated (acetate, oxalate, and fulvic acid) occur naturally in relatively high concentrations, whereas others (phthalate and salicylate) serve as models of potential binding sites on humic and fulvic acids. Solubility measurements show that the presence of acetate, phthalate, salicylate, and fulvic acid (oxalate was not studied via solubility methods) can increase the mobility of Pd over various pH ranges, depending on the organic ligand. In the case of acetate, UV-visible and Raman spectroscopy provide strong evidence for the formation of electrostatically bound, possibly outer-sphere palladium acetate complexes. Oxalate was confirmed by UV-visible and FTIR spectroscopy to compete favorably with chloride (0.56 M NaCl) for Pd even at oxalate concentrations as low as 1 mM at pH = 6-7. Available data from the literature suggest that oxalate may have an influence on Pd mobility at free oxalate concentrations as low as 10[sup [minus]8]=10[sup [minus]9] M. UV-visible spectroscopy provides evidence of an initially rapid, followed by a slower, reaction between PdCl[sup 2-][sub 4] and o-phthalate ion. These findings lend support to the idea that similar bindings sites on fulvic acid may be capable of complexing and solubilizing Pd in the natural environment. Although thermodynamic data are required to fully quantify the extent, it is concluded that simple carboxylic acid anions and/or fulvic and humic acids should be capable of significantly enhancing Pd transport in the surficial environment by forming truly dissolved complexes. On the other hand, flocculation of fulvic/humic acids, owing to changing ionic strengths or pH, or adsorption of these acids onto mineral surfaces, may also provide effective means of immobilizing Pd.

  12. Diuretic Agent and Normal Saline Infusion Technique for Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomies in Nondilated Pelvicaliceal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yagci, Cemil Ustuner, Evren Atman, Ebru Dusunceli; Baltaci, Sumer; Uzun, Caglar Akyar, Serdar

    2013-04-15

    Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) in a nondilated pelvicaliceal system is technically challenging. We describe an effective method to achieve transient dilatation of the pelvicaliceal system via induction of diuresis using infusion of a diuretic agent in normal saline, therefore allowing easier access to the pelvicaliceal system. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, the technique had been tested in 22 nephrostomies with nondilated system (a total of 20 patients with 2 patients having bilateral nephrostomies) during a 5-year period. Patients were given 40 mg of furosemide in 250 ml of normal saline solution intravenously by rapid infusion. As soon as maximum calyceal dilatation of more than 5 mm was observed, which is usually 15 min later after the end of rapid infusion, patients were positioned obliquely, and PCN procedure under ultrasound guidance was performed. The procedure was successful in 19 of the nephrostomies in 17 patients with a success rate of 86.36 % per procedure and 85 % per patient in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems. No major nephrostomy-, drug-, or technique-related complications were encountered. The technique failed to work in three patients due to the presence of double J catheters and preexisting calyceal perforation which avoided transient dilation of the pelvicaliceal system with diuresis. Diuretic infusion in saline is a feasible and effective method for PCN in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems.

  13. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-02-01

    The structural properties of spent nuclear fuel shipping containers vary as a function of the cask wall temperature. An analysis is performed to determine the effect of a realistic, though bounding, hot day environment on the thermal behavior of spent fuel shipping casks. These results are compared to those which develop under a steady-state application of the prescribed normal thermal conditions of 10CFR71. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by using the steady-state application of the regulatory boundary conditions. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the regulatory condition. This is due to the conservative assumptions present in the ambient conditions used. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations which penetrate the cask wall have maxima substantially less than the corresponding temperatures obtained when applying the steady-state regulatory boundary conditions. Therefore, it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the steady-state interpretation of the 10CFR71 normal conditions.

  14. Target normal sheath acceleration of foil ions by laser-trapped hot electrons from a long subcritical-density preplasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luan, S. X.; Yu, Wei; Shen, B. F.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Xu, Han; Wong, A. Y.; Wang, J. W.

    2014-12-15

    In a long subcritical density plasma, an ultrashort ultraintense laser pulse can self-organize into a fast but sub-relativistic propagating structure consisting of the modulated laser light and a large number of trapped electrons from the plasma. Upon impact of the structure with a solid foil target placed in the latter, the remaining laser light is reflected, but the dense and hot trapped electrons pass through the foil, together with the impact-generated target-frontsurface electrons to form a dense hot electron cloud at the back of the target suitable for enhancing target normal sheath acceleration of the target-backsurface ions. The accelerated ions are well collimated and of high charge and energy densities, with peak energies a full order of magnitude higher than that from target normal sheath acceleration without the subcritical density plasma. In the latter case, the space-charge field accelerating the ions is limited since they are formed only by the target-frontsurface electrons during the very short instant of laser reflection.

  15. AECOM Normal.dot

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Keeler to Tillamook Transmission Line Rebuild Project Page 1 Finding of No Significant Impact Keeler to Tillamook Transmission Line Rebuild Project Finding of No Significant Impact Bonneville Power Administration DOE/EA-1931 January 2014 Summary Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) announces its environmental findings on the Keeler to Tillamook Transmission Line Rebuild Project. BPA's Proposed Action is to rebuild 57.8 miles of the existing 59.7- mile long Keeler to Tillamook Transmission lines

  16. Environmental assessment: Transfer of normal and low-enriched uranium billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    Under the auspices of an agreement between the U.S. and the United Kingdom, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an opportunity to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium (LEU) to the United Kingdom; thus, reducing long-term surveillance and maintenance burdens at the Hanford Site. The material, in the form of billets, is controlled by DOE`s Defense Programs, and is presently stored as surplus material in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The United Kingdom has expressed a need for the billets. The surplus uranium billets are currently stored in wooden shipping containers in secured facilities in the 300 Area at the Hanford Site (the 303-B and 303-G storage facilities). There are 482 billets at an enrichment level (based on uranium-235 content) of 0.71 weight-percent. This enrichment level is normal uranium; that is, uranium having 0.711 as the percentage by weight of uranium-235 as occurring in nature. There are 3,242 billets at an enrichment level of 0.95 weight-percent (i.e., low-enriched uranium). This inventory represents a total of approximately 532 curies. The facilities are routinely monitored. The dose rate on contact of a uranium billet is approximately 8 millirem per hour. The dose rate on contact of a wooden shipping container containing 4 billets is approximately 4 millirem per hour. The dose rate at the exterior of the storage facilities is indistinguishable from background levels.

  17. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-04-01

    An examination of the effect of a realistic (though conservative) hot day environment on the thermal transient behavior of spent fuel shipping casks is made. These results are compared to those that develop under the prescribed normal thermal condition of 10 CFR 71. Of specific concern are the characteristics of propagating thermal waves, which are set up by diurnal variations of temperature and insolation in the outdoor environment. In order to arrive at a realistic approximation of these variations on a conservative hot day, actual temperature and insolation measurements have been obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for representatively hot and high heat flux days. Thus, the use of authentic meteorological data ensures the realistic approach sought. Further supporting the desired realism of the modeling effort is the use of realistic cask configurations in which multiple laminations of structural, shielding, and other materials are expected to attenuate the propagating thermal waves. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by enforcement of the regulatory environmental conditions of 10 CFR 71. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the prescribed regulatory conditions. However, the temperature differences are small enough that the normal conservative assumptions that are made in the course of typical cask evaluations should correct for any potential violations. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations that penetrate the cask wall all have maxima substantially less than the corresponding regulatory solutions. Therefore it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the conditions of 10 CFR 71.

  18. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport – Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and transport (NCT).

  19. Comparison of Normalized and Unnormalized Single Cell and Population Assemblies (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hugenholtz, Phil [University of Queensland

    2013-01-22

    University of Queensland's Phil Hugenholtz on "Comparison of Normalized and Unnormalized Single Cell and Population Assemblies" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  20. Positive field-cooled dc susceptibility in granular superconductors interpreted through numerical simulations on a simple Josephson-junction-array model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auletta, C.; Raiconi, G.; De Luca, R.; Pace, S.

    1995-05-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of a field-cooled dc susceptibility experiment carried out for granular superconductors by modeling these systems with a simple Josephson-junction array proposed by the authors. By this analysis the temperature dependence of the positive field-cooled susceptibility at very low values of the applied magnetic field, observed by Braunisch {ital et} {ital al}. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 1908 (1992)] for some ceramic superonductors, has been reproduced and interpreted.

  1. A simple object-oriented and open-source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system – Hector v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Simple climate models play an integral role in the policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector v1.0, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global-scale earth system processes. Hector has a three-part main carbon cycle: a one-pool atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model's terrestrial carbon cycle includes primary production and respiration fluxes, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector actively solves the inorganic carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air–sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2], radiative forcing, and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) with equivalent rates of change of key variables over time compared to current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and models from the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. Hector's flexibility, open-source nature, and modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.

  2. A simple object-oriented and open-source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system – Hector v1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Simple climate models play an integral role in the policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector v1.0, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global-scale earth system processes. Hector has a three-part main carbon cycle: a one-pool atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model's terrestrial carbon cycle includes primary production and respiration fluxes, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector actively solves the inorganicmore » carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air–sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2], radiative forcing, and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) with equivalent rates of change of key variables over time compared to current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and models from the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. Hector's flexibility, open-source nature, and modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.« less

  3. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen; Hashemi, Bijan; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi; Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

  4. Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Inelastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Q-Weak Apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuruzzaman, nfn

    2014-12-01

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (B_n) on H_2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic B_n is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of B_n background studies, we made the first measurement of B_n in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be B_n = 42.82 ± 2.45 (stat) ± 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy E_beam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 deg, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. B_n from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma^* Delta Delta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ~10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system has also proven valuable for tracking changes in the beamline optics, such as dispersion at the target.

  5. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS: photometric redshifts for normal and X-ray-detected galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis; Donley, Jennifer L.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Guo, Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Rangel, Cyprian; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Budavri, Tams; Szalay, Alexander S.; Dahlen, Tomas; and others

    2014-11-20

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). This work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4 Ms CDFS and 250 ks ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources (?96%). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of active galactic nuclei/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014 and outlier fractions are 4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better, as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broadband photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.

  6. Energy information needs for U. S. state-level policy making: Minimal data requirements during normal and emergency periods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Leff, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    Since the oil embargo of 1973, state governments have increased their efforts to track and understand energy flows within their boundaries. There is a commonly perceived need to comprehend the status of present and expected future energy availability, demand, and price and to be prepared to exercise responsible and effective management during energy emergencies. This responsibility has brought with it new needs for accurate and timely state-level information on energy transactions and the external parameters that effect energy availability and disposition. What energy data are needed by a state, regardless of its idiosyncracies, during both normal and energy emergency periods, and to what extent are these data available now. The authors find that needed ongoing (core) data are only partially available at present, and that emergency data can be obtained only with a carefully planned monitoring program that can be fitted to specific emergency conditions. Overall, this paper provides a realistic assessment of the state-level energy data needed to provide state policy makers with sufficient information to make considered judgments.

  7. Energy-information needs for US state-level policy making: minimal data requirements during normal and emergency periods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Leff, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    Since the oil embargo of 1973, state governments have increased their efforts to track and understand energy flows within their boundaries. There is a commonly perceived need to comprehend the status of present and expected future energy availability, demand, and price and to be prepared to exercise responsible and effective management during energy emergencies. This responsibility has brought with it new needs for accurate and timely state-level information on energy transactions and the external parameters that effect energy availability and disposition. Hence, we ask: what energy data are needed by a state, regardless of its idiosyncracies, during both normal and energy emergency periods, and to what extent are these data available now. We find that needed ongoing (core) data are only partially available at present, and that emergency data can be obtained only with a carefully planned monitoring program that can be fitted to specific emergency conditions. Overall, this paper provides a realistic assessment of the state-level energy data needed to provide state policy makers with sufficient information to make considered judgments. 7 references, 6 tables.

  8. A 3% Measurement of the Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Qweak Setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waidyawansa, Dinayadura Buddhini

    2013-08-01

    The beam normal single spin asymmetry generated in the scattering of transversely polarized electrons from unpolarized nucleons is an observable of the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange process. Moreover, it is a potential source of false asymmetry in parity violating electron scattering experiments. The Q{sub weak} experiment uses parity violating electron scattering to make a direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton. The targeted 4% measurement of the weak charge of the proton probes for parity violating new physics beyond the Standard Model. The beam normal single spin asymmetry at Q{sub weak} kinematics is at least three orders of magnitude larger than 5 ppb precision of the parity violating asymmetry. To better understand this parity conserving background, the Q{sub weak} Collaboration has performed elastic scattering measurements with fully transversely polarized electron beam on the proton and aluminum. This dissertation presents the analysis of the 3% measurement (1.3% statistical and 2.6% systematic) of beam normal single spin asymmetry in electronproton scattering at a Q2 of 0.025 (GeV/c)2. It is the most precise existing measurement of beam normal single spin asymmetry available at the time. A measurement of this precision helps to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process.

  9. Normalized Tritium Quantification Approach (NoTQA) a Method for Quantifying Tritium Contaminated Trash and Debris at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, J L; Rasmussen, C L

    2008-07-23

    Several facilities and many projects at LLNL work exclusively with tritium. These operations have the potential to generate large quantities of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) with the same or similar radiological characteristics. A standardized documented approach to characterizing these waste materials for disposal as radioactive waste will enhance the ability of the Laboratory to manage them in an efficient and timely manner while ensuring compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements. This standardized characterization approach couples documented process knowledge with analytical verification and is very conservative, overestimating the radioactivity concentration of the waste. The characterization approach documented here is the Normalized Tritium Quantification Approach (NoTQA). This document will serve as a Technical Basis Document which can be referenced in radioactive waste characterization documentation packages such as the Information Gathering Document. In general, radiological characterization of waste consists of both developing an isotopic breakdown (distribution) of radionuclides contaminating the waste and using an appropriate method to quantify the radionuclides in the waste. Characterization approaches require varying degrees of rigor depending upon the radionuclides contaminating the waste and the concentration of the radionuclide contaminants as related to regulatory thresholds. Generally, as activity levels in the waste approach a regulatory or disposal facility threshold the degree of required precision and accuracy, and therefore the level of rigor, increases. In the case of tritium, thresholds of concern for control, contamination, transportation, and waste acceptance are relatively high. Due to the benign nature of tritium and the resulting higher regulatory thresholds, this less rigorous yet conservative characterization approach is appropriate. The scope of this document is to define an appropriate and acceptable characterization method for quantification of tritium contaminated trash and debris. The characterization technique is applicable to surface and subsurface tritium contaminated materials with surfaces amenable to swiping. Some limitations of this characterization technique are identified.

  10. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  11. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold; Geelhood, Ken; Koeppel, Brian; Coleman, Justin; Bignell, John; Flores, Gregg; Wang, Jy-An; Sanborn, Scott; Spears, Robert; Klymyshyn, Nick

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  12. Methods for determining optical power, for power-normalizing laser measurements, and for stabilizing power of lasers via compliance voltage sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

    2015-04-07

    A method is disclosed for power normalization of spectroscopic signatures obtained from laser based chemical sensors that employs the compliance voltage across a quantum cascade laser device within an external cavity laser. The method obviates the need for a dedicated optical detector used specifically for power normalization purposes. A method is also disclosed that employs the compliance voltage developed across the laser device within an external cavity semiconductor laser to power-stabilize the laser mode of the semiconductor laser by adjusting drive current to the laser such that the output optical power from the external cavity semiconductor laser remains constant.

  13. Structure and Morphology of Neodymium-doped Cerium Oxide Solid Solution Prepared by a Combined Simple Polymer Heating and D.C.-Magnetron Sputtering Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurhasanah, I.; Abdullah, M.; Khairurrijal

    2008-03-17

    Neodymium-doped Cerium Oxide (NDC) solid solution is attractive alternative material to replace yttria-stabillized zirconia (YSZ) used as an electrolyte for solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). In this study Nd-CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles with Nd of 3, 6 and 9 at./at.-% were synthesized by simple polymer heating. The NDC thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by using target made from the nanoparticles. Deposition process was carried out by D.C.-magnetron sputtering at temperature as low as 375 deg. C. XRD pattern was used to confirm solid solubility and structural properties of the films. The results indicated that all samples are single phase solid solution with cubic fluorite structure. Their lattice parameters increase with increasing Nd content. It was also found that the mean grain size decrease with increasing Nd content. SEM analysis showed that NDC thin films have dense and uniform thickness. These results revealed that the nanoparticles and thin films of NDC solid solution are successfully prepared by a combined simple polymer heating and D.C.-Magnetron Sputtering method at low temperature.

  14. First-principles binary diffusion coefficients for H, H{sub 2}, and four normal alkanes + N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasper, Ahren W. Kamarchik, Eugene; Miller, James A.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2014-09-28

    Collision integrals related to binary (dilute gas) diffusion are calculated classically for six species colliding with N{sub 2}. The most detailed calculations make no assumptions regarding the complexity of the potential energy surface, and the resulting classical collision integrals are in excellent agreement with previous semiclassical results for H + N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} + N{sub 2} and with recent experimental results for C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2} + N{sub 2}, n = 24. The detailed classical results are used to test the accuracy of three simplifying assumptions typically made when calculating collision integrals: (1) approximating the intermolecular potential as isotropic, (2) neglecting the internal structure of the colliders (i.e., neglecting inelasticity), and (3) employing unphysical R{sup ?12} repulsive interactions. The effect of anisotropy is found to be negligible for H + N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} + N{sub 2} (in agreement with previous quantum mechanical and semiclassical results for systems involving atomic and diatomic species) but is more significant for larger species at low temperatures. For example, the neglect of anisotropy decreases the diffusion coefficient for butane + N{sub 2} by 15% at 300 K. The neglect of inelasticity, in contrast, introduces only very small errors. Approximating the repulsive wall as an unphysical R{sup ?12} interaction is a significant source of error at all temperatures for the weakly interacting systems H + N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} + N{sub 2}, with errors as large as 40%. For the normal alkanes in N{sub 2}, which feature stronger interactions, the 12/6 LennardJones approximation is found to be accurate, particularly at temperatures above ?700 K where it predicts the full-dimensional result to within 5% (although with somewhat different temperature dependence). Overall, the typical practical approach of assuming isotropic 12/6 LennardJones interactions is confirmed to be suitable for combustion applications except for weakly interacting systems, such as H + N{sub 2}. For these systems, anisotropy and inelasticity can safely be neglected but a more detailed description of the repulsive wall is required for quantitative predictions. A straightforward approach for calculating effective isotropic potentials with realistic repulsive walls is described. An analytic expression for the calculated diffusion coefficient for H + N{sub 2} is presented and is estimated to have a 2-sigma error bar of only 0.7%.

  15. Efficient and simpler method to construct normalized cDNA libraries with improved representations of full-length cDNAs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Fatima Bonaldo, M. de

    1998-12-08

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library comprising: (a) constructing a directionally cloned library containing cDNA inserts wherein the insert is capable of being amplified by polymerase chain reaction; (b) converting a double-stranded cDNA library into single-stranded DNA circles; (c) generating single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) by polymerase chain reaction with appropriate primers; (d) hybridizing the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) with the complementary single-stranded nucleic acid molecules generated in step (c) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; and (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded DNA circles from the hybridized DNA circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides a method to normalize a cDNA library wherein the generating of single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) is by excising cDNA inserts from the double-stranded cDNA library; purifying the cDNA inserts from cloning vectors; and digesting the cDNA inserts with an exonuclease. This invention further provides a method to construct a subtractive cDNA library following the steps described above. This invention further provides normalized and/or subtractive cDNA libraries generated by the above methods. 25 figs.

  16. Efficient and simpler method to construct normalized cDNA libraries with improved representations of full-length cDNAs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo Bento; Bonaldo, Maria de Fatima

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library comprising: (a) constructing a directionally cloned library containing cDNA inserts wherein the insert is capable of being amplified by polymerase chain reaction; (b) converting a double-stranded cDNA library into single-stranded DNA circles; (c) generating single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) by polymerase chain reaction with appropriate primers; (d) hybridizing the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) with the complementary single-stranded nucleic acid molecules generated in step (c) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; and (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded DNA circles from the hybridized DNA circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides a method to normalize a cDNA library wherein the generating of single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) is by excising cDNA inserts from the double-stranded cDNA library; purifying the cDNA inserts from cloning vectors; and digesting the cDNA inserts with an exonuclease. This invention further provides a method to construct a subtractive cDNA library following the steps described above. This invention further provides normalized and/or subtractive cDNA libraries generated by the above methods.

  17. Fuel Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly under Surrogate Normal Conditions of Truck Transport R0.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Results of testing employing surrogate instrumented rods (non-high-burnup, 17 x 17 PWR fuel assembly) to capture the response to the loadings experienced during normal conditions of transport indicate that strain- or stress-based failure of fuel rods seems unlikely; performance of high-burnup fuels continues to be assessed.

  18. Role for DNA methylation in the regulation of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in normal and cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrba, Lukas; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Cress, Anne E.; Dickinson, Sally; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-23

    BACKGROUND: The microRNA-200 family participates in the maintenance of an epithelial phenotype and loss of its expression can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the loss of expression of miR-200 family members is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype. Regulation of the miR-200 family expression in normal and cancer cells is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epigenetic mechanisms participate in the control of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in both normal and cancer cells. A CpG island near the predicted mir-200c/mir-141 transcription start site shows a striking correlation between miR-200c and miR-141 expression and DNA methylation in both normal and cancer cells, as determined by MassARRAY technology. The CpG island is unmethylated in human miR-200/miR-141 expressing epithelial cells and in miR-200c/miR-141 positive tumor cells. The CpG island is heavily methylated in human miR-200c/miR-141 negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative tumor cells. Mouse cells show a similar inverse correlation between DNA methylation and miR-200c expression. Enrichment of permissive histone modifications, H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation, is seen in normal miR-200c/miR-141-positive epithelial cells, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to real-time PCR. In contrast, repressive H3K9 dimethylation marks are present in normal miR-200c/miR-141-negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative cancer cells and the permissive histone modifications are absent. The epigenetic modifier drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, reactivates miR-200c/miR-141 expression showing that epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in their transcriptional control. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: We report that DNA methylation plays a role in the normal cell type-specific expression of miR-200c and miR-141 and this role appears evolutionarily conserved, since similar results were obtained in mouse. Aberrant DNA methylation of the miR-200c/141 CpG island is closely linked to their inappropriate silencing in cancer cells. Since the miR-200c cluster plays a significant role in EMT, our results suggest an important role for DNA methylation in the control of phenotypic conversions in normal cells.

  19. The performance of measurement-based simple models for the x-band complex permittivity of 370 ohms/sq. Kapton XC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, Brian B; Whites, Kieth W; Amert, Tony

    2009-01-01

    The X-band complex permittivity of a commercially-available, carbon loaded, polyamide film is measured. Simple though approximate models are obtained which are shown to be necessary and suitable for analytic or computational modeling of thin absorbing structures realized with the thin lossy film. The utility of each model is tested against experimental results for thin high-impedance surface (HIS) enhanced Salisbury absorbers, enhanced in the sense that the HIS augmented absorber is much thinner than a conventional Salisbury absorber. Kapton XC(reg.) is a commercially-available, carbon-loaded polyamide film manufactured by Dupont(reg.). Though these films are exceptionally durable and available in a range of surface resistivities, their effective permittivity is complex valued and, therefore, their sheet impedance is frequency dependent as is typical of carbon-loaded dielectrics. We have measured the X-band complex permittivity of Kapton XC(reg.) with a manufacture's quoted direct current (DC) sheet resistivity of approximately 370 {Omega}/sq. and thicknesses of 40.0 {mu}m. This study showed the need for relatively precise knowledge of the real part of a carbon particulate loaded, lossy thin film's permittivity in order to accurately engineer the reflection coefficient of high-impedance surface enhanced electromagnetic absorbers. Specifically, simple, approximate models can be obtained for the X-band complex pennittivity of commercially available, carbon loaded, 370 {Omega}/sq., Kapton XC(reg.) thin film. These simple, approximate models can be used in the analytic modeling of high-impedance surface enhanced X-band absorbers or computational modeling of other possibly more complicated absorbing structures which are composed, in part, of 370 {Omega}/sq. Kapton XC(reg.) and designed to operate within the X-band. Finally, the results of this study illustrate the need for simgle models for calculating the complex permittivity spectra of 370 {Omega}/sq. Kapton XC(reg.) over a relatively broad bandwidth (1-20 GHz) to facilitate accurate analytical and computational modeling.

  20. Hydromechanical modeling of pulse tests that measure both fluidpressure and fracture-normal displacement of the Coaraze Laboratory site,France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappa, F.; Guglielmi, Y.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.; Thoraval, A.

    2006-04-22

    In situ fracture mechanical deformation and fluid flowinteractions are investigated through a series of hydraulic pulseinjection tests, using specialized borehole equipment that cansimultaneously measure fluid pressure and fracture displacements. Thetests were conducted in two horizontal boreholes spaced one meter apartvertically and intersecting a near-vertical highly permeable faultlocated within a shallow fractured carbonate rock. The field data wereevaluated by conducting a series of coupled hydromechanical numericalanalyses, using both distinct-element and finite-element modelingtechniques and both two- and three-dimensional model representations thatcan incorporate various complexities in fracture network geometry. Oneunique feature of these pulse injection experiments is that the entiretest cycle, both the initial pressure increase and subsequent pressurefall-off, is carefully monitored and used for the evaluation of the insitu hydromechanical behavior. Field test data are evaluated by plottingfracture normal displacement as a function of fluid pressure, measured atthe same borehole. The resulting normal displacement-versus-pressurecurves show a characteristic loop, in which the paths for loading(pressure increase) and unloading (pressure decrease) are different. Bymatching this characteristic loop behavior, the fracture normal stiffnessand an equivalent stiffness (Young's modulus) of the surrounding rockmass can be back-calculated. Evaluation of the field tests by couplednumerical hydromechanical modeling shows that initial fracture hydraulicaperture and normal stiffness vary by a factor of 2 to 3 for the twomonitoring points within the same fracture plane. Moreover, the analysesshow that hydraulic aperture and the normal stiffness of the pulse-testedfracture, the stiffness of surrounding rock matrix, and the propertiesand geometry of the surrounding fracture network significantly affectcoupled hydromechanical responses during the pulse injection test. Morespecifically, the pressure-increase path of the normaldisplacement-versus-pressure curve is highly dependent on thehydromechanical parameters of the tested fracture and the stiffness ofthe matrix near the injection point, whereas the pressure-decrease pathis highly influenced by mechanical processes within a larger portion ofthe surrounding fractured rock.

  1. Simple and Flexible Scene Graph

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-10-01

    The system implements a flexible and extensible scene graph for the visualization and analysis of scientific information.

  2. Hierarchical Na-doped cubic ZrO{sub 2} synthesis by a simple hydrothermal route and its application in biodiesel production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara-Garca, Hugo A.; Romero-Ibarra, Issis C.; Pfeiffer, Heriberto

    2014-10-15

    Hierarchical growth of cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase was successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal process in the presence of different surfactants (cationic, non-ionic and anionic) and sodium hydroxide. The structural and microstructural characterizations of different ZrO{sub 2} powders were performed using various techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorptiondesorption, scanning electron microscopy and infrared. Results indicated that sodium addition stabilized the cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase by a Na-doping process, independently of the surfactant used. In contrast, microstructural characteristics varied as a function of the surfactant and sodium presence. In addition, water vapor (H{sub 2}O) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sorption properties were evaluated on ZrO{sub 2} samples. Results evidenced that sample surface reactivity changed as a function of the sodium content. Finally, this surface reactivity was evaluated on the biodiesel transesterification reaction using the different synthesized samples, obtaining yields of 93%. - Graphical abstract: Hierarchical growth of cubic Na-ZrO{sub 2} phase was synthesized by hydrothermal processes in the presence of surfactants and sodium. Sodium addition stabilized the cubic phase by a Na-doping process, while the microstructural characteristics varied with surfactants. Finally, this surface reactivity was evaluated on the biodiesel transesterification reaction. - Highlights: Cubic-ZrO{sub 2} phase was synthesized via a simple hydrothermal process. ZrO{sub 2} structure and microstructures changed as a function of the surfactant. Cubic-ZrO{sub 2} phase was evaluated on the biodiesel transesterification reaction.

  3. New synthesis of excellent visible-light TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x} photocatalyst using a very simple method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Danzhen Huang Hanjie; Chen Xu; Chen Zhixin; Li Wenjuan; Ye Dong; Fu Xianzhi

    2007-09-15

    An excellent visible-light-responsive (from 400 to 550 nm) TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x} photocatalyst was prepared by a simple wet method. Hydrazine was used as a new nitrogen resource in this paper. Self-made amorphous titanium dioxide precursor powders were dipped into hydrazine hydrate, and calcined at low temperature (110 deg. C) in the air. The TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x} was successfully synthesized, following by spontaneous combustion. The photocatalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), transmission electron microscope (TEM), UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrometer (DRS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Analysis of XPS indicated that N atoms were incorporated into the lattice of the titania crystal during the combustion of hydrazine on the surface of TiO{sub 2}. Ethylene was selected as a target pollutant under visible-light excitation to evaluate the activity of this photocatalyst. The newly prepared TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x} photocatalyst with strong photocatalytic activity and high photochemical stability under visible-light irradiation was firstly demonstrated in the experiment. - Graphical abstract: The excellent visible-light-responsive (from 400 to 550 nm) TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x} photocatalyst was prepared by a simple wet method. Hydrazine was used as a new nitrogen resource in this paper. In the experiment, a strong photocatalytic activity with high photochemical stability under visible-light irradiation was demonstrated.

  4. Individualized 3D Reconstruction of Normal Tissue Dose for Patients With Long-term Follow-up: A Step Toward Understanding Dose Risk for Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Angela; Brock, Kristy K.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Tim; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Hodgson, David C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Understanding the relationship between normal tissue dose and delayed radiation toxicity is an important component of developing more effective radiation therapy. Late outcome data are generally available only for patients who have undergone 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3D normal tissue dosimetry derived from reconstructed 2D treatment plans in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional lung, heart, and breast volumes were reconstructed from 2D planning radiographs for HL patients who received mediastinal radiation therapy. For each organ, a reference 3D organ was modified with patient-specific structural information, using deformable image processing software. Radiation therapy plans were reconstructed by applying treatment parameters obtained from patient records to the reconstructed 3D volumes. For each reconstructed organ mean dose (D{sub mean}) and volumes covered by at least 5 Gy (V{sub 5}) and 20Gy (V{sub 20}) were calculated. This process was performed for 15 patients who had both 2D and 3D planning data available to compare the reconstructed normal tissue doses with those derived from the primary CT planning data and also for 10 historically treated patients with only 2D imaging available. Results: For patients with 3D planning data, the normal tissue doses could be reconstructed accurately using 2D planning data. Median differences in D{sub mean} between reconstructed and actual plans were 0.18 Gy (lungs), -0.15 Gy (heart), and 0.30 Gy (breasts). Median difference in V{sub 5} and V{sub 20} were less than 2% for each organ. Reconstructed 3D dosimetry was substantially higher in historical mantle-field treatments than contemporary involved-field mediastinal treatments: average D{sub mean} values were 15.2 Gy vs 10.6 Gy (lungs), 27.0 Gy vs 14.3 Gy (heart), and 8.0 Gy vs 3.2 Gy (breasts). Conclusions: Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorbed dose to organs at risk can be estimated accurately many years after exposure by using limited 2D data. Compared to contemporary involved-field treatments, normal tissue doses were significantly higher in historical mantle-field treatments. These methods build capacity to quantify the relationship between 3D normal tissue dose and observed late effects.

  5. Modified normal-phase ion-pair chromatographic methods for the facile separation and purification of imidazolium-based ionic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, ND; Schenkel, MR; Robertson, LA; Noble, RD; Gin, DL

    2012-07-04

    lmidazolium- and oligo(imidazolium)-based ionic organic compounds are important in the design of room-temperature ionic liquid materials; however, the chromatographic analysis and separation of such compounds are often difficult. A convenient and inexpensive method for effective thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis and column chromatography separation of imidazolium-based ionic compounds is presented. Normal-phase ion-pair TLC is used to effectively analyze homologous mixtures of these ionic compounds. Subsequent separation of the mixtures is performed using ion-pair flash chromatography on normal-phase silica gel, yielding high levels of recovery. This method also results in a complete exchange of the counter anion on the imidazolium compounds to the anion of the ion-pair reagent. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of Negligible Creep, Off-Normal Welding and Heat Treatment of Gr91 Steel for Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Terry, Totemeier

    2006-10-01

    Two different topics of Grade 91 steel are investigated for Gen IV nuclear reactor pressure vessel application. On the first topic, negligible creep of Grade 91 is investigated with the motivation to design the reactor pressure vessel in negligible creep regime and eliminate costly surveillance programs during the reactor operation. Available negligible creep criteria and creep strain laws are reviewed, and new data needs are evaluated. It is concluded that modifications of the existing criteria and laws, together with their associated parameters, are needed before they can be reliably applied to Grade 91 for negligible creep prediction and reactor pressure vessel design. On the second topic, effects of off-normal welding and heat treatment on creep behavior of Grade 91 are studied with the motivation to better define the control over the parameters in welding and heat treatment procedures. The study is focused on off-normal austenitizing temperatures and improper cooling after welding but prior to post-weld heat treatment.

  7. SU-E-J-190: Characterization of Radiation Induced CT Number Changes in Tumor and Normal Lung During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C; Liu, F; Tai, A; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure CT number (CTN) changes in tumor and normal lung as a function of radiation therapy (RT) dose during the course of RT delivery for lung cancer using daily IGRT CT images and single respiration phase CT images. Methods: 4D CT acquired during planning simulation and daily 3D CT acquired during daily IGRT for 10 lung cancer cases randomly selected in terms of age, caner type and stage, were analyzed using an in-house developed software tool. All patients were treated in 2 Gy fractions to primary tumors and involved nodal regions. Regions enclosed by a series of isodose surfaces in normal lung were delineated. The obtained contours along with target contours (GTVs) were populated to each singlephase planning CT and daily CT. CTN in term of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of each voxel in these delineated regions were collectively analyzed using histogram, mean, mode and linear correlation. Results: Respiration induced normal lung CTN change, as analyzed from single-phase planning CTs, ranged from 9 to 23 (2) HU for the patients studied. Normal lung CTN change was as large as 50 (12) HU over the entire treatment course, was dose and patient dependent and was measurable with dose changes as low as 1.5 Gy. For patients with obvious tumor volume regression, CTN within the GTV drops monotonically as much as 10 (1) HU during the early fractions with a total dose of 20 Gy delivered. The GTV and CTN reductions are significantly correlated with correlation coefficient >0.95. Conclusion: Significant RT dose induced CTN changes in lung tissue and tumor region can be observed during even the early phase of RT delivery, and may potentially be used for early prediction of radiation response. Single respiration phase CT images have dramatically reduced statistical noise in ROIs, making daily dose response evaluation possible.

  8. An Attempt to Calibrate and Validate a Simple Ductile Failure Model Against Axial-Torsion Experiments on Al 6061-T651.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reedlunn, Benjamin; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2015-01-01

    This report details a work in progress. We have attempted to calibrate and validate a Von Mises plasticity model with the Johnson-Cook failure criterion ( Johnson & Cook , 1985 ) against a set of experiments on various specimens of Al 6061-T651. As will be shown, the effort was not successful, despite considerable attention to detail. When the model was com- pared against axial-torsion experiments on tubes, it over predicted failure by 3 x in tension, and never predicted failure in torsion, even when the tube was twisted by 4 x further than the experiment. While this result is unfortunate, it is not surprising. Ductile failure is not well understood. In future work, we will explore whether more sophisticated material mod- els of plasticity and failure will improve the predictions. Selecting the appropriate advanced material model and interpreting the results of said model are not trivial exercises, so it is worthwhile to fully investigate the behavior of a simple plasticity model before moving on to an anisotropic yield surface or a similarly complicated model.

  9. A simple method to deposit palladium doped SnO{sub 2} thin films using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young Soon; Wahab, Rizwan; Shin, Hyung-Shik [School of Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Ansari, S. G.; Ansari, Z. A. [Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2010-11-15

    This work presents a simple method to deposit palladium doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin films using modified plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition as a function of deposition temperature at a radio frequency plasma power of 150 W. Stannic chloride (SnCl{sub 4}) was used as precursor and oxygen (O{sub 2}, 100 SCCM) (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) as reactant gas. Palladium hexafluroacetyleacetonate (Pd(C{sub 5}HF{sub 6}O{sub 2}){sub 2}) was used as a precursor for palladium. Fine granular morphology was observed with tetragonal rutile structure. A peak related to Pd{sub 2}Sn is observed, whose intensity increases slightly with deposition temperature. Electrical resistivity value decreased from 8.6 to 0.9 m{Omega} cm as a function of deposition temperature from 400 to 600 deg. C. Photoelectron peaks related to Sn 3d, Sn 3p3, Sn 4d, O 1s, and C 1s were detected with varying intensities as a function of deposition temperature.

  10. Benchmark atomization energy of ethane : importance of accurate zero-point vibrational energies and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections for a 'simple' organic molecule.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karton, A.; Martin, J. M. L.; Ruscic, B.; Chemistry; Weizmann Institute of Science

    2007-06-01

    A benchmark calculation of the atomization energy of the 'simple' organic molecule C2H6 (ethane) has been carried out by means of W4 theory. While the molecule is straightforward in terms of one-particle and n-particle basis set convergence, its large zero-point vibrational energy (and anharmonic correction thereto) and nontrivial diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction (DBOC) represent interesting challenges. For the W4 set of molecules and C2H6, we show that DBOCs to the total atomization energy are systematically overestimated at the SCF level, and that the correlation correction converges very rapidly with the basis set. Thus, even at the CISD/cc-pVDZ level, useful correlation corrections to the DBOC are obtained. When applying such a correction, overall agreement with experiment was only marginally improved, but a more significant improvement is seen when hydrogen-containing systems are considered in isolation. We conclude that for closed-shell organic molecules, the greatest obstacles to highly accurate computational thermochemistry may not lie in the solution of the clamped-nuclei Schroedinger equation, but rather in the zero-point vibrational energy and the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction.

  11. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garbe, James C.; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; Fuchs, Laura; Novak, Petr; Brothman, Arthur R.; Jackson, Mark; Chin, Koei; LaBarge, Mark A.; Watts, George; et al

    2014-10-29

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agentsmore » are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization.« less

  12. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbe, James C.; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; Fuchs, Laura; Novak, Petr; Brothman, Arthur R.; Jackson, Mark; Chin, Koei; LaBarge, Mark A.; Watts, George; Futscher, Bernard W.; Stampfer, Martha R.

    2014-10-29

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agents are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization.

  13. Control of normal and abnormal bipolar resistive switching by interface junction on In/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3} interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, J.; Jia, C. H.; Li, G. Q.; Zhang, W. F.

    2012-09-24

    The resistive switching behaviors of indium (In)/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3} (NSTO) with different metal/semiconductor contacts are investigated. The In electrodes with the Schottky contacts are fabricated on NSTO surface using direct current reactive magnetron sputtering, and the fresh In is directly pressed to form the Ohmic contact. The device with one Schottky barrier displays a normal bipolar resistive switching (BRS) behavior, while the device with two Schottky barriers shows an abnormal BRS behavior. The results demonstrate that the injection and trapping or detrapping of carriers near the interface between the metal electrode and semiconductor are closely related to the resistive switching performance.

  14. Induction of stable p53 oncoprotein and of c-myc overexpression in cultured normal human uroepithelium by radiation and N-nitrosodiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mothersill, C.; Seymour, C.B. ); Harney, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Uroepithelium cultured from normal patients without cancer (60 individuals) was found to segregate into four subtypes based on the level of carcinogen treatment needed to induce abnormal p53 and c-myc. Twenty-two percent of patient cultures never showed abnormal p53 expression, even after chronic exposure to nitrosamines, while a further 26% required only a single dose of radiation to induce the abnormal protein. The remaining patients had tissues which, while initially negative for stable p53, became positive when put into culture and stimulated to grow. The c-myc protein was overexpressed in all cultures with abnormal p53. It would appear that elevated expression of conformationally inactive p53 and of high levels of c-myc represents an early response of normal uroepithelial cells to carcinogen challenge. It also appears that a relatively high number of patients without cancer express these proteins when their cells are challenged to grow; a pre-exposure to environmental carcinogens such as nitrosamines in cigarette smoke is likely to be involved. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity Is Not a Common Effect in Normal Asynchronous and G2-Phase Fibroblasts of Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S?onina, Dorota; Biesaga, Beata; Janecka, Anna; Kabat, Damian; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Gasi?ska, Anna

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: In our previous study, using the micronucleus assay, a low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS)-like phenomenon was observed for normal fibroblasts of 2 of the 40 cancer patients investigated. In this article we report, for the first time, the survival response of primary fibroblasts from 25 of these patients to low-dose irradiation and answer the question regarding the effect of G2-phase enrichment on HRS elicitation. Methods and Materials: The clonogenic survival of asynchronous as well as G2-phase enriched fibroblast populations was measured. Separation of G2-phase cells and precise cell counting was performed using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Sorted and plated cells were irradiated with single doses (0.1-4 Gy) of 6-MV x-rays. For each patient, at least 4 independent experiments were performed, and the induced-repair model was fitted over the whole data set to confirm the presence of HRS effect. Results: The HRS response was demonstrated for the asynchronous and G2-phase enriched cell populations of 4 patients. For the rest of patients, HRS was not defined in either of the 2 fibroblast populations. Thus, G2-phase enrichment had no effect on HRS elicitation. Conclusions: The fact that low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity is not a common effect in normal human fibroblasts implies that HRS may be of little consequence in late-responding connective tissues with regard to radiation fibrosis.

  16. 7-Tesla Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging to Assess the Effects of Radiotherapy on Normal-Appearing Brain in Patients With Glioma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupo, Janine M., E-mail: janine.lupo@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chuang, Cynthia F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chang, Susan M. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Jimenez, Bert; Hess, Christopher P. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nelson, Sarah J. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the intermediate- and long-term imaging manifestations of radiotherapy on normal-appearing brain tissue in patients with treated gliomas using 7T susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Methods and Materials: SWI was performed on 25 patients with stable gliomas on a 7 Tesla magnet. Microbleeds were identified as discrete foci of susceptibility that did not correspond to vessels. The number of microbleeds was counted within and outside of the T2-hyperintense lesion. For 3 patients, radiation dosimetry maps were reconstructed and fused with the 7T SWI data. Results: Multiple foci of susceptibility consistent with microhemorrhages were observed in patients 2 years after chemoradiation. These lesions were not present in patients who were not irradiated. The prevalence of microhemorrhages increased with the time since completion of radiotherapy, and these lesions often extended outside the boundaries of the initial high-dose volume and into the contralateral hemisphere. Conclusions: High-field SWI has potential for visualizing the appearance of microbleeds associated with long-term effects of radiotherapy on brain tissue. The ability to visualize these lesions in normal-appearing brain tissue may be important in further understanding the utility of this treatment in patients with longer survival.

  17. Effect of calcination temperature on structural and photocatalyst properties of nanofibers prepared from low-cost natural ilmenite mineral by simple hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpraditpan, Athapon; Wirunmongkol, Thanakorn; Pavasupree, Sorapong; Pecharapa, Wisanu

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Nanofibers were prepared from low-cost ilmenite mineral via simple hydrothermal. High photocatalyst nanofibers were prepared via post heat treatment method. The nanofibers calcined at 100700 C for 2 h maintained nanofiber structure. The calcined nanofibers at 400 C showed the highest photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Titanate nanofibers were synthesized via the hydrothermal method (120 C for 72 h) using natural ilmenite mineral (FeTiO{sub 3}) as the starting material. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescent (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and BrunauerEmmettTeller (BET) for specific surface area. The nanofibers were 2090 nm in diameter and 27 ?m in length. The as-synthesized nanofibers calcined at 300400 C showed TiO{sub 2} (B) whereas the nanofibers calcined at 500 C revealed a mixture of two phases of TiO{sub 2} (B) and anatase. The nanofibers calcined at high temperature of 6001000 C showed a mixture of tri-crystalline of anatase, rutile, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The rutile phase increased with increasing calcination temperature. The nanofibers calcined at 300700 C maintained their structure while the morphology of the nanofibers calcined at 8001000 C transformed into submicron rod-like structure. This increase of calcination temperature led to the phase transformation from thermodynamically metastable anatase to the most stable form of rutile phase. The crystallite size of prepared samples increased with increasing calcination temperature. Interestingly, with increasing calcination temperature, the absorption edge of the prepared samples shows an obvious shift to visible light region due to the change of crystallite phase and increased crystallite size. Therefore, the band gap energy of the prepared samples became narrower with increasing calcination temperature. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activity of the nanofibers calcined at 400 C for 2 h was found to be not merely higher than those of the commercially available TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles powders (P-25, JRC-01, and JRC-03) but also the highest of all the samples in this study.

  18. Management of the baseline shift using a new and simple method for respiratory-gated radiation therapy: Detectability and effectiveness of a flexible monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kitamura, Nozomi; Ito, Yasushi; Kawai, Daisuke; Nakajima, Masaru; Tsuda, Akihisa; Shiizuka, Hisao

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: In respiratory-gated radiation therapy, a baseline shift decreases the accuracy of target coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing. The effectiveness of audio-feedback and audio-visual feedback in correcting the baseline shift in the breathing pattern of the patient has been demonstrated previously. However, the baseline shift derived from the intrafraction motion of the patient's body cannot be corrected by these methods. In the present study, the authors designed and developed a simple and flexible system. Methods: The system consisted of a web camera and a computer running our in-house software. The in-house software was adapted to template matching and also to no preimage processing. The system was capable of monitoring the baseline shift in the intrafraction motion of the patient's body. Another marker box was used to monitor the baseline shift due to the flexible setups required of a marker box for gated signals. The system accuracy was evaluated by employing a respiratory motion phantom and was found to be within AAPM Task Group 142 tolerance (positional accuracy <2 mm and temporal accuracy <100 ms) for respiratory-gated radiation therapy. Additionally, the effectiveness of this flexible and independent system in gated treatment was investigated in healthy volunteers, in terms of the results from the differences in the baseline shift detectable between the marker positions, which the authors evaluated statistically. Results: The movement of the marker on the sternum [1.599 {+-} 0.622 mm (1 SD)] was substantially decreased as compared with the abdomen [6.547 {+-} 0.962 mm (1 SD)]. Additionally, in all of the volunteers, the baseline shifts for the sternum [-0.136 {+-} 0.868 (2 SD)] were in better agreement with the nominal baseline shifts than was the case for the abdomen [-0.722 {+-} 1.56 mm (2 SD)]. The baseline shifts could be accurately measured and detected using the monitoring system, which could acquire the movement of the marker on the sternum. The baseline shift-monitoring system with the displacement-based methods for highly accurate respiratory-gated treatments should be used to make most of the displacement-based gating methods. Conclusions: The advent of intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated radiation therapy facilitates margin reduction for the planning target volumes and the OARs, but highly accurate irradiation is needed to achieve target coverage and OAR sparing with a small margin. The baseline shifts can affect treatment not only with the respiratory gating system but also without the system. Our system can manage the baseline shift and also enables treatment irradiation to be undertaken with high accuracy.

  19. Not Your Normal Power Box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okman, Oya; Baginska, Marta; Jones, Elizabeth MC; Pety, Stephen J; Lim, Tae Wook; Kaitz, Joshua A; Dong, Hefei; Vissers, Daniel R; Sottos, Nancy R; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Thackery, Michael M; Fenter, Paul A; Trahey, Lynn; Sandler, Sana; Hersam, Mark C; Kapper, Aaron J

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center for Electrical Energy Storage (CEES), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge and was awarded "Best Science Lesson." As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE: energy. The mission of the CEES is to acquire a fundamental understanding of interfacial phenomena controlling electrochemical processes that will enable dramatic improvements in the properties and performance of energy storage devices, notably Li ion batteries.

  20. Comparative studies of optical and elastic properties of ZrO{sub 2} thin films prepared under normal and oblique incidence deposition geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, P. Tokas, R. B. Jena, S. Thakur, S. Sahoo, N. K.

    2014-04-24

    Oblique angle deposited optical thin films have attracted recent researcher’s interest because of their attractive optical, micro-structural, mechanical properties and more importantly because of their great potential in achieving tunability in refractive index. These properties in turn make it important in case of designing different optical devices. In the present work, ZrO{sub 2} thin films have been deposited on fused silica substrate by electron beam evaporation technique in normal as well as oblique angle deposition configurations. Optical properties, especially refractive index of the films have been estimated by fitting the measured transmission spectra with suitable theoretical dispersion models. Atomic force microscopy has been employed to characterize morphological properties of samples. The elastic properties of both the films are estimated by Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy, a new and highly sensitive technique for thin films.

  1. SU-E-T-501: Normal Tissue Toxicities of Pulsed Low Dose Rate Radiotherapy and Conventional Radiotherapy: An in Vivo Total Body Irradiation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cvetkovic, D; Zhang, P; Wang, B; Chen, L; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) is a re-irradiation technique for therapy of recurrent cancers. We have previously shown a significant difference in the weight and survival time between the mice treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and PLDR using total body irradiation (TBI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of PLDR on normal mouse tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty two male BALB/c nude mice, 4 months of age, were randomly assigned into a PLDR group (n=10), a CRT group (n=10), and a non-irradiated control group (n=2). The Siemens Artiste accelerator with 6 MV photon beams was used. The mice received a total of 18Gy in 3 fractions with a 20day interval. The CRT group received the 6Gy dose continuously at a dose rate of 300 MU/min. The PLDR group was irradiated with 0.2Gyx20 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. The mice were weighed thrice weekly and sacrificed 2 weeks after the last treatment. Brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive organs, and sternal bone marrow were removed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and stained with H and E. Morphological changes were observed under a microscope. Results: Histopathological examination revealed atrophy in several irradiated organs. The degree of atrophy was mild to moderate in the PLDR group, but severe in the CRT group. The most pronounced morphological abnormalities were in the immune and hematopoietic systems, namely spleen and bone marrow. Brain hemorrhage was seen in the CRT group, but not in the PLDR group. Conclusions: Our results showed that PLDR induced less toxicity in the normal mouse tissues than conventional radiotherapy for the same dose and regimen. Considering that PLDR produces equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy, it would be a good modality for treatment of recurrent cancers.

  2. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-04-01

    Under current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation, it is not sufficient for used nuclear fuel (UNF) to simply maintain its integrity during the storage period, it must maintain its integrity in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and moving it to treatment or recycling facilities, or a geologic repository. Hence it is necessary to understand the performance characteristics of aged UNF cladding and ancillary components under loadings stemming from transport initiatives. Researchers would like to demonstrate that enough information, including experimental support and modeling and simulation capabilities, exists to establish a preliminary determination of UNF structural performance under normal conditions of transport (NCT). This research, development and demonstration (RD&D) plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. This methodology will be used to provide a preliminary assessment of the performance characteristics of UNF cladding and ancillary components under rail-related NCT loading. The methodology couples modeling and simulation and experimental efforts currently under way within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The methodology will involve limited uncertainty quantification in the form of sensitivity evaluations focused around available fuel and ancillary fuel structure properties exclusively. The work includes collecting information via literature review, soliciting input/guidance from subject matter experts, performing computational analyses, planning experimental measurement and possible execution (depending on timing), and preparing a variety of supporting documents that will feed into and provide the basis for future initiatives. The methodology demonstration will focus on structural performance evaluation of Westinghouse WE 17×17 pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies with a discharge burnup range of 30-58 GWd/MTU (assembly average), loaded in a representative high-capacity (≥32 fuel rod assemblies) transportation package. Evaluations will be performed for representative normal conditions of rail transport involving a rail conveyance capable of meeting the Association of American Railroads (AAR) S-2043 specification. UNF modeling is anticipated to be defined to the pellet-cladding level and take in to account influences associated with spacer grids, intermediate fluid mixers, and control components. The influence of common degradation issues such as ductile-to-brittle-transition will also be accounted for. All model development and analysis will be performed with commercially available software packages exclusively. Inputs and analyses will be completely documented, all supporting information will be traceable, and bases will be defendable so as to be most useful to the U.S. Department of Energy community and mission. The expected completion date is the end of fiscal year (FY) 2013.

  3. Understanding composite explosive energetics: 4. Reactive flow modeling of aluminum reaction kinetics in PETN and TNT using normalized product equation of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, W.C.; Tarver, C.M.; Kury, J.W.; Lee, C.G.; Ornellas, D.L.

    1993-07-01

    Using Fabry-Perot interferometry techniques, we have determined the early time rate of energy release from detonating PETN and TNT explosives filled with 5 to 20 wt % of either 5 {mu}m or 18 {mu}m spherical aluminum with the detonation products, and calculate the extent of reaction at 1--3 {mu}s after the detonation. All of the metal in PETN formulations filled with 5 wt % and 10 wt % of either 5 {mu}m or 18 {mu}m aluminum reacted within 1.5 {mu}s, resulting in an increase of 18--22% in energy compared to pure PETN. For TNT formulations, between 5 to 10 wt % aluminum reacts completely with the same timeframe. A reactive flow hydrodynamic code model based on the Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) description of the reaction zone and subsequent reaction product expansion (Taylor wave) is used to address the reaction rate of the aluminum particles with detonation product gases. The detonation product JWL equation of state is derived from that of pure PETN using a parametric normalization methodology.

  4. Measurements of normalized differential cross sections for tt¯ production in pp collisions at (s)=7  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2014-10-13

    We present measurements of normalized differential cross sections for top-quark pair production as a function of the top-quark transverse momentum, and of the mass, transverse momentum, and rapidity of the t¯t system, in proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √ s=7 TeV. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb₋1, recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Events are selected in the lepton + jets channel, requiring exactly one lepton and at least four jets with at least one of the jets tagged as originating from a b-quark. The measuredmore » spectra are corrected for detector efficiency and resolution effects and are compared to several Monte Carlo simulations and theory calculations. The results are in fair agreement with the predictions in a wide kinematic range. Nevertheless, data distributions are softer than predicted for higher values of the mass of the t¯t system and of the top-quark transverse momentum. Lastly, the measurements can also discriminate among different sets of parton distribution functions.« less

  5. Ultrasound guided fluorescence molecular tomography with improved quantification by an attenuation compensated born-normalization and in vivo preclinical study of cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Baoqiang; Berti, Romain; Abran, Maxime; Lesage, Frédéric; Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec H1T 1C8

    2014-05-15

    Ultrasound imaging, having the advantages of low-cost and non-invasiveness over MRI and X-ray CT, was reported by several studies as an adequate complement to fluorescence molecular tomography with the perspective of improving localization and quantification of fluorescent molecular targets in vivo. Based on the previous work, an improved dual-modality Fluorescence-Ultrasound imaging system was developed and then validated in imaging study with preclinical tumor model. Ultrasound imaging and a profilometer were used to obtain the anatomical prior information and 3D surface, separately, to precisely extract the tissue boundary on both sides of sample in order to achieve improved fluorescence reconstruction. Furthermore, a pattern-based fluorescence reconstruction on the detection side was incorporated to enable dimensional reduction of the dataset while keeping the useful information for reconstruction. Due to its putative role in the current imaging geometry and the chosen reconstruction technique, we developed an attenuation compensated Born-normalization method to reduce the attenuation effects and cancel off experimental factors when collecting quantitative fluorescence datasets over large area. Results of both simulation and phantom study demonstrated that fluorescent targets could be recovered accurately and quantitatively using this reconstruction mechanism. Finally, in vivo experiment confirms that the imaging system associated with the proposed image reconstruction approach was able to extract both functional and anatomical information, thereby improving quantification and localization of molecular targets.

  6. Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katich, Joseph; Qian, Xin; Zhao, Yuxiang; Allada, Kalyan; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Elliott; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cornejo, Juan; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Ding, Huaibo; Dolph, Peter; Dutta, Chiranjib; Dutta, Dipangkar; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilad, Gilad; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Guo, Lei; Hamilton, David; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jijun; Huang, Min; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jin, Ge; Jones, Mark; Kelleher, Aidan; Kim, Wooyoung; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Y; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lu, Hai-jiang; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Oh, Yoomin; Osipenko, Mikhail; Parno, Diana; Peng, Jen-chieh; Phillips, Sarah; Posik, Matthew; Puckett, Andrew; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Ransome, Ronald; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Schulte, Elaine; Shahinyan, Albert; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Sirca, Simon; Stepanyan, Stepan; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tang, Liguang; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vilardi, Ignazio; Wang, Kebin; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Z; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zong, Xing

    2014-07-01

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry in deep-inelastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero in the Born approximation. The experiment, conducted at Jefferson Lab using a 5.89 GeV electron beam, covers a range of 1.72 GeV, which is non-zero at the 2.75sigma level. Theoretical calculations, which assume two-photon exchange with quasi-free quarks, predict a neutron asymmetry of O(10−4) when both photons couple to one quark, and O(10−2) for the photons coupling to different quarks. Our measured asymmetry agrees both in sign and magnitude with the prediction that uses input based on the Sivers transverse momentum distribution obtained from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  7. Measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in quasielastic scattering from the reaction He3↑(e,e')

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y. -W.; Long, E.; Mihovilovič, M.; Jin, G.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Ayerbe-Gayoso, C.; Boeglin, W.; et al

    2015-10-22

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry, Ay, in quasi-elastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He↑ (e,e') on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton scattering plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero for one-photon exchange. A non-zero Ay can arise from the interference between the one- and two-photon exchange processes which is sensitive to the details of the sub-structure of the nucleon. An experiment recently completed at Jefferson Lab yielded asymmetries with high statistical precision at Q2= 0.13, 0.46 and 0.97 GeV2. These measurements demonstrate, for the first time, that the 3Hemore » asymmetry is clearly non-zero and negative with a statistical significance of (8-10)σ. Using measured proton-to-3He cross-section ratios and the effective polarization approximation, neutron asymmetries of -(1-3)% were obtained. The neutron asymmetry at high Q2 is related to moments of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). Our measured neutron asymmetry at Q2=0.97 GeV2 agrees well with a prediction based on two-photon exchange using a GPD model and in addition provides a new independent constraint on these distributions.« less

  8. Toward a self-consistent model of the interaction between an ultra-intense, normally incident laser pulse with an overdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debayle, A.; ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 ; Sanz, J.; Gremillet, L.; Mima, K.

    2013-05-15

    Following a recent work by Sanz et al. [Phys. Rev. E 85, 046411 (2012)], we elaborate upon a one-dimensional model describing the interaction between an ultra-intense, normally incident laser pulse and an overdense plasma. The analytical solutions of the reflected laser field, the electrostatic field, and the plasma surface oscillation are obtained within the cold-fluid approximation. The high-order harmonic spectrum is calculated from the exact solution of the plasma surface oscillations. In agreement with particle-in-cell simulations, two regimes of harmonic generation are predicted: for moderately relativistic laser intensities, or high plasma densities, the harmonic spectrum is determined by the discontinuity in the derivative of the reflected field when the electron plasma boundary oscillates across the fixed ion boundary. For higher intensities, the electron plasma boundary is confined inside the ion region and oscillates at relativistic velocities, giving rise to a train of reflected attosecond pulses. In both cases, the harmonic spectrum obeys an asymptotic ω{sup −4} scaling. The acceleration of electrons and the related laser absorption efficiency are computed by a test particle method. The model self-consistently reproduces the transition between the “anomalous skin effect” and the “J × B” heating predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. Analytical estimates of the different scalings are presented.

  9. Changes in Normal Liver and Spleen Volume after Radioembolization with {sup 90}Y-Resin Microspheres in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Findings and Clinical Significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paprottka, Philipp M. Schmidt, G. P.; Trumm, C. G.; Hoffmann, R. T.; Reiser, M. F.; Jakobs, T. F.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: In clinical trials with yttrium-90-resin-microspheres for the management of colorectal cancer liver metastases, it was observed that radioembolization might result in splenomegaly and an increase in portal vein size. Subclinical hepatitis in normal liver tissue as well as the effects of radioembolization and prior chemotherapy are suspected to be responsible for this phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to quantify the changes in liver and spleen volume and portal vein diameter after radioembolization. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with liver-dominant metastatic disease from breast cancer who had not responded to chemotherapy or had to abandon chemotherapy because of its toxic effects were evaluated. Changes in liver and spleen volume and portal vein diameter as well as liver tumor volume and diameter were quantified using computed tomography scans. Results: Radioembolization was associated with a significant mean decrease in the whole liver volume of 10.2% (median 16.7%; P = 0.0024), mainly caused by a reduction in the right lobe volume (mean 16.0%; P < 0.0001). These changes were accompanied by a significant increase in the diameter of the main portal vein (mean 6.8%; P < 0.0001) as well as splenic volume (mean 50.4%; P < 0.0001). Liver-tumor volume and diameter decreased by a median of 24 and 39.7%. Conclusions: Radioembolization is an effective treatment for tumor size reduction in patients with breast cancer liver metastases. Treatment is associated with changes of hepatic parenchymal volume, splenic volume, and portal vein size that appear not to represent clinically important sequelae in this patient cohort.

  10. SU-D-16A-01: A Novel Method to Estimate Normal Tissue Dose for Radiotherapy Patients to Support Epidemiologic Studies of Second Cancer Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C; Jung, J; Pelletier, C; Kim, J; Lee, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient cohort of second cancer study often involves radiotherapy patients with no radiological images available: We developed methods to construct a realistic surrogate anatomy by using computational human phantoms. We tested this phantom images both in a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse) and a custom Monte Carlo (MC) transport code. Methods: We used a reference adult male phantom defined by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The hybrid phantom which was originally developed in Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) and polygon mesh format was converted into more common medical imaging format. Electron density was calculated from the material composition of the organs and tissues and then converted into DICOM format. The DICOM images were imported into the Eclipse system for treatment planning, and then the resulting DICOM-RT files were imported into the MC code for MC-based dose calculation. Normal tissue doses were calculation in Eclipse and MC code for an illustrative prostate treatment case and compared to each other. Results: DICOM images were generated from the adult male reference phantom. Densities and volumes of selected organs between the original phantom and ones represented within Eclipse showed good agreements, less than 0.6%. Mean dose from Eclipse and MC code match less than 7%, whereas maximum and minimum doses were different up to 45%. Conclusion: The methods established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support epidemiological studies of second cancer in cancer survivors treated by radiotherapy. We also work on implementing body size-dependent computational phantoms to better represent patient's anatomy when the height and weight of patients are available.

  11. Poster — Thur Eve — 64: Preliminary investigation of arc configurations for optimal sparing of normal tissue in hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HF-SRT) of multiple brain metastases using a 5mm interdigitating micro-multileaf collimator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leavens, C; Wronski, M; Lee, YK; Ruschin, M; Soliman, H; Sahgal, A

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate normal tissue sparing in intra-cranial HF-SRT, comparing various arc configurations with the Synergy Beam Modulator (SynBM) and Agility linacs, the latter incorporating leaf interdigitation and backup jaws. Methods: Five patients with multiple brain metastases (BMs), (5 BMs (n=2), 3 BMs (n=3)) treated with HF-SRT using 25 Gy (n=2) or 30 Gy (n=3) in 5 fractions, were investigated. Clinical treatment plans used the SynBM. Each patient was retrospectively re-planned on Agility, employing three planning strategies: (A) one isocenter and dedicated arc for each BM; (B) a single isocenter, centrally placed with respect to BMs; (C) the isocenter and arc configuration used in the SynBM plan, where closely spaced (<5cm) BMs used a dedicated isocenter and arcs. Agility plans were normalized for PTV coverage and heterogeneity. Results and Conclusion: Strategy A obtained the greatest improvements over the SynBM plan, where the maximum OAR dose, and mean dose to normal brain (averaged for all patients) were reduced by 55cGy and 25cGy, respectively. Strategy B was limited by having a single isocenter, hence less jaw shielding and increased MLC leakage. The maximum OAR dose was reduced by 13cGy, however mean dose to normal brain increased by 84cGy. Strategy C reduced the maximum OAR dose and mean dose to normal brain by 32cGy and 9cGy, respectively. The results from this study indicate that, for intra-cranial HF-SRT of multiple BMs, Agility plans are equal or better than SynBM plans. Further planning is needed to investigate dose sparing using Strategy A and the SynBM.

  12. Modeling natural gas reservoirs - a simple model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, R.S.

    1981-10-01

    A mathematical model is developed and tested for the production of natural gas with water encroachment and gas entrapment. The model is built on the material and volumetric balance relations, the Schilthuis water drive model, and a gas entrapment mechanism which assumes that the rate of gas entrapment is proportional to the volumetric rate of water influx. This model represents an alternative to the large grid models because of its low computer, maintenance, and manpower costs. 13 refs.

  13. A simple approach to modeling ductile failure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Gerald William

    2012-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has the need to predict the behavior of structures after the occurrence of an initial failure. In some cases determining the extent of failure, beyond initiation, is required, while in a few cases the initial failure is a design feature used to tailor the subsequent load paths. In either case, the ability to numerically simulate the initiation and propagation of failures is a highly desired capability. This document describes one approach to the simulation of failure initiation and propagation.

  14. S13: HPC Archive Solutions Made Simple

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alan Powers, CSC Jason Hick, NERSC Matt Cary, NASA Advanced Simulation Facility http:... Computing Center (DOENERSC - 22 PB), NASA Advanced Supercomputing Facility (NASANAS ...

  15. A simple method to estimate interwell autocorrelation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pizarro, J.O.S.; Lake, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    The estimation of autocorrelation in the lateral or interwell direction is important when performing reservoir characterization studies using stochastic modeling. This paper presents a new method to estimate the interwell autocorrelation based on parameters, such as the vertical range and the variance, that can be estimated with commonly available data. We used synthetic fields that were generated from stochastic simulations to provide data to construct the estimation charts. These charts relate the ratio of areal to vertical variance and the autocorrelation range (expressed variously) in two directions. Three different semivariogram models were considered: spherical, exponential and truncated fractal. The overall procedure is demonstrated using field data. We find that the approach gives the most self-consistent results when it is applied to previously identified facies. Moreover, the autocorrelation trends follow the depositional pattern of the reservoir, which gives confidence in the validity of the approach.

  16. ARM - Lesson Plans: Simple Light Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox ...

  17. A Simple Candle Filter Safeguard Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurley, J.P.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.L.

    2002-09-18

    In order to reach the highest possible efficiencies in a coal-fired turbine-based power system, the turbine should be directly fired with the products of coal utilization. Two main designs employ these turbines: those based on pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBCs) and those based on integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCCs). In both designs, the suspended particulates, or dust, must be cleaned from the gas before it enters the turbine to prevent fouling and erosion of the blades. To produce the cleanest gas, barrier filters are being developed and are in commercial use. Barrier filters are composed of porous, high-temperature materials that allow the hot gas to pass but collect the dust on the surface. The three main configurations are candle, cross-flow, and tube. Both candle and tube filters have been tested extensively. They are primarily composed of coarsely porous ceramic that serves as a structural support, overlain with a thin, microporous ceramic layer o n the dirty gas side that serves as the primary filter surface. They are highly efficient at removing particulate matter from the gas stream and, because of their ceramic construction, are resistant to gas and ash corrosion. However, ceramics are brittle, and individual elements can fail, allowing the particulates to pass through the hole left by the filter element and erode the turbine. Because of the possibility of occasional filter breakage, safeguard devices (SGDs) must be employed to prevent the dust streaming through broken filters from reaching the turbine. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) safeguard device is composed of three main parts: the ceramic substrate, the adhesive coating, and the safeguard device housing. This report describes the development and laboratory testing of each of those parts as well as the bench-scale performance of both types of complete SGDs.

  18. Simple Power, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Phone Number: 1.800.692.4776 Website: www.cirroenergy.com Twitter: @cirroenergytx Facebook: https:www.facebook.comCirroEnergy Outage Hotline: 1.800.692.4776 References:...

  19. Simple Waste Solutions for Complex Facilities - 12433

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Terry I.; Stephan, Clifford J.

    2012-07-01

    The buildings in the 300 Area, including several Category 3 nuclear facilities are undergoing deactivation, decommissioning, decontamination and demolition (D4) by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) as part of the River Corridor Closure Contract (RCCC). The D4 process has generated a wide variety of low-level radioactive and low-level radioactive mixed waste as well as TRU. The Hanford Site-wide Transportation Safety Document (TSD) has been successfully utilized to transport waste streams that otherwise would not be able to be shipped. The TSD accomplished this by establishing a comprehensive set of onsite transportation and packaging performance standards and risk-based standards. The requirements and standards presented are equivalent to DOT and NRC standards (10 CFR 71). (authors)

  20. Simple and low-temperature preparation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} sphere-like nanoparticles via solid-state thermolysis of the [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3} complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farhadi, Saeid; Pourzare, Kolsoum

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ? [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3} precursor was used for synthesizing pure Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals. ? Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized at low temperature of 200 C. ? Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals show a weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. ? This simple method is low-cost and suitable for high-scale production of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. -- Abstract: In this work, spinel-type Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} spherical nanoparticles were easily prepared via decomposition of the hexamminecobalt(III) nitrate complex, [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, at low temperature (200 C). The product was characterized by thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, UVvis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), BrunauerEmmettTeller (BET) specific surface area measurement and magnetic measurements. The results confirmed that pure single-phase Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with weak ferromagnetic behavior were obtained by this method. TEM images showed that the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are sphere-like with an average diameter size of around 15 nm. The optical spectrum indicated two direct band gaps at 2.15 and 3.56 eV which are blue-shifted relative to reported values for the bulk sample. Using this fast and simple method, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles can be produced without expensive and toxic solvents or complicated equipment.

  1. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D{sub 105%} and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT.

  2. Hydromechanical transmission with three simple planetary assemblies, one sun gear being mounted on the output shaft and the other two on a common shaft connected to an input-driven hydraulic module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1978-01-01

    A power transmission having three simple planetary assemblies, each having its own carrier and its own planet, sun, and ring gears. A speed-varying module is connected in driving relation to the input shaft and in driving relationship to the sun gears of the first two planetary assemblies, these two sun gears being connected together on a common shaft. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being connected in driving relation to the input shaft, the other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, being connected in driving relation to the sun gears. The input shaft is also connected to drive the second ring gear and, furthermore is clutchable to the carrier of the third planetary assembly. A brake grounds the first carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode. The carrier of the second planetary assembly drives the ring gear of the third planetary assembly, which is clutchable to the output shaft, and the sun gear of the third planetary assembly is mounted rigidly to the output shaft.

  3. Adaptive capture of expert behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.D.; Barrett, C.L.; Hand, U.; Gordon, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The authors smoothed and captured a set of expert rules with adaptive networks. The motivation for doing this is discussed. (1) Smoothing leads to stabler control actions. (2) For some sets of rules, the evaluation of the rules can be sped up. This is important in large-scale simulations where many intelligent elements are present. (3) Variability of the intelligent elements can be achieved by adjusting the weights in an adaptive network. (4) After capture has occurred, the weights can be adjusted based on performance criteria. The authors thus have the capability of learning a new set of rules that lead to better performance. The set of rules the authors chose to capture were based on a set of threat determining rules for tank commanders. The approach in this paper: (1) They smoothed the rules. The rule set was converted into a simple set of arithmetic statements. Continuous, non-binary inputs, are now permitted. (2) An operational measure of capturability was developed. (3) They chose four candidate networks for the rule set capture: (a) multi-linear network, (b) adaptive partial least squares, (c) connectionist normalized local spline (CNLS) network, and (d) CNLS net with a PLS preprocessor. These networks were able to capture the rule set to within a few percent. For the simple tank rule set, the multi-linear network performed the best. When the rules were modified to include more nonlinear behavior, CNLS net performed better than the other three nets which made linear assumptions. (4) The networks were tested for robustness to input noise. Noise levels of plus or minus 10% had no real effect on the network performance. Noise levels in the plus or minus 30% range degraded performance by a factor of two. Some performance enhancement occurred when the networks were trained with noisy data. (5) The scaling of the evaluation time was calculated. (6) Human variation can be mimicked in all the networks by perturbing the weights.

  4. Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    345,000,000 W 345,000,000,000 mW 0.345 GW 3.45e-4 TW 548.15 K275 C 527 F 986.67 R Java - Darajat Geothermal Area Sunda Volcanic Arc Subduction Zone Volcanics 255 MW255,000 kW...

  5. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  6. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  7. Inversion of normal moveout for monoclinic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grechka, V.; Contreras, P.; Tsvankin, I.

    2000-05-01

    Multiple vertical fracture sets, possibly combined with horizontal fine layering, produce an equivalent medium of monoclinic symmetry with a horizontal symmetry plane. Although monoclinic models may be rather common for fractured formations, they have hardly been used in seismic methods of fracture detection due to the large number of independent elements in the stiffness tensor. Here, the authors show that multicomponent wide-azimuth walkaway VSP surveys provide enough information to invert for all but one anisotropic parameters of monoclinic media. In order to facilitate the inversion procedure, the authors introduce a Thomsen-style parametrization for monoclinic media that includes the vertical velocities of the P-wave and one of the split S-waves and a set of dimensionless anisotropic coefficients. The parameter-estimation algorithm, based on NMO equations valid for any strength of the anisotropy, is designed to obtain anisotropic parameters of monoclinic media by inverting the vertical velocities and NMO ellipses of the P-, S{sub 1}- and S{sub 2}-waves. A Dix-type representation of the NMO velocity of mode-converted waves makes it possible to replace the pure shear modes in reflection surveys with the PS{sub 1}- and PS{sub 2}-waves. Numerical tests show that this method yields stable estimates of all relevant parameters for both a single layer and a horizontally stratified monoclinic medium.

  8. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  9. Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry A{sub y}{sup n} in the Deep Inelastic Region from the Reaction {sup 3}He{up_arrow}(e,e')

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katich, Joseph [William and Mary College

    2011-01-01

    A first measurement of the inclusive target single-spin asymmetry, A{sup n}{sub y}, has been performed in deep-inelastic scattering of electrons from a {sup 3}He target polarized normal to the electron scattering plane. This asymmetry is void of contributions at the Born level, and thus is a direct observable for two-photon physics. The experiment was performed in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility from October 2008 through early February 2009. The measurement is the first from a polarized neutron target. The final overall precision is several times better than previously existing SLAC proton data, and significantly extends the kinematic range over which the asymmetry has been measured. The asymmetry was measured at five kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region covering Q{sup 2} = 1 - 3 GeV{sup 2} and x{sub B} = 0.16 to 0.41. The asymmetry varied from 0.006 to 0.071 with astatistical precision at the 10{sup -2} level.

  10. THE SPITZER MID-INFRARED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SURVEY. I. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF OBSCURED CANDIDATES AND NORMAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED IN THE MID-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacy, M.; Ridgway, S. E.; Gates, E. L.; Petric, A. O.; Sajina, A.; Urrutia, T.; Cox Drews, S.; Harrison, C.; Seymour, N.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a program of optical and near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up of candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the mid-infrared. This survey selects both normal and obscured AGNs closely matched in luminosity across a wide range, from Seyfert galaxies with bolometric luminosities L {sub bol} ? 10{sup 10} L {sub ?} to highly luminous quasars (L {sub bol} ? 10{sup 14} L {sub ?}), all with redshifts ranging from 0 to 4.3. Samples of candidate AGNs were selected with mid-infrared color cuts at several different 24 ?m flux density limits to ensure a range of luminosities at a given redshift. The survey consists of 786 candidate AGNs and quasars, of which 672 have spectroscopic redshifts and classifications. Of these, 137 (20%) are type 1 AGNs with blue continua, 294 (44%) are type 2 objects with extinctions A{sub V} ?> 5 toward their AGNs, 96 (14%) are AGNs with lower extinctions (A{sub V} ? 1), and 145 (22%) have redshifts, but no clear signs of AGN activity in their spectra. Of the survey objects 50% have L {sub bol} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ?}, in the quasar regime. We present composite spectra for type 2 quasars and objects with no signs of AGN activity in their spectra. We also discuss the mid-infraredemission-line luminosity correlation and present the results of cross correlations with serendipitous X-ray and radio sources. The results show that: (1) obscured objects dominate the overall AGN population, (2) mid-infrared selected AGN candidates exist which lack AGN signatures in their optical spectra but have AGN-like X-ray or radio counterparts, and (3) X-ray and optical classifications of obscured and unobscured AGNs often differ.

  11. Influence of microstructural changes due to tempering at 923 K and 1,023 K on magnetic Barkhausen noise behavior in normalized 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj, B.; Moorthy, V.; Vaidyanathan, S.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis has been used to characterize the microstructural changes in normalized and tempered 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel. It is observed that tempering at 923 K shows a single peak behavior up to 20 h and tempering at 1,023 K shows a two peak behavior. This has been explained on the basis of the two stage process of irreversible domain wall movement during magnetization, associated with two major obstacles to domain wall movement: namely lath/grain boundaries and secondary phase precipitates. At lower fields, existing reverse domain walls at lath/grain boundaries overcome the resistance offered by the grain boundaries and move to a distance before they are pined by the precipitates. Then, at higher field, they overcome these precipitates. These two processes occur over a range of critical field strengths with some mean values. If these two mean values are close to each other, then a single peak in the rms voltage of the magnetic Barkhausen noise, with the associated changes in its shape, is observed. On the other hand, if the mean values of the critical fields for these two barriers are widely separated, then a two peak behavior is the clear possibility. The effect of the microstructural changes due to tempering for different durations at 923 K and 1,023 K in 2.25 Cr-1Mo ferritic steel on magnetic Barkhausen noise is explained based on these two stage processes. The influence of high dislocation density in bainitic structure, dissociation of bainite, and precipitation of different carbides such as Fe{sub 3}C, Mo{sub 2}C, Cr{sub 7}Ce{sub 3}, M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, etc., on magnetic Barkhausen noise behavior has been analyzed in this study.

  12. A Simple Harmonic Universe (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    RELATIVITY THEORY; HARMONICS; PARTICLE PRODUCTION; UNIVERSE Theory-HEP,HEPPH, HEPTH, ASTRO, GRQC Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text...

  13. How a Geothermal Power Plant Works (Simple) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heat from the Earth, or geothermal - Geo (Earth) + thermal (heat) - energy is accessed by drilling water or steam wells in a process similar to drilling for oil. Geothermal power ...

  14. Simple benign aqueous-based amination of polycarbonate surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): SAND2014-17759J 537562 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces

  15. A Simple Harmonic Universe (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for pages...

  16. A simple model for amplified spontaneous emission in dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.C.; Hong, Chung Ki; Nathel, H.

    1990-01-09

    Amplified spontaneous emission in dyes is modelled by replacing the actual molecular spectrum by an effective four-level atom which includes the levels involved in pumping and stimulated emission. Propagation of the signal and pump waves is described in the slowly varying envelope approximation. It is shown that the saturation intensity of the signal depends on the pump intensity, and reciprocally that the pump saturation intensity depends on the signal intensity. 1 fig.

  17. A Simple Index for Characterizing Charge Transport in Molecular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    solar (fuels), photosynthesis (natural and artificial), bio-inspired, hydrogen and fuel cells, electrodes - solar, defects, charge transport, spin dynamics, membrane, materials...

  18. A Simple Empirical Equation to Calculate Cloud Optical Thickness...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and high values of this quantity. With the above evidence in mind, we conclude that the empirical method described here is a useful tool for estimating cloud optical thickness at...

  19. Simple Maintenance Saves Costly Furnace Repair/Replacement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Simon Edelman About Us Simon Edelman - Chief Creative Officer Simon Edelman Simon Edelman is Chief Creative Officer for the U.S. Department of Energy. He works with the digital content team to to develop, create, and expand visual content that tells the story of the Energy Department, its employees, and the work they do. Prior to joining the Energy.gov team, Simon founded a creative agency in Chicago, worked as Creative Director for Illinois Governor Pat Quinn, and was a producer, writer, and

  20. Idaho Power- Easy Upgrades for Simple Retrofits Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Power offers incentives for its commercial and industrial customers in Idaho and Oregon to upgrade to more efficient equipment in their facilities. The utility provides rebates for lighting...

  1. DMP: Simple, Scalable, and Submerged; FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT (REDACTED VERSION)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrow, Mike; Delos-Reyes, Michael; McNatt, Cameron; Ozkan-Haller, Tuba; Klure, Justin; Kopf, Steven; Ai, Zhuan; Cleary, Casey; Goold, Caitlin; Vanithbuncha, Phattharawan

    2012-02-08

    At the start of work by M3 Wave under the current DOE funding, the DMP technology was nominally at TRL2 with some physical model testing completed. With DOE and OWET funding, much progress was made on several fronts including: cost of energy modeling, 1:50 scale model testing, numerical modeling, site evaluation, cost of mooring, construction, operations and maintenance, regulatory, and power take off. Since the technology is stationary on the ocean floor, arrays can be very dense. Even though overall efficiency is lower than buoys, the total power per acre of the technology looks to be at least twice the output per acre of known buoy WEC technologies. If the assumptions and inputs are correct, then DMP ocean power devices could be commercially competitive with other offshore renewable energy resources, such as off-shore wind power. Leveraging the data, analysis, and engineering conducted on this project, larger 1:6 scale testing was recently completed under separate funding. All aspects tested at 1:6 suggest that the DMP is a viable and disruptive technology, leading M3 Wave to continue development of the DMP.

  2. Optical analog data link with simple self-test feature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Witkover, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    A communications circuit for optically transmitting analog data signals free of excessive ripple, while having rapid response time. The invention is further characterized by being adapted to provide an immediate indication of the failure of the optical transmission link of the circuit. Commercially available voltage to frequency converter chips are used in conjunction with suitable wiring arrays and in combination with readily available indicator means for constructing the communication circuit of the invention. A V/F converter in the communications circuit is coupled to an offset adjustment means to cause the converter to continuously produce a string of output voltage pulses having a frequency of about 1 Khz responsive to the input analog signal to the converter being zero. The continuous presence of the 1 Khz frequency on the optical transmission link is monitored at the receiving end of the communication circuit and the indicator means is connected to immediately provide an easily detected indication of a failure of the optical transmission link to transmit the 1 Khz frequency pulses.

  3. Optical analog data link with simple self-test feature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Witkover, R.L.

    1984-02-01

    A communications circuit for optically transmitting analog data signals free of excessive ripple, while having rapid response time. The invention is further characterized by being adapted to provide an immediate indication of the failure of the optical transmission link of the circuit. Commerically available voltage to frequency converter chips are used in conjunction with suitable wiring arrays and in combination with readily available indicator means for constructing the communication circuit of the invention. A V/F converter in the communications circuit is coupled to an offset adjustment means to cause the converter to continuously produce a string of output voltage pulses having a frequency of about 1Khz responsive to the input analog signal to the converter being zero. The continuous presence of the 1Khz frequency on the optical transmission link is monitored at the receiving end of the communication circuit and the indicator means is connected to immediately provide an easily detected indication of a failure of the optical transmission link to transmit the 1Khz frequency pulses.

  4. A simple procedure to prepare spherical {alpha}-alumina powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Hongyu [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Ning Guiling [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)], E-mail: ninggl@dlut.edu.cn; Gan Zhihong; Lin Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)

    2009-04-02

    Spherical {alpha}-alumina powders were prepared by the controlled hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide in a hydrolysis system consisting of octanol and acetonitrile. Diverse solvents to dissolve reactant formed diverse hydrolysis systems and affected particle shape of {alpha}-alumina powders. The precursors crystallized to {gamma}-alumina at 1000 deg. C and converted to {alpha}-alumina at 1150 deg. C without intermediate phases. The particle morphology of precursor was retained after it crystallized to {alpha}-alumina. The heating rate influenced the particle shape and the state of agglomeration during calcination process. The thermal properties of the precursors were characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis. X-ray diffraction technique was used to confirm the conversion of crystalline phase of alumina powders from amorphous to {alpha}-phase. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphologies and size of the precursors and products.

  5. Design of Spintronic Materials with Simple Structures (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We discuss the interactions responsible for the half metallic properties. Special properties of superlattices and a digital ferromagnetic heterostructure incorporating zincblende ...

  6. The Emittance Spoiler Foil: A Simple Method to Produce Femtosecond...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    doubling time of about 10 months leading to the new Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Lasers (SASE FELs or X-Ray Lasers), a source more than ten orders of magnitude...

  7. Nuclear processing - a simple cost equation or a complex problem?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banfield, Z.; Banford, A.W.; Hanson, B.C.; Scully, P.J.

    2007-07-01

    BNFL has extensive experience of nuclear processing plant from concept through to decommissioning, at all stages of the fuel cycle. Nexia Solutions (formerly BNFL's R and D Division) has always supported BNFL in development of concept plant, including the development of costed plant designs for the purpose of economic evaluation and technology selection. Having undertaken such studies over a number of years, this has enabled Nexia Solutions to develop a portfolio of costed plant designs for a broad range of nuclear processes, throughputs and technologies. This work has led to an extensive understanding of the relationship of the cost of nuclear processing plant, and how this can be impacted by scale of process, and the selection of design philosophy. The relationship has been seen to be non linear and so simplistic equations do not apply, the relationship is complex due to the variety of contributory factors. This is particularly evident when considering the scale of a process, for example how step changes in design occurs with increasing scale, how the applicability of technology options can vary with scale etc... This paper will explore the contributory factor of scale to nuclear processing plant costs. (authors)

  8. Simple benign aqueous-based amination of polycarbonate surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Abstract not provided. Authors: Bachand, George David ; Vandelinder, Virginia Starke ; Wheeler, David Roger ; Small, Leo J ; Henderson, Ian M. ; Spoerke, Erik David Publication...

  9. THE SIMPLE ECONOMICS OF COMMODITY PRICE SPECULATION Christopher

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    12,458 1,124 19,312 10,020 107 138 18,254 4,948 19,680 PADD 1 365 29 3,734 1,930 3,700 8 55 3,685 284 5,743 PADD 2 2,519 948 4,459 2,809 -864 -155 -6 4,234 463 5,025 PADD 3 7,397 114 7,459 3,648 -2,747 247 161 6,885 3,807 5,265 PADD 4 1,033 13 625 311 -624 -4 18 593 10 733 PADD 5 1,144 20 3,034 1,322 534 10 -90 2,858 384 2,914 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Imports at the PAD District level

  10. Novel Fabrication and Simple Hybridization of Exotic Material MEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datskos, P.G.; Rajic, S.

    1999-11-13

    Work in materials other than silicon for MEMS applications has typically been restricted to metals and metal oxides instead of more ''exotic'' semiconductors. However, group III-V and II-VI semiconductors form a very important and versatile collection of material and electronic parameters available to the MEMS and MOEMS designer. With these materials, not only are the traditional mechanical material variables (thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young's modulus, etc.) available, but also chemical constituents can be varied in ternary and quaternary materials. This flexibility can be extremely important for both friction and chemical compatibility issues for MEMS. In addition, the ability to continually vary the bandgap energy can be particularly useful for many electronics and infrared detection applications. However, there are two major obstacles associated with alternate semiconductor material MEMS. The first issue is the actual fabrication of non-silicon devices and the second impediment is communicating with these novel devices. We will describe an essentially material independent fabrication method that is amenable to most group III-V and II-VI semiconductors. This technique uses a combination of non-traditional direct write precision fabrication processes such as diamond turning, ion milling, laser ablation, etc. This type of deterministic fabrication approach lends itself to an almost trivial assembly process. We will also describe in detail the mechanical, electrical, and optical self-aligning hybridization technique used for these alternate-material MEMS.

  11. Simple Method Quantifies Recombination Pathways in Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-09-01

    NREL's analytic equation uses open-circuit voltage data to determine how much recombination occurs via different channels in a solar cell.

  12. Argonne scientists use bacteria to power simple machines | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University and placed in the solution along with the common aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis. Andrey Sokolov of Princeton University and Igor Aronson from Argonne, along...

  13. Simple method for elimination of theromoacoustic oscillations in cryogenic tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbachev, S.P.; Korolev, A.V.; Sysoev, V.A.

    1986-08-01

    The authors show that thermoacoustic oscillations of gas in cryogenic tubes can be eliminated by changing their length. Geometric dimensions that do not produce oscillations are given.

  14. Simple Analysis of Flame Dynamics via Flexible Convected Disturbance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email Email address: Content: Close Send Cite: MLA Format Close Cite: APA ...

  15. Energy Efficiency Residential Marketing- Keep it Simple, Keep it Focused

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an overview of the EnergyWorks program, brand personality, messaging strategy, advertising, and lessons learned.

  16. Community Wind Handbook/Calculate Simple Payback | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and decide whether wind energy will work for you. The spreadsheet can be opened using Microsoft Excel software. You provide information about how you will finance the system, the...

  17. Simple intrinsic defects in InAs : numerical predictions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in indium arsenide, InAs, as computed by density functional theory using semi-local density functionals, intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

  18. Selective Conversion of Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases Todd H. Gardner (todd.gardner@netl.doe.gov, 304-285-4226) David A. Berry (david.berry@netl.doe.gov, 304-285-4430) K. David Lyons (kenneth.lyons@netl.doe.gov, 304-285-4379) Stephen K. Beer (stephen.beer@netl.doe.gov, 304-285-4040) Michael J. Monahan (michael.monahan@netl.doe.gov, 304-285-4408) U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P. O. Box 880 3610 Collins Ferry Road

  19. Energy Efficiency Residential Marketing - Keep it Simple, Keep...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Focus Series: Philadelphia Energyworks: In the City of Brotherly Love, Sharing Know-How Leads to Sustainability The Better Buildings Neighborhood View ...

  20. Solar So Simple It Is Just a Click Away

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SunShot Initiative is working to make it easier for consumers to install solar panels on their homes.

  1. PV vs. Solar Water Heating- Simple Solar Payback

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar energy systems hang their hats on payback. Financial payback is as tangible as money in your bank account, while other types of payback—like environmental externalities—are not usually calculated in dollars. There’s no doubt that photovoltaic (PV) and solar hot water (SHW) systems will pay you back. Maybe not as quickly as you’d like, but all systems will significantly offset their cost over their lifetimes. Here we’ll try to answer: Which system will give the quickest return on investment (ROI)?

  2. A Simple Evacuation Modeling and Simulation Tool for First Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B; Payne, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    Although modeling and simulation of mass evacuations during a natural or man-made disaster is an on-going and vigorous area of study, tool adoption by front-line first responders is uneven. Some of the factors that account for this situation include cost and complexity of the software. For several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been actively developing the free Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) to address these issues. One of the components of IMPACT is a multi-agent simulation module for area-based and path-based evacuations. The user interface is designed so that anyone familiar with typical computer drawing tools can quickly author a geospatially-correct evacuation visualization suitable for table-top exercises. Since IMPACT is designed for use in the field where network communications may not be available, quick on-site evacuation alternatives can be evaluated to keep pace with a fluid threat situation. Realism is enhanced by incorporating collision avoidance into the simulation. Statistics are gathered as the simulation unfolds, including most importantly time-to-evacuate, to help first responders choose the best course of action.

  3. Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Content: Close Send 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for pages...

  4. METHOD FOR SOLDERING NORMALLY NON-SOLDERABLE ARTICLES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, J.C.

    1959-11-24

    Methods are presented for coating and joining materials which are considered difficult to solder by utilizing an abrasive wheel and applying a bar of a suitable coating material, such as Wood's metal, to the rotating wheel to fill the cavities of the abrasive wheel and load the wheel with the coating material. The surface of the base material is then rubbed against the loaded rotating wheel, thereby coating the surface with the soft coating metal. The coating is a cohesive bonded layer and holds the base metal as tenaciously as a solder holds to easily solderable metals.

  5. Method for restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2000-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  6. Biochip Image Grid Normalization Absolute Signal Fluorescence Measurement Using

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-04-17

    This software was developed to measure absolute fluorescent intensities of gel pads on a microchip in units defined by a standard fluorescent slide. It can accomodate varying measurement conditions (e.g. exposure time, sensitivity of detector, resolution of detector, etc.) as well as fluorescent microscopes with non-uniform sensitivity across their field of view allowing the user to compare measurements done on different detectors with varying exposure times, sensitivities, and resolutions. The software is designed both tomore » operate Roper Scientific, Inc. cameras and to use image files produced by the program supplied with that equipment for its calculations. the intensity of the gel pad signal is computed so as to reduce background influence.« less

  7. Termination of a Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sometimes split into multiple closely-spaced faults that result in increased permeability. Fault sets at these terminations sometimes appear as "horsetailing" splays that...

  8. Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through a crystal-chemical lens. ... chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through a crystal-chemical lens. ...

  9. Radionuclide Releases During Normal Operations for Ventilated Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blunt, B.

    2001-09-24

    This calculation estimates the design emissions of radionuclides from Ventilated Tanks used by various facilities. The calculation includes emissions due to processing and storage of radionuclide material.

  10. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the ...

  11. Apex or Salient of Normal Fault | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    H. Hinz,Mark F. Coolbaugh,Patricia H. Cashman,Christopher Kratt,Gregory Dering,Joel Edwards,Brett Mayhew,Holly McLachlan. 2011. Assessment of Favorable Structural Settings of...

  12. Normal form decomposition for Gaussian-to-Gaussian superoperators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Palma, Giacomo; Mari, Andrea; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Holevo, Alexander S.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, we explore the set of linear maps sending the set of quantum Gaussian states into itself. These maps are in general not positive, a feature which can be exploited as a test to check whether a given quantum state belongs to the convex hull of Gaussian states (if one of the considered maps sends it into a non-positive operator, the above state is certified not to belong to the set). Generalizing a result known to be valid under the assumption of complete positivity, we provide a characterization of these Gaussian-to-Gaussian (not necessarily positive) superoperators in terms of their action on the characteristic function of the inputs. For the special case of one-mode mappings, we also show that any Gaussian-to-Gaussian superoperator can be expressed as a concatenation of a phase-space dilatation, followed by the action of a completely positive Gaussian channel, possibly composed with a transposition. While a similar decomposition is shown to fail in the multi-mode scenario, we prove that it still holds at least under the further hypothesis of homogeneous action on the covariance matrix.

  13. Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Download Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF SWERA UNEP atmospheric water v... solar Additional Info Field Value Source www.nrel.gov Author National Renewable...

  14. Lattice thermal expansion for normal tetrahedral compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, M.S. . E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

    2007-02-15

    The cubic root of the deviation of the lattice thermal expansion from that of the expected value of diamond for group IV semiconductors, binary compounds of III-V and II-VI, as well as several ternary compounds from groups I-III-VI{sub 2}, II-IV-V{sub 2} and I-IV{sub 2}V{sub 3} semiconductors versus their bonding length are given straight lines. Their slopes were found to be 0.0256, 0.0210, 0.0170, 0.0259, 0.0196, and 0.02840 for the groups above, respectively. Depending on the valence electrons of the elements forming these groups, a formula was found to correlate all the values of the slopes mentioned above to that of group IV. This new formula which depends on the melting point and the bonding length as well as the number of valence electrons for the elements forming the compounds, will gives best calculated values for lattice thermal expansion for all compounds forming the groups mentioned above. An empirical relation is also found between the mean ionicity of the compounds forming the groups and their slopes mentioned above and that gave the mean ionicity for the compound CuGe{sub 2}P{sub 3} in the range of 0.442.

  15. Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings Authors: Qian, ... Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters Additional ...

  16. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    was modeled at the cask-level, fuelrod-level, and assembly-level (shock and vibration effects for variable materials configurations, bending stress). Results of a...

  17. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: Conf.Proc.C110904:241-243,2011; Conference: Presented at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC-2011), San Sebastian, Spain, ...

  18. Superconductor-normal-superconductor with distributed Sharvin point contacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, Matthew J.; Little, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A non-linear superconducting junction device comprising a layer of high transient temperature superconducting material which is superconducting at an operating temperature, a layer of metal in contact with the layer of high temperature superconducting material and which remains non-superconducting at the operating temperature, and a metal material which is superconducting at the operating temperature and which forms distributed Sharvin point contacts with the metal layer.

  19. d+d Fusions with Log-normal Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MacKenzie Warrens 1 Cryo-cooled gas mixture of D 2 + 3 He was released from the gas jet 90-180J pulse from the Texas Pettawatt Laser irradiated the D 2 clusters Coulomb...

  20. Normal Modes of Black Hole Accretion Disks (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Ortega-Rodriguez, Manuel ; Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. Costa Rica U. ; Silbergleit, Alexander S. ; Stanford U., HEPL ; Wagoner, Robert V. ; Stanford U., Phys. Dept. ...

  1. A complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as a means to improve the design, maintenance and operation of the substation automation systems. Design a standard substation considering the existing and new solutions...

  2. Normal incidence x-ray mirror for chemical microanalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, M.J.; Romig, A.D. Jr.

    1987-08-05

    An x-ray mirror for both electron column instruments and micro x-ray fluorescence instruments for making chemical, microanalysis comprises a non-planar mirror having, for example, a spherical reflecting surface for x-rays comprised of a predetermined number of alternating layers of high atomic number material and low atomic number material contiguously formed on a substrate and whose layers have a thickness which is a multiple of the wavelength being reflected. For electron column instruments, the wavelengths of interest lie above 1.5nm, while for x-ray fluorescence instruments, the range of interest is below 0.2nm. 4 figs.

  3. Normal incidence X-ray mirror for chemical microanalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Martin J.; Romig, Jr., Alton D.

    1990-01-01

    A non-planar, focusing mirror, to be utilized in both electron column instruments and micro-x-ray fluorescence instruments for performing chemical microanalysis on a sample, comprises a concave, generally spherical base substrate and a predetermined number of alternating layers of high atomic number material and low atomic number material contiguously formed on the base substrate. The thickness of each layer is an integral multiple of the wavelength being reflected and may vary non-uniformly according to a predetermined design. The chemical analytical instruments in which the mirror is used also include a predetermined energy source for directing energy onto the sample and a detector for receiving and detecting the x-rays emitted from the sample; the non-planar mirror is located between the sample and detector and collects the x-rays emitted from the sample at a large solid angle and focuses the collected x-rays to the sample. For electron column instruments, the wavelengths of interest lie above 1.5 nm, while for x-ray fluorescence instruments, the range of interest is below 0.2 nm. Also, x-ray fluorescence instruments include an additional non-planar focusing mirror, formed in the same manner as the previously described m The invention described herein was made in the performance of work under contract with the Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP00789, and the United States Government has rights in the invention pursuant to this contract.

  4. New measurement of the α asymptotic normalization coefficient...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that dominates the C 13 ( , n ) O 16 reaction rate at temperatures relevant for the s ... Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review C Additional Journal ...

  5. Assessment of Normal Variability in Peripheral Blood Gene Expression

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campbell, Catherine; Vernon, Suzanne D.; Karem, Kevin L.; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Unger, Elizabeth R.

    2002-01-01

    Peripheral blood is representative of many systemic processes and is an ideal sample for expression profiling of diseases that have no known or accessible lesion. Peripheral blood is a complex mixture of cell types and some differences in peripheral blood gene expression may reflect the timing of sample collection rather than an underlying disease process. For this reason, it is important to assess study design factors that may cause variability in gene expression not related to what is being analyzed. Variation in the gene expression of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from three healthy volunteers sampled three times onemore » day each week for one month was examined for 1,176 genes printed on filter arrays. Less than 1% of the genes showed any variation in expression that was related to the time of collection, and none of the changes were noted in more than one individual. These results suggest that observed variation was due to experimental variability.« less

  6. Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for 14C + n <--> 15C, the 14C(n, gamma)15C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.; Eremenko, V.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Lui, Y. W.; McCleskey, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Spiridon, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Thompson, I. J.

    2014-04-17

    The 14C + n <--> 15C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the 15C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on 14C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the 15C SF via its mirror nucleus 15F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

  7. Siting handbook for small wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegley, H.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Orgill, M.M.; Drake, R.L.

    1980-03-01

    This handbook was written to serve as a siting guide for individuals wishing to install small wind energy conversion systems (WECS); that is, machines having a rated capacity of less than 100 kilowatts. It incorporates half a century of siting experience gained by WECS owners and manufacturers, as well as recently developed siting techniques. The user needs no technical background in meteorology or engineering to understand and apply the siting principles discussed; he needs only a knowledge of basic arithmetic and the ability to understand simple graphs and tables. By properly using the siting techniques, an owner can select a site that will yield the most power at the least installation cost, the least maintenance cost, and the least risk of damage or accidental injury.

  8. Regulatory and Technical Reports (Abstract Index Journal). Annual compilation for 1995, Volume 20, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehan, M.

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1994) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  9. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1993) and cumulative data, usually for the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  10. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of 12-31-94: Volume 19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1994) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  11. The response of fabric variations to simple shear and migration recrystallization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettit, Dr. Erin C

    2015-01-01

    The observable microstructures in ice are the result of many dynamic and competing processes. These processes are influenced by climate variables in the firn. Layers deposited in different climate regimes may show variations in fabric which can persist deep into the ice sheet; fabric may `remember' these past climate regimes. We model the evolution of fabric variations below the firn-ice transition and show that the addition of shear to compressive-stress regimes preserves the modeled fabric variations longer than compression-only regimes because shear drives a positive feedback between crystal rotation and deformation. Even without shear, the modeled ice retains memory of the fabric variation for $\\approx 200 \\unit{ka}$ in typical polar ice-sheet conditions. Our model shows that temperature affects how long the fabric variation is preserved, but only affects the strain-integrated fabric evolution profile when comparing results straddling the thermal-activation-energy threshold ($\\approx -10 \\degr \\unit{C}$). Even at high temperatures, migration recrystallization doesn't eliminate the modeled fabric's memory under most conditions. High levels of nearest-neighbor interactions will, however, eliminate the modeled fabric's memory more quickly than low levels of nearest-neighbor interactions. Ultimately, our model predicts that fabrics will retain memory of past climatic variations when subject to a wide variety of conditions found in polar ice sheets.

  12. A Few Simple Steps for Better Gas Mileage | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6 MEISPP Flyer 2016 MEISPP Flyer PDF icon 2016 MEISPP Flyer.pdf More Documents & Publications 2015 Student Employment Brochure

    National Fall Prevention Campaign 2016 National Fall Prevention Campaign March 17, 2016 - 9:07am Addthis 2016 National Fall Prevention Campaign As part of a Fall Prevention event initiated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the 3rd Annual National Fall Prevention Campaign will take place on May 2-6. This event is a nationwide voluntary

  13. The complex third-party EIS and how to make it simple

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernitz, S.; Bell, R.W. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper will begin with a brief introduction to the EIS and a recognition of its use since 1970. The paper will discuss the problems faced by EIS sponsors (federal agencies) which spur the third-party process and explain the third-party arrangement. Project teams, discipline specialists, and the corresponding ID team concept (agency/consultant) will be described. The organization of the EIS document leads to several simplifying measures. Presentation of the project description and alternatives, project packages, and project package versus project component alternatives will be clarified. Mapping tricks will be revealed for effective presentations to the layman. Impact analysis methods and how to press the agency to specify a feasible and concise rating scheme will be outlined. A discussion of engineering and cost factors will amplify CEQ guidance, as well as guidance in state environmental policy and quality acts. Preparation of the draft preferred alternative for agency consideration (if so directed) and implications for the ROD and subsequent EIS permits will be discussed. The questions of funding for impacts monitoring and interagency MOAs to help perform such monitoring will be addressed.

  14. Thrust 1: Structure and Dynamics of Simple Fluid-Solid Interfaces (Peter T. Cumm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    award | National Nuclear Security Administration Three NNSA researchers receive President's highest early-career STEM award Thursday, May 5, 2016 - 10:35am Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, left, and NNSA Administrator Frank Klotz, right, join physicist Tammy Ma as she celebrates receiving a PECASE award for her work with the National Ignition Facility. Yesterday Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz hosted a special ceremony honoring DOE's 13 recipients of the 2016 Presidential Early Career

  15. Photochemical carbonylation of adamantanes; simple synthesis of 1,3,5,7-tetranitroadamantane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashir-Hashemi, A.; Li, J.; Gelber, N.

    1995-12-01

    1,3,5,7-Tetranitroadamantane (2) was obtained from the irradiation of a mixture of 1-adamantanecarboxylic acid (1) and oxalylchloride followed by conversion of chlorocarbonyl functions to nitro groups using the method of Eaton et. al.

  16. A simple and clean source of low-energy atomic carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasnokutski, S. A.; Huisken, F.

    2014-09-15

    A carbon source emitting low-energy carbon atoms from a thin-walled, sealed tantalum tube via thermal evaporation has been constructed. The tube is made from a 0.05?mm thick tantalum foil and filled with {sup 12}C or {sup 13}C carbon powder. After being sealed, it is heated by direct electric current. The solvated carbon atoms diffuse to the outer surface of the tube and, when the temperature rises over 2200?K, the evaporation of atomic carbon from the surface of the tantalum tube is observed. As the evaporated species have low energy they are well-suited for the incorporation into liquid helium droplets by the pick-up technique. Mass analysis of the incorporated species reveals the dominant presence of atomic carbon and very low abundances of C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} molecules (<1%). This is in striking contrast to the thermal evaporation of pure carbon, where C{sub 3} molecules are found to be the dominant species in the gas phase. Due to the thermal evaporation and the absence of high-energy application required for the dissociation of C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} molecules, the present source provides carbon atoms with rather low energy.

  17. Synthesis of flower-like Boehmite (AlOOH) via a simple solvothermal process without surfactant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guangci; Liu, Yunqi; Liu, Di; Liu, Lihua; Liu, Chenguang

    2010-10-15

    Boehmite (AlOOH) with hierarchical flower-like structures was synthesized by the solvothermal reaction of AlCl{sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O in the presence of ethanol and toluene at 200 {sup o}C for 24 h. The product was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that boehmite with flower-like nanostructures, which aggregated together by the weak hydrogen bonds, was formed through dissolution-deposition process of boehmite microcrystals and the toluene has a great effect on the morphology of product in the reaction system. Meanwhile, the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also obtained by calcination of above product at 500 {sup o}C for 2 h, and the flower-like morphology kept no change. The surface area of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder was determined to be 166.8 m{sup 2}/g by N{sub 2} adsorption measurement. The possible formation mechanism of flower-like boehmite nanostructures was proposed and discussed.

  18. A Simple Radionuclide-Driven Single-Ion Source (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to...

  19. Structural complexity of simple Fe[subscript 2]O[subscript 3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Nature Communications; Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 02, 2016 Publisher: Nature Publishing Group Research Org: ...

  20. A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We restrict this to the "indirect effect", the cooling of outside air that lessens the demand for air conditioning (AC). Given the power demand of the electric utilities and data ...

  1. Dynamics of multiple double layers in high pressure glow discharge in a simple torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Paul, Manash, E-mail: manashkr@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Tripura799 046 (India); Sharma, P. K.; Thakur, A.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Bora, D. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat382 428 (India)

    2014-06-15

    Parametric characterization of multiple double layers is done during high pressure glow discharge in a toroidal vessel of small aspect ratio. Although glow discharge (without magnetic field) is known to be independent of device geometry, but the toroidal boundary conditions are conducive to plasma growth and eventually the plasma occupy the toroidal volume partially. At higher anode potential, the visibly glowing spots on the body of spatially extended anode transform into multiple intensely luminous spherical plasma blob structures attached to the tip of the positive electrode. Dynamics of multiple double layers are observed in argon glow discharge plasma in presence of toroidal magnetic field. The radial profiles of plasma parameters measured at various toroidal locations show signatures of double layer formation in our system. Parametric dependence of double layer dynamics in presence of toroidal magnetic field is presented here.

  2. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organci molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan Thomas; Michael Kelley

    2007-06-18

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on ?-alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto ?-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  3. Reducing Office Plug Loads through Simple and Inexpensive Advanced Power Strips: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; Sheppy, M.; Cutler, D.

    2013-07-01

    This paper documents the process (and results) of applying Advanced Power Strips with various control approaches.

  4. NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES THE SIMPLE ECONOMICS OF COMMODITY PRICE SPECULATION

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Mountain Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 558,453 523,122 503,750 502,309 519,323 541,977 562,863 580,527 598,135 610,882 598,284 573,155 2015 552,277 537,185 537,004 539,816 558,882 578,300 595,505 610,816 626,924 638,383 633,170 611,934 2016 582,516 569,950 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  5. Evaluation of a simple method for chopping Penning surface-plasma source H[sup [minus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.V. Jr.; Allison, P.; Schneider, J.D.; Stelzer, J.E.; Stevens, R.R. Jr. )

    1995-02-01

    Accumulator rings proposed for use in high-intensity spallation-neutron sources require a chopped beam with [similar to]100-ns-wide particle-free gaps at 1--2 MHz rates, with fall and rise times [le]20 ns. Chopping the beam directly in the ion source may be an attractive way to provide the desired beam structure. Previous measurements showed that placing a grounded collar in the drift region just before the emission aperture lowers the [ital e][sup [minus

  6. Experimental study of a simple method to chop Penning SPS H{sup {minus}} beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.V. Jr.; Allison, P.; Schneider, J.D.; Stelzer, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    Accumulator rings proposed for use in high-intensity spallation-neutron sources require a chopped beam with particle-free gaps {approx}100 ns wide at 1--2 MHz rates with rise and fall times {le} 20 ns. Chopping the beam directly in the ion source may be an attractive way to provide the desired beam structure. A grounded collar placed in the drift region next to the emission aperture lowers the e{sup {minus}}/H{sup {minus}} ratio in the 8X source H{sup {minus}} beam. We electrically isolated the collar and biased it to modulate the extracted H{sup {minus}} current. Positive collar bias decreases the H{sup {minus}} beam by up to 90%. The fastest H{sup {minus}} current fall and rise times achieved to date are 400 ns and 2 {mu}s, respectively. The fall time is close to the pulser rise time ({approx}300 ns). The rise time is considerably longer than the pulser fall time ({approx}500 ns). Negative collar bias lowers the H{sup {minus}} beam by up to 50%.

  7. A simple radionuclide-driven single-ion source (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sup 148Gd onto a silicon alpha-particle detector and vapor depositing a layer of BaFsub 2 over it. sup 144Sm recoils from the alpha decay of sup 148Gd are used to ...

  8. Coherence penalty functional: A simple method for adding decoherence in Ehrenfest dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimov, Alexey V. E-mail: oleg.prezhdo@rochester.edu; Long, Run; Prezhdo, Oleg V. E-mail: oleg.prezhdo@rochester.edu

    2014-05-21

    We present a new semiclassical approach for description of decoherence in electronically non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. The method is formulated on the grounds of the Ehrenfest dynamics and the Meyer-Miller-Thoss-Stock mapping of the time-dependent Schrdinger equation onto a fully classical Hamiltonian representation. We introduce a coherence penalty functional (CPF) that accounts for decoherence effects by randomizing the wavefunction phase and penalizing development of coherences in regions of strong non-adiabatic coupling. The performance of the method is demonstrated with several model and realistic systems. Compared to other semiclassical methods tested, the CPF method eliminates artificial interference and improves agreement with the fully quantum calculations on the models. When applied to study electron transfer dynamics in the nanoscale systems, the method shows an improved accuracy of the predicted time scales. The simplicity and high computational efficiency of the CPF approach make it a perfect practical candidate for applications in realistic systems.

  9. Generation of simple, type-safe messages for inter-task communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neswold, R.; King, C.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    We present a development tool that generates source code to marshal and unmarshal messages. The code generator creates modules for differing processor architectures and programming languages.

  10. The response of fabric variations to simple shear and migration recrystallization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pettit, Dr. Erin C

    2015-01-01

    The observable microstructures in ice are the result of many dynamic and competing processes. These processes are influenced by climate variables in the firn. Layers deposited in different climate regimes may show variations in fabric which can persist deep into the ice sheet; fabric may `remember' these past climate regimes. We model the evolution of fabric variations below the firn-ice transition and show that the addition of shear to compressive-stress regimes preserves the modeled fabric variations longer than compression-only regimes because shear drives a positive feedback between crystal rotation and deformation. Even without shear, the modeled ice retains memory of the fabric variation formore » $$\\approx 200 \\unit{ka}$$ in typical polar ice-sheet conditions. Our model shows that temperature affects how long the fabric variation is preserved, but only affects the strain-integrated fabric evolution profile when comparing results straddling the thermal-activation-energy threshold ($$\\approx -10 \\degr \\unit{C}$$). Even at high temperatures, migration recrystallization doesn't eliminate the modeled fabric's memory under most conditions. High levels of nearest-neighbor interactions will, however, eliminate the modeled fabric's memory more quickly than low levels of nearest-neighbor interactions. Ultimately, our model predicts that fabrics will retain memory of past climatic variations when subject to a wide variety of conditions found in polar ice sheets.« less

  11. Development of a simple 5-15 litre per hour LNG refueling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corless, A.J.; Sarangi, S.; Hall, J.L.; Barclay, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A variable capacity, small-scale liquefied natural gas (LNG) refueling system has been designed, built, and tested at the Cryofuel Systems` Laboratory, University of Victoria, Canada. The system, designed to continuously liquefy between 5 and 15 litres of NG, utilizes liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) as its cold source and contains most of the components found in a typical commercial refueling system; i.e. purification system, liquefier, LNG storage, automatic control and monitoring system. This paper describes the design of the system as well as the results of a set of LNG production trials. The performance of the system exceeded expected LNG production rates, but at levels of efficiency somewhat less than predicted. Cryofuel Systems expects to use this system to implement an LNG vehicle demonstration program and to gain experience in the integration of LNG refueling systems which exploit advanced liquefaction technology such as magnetic refrigeration.

  12. A Seemingly Simple Task: Filling a Solenoid Volume in Vacuum with Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Roy, Prabir; Oks, Efim

    2010-06-24

    Space-charge neutralization of a pulsed, high-current ion beam is required to compress and focus the beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described attempts to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary charge-compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from four pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means and by an array of movable Langmuir probes. The plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. Beam neutralization and compression are accomplished, though issues of density, uniformity, and pulse-to-pulse reproducibly remain to be solved.

  13. A Simple Heat-Flow Quality Function And Appraisal Of Heat-Flow...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    depths less than 2000 m and about 50% are Bottom Hole Temperatures (BHT). Heat-flow density distribution models can be expanded to include estimates of heat flow derived from...

  14. Note: A simple vibrating orifice monodisperse droplet generator using a hard drive actuator arm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosch, Sebastian E-mail: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca; Ashgriz, Nasser E-mail: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca

    2015-04-15

    We propose that the rotary voice coil actuators found in magnetic hard drives are fit to supercede loudspeakers as expedient vibration sources in the laboratory setting. A specific use case is the excitation of a liquid jet to induce controlled breakup into monodisperse droplets. Like loudspeakers, which are typically used for prototyping such devices, hard drive actuators are cheap and ubiquitous, but they are less unwieldy and supply greater amplitudes without producing noise. Frequencies between 0 and 17 kHz, and likely beyond, can be reproduced reliably. No machining tools or amplifying electronics are needed for the construction and operation of the presented droplet generator.

  15. Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is then assumed that the domain averaged irradiance F at the bottom of two layers is , Fd ) C exp( ) , ; ( P C 1 F 0 0 0 u where P is a gamma distribution expressing the...

  16. Simple route for the synthesis of supercapacitive Co-Ni mixed hydroxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubal, D.P.; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 ; Jagadale, A.D.; Patil, S.V.; Lokhande, C.D.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel method for deposition of Co-Ni mixed hydroxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticle network of Co-Ni hydroxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High specific capacitance of 672 F g{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High discharge/charge rates. -- Abstract: Facile synthesis of Co-Ni mixed hydroxides films with interconnected nanoparticles networks through two step route is successfully established. These films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared technique (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wettability test. Co-Ni film formation is confirmed from XRD and FTIR study. SEM shows that the surface of Co-Ni films is composed of interconnected nanoparticles. Contact angle measurement revealed the hydrophilic nature of films which is feasible for the supercapacitor. The electrochemical performance of the film is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, and constant-current charge/discharge cycling techniques. Specific capacitance of the Co-Ni mixed hydroxide electrode achieved 672 F g{sup -1}. Impedance analysis shows that Co-Ni mixed hydroxide electrode provides less resistance for the intercalation and de-intercalation of ions. The Co-Ni mixed electrode exhibited good charge/discharge rate at different current densities. The results demonstrated that Co-Ni mixed hydroxide composite is very promising for the next generation high performance electrochemical supercapacitors.

  17. A simple aluminum gasket for use with both stainless steel and aluminum flanges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langley, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A technique has been developed for making aluminum wire seal gaskets of various sizes and shapes for use with both stainless steel and aluminum alloy flanges. The gasket material used is 0.9999 pure aluminum, drawn to a diameter of 3 mm. This material can be easily welded and formed into various shapes. A single gasket has been successfully used up to five times without baking. The largest gasket tested to date is 3.5 m long and was used in the shape of a parallelogram. Previous use of aluminum wire gaskets, including results for bakeout at temperatures from 20 to 660{degree}C, is reviewed. A search of the literature indicates that this is the first reported use of aluminum wire gaskets for aluminum alloy flanges. The technique is described in detail, and the results are summarized. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Analysis of biosurfaces by neutron reflectometry: From simple to complex interfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Junghans, Ann; Watkins, Erik B.; Barker, Robert D.; Singh, Saurabh; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2015-03-01

    Because of its high sensitivity for light elements and the scattering contrast manipulation via isotopic substitutions, neutron reflectometry (NR) is an excellent tool for studying the structure of soft-condensed material. These materials include model biophysical systems as well as in situ living tissue at the solid–liquid interface. The penetrability of neutrons makes NR suitable for probing thin films with thicknesses of 5–5000 Å at various buried, for example, solid–liquid, interfaces [J. Daillant and A. Gibaud, Lect. Notes Phys. 770, 133 (2009); G. Fragneto-Cusani, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13, 4973 (2001); J. Penfold, Curr. Opin. Colloid Interface Sci. 7, 139 (2002)].more » Over the past two decades, NR has evolved to become a key tool in the characterization of biological and biomimetic thin films. Highlighted In the current report are some of the authors' recent accomplishments in utilizing NR to study highly complex systems, including in-situ experiments. Such studies will result in a much better understanding of complex biological problems, have significant medical impact by suggesting innovative treatment, and advance the development of highly functionalized biomimetic materials.« less

  19. Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: This article describes a method to achieve near optimal performance with low energy resolution detectors. Tapiovaara and Wagner [Phys. Med. Biol. 30, 519-529 (1985)] showed that an energy selective x-ray system using a broad spectrum source can produce images with a larger signal to noise ratio (SNR) than conventional systems using energy integrating or photon counting detectors. They showed that there is an upper limit to the SNR and that it can be achieved by measuring full spectrum information and then using an optimal energy dependent weighting. Methods: A performance measure is derived by applying statistical detection theory to an abstract vector space of the line integrals of the basis set coefficients of the two function approximation to the x-ray attenuation coefficient. The approach produces optimal results that utilize all the available energy dependent data. The method can be used with any energy selective detector and is applied not only to detectors using pulse height analysis (PHA) but also to a detector that simultaneously measures the total photon number and integrated energy, as discussed by Roessl et al. [Med. Phys. 34, 959-966 (2007)]. A generalization of this detector that improves the performance is introduced. A method is described to compute images with the optimal SNR using projections in a ''whitened'' vector space transformed so the noise is uncorrelated and has unit variance in both coordinates. Material canceled images with optimal SNR can also be computed by projections in this space. Results: The performance measure is validated by showing that it provides the Tapiovaara-Wagner optimal results for a detector with full energy information and also a conventional detector. The performance with different types of detectors is compared to the ideal SNR as a function of x-ray tube voltage and subject thickness. A detector that combines two bin PHA with a simultaneous measurement of integrated photon energy provides near ideal performance across a wide range of operating conditions. Conclusions: Low energy resolution detectors can be used in energy selective x-ray imaging systems to produce images with near optimal performance.

  20. Customized oligonucleotide microchips that convert multiple genetic information to simple patterns, are portable and reusable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzabekov, Andrei; Guschin, Dmitry Y.; Chik, Valentine; Drobyshev, Aleksei; Fotin, Alexander; Yershov, Gennadiy; Lysov, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to using customized oligonucleotide microchips as biosensors for the detection and identification of nucleic acids specific for different genes, organisms and/or individuals in the environment, in food and in biological samples. The microchips are designed to convert multiple bits of genetic information into simpler patterns of signals that are interpreted as a unit. Because of an improved method of hybridizing oligonucleotides from samples to microchips, microchips are reusable and transportable. For field study, portable laser or bar code scanners are suitable.

  1. An improved simple polarisable water model for use in biomolecular simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachmann, Stephan J.; Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van

    2014-12-14

    The accuracy of biomolecular simulations depends to some degree on the accuracy of the water model used to solvate the biomolecules. Because many biomolecules such as proteins are electrostatically rather inhomogeneous, containing apolar, polar, and charged moieties or side chains, a water model should be able to represent the polarisation response to a local electrostatic field, while being compatible with the force field used to model the biomolecules or protein. The two polarisable water models, COS/G2 and COS/D, that are compatible with the GROMOS biomolecular force fields leave room for improvement. The COS/G2 model has a slightly too large dielectric permittivity and the COS/D model displays a much too slow dynamics. The proposed COS/D2 model has four interaction sites: only one Lennard-Jones interaction site, the oxygen atom, and three permanent charge sites, the two hydrogens, and one massless off-atom site that also serves as charge-on-spring (COS) polarisable site with a damped or sub-linear dependence of the induced dipole on the electric field strength for large values of the latter. These properties make it a cheap and yet realistic water model for biomolecular solvation.

  2. A simple model of chromospheric evaporation and condensation driven conductively in a solar flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longcope, D. W.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic energy released in the corona by solar flares reaches the chromosphere where it drives characteristic upflows and downflows known as evaporation and condensation. These flows are studied here for the case where energy is transported to the chromosphere by thermal conduction. An analytic model is used to develop relations by which the density and velocity of each flow can be predicted from coronal parameters including the flare's energy flux F. These relations are explored and refined using a series of numerical investigations in which the transition region (TR) is represented by a simplified density jump. The maximum evaporation velocity, for example, is well approximated by v{sub e} ? 0.38(F/?{sub co,} {sub 0}){sup 1/3}, where ?{sub co,} {sub 0} is the mass density of the pre-flare corona. This and the other relations are found to fit simulations using more realistic models of the TR both performed in this work, and taken from a variety of previously published investigations. These relations offer a novel and efficient means of simulating coronal reconnection without neglecting entirely the effects of evaporation.

  3. High performance computing in chemistry and massively parallel computers: A simple transition?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendall, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    A review of the various problems facing any software developer targeting massively parallel processing (MPP) systems is presented. Issues specific to computational chemistry application software will be also outlined. Computational chemistry software ported to and designed for the Intel Touchstone Delta Supercomputer will be discussed. Recommendations for future directions will also be made.

  4. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Treasure Hunts: Simple Steps to Finding Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Treasure Hunt is a dynamic, effective process for identifying savings opportunities, and is a best practice adopted by many ENERGY STAR partners to identify no- and low-cost savings...

  5. 2008-05 "Develop a Simple Project Status Reporting Format for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    support an evaluation of what may be considered an effective management practice by LANL management to enhance communication of information to the NNMCAB and thus the public...

  6. Simple electronic apparatus for the analysis of radioactively labeled gel electrophoretograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goulianos, Konstantin; Smith, Karen K.; White, Sebastian N.

    1982-01-01

    A high resolution position sensitive radiation detector for analyzing radiation emanating from a source, constructed of a thin plate having an elongated slot with conductive edges acting as a cathode, a charged anode wire positioned within 0.5 mm adjacent the source and running parallel to the slot and centered therein, an ionizable gas ionized by radiation emanating from the source provided surrounding the anode wire in the slot, a helical wire induction coil serving as a delay line and positioned beneath the anode wire for detecting gas ionization and for producing resulting ionization signals, and processing circuits coupled to the induction coil for receiving ionization signals induced therein after determining therefrom the location along the anode wire of any radiation emanating from the source. An ionization gas of 70% Ar, 29% Isobutane, 0.6% Freon 13BI, and 0.4% Methylal is used.

  7. A simple model simulating a fan as a source of axial and circumferential body forces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-07-01

    This software can be used in a computational fluids dynamics (CFD) code to represent a fan as a source of axial and circumferential body forces. The combined software can be used effectively in car design analyses that involve many underhood thermal management simulations. FANMOD uses as input the rotational speed of the fan, geometric fan data, and the lift and drag coefficients of the blades, and predicts the body forces generated by the fan inmore » the axial and circumferential directions. These forces can be used as momentum forces in a CFD code to simulate the effect of the fan in an underhood thermal management simulation.« less

  8. Optimization of solar assisted heat pump systems via a simple analytic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, J W

    1980-01-01

    An analytic method for calculating the optimum operating temperature of the collector/storage subsystem in a solar assisted heat pump is presented. A tradeoff exists between rising heat pump coefficient of performance and falling collector efficiency as this temperature is increased, resulting in an optimum temperature whose value increases with increasing efficiency of the auxiliary energy source. Electric resistance is shown to be a poor backup to such systems. A number of options for thermally coupling the system to the ground are analyzed and compared.

  9. Selective aerobic alcohol oxidation method for conversion of lignin into simple aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahl, Shannon S; Rahimi, Alireza

    2015-03-03

    Described is a method to oxidize lignin or lignin sub-units. The method includes oxidation of secondary benzylic alcohol in the lignin or lignin sub-unit to a corresponding ketone in the presence of unprotected primarily aliphatic alcohol in the lignin or lignin sub-unit. The optimal catalyst system consists of HNO.sub.3 in combination with another Bronsted acid, in the absence of a metal-containing catalyst, thereby yielding a selectively oxidized lignin or lignin sub-unit. The method may be carried out in the presence or absence of additional reagents including TEMPO and TEMPO derivatives.

  10. SIMPLEV: A simple electric vehicle simulation program, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, G.H.

    1991-06-01

    An electric vehicle simulation code which can be used with any IBM compatible personal computer was written. This general purpose simulation program is useful for performing parametric studies of electric vehicle performance on user input driving cycles. The program is run interactively and guides the user through all of the necessary inputs. Driveline components and the traction battery are described and defined by ASCII files which may be customized by the user. Scaling of these components is also possible. Detailed simulation results are plotted on the PC monitor and may also be printed on a printer attached to the PC. This report serves as a users` manual and documents the mathematical relationships used in the simulation.

  11. Measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in quasielastic scattering from the reaction He3(e,e')

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. -W.; Long, E.; Mihovilovič, M.; Jin, G.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Ayerbe-Gayoso, C.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; John, J. St.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, X.; Riordan, S.; Ron, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Širca, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2015-10-22

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry, Ay, in quasi-elastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He↑ (e,e') on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton scattering plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero for one-photon exchange. A non-zero Ay can arise from the interference between the one- and two-photon exchange processes which is sensitive to the details of the sub-structure of the nucleon. An experiment recently completed at Jefferson Lab yielded asymmetries with high statistical precision at Q2= 0.13, 0.46 and 0.97 GeV2. These measurements demonstrate, for the first time, that the 3He asymmetry is clearly non-zero and negative with a statistical significance of (8-10)σ. Using measured proton-to-3He cross-section ratios and the effective polarization approximation, neutron asymmetries of -(1-3)% were obtained. The neutron asymmetry at high Q2 is related to moments of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). Our measured neutron asymmetry at Q2=0.97 GeV2 agrees well with a prediction based on two-photon exchange using a GPD model and in addition provides a new independent constraint on these distributions.

  12. Persistent Fe moments in the normal state of the pressure-induced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Jeffries, J R ; Butch, N P ; Lipp, M J ; Bradley, J A ; Kirshenbaum, K ; Saha, S R ; Paglione, J ; Kenney-Benson, C ; Xiao, Y ; Chow, P ; Evans, W J Publication Date: ...

  13. Normal and outlying populations of the Milky Way stellar halo at [Fe/H] <2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Judith G.; Christlieb, Norbert; Thompson, Ian; McWilliam, Andrew; Shectman, Stephen; Reimers, Dieter; Wisotzki, Lutz; Kirby, Evan E-mail: N.Christlieb@lsw.uni-heidelberg.de E-mail: shec@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: dreimers@hs.uni-hamburg.de E-mail: ekirby@uci.edu

    2013-11-20

    From detailed abundance analysis of >100 Hamburg/ESO candidate extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars we find 45 with [Fe/H] < 3.0 dex. We identify a heretofore unidentified group: Ca-deficient stars with sub-solar [Ca/Fe] ratios and the lowest neutron-capture abundances; the Ca-deficient group comprises ?10% of the sample, excluding Carbon stars. Our radial velocity distribution shows that the carbon-enhanced stars with no s-process enhancements, CEMP-no, and which do not show C{sub 2} bands are not preferentially binary systems. Ignoring Carbon stars, approximately 15% of our sample are strong (?5?) outliers in one or more elements between Mg and Ni; this rises to ?19% if very strong (?10?) outliers for Sr and Ba are included. Examples include: HE03050554 with the lowest [Ba/H] known; HE10121540 and HE23230256, two (non-velocity variable) C-rich stars with very strong [Mg,Al/Fe] enhancements; and HE12261149, an extremely r-process rich star.

  14. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Standing Wave Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Yeremian, Anahid; Higashi, Yasuo; Spataro, Bruno; /INFN, Rome

    2012-06-25

    Our experiments are directed toward the understanding of the physics of rf breakdown in systems that can be used to accelerate electron beams at {approx}11.4 GHz. The structure geometries have apertures, stored energy per cell, and rf pulse duration close to that of the NLC or CLIC. The breakdown rate is the main parameter that we use to compare rf breakdown behavior for different structures at a given set of rf pulse parameters (pulse shape and peak power) at 60 Hz repetition rate. In our experiments, the typical range of the breakdown rate is from one per few hours to {approx}100 per hour. To date we have tested 29 structures. We consistently found that after the initial conditioning, the behavior of the breakdown rate is reproducible for structures of the same geometry and material, and the breakdown rate dependence on peak magnetic fields is stronger than on peak surface electric fields for structures of different geometries. Below we report the main results from tests of seven structures made from hard copper, soft copper alloys and hard-copper alloys. Additional details on these and other structures will be discussed in future publications.

  15. Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Gilad, Gilad ; Gilman, Ronald ; Glamazdin, Oleksandr ; Golge, Serkan ; Guo, Lei ; Hamilton, David ; Hansen, Jens-Ole ; Higinbotham, Douglas ; Holmstrom, Timothy ; Huang, Jijun ...

  16. Pressure gradient passivation of carbonaceous material normally susceptible to spontaneous combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ochs, Thomas L.; Sands, William D.; Schroeder, Karl; Summers, Cathy A.; Utz, Bruce R.

    2002-01-29

    This invention is a process for the passivation or deactivation with respect to oxygen of a carbonaceous material by the exposure of the carbonaceous material to an oxygenated gas in which the oxygenated gas pressure is increased from a first pressure to a second pressure and then the pressure is changed to a third pressure. Preferably a cyclic process which comprises exposing the carbonaceous material to the gas at low pressure and increasing the pressure to a second higher pressure and then returning the pressure to a lower pressure is used. The cycle is repeated at least twice wherein the higher pressure may be increased after a selected number of cycles.

  17. Fission Product Transport in TRISO Particle Layers under Operating and Off-Normal Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van der Ven, Anton; Was, Gary; Wang, Lumin; Taheri, Mitra

    2014-07-07

    The objective of this project is to determine the diffusivity and chemical behavior of key fission products (ag, Cs, I. Te, Eu and Sr) through SiC and PyC both thermally, under irradiation, and under stress using FP introduction techniques that avoid the pitfalls of past experiments. The experimental approach is to create thin PyC-SiC couples containing the fission product to be studied embedded in the PyC layer. These samples will then be subjected to high temperature exposures in a vacuum and also to irradiation at high temperature, and last, to irradiation under stress at high temperature. The PyC serves as a host layer, providing a means of placing the fission product close to the SiC without damaging the SiC layer by its introduction or losing the FP during heating. Experimental measurements of grain boundary structure and distribution (EBSD, HRTEM, APT) will be used in the modeling effort to determine the qualitative dependence of FP diffusion coefficients on grain boundary orientation, temperature and stress.

  18. Topical report : NSTF facilities plan for water-cooled VHTR RCCS : normal operational tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C. P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the gas-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept.

  19. Persistent C II absorption in the normal type Ia supernova 2002fk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cartier, Rgis; Zelaya, Paula [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Hamuy, Mario; Maza, Jos; Gonzlez, Luis; Huerta, Leonor [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Pignata, Giuliano [Departamento Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Av. Repblica 252, Santiago (Chile); Frster, Francisco [Center for Mathematical Modelling, Universidad de Chile, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2120, Piso 7, Santiago (Chile); Folatelli, Gaston [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Roth, Miguel; Gonzlez, Sergio [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina el Pino s/n, Casilla 601 (Chile); Krisciunas, Kevin; Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Clocchiatti, Alejandro [Departamento de Astronoma y Astrofsica, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago (Chile); Coppi, Paolo [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Koviak, Kathleen, E-mail: rcartier@das.uchile.cl [Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 911901 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present well-sampled UBVRIJHK photometry of SN 2002fk starting 12 days before maximum light through 122 days after peak brightness, along with a series of 15 optical spectra from 4 to +95 days since maximum. Our observations show the presence of C II lines in the early-time spectra of SN 2002fk, expanding at 11,000 km s{sup 1} and persisting until 8 days past maximum light with a velocity of ?9000 km s{sup 1}. SN 2002fk is characterized by a small velocity gradient of v-dot {sub Si} {sub II}=26 km s{sup 1} day{sup 1}, possibly caused by an off-center explosion with the ignition region oriented toward the observer. The connection between the viewing angle of an off-center explosion and the presence of C II in the early-time spectrum suggests that the observation of C II could be also due to a viewing angle effect. Adopting the Cepheid distance to NGC 1309 we provide the first H {sub 0} value based on near-infrared (near-IR) measurements of a Type Ia supernova (SN) between 63.0 0.8 (3.4 systematic) and 66.7 1.0 (3.5 systematic) km s{sup 1} Mpc{sup 1}, depending on the absolute magnitude/decline rate relationship adopted. It appears that the near-IR yields somewhat lower (6%-9%) H {sub 0} values than the optical. It is essential to further examine this issue by (1) expanding the sample of high-quality near-IR light curves of SNe in the Hubble flow, and (2) increasing the number of nearby SNe with near-IR SN light curves and precise Cepheid distances, which affords the promise to deliver a more precise determination of H {sub 0}.

  20. Equation of state and contact of a strongly interacting Bose gas in the normal state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Xia -Ji; Mulkerin, Brendan; He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui

    2015-04-27

    Here, we theoretically investigate the equation of state and Tan's contact of a nondegenerate three-dimensional Bose gas near a broad Feshbach resonance, within the framework of large-N expansion. Our results agree with the path-integral Monte Carlo simulations in the weak-coupling limit and recover the second-order virial expansion predictions at strong interactions and high temperatures. At resonance, we find that the chemical potential and energy are significantly enhanced by the strong repulsion, while the entropy does not change significantly. With increasing temperature, the two-body contact initially increases and then decreases like T–1 at large temperature, and therefore exhibits a peak structuremore » at about 4Tc0, where Tc0 is the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature of an ideal, noninteracting Bose gas. These results may be experimentally examined with a nondegenerate unitary Bose gas, where the three-body recombination rate is substantially reduced. In particular, the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the two-body contact could be inferred from the momentum distribution measurement.« less

  1. Pressure gradient passivation of carbonaceous material normally susceptible to spontaneous combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ochs, Thomas L.; Sands, William D.; Schroeder, Karl; Summers, Cathy A.; Utz, Bruce R.

    2000-11-14

    This invention is a process for the passivation or deactivation with resp to oxygen of a carbonaceous material by the exposure of the carbonaceous material to an oxygenated gas in which the oxygenated gas pressure is increased from a first pressure to a second pressure and then the pressure is changed to a third pressure. Preferably a cyclic process which comprises exposing the carbonaceous material to the gas at low pressure and increasing the pressure to a second higher pressure and then returning the pressure to a lower pressure is used. The cycle is repeated at least twice wherein the higher pressure may be increased after a selected number of cycles.

  2. Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

  3. A new method of calibration and normalization for neutron detector families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menlove, H.O.; Stewart, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    A calibration and cross-reference is presented for passive and active neutron assay instruments. The method reduces and number of physical standards required to calibrate families of neutron detectors and also ties together much of the calibration information currently available. The basic approach is to carefully calibrate one member of the family (reference detector) over the complete mass range of interest. Other members of the family can be cross-referenced to the calibrated detector using a single sample or radioactive source. Calibration and cross-reference information is presented for the Inventory Sample Counter, High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter. Active Well Coincidence Counter, and the Neutron Collar. 1 ref., 15 figs., 20 tabs.

  4. Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    intersections between the overlapping fault strands results in increased fracture density that enhances hydrothermal fluid flow. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling...

  5. "Partial Panel" Operator Training: Advanced Simulator Training to Enhance Situational Awareness in Off-Normal Situations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-06-01

    On August 14, 2003, the largest blackout in the history of the North American electricity grid occurred. The four root causes identified by the blackout investigation team were inadequate system understanding, inadequate situational awareness, inadequate tree trimming, and inadequate reliability coordinator diagnostic support. Three of these four root causes can be attributed to deficiencies in training, communication, and the tools used by the control room operators. Using the issues revealed in the August 14, 2003 blackout, and addressing concerns associated with the security of control systems, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed a hands-on training curriculum that utilizes a dispatcher training simulator to evoke loss of situational awareness by the dispatcher. PNNL performed novel changes to the dispatcher training software in order to accomplish this training. This presentation will describe a vision for a future training environment that will incorporate hands-on training with a dispatcher training simulator in a realistic environment to train operators to recognize and respond to cyber security issues associated with their control systems.

  6. Plutonium in human urine: Normal levels in the US public. 1991 Annual report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Xue, Ying-Hua

    1997-03-01

    A neutron induced fission track method was successfully developed for assaying {sup 239}Pu in human urine with a detection limit below 20 aCi/sample. The technique involves the co-precipitation of {sup 239}Pu with rhodizonic acid, separation of {sup 239}Pu from potentially interfering natural uranium and other inorganic materials by ion-exchange techniques, collection of the sample onto lexan detectors, irradiation of sample in MIT reactor at a fluence of 1.1 x 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}, etching of the lexan slide and counting the track either manually or by some automated counting system.

  7. Double-sided electromagnetic pump with controllable normal force for rapid solidification of liquid metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuznetsov, S.B.

    1987-01-13

    A system for casting liquid metals is provided with an electromagnetic pump which includes a pair of primary blocks each having a polyphase winding and being positioned to form a gap through which a movable conductive heat sink passes. A solidifying liquid metal sheet is deposited on the heat sink and the heat sink and sheet are held in compression by forces produced as a result of current flow through the polyphase windings. Shaded-pole interaction between the primary windings, heat sink and solidifying strip produce transverse forces which act to center the strip on the heat sink. 5 figs.

  8. Double-sided electromagnetic pump with controllable normal force for rapid solidification of liquid metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuznetsov, Stephen B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for casting liquid metals is provided with an electromagnetic pump which includes a pair of primary blocks each having a polyphase winding and being positioned to form a gap through which a movable conductive heat sink passes. A solidifying liquid metal sheet is deposited on the heat sink and the heat sink and sheet are held in compression by forces produced as a result of current flow through the polyphase windings. Shaded-pole interaction between the primary windings, heat sink and solidifying strip produce transverse forces which act to center the strip on the heat sink.

  9. Persistent Fe moments in the normal-state collapsed-tetragonal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 14; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121 Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), ...

  10. Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

    2005-09-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the military’s nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

  11. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    American Petroleum Institute, "Joint Association Survey on Drilling Costs". Explanatory ... Average cost is the arithmetic mean and includes all costs for drilling and equipping ...

  12. Computing Eigenvalues of Real Symmetric Matrices Using Rational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matrices are real symmetric, most such methods rely on complex arithmetic, to solve the linear systems that arise in their implementations. An appealing technique for overcoming...

  13. Application Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NESAP Application Porting and Performance IXPUG Performance and Debugging Tools Measuring Arithmetic Intensity Training & Tutorials Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users...

  14. Exploiting data representation for fault tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoemmen, Mark Frederick; Elliott, J.; Mueller, F.

    2015-01-06

    Incorrect computer hardware behavior may corrupt intermediate computations in numerical algorithms, possibly resulting in incorrect answers. Prior work models misbehaving hardware by randomly flipping bits in memory. We start by accepting this premise, and present an analytic model for the error introduced by a bit flip in an IEEE 754 floating-point number. We then relate this finding to the linear algebra concepts of normalization and matrix equilibration. In particular, we present a case study illustrating that normalizing both vector inputs of a dot product minimizes the probability of a single bit flip causing a large error in the dot product's result. Moreover, the absolute error is either less than one or very large, which allows detection of large errors. Then, we apply this to the GMRES iterative solver. We count all possible errors that can be introduced through faults in arithmetic in the computationally intensive orthogonalization phase of GMRES, and show that when the matrix is equilibrated, the absolute error is bounded above by one.

  15. Exploiting data representation for fault tolerance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoemmen, Mark Frederick; Elliott, J.; Sandia National Lab.; Mueller, F.

    2015-01-06

    Incorrect computer hardware behavior may corrupt intermediate computations in numerical algorithms, possibly resulting in incorrect answers. Prior work models misbehaving hardware by randomly flipping bits in memory. We start by accepting this premise, and present an analytic model for the error introduced by a bit flip in an IEEE 754 floating-point number. We then relate this finding to the linear algebra concepts of normalization and matrix equilibration. In particular, we present a case study illustrating that normalizing both vector inputs of a dot product minimizes the probability of a single bit flip causing a large error in the dot product'smore » result. Moreover, the absolute error is either less than one or very large, which allows detection of large errors. Then, we apply this to the GMRES iterative solver. We count all possible errors that can be introduced through faults in arithmetic in the computationally intensive orthogonalization phase of GMRES, and show that when the matrix is equilibrated, the absolute error is bounded above by one.« less

  16. Comment on ''Quasinormal modes in Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime: A simple derivation of the level spacing of the frequencies''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batic, D.; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2011-05-15

    It is shown here that the extraction of quasinormal modes within the first Born approximation of the scattering amplitude is mathematically not well-founded. Indeed, the constraints on the existence of the scattering amplitude integral lead to inequalities for the imaginary parts of the quasinormal mode frequencies. For instance, in the Schwarzschild case, 0{<=}{omega}{sub I}<{kappa} (where {kappa} is the surface gravity at the horizon) invalidates the poles deduced from the first Born approximation method, namely, {omega}{sub n}=in{kappa}.

  17. Utilizing a simple CT dosimetry phantom for the comprehension of the operational characteristics of CT AEC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsalafoutas, Ioannis A.; Varsamidis, Athanasios; Thalassinou, Stella; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the nested polymethylacrylate (PMMA) phantom (which is available in many CT facilities for CTDI measurements), as a tool for the presentation and comparison of the ways that two different CT automatic exposure control (AEC) systems respond to a phantom when various scan parameters and AEC protocols are modified.Methods: By offsetting the two phantom's components (the head phantom and the body ring) half-way along their longitudinal axis, a phantom with three sections of different x-ray attenuation was created. Scan projection radiographs (SPRs) and helical scans of the three-section phantom were performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 and a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanners, with different scan parameter selections [scan direction, pitch factor, slice thickness, and reconstruction interval (ST/RI), AEC protocol, and tube potential used for the SPRs]. The dose length product (DLP) values of each scan were recorded and the tube current (mA) values of the reconstructed CT images were plotted against the respective Z-axis positions on the phantom. Furthermore, measurements of the noise levels at the center of each phantom section were performed to assess the impact of mA modulation on image quality.Results: The mA modulation patterns of the two CT scanners were very dissimilar. The mA variations were more pronounced for Aquilion 64, where changes in any of the aforementioned scan parameters affected both the mA modulations curves and DLP values. However, the noise levels were affected only by changes in pitch, ST/RI, and AEC protocol selections. For Brilliance 64, changes in pitch affected the mA modulation curves but not the DLP values, whereas only AEC protocol and SPR tube potential selection variations affected both the mA modulation curves and DLP values. The noise levels increased for smaller ST/RI, larger weight category AEC protocol, and larger SPR tube potential selection.Conclusions: The nested PMMA dosimetry phantom can be effectively utilized for the comprehension of CT AEC systems performance and the way that different scan conditions affect the mA modulation patterns, DLP values, and image noise. However, in depth analysis of the reasons why these two systems exhibited such different behaviors in response to the same phantom requires further investigation which is beyond the scope of this study.

  18. Simple visualization techniques for die casting part and die design. Final report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.A.; Lu, S.C.; Rebello, A.B.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and test die casting design evaluation techniques based on the visualization of geometric data that is related to potential defects of problems. Specifically, thickness information is used to provide insight into potential thermal problems in the part and die. Distance from the gate and a special type of animation of the fill pattern is used to provide an assessment of gate, vent and overflow locations. Techniques have been developed to convert part design information in the form of STL files to a volume-based representation called a voxel model. The use of STL files makes the process CAD system independent. Once in voxel form, methods that were developed in this work are used to identify thick regions in the part, thin regions in the part and/or die, distance from user specified entry locations (gates), and the qualitative depiction of the fill pattern. The methods were tested with a prototype implementation on the UNIX platform. The results of comparisons with numerical simulation and field reported defects were surprisingly good. The fill-related methods were also compared against short-shots and a water analog study using high speed video. The report contains the results of the testing plus detailed background material on the construction of voxel models, the methods used for displaying results, and the computational geometric reasoning methods used to create die casting-related information form the voxel model for display to the user.

  19. Simple visualization techniques for die casting part and die design. Final report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.A.; Lu, S.C.; Rebello, A.B.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and test die casting design evaluation techniques based on the visualization of geometric data that is related to potential defects of problems. Specifically, thickness information is used to provide insight into potential thermal problems in the part and die. Distance from the gate and a special type of animation of the fill pattern is used to provide an assessment of gate, vent and overflow locations. Techniques have been developed to convert part design information in the form of STL files to a volume-based representation called a voxel model. The use of STL files makes the process CAD system independent. Once in voxel form, methods that were developed in this work are used to identify thick regions in the part, thin regions in the part and/or die, distance from user specified entry locations (gates), and the qualitative depiction of the fill pattern. The methods were tested with a prototype implementation on the UNIX platform. The results of comparisons with numerical simulation and field reported defects were surprisingly good. The fill-related methods were also compared against short-shots and a water analog study using high speed video. The report contains the results of the testing plus detailed background material on the construction of voxel models, the methods used for displaying results, and the computational geometric reasoning methods used to create die casting-related information from the voxel model for display to the user.

  20. A simple technique to reduce evaporation of crystallization droplets by using plate lids with apertures for adding liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipper, Lauren E.; Aristide, Xavier; Bishop, Dylan P.; Joshi, Ishita; Kharzeev, Julia; Patel, Krishna B.; Santiago, Brianna M.; Joshi, Karan; Dorsinvil, Kahille; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2014-11-28

    This article describes the use of evaporation control lids that are fitted to crystallization plates to improve the reproducibility of trials using as little as 5 nl. The plate lids contain apertures which are large enough for the transfer of protein containing droplets, but small enough to greatly reduce the rate of evaporation during the time needed to prepare the plate. A method is described for using plate lids to reduce evaporation in low-volume vapor-diffusion crystallization experiments. The plate lids contain apertures through which the protein and precipitants were added to different crystallization microplates (the reservoir was filled before fitting the lids). Plate lids were designed for each of these commonly used crystallization microplates. This system minimizes the dehydration of crystallization droplets containing just a few nanolitres of protein and precipitant, and results in more reproducible diffraction from the crystals. For each lid design, changes in the weight of the plates were used to deduce the rate of evaporation under different conditions of temperature, air movement, droplet size and precipitant. For comparison, the state of dehydration was also visually assessed throughout the experiment. Finally, X-ray diffraction methods were used to compare the diffraction of protein crystals that were conventionally prepared against those that were prepared on plates with plate lids. The measurements revealed that the plate lids reduced the rate of evaporation by 6382%. Crystals grown in 5 nl drops that were set up with plate lids diffracted to higher resolution than similar crystals from drops that were set up without plate lids. The results demonstrate that plate lids can be instrumental for improving few-nanolitre crystallizations.