Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is known as Normalized Differ- ence Water Index (NDWI) [12]. It is calculated using reflectance in two near infrared (NIR) channels. Similar indices have been proposed that use reflectance at other NIR wavelengthsNormalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks Kristine

Small, Eric

2

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION COVER TYPES ON SEDIMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION COVER TYPES ON SEDIMENT by trapping sediment during tidal exchange. They are considered good sediment retention environments, but little is known about the spatial variability of sedimentation within these wetlands, and the role

Lovett, Gary M.

3

CASTANEA 69(2): 92108. JUNE 2004 Aspect Induced Differences in Vegetation, Soil,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. GOTTSCHALK 1 1 United States Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station, 180 Canfield Street, Morgantown, air temperature, light, nutrients, response to competition and predation, and disturbance regime of solar radiation received at different times of the year, and has an influence on the microclimate

Rentch, James

4

Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with those observed in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) extending back to 1981. The NDVI is derived by subtracting in the hydrological, energy and carbon cycles, through influences of land cover change on hydrologic responses

Evans, Jason

5

Spatial and temporal patterns of greenness on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia: interactions of ecological and social factors affecting the Arctic normalized difference vegetation index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial and temporal patterns of greenness on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia: interactions.1088/1748-9326/4/4/045004 Spatial and temporal patterns of greenness on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia: interactions of ecological, USA 2 Earth Cryosphere Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Siberian Branch, Tyumen, Russia 3

Bhatt, Uma

6

Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

Chen, Tsuhan

7

Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hydrodynamics of vegetated channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper highlights some recent trends in vegetation hydrodynamics, focusing on conditions within channels and spanning spatial scales from individual blades, to canopies or vegetation patches, to the channel reach. At ...

Nepf, Heidi

9

Vegetables: Selection, Care, Cooking.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and blemishes and decay. For the least waste in paring, select potatoes that are regular in shape and have shallow eyes. Avoid potatoes that show green 1 color on some part of the surface; the green portions taste bitter. One pound of fresh po- , tatoes... aging. daily food guide for Texans, three kinds of Other vegetables include all those that are vegetables-green or yellow, other vegetables not green or yellow, and supply other needed and Irish or sweet potatoes are good nutrition vitamins...

Reasonover, Frances; Mason, Louise; Tribble, Marie; Cox, Maeona

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Special study on vegetative covers. [UMTRA Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Vegetative covers: Special study. [Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Vegetable Gardening in Containers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This 7 page publications explains how to grow vegetables in containers when insufficient space or unsutable soil conditions make a traditional garden difficult to achieve. Topics include: container materials, crop selection, growing media, seeding...

Masabni, Joseph; Cotner, Sam

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

Specialty Vegetables in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chayote squash - Creole cooks call it mirliton, South Americans call it mango squash and Floridians call it a vegetable pear. These are all the same vegetable but with many names! Amaranths (Chinese Spinach) Description. Amaranths are green, leafy... wash flowers thoroughly and make certain all chemical or organic pesticide has been removed. Give them a gentle bath in salt water and then dip the petals in ice water to perk them up. Drain on paper towels. For later marketing, petals and whole...

Longbrake, Thomas D.; Baker, Marvin L.; Cotner, Sam; Parsons, Jerry; Roberts, Roland; Stein, Larry

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations Jozsef Szilagyi1 Abstract: Multiyear Seevers and Ottmann 1994; Nicholson et al. 1996; Sz- ilagyi et al. 1998; Szilagyi and Parlange 1999; Szilagyi 2000 . Different authors drew differing conclusions about the appli- cability of NDVI to estimate

Szilagyi, Jozsef

15

ccsd00003444, Jordan Normal and Rational Normal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the characteristic polynomial can be fully factorized (see e.g. Fortuna-Gianni for rational normal forms

16

Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines Based on Sustainability Goals for the Macquarie Campus #12.................................................................................................................................10 4.2.5 Shale-Sandstone soil transition...................................................................................................................................11 #12;3 1. Purpose This document provides a guideline for specific grounds management procedures

Wang, Yan

17

Vegetable Gardening in Containers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are indicated in Table 1. * Growing Media Synthetic "soils" are best suited for vegetable container gardening. These mixes may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, ver miculite or almost any other type of media. Regardless of what... "soils" are available from gar den centers, or one can be pre pared by mixing horticultu ral grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate, and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons...

Cotner, Sam

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Vegetation and sediment characteristics of created and natural Spartina alterniflora marshes in Lower Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Five natural and ten created Spartina altemiflora marshes in the Lower Galveston Bay System, Texas, were compared to determine if there were significantly different vegetative and sediment characteristics associated with each marsh type. Vegetative...

Albertson, Andrea Kai

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Chapter 17 Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStanding FriedelIron-Sulfur3-1 November 2012 Words in17-1

20

N A Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModificationEnzyme-FunctionalizedCirculatoryo r t h F o-N A

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Vegetation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip:ScaleVegetation Jump to: navigation,

22

Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Investigation of the utility of the vegetation condition index (VCI) as an indicator of drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationship between the satellite-based Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) and frequently used agricultural drought indices like Palmer Drought Severity Index, Palmerís Z-index, Standard Precipitation Index, percent normal and deciles...

Ganesh, Srinivasan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

International bibliography of vegetation maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:100,000,000], in Voss, John, "Preliminary report of the paleo-ecology of a Wisconsin and an Illinois bog." Trans. Illinois State Acad. Sci., vol. 24, p. 136.) 1887 "VEGETATION REGIONS ACCORDING TO OSCAR DRUDE" black and white [1:56,300,0001 LEGEND 1. Tundra 2... survey of North America." In Engler, A., and Oscar Drude (eds.), Die Vegetation der Erde. Leipzig, Wilhelm Engelmann, vol. 13, inserted at back. [ 1911 ] "NORTH AMERICA VEGETATION" black and white [ 1 -.34,400,000] LEGEND 1. Tropical forest 5...

Ku?chler, A. W. (August William)

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Normal Curvature . . . Geodesic Curvature . . .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Normal Curvature . . . Geodesic Curvature . . . Home Page Title Page Page 683 of 711 Go Back Full quadratic form associated with a surface. #12;Normal Curvature . . . Geodesic Curvature . . . Home Page Title Page Page 684 of 711 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit The component g is called the geodesic

Gallier, Jean

26

Vegetation Dynamics and Livestock Production on Rangelands in the Southern Great Plains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We examined vegetation dynamics and livestock production in response to land management practices on rangelands in two different studies, one in north central and oneÖ (more)

Cummings, Daniel Chad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Fruit and Vegetable Servings in Local Farm-Sourced and Standard Lunches Offered to Children in a Head Start Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Independent-samples t-tests were performed using SPSS. There were no significant differences in either fruit or vegetable consumption between conventional lunches and locally-sourced lunches. Even though there was more variety of fruit and vegetable offerings...

Johnson, Amy M.

2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

28

Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

Ortiz, Alejandra C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Selecting Fresh Fruits and Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time. Selecting Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Amanda Scott* E-197 9/08 This publication was sponsored by a grant from the Initiative for Future Agriculture Food Systems, a program of the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, which...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

Murphy, Enda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Texas Home Vegetable Gardening Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With this manual, home gardeners are sure to be successful growing vegetables. It includes information on garden planning, crop selection, soil preparation, fertilization, planting techniques, watering, pest control and harvesting. Tables show...

Masabni, Joseph

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

Normalizing the causality between time series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, a rigorous yet concise formula has been derived to evaluate the information flow, and hence the causality in a quantitative sense, between time series. To assess the importance of a resulting causality, it needs to be normalized. The normalization is achieved through distinguishing three types of fundamental mechanisms that govern the marginal entropy change of the flow recipient. A normalized or relative flow measures its importance relative to other mechanisms. In analyzing realistic series, both absolute and relative information flows need to be taken into account, since the normalizers for a pair of reverse flows belong to two different entropy balances; it is quite normal that two identical flows may differ a lot in relative importance in their respective balances. We have reproduced these results with several autoregressive models. We have also shown applications to a climate change problem and a financial analysis problem. For the former, reconfirmed is the role of the Indian Ocean Dipole as ...

Liang, X San

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Environmental Effects of Woody Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In rural loca- tions, woody vegetation provides for man's protection and preservation. Farm windbreaks in improv- ing human comfort by shielding people from direct solar radiation. What happens to the solar but significant amount is used for heating tree parts. The portion of solar radiation used in photosynthesis (food

Koford, Rolf R.

35

Vegetation's Red Edge: A Possible Spectroscopic Biosignature of Extraterrestrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth's deciduous plants have a sharp order-of-magnitude increase in leaf reflectance between approximately 700 and 750 nm wavelength. This strong reflectance of Earth's vegetation suggests that surface biosignatures with sharp spectral features might be detectable in the spectrum of scattered light from a spatially unresolved extrasolar terrestrial planet. We assess the potential of Earth's step-function-like spectroscopic feature, referred to as the "red edge", as a tool for astrobiology. We review the basic characteristics and physical origin of the red edge and summarize its use in astronomy: early spectroscopic efforts to search for vegetation on Mars and recent reports of detection of the red edge in the spectrum of Earthshine (i.e., the spatially integrated scattered light spectrum of Earth). We present Earthshine observations from Apache Point Observatory to emphasize that time variability is key to detecting weak surface biosignatures such as the vegetation red edge. We briefly discuss the evolutionary advantages of vegetation's red edge reflectance, and speculate that while extraterrestrial "light harvesting organisms" have no compelling reason to display the exact same red edge feature as terrestrial vegetation, they might have similar spectroscopic features at different wavelengths than terrestrial vegetation. This implies that future terrestrial-planet-characterizing space missions should obtain data that allow time-varying, sharp spectral features at unknown wavelengths to be identified. We caution that some mineral reflectance edges are similar in slope and strength to vegetation's red edge (albeit at different wavelengths); if an extrasolar planet reflectance edge is detected care must be taken with its interpretation.

Sara Seager; Edwin L. Turner; Justin Schafer; Eric B. Ford

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

EXAMINING VEGETATION AND CLIMATE INTERACTIONS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION TYPES AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The mechanisms responsible for influencing the climate away from the surface, into the atmosphere, and to remote reduction in latent cooling. In contrast, boreal deforestation causes a large surface temperature cooling

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

37

Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2005 MANAGEMENT TIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Labeled for Row Middle Use in Vegetable Crops 446 Kudzu Turning Over New Leaves in Indiana Counties 447

Ginzel, Matthew

38

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fruit and Vegetable Consumption by Low-Income Americans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ML, Schillo BA. 5 A Day fruit and vegetable interventionof perceived barriers to fruit and vegetable consumptionKA, Potter JD. Vegetables, fruit, and cancer prevention: a

Sisson, Aimee

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudha Patri Mechanical Engineer Telephoneo 250 o 250 G-2.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudha Patri Mechanical Engineer Telephoneo 250 o 250

42

Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudha Patri Mechanical Engineer Telephoneo 250 o 250/::vI

43

Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,PvtSouth Dakota) Jump to:Oklahoma:Vegetables Jump to:

44

Vegetation of Upper Coastal Plain depression wetlands: Environmental templates and wetland dynamics within a landscape framework.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference wetlands play an important role in efforts to protect wetlands and assess wetland condition. Because wetland vegetation integrates the influence of many ecological factors, a useful reference system would identify natural vegetation types and include models relating vegetation to important regional geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical properties. Across the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain, depression wetlands are a major hydrogeomorphic class with diverse characteristics. For 57 functional depression wetlands in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, we characterized the principal vegetation types and used a landscape framework to assess how local (wetland-level) factors and regional landscape settings potentially influence vegetation composition and dynamics. Wetland sites were stratified across three Upper Coastal Plain landscape settings that differ in soils, surface geology, topography, and land use. We sampled plant composition, measured relevant local variables, and analyzed historical transitions in vegetative cover types. Cluster analysis identified six vegetation types, ranging from open-water ponds and emergent marshes to closed forests. Significant vegetation-environment relationships suggested environmental ''templates'' for plant community development. Of all local factors examined, wetland hydrologic regime was most strongly correlated with vegetation type, but depression size, soil textural type, and disturbance history were also significant. Because hydrogeologic settings influence wetland features, local factors important to vegetation were partly predictable from landscape setting, and thus wetland types were distributed non-randomly across landscape settings. Analysis of long-term vegetation change indicated relative stability in some wetlands and succession in others. We developed a landscape-contingent model for vegetation dynamics, with hydroperiod and fire as major driving variables. The wetland classification, environmental templates, and dynamics model provide a reference framework to guide conservation priorities and suggest possible outcomes of restoration or management.

De Steven, Diane; Toner, Maureen, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ecophysiology of forest and savanna vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lowland vegetation of tropical South AmericaóAn overview, instate for tropical South America, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 30(dry seasonal forests of South America, Ann. Mo. Bot. Gard. ,

Lloyd, J.; Goulden, M. L.; Ometto, J. P.; Patino, S.; Fyllas, N. M.; Quesada, C. A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Contribution of vegetation and peat fires to particulate air pollution in Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smoke haze, caused by vegetation and peat fires in Southeast Asia, is of major concern because of its adverse impact on regional air quality. We apply two different methods (a chemical transport model and a Lagrangian ...

Reddington, C L

47

Monte Carlo simulation model for electromagnetic scattering from vegetation and inversion of vegetation parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis research, a coherent scattering model for microwave remote sensing of vegetation canopy is developed on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations. An accurate model of vegetation structure is essential for the ...

Wang, Li-Fang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Sandhills Vegetation Will heat from the pipeline affect the growth of vegetation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sandhills Vegetation Will heat from the pipeline affect the growth of vegetation? What we know. Will the Sandhills vegetation grow back after the pipeline is constructed? What we know ­ response by Professor Jerry issues, revegetation problems on the pipeline will be at discreet locations. If surrounding pastures

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

49

Fruit and Vegetable Safety Challenge Game Directions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fruit and Vegetable Safety Challenge Game Directions Equipment needed: 1. Computer, projector (fruits, vegetables, and meat) 6. Cleaning solutions (bleach, soap, water) 7. Stop watch 8. Team prizes How to Start: This game can be used with the "A Healthy Harvest: Safe Handling of Fresh Fruits

50

Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management Plans in Oregon Maribeth V. Gibbons is an integrated aquatic vegetation management plan? When is an IAVMP required? Part II: Developing a Plan Chapter and Reservoirs · Portland State University · Portland OR 97207 #12;Acknowledgements This manual benefited

51

HYDROPONIC VEGETABLE GARDENING Marcy Stanton, Master Gardener  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a water source. Lighting: A simple 2-bulb 4-foot fluorescent fixture with standard COOL WHITE bulbs is adequate for most leafy vegetables. Do not buy any of the fancy fluorescent grow bulbs; you are wasting your money on these expensive bulbs. When we set up a fluorescent light system to grow vegetables, what

New Hampshire, University of

52

Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

Liskiewicz, Maciej

53

International Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of southern Russia and climatic changes" 15.00 ­ Dr. A. Skorobogatov (Voronezh University, Russia). "TheInternational Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human Society to Climatic Changes in Ukraine- Ukrainian team started to investigate Holocene climate changes and the resulting vegetation and human

Bern, Universität

54

Activity of polymerized trichloroacetic acid for highway vegetation control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mem r ember Play 1/74 ABSTRACT Activity of Polymer- zed Trichloroacetic Acid for Highway Vegetation Control. (May 1/74) Hobert Phillip Wieaenfeld, B. S. , California State University, Humboldt Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wayne G. Mc... applied to highway roadsides near Fort Worth, Lufkin and Yoakum, Texas in the spring of 1g'7$. Two polymerizing activates which differed in their solubility were used. TCA polymerized with the more soluble activate and applied at a rate of '3 lbs...

Wiedenfeld, R. P

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Normal matter storage of antiprotons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

Campbell, L.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Interaction between flow, transport and vegetation spatial structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper summarizes recent advances in vegetation hydrodynamics and uses the new concepts to explore not only how vegetation impacts flow and transport, but also how flow feedbacks can influence vegetation spatial ...

Luhar, Mitul

57

Reliability Based Vegetation Management Through Intelligent System Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability Based Vegetation Management Through Intelligent System Monitoring Final Project Report Research Center since 1996 PSERC #12;Power Systems Engineering Research Center Reliability Based Vegetation project titled "Reliability Based Vegetation Maintenance Through Intelligent System Monitoring (T-27)." We

58

CONNECTICUT VEGETABLE & SMALL FRUIT GROWERS' Thursday, January 15, 2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONNECTICUT VEGETABLE & SMALL FRUIT GROWERS' CONFERENCE Thursday, January 15, 2015 Maneeley. Connecticut Vegetable & Small Fruit Growers' Conference (We need folks to pre-register so Maneeley's has:______________________________________ ---- Town:______________ State:_____ Zip:____________ ---- Check off: Vegetable grower ___ Fruit grower

Alpay, S. Pamir

59

VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The work involved will be to clear tall growing vegetation that is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Vegetative covers: Special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The temporal mapping of riparian vegetation at Leon Creek in Bexar County, Texas from 1987 to 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and urban zones. Results for both Image Difference Calculation and Percent Area Calculation suggest that for the total watershed, there are higher rates of decreases in vegetation occurring in rural and urban zones. Less vegetation overall in the 0.5 mi...

Cummins, Karen Leigh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C][W][OA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C controlling the elongated fruit shape of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is SUN. In this study, we explored the roles of SUN in vegetative and reproductive development using near isogenic lines (NILs) that differ

van der Knaap, Esther

64

The limited growth of vegetated shear layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In contrast to free shear layers, which grow continuously downstream, shear layers generated by submerged vegetation grow only to a finite thickness. Because these shear layers are characterized by coherent vortex structures ...

Ghisalberti, M.

65

Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who...

Lin, Lan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

N /A

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

68

Safe Storage of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper storage of fresh fruits and vegetables can help consumers avoid foodborne illness. This publication explains how to safely store apples, bananas, berries, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, grapes, herbs, lettuce and greens, melons, nectarines...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nonlinear Characteristics of Wave Propagation over Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The attenuation of wave energy by submerged or near-emergent coastal vegetation is one of the prominent methods of energy dissipation in areas with significant presence of wetlands. In this thesis, the nature of this dissipation in nearshore random...

Venkattaramanan, Aravinda

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Normalized cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Normalized cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

Assessing the efficiency of dye-swap normalization to remove systematic bias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing the efficiency of dye-swap normalization to remove systematic bias from two. Using three different data sets, this paper assesses the effectiveness of dye-swap normalization. The results show how dye-swap normalization corrects the bias introduced by the different properties

Rostock, Universität

75

Vegetation classification and the efficacy of plant dominance-based classifications in predicting the occurrence of plant and animal species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Vegetation associations are often distinguished on the basis of the dominant plant species. Associations with markedly different dominants (e.g., evergreen and deciduous trees) are expected to indicate high complementarity. In this study I evaluated...

Yantis, James Hugh

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Easy Gardening.....Harvesting and Handling Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Easy Gardening Joseph Masabni, Assistant Professor and Extension Horticulturist, The Texas A&M University System HARVESTING ? HANDLING ? STORING VEGETABLES -1- T ohelpensurethatthevegetables yougrowandprepareareofhigh quality.... Acknowledgments Thispublicationwasrevisedfromearlierversionswrittenby SamCotner,ProfessorEmeritusandformerExtension Horticulturist,andAlWagner,formerProfessorand ExtensionHorticulturist. -6- Produced by AgriLife Communications, The Texas A&M System Extension...

Cotner, Sam; Masabni, Joseph; Wagner, Al

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

77

Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

Bhatt, Uma

78

Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

79

Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

An application of predictive vegetation mapping to mountain vegetation in Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

community data as the dependent variable and various environmental data as the independent variables thought to control or correlate with vegetation distributions. The environmental data were either obtained from existing digital datasets or derived from...

Green, Janet Alexis

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z. [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Momentum and scalar transport in vegetated shear flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental aquatic flows are seldom free of vegetative influence. However, the impact of submerged vegetation on the hydrodynamics and mixing processes in aquatic flows remains poorly understood. In this thesis, I present ...

Ghisalberti, Marco (Marco Andrea), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Improving vegetable preference and consumption among preschool children: evaluating results from an educational intervention using vegetable gardening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's exposure to a variety of vegetables through the incorporation of weekly gardening supplemented with classroom activities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of vegetable gardening to improve preschool children's affective responses...

Lorenz, Saundra Gail

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

?Aceite Vegetal Puro Como Combustible Diesel? (Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Spanish Version) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today and during the last extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here, we investigate the potential during these extrema, when Earth's climate and biomes maps were different from today, we are able to test

Arnold, Luc

90

Evaluation of vegetative cover on reclaimed land by color infrared videography relative to soil properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were collected in three reclaimed portions of the Martin Lake mine near Tatum, Texas. Analysis of the video imagery indicated that 11% of the A2 area, 8% of the B area and 15% of the C2 area were poorly vegetated by bermudagrass. Areas totally devoid... as bare soil in these two mine areas are known to be actively used haul roads. Sparsely vegetated areas account for 7. 8'4 of the A2, 4. 8% of the B and 13% of the C2 areas. These values were significantly different at the 5% confidence level...

Pfordresher, Anne Augusta

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Turing's normal numbers: towards randomness Veronica Becher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

presumably in 1938 Alan Turing gave an algorithm that produces real numbers normal to every integer base- putable normal numbers, and this result should be attributed to Alan Turing. His manuscript entitled "A

93

Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

SMITH NORMAL FORM AND LAPLACIANS DINO LORENZINI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SMITH NORMAL FORM AND LAPLACIANS DINO LORENZINI Abstract. Let M denote the Laplacian matrix of a graph G. Associated with G is a finite group (G), obtained from the Smith normal form of M, and whose /Im(M). This group can be computed in practice using the Smith normal form of M, as follows. Given any

Lorenzini, Dino J.

95

Combinatorial Maps with Normalized Knot Dainis ZEPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combinatorial Maps with Normalized Knot Dainis ZEPS Abstract We consider combinatorial maps's normalization doesn't affect combinatorial map what concerns its generality. Knot's normalization leads to more concise numeration of corners in maps, e.g., odd or even corners allow easy to follow distinguished cycles

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

96

arctic vegetation damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gradient. Here we examine the complex interrelationships between patterned ground, climate, vegetation and soil along a north-south transect through all five bioclimate...

97

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOEEIS-0285SA-35) James Jellison - TFOOlympia...

98

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPZ992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOEEIS-0285SA-25) Elizabeth Johnson - TFRThe...

99

The effects of elephant and mesoherbivores on woody vegetation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Herbivores are important drivers and have a longstanding history in shaping our terrestrial environments. However, during the past decades, changes in woody vegetation in savannaÖ (more)

Lagendijk, Daisy Diana Georgette.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Local...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

affects arabidopsis vegetative: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The vegetation reacts with changes in species composition and a decrease in biodiversity. Artificial snowing modifies some of these impacts: The soil frost is mitigated due to an...

102

african vegetation phenology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

rainy season. Further research is needed to address interaction between groundwater under climate change. 1. Introduction "Vegetation phenology" refers to the periodic biological...

103

Fresh Vegetables: Getting the Most Nutrition for Your Money  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and quality. Visit local farmer?s markets and roadside stands. Grocery stores aren?t the only place to buy fresh vegetables. Be Safe! P oor storage and preparation of vegeta- bles can cost you money if the vegeta- bles go to waste or cause a foodborne... carefully. Bruises and other blemishes speed up deterioration and allow bacteria to enter the produce. Use clean, cool, running water to wash the vegetables. Hard vegetables like potatoes and carrots should be cleaned with a vegetable brush to remove any...

Anding, Jenna

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Lambda hyperonic effect on the normal driplines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A generalized mass formula is used to calculate the neutron and proton drip lines of normal and lambda hypernuclei treating non-strange and strange nuclei on the same footing. Calculations suggest existence of several bound hypernuclei whose normal cores are unbound. Addition of Lambda or, Lambda-Lambda hyperon(s) to a normal nucleus is found to cause shifts of the neutron and proton driplines from their conventional limits.

C. Samanta; P. Roy Chowdhury; D. N. Basu

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

AUGUSTOSAGNOTTI ScuolaNormaleSuperiore-Pisa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JoelScherk,unfisicodell'Eco- le Normale Supérieure di Parigi scomparso prematuramente nel- l'80. La stessa Teoria, creata nel 1968

Abbondandolo, Alberto

107

alla Normale 1_la Scuola 9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

funzione che in Francia viene svolta dalla gemella √?cole Normale Sup√©rieure di Parigi. A questa antica

Abbondandolo, Alberto

108

Conformal Universality in Normal Matrix Ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A remarkable property of Hermitian ensembles is their universal behavior, that is, once properly rescaled the eigenvalue statistics does not depend on particularities of the ensemble. Recently, normal matrix ensembles have attracted increasing attention, however, questions on universality for these ensembles still remain under debate. We analyze the universality properties of random normal ensembles. We show that the concept of universality used for Hermitian ensembles cannot be directly extrapolated to normal ensembles. Moreover, we show that the eigenvalue statistics of random normal matrices with radially symmetric potential can be made universal under a conformal transformation.

Alexei M. Veneziani; Tiago Pereira; Domingos H. U. Marchetti

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

109

Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Vegetation communities associated with the 100-Area and 200-Area facilities on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, lies within the broad semi-arid shrub-steppe vegetation zone of the Columbia Basin. Thirteen different habitat types on the Hanford Site have been mapped in Habitat Types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and Plant Species of Concern (Downs et al. 1993). In a broad sense, this classification is correct. On a smaller scale, however, finer delineations are possible. This study was conducted to determine the plant communities and estimate vegetation cover in and directly adjacent to the 100 and 200 Areas, primarily in relation to waste sites, as part of a comprehensive ecological study for the Compensation Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) characterization of the 100 and 200 Areas. During the summer of 1993, field surveys were conducted and a map of vegetation communities in each area, including dominant species associations, was produced. The field surveys consisted of qualitative community delineations. The community delineations described were made by field reconnaissance and are qualitative in nature. The delineations were made by visually determining the dominant plant species or vegetation types and were based on the species most apparent at the time of inspection. Additionally, 38 transects were run in these plant communities to try to obtain a more accurate representation of the community. Because habitat disturbances from construction/operations activities continue to occur in these areas, users of this information should be cautious in applying these maps without a current ground survey. This work will complement large-scale habitat maps of the Hanford Site.

Stegen, J.A.

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

Douches, David S.

112

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Sustainable Vegetable Production and Nutrition Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management that builds collaboratively on MSU's strengths in vegetable production and sustainable croppingASSISTANT PROFESSOR Sustainable Vegetable Production and Nutrition Systems The Department of Horticulture (http://www.hrt.msu.edu) in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Michigan State

Isaacs, Rufus

113

FRUIT & VEGETABLE GROWERS MANUAL FOR THE BEGINNING GROWER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINNESOTA FRUIT & VEGETABLE GROWERS MANUAL FOR THE BEGINNING GROWER Developed by the University & Outreach Assistance Partnership Program through a partnership agreement with the Minnesota Fruit before I harvest my produce? 135 3. When should I harvest my fruits and vegetables? 136 4. How should I

Amin, S. Massoud

114

Stream Temperature Response to Three Riparian Vegetation Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Stream temperature response to three distinct riparian conditions were then modeled: open, in vegetation loss can increase other processes that play a role in heat exchange between the atmosphere local near-stream air mass transfer (18). Recent research on the effects of riparian vegetation

Selker, John

115

Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data. Abstract Creation photo-interpretation, or ground-based inventories. National inventories are a potential source

116

Oak Woodland Vegetation Dynamics: A State and Transition Approach1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a format that is sensible and accessible to natural resource managers. State and transition models have93 Oak Woodland Vegetation Dynamics: A State and Transition Approach1 Melvin R. George2 and Maximo and transition format. Keywords: Oak-woodlands, state and transition models, succession, vegetation dynamics

Standiford, Richard B.

117

Extremal unital completely positive normal maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the convex set of unital completely positive normal map on a von-Neumann algebra and find a necessary and sufficient condition for an element in the convex set to be extremal. We also deal with the same problem for the convex subset which admits a faithful normal state.

Anilesh Mohari

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

NONE

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

Relation of Soils, Rainfall and Grazing Management to Vegetation, Western Edwards Plateau of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the station have been subjected to different rates of stocking with various ' cornhinations of sheep and cattle since grazing experiments were started in 1938. Vegetation on the experimental pastures is fairly representative of that supported by several... areas. I (2) Tobosagrass has been affected very little by the grazing practices for the 16-year period. ' It decreased slightly on the ridgetop soils but increased on other soils in pastures grazed with sheep. ' Cattle utilized tobosa more...

Young, Vernon A. (Vernon Alphus); Thomas, Gerald W.

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosytstems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

Robert P. Breckenridge

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Interactions among flow, sediment deposition and aquatic vegetation in a channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic vegetation is commonly present in rivers in many forms. This thesis consists of two studies, which examine the flow structure around a patch of emergent, rigid vegetation in a laboratory channel. The vegetation ...

Zong, Lijun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of wave attenuation through artificial vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is commonly known that coastal vegetation dissipates energy and aids in shoreline protection by damping incoming waves and depositing sediment in vegetated regions. However, this critical role of vegetation to dampen wave forces is not fully...

Augustin, Lauren Nicole

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

124

Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

125

Original article Normal and sickle red blood cell dynamics under venular flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Original article Normal and sickle red blood cell dynamics under venular flow C. Allayousa , A these notions are found in sickle cell disease where sickle red blood cells become more rigid, leading. Thus, normal and sickle red blood cells are classified into different sub-groups, showing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

fruits and vegetables. Beyond tasting and learning about the many varieties of tomatoes, visitors are also  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fruits and vegetables. Beyond tasting and learning about the many varieties of tomatoes, visitors and other fruit, vegetable, and herb variety research conducted by Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonian vegetation coupled Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Amazonia L. R. Hutyra,1,2 Summary: and resilience of Amazonian vegetation to climate change by analyzing observed climate-vegetation relationships... coupled changes...

128

Flow and Transport in Regions with Aquatic Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This review describes mean and turbulent flow and mass transport in the presence of aquatic vegetation. Within emergent canopies, the turbulent length scales are set by the stem diameter and spacing, and the mean flow is ...

Nepf, Heidi

129

Status of Baseline Sampling for Elements in Soil and Vegetation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling for Elements in Soil and Vegetation at Four Kgra's in the Imperial Valley, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

130

Flow-induced reconfiguration of buoyant and flexible aquatic vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant posture can play a key role in the health of aquatic vegetation, by setting drag, controlling light availability, and mediating the exchange of nutrients and oxygen. We study the flow-induced reconfiguration of ...

Nepf, Heidi

131

Biogeochemistry and vegetation in a cranberry bog chronosequence Genevieve Noyce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeochemistry and vegetation in a cranberry bog chronosequence Genevieve Noyce Mount Holyoke Ecosystems Center, MBL, Woods Hole, MA 17 December 2007 #12;Noyce 2 Abstract Abandoned cranberry bogs: abandoned cranberry bogs, succession, biogeochemical controls, exotic species, forests Introduction

Vallino, Joseph J.

132

EIS-0097: Bonneville Power Administration Transmission Facilities Vegetation Management Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energyís Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of various alternatives associated with implementing a vegetation management program.

133

Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet...

Ford, Trenton W.

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

134

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usa Abstract A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and around the resurgent dome of Long...

135

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USA Abstract A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and around the resurgent dome of Long...

136

Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

Nepf, Heidi

137

Further Tests of Vegetable Varieties for the Winter Garden Region.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watermelon 3 8 Summary of Promising Varieties 42 AcknowIedgments Literature Cited BULLETIN NO. 546 JULY , 1937 FURTHER TESTS OF VEGETABLE VARIETIES FOR THE WINTER GARDEN REGION By Leslie R. Hawthorn, Horticulturist, Substation No. 19, Winter Haven...

Hawthorn, L. R. (Leslie Rushton)

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Map of mixed prairie grassland vegetation, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A color vegetation map at the scale of 1:12,000 of the area surrounding the Rocky Flats, Rockwell International Plant near Boulder, Colorado, provides a permanent record of baseline data which can be used to monitor changes in both vegetation and environment and thus to contribute to future land management and land-use policies. Sixteen mapping units based on species composition were identified, and characterized by two 10-m/sup 2/ vegetation stands each. These were grouped into prairie, pasture, and valley side on the basis of their species composition. Both the mapping units and these major groups were later confirmed by agglomerative clustering analysis of the 32 vegetation stands on the basis of species composition. A modified Bray and Curtis ordination was used to determine the environmental factor complexes controlling the distribution of vegetation at Rocky flats. Recommendations are made for future policies of environmental management and predictions of the response to environmental change of the present vegetation at the Rocky Flats site.

Clark, S J.V.; Webber, P J; Komarkova, V; Weber, W A

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Uncertainty analysis of vegetation distribution in the northern high latitudes during the 21st century with a dynamic vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study aims to assess how high-latitude vegetation may respond under various climate scenarios during the 21st century with a focus on analyzing model parameters induced uncertainty and how this uncertainty compares ...

Jiang, Yueyang

140

Measurement of normal contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effects of roughness and fractality on the normal contact stiffness of rough surfaces. Samples of isotropically roughened aluminium surfaces are considered. The roughness and fractal dimension were altered through blasting using different sized particles. Subsequently, surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) was applied to the surfaces in order to modify the surface at the microscale. The surface topology was characterised by interferometry based profilometry. The normal contact stiffness was measured through nanoindentation with a flat tip utilising the partial unloading method. We focus on establishing the relationships between surface stiffness and roughness, combined with the effects of fractal dimension. The experimental results, for a wide range of surfaces, showed that the measured contact stiffness depended very closely on surfaces' root mean squared (RMS) slope and their fractal dimension, with correlation coefficients of around 90\\%, whilst a relatively weak correlation coefficient of 57\\% was found between the contact stiffness and RMS roughness.

Chongpu Zhai; Sťbastien Bevand; Yixiang Gan; Dorian Hanaor; GwťnaŽlle Proust; Bruno Guelorget; Delphine Retraint

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Computing Instantaneous Frequency by normalizing Hilbert Transform  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention presents Normalized Amplitude Hilbert Transform (NAHT) and Normalized Hilbert Transform(NHT), both of which are new methods for computing Instantaneous Frequency. This method is designed specifically to circumvent the limitation set by the Bedorsian and Nuttal Theorems, and to provide a sharp local measure of error when the quadrature and the Hilbert Transform do not agree. Motivation for this method is that straightforward application of the Hilbert Transform followed by taking the derivative of the phase-angle as the Instantaneous Frequency (IF) leads to a common mistake made up to this date. In order to make the Hilbert Transform method work, the data has to obey certain restrictions.

Huang, Norden E.

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Influence of metal process micronic and submicronic particles on vegetables quality and ecosystems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sativa) and parsley (Petroselinum crispum), vegetables currently cultivated in kitchen gardens with high

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

143

Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., phosphorous) [Sansalone and Buchberger, 1997; Noe et al., 2007]. [3] Wetland vegetation influences flow

144

Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperatures

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

145

Physics of collisionless scrape-off-layer plasma during normal and off-normal Tokamak operating conditions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of a collisionless scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma in tokamak reactors is being studied to define the electron distribution function and the corresponding sheath potential between the divertor plate and the edge plasma. The collisionless model is shown to be valid during the thermal phase of a plasma disruption, as well as during the newly desired low-recycling normal phase of operation with low-density, high-temperature, edge plasma conditions. An analytical solution is developed by solving the Fokker-Planck equation for electron distribution and balance in the SOL. The solution is in good agreement with numerical studies using Monte-Carlo methods. The analytical solutions provide an insight to the role of different physical and geometrical processes in a collisionless SOL during disruptions and during the enhanced phase of normal operation over a wide range of parameters.

Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Comparison of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Platforms for Assessing Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quick and safe method for monitoring biotic resources was evaluated. Vegetation cover and the amount of bare ground are important factors in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems and assessment of rangeland health. Methods that improve speed and cost efficiency could greatly improve how biotic resources are monitored on western lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species (including sage grouse and pygmy rabbit). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, two UAV platforms, fixed wing and helicopter, were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate percent cover for six different vegetation types (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forb, litter, and bare ground) and (2) locate sage grouse using representative decoys. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Engineering (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetation cover. A software program called SamplePoint was used along with visual inspection to evaluate percent cover for the six cover types. Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform to use. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Sera White

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by2 Homogenized Monthly Temperature Normals3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1 A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by2 Homogenized a constrained harmonic technique that forces the daily30 temperature normals to be consistent with the monthly, or harmonic even though the annual march of temperatures for some locations can be highly asymmetric. Here, we

148

EFFECTS OF VEGETATION ON TURBULENCE, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND STREAM MORPHOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation, from an individual stem to multiple stems in various configurations, profoundly alters turbulent flows. These alterations influence sediment transport and stream morphology, but depend on complex interactions and relationships between flow, plants and sediment properties. This is illustrated for three case studies that represent a variety of macrophyte patterns and scales in the environment: flows through simulated uniformly distributed plant stems, emergent and submerged; flows with alternating simulated stem patches; and flow around an isolated stem in a flood plain. The emergent case demonstrates that when density is sparse the mean velocity and turbulence intensities vary horizontally around the stems, which would promote a heterogeneous bedform morphology. However, it is still unclear how density, submergence ratio, and flow Reynolds number, in combination, influence interference effects, vortex shedding and dissipation, and velocity, pressure and lift fluctuations that affect sediment entrainment. The submerged case demonstrates significant reduction of the mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and turbulent shear near the bed compared to an unobstructed flow and supports numerous observations that vegetation promotes deposition or stabilizes bed sediments. The case of alternating emergent vegetation patches illustrates how vegetation adjusts the bed promoting scour in open water and deposition within the patches. The isolated stem case illustrates the variety of coherent structures generated, their complex interaction, and their role in specific sediment transport phenomena observed. Additional research is required, however, to quantify thresholds and relationships for flow-vegetation-sediment interactions so that aquatic macrophyte plantings can be used more effectively in water resource management.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Vegetation uptake from burial ground alpha waste trenches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted as part of an evaluation of the potential radiological consequences of reinhabiting the SRS burial ground. The objective was to determine the uptake of buried, low-level, transuranic waste from unlined earthen trenches by forest vegetation. Two tree plots were established in 1979. One plot was put over a trench containing alpha waste and the other in an area without trenches. When the tree seedlings were sampled during 1979 and 1980, and analysized for {sup 239}Pu and {sup 238}Pu, there was only a small difference in radionuclude concentration between trees planted over the trench and those planted on the control plot because of the limited root intrusion into the trench by the seedlings. However, when trees were sample in 1986, 1987, and 1988 and analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 237}Np activity, the average activity of all of these isotopes was significantly higher over the trenches than in the control plot. These measurements indicate that tree roots will extract transuranic isotopes from buried, low-level waste. The amount of radioisotopes moved from the trenches to the surface is small and the level in the trees is low enough that dose from exposure will be small. The long term effects of transport of radioisotopes from the trenches to the surface soil was evaluated by estimating the accumulation in the surface soil. Transuranic activity in selected food crops was calculated using the soil activity and the literature derived concentration factors. In all cases, the activity of the transuranic isotopes in the edible portion of the plants was quite low. The activity in the leaf tissue was much higher than in the seed. However, it should be noted that in only one case was the activity higher than the naturally occurring activity of {sup 40}K in the pine foliage.

Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Tuckfield, R.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

Phillip H. Henna

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fitting Parton Distribution Data with Multiplicative Normalization Uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the generic problem of performing a global fit to many independent data sets each with a different overall multiplicative normalization uncertainty. We show that the methods in common use to treat multiplicative uncertainties lead to systematic biases. We develop a method which is unbiased, based on a self--consistent iterative procedure. We demonstrate the use of this method by applying it to the determination of parton distribution functions with the NNPDF methodology, which uses a Monte Carlo method for uncertainty estimation.

The NNPDF Collaboration; Richard D. Ball; Luigi Del Debbio; Stefano Forte; Alberto Guffanti; Jose I. Latorre; Juan Rojo; Maria Ubiali

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Weather Normalization in an ESPC Document explains how to use estimated energy rates and normalized weather data in determining an energy service company's (ESCO's)...

153

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARMnumberDoppler ARMdiffusedirect normal

154

Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

Cai, D Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

Maxwell, S.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

158

Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain water. This publication...

Schuster, Joseph L.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

159

Sweet potatoes are a warm-weather vegetable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sweet potatoes are a warm- weather vegetable related to the morning glory family.Although Louisiana sweet potatoes are often referred to as yams, they truly are sweet potatoes. The Louisiana producers began calling the orange-fleshed sweet potatoes grown in Louisiana"yams" to distinguish them from

160

Chicken Noodle Soup 3 T. canola or vegetable oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chicken Noodle Soup 3 T. canola or vegetable oil 3# chicken bone-in (thigh meat or legs the skins and ends for the stock. Cut the end off the celery head and reserve for stock. Cut both onions in half and remove skin of onion and reserve for stock. Take 1 carrot, 1 stalk of celery and 1 onion

Liu, Taosheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A phenomenological model for the flow resistance over submerged vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenological model for the flow resistance over submerged vegetation Alexandra G. Konings,1: Konings, A. G., G. G. Katul, and S. E. Thompson (2012), A phenomenological model for the flow resistance [2002]. In this paper, a phenomenological approach is used to describe the momentum transfer

Katul, Gabriel

162

9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management remains widely cited as the most logical and elegant frame- work for continuous improvement9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes David H Duncan1 of the `adaptive management' paradigm to natural resource man- agement, using regional management of native

Burgman, Mark

163

Beyond Biodiesel Running on Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 Beyond Biodiesel ­ Running on Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO) The green tree has many branches in the development and promotion of biodiesel for nearly two decades. Technologies based on the use of hydrogen in a low-percentage mixture with petroleum fuel. Hence the development of biodiesel. Paul Trella, New

Kaye, Jason P.

164

Quantifying the role of climate and landscape characteristics on hydrologic partitioning and vegetation response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the water and energy balance, as well as landscape characteristics, to predict Normalized Difference Experiment (MOPEX) catchments across the United States. Statistical analysis revealed that the Horton index energy to available water at the Earth's surface, the aridity index. Here we show that the Horton index

Troch, Peter

165

Advances in target normal sheath acceleration theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical model of the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) process, able to go beyond the limits of available descriptions, is developed. It allows to achieve a more satisfactory interpretation of TNSA. The theory, also supported by two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, elucidates the role played by the main laser and target parameters. Comparison between model predictions and experimental data related to the target thickness dependence of the maximum ion energy is discussed, showing satisfactory agreement. The model can be used as a simple but effective tool to guide the design of future experiments.

Passoni, M.; Sgattoni, A. [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, and Sezione di Milano INFN, Milan (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, and Sezione di Milano INFN, Milan (Italy); Perego, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitŗ di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitŗ di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Batani, D. [Universitť Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France) [Universitť Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, and Sezione di Milano INFN, Milan (Italy)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Figure legends Figure 1: Normalized radiance spectra of the different experimental color  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatment groups. The fluorescent (red) line represents the narrow rearing treatment. The 5500K (green) and 10000K (blue) lines represent the two bulb types used. #12;Figure S4: Behavioral predictive model performance for the broad-spectrum

Carleton, Karen L.

167

Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover and Identify Biotic Resources in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems: Preliminary Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

Robert P. Breckenridge

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The role of vegetation in the CO[subscript 2] flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO[subscript 2]. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO[subscript 2] emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is ...

Velasco, E.

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting vegetable stand Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: non-vegetative ground cover. For example, if running water covers 1% of your station, standing water 2... . If a habitat is flooded but Live vegetation ground cover...

170

Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation GLAS Optimization Remote sensing Vegetation structure The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) has optimized a noise coefficient which could be constant or vary according to observation period or noise

Lefsky, Michael

171

Measurements and Linear Wave Theory Based Simulations of Vegetated Wave Hydrodynamics for Practical Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave attenuation by vegetation is a highly dynamic process and its quantification is important for accurately understanding and predicting coastal hydrodynamics. However, the influence of vegetation on wave dissipation is not yet fully established...

Anderson, Mary Elizabeth

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

Best Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Develop educational materials related to aquatic plant identification and their specific managementBest Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E vegetation management with the ultimate goal of producing the best management practices protocol in Iowa

Koford, Rolf R.

173

Resonant normal form and asymptotic normal form behavior in magnetic bottle Hamiltonians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider normal forms in `magnetic bottle' type Hamiltonians of the form $H=\\frac{1}{2}(\\rho^2_\\rho+\\omega^2_1\\rho^2) +\\frac{1}{2}p^2_z+hot$ (second frequency $\\omega_2$ equal to zero in the lowest order). Our main results are: i) a novel method to construct the normal form in cases of resonance, and ii) a study of the asymptotic behavior of both the non-resonant and the resonant series. We find that, if we truncate the normal form series at order $r$, the series remainder in both constructions decreases with increasing $r$ down to a minimum, and then it increases with $r$. The computed minimum remainder turns to be exponentially small in $\\frac{1}{\\Delta E}$, where $\\Delta E$ is the mirror oscillation energy, while the optimal order scales as an inverse power of $\\Delta E$. We estimate numerically the exponents associated with the optimal order and the remainder's exponential asymptotic behavior. In the resonant case, our novel method allows to compute a `quasi-integral' (i.e. truncated formal integral) valid both for each particular resonance as well as away from all resonances. We applied these results to a specific magnetic bottle Hamiltonian. The non resonant normal form yields theorerical invariant curves on a surface of section which fit well the empirical curves away from resonances. On the other hand the resonant normal form fits very well both the invariant curves inside the islands of a particular resonance as well as the non-resonant invariant curves. Finally, we discuss how normal forms allow to compute a critical threshold for the onset of global chaos in the magnetic bottle.

C. Efthymiopoulos; M. Harsoula; G. Contopoulos

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Overview Report: Normal and Emergency Operation Visualization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an overview report to document and illustrate methods used in a project entitled ďNormal and Emergency Operations VisualizationĒ for a utility company, conducted in 2009-2010 timeframe with funding from the utility company and the U.S. Department of Energy. The original final report (about 180 pages) for the project is not available for distribution because it alludes to findings that assessed the design of an operational system that contained proprietary information; this abridged version contains descriptions of methods and some findings to illustrate the approach used, while avoiding discussion of sensitive or proprietary information. The client has approved this abridged version of the report for unlimited distribution to give researchers and collaborators the benefit of reviewing the research concepts and methods that were applied in this study.

Greitzer, Frank L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Self-consistent photothermal techniques: Application for measuring thermal diffusivity in vegetable oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent photothermal techniques: Application for measuring thermal diffusivity in vegetable of vegetable oils. The thermal diffusivity of six commercial vegetable oils olive, corn, soybean, canola in terms of thermal diffusivity was shown. The high measurement precision of the TWRC highlights

Mandelis, Andreas

176

Updated March 2013 Eat Smart, Live Strong is designed to improve fruit and vegetable consumption and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated March 2013 Eat Smart, Live Strong is designed to improve fruit and vegetable consumption: ¬∑ eat at least 3 ¬Ĺ cups of fruit and vegetable per day (1 ¬Ĺ cups of fruits and 2 cups of vegetables;Session 1, Reach Your Goals, Step by Step allows participants to review the amount of fruits

177

ForPeerReview From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to polyols and main industrial products Myriam and main industrial products Most of biobased polyols for polyurethanes are synthesized from vegetable oils literature; focus on the industrial synthetic routes. Keywords: vegetable oils; biobased polyols

Boyer, Edmond

178

Fire recurrence in the subarctic and its implications for vegetation composition E. A. JOHNSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire recurrence in the subarctic and its implications for vegetation composition E. A. JOHNSON JOHNSON,,E. A. 1979. Fire recurrence in the subarctic and its implications for vegetation composition. Can of the distribution's hazard of burning function to vegetation composition and r-K selection is discussed. JOHNSON,E

Johnson, Edward A.

179

ERDC/CERLTR-05-39 Simulation of Vegetation Recovery from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/CERLTR-05-39 Simulation of Vegetation Recovery from Military Disturbances on Fort Bliss Tamara of Vegetation Recovery from Military Disturbances on Fort Bliss Tamara Hochstrasser and Debra Peters USDA the vegetation simulation modeling capabilities of Fort Bliss, Texas, for evaluating the effects of military

Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

180

Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban neighbourhoods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban the Queen in Right of Canada 2013 Abstract Estimating the relative importance of vegetation on residential land (gardens, yards, and street-trees) and vegetation on non-residential land (parks and other large

Dawson, Jeff W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Vegetation survey of knapweed on the Yakima Training Center - 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes and discusses the results of a vegetation survey conducted in 1992 on a portion of the Yakima Training Center (YTC). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this survey and a similar survey in 1991 for the U.S. Department of the Army. The objectives of the survey were to evaluate the impact of the herbicide picloram on forbs where aerial applications of picloram were made in 1988, 1989, and 1991 to control knapweed infestations. Forbs are of special interest because they are an important part of the spring and summer diet of the western sage grouse, which is a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service candidate species for the threatened and endangered list. We also conducted a limited evaluation of the effectiveness of the spray program in controlling the spread of knapweed. Percent plant canopy cover and number of forbs were measured on 120 transacts on the herbicide-treated and untreated control areas. Herbicide treatment in 1991 resulted in a significant reduction in knapweed based on percent cover and density. The treatment areas also all had lower percent canopy cover of perennial forbs and fewer perennial forbs compared to control areas. Canopy cover of shrubs and annual, biennial, and perennial forbs measured on the YTC increased between the 1991 and 1992 survey, which may indicate a recovery of these vegetation types after disturbance. These increases also could reflect the mild 1992 winter and superior growing conditions in the spring of 1992. We recommend that these vegetation transacts continue to be monitored for an additional growing season to evaluate (1) whether knapweed increases to its previous abundance in the 1991 herbicide-treated area, (2) the efficacy of herbicide application on transacts along roadways, and (3) the increase in invasive annuals in herbicide-treated areas and the possible effects on community vegetation structure and sage grouse habitat.

Downs, J.L.; Cadoret, N.A.; Rickard, W.H.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Vegetation, edaphic, and topographic interrelationships in an East Texas forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATION, EDAPHIC, AND TOPOGRAPHIC INTERRELATIONSHIPS IN AN EAST TEXAS FOREST A Thesis by JOHNNY ZANE HINTON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) (Head of Department) December 1981 ABSTRACT... Vegetat1on, Edaphic, and Topographic Interrelationsh1ps In an East Texas Forest. (Oecember 1981) Johnny Zane Hinton, B. S. , Texas A&M Un1versity Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Fred E, Sme1ns Thirty stands were sampled on the Angelina National...

Hinton, Johnny Zane

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Iodine in Drinking Waters, Vegetables, Cottonseed Meal, and Roughages.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY, A & M COLLEGE, G. S. FRAPS and J. F. FUDGE Division of Chemistry TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 595 NOVEMBER 1940 -- IODINE IN DRINKING WATERS, VEGETABLES..., COTTONSEED MEAL, AND ROUGEIAGES ! .I rq?,\\?Y - AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President A96-1140-7M-LJ.80 5 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Iodine was determined in nearly 500 samples of city and rural drinking waters...

Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Range Vegetation Response to Burning Thicketized Live Oak Savannah.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TABLE 9. TOTAL STANDING CROP OF LIVE OAK AND NEW GROWTH (KGIHA) AND STANDING CROP INCREASE ( REPRESENTED BY NEW GROWTH IN APRIL AND JULY, 1* ON AREAS BURNED AT VARIOUS DATES ON THE ARANS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE NEAR AUSTWELL, TEXAS' New growth2... Response of live oak-dominated vegetation on thicketized uplands to burning in the fall 1974, spring 1975, and fall 1975 was evaluated through 1977 on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. Standing crop, species diversity, and botanical composition...

Scifres, C.J.; Kelly, D.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Characterizing the Performance of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer An Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With interest growing in the deployment of solar energy system, the accuracy of irradiance measurements becomes for concentrating solar energy systems. The Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) is used extensively for DNI and periods with clouds were excluded. The NIP is mounted on an automatic tracker that keeps the instrument

Oregon, University of

186

Phenomenology of electrostatically charged droplet combustion in normal gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental findings are provided on the effect of electrostatically charging a fuel on single-burning droplet combustion in normal gravity. It was established that significant modification of the flame morphology and the droplet burning time could be achieved, solely by the droplet charge, without the application of external electric fields. Negative charging of the droplets of mixtures of isooctane with either ethanol or a commercially available anti-static additive generated intense motion of the flame and abbreviated the droplet burning time by as much as 40% for certain blend compositions. Positive charging of the droplets generated almost spherical flames, because electrostatic attraction toward the droplets countered the effect of buoyancy. By comparing combustion of droplets of the same conductivity but different compositions, coupling of electrostatics with combustion chemistry was established. (author)

Anderson, Eric K.; Koch, Jeremy A.; Kyritsis, Dimitrios C. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fermi Normal Coordinates and Fermion Curvature Couplings in General Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study gravitational curvature effects in circular and radial geodesics in static, spherically symmetric space-times, using Fermi normal coordinates. We first set up these coordinates in the general case, and then use this to study effective magnetic fields due to gravitational curvature in the exterior and interior Schwarzschild, Janis-Newman-Winicour, and Bertrand space-times. We show that these fields can be large for specific parameter values in the theories, and thus might have observational significance. We discuss the qualitative differences of the magnetic field for vacuum space-times and for those seeded by matter. We estimate the magnitude of these fields in realistic galactic scenarios and discuss their possible experimental relevance. Gravitational curvature corrections to the Hydrogen atom spectrum for these space-times are also discussed briefly.

Anshuman Dey; Abhisek Samanta; Tapobrata Sarkar

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

188

Normalization and missing value imputation for label-free LC...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Normalization and missing value imputation for label-free LC-MS analysis. Normalization and missing value imputation for label-free LC-MS analysis. Abstract: Shotgun proteomic data...

189

Fractal Fluctuations and Statistical Normal Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamical systems in nature exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations and the corresponding power spectra follow inverse power law form signifying long-range space-time correlations identified as self-organized criticality. The physics of self-organized criticality is not yet identified. The Gaussian probability distribution used widely for analysis and description of large data sets underestimates the probabilities of occurrence of extreme events such as stock market crashes, earthquakes, heavy rainfall, etc. The assumptions underlying the normal distribution such as fixed mean and standard deviation, independence of data, are not valid for real world fractal data sets exhibiting a scale-free power law distribution with fat tails. A general systems theory for fractals visualizes the emergence of successively larger scale fluctuations to result from the space-time integration of enclosed smaller scale fluctuations. The model predicts a universal inverse power law incorporating the golden mean for fractal fluctuations and for the corresponding power spectra, i.e., the variance spectrum represents the probabilities, a signature of quantum systems. Fractal fluctuations therefore exhibit quantum-like chaos. The model predicted inverse power law is very close to the Gaussian distribution for small-scale fluctuations, but exhibits a fat long tail for large-scale fluctuations. Extensive data sets of Dow Jones index, Human DNA, Takifugu rubripes (Puffer fish) DNA are analysed to show that the space/time data sets are close to the model predicted power law distribution.

A. M. Selvam

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

190

Smith Normal Form a possible basis for an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smith Normal Form ­ a possible basis for an SVD ­ like code construction? (Semester Project I) Name.7 The Smith Normal Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 3 Detailed treatment of the possibilities to use Smith's Normal Form for coding 14 3.1 Introduction

Henkel, Werner

191

EIGENVALUES AND THE SMITH NORMAL FORM Joseph J. Rushanan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EIGENVALUES AND THE SMITH NORMAL FORM Joseph J. Rushanan The MITRE Corporation, M/S E025, Bedford, MA 01730 Abstract. Results are shown that compare the Smith Normal Form (SNF) over the integers and its Smith Normal Form (SNF) over the integers. Our goals are more general than those results

Rushanan, Joe J.

192

Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices; Abstract We study the problem of computing Hermite and Smith normal forms of ma- trices over. One first result is a fast Las Vegas probabilistic algorithm to compute the * *Smith normal form

Storjohann, Arne

193

Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices by Arne Storjohann A thesis presented the problem of computing Hermite and Smith normal forms of ma­ trices over principal ideal domains. The main probabilistic algorithm to compute the Smith normal form of a polynomial matrix for those cases where pre

Storjohann, Arne

194

Vegetable Varieties for the Winter Garden Region of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in successive plantings. While all of these plantings might not be successful commercially, because of the various market conditions, they would under normal weather conditions be successful in the home garden. Beets grown in the sandy soils of the Winter...

Hawthorn, L. R. (Leslie Rushton)

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A generalized 3D inverted pendulum model to represent human normal walking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A generalized 3D inverted pendulum model to represent human normal walking Sophie Sakka IRCCy,lacouture}@univ-poitiers.fr Abstract-- This paper compares different inverted pendulum models to represent the stance phase of human adapted to pathological walking as the walking symmetry hypothesis -needed to build classical inverted

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

197

Perturbative description of the fermionic projector: Normalization, causality, and Furry's theorem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The causal perturbation expansion of the fermionic projector is performed with a contour integral method. Different normalization conditions are analyzed. It is shown that the corresponding light-cone expansions are causal in the sense that they only involve bounded line integrals. For the resulting loop diagrams we prove a generalized Furry theorem.

Finster, Felix, E-mail: finster@ur.de [Fakultšt fŁr Mathematik, Universitšt Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)] [Fakultšt fŁr Mathematik, Universitšt Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Tolksdorf, JŁrgen, E-mail: Juergen.Tolksdorf@mis.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Microsoft PowerPoint - Town Bluff Vegetation impact.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping Richland OperationsU.S.OnlineTank09TWP-ICEPortland, Oregon

199

Community Involvement and Making a Difference  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement and Making a Difference Community

200

Cofinality in normal, almost compact spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TV and such that S(N, k)\\N is (homeomorphic to) k . (Without extra axioms of set theory, we can say only that k satisfies cox < k < c). It is routine to check that ÷(N, k) £ FR(k)\\CI(k) . Example 3.4. Assuming the axiom 0, Osteszewski [O] constructed... £ %. By the pressing down lemma, there is pa , which is in Ux for cofinally many X 's. Because qx $ Mx , there are k many different Ux 's. (c) Follows from (a), (b), and Kunen's Theorem [P, 3.7]. We remark that the disjoint closed subsets of X x (k + 1) that cannot...

Fleissner, William G.; Kulesza, J.; Levy, R.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

VEGETATION MEDIATED THE IMPACTS OF POSTGLACIAL CLIMATIC CHANGE ON FIRE REGIMES IN THE SOUTHCENTRAL BROOKS RANGE, ALASKA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine direct and indirect impacts of millennial-scale climatic change on fire regimes in the southcentral Brooks Range, Alaska, using four lake-sediment records and existing paleoclimate interpretations. New techniques are introduced to identify charcoal peaks semi-objectively and detect statistical differences in fire regimes. Peaks in charcoal accumulation rates (CHARs) provide estimates of fire return intervals (FRIs) which are compared between vegetation zones described by fossil pollen and stomata. Climatic warming from ca 15-9 ka BP (calendar years before CE 1950) coincides with shifts in vegetation from herb tundra to shrub tundra to deciduous woodlands, all novel species assemblages relative to modern vegetation. Two sites cover this period and show increased CHARs and decreased FRIs with the transition from herb to shrub tundra ca 13.3-14.3 ka BP. Short FRIs in the Betula-dominated shrub tundra (mean [m] FRI 144 yr; 95% CI 119-170) primarily reflect the effects of flammable, continuous fuels on the fire regime. FRIs increased significantly with the transition to Populus-dominated deciduous woodlands ca 10.5 ka BP (mFRI 251 yr [158-352]), despite evidence of warmer- and drier-than-present summers. We attribute reduced fire activity under these conditions to low flammability of deciduous fuels. Three sites record the mid to late Holocene, when cooler and moister conditions allowed Picea glauca forest-tundra and P. mariana boreal forests to establish ca 8 and 5.5 ka BP. Forest-tundra FRIs did not differ significantly from the previous period (mFRIs range from 131-238 yr), but FRIs decreased with the transition to boreal forest (mFRI 145 yr [129-163]). Overall, fire-regime shifts in the study area showed greater correspondence with vegetation characteristics than with inferred climate, and we conclude that vegetation mediated the impacts of millennial-scale climatic change on fire regimes by modifying landscape flammability. Our findings emphasize the importance of biological-physical feedbacks in determining the response of arctic and subarctic ecosystems to past, and by inference, future climatic change.

Higuera, P E; Brubaker, L B; Anderson, P M; Hu, F S; Brown, T A

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

Normal Agricultural Operations and Dove Hunting in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: baiting Doves are migratory birds, and dove hunting is therefore regulated by the Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which specifically prohibits baiting. Under federal law, baiting is the direct or indirect placing, exposing, depositing, distributing... considers this acceptable to hunt over. A problem arises, however, as to what constitutes a ?normal agricultural operation.? For the purpose of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act ?normal agricultural operation? means a normal agricultural planting...

Redmon, Larry

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

SciTech Connect: Effect of radiation on normal hematopoiesis...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Effect of radiation on normal hematopoiesis and on viral induced cancer of the hematopoietic system. Technical progress report, August 1, 1973--July 31, 1974 Citation Details...

206

asymptotic normalization coefficients: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

zeilbergtokhniotSameSexMarriages Zeilberger, Doron 114 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

207

asymptotic normalization coefficient: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

zeilbergtokhniotSameSexMarriages Zeilberger, Doron 114 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

208

adjacent normal skin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tangential mechanics SAI mechanoreceptor depth actuator strain energy density James Biggs; Mandayam A. Srinivasan 5 Expression and function of small RNAs in normal and...

209

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization Used...

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - astrocytes normalizes revascularization...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: astrocytes normalizes revascularization Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Brain Research 896 (2001) 8695 www.elsevier.comlocatebres Summary: Astrocytes are an ideal...

211

allowing normal bone: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assays. Correlations of fluoride levels between normal bone near the Nancy Medina; Chester W. Douglass; Gary M. Whitford; Robert N. Hoover; Thomas R. Fears 6 Differential...

212

Data Collection and Normalization for the Development of Cost...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This chapter discusses considerations for data collection and normalization. g4301-1chp19.pdf -- PDF Document, 21 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

213

Effect of Brush Vegetation on Deep Drainage Using Chloride Mass Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is comparable to that by herbaceous vegetation (Wilcox, 2005). The canopy of an average-size, mature redberry and ashe juniper can intercept 26% and 37% of the annual precipitation, respectively. Redberry and ashe juniper litter can intercept 40% and 43..., superactive, thermic Pachic Paleustolls. Dominant woody-shrub vegetation cover includes juniper (Juniperus ashei) with other existing vegetation such as little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) and threeawn (Aristida). Site G4 The soil at site G4...

Navarrete Ganchozo, Ronald J.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic vegetation fires Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dust aerosols VOCsDMS ET vegetation Anthropogenic waste byproduct air quality water management... combustionfires Anthropogenic crop production oil byproduct drilling...

215

SITE DESIGN GUIDELINES PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR BICYCLE VEGETATION FURNISHINGS LIGHTING SIGNAGE PAVING SITEWORK PARKING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SITE DESIGN GUIDELINES PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR BICYCLE VEGETATION FURNISHINGS LIGHTING SIGNAGE PAVING.7 Pedestrians .................................................................................... 3.8 Bicycles ..................................................... Section Four Bicycle Systems 4.1 Shared Roadways

Duchowski, Andrew T.

216

Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

Han, Eun Young, E-mail: eyhan@uams.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Zhang Xin; Yan Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Moros, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Corry, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen;Abstract The normal curve has been used to fit the rate of both world and U.S.A. oil production. In this paper we give the first theoretical basis for these curve fittings. It is well known that oil field

Stark, Dudley

218

New Equipartition Results for Normal Mode Energies of Anharmonic Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Equipartition Results for Normal Mode Energies of Anharmonic Chains B.I. Henry 1 and T. Szeredi 2;3 Date: 26 September 1995 The canonical and micro­canonical distribution of energy among. If the inter­particle potential is an even function then energy is distributed uniformly among the normal modes

Henry, Bruce Ian

219

SMITH NORMAL FORM OF A MULTIVARIATE MATRIX ASSOCIATED WITH PARTITIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SMITH NORMAL FORM OF A MULTIVARIATE MATRIX ASSOCIATED WITH PARTITIONS CHRISTINE BESSENRODT polynomials, and by determining not only the deter- minant but also the Smith normal form of these matrices. A priori the Smith form need not exist but its existence follows from the explicit computation

220

Numerical algorithms for the computation of the Smith normal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical algorithms for the computation of the Smith normal form of integral matrices C of the Smith normal form of integral matrices are described. More specifically, the com­ pound matrix method of the algorithms. AMS Subject Classification: Primary 65F30, Secondary 15A21, 15A36. Key words and phrases: Smith

Seberry, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Conformal Deformation from Normal to Hermitian Random Matrix Ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the eigenvalues statistics of ensembles of normal random matrices when their order N tends to infinite. In the model the eigenvalues have uniform density within a region determined by a simple analytic polynomial curve. We study the conformal deformations of normal random ensembles to Hermitian random ensembles and give sufficient conditions for the latter to be a Wigner ensemble.

Alexei M. Veneziani; Tiago Pereira; Domingos H. U. Marchetti

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

-Climate and pH as determinants of vegetation succession in man-made habitats -701 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 701-710, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sites in areas deforested by air pollution. Methods: We investigated vegetation patterns on 15 succes, spoil heaps after coal mining, sites at water reservoirs, extracted sand pit and peatland and reclaimed

Kratochvíl, Lukas

223

CHANGES IN 137 CS CONCENTRATIONS IN SOIL AND VEGETATION ON THE FLOODPLAIN OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER OVER A 30 YEAR PERIOD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{sup 137}Cs released during 1954-1974 from nuclear production reactors on the Savannah River Site, a US Department of Energy nuclear materials production site in South Carolina, contaminated a portion of the Savannah River floodplain known as Creek Plantation. {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations have been measured in Creek Plantation since 1974 making it possible to calculate effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in soil and vegetation and assess the spatial distribution of contaminants on the floodplain. Activity concentrations in soil and vegetation were higher near the center of the floodplain than near the edges as a result of frequent inundation coupled with the presence of low areas that trapped contaminated sediments. {sup 137}Cs activity was highest near the soil surface, but depth related differences diminished with time as a likely result of downward diffusion or leaching. Activity concentrations in vegetation were significantly related to concentrations in soil. The plant to soil concentration ratio (dry weight) averaged 0.49 and exhibited a slight but significant tendency to decrease with time. The effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in shallow (0-7.6 cm) soil and in vegetation were 14.9 (95% CI = 12.5-17.3) years and 11.6 (95% CI = 9.1-14.1) years, respectively, and rates of {sup 137}Cs removal from shallow soil and vegetation did not differ significantly among sampling locations. Potential health risks on the Creek Plantation floodplain have declined more rapidly than expected on the basis of radioactive decay alone because of the relatively short effective half-life of {sup 137}Cs.

Paller, M.; Jannik, T.; Fledderman, P.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new numerical scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ii Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new.S. Fairbanks, Alaska August 2005 #12;iii Abstract The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS........................................................................................................................... 24 Evaluation of snow depth and soil temperatures predicted by the Hydro- Thermodynamic Soil

Moelders, Nicole

225

Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS) Pamela Spier, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK Abstract This paper presents an evaluation of the Hydro. Introduction and Motivation The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS, Kramm et al. 1996, Mölders

Moelders, Nicole

226

Comparing Optical and Microwave Remote Sensing-based Vegetation Density over Mongolia for 1988-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation Index (NDVI), derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) series.vandijk@csiro.au Abstract ­ Vegetation density plays an important role in water and energy balance. Satellite-based optical product (Tucker et al., 2005). It can provide a relatively high spatial resolution product (up to 1km

Evans, Jason

227

Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1@mnhn.fr Abstract. In French Guiana, inselbergs are granite outcrops rising abruptly from the surrounding rain substrate. Shrub granitic vegetation, organised in thickets on open exposed rocks of inselbergs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Effects of Woody Vegetation Removal on Soil Water Dynamics in a South Texas Shrubland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal on various soil textures we studied changes in soil water, rooting depth, and the role of water redistribution by woody vegetation. Woody vegetation was removed using common methods of cut-stump and roller chop across three soil types. Soil water...

Mattox, April Marie

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Effects of forestry practices on vegetation structure and bird community of Kibale National Park, Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Uganda Cagan H. Sekercioglu* Center for Conservation Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford on the vegetation structure and bird community of Kibale National Park, Uganda. I compared four forest treatments Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uganda; Tropical forestry; Selective logging; Vegetation structure

Sekercioglu, Cagan Hakki

230

P.M. Vermeersch (ed.) 3 -WOODY VEGETATION AND ITS USE DURING THE NEOLITHIC AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because they have been submitted for 14 C dating. The site is located in a tributary wadi of the wadi). The modern arboreal vegetation of the Tree Shelter wadi is limited to a lonely Acacia tree at the en- trance of the wadi. The modern vegetation in the broad area of the Red Sea coastal land between wadi Qena

Marinova, Elena

231

Impacts of vegetation and cold season processes on soil moisture and climate relationships over Eurasia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of vegetation and cold season processes on soil moisture and climate relationships over investigate the impacts of vegetation and cold season processes on soil moisture persistence and climate, without the use of a model, in the former Soviet Union provides a unique look at soil moisture­climate

Ni-Meister, Wenge

232

Climate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: burning; arid ecosystems; livestock; climate; broad-scale climate; Southern Russia; socio-economic change by decreasing livestock numbers, vegetation changes, climate change, or interactions of these factors. OurClimate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid Ecosystems of Southern

Radeloff, Volker C.

233

A TEST FOR LIFE ON EXOPLANETS: THE TERRESTRIAL VEGETATION DETECTION IN THE EARTHSHINE SPECTRUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bacteria [7]. A second type of biosignature is provided by signs of stellar light transformation the possible presence of life on this planet. Spectral biosignatures can be of two types. A first type consists of photosynthetic (green) vegetation, non­photosynthetic (dry) and a soil (from [9]). The so­called vegetation red

Lardière, Olivier

234

Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrates on natural processes and how to manage them. Other materials and products are additions to .......................................6 Safety ................................................................6 Insect Management ...........................................7 Disease Management ......................................10 Weed Management

235

Towards a tool to design vegetated strips for mitigation of pesticides transfers in surface runoff. Assessment of different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Simunek et al,1999) coupled with a kinematic wave equation, which represents both surface runoff pollutions. Water pollution control division. Cemagref. 3 Bis Quai Chauveau. 69 336 LYON 09. France. * nadia fields towards surface waters. However, as the efficiency of these structures is closely related

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

236

The soil organic matter dynamic by using different compost organic manure in a vegetable system in North China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to cattle manure compost and biogas residue compost. Higherafter crop harvest in biogas residue compost treatment.2) cattle compost, 3) biogas residue, 4) control, no

Sun, Qinping; Li, Jijin; Liu, Bensheng; Zou, Guoyuan; Liu, Baocun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Characteristics of Wind Turbines Under Normal and Fault Conditions: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the characteristics of a variable-speed wind turbine connected to a stiff or weak grid under normal and fault conditions and the role of reactive power compensation.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Parsons, B.; Ellis, A.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Normality of Monte Carlo criticality eigenfunction decomposition coefficients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proof is presented, which shows that after a single Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport power method iteration without normalization, the coefficients of an eigenfunction decomposition of the fission source density are normally distributed when using analog or implicit capture MC. Using a Pearson correlation coefficient test, the proof is corroborated by results from a uniform slab reactor problem, and those results also suggest that the coefficients are normally distributed with normalization. The proof and numerical test results support the application of earlier work on the convergence of eigenfunctions under stochastic operators. Knowledge of the Gaussian shape of decomposition coefficients allows researchers to determine an appropriate level of confidence in the distribution of fission sites taken from a MC simulation. This knowledge of the shape of the probability distributions of decomposition coefficients encourages the creation of new predictive convergence diagnostics. (authors)

Toth, B. E.; Martin, W. R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Griesheimer, D. P. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., P.O. Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Coarser connected topologies and non-normality points  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate two topics, coarser connected topologies and non-normality points. The motivating question in the first topic is: When does a space have a coarser connected topology with a nice topological property? We will ...

Yengulalp, Lynne Christine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Computing Simplicial Homology Based on Efficient Smith Normal Form Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in general are sparse. We provide a review of several al- gorithms for the calculation of Smith Normal Form defined by ieA = i j=0 (-1)j eA\\{aj }, where A = {a0

Dumas, Jean-Guillaume

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Paducah and Portsmouth Off-Specification Enriched and Normal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enriched and Normal UF 6 Inventory 1 3B refers to a 30B cylinder size and 4A refers to a 48A size cylinder. Table 1 PORTS Enriched Inventory Container ID Sample Transfer Gross lbs...

242

Deconvolution in Random Effects Models via Normal Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation describes a minimum distance method for density estimation when the variable of interest is not directly observed. It is assumed that the underlying target density can be well approximated by a mixture of normals. The method...

Litton, Nathaniel A.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

Use of Normalized Radial Basis Function in Hydrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article we will present a use of normalized radial basis function in hydrology for prediction of missing river Reka runoff data. The method is based on multidimensional normal distribution, where standard deviation is first optimized and later the whole prediction process is learned on existing data [5]. We can conclude, that the method works very well for middle ranges of data, but not so well for extremes because of its interpolating nature.

Cotar, Anton; Brilly, Mitja [Chair of Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Jamova 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

244

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

N /A

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

245

The impact of cattle grazing on salt marsh and elevated hummock vegetation communities of a Texas barrier island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To assess the effects of cattle herbivory on vegetation community structure and composition in a Texas coastal salt marsh, data measuring several vegetation parameters were collected in four distinct habitats within a heavily grazed marsh over...

Carothers, James Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Use of vegetation for abatement of road traffic noise in a 1:10 scale street model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of vegetation for abatement of road traffic noise in a 1:10 scale street model J.Y. Jeona , H was constructed to evaluate the noise abatement by use of vegetation as sustainable means. The model materials

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

247

The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vegetables spinach and cabbage have a lower water demandmelons, spinach and yellow corn are among the most water-

Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

above the vegetable beds. Heavy water tanks require strongspaces. Since water is very heavy (8 pounds per gallon) it

Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

250

Supply Response and Impact of Government-Supported Crops on the Texas Vegetable Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply functions, elasticity estimates, and nonjointness test results consistently indicated that few commodities compete economically in the production of six major Texas vegetables (cabbage, cantaloupes, carrots, onions, potatoes, and watermelons). Significant bias effects caused by government-supported commodities, fixed inputs, and technological change were observed and measured. Nonnested test results for the hypothesis of sequential decision making by vegetable producers were inconclusive, but they gave greater likelihood support to sequential than to contemporaneous decision making. Many crops are produced under provision of gov-ernment programs intended both to prevent severe drops in prices received by farmers and to limit supplies. Diversion payments, price supports, and acreage restrictions are examples of governmental policies designed to stabilize and control field crop production in the U.S, Vegetable production and marketing, on the other hand, are often subject only to minimum standards implemented by grow-ers í associations and shippers to ensure quality of the fresh produce. Their prices are allowed to vary according to market conditions prevailing at the time of harvest. Meanwhile, health-conscious con-sumers are enhancing their diets by expanding con-sumption of vegetables. For example, per capita consumption of fresh vegetables in the U.S. has increased more than a third in less than 15 years, rising from 75 to 102 pounds between 1975 and 1989 (USDA). Texas is a major vegetable producing state. In 1989 it ranked sixth among the 50 states in value of vegetables produced and fourth in value of fresh vegetables produced (USDA). Considerable re-sources are devoted to them, and income generated from vegetable production and associated agribus-iness activities contribute substantially to the eco-

Fermin Ornelas; C. Richard Shumway

251

Establishing the Proteome of Normal Human Cerebrospinal Fluid . | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100 ton Stanat

252

Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries. 19 figs.

Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries.

Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Harmonic propagation of variability in surface energy balance within a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] The response of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum model to incoming radiation forcing is investigated in order to gain insights into the coupling of soil and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) states and fluxes. The ...

Gentine, P.

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - african vegetation fires Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2005 by the Ecological Society of America Summary: A MODEL-FRAMED EVALUATION OF ELEPHANT EFFECTS ON TREE AND FIRE DYNAMICS IN AFRICAN SAVANNAS PETER W. J... . The vegetation...

256

Assessing general relationships between aboveground biomass and vegetation structure parameters for improved carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click Here for Full Article Assessing general relationships between aboveground biomass 2010; published 23 June 2010. [1] Lidarbased aboveground biomass is derived based on the empirical relationship between lidarmeasured vegetation height and aboveground biomass, often leading to large

Ni-Meister, Wenge

257

The effects of nutrition education on attitudes and behaviors of children regarding fruits and vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

curriculum has improved nutritional knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding fruits and vegetables. One hundred and thirty - five students, representing ages five through twelve, approximately grades three through five, from four counties across...

Koch, Sharon Elaine, 1976-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Feedbacks between flow, vegetation, deposition, and the implications for landscape development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow and sedimentation around patches of vegetation are important to landscape evolution, and a better understanding of these processes would facilitate more effective river restoration and wetlands engineering. In wetlands ...

Kondziolka, John M. (John Michael)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Vegetation, soils, and surface hydrology of playa landforms in the Rio Grande Plains, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Playas in the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas were compared with respect to their: 1) size, shape, soil properties, and microtopography, 2) vegetation composition and structure, 3) surface water accumulation potential, and 4) disturbance history...

Farley, Andrea Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic vegetation amplify Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Y N C H E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society Summary: vegetation, permafrost, soil, and the atmo- sphere to amplify ecosystem change. MacDonald et al. (1993... the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Model and laboratory study of dispersion in flows with submerged vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries, and wetlands, strongly influencing water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and dispersion. ...

Murphy, E.

262

Coastal Marsh Vegetation Dynamics of the East Bay of Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure and function of coastal marshes results from a complex interaction of biotic and abiotic processes that continually influence the characteristics of marsh vegetation. A great deal of research has focused on how tidal processes...

Johnson, Jeremy Scott

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

263

The coupled development of terrain and vegetation : the case of semiarid grasslands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The distribution of vegetation in semiarid landscapes organizes as a function of moisture availability, which is often mediated by the form of the land surface. Simultaneously the processes that shape the land surface are ...

Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Momentum and mass transport by coherent structures in a shallow vegetated shear flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In many aquatic systems, from tidal creeks with fringing mangroves to rivers and associated floodplains, there exists an interface between dense vegetation and a high conveyance channel. A shear flow develops across this ...

White, Brian L., 1975-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Relationships of exotic plant communities with native vegetation, environmental factors, disturbance, and landscape ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystems in numerous ways. Theories on relation- ships of exotic species invasions with native vegetation strongly related to the eco- system classification. For example, mean exotic cover ranged from

Abella, Scott R.

266

Effects of dynamic vegetation and topography on hydrological processes in semi-arid areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems of dry climates represent a particularly interesting object for ecohydrological studies, as water is generally considered to be the key limiting resource. This work focuses on vegetation-water-energy dynamics ...

Ivanov, Valeri Yuryevich, 1974-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences the metabolism of prairie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences, the restoration allowed recovery of some features of open-canopy prairie streams. Woody expansion apparently. Keywords: macroalgae, microalgae, primary production, restoration, streams Introduction North American

Dodds, Walter

268

A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

Wilson, Ashley

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Using mobile technology to impact fruit and vegetable consumption in low-income youth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The benefits of fruits and vegetables (FV) include supplying nutrients and fiber to the diet, reducing risk of disease, and assisting in weight maintenance by increasing satiety and decreasing energy density of the diet. FV intake has been...

Hutcheson, Tresza Denae

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model with a combination of satellite observations (Fig. 2.1) and field mea- surements, as projected by simulation modeling

Bhatt, Uma

271

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS, Virginia, USA 20192 Abstract: Created wetlands are increasingly used to mitigate wetland loss. Thus, identifying wetland creation methods that enhance ecosystem development might increase the likelihood

272

Regulation of bcl-2 proto-oncogene expression during normal human lymphocyte proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bcl-2 and c-myc proto-oncogenes are brought into juxtaposition with the immuno-globulin heavy chain locus in particular B-cell lymphomas, resulting in high levels of constitutive accumulation of their messenger RNAs. Precisely how the products of the bcl-2 and c-myc genes contribute to tumorigenesis is unknown, but observations that c-myc expression is rapidly induced in nonneoplastic lymphocytes upon stimulation of proliferation raise the possibility that this proto-oncogene is involved in the control of normal cellular growth. In addition to c-myc, the bcl-2 proto-oncogene also was expressed in normal human B and T lymphocytes after stimulation with appropriate mitogens. Comparison of the regulation of the expression of these proto-oncogenes demonstrated marked differences and provided evidence that, in contrast to c-myc, levels of bcl-2 messenger RNA are regulated primarily though transcriptional mechanisms. 10 references, 3 figures.

Reed, J.C.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Alpers, J.D.; Croce, C.M.; Nowell, P.C.

1987-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

273

Gamma Ray Bursts, The Principle of Relative Locality and Connection Normal Coordinates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The launch of the Fermi telescope in 2008 opened up the possibility of measuring the energy dependence of the speed of light by considering the time delay in the arrival of gamma ray bursts emitted simultaneously from very distant sources.The expected time delay between the arrival of gamma rays of significantly different energies as predicted by the framework of relative locality has already been calculated in Riemann normal coordinates. In the following, we calculate the time delay in more generality and then specialize to the connection normal coordinate system as a check that the results are coordinate independent. We also show that this result does not depend on the presence of torsion.

A. E. McCoy

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

274

Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form. The method comprises: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Evaluation of vegetable oils for deep frying of batter-breaded meat nuggets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF VEGETABLE OILS FOR DEEP FRYING OF BATIER-BREADED MEAT NUGGETS A Thesis by SHIRLEY ELIZABETH HOUSSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology EVALUATION OF VEGETABLE OILS FOR DEEP FRYING OF BATTER-BREADED MEAT NUGGETS A Thesis by SHIRLEY ELIZABETH HOUSSON Approved as to style and content by: Ki Soon Rhee (Chair...

Housson, Shirley Elizabeth

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Canopy, litter and allelopathic effects of Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei, Buchholz) on understory vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CANOPY, ~ AND ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF ASHE JUNIPER (JUNIPERUS ASHEI, BUCHHOLZ) ON UNDERSTORY VEGETATION A Thesis by LISA YVONNE YAGER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fufillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Range Science CANOPY, LIITER AND ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF ASHE JUNIPER (JUNIPERUS ASHEI, BUCHHOLZ) ON UNDERSTORY VEGETATION A Thesis by LISA YVONNE YAGER Submitted to Texas A...

Yager, Lisa Yvonne

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR SEDIMENT CONTROL AND PHOSPHORUS SEQUESTRATION FROM DAIRY WASTE APPLICATION FIELDS A Thesis by SUBHASIS GIRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR SEDIMENT CONTROL AND PHOSPHORUS SEQUESTRATION FROM DAIRY WASTE APPLICATION FIELDS A Thesis...

Giri, Subhasis

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson Joseph A for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson,a Joseph A. Shaw,a Rick Lawrence,b Paul W. Nugent,a Laura M of these calibrated imagers is imaging of vegetation for CO2 gas leak detection. During a four-week period

Shaw, Joseph A.

280

Growth response of selected vegetable species to plant residue of guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Horticulture GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Approved as to style...

Reid, Debbie John

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An evaluation of low-density introductions of triploid grass carp in vegetated small sportfishing impoundments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EVALUATION OF LOW-DENSITY INTRODUCTIONS OF TRIPLOID GRASS CARP IN VEGETATED SMALL SPORTFISHING IMPOUNDMENTS A Thesis by BRIAN GENE BLACKWELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences AN EVALUATION OF LOW-DENSITY INTRODUCTIONS OF TRIPLOID GRASS CARP IN VEGETATED SMALL SPORTFISHING IMPOUNDMENTS A Thesis by BRIAN GENE...

Blackwell, Brian Gene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

282

Use of vegetation to ameliorate building microclimates: an assessment of energy-conservation potentials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The space-conditioning energy conservation potentials of landscapes designed to ameliorate building microclimates are evaluated. The physical bases for vegetative modifications of climate are discussed, and results of past study of the effects of vegetation on space-conditioning energy consumption in buildings are reviewed. The state-of-the-art of energy-conserving landscape designs is assessed and recommendations are presented for further research.

Hutchison, B.A.; Taylor, F.G.; Wendt, R.L.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 ◊ 0.6 mm and 16 ◊ 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10Ė20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B [San Diego State University, San Diego, CA (United States)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Radiative transfer based scaling of LAI retrievals from reflectance data of different resolutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is investigated with 1-km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data aggregated to different coarse into biogeophysical (energy and water exchanges) and biogeochemical (carbon and volatile organic compound exchanges. Vegetation leaf area index governs net radiation and its expenditure (energy balance), net primary production

Myneni, Ranga B.

285

Non-equilibrium and local detection of the normal fraction of a trapped two-dimensional Bose gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional Bose gas, a quantity that generally differs from the Bose-Einstein condensed fraction. The idea-Einstein condensation [7]. A possibil- ity explored in [8] is to look at the response of a gas in a toroidal trap for atomic samples, as the superfluid core co-exists with an external ring of normal gas [10]. In p

286

Normalized Lift: An Energy Interpretation of the Lift Coefficient Simplifies Comparisons of the Lifting Ability of Rotating and Flapping Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient of a fixed wing slightly differently, as the work exerted by the wing on the surrounding flow field (L/?∑S), compared against the total kinetic energy required for generating said lift, Ĺv2. This reinterpreted coefficient, the normalized lift...

Burgers, Phillip; Alexander, David E.

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

Water-Energy Shortages in the West: The New Normal?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water-Energy Shortages in the West: The New Normal? Tuesday, November 19, 2013 12:00 - 1:30 p, Kristen Averyt, director of the Western Water Assessment, a NOAA program based at CIRES, will discuss the connections between climate science and decision- making across the West , in particular, the water

Zhang, Junshan

288

Rigid Shape Interpolation Using Normal Equations William Baxter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rigid Shape Interpolation Using Normal Equations William Baxter OLM Digital, Inc. Pascal Barla INRIA Bordeaux University Ken-ichi Anjyo OLM Digital, Inc. Figure 1: Rigid Morphing with large rotations works well and is a very practical way e-mail: baxter@olm.co.jp e-mail: pascal.barla@labri.fr e

Boyer, Edmond

289

Auditory Responses in Normal-Hearing, Noise-Exposed Ears  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................... 29 Influence of ABR Recording Electrode ......................................................................................... 31 ABR Wave V Amplitude... membrane electrode (Ferguson and Ferraro, 1989; Schwartz et al., 1994; Hall, 2007b; Gaddam and Ferraro, 2008). Variability is commonly seen in ABR response amplitude, even in normal-hearing ears (Schwartz et al., 1994). In light of the recent animal data...

Stamper, Greta

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY OF NORMAL AND SUPERCONDUCTING ELECTRON LIQUIDS: EXPLICIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY OF NORMAL AND SUPERCONDUCTING ELECTRON LIQUIDS: EXPLICIT FUNCTIONALS VIA√?th University Nathan, Queensland 4111, Australia Abstract The basic idea of density functional theory is to map potential which is a functional of the density. The central task of density functional theory is to #12;nd

Gross, E.K.U.

291

Liquidliquid separation in solutions of normal and sickle cell hemoglobin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid­liquid separation in solutions of normal and sickle cell hemoglobin Oleg Galkin*, Kai Chen, Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center, Bronx, NY 10461 Edited by John M. Prausnitz, University of California the nucleation of HbS polymers, whose formation is the primary pathogenic event for sickle cell anemia. In view

Vekilov, Peter

292

Oddelek za ziko Normal modes in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

weather prediction. In section 3 I concentrate on the normal modes of a very simple model, shallow water #12;Numerical weather prediction is an initial condition problem. That means we need ini- tial-gravity waves just play their role, but in numerical models of the atmosphere, they can cause huge problems. 1

¬?umer, Slobodan

293

CONCENTRATED SOLID SOLUTIONS OF NORMAL METALS By H. JONES,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

637. CONCENTRATED SOLID SOLUTIONS OF NORMAL METALS By H. JONES, Imperial College. Department and Heine [1] in the light of the new knowledge of the Fermi surface revealed by experi- ments alloys is reviewed in the light of modern work on the nature of the Fermi surfaces in the noble metals

Boyer, Edmond

294

Some Properties of Realcompact Subspaces and Coarser Normal Spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

William Fleissner. In 1997 Buzjakova proved that for a pseudocompact space X, there exists an ordinal such that the product of X and that ordinal condenses onto a normal space if and only if X condenses onto a compact space. In the third chapter, we extend...

Niknejad, Jila

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance Huai-Xiang Hao*, Caleb M. Cardon*, Wojtek, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Edited by Steven L. McKnight, University in a cell-autonomous manner to maintain cellular energy homeostasis and is a potential therapeutic target

Rutter, Jared

296

Rates of Convergence of Extremes from Skew Normal Samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a standard skew-normal distribution with shape parameter R (written as X SN()) if its probability density); population structure of Schima superba in Qingliangfeng National Nature Reserve (Liu et al., 2011); rain); modeling of seasonal rainfall in Africa (Siebert and Ward, 2011); modeling of HIV viral loads

Sidorov, Nikita

297

NAVARRO VERTICES AND NORMAL SUBGROUPS IN GROUPS OF ODD ORDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAVARRO VERTICES AND NORMAL SUBGROUPS IN GROUPS OF ODD ORDER JAMES P. COSSEY Abstract. Let p be a prime and suppose G is a finite solvable group and is an ordinary irreducible character of G. Navarro character of Q, which is unique up to conjugacy. This pair is called the Navarro vertex

Cossey, James P.

298

Performance of vegetated roadsides in removing stormwater pollutants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sections in two Texas cities: Austin and College Station. Three sites in each city were examined in this study over a 14-month monitoring period. No significant difference between the edges of pavement pollutant concentrations were observed at any...

Rammohan, Pavitra

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

299

Establishment of wetland vegetation on East Texas mine spoil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drawdown. Means with different letters differ (P&0. 05), . 40 10. Mean stem density and AGB of the 4 dominant species, total stem density, and total AGB in seed bank plots at Big Brown Mine, Fairfield, Texas, 1990. UNF = unflooded, APR = April drawdown... Prior to planting, 10 randomly selected soil samples were collected on each shelf with a 7-cm diameter auger pressed 18 cm into the soiL Seven samples per shelf were taken to Core Laboratories, Tyler, Texas, and analyzed for pH, potential acidity...

McKnight, Steven Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

SciTech Connect: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolutely normal bone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

females (N 49). The data set consisted of bone biopsies from normal and vertebral fracture subjects... microradiographic studies of normal and oste- oporotic ... Source: Ecole...

302

Low-Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria. Low-Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria. Abstract: Microarray analysis indicated...

303

Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

304

Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 1 fig.

Bonaldo, M.D.; Soares, M.B.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

Bonaldo, Maria DeFatima (New York, NY); Soares, Marcelo Bento (New York, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Higher-Rank Numerical Ranges of Unitary and Normal Matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We verify a conjecture on the structure of higher-rank numerical ranges for a wide class of unitary and normal matrices. Using analytic and geometric techniques, we show precisely how the higher-rank numerical ranges for a generic unitary matrix are given by complex polygons determined by the spectral structure of the matrix. We discuss applications of the results to quantum error correction, specifically to the problem of identification and construction of codes for binary unitary noise models.

Man-Duen Choi; John A. Holbrook; David W. Kribs; Karol Zyczkowski

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Normal completely positive maps on the space of quantum operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define a class of higher-order linear maps that transform quantum operations into quantum operations and satisfy suitable requirements of normality and complete positivity. For this class of maps we prove two dilation theorems which are the analogues of the Stinespring and Radon-Nikodym theorems for quantum operations. A structure theorem for probability measures with values in this class of higher-order maps is also derived.

Chiribella, G; Umanitŗ, V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at radioactive-waste disposal Area G during the 1994 growing season  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overstory (pinon pine) and understory (grass and forb) vegetation samples were collected within and around selected points at Area G-a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory-for the analysis of tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238} Pu and {sup 239}Pu), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), americium ({sup 241}Am), and total uranium. In general, most vegetation samples collected within and around Area G contained radionuclide levels in higher concentrations than vegetation collected from background areas. Tritium, in particular, was detected as high as 5,800 pCi/mL in overstory vegetation collected outside the fence just west of the tritium shafts; this suggests that tritium is migrating from this waste repository through subsurface pathways. Also, understory vegetation collected north of the transuranic (TRU) pads (outside the fence of Area G) contained the highest values of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am, and may be a result of surface holding, storage, or disposal activities.

Fresquez, P.R.; Biggs, J.B.; Bennett, K.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Surface tension with Normal Curvature in Curved Space-Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With an aim to include the contribution of surface tension in the action of the boundary, we define the tangential pressure in terms of surface tension and Normal curvature in a more naturally geometric way. First, we show that the negative tangential pressure is independent of the four-velocity of a very thin hyper-surface. Second, we relate the 3-pressure of a surface layer to the normal curvature and the surface tension. Third, we relate the surface tension to the energy of the surface layer. Four, we show that the delta like energy flows across the hyper-surface will be zero for such a representation of intrinsic 3-pressure. Five, for the weak field approximation and for static spherically symmetric configuration, we deduce the classical Kelvin's relation. Six, we write a modified action for the boundary having contributions both from surface tension and normal curvature of the surface layer. Also we propose a method to find the physical action assuming a reference background, where the background is not flat.

Himanshu kumar; Sharf Alam; Suhail Ahmad

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Trajectories of change in sagebrush steppe vegetation communities in relation to multiple wildfires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeated perturbations, both biotic and abiotic, can lead to fundamental changes in the nature of ecosystems including changes in state. Sagebrush-steppe communities provide important habitat for wildlife and grazing for livestock. Fire is an integral part of these systems, but there is concern that increased ignition frequencies and invasive species are fundamentally altering these systems. Despite these issues, the majority of studies of fire effects in Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis-dominated systems have focused on the effects of single burns. The Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), in south-central Washington (U.S.A.), was one of the largest areas of continuous shrub-steppe habitat in the state until large wildfires burnt the majority of it in 2000 and 2007. We analysed data from permanent vegetation transects established in 1996 and resampled in 2002 and 2009. Our objective was to describe how the fires, and subsequent post-fire restoration efforts, affected communities successional pathways. Plant communities differed in response to repeated fire and restoration; these differences could largely be ascribed to the functional traits of the dominant species. Low elevation communities, previously dominated by obligate seeders, moved farthest from their initial composition and were dominated by weedy, early successional species in 2009. Higher elevation sites with resprouting shrubs, native bunchgrasses and few invasive species were generally more resilient to the effects of repeated disturbances. Shrub cover has been almost entirely removed from ALE, though there is evidence of recovery where communities were dominated by re-sprouters. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominance was reduced by herbicide application in areas where it was previously abundant but increased significantly in untreated areas. Several re-sprouting species, notably Phlox longifolia and Poa secunda, expanded remarkably following competitive release from shrub canopies and/or abundant cheatgrass. Our results suggest that community dynamics can be understood through a state-and-transition model with two axes (shrub/grass and native/invasive abundance), though such models also need to account for differences in plant functional traits and disturbance regimes. We use our results to develop an illustrative model that will be expanded with further research.

Davies, G. M.; Bakker, J. D.; Dettweiler-Robinson, E.; Dunwiddie, Peter W.; Hall, S. A.; Downs, Janelle L.; Evans, J.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Effect of normal stress during hydration and shear on the shear strength of GCL/textured geomembrane interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory testing program was performed to evaluate the interface shear strength of a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL)/textured geomembrane interface utilizing two pre-shear inundation methods designed to simulate field conditions. Two commercially-available products were tested, a needlepunched and a stitch-bonded GCL. Oedometer swell tests provided swell data for the two products which were used to design the interface shear testing program. Interface shear tests were performed for (1) GCL samples inundated under a low normal stress for a short time and sheared under a higher normal stress, and (2) GCL samples inundated for a longer period under the design normal stress. The results for the two different GCL materials and the two preshear inundation conditions are compared.

Hewitt, R.D.; Soydemir, C. [Haley and Aldrich, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Stulgis, R.P. [Haley and Aldrich, Inc., Manchester, NH (United States); Coombs, M.T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Effect on high-T{sub c} superconductivity of the a-b anisotropy in the normal phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously proposed a two-dimensional d+s-wave superconductivity model in order to account for high-T{sub c} cuprates, in which an orthorhombic distorsion is present within the layers. Conversely, recent microwave conductivity data suggest that a substantial portion of the a-b anisotropy in the magnetic penetration depth is a normal-state effect. We thus generalize in this paper our d+s model to take into account the normal-state anisotropy. We show that such an anisotropy reacts not only on the a-b anisotropy in the transport coefficients but also on the density of states and other thermodynamic quantities. We hope that future experiments will confirm this effect and help us to sort out the a-b anisotropies due to the normal state with higher precision in a number of different compounds. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Beal-Monod, M.T. [Physique des Solides, Universite de Paris-sud, 91400 Orsay (France)] [Physique des Solides, Universite de Paris-sud, 91400 Orsay (France); Maki, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A Statistical Selection Strategy for Normalization Procedures in LC-MS Proteomics Experiments through Dataset Dependent Ranking of Normalization Scaling Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of LC-MS peak intensities assigned during peptide identification in a typical comparative proteomics experiment will deviate from run-to-run of the instrument due to both technical and biological variation. Thus, normalization of peak intensities across a LC-MS proteomics dataset is a fundamental step in pre-processing. However, the downstream analysis of LC-MS proteomics data can be dramatically affected by the normalization method selected . Current normalization procedures for LC-MS proteomics data are presented in the context of normalization values derived from subsets of the full collection of identified peptides. The distribution of these normalization values is unknown a priori. If they are not independent from the biological factors associated with the experiment the normalization process can introduce bias into the data, which will affect downstream statistical biomarker discovery. We present a novel approach to evaluate normalization strategies, where a normalization strategy includes the peptide selection component associated with the derivation of normalization values. Our approach evaluates the effect of normalization on the between-group variance structure in order to identify candidate normalization strategies that improve the structure of the data without introducing bias into the normalized peak intensities.

Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

SMITH NORMAL FORMS OF INCIDENCE MATRICES Abstract. A brief introduction is given to the topic of Smith normal forms of incidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SMITH NORMAL FORMS OF INCIDENCE MATRICES PETER SIN Abstract. A brief introduction is given to the topic of Smith normal forms of incidence matrices. A general discussion of techniques is illustrated, the fundamental invariant is the Smith normal form of A, whose definition we now recall. A square integer matrix

Sin, Peter

316

Canned and Frozen Vegetables: Getting the Most Nutrition for Your Money  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Suggested Uses of Selected Canned and Frozen Vegetables Vegetable Availability Key Nutrients Comments/Uses Asparagus canned,frozen Vitamin C and Folate Expensive. Use as a side dish. Beans,Baked canned Protein, Fiber,Thiamin, Low cost. Use as a main or side... dish. Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc and Phosphorus Beans,Green canned,frozen Fiber (F) and Vitamin C Use cut beans in salads and mixed dishes. or Wax Beans,Lima canned,frozen Protein, Fiber,Vitamins Available in white, green and yellow...

Anding, Jenna

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

317

The effects of cattle on shoreline vegetation of ponds and tanks in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December I97S Hajor Subject: Wildlife and. Fisheries Sciences THE EFFECTS OF CATTLE ON SHORELINE VEGETATION OF PONDS AND TANKS IN SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis by RICHARD JOHN WHITE Approved as to content and style by: Chairmen of Committee Head... of Department M ber ber December 1978 ABSTRACT Ti e Effe ts of Cattle on Shoreline Vegetation of Ponds a", !d Tanks in "outh Texas. (December i978) Richard John Nhytc, B, Nat ~ Res. , University of New England Chairman of Mvisory Committee: Dr. N ~ J...

Whyte, Richard John

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Frequency combs and platicons in optical microresonators with normal GVD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We predict the existence of a novel type of the flat-top dissipative solitonic pulses, "platicons", in microresonators with normal group velocity dispersion (GVD). We propose methods to generate these platicons from cw pump. Their duration may be altered significantly by tuning the pump frequency. The transformation of a discrete energy spectrum of dark solitons of the Lugiato-Lefever equation into a quasicontinuous spectrum of platicons is demonstrated. Generation of similar structures is also possible with bi-harmonic, phase/amplitude modulated pump or via laser injection locking.

Lobanov, V E; Kippenberg, T J; Gorodetsky, M L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

SRS reactor control rod cooling without normal forced convection cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an analytical study of the coolability of the control rods in the Savannah River site (SRS) K production reactor under conditions of loss of normal forced convection cooling. The study was performed as part of the overall safety analysis of the reactor supporting its restart. The analysis addresses the buoyancy-driven boiling flow over the control rods that occurs when forced cooling is lost. The objective of the study was to demonstrate that the control rods will remain cooled (i.e., no melting) at powers representative of those anticipated for restart of the reactor.

Smith, D.C. (SAIC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Easterling, T.C. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Combinatorics and Boson normal ordering: A gentle introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a general combinatorial framework for operator ordering problems by applying it to the normal ordering of the powers and exponential of the boson number operator. The solution of the problem is given in terms of Bell and Stirling numbers enumerating partitions of a set. This framework reveals several inherent relations between ordering problems and combinatorial objects, and displays the analytical background to Wick's theorem. The methodology can be straightforwardly generalized from the simple example given herein to a wide class of operators.

Blasiak, P; Penson, K A; Solomon, A I; Duchamp, G H E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Combinatorics and Boson normal ordering: A gentle introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a general combinatorial framework for operator ordering problems by applying it to the normal ordering of the powers and exponential of the boson number operator. The solution of the problem is given in terms of Bell and Stirling numbers enumerating partitions of a set. This framework reveals several inherent relations between ordering problems and combinatorial objects, and displays the analytical background to Wick's theorem. The methodology can be straightforwardly generalized from the simple example given herein to a wide class of operators.

P. Blasiak; A. Horzela; K. A. Penson; A. I. Solomon; G. H. E. Duchamp

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Asymptotic normalization coefficients for B-10->Be-9+p  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

started the Asymptotic normalization coefficient A. M. Mukhamedzhanov, H. L. Clark, C. A. Gagliardi, Y.-W Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University V. Burjan, J. Cejpek Institute for Nuclear Physics, Czech Academ F. Carstoi Institute of Atomic...! the 7Be(p ,g)8B radiative capture cross section at ver astrophysics. @S0556-2813~97!02109-2# PACS number~s!: 25.70.Hi, 21.10.Jx, 24.10.Ht, 25.70.B I. INTRODUCTION Despite considerable experimental and theoretical progress in determining...

Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Clark, HL; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Lui, YW; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Xu, HM; Zhou, XG; Burjan, V.; Cejpek, J.; Kroha, V.; Carstoiu, F.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

High-accuracy measurements of the normal specular reflectance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The French Laser Megajoule (LMJ) is designed and constructed by the French Commissariata l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Its amplifying section needs highly reflective multilayer mirrors for the flash lamps. To monitor and improve the coating process, the reflectors have to be characterized to high accuracy. The described spectrophotometer is designed to measure normal specular reflectance with high repeatability by using a small spot size of 100 {mu}m. Results are compared with ellipsometric measurements. The instrument can also perform spatial characterization to detect coating nonuniformity.

Voarino, Philippe; Piombini, Herve; Sabary, Frederic; Marteau, Daniel; Dubard, Jimmy; Hameury, Jacques; Filtz, Jean Remy

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Termination of a Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump to:TaosISGANAttribution(Alabama)Tennessee/WindTequesta,Normal

325

Biodiversity Analysis of Vegetation on the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) located in south central Nevada encompasses approximately 3,561 square kilometers and straddles two major North American deserts, Mojave and Great Basin. Transitional areas between the two desert types have been created by gradients in elevation, precipitation, temperature, and soils. From 1996-1998, more than 1,500 ecological landform units were sampled at the NTS for numerous biotic and abiotic parameters. These data provide a basis for spatial evaluations of biodiversity over landscape scales at the NTS. Species diversity maps (species richness vs. species abundance) have been produced. Differences in ecosystem diversity at the ecoregion, alliance, association, and ecological landform unit levels are presented. Spatial distribution maps of species presence and abundance provide evidence of where transition zones occur and the resulting impact on biodiversity. The influences of abiotic factors (elevation, soil, precipitation) and anthropogenic disturbance on biodiversity are assessed.

W. K. Ostler; D. J. Hansen

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Disease Management for Vegetable Crops Program Leader: Margaret Tuttle McGrath, Associate Professor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affecting vegetables grown on Long Island within organic as well as conventional production systems by and genetic control. Examine impact on diseases of practices to improve soil health: annual compost amendments conducted in 2010 included 1) evaluating registered conventional fungicides and experimentals; 2) examining

Lazzaro, Brian

327

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and during the last in an unresolved extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here we investigate the potential during these extrema when 1 hal-00351408,version1-9Jan2009 #12;Earth's climate and biomes maps were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three Major Floods, Gila RiverKelvey, Director Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Burkham, D. E. 1927 Hydraulic effects 19.16:655-J 1. Gila River-Floods. 2. Hydraulics. 3. Botany-Ecology-Gila River. 1. Title: Hydraulic

329

Sediment storage by vegetation in steep bedrock landscapes: Theory, experiments, and implications for postfire sediment yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment storage by vegetation in steep bedrock landscapes: Theory, experiments, and implications for postfire sediment yield Michael P. Lamb,1 Mariya Levina,1 Roman A. DiBiase,1 and Brian M. Fuller1 Received 26 September 2012; revised 6 March 2013; accepted 8 March 2013. [1] Mechanistic models for sediment

330

Modeling of the interactions between forest vegetation, disturbances, and sediment yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of the interactions between forest vegetation, disturbances, and sediment yields Erkan on the frequency and magnitude of sediment delivery from a small watershed ($3.9 km2 ) in the Idaho batholith weathering and the divergence of diffusive sediment transport on hillslopes. Soil removal is due to episodic

Tarboton, David

331

Mark E. Uchanksi, PhD Assistant Professor of Vegetable Physiology, Plant and Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

producers in New Mexico and the desert southwest. Several recent projects have shown the great potential imports from other states. New Mexico vegetable farmers face many unique challenges, which are often. Effect of Rotational Crop Residues on Chile (Capsicum annuum) Germination and Vigor. Hortscience 46(9): S

Johnson, Eric E.

332

Specialty Crop Profile: Anthony Bratsch, Extension Specialist, Vegetables and Small Fruit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specialty Crop Profile: Pawpaw Anthony Bratsch, Extension Specialist, Vegetables and Small Fruit Introduction Pawpaw (Asimina spp.) is a native fruit crop that is in the beginning phases of domestication.S. The pawpaw is the largest edible tree fruit native to the United States. It is the only temperate member

Liskiewicz, Maciej

333

Flow, Sedimentation, and Biomass Production on a Vegetated Salt Marsh in South Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Flow, Sedimentation, and Biomass Production on a Vegetated Salt Marsh in South Carolina: Toward studies at North Inlet estuary, South Carolina, the biomass of the S. alterniflora on the marsh platform at North Inlet are used to relate biomass to plant area per unit volume, stem diameter, and an empirical

334

I. Abstract Vegetation plays an important role in the surface energy and water balance of wetlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

55 I. Abstract Vegetation plays an important role in the surface energy and water balance or reverse the downward trend in streamflow. In this study, we investigated the energy and water balance had been sprayed with herbicide (and remained only as dead, standing biomass). Energy balance

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

335

Postdoctoral research associate position on vegetation remote sensing at the Free University of Berlin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 100% of the German TV-L13 salary scale. Title of the post Analysis of global maps of terrestrial vegetation: part of the energy absorbed by chlorophyll is not used for carbon fixation but emitted at longer of GOSAT-FTS spaceborne measurements in the 750-770 nm window. Solar Fraunhofer lines superposed to the Fs

336

Eighty years of change: vegetation in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, Alberta,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eighty years of change: vegetation in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, Alberta and dis- tribution in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta parc natio- nal de Jasper, situé dans les Montagnes Rocheuses en Alberta, au Canada. Une approche

Macdonald, Ellen

337

-Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings -681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings - 681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996 abandoned for half a century and are sur- rounded by Picea abies (Norway spruce) forests. The causes of inhibition of establishment of Norway spruce seedlings in the meadows were tested experimentally

Leps, Jan "Suspa"

338

Vegetation changes on an abandoned rice field following herbicide and fertilizer treatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ass (pa icum ~v(r turn L. ), a d rownseed nasn I (~nas alum plicat I ~ Michx. ). In co treat, vegetation of abend ed rice land is composed principally of annual forbs intermixed with three-awns (Aristida spp. ). Forbs, as used in this paper, wili...

Cwik, Michael Joseph

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A satellite-based biosphere parameterization for net ecosystem CO2 exchange: Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) Pathmathevan Mahadevan,1 Steven C. Wofsy,1 Daniel M. Matross,1 12 April 2008. [1] We present the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM), a satellite of ecosystem photosynthesis, and annual sum of NEE at all eddy flux sites for which it is optimized

Lin, John Chun-Han

340

The Elephant in the Room Presentation to the Saskatchewan Greenhouse and Vegetable Growers Association of Saskatchewan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Elephant in the Room Presentation to the Saskatchewan Greenhouse and Vegetable Growers Association of Saskatchewan November 14, 2009, by MIKE FURI, Branch Manager Manitoba/Saskatchewan Wholesale Division TGP, Saskatchewan Director Canadian Produce Marketing Association #12;Goals & Benefits · To reduce

Peak, Derek

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas Justin A. Hogan,1 sequestration sites for possible leaks of the CO2 gas from underground reservoirs, a low-cost multispectral are then flagged for closer inspection with in-situ CO2 sensors. The system is entirely self

Shaw, Joseph A.

342

A flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control in urban storm water runoff [Kirby et al., 2005], and linking tidal hydrodynamic forcing to flow and field studies. The proposed model asymptotically recovers the flow resistance formulation when the waterA flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics Gabriel G

Katul, Gabriel

343

Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation, the impacts of climate change on vegetation and water cycle are predicted with relatively low under Climate Change Scenarios* PABLO IMBACH,1 LUIS MOLINA,1 BRUNO LOCATELLI,# OLIVIER ROUPSARD,1,@ GIL MAHE¬ī ,& RONALD NEILSON,**,&& LENIN CORRALES,11 MARKO SCHOLZE,## AND PHILIPPE CIAIS @@ 1 Climate Change

Boyer, Edmond

344

The impact of vegetation on fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) during waterrock interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of vegetation on fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) during water The fractionation of the rare earth elements (REE) in river water, as well as the immobilization of REE in the river earth elements (REE) principally originate from apatite dissolution during weathering. However, stream

Mailhes, Corinne

345

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= ) in the silty ice, reaching values as high as 22 mM [Tison et al., 1998]. Ammonium oxalate is produced duringGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, J√©r√īme

346

Vegetative and reproductive innovations of early land plants: implications for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetative and reproductive innovations of early land plants: implications for a uni ed phylogeny Karen Sue Renzaglia1 , R. Joel Du¬°1 {, Daniel L. Nickrent1 and David J. Garbary2 1Department of Plant (renzaglia@plant.siu.edu) 2 Department of Biology, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia

Nickrent, Daniel L.

347

Applying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies: A Study over Australia*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Climate Change Research Centre, Level 4 Mathews Building, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052: A Study over Australia* MARK DECKER, ANDY J. PITMAN, AND JASON EVANS Climate Change Research CentreApplying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies

Evans, Jason

348

Russell W. Wallace, Ph.D. & John C. Hodges Extension Vegetable Specialist & Research Technician  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Agricultural Research. & Extension Center Route 3, Box 213AA Lubbock, TX 79403 Effects of Plastic than those grown on red plastic film. Tomato yields were significantly higher when grown in cages. Hodges Extension Vegetable Specialist & Research Technician Texas Agricultural Research. & Extension

Mukhtar, Saqib

349

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight-path laser absorption measurements [14]­[16], in-situ visible and near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectral

Lawrence, Rick L.

350

Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked September 2008 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Brownfield sites contribute of a chronosequence of urban brownfield sites in Bremen and Berlin, Germany. These parameters were linked

Kleyer, Michael

351

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate are from land-use conversion to agriculture, streamflow regulation, nutrient enrichment, and climate change editors: N. Bonada & V. H. Resh / Streams in Mediterranean climate regions: lessons learned from the last

Stella, John C.

352

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin √Ā O. Heiri √Ā W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

Bern, Universität

353

Holocene vegetation and fire dynamics in the supra-mediterranean belt of the Nebrodi Mountains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Mediterranean region. Copyright # 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS: climate change; human impact; Ilex TINNER1 1 Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of BernHolocene vegetation and fire dynamics in the supra-mediterranean belt of the Nebrodi Mountains

Bern, Universität

354

Global latitudinal-asymmetric vegetation growth trends and their driving mechanisms: 1982-2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a recent Leaf Area Index (LAI) dataset and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), we investigate percent changes and controlling factors of global vegetation growth for the period 1982 to 2009. Over that 28-year period, both the remote-sensing estimate and model simulation show a significant increasing trend in annual vegetation growth. Latitudinal asymmetry appeared in both products, with small increases in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and larger increases at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The south-to-north asymmetric land surface warming was assessed to be the principal driver of this latitudinal asymmetry of LAI trend. Heterogeneous precipitation functioned to decrease this latitudinal LAI gradient, and considerably regulated the local LAI change. CO2 fertilization during the last three decades, was simulated to be the dominant cause for the enhanced vegetation growth. Our study, though limited by observational and modeling uncertainties, adds further insight into vegetation growth trends and environmental correlations. These validation exercises also provide new quantitative and objective metrics for evaluation of land ecosystem process models at multiple spatio-temporal scales.

Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Zhu, Zaichun [Boston University; Myneni, Ranga B. [Boston University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ris Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6.2 Ris√ł Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been chemically (canola) oil with methanol. Biodiesel can be burned directly in diesel engines. Robert Diesel himself, but it was not until the oil crisis of the 1970s that biofuels attracted serious interest. Biodiesel is reported

356

8 March 2010 Role of dietary iodine and cruciferous vegetables in thyroid cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 March 2010 1 Role of dietary iodine and cruciferous vegetables in thyroid cancer: A countrywide Rougier, MD4 Pascal Guénel, MD, PhD1,2 Author affiliations 1 Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, CESP: Pascal Guénel, MD, PhD Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer UMRS 1018, Inserm CESP 16 avenue Paul

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

357

Quaternary Science Reviews 21 (2002) 10391059 Lateglacial and early Holocene vegetation development in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development in the Gutaiului Mountains, northwestern Romania Leif Bj.orkmana, *, Angelica Feurdeanb , Kajsa-Bolyai University, Kogalniceanu 1, 3400 Cluj, Romania c (Angstr.om Laboratory, Division of Ion Physics, Box 534, S in the Gutaiului Mountains in northwestern Romania, in order to reconstruct the vegetation development during

Wohlfarth, Barbara

358

Using Long Term Vegetation Data and Ecological Sites: A Strategy for Wildlife Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Long Term Vegetation Data and Ecological Sites: A Strategy for Wildlife Management Kevin of data grouped by Ecological Site with management and environmental variables to determine mechanisms project goals. Benefits are overlapping and include: · State and Transition Models (STMs): Inference

359

Vegetation and Fire at the Last Glacial Maximum in Tropical South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Vegetation and Fire at the Last Glacial Maximum in Tropical South America Francis E temperatures. Keywords Charcoal · Last Glacial Maximum · pollen · Quaternary · tropical South America F-mail: Francis.Mayle@ed.ac.uk 89F. Vimeux et al. (eds.), Past Climate Variability in South America

Binford, Michael W.

360

Geomorphic controls on hydrology and vegetation in an arid basin: Turkana district, northern Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a broad ecological study of Kenyan pastoralist adaptation to periodic drought, a study was done to determine how arid region geomorphology affects hydrology and subsequently vegetative patterns. In this study area, 100 kilometers south of Lake Turkana, it appears that irregular precipitation is stored in bajada sediments and is available to deeply rooted vegetation over long periods of time. This vegetation provides a relatively constant food source for people's herds of browsers, the camels and goats, whereas cattle, which graze mainly on grasses, are significant producers only during wet seasons. Field observations suggest that the mountain and abutting pediment soils are too shallow to store appreciable water. However, greater quantities of water are stored in the deeper bajada sediments adjacent to the pediment where pastoralists dig temporary wells in ephemeral channels during wet seasons. Density of tree growth is greater along channels, and highest canopy cover values are found about the pediment-bajada interface. Geohydrologic processes in this area provide the basis for continuous occupation by the desert people, in contrast to recurring famines in adjacent areas, by enhancing the growth of woody vegetation.

Coppinger, K.D.; Doehring, D.O.; Schimel, D.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

Wang, Yang

362

Power spectrum normalization from the local abundance of rich clusters of galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The number density of rich galaxy clusters still provides the most robust way of normalizing the power spectrum of dark matter perturbations on scales relevant to large-scale structure. We revisit this constraint in light of several recent developments: (1) the availability of well-defined samples of local clusters with relatively accurate X-ray temperatures; (2) new theoretical mass functions for dark matter haloes which provide a good fit to large numerical simulations; (3) more accurate mass-temperature relations from larger catalogs of hydrodynamical simulations; (4) the requirement to consider closed as well as open and flat cosmologies to obtain full multi-parameter likelihood constraints for CMB and SNe studies. We present a new sample of clusters drawn from the literature and use this sample to obtain improved results on sigma_8, the normalization of the matter power spectrum on scales of 8 h^{-1} Mpc, as a function of the matter density and cosmological constant in a Universe with general curvature. We discuss our differences with previous work, and the remaining major sources of uncertainty. Final results on the 68 per cent confidence region, approximately independent of power spectrum shape, can be expressed as constraints on sigma at an appropriate cluster normalization scale R_Cl. We provide fitting formulas for R_Cl and sigma(R_Cl) for general cosmologies, as well as for sigma_8 as a function of cosmology and shape parameter Gamma. For flat models we find approximately sigma_8 \\simeq 0.495^{+0.034}_{-0.037}) Omega_M^{-0.60} for Gamma=0.23, where the error bar is dominated by uncertainty in the mass-temperature relation.

E. Pierpaoli; D. Scott; M. White

2001-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

363

Short- and Mid-term Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on Normal Renal Tissue: An Animal Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel nonthermal tissue ablation technique by high current application leading to apoptosis without affecting extracellular matrix. Previous results of renal IRE shall be supplemented by functional MRI and differentiated histological analysis of renal parenchyma in a chronic treatment setting. Three swine were treated with two to three multifocal percutaneous IRE of the right kidney. MRI was performed before, 30 min (immediate-term), 7 days (short-term), and 28 days (mid-term) after IRE. A statistical analysis of the lesion surrounded renal parenchyma intensities was made to analyze functional differences depending on renal part, side and posttreatment time. Histological follow-up of cortex and medulla was performed after 28 days. A total of eight ablations were created. MRI showed no collateral damage of surrounded tissue. The highest visual contrast between lesions and normal parenchyma was obtained by T2-HR-SPIR-TSE-w sequence of DCE-MRI. Ablation zones showed inhomogeneous necroses with small perifocal edema in the short-term and sharp delimitable scars in the mid-term. MRI showed no significant differences between adjoined renal parenchyma around ablations and parenchyma of untreated kidney. Histological analysis demonstrated complete destruction of cortical glomeruli and tubules, while collecting ducts, renal calyxes, and pelvis of medulla were preserved. Adjoined kidney parenchyma around IRE lesions showed no qualitative differences to normal parenchyma of untreated kidney. This porcine IRE study reveals a multifocal renal ablation, while protecting surrounded renal parenchyma and collecting system over a mid-term period. That offers prevention of renal function ablating centrally located or multifocal renal masses.

Wendler, J. J., E-mail: johann.wendler@med.ovgu.de; Porsch, M.; Huehne, S.; Baumunk, D. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany)] [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany); Buhtz, P. [Institute of Pathology, University of Magdeburg (Germany)] [Institute of Pathology, University of Magdeburg (Germany); Fischbach, F.; Pech, M. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany)] [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Mahnkopf, D. [Institute of Medical Technology and Research (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Technology and Research (Germany); Kropf, S. [Institute of Biometry, University of Magdeburg (Germany)] [Institute of Biometry, University of Magdeburg (Germany); Roessner, A. [Institute of Pathology, University of Magdeburg (Germany)] [Institute of Pathology, University of Magdeburg (Germany); Ricke, J. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany)] [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Schostak, M.; Liehr, U.-B. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany)] [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Overview of Opportunities for Co-Location of Solar Energy Technologies and Vegetation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale solar facilities have the potential to contribute significantly to national electricity production. Many solar installations are large-scale or utility-scale, with a capacity over 1 MW and connected directly to the electric grid. Large-scale solar facilities offer an opportunity to achieve economies of scale in solar deployment, yet there have been concerns about the amount of land required for solar projects and the impact of solar projects on local habitat. During the site preparation phase for utility-scale solar facilities, developers often grade land and remove all vegetation to minimize installation and operational costs, prevent plants from shading panels, and minimize potential fire or wildlife risks. However, the common site preparation practice of removing vegetation can be avoided in certain circumstances, and there have been successful examples where solar facilities have been co-located with agricultural operations or have native vegetation growing beneath the panels. In this study we outline some of the impacts that large-scale solar facilities can have on the local environment, provide examples of installations where impacts have been minimized through co-location with vegetation, characterize the types of co-location, and give an overview of the potential benefits from co-location of solar energy projects and vegetation. The varieties of co-location can be replicated or modified for site-specific use at other solar energy installations around the world. We conclude with opportunities to improve upon our understanding of ways to reduce the environmental impacts of large-scale solar installations.

Macknick, J.; Beatty, B.; Hill, G.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Hard Sphere Dynamics for Normal and Granular Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fluid of N smooth, hard spheres is considered as a model for normal (elastic collisions) and granular (inelastic collisions) fluids. The potential energy is discontinuous for hard spheres so the pairwise forces are singular and the usual forms of Newtonian and Hamiltonian mechanics do not apply. Nevertheless, particle trajectories in the N particle phase space are well defined and the generators for these trajectories can be identified. The first part of this presentation is a review of the generators for the dynamics of observables and probability densities. The new results presented in the second part refer to applications of these generators to the Liouville dynamics for granular fluids. A set of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the generator for this Liouville dynamics is identified in a special "stationary representation". This provides a class of exact solutions to the Liouville equation that are closely related to hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

James W. Dufty; Aparna Baskaran

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

366

Tunneling from super- to normal-deformed minima in nuclei.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An excited minimum, or false vacuum, gives rise to a highly elongated superdeformed (SD) nucleus. A brief review of superdeformation is given, with emphasis on the tunneling from the false to the true vacuum, which occurs in the feeding and decay of SD bands. During the feeding process the tunneling is between hot states, while in the decay it is from a cold to a hot state. The {gamma} spectra connecting SD and normal-deformed (ND) states provide information on several physics issues: the decay mechanism; the spin/parity quantum numbers, energies and microscopic structures of SD bands; the origin of identical SD bands; the quenching of pairing with excitation energy; and the chaoticity of excited ND states at 2.5-5 MeV. Other examples of tunneling in nuclei, which are briefly described, include the possible role of tunneling in {Delta}I = 4 bifurcation in SD bands, sub-barrier fusion and proton emitters.

Khoo, T. L.

1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

367

Asymptotic normalization coefficients, spectroscopic factors, and direct radiative capture rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the norms of the overlap function and the radial bound-state wave function are, correspondingly, the spectroscopic factor SlB jB and unity, the single-particle spec- troscopic factor SlB jB (sp) in Eq. ~5! will equal the spectroscopic factor SlB jB... of the radial overlap function is given by Eq. ~3!, and the asymptotic normalization of the radial bound-state wave function is defined as wnBlB jB~r ! ? r.RN blB jB W 2hB ,lB11/2~2kBr ! r . ~6! By the proper choice of SlB jB (sp) , one can make Eq...

Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The helium abundances in HgMn and normal stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The parameter-free model of diffusion in the atmospheres of HgMn stars (Michaud 1986; Michaud et al 1979) predicts that helium should sink below the He II ionization zone in order that diffusion of other elements may take place, and that all HgMn stars should have deficits of helium in their photospheres, with a minimum deficit of 0.3 dex. In this study, the Smith & Dworetsky (1993) sample of HgMn stars and normal comparison stars is examined, and the helium abundances determined by spectrum synthesis using echelle spectra taken at Lick Observatory and the AAT. The prediction is confirmed; all HgMn stars are deficient in He by as much as 1.5 dex. Also, two HgMn stars, HR7361 and HR7664, show clear evidence of helium stratification.

M. M. Dworetsky

2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

Insolation data manual and direct normal solar radiation data manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24--25 years of data, generally from 1952--1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/m{sup 2} per day, Btu/ft{sup 2} per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global {bar K}{sub T} (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global {bar K}{sub T} is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

none,

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

ARM - Different Climates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation DataDatastreamswacrspeccmaskcopolDatastreamsxsacrslrAlaskaDefensive Shotgun -ListDifferent Climates

371

PARTICLES OF DIFFERENCE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is no longer appropriate, if it ever was, to think of atmospheric aerosols as homogeneous spheres of uniform composition and size. Within the United States, and even more globally, not only the mass loading but also the composition, morphology, and size distribution of atmospheric aerosols are highly variable, as a function of location, and at a given location as a function of time. Particles of a given aerodynamic size may differ from one another, and even within individual particles material may be inhomogeneously distributed, as for example, carbon spherules imbedded in much larger sulfate particles. Some of the particulate matter is primary, that is, introduced into the atmosphere directly as particles, such as carbon particles in diesel exhaust. Some is secondary, that is, formed in the atmosphere by gas-to-particle conversion. Much of the material is inorganic, mainly sulfates and nitrates resulting mainly from energy-related emissions. Some of the material is carbonaceous, in part primary, in part secondary, and of this material some is anthropogenic and some biogenic. While the heterogeneity of atmospheric aerosols complicates the problem of understanding their loading and distribution, it may well be the key to its solution. By detailed examination of the materials comprising aerosols it is possible to infer the sources of these materials. It may be possible as well to identify specific health impairing agents. The heterogeneity of aerosol particles is thus the key to identifying their sources, to understanding the processes that govern their loading and properties, and to devising control strategies that are both effective and efficient. Future research must therefore take cognizance of differences among aerosol particles and use these differences to advantage.

SCHWARTZ,S.E.

2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

Vegetation History And Logging Disturbance: Effects On Rain Forest In The Lope Reserve, Gabon (With Special Emphasis On Elephants and Apes)†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation of the effects of commercial mechanised selective logging on rain forest vegetation and mammals, was undertaken in the Lope Reserve, central Gabon, between January 1989 to July 1991. Vegetation in Lope ...

White, Lee JT

373

The Filter Difference Spectrometer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2Different ImpactsTheRolling Stone"TheThe

374

Radiobiology of normal rat lung in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary cancer radiation therapy that utilizes biochemical tumor cell targeting and provides a mixed field of high and low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation with differing ...

Kiger, Jingli Liu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

SPEECH-CODING AND TRAINING-INDUCED PLASTICITY IN AUDITORY CORTEX OF NORMAL AND DYSLEXIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPEECH-CODING AND TRAINING-INDUCED PLASTICITY IN AUDITORY CORTEX OF NORMAL AND DYSLEXIA MODEL RATS anymore... #12;SPEECH-CODING AND TRAINING-INDUCED PLASTICITY IN AUDITORY CORTEX OF NORMAL AND DYSLEXIA

Kilgard, Michael P.

376

3D culture models of normal and malignant breast epithelial cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D culture models of normal and malignant breast epithelialcells; Lee et al. 3D culture models of normal and malignantFor correspondence: mjbissell@lbl.gov 3D culture models of

Lee, Genee Y.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Lee, Eva H.; Bissell, Mina J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Imaging of normal and pathologic joint synovium using nonlinear optical microscopy as a potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and gout at 3.0 million. Arthritis can result in irreversible destruction and loss of normal articular

Rose, Michael R.

378

Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

NONE

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

379

UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

SO/sub 2/ dose-response sensitivity classification data for crops and natural vegetation species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years studies have been made on the interaction of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and vegetation by performing field research and by developing analytical procedures for applying field observation data to energy impact assessments. As a result of this work, numerous reports have been prepared on crop-pollutant interactions, such as dose-response data; on the applications of such data to screening approaches for identifying crops at risk; and on models that predict crop yield reductions from point source emissions of SO/sub 2/. Data that were used for these studies, such as the crop-at-risk screening procedure, are presented in this report. Maps are also presented that show the national distribution of SO/sub 2/-sensitive crops and natural vegetation.

Irving, P.M.; Ballou, S.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The direct economic effects of a policy to provide government subsidized price discounts for the purchase of fruit and vegetable by food stamp recipients.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the purchase of fruit and vegetable by food stamp recipients. by Karen M. Jetter Assistant Research Economist price discounts on fresh fruit and vegetable to food stamp recipients. The suggestion for a price discount on fruit and vegetable for food stamps recipients is contained in the 2004 Farm Bill, section 4116

California at Davis, University of

382

Synchrotron radiation damage observations in normal incidence copper mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-cooled copper mirrors used at near-normal incidence on two beam lines at the NSLS are observed to undergo severe degradation upon exposure to the direct SR beam. These mirrors are used on beam lines designed to utilize radiation in the wavelength regions longer than 100 nm and are coated with a uv reflection-enhancing coating, consisting of one or more bilayers of aluminum with a MgF/sub 2/ overcoat. Beamline performance degrades very rapidly following installation of a new set of mirrors. Analysis of the mirror surfaces by various non-destructive techniques indicates severe degradation of the coating and surface along the central strip where most of the x-ray power is absorbed from the beam. In one case where the mirror had three bilayer coatings, the outer coating layer has disappeared along the central strip. Rutherford backscatter measurements indicate compositional changes between layers and confirm the existence of a carbon deposit on the surface. Thermal modeling suggests that most of the damage is caused by direct photon interaction, since the temperature rise in the energy deposition region is small.

Takacs, P.Z.; Melendez, J.; Colbert, J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Sampling Plan for Assaying Plates Containing Depleted or Normal Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the rationale behind the proposed method for selecting a 'representative' sample of uranium metal plates, portions of which will be destructively assayed at the Y-12 Security Complex. The total inventory of plates is segregated into two populations, one for Material Type 10 (depleted uranium (DU)) and one for Material Type 81 (normal [or natural] uranium (NU)). The plates within each population are further stratified by common dimensions. A spreadsheet gives the collective mass of uranium element (and isotope for DU) and the piece count of all plates within each stratum. These data are summarized in Table 1. All plates are 100% uranium metal, and all but approximately 60% of the NU plates have Kel-F{reg_sign} coating. The book inventory gives an overall U-235 isotopic percentage of 0.22% for the DU plates, ranging from 0.19% to 0.22%. The U-235 ratio of the NU plates is assumed to be 0.71%. As shown in Table 1, the vast majority of the plates are comprised of depleted uranium, so most of the plates will be sampled from the DU population.

Ivan R. Thomas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Rap G protein signal in normal and disordered lymphohematopoiesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rap proteins (Rap1, Rap2a, b, c) are small molecular weight GTPases of the Ras family. Rap G proteins mediate diverse cellular events such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and gene activation through various signaling pathways. Activation of Rap signal is regulated tightly by several specific regulatory proteins including guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins. Beyond cell biological studies, increasing attempts have been made in the past decade to define the roles of Rap signal in specific functions of normal tissue systems as well as in cancer. In the immune and hematopoietic systems, Rap signal plays crucial roles in the development and function of essentially all lineages of lymphocytes and hematopoietic cells, and importantly, deregulated Rap signal may lead to unique pathological conditions depending on the affected cell types, including various types of leukemia and autoimmunity. The phenotypical studies have unveiled novel, even unexpected functional aspects of Rap signal in cells from a variety of tissues, providing potentially important clues for controlling human diseases, including malignancy.

Minato, Nagahiro, E-mail: minato@imm.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Smith Normal Form of a Matrix Associated with Young's Lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Smith Normal Form of a Matrix Associated with Young's Lattice Tommy Wuxing Cai and Richard P. Stanley Abstract. We prove a conjecture of Miller and Reiner on the Smith normal form of the operator DU be a commutative ring with 1 and M an m√?m matrix over R. We say that M has a Smith normal form (SNF) over R

386

Synthetic cytokinin effects on vegetative propagation of Lilium longiflorum Thunb. 'Ace'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A ', ~/~ '- . g. ~ember August 1974 ABSTRACT Synthetic Cytokinin Effects on Vegetative Propagation oi' Lili 1 ~if1 , h O. 'Ace'. (hog : 1974I Cathy Marie Wilhite, B. S. , Texas Tech University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. A. E. Nightingale Foliar... of her commi ttee, Drs. A. E. Nightingale, H. T. Blackhurst, and M. H. Milford, for their patience, guidance, and understanding. She also appreciates the encouragement of the faculty, secretaries, and fellow graduate students in the Horticulture...

Wilhite, Cathy Marie

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Impact of trail use on the soils and vegetation of Petit Jean State Park, Arkansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Magill & Nord, 1963). STUDY AREA Petit Jean State Park is located on Petit Jean Mountain. This is one flat-topped ridge among many such ridges along the Arkansas River Valley. It is located in the southwest corner of Conway County, Arkansas... closed canopy E. A sparse ground vegetative cover II. Upland Woodland exhibited the following biotic and physical characteristics (Fig. 5): A. A ridge top or exposed slope location B. A drier environment than that along streams C. An oak...

Walter, Elizabeth Anne

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Modeling of sorption isotherms of dried vegetable wastes from wholesale market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The moisture sorption isotherms of dried vegetable wastes (based on green leaves and fruits) from wholesale market were determined at 25, 40, 60 and 90 C by the static gravimetric method. Experimental data were fit by using several mathematical models. The G.A.B. and the Halsey model gave the minimum mean square error. G.A.B. parameters were related with temperature by Arrhenius expressions.

Lopez, A.; Iguaz, A.; Esnoz, A.; Virseda, P.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance -A Closure Experiment, Halthore et al. 1 Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This is the energy in the solar spectrum falling per unit time on a unit area of a surface oriented normal to the Sun Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the extinction - whether absorption or scattering

Schwartz, Stephen E.

390

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Vegetation trends in reclaimed areas at Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine, Grimes County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation productivity and cover studies have been conducted annually at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine since 1989, and multiple annual clippings have been collected since 1991. The primary purpose of these studies was to examine revegetation success, in terms of herbaceous productivity, for various post-mine soil types. However, the studies also contain detailed information on species composition. For the years in which multiple annual clippings have been collected (1991 through 1996), total vegetation cover increased, with the mean proportion of bare ground dropping from 12% in 1991 to 1% in 1996. Relative proportions of most introduced and native grasses were virtually static from 1991 through 1994; in 1995, however, herbicide applications to reduce clover cover resulted in a dramatic increase in total grass cover, especially in bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) and Indiangrass (Sorgastrum nutans). In contrast to the trends of other introduced and native grasses, bahiagrass increased in cover throughout the study period, increasing from 7% in 1991 to 21 % in 1996. Annual and weedy grass species decreased in cover throughout the study period, falling from 12% cover in 1991 to 2% in 1996. This trend of displacement of annuals by perennials is typically observed during ecological succession in natural vegetation communities, and appears to have been accelerated by the herbicide application.

Westerman, C.A. [Morrison Knudsen Corp., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Determination of locational error associated with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars in relation to vegetation and topography in north-central New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, a study was initiated to assess seasonal habitat use and movement patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using global positioning system (GPS) radio collars. As part of this study, the authors attempted to assess the accuracies of GPS (non-differentially corrected) positions under various vegetation canopies and terrain conditions with the use of a GPS ``test`` collar. The test collar was activated every twenty minutes to obtain a position location and continuously uplinked to Argos satellites to transfer position data files. They used a Telonics, Inc. uplink receiver to intercept the transmission and view the results of the collar in real time. They placed the collar on a stand equivalent to the neck height of an adult elk and then placed the stand within three different treatment categories: (1) topographical influence (canyon and mesa tops), (2) canopy influence (open and closed canopy), and (3) vegetation type influence (ponderosa pine and pinion pine-juniper). The collar was kept at each location for one hour (usually obtaining three fixes). In addition, the authors used a hand-held GPS to obtain a position of the test collar at the same time and location.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Normal and lateral Casimir forces between deformed plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Casimir force between macroscopic bodies depends strongly on their shape and orientation. To study this geometry dependence in the case of two deformed metal plates, we use a path-integral quantization of the electromagnetic field which properly treats the many-body nature of the interaction, going beyond the commonly used pairwise summation (PWS) of van der Waals forces. For arbitrary deformations we provide an analytical result for the deformation induced change in the Casimir energy, which is exact to second order in the deformation amplitude. For the specific case of sinusoidally corrugated plates, we calculate both the normal and the lateral Casimir forces. The deformation induced change in the Casimir interaction of a flat and a corrugated plate shows an interesting crossover as a function of the ratio of the mean plate distance H to the corrugation length {lambda}: For {lambda}<>H. The amplitude of the lateral force between two corrugated plates which are out of registry is shown to have a maximum at an optimal wavelength of {lambda}{approx_equal}2.5 H. With increasing H/{lambda} > or approx. 0.3 the PWS approach becomes a progressively worse description of the lateral force due to many-body effects. These results may be of relevance for the design and operation of novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and other nanoscale devices.

Emig, Thorsten; Hanke, Andreas; Golestanian, Ramin; Kardar, Mehran [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan 45195-159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes and evaluates the concentrations of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, and total U in understory and overstory vegetation collected from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), its perimeter, and regional background areas in 1998. Comparisons to conservative toxicity reference value safe limits were also made. The arithmetic mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in understory were 501 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 0.581 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.001 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.007 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.46 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.233 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. The mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in overstory were 463 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 1.51 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.0004 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.014 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.97 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.388 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. Concentrations of radionuclides and total U in both understory and overstory vegetation at LANL generally were not statistically higher than in perimeter and regional background vegetation ({alpha} = 0.05). The exceptions were LANL {sup 3}H > perimeter {sup 3}H (understory) and LANL {sup 3}H background {sup 3}H (overstory). All maximum radionuclide concentrations were lower than toxicity reference values. With the exception of total U, the relationship between contaminant concentration in soil vs. vegetation was insignificant ({alpha} = 0.05). Generally, as the concentration of total U in soil decreased, the concentration in vegetation increased. This held true for both understory and overstory and regardless of whether data were separated by general location (LANL, perimeter, and background) or not. There was no apparent relationship between contaminant concentrations in understory vs. overstory.

G. J. Gonzales; P. R. Fresquez; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

Kicklighter, D W

397

OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY AT 5 YEARS OF AGE IN RELATION TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INTAKE OVER TIME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Childhood overweight and obesity has increased as American diets have evolved to include fewer fruits and vegetables. It is important to evaluate the effect of dietary components on childhood overweight and obesity. Objective...

Cody, Claire McCaslin

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

The wake structure behind a porous obstruction and its implications for deposition near a finite patch of emergent vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This experimental study describes the mean and turbulent flow structure in the wake of a circular array of cylinders, which is a model for a patch of emergent vegetation. The patch diameter, D, and patch density, a (frontal ...

Chen, Zhengbing

399

Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale-waste lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale and total Al concentrations showed a significant decrease after planting S. cumini plantation onto the shale

Neher, Deborah A.

400

SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report ďSRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping ReportĒ, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Studies on the effect of heading back and chemical treatments of vegetative and fruiting response of pecans Carya illinoensis (Wag.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF HEADING BACK AND CHEMICAL TREATMENTS ON VEGETATIVE AND FRUITING RESPONSE OF PECANS CARYA ILLINOENSIS (WAG. ) A Thesis RONALD FRED HOOKS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE January l966 Major Subject: Horticulture STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF HEADING BACK AND CHEMICAL TREATMENTS ON VEGETATIVE AND FRUITING RESPONSE OF PECANS CARYA ILLINOENSIS (WAG. ) A The...

Hooks, Ronald Fred

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The characteristics of the woody vegetation on three soils in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dominant woody vegetat1on on the Axtell soil series. 29 Percent compos it1on, abundance, density, frequency and mean area of woody vegetation exceeding twenty feet in height on the Lakeland soil ser1es. 32 6. Species composition based on cover, number... savannah by Gould et al. (1960). Darrow and NcCully (19/9) reported that "during the past several decades, the 1ncrease and continued spread of such brushy plants as post and black- I pack oaks, haw, smilax and yaupon have converted the or1g1nal open...

Capps, Robert Curtis

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Services, Facilities, and Costs of Marketing Vegetables in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000. The railroads have established regular fast-freight schedules for fruit and vegetables as follows : first morning out, Houston; second morning out, Fort Worth; third morning out, Little Rock, Memphis, and New Orleans ; fourth morning out, St. Louis ; fifth... on the right gives the average per cent for the ithree years of carlots shipped by Texas to these markets. Of all carlots #of cabbage shipped into St. Louis, 78 per cent mere from Texas. Dur- ing the same period, Texas furnished 58 per cent for Chicago...

Crawford, G. L. (George Lemuel)

1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

NONE

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Mead-Liberty 345-kV Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance and Localized Vegetation Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012 1:00 -2 Mead-Liberty

406

Evolution of globular cluster systems in elliptical galaxies. I. Log-normal initial mass function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the evolution of globular cluster systems (GCS) in elliptical galaxies and explore the dependence of their main properties on the mass and the size of the host galaxy.The dependence of the evolution of the GCS mass function (GCMF), of the fraction of surviving clusters and of the ratio of the final to initial mass in clusters on the structure of the host galaxy as well as their variation with the galactocentric distance inside individual host galaxies has been thoroughly investigated.After a survey over a large number of different host galaxies we have restricted our attention to a sample of galaxies with effective masses and radii equal to those observed for dwarf,normal and giant ellipticals. We show that, in spite of large differences in the fraction of surviving clusters, the final mean masses of the GCMF in massive galaxies are very similar to each other with a small galaxy-to-galaxy dispersion;low-mass compact galaxies tend to have smaller values of the final mean mass and a larger galaxy-to-galaxy dispersion. These findings are in agreement with those of recent observational analyses. The fraction of surviving clusters increases with the mass of the host galaxy. We show that a small difference between the initial and the final mean mass and dispersion of the GCMF and the lack of a significant radial dependence of the mean mass inside individual galaxies do not necessarily imply that evolutionary processes have been unimportant in the evolution of the initial population of clusters. For giant galaxies most disruption occurs within the effective radius while for low-mass galaxies a significant disruption of clusters takes place also at larger galactocentric distances. The dependence of the results obtained on the initial mean mass of the GCMF is investigated. (abridged)

E. Vesperini

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

407

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Physical Properties of Normal Grade Biodiesel and Winter Grade Biodiesel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: In this study, optical and thermal properties of normal grade and winter grade palm oil biodiesel were investigated. Surface Plasmon Resonance and Photopyroelectric technique were used to evaluate the samples. The dispersion curve and thermal diffusivity were obtained. Consequently, the variation of refractive index, as a function of wavelength in normal grade biodiesel is faster than winter grade palm oil biodiesel, and the thermal diffusivity of winter grade biodiesel is higher than the thermal diffusivity of normal grade biodiesel. This is attributed to the higher palmitic acid C16:0 content in normal grade than in winter grade palm oil biodiesel.

Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini; Mohd Maarof Moksin; Harrison Lau; Lik Nang; Monir Norozi; W. Mahmood; Mat Yunus; Azmi Zakaria

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute normal tissue Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Tel Aviv University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 16 Blast-induced phenotypic switching in cerebral vasospasm Summary: blast. (G-H) Normalized...

409

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymptotically normal estimators Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jin, Jiashun - Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University Collection: Mathematics 2 Robust Asymptotic Statistics Exponential Families Summary: . normal M-, L-, R-,...

410

Pentose fermentation of normally toxic lignocellulose prehydrolysate with strain of Pichia stipitis yeast using air  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis NPw9 (ATCC PTA-3717) useful for the production of ethanol using oxygen for growth while fermenting normally toxic lignocellulosic prehydrolysates.

Keller, Jr., Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Ar-40/Ar-39 Age Constraints for the Jaramillo Normal Subchron...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oxygen isotope, climate record calibration of the astronomical timescale proposed by Johnson (1982) and Shackleton et al. (1990). Ar-40Ar-39 ages of a normally magnetized...

412

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymp normalization coefficients Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Department of Mathematics, Capital Normal University Beijing 100048, China Abstract: It's a joint work... our recent work on the asymp- totic stability of the waves...

413

Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding degradation of the contact interface of a fluorocarbon monolayer-coated polycrystalline silicon microdevice

Krim, Jacqueline

414

Calculation set for design and optimization of vegetative soil covers Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates that containment of municipal and hazardous waste in arid and semiarid environments can be accomplished effectively without traditional, synthetic materials and complex, multi-layer systems. This research demonstrates that closure covers combining layers of natural soil, native plant species, and climatic conditions to form a sustainable, functioning ecosystem will meet the technical equivalency criteria prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. In this study, percolation through a natural analogue and an engineered cover is simulated using the one-dimensional, numerical code UNSAT-H. UNSAT-H is a Richards. equation-based model that simulates soil water infiltration, unsaturated flow, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, and deep percolation. This study incorporates conservative, site-specific soil hydraulic and vegetation parameters. Historical meteorological data are used to simulate percolation through the natural analogue and an engineered cover, with and without vegetation. This study indicates that a 3-foot (ft) cover in arid and semiarid environments is the minimum design thickness necessary to meet the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-prescribed technical equivalency criteria of 31.5 millimeters/year and 1 x 10{sup -7} centimeters/second for net annual percolation and average flux, respectively. Increasing cover thickness to 4 or 5 ft results in limited additional improvement in cover performance.

Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Vegetation success, seepage, and erosion on tailing sites reclaimed with cattle and biosolids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reclamation field studies were designed at the Phelps Dodge Morenci Mine in Arizona to evaluate the benefits of biosolids, cattle impact, and other treatment variables on soil-capped tailings. First-year monitoring has provided preliminary data about soil chemical and physical parameters, soil matrix potential profiles, erosion, and vegetation measurements of ground cover, biomass production and frequency. Plots were first seeded in January 1998 with a cover crop of oats or barley. Plots were seeded again in August 1998 with native and native plus non-native plant species. Early productivity from the second seeding was inversely related to seedling density. Plots capped with unamended Gila conglomerate (Gila) materials contained meager plant nutrient levels and produced numerous small seedlings that were poorly rooted and had little standing biomass. Vegetation on the cattle and biosolids treatments was vigorous and productive but at a much lower density than unamended Gila plots. Cattle treatment added little plant-nutrient value to the Gila cap compared to biosolids amendment. However, high rates of biosolids brought excessive salinity. Straw from the cattle treatment provided an effective mulch to improve soil moisture storage but increased the potential for deep seepage. Unamended Gila and biosolids plots had intermediate moisture storage and a modest potential for seepage compared to bare tailings. Mulch cover plus a lower rate of biosolids on Gila is seen as a promising, cost-effective amendment combination for future evaluation.

Vinson, J.; Jones, B.; Milczarek, M.; Hammermeister, D.; Word, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

Not Available

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Hydrogenated soy ethyl ester (HySEE) from ethanol and waste vegetable oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiesel is gaining recognition in the United States as a renewable fuel which may be used as an alternative to diesel fuel without any modifications to the engine. Currently the cost of this fuel is the factor that limits its use. One way to reduce the cost of biodiesel is to use a less expensive form of vegetable oil such as waste oil from a processing plant. These operations use mainly hydrogenated soybean oil, some tallow and some Canola as their frying oils. It is estimated that there are several million pounds of waste vegetable oil from these operations. Additional waste frying oil is available from smaller processors, off-grade oil seeds and restaurants. This paper reports on developing a process to produce the first 945 liters (250 gallons) of HySEE using recipes developed at the University of Idaho; fuel characterization tests on the HySEE according to the ASAE proposed Engineering Practice for Testing of Fuels from Biological Materials, X552; short term injector coking tests and performance tests in a turbocharged, DI, CI engine; and a 300 hour screening test in a single cylinder, IDI, CI engine.

Peterson, C.; Reece, D.; Thompson, J. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Uptake of 137Cs by Leafy Vegetables and Grains from Calcareous Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cesium-137 was deposited on Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll in 1954 as a result of nuclear testing and has been transported and cycled in the ecosystem ever since. Atoll soils are of marine origin and are almost pure CaCO{sub 3} with high concentrations of organic matter in the top 40 cm. Data from previous experiments with mature fruit trees show very high transfer factors (TF's), [Bq g{sup -1} plant/ Bq g{sup -1} soil, both in dry weight] into fruits from atoll calcareous soil. These TF's are much higher than reported for continental, silica-based soils. In this report TF's for 5 types of leafy vegetable crops and 2 types of grain crops are provided for use in predictive dose assessments and for comparison with other data from other investigators working with other types of soil in the IAEA CRP ''The Classification of Soil Systems on the Basis of Transfer Factors of Radionuclides from Soil to Reference Plants''. Transfer factors for plants grown on calcareous soil are again very high relative to clay-containing soils and range from 23 to 39 for grain crops and 21 to 113 for leafy vegetables. Results from these experiments, in this unique, high pH, high organic content, low potassium (K) soil, provide a boundary condition for models relating soil properties to TF.

Robison, W; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C; Kehl, S

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation, soil, animals, cistern water, and ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended as a resource document for the eventual cleanup of Bikini Atoll and contains a summary of the data for the concentrations of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in vegetation through 1987 and in soil through 1985 for 14 islands at Bikini Atoll. The data for the main residence island, Bikini, and the most important island, Eneu, are extensive; these islands have been the subject of a continuing research and monitoring program since 1974. Data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, and pigs from Bikini and Eneu Islands are presented. Also included are general summaries of our resuspension and rainfall data from Bikini and Eneu Islands. The data for the other 12 islands are much more limited because samples were collected as part of a screening survey and the islands have not been part of a continuing research and monitoring program. Cesium-137 is the radionuclide that produces most of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake by terrestrial foods and secondly by direct external gamma exposure. Remedial measures for reducing the /sup 137/Cs uptake in vegetation are discussed. 40 refs., 32 figs., 131 tabs.

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.

1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO-FIR CORRELATION IN NORMAL GALAXIES AT {approx}1 kpc SCALES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the radio-FIR correlation between the nonthermal (synchrotron) radio continuum emission at {lambda}90 cm (333 MHz) and the far-infrared emission due to cool ({approx}20 K) dust at {lambda}70 {mu}m in spatially resolved normal galaxies at scales of {approx}1 kpc. The slope of the radio-FIR correlation significantly differs between the arm and interarm regions. However, this change is not evident at a lower wavelength of {lambda}20 cm (1.4 GHz). We find the slope of the correlation in the arm to be 0.8 {+-} 0.12 and we use this to determine the coupling between equipartition magnetic field (B{sub eq}) and gas density ({rho}{sub gas}) as B{sub eq}{proportional_to}{rho}{sup 0.51{+-}0.12}{sub gas}. This is close to what is predicted by magnetohydrodynamic simulations of turbulent interstellar medium, provided the same region produces both the radio and far-infrared emission. We argue that at 1 kpc scales this condition is satisfied for radio emission at 1.4 GHz and may not be satisfied at 333 MHz. The change of slope observed in the interarm region could be caused by propagation of low energy ({approx}1.5 GeV) and long-lived ({approx}10{sup 8} yr) cosmic-ray electrons at 333 MHz.

Basu, Aritra; Roy, Subhashis; Mitra, Dipanjan, E-mail: aritra@ncra.tifr.res.in, E-mail: roy@ncra.tifr.res.in, E-mail: dmitra@ncra.tifr.res.in [National Center for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind Road, Pune-411007 (India)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Impact of assumption of log-normal distribution on monthly rainfall estimation from TMI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-evaluate the assumption for estimates from TMI, which, unlike the SSM/I, has a 10 GHz channel. The minimum chi-square estimation technique was used for the log-normal method. To check the credibility of the estimation routines, log-normally distributed synthetic data were...

Lee, Dong Heon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Projective re-normalization for improving the behavior of a homogeneous conic linear system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the homogeneous conic system F : Ax = 0, x ? C \\ {0}. We choose a point Įs ? intC? that serves as a normalizer and consider computational properties of the normalized system FĮs : Ax = 0, ĮsT x = 1, ...

Belloni, Alexandre

423

The Smith Normal Form of the Incidence Matrix of Skew Lines in PG(3, q)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Smith Normal Form of the Incidence Matrix of Skew Lines in PG(3, q) Peter Sin, University. In our case D = q4I. #12;Smith normal forms A, L define endomorphisms of the free Z-module on lines. Cokernel of A is called the Smith group and the torsion subgroup of the cokernel of L is known

Sin, Peter

424

Geometry and scaling relations of a population of very small rift-related normal faults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

normal faults within the Solite Quarry of the Dan River rift basin range in length from a few millimetres AND SCALING RELATIONS The small normal faults are present in quarries of the Virginia Solite Corporation outcrops and quarried boulders (Fig. 2). The fault traces are typically straight, although the fault tips

425

Temperature dependence of the structure of Langmuir films of normal-alkanes on liquid mercury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature dependence of the structure of Langmuir films of normal-alkanes on liquid mercury H phase behavior of Langmuir films of n-alkanes CH3(CH2)n 2CH3 , denote Cn on mercury was studied surface normal, alkanes on mercury are always oriented surface parallel and show no long-range in

Ocko, Ben

426

A Filtering Mechanism for Normal Fish Trajectories Cigdem Beyan, Robert B. Fisher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Filtering Mechanism for Normal Fish Trajectories Cigdem Beyan, Robert B. Fisher IPAB, School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, UK C.Beyan@sms.ed.ac.uk, rbf@inf.ed.ac.uk Abstract Understanding fish surveillance, etc. However, the literature is very limited in terms of normal/abnormal fish behavior

Fisher, Bob

427

Interpolating wind speed normals from the sparse Dutch network to a high resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we had potential wind speed time series with 30 years of data (with at least 20 yearly and monthly by Verkaik (Verkaik, 2001). The method is a five-step procedure: 1 Use series of (potential) wind to calculate (potential) normals at measuring sites 2 Calculate wind speed normals at the top of the surface

Stoffelen, Ad

428

Combining MSS and AVHRR imagery to assess vegetation biomass and dynamics in an arid pastoral ecosystem, Turkana District, Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) imagery was used to develop a vegetation type-biomass map of the 84,000 Km/sup 2/ Turkana District, Kenya. NOAA satellite advanced very high resolution radiometry (AVHRR) imagery was overlaid on the MSS map to trace the seasonal and annual dynamics of vegetation communities used by Turkana pastoral nomads, 1981-1984. Four regions (sub-sectional territories) were compared with respect to peak herbaceous biomass, woody canopy cover, and seasonal fluxes in total green biomass. Results demonstrated major variations among regions and between wet and dry season ranges within regions. Pastoral land use patterns appear to minimize effects of seasonal vegetation fluxes on livestock herds.

Ellis, J.E.; Swift, D.M.; Hart, T.C.; Dick, O.B.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Computer Graphics International 2004 (CGI), June 1619, Crete, Greece. IEEE Computer Society Press. Consistent Normal Orientation for Polygonal Meshes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Consistent Normal Orientation for Polygonal Meshes Pavel Borodin Gabriel Zachmann Reinhard Klein Institute

Zachmann, Gabriel

430

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetable Processing/Cold Storage Facilities. Proceedings ofControl System in a Food Cold Storage Facility. Case Studyare discussed below. Cold storage involves the storage of

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Correlation of hetorogeneous blood flow and uptake of a di-methyl-branched IODO fatty acid in the normal and ischemic dog heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Myocardial blood flow (MBF) is heterogeneously distributed in normal and ischemic myocardium (myoc). Methylated iodinated fatty acids, like 15-(p-I-125-iodophenyl)-3,3-dimethylpentadecanoic acid (DMIPPA) can be used to study fatty acid metabolism with SPECT. We studied the relationship between DMIPPA uptake and MBF. In 10 open-chest dogs, ischemica was induced in the LAD coronary artery by an extra-corporal bypass system. MBF was measured with Sc-46 labeled microspheres. Fourty min. after DMIPPA iv. (34{plus_minus}4 MBq), hearts were excised and left ventricles were cut into 120 pieces, weighed and radioactivities counted. MBF and DMIPPA uptake were determined by counting in normal and ischemic myoc. Heterogeneity is expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV) and agreement as the CV of the DMIPPA uptake to MBF ratio. A control study, normal flow in LAD, in 4 dogs revealed no differences in MBF or DMIPPA uptake between the cannulated versus native perfused myoc. We conclude the DMIPPA detects ischemia, in which it shows a different relation with MBF compared to normal myoc. DMIPPA is less heterogeneously distributed than MBF and agreement between MFB and DMIPPA uptake decreases during ischemia.

Sloof, G.W.; Visser, F.C.; Comans, E.F.I. [Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, Vincent P. (Los Alamos, NM); Barron, Michael H. (Los Alamos, NM); Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

Thin-layer drying behavior of vegetable wastes from wholesale market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thin-layer drying behavior of vegetable wastes (as a mix of lettuce and cauliflower leaves) from wholesale market for a temperature range of 50--150 C was determined. Drying of this material was found to take part only in the falling-rate period. The experimental data were fitted to the simple exponential model and the Page model. Both models have good prediction capability. Effective diffusion coefficient varied from 6.03 x 10{sup {minus}9} to 3.15 x 10{sup {minus}8} m{sup 2}/s with an activation energy of diffusion of 19.82 kJ/mol. The temperature dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient was expressed by an Arrhenius-type relationship.

Lopez, A.; Iguaz, A.; Esnoz, A.; Virseda, P.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 įC increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

436

Synthesis, droplet combustion, and sooting characteristics of biodiesel produced from waste vegetable oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light of the potential of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME, i.e. biodiesel) as a renewable energy source, an innovative acid catalyzed process was developed for the synthesis of biodiesel from waste vegetable oils. The synthesized biodiesels were analytically characterized for their major components, molar fraction and molecular weight of each component, the average molecular weight, and the heat of combustion. Their droplet combustion characteristics in terms of the burning rate, flame size, and sooting tendency were subsequently determined in a high-temperature, freely-falling droplet apparatus. Results show that the biodiesel droplet has higher burning rate, and that biodiesel in general has a lower propensity to soot because its molecular oxygen content promotes the oxidation of the soot precursors.

Li, T. X.; Zhu, D. L.; Akafuah, N.; Saito, K.; Law, C. K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Gender Differences in Seeking Help.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gender differences in willingness to seek help were examined in this study. Males often appear to not seek help from others, especially from a professional,Ö (more)

Jackson, Jeff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Individual differences in sentence processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to elucidate shared mechanisms between retrieval in sentence processing and memory retrieval processes in nonlinguistic domains using an individual differences approach. Prior research in individual ...

Troyer, Melissa L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Building a World of Difference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Building a World of Difference Presentation by Patricia Scanlan, Director of Residuals Treatment Technologies, Black & Veatch

440

New method for computing ideal MHD normal modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytic elimination of the two magnetic surface components of the displacement vector permits the normal mode ideal MHD equations to be reduced to a scalar form. A Galerkin procedure, similar to that used in the PEST codes, is implemented to determine the normal modes computationally. The method retains the efficient stability capabilities of the PEST 2 energy principle code, while allowing computation of the normal mode frequencies and eigenfunctions, if desired. The procedure is illustrated by comparison with earlier various of PEST and by application to tilting modes in spheromaks, and to stable discrete Alfven waves in tokamak geometry.

Wysocki, F.; Grimm, R.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fuel cell system logic for differentiating between rapid and normal shutdown commands  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of controlling the operation of a fuel cell system wherein each shutdown command for the system is subjected to decision logic which determines whether the command should be a normal shutdown command or rapid shutdown command. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a normal shutdown command, then the system is shutdown in a normal step-by-step process in which the hydrogen stream is consumed within the system. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a rapid shutdown command, the hydrogen stream is removed from the system either by dumping to atmosphere or routing to storage.

Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Multi-phase decline curve analysis with normalized rate and time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Material Balance Equation. The purpose of the current work is to develop a normalized time and a normalized rate which can be applied to the Fetkovich type curve or any other decline type curve. From a Fetkovich type curve analysis, an engineer can...MULTI-PHASE DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS WITH NORMALIZED RATE AND TIME A Thesis by MICHAEL LEE FRAIM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University &n partial fulf 111ment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August...

Fraim, Michael Lee

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics by ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hourly time steps, soil surface temperature is calculated by iteratively solving the energy balanceRepresenting the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal] Soil surface temperature is a critical boundary condition for the simulation of soil temperature

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

444

int. j. remote sensing, 2002, vol. 23, no. 21, 47614776 A multivariate approach to vegetation mapping of Manitoba's Hudson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12­14 June 2000. International Journal of Remote Sensing ISSN 0143-1161 print/ISSN 1366-5901 onlineint. j. remote sensing, 2002, vol. 23, no. 21, 4761­4776 A multivariate approach to vegetation the likelihood of errors in classi cation caused by overlap between classes. 1. Introduction Remotely sensed data

Kenkel, Norm

445

Comparison of Georgia and US Per Capita Fruit, Vegetable, Livestock, and Poultry Consumption, 2011 Estimated 2011 Georgia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Georgia and US Per Capita Fruit, Vegetable, Livestock, and Poultry Consumption, 2011 Capita) Data System 4 Value= Per capita consumption (column 3) multiplied by Georgia Population (9 Estimated 2011 Georgia Population (9,687,653)1 2011 Farm Gate Production (lbs)2 2010 Per Capita US

Scott, Robert A.

446

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J. van Aarde b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J Accepted 8 August 2009 Available online 6 October 2009 Keywords: African elephants Conservation ecology Land use change Habitat selection a b s t r a c t As African savanna elephants (Loxodonta africana

Pretoria, University of

447

VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA --Much of the previous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

49 NOTES VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA mortality (Beale 1978, Barrett 1984, Gregg et al. 2001) and social behavior (Kitchen 1974, Autenrieth. The pronghorn was reintroduced into Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota, in 1914 and thus, has been maintained

448

Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5&  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are required forest areas for Vietnam Erosion Risk Map Cover types C1 Natural Forests >1.7 Plantation forest.2 (ESRI, 2008), to generate a map of required protective forest area for Vietnam. (3) (4) (5Results Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5& ∑ Map

449

-Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load -751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 751-754, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as predictors. Heat load was calculated as a 45 degree rotation of the PDIR response surface. Results- Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load - 751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18 regression (NPMR) improve estimates of potential direct incident radia- tion (PDIR) and heat load based

McCune, Bruce

450

Vegetation and climate dynamics during the early Middle Miocene from Lake Sinj (Dinaride Lake System, SE Croatia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System, SE Croatia) Gonzalo Jiménez-Moreno a, , Oleg Mandic b , Mathias Harzhauser b , Davor Paveli c of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia A B S T R A C TA R T I C L E I N F O Article history 2008 Keywords: pollen vegetation climate change Miocene Croatia Pollen data from sediments from

Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo

451

Exploring the relationships between vegetation measurements and temperature in residential areas by integrating LIDAR and remotely sensed imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at higher resolutions is much more difficult to obtain. This has allowed researchers to study urban heat island dynamics at a micro-scale. However, this study suggests that a vegetation index alone might not be the best surrogate variable for providing...

Clemonds, Matthew A

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

-RECORDING RELATIVE WATER TABLE DEPTH USING PVC TAPE DISCOLOURATION -21 Applied Vegetation Science 8: 21-26, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- RECORDING RELATIVE WATER TABLE DEPTH USING PVC TAPE DISCOLOURATION - 21 Applied Vegetation during restoration. The PVC tape discolouration method enables spatially and temporally extensive studies and the same variables indicated by discolouration of PVC tape attached to green bamboo stakes installed

Navr√°tilov√°, Jana

453

The influence of increasing population size and vegetation productivity on elephant distribution in the Kruger National Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cell occupancy increased with population size, while grid-cell-specific density became less variable. In additionThe influence of increasing population size and vegetation productivity on elephant distribution Research Unit, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa

Pretoria, University of

454

Integrating multi-temporal spectral and structural information to map wetland vegetation in a lower Connecticut River tidal marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Coastal wetlands Image classification LiDAR Phragmites australis QuickBird Spectroradiometer Vegetation variability of the dominant marsh plant species, Spartina patens, Phragmites australis and Typha spp-native genotype of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud (common reed) in Connecticut marshes (Barrett

Royer, Dana

455

Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN B. B. Triplett, N. E.State Heat Capacity of Tungsten* B. n. Triplett,t N. E.I. ;\\feasurement Properties of tungsten sa~ples. ~feasured

Triplett, B.B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Bistructures, Bidomains and Linear Pierre-Louis Curien, LIENS, CNRSEcole Normale Superieure, Paris, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bistructures, Bidomains and Linear Logic Pierre-Louis Curien, LIENS, CNRS­Ecole Normale Sup hope that the structures isolated here will help in the search for a direct, extensional

Plotkin, Gordon

458

Yield and leaf blade area comparisons of extra leafy to normal leafed maize (Zea mays L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relationships between extra leaf production and rain yield of the leafy 9 hybrids. Fourteen hybrids were compared, including, eight Lfy and six normal-leafed industry standard hybrids. The fourteen hybrids were replicated four times in a randomized block design...

Rushing, Ronald Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Field measurements of a swell band, shore normal, flux divergence reversal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Throughout this thesis we will discuss the theoretical background and empirical observation of a swell band shore normal flux divergence reversal. Specifically, we will demonstrate the existence and persistence of the ...

Link, Shmuel G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla and Alzheimer's disease based on high resolution MRI at 3 Tesla. T1-weighted images were acquired from 19

Thompson, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Todd, State-of-the art electron guns and injector de- signs,7] Summary of working group on guns and injectors, 41st Ad-A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and

Baptiste, Kenneth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G.sub.1 cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G.sub.1 phase, suggesting that such G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

Crissman, Harry A. (Los Alamos, NM); Gadbois, Donna M. (Los Alamos, NM); Tobey, Robert A. (Los Alamos, NM); Bradbury, E. Morton (Santa Fe, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Operating Experience Level 3, Dangers of Objects Falling into Normally Occupied Areas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to the dangers of items falling from heights into spaces normally occupied by workers at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities.

464

Long-term evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme's frozen ground/permafrost component using observations at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme's frozen ground/permafrost component of the hydro-thermodynamic soil-vegetation scheme (HTSVS) was evaluated by means of permafrost computational time. Citation: Mo¨lders, N., and V. E. Romanovsky (2006), Long-term evaluation of the Hydro

Moelders, Nicole

465

Fruits & Veggies On the Go! You know that eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is good for you, but  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fruits & Veggies On the Go! You know that eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is good for you, but you're constantly on the go. See how you can fit fruits and veggies into your everyday world. Fruits and vegetables can be a part of a balanced diet any- time, anywhere. Fruits and veggies

Burke, Peter

466

H. Nguyen-Ngoc, C. Tran-Minh / Materials Science and Engineering C 27 (2007) 607-611 Sol-gel process for vegetal-cells encapsulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation of by-products that is detrimental to Chlorella vulgaris cells. The influence of several factors entrapment, vegetal cells, Chlorella vulgaris, fluorescence detection by aqueous precursors [7-8]. In this work, micro-algae cells of Chlorella vulgaris as an example of vegetal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

467

34 Jong-Seok Lee : Utilizing Concept of Vegetation Freeboard Equivalence in River Restoration International Journal of Contents, Vol.8, No.3, Sep 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Vegetation Freeboard Equivalence (VFE); River Restoration; Stream Rehabilitation; Levee Design; Flood Control34 Jong-Seok Lee : Utilizing Concept of Vegetation Freeboard Equivalence in River Restoration in River Restoration Jong-Seok Lee* Department of Civil Engineering Hanbat National University, Daejeon 301

Julien, Pierre Y.

468

Indirect methods of determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients and their application for nuclear astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic methods of the determination of asymptotic normalization coefficient for A+a?B of astrophysical interest are briefly presented. The results of the application of the specific asymptotic normalization coefficients derived within these methods for the extrapolation of the astrophysical S factors to experimentally inaccessible energy regions (E ? 25 keV) for the some specific radiative capture A(a,?)B reactions of the pp-chain and the CNO cycle are presented.

Yarmukhamedov, R. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan, 100214 Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

469

Reactive-coupling-induced normal mode splittings in microdisk resonators coupled to waveguides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the optomechanical design introduced by M. Li et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 223901 (2009)], which is very effective for investigation of the effects of reactive coupling. We show the normal mode splitting that is due solely to reactive coupling rather than due to dispersive coupling. We suggest feeding the waveguide with a pump field along with a probe field and scanning the output probe for evidence of reactive-coupling-induced normal mode splitting.

Huang Sumei; Agarwal, G. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

May 28-29, 2008/ARR Thermal Effect of Off-Normal Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;May 28-29, 2008/ARR 2 Power Plant FW Under Energy Deposition from Off- Normal Conditions · Thermal for Power Plant with Bare FS FW · Disruption simulation: q''=1.667 x 109 W/m2 over 3 ms (~5 MJ/m2) · 4+1 mm impact of off-normal events on power plant FW presented before for SiC and W · Questions arise

Raffray, A. René

471

The effect of firming agents on quality of parthenocarpic and normal fresh-pack pickles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of calcium salts as firming agents is widespread in the food industry; however, alum has traditionally been used for this purpose in pickles. The parthenocarpic cucumber, which holds great promise because of improved machine harvesting... characteris- tics, was found to be softer than normal pickles when processed by the usual commercial method. Calcium chloride, calcium lactate, and alum were evaluated as firming agents at five levels each in both parthenocarpic and normal pickles...

Longan, Bobby Jeff

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Incident detection using the Standard Normal Deviate model and travel time information from probe vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCIDENT DETECTION USING THE STANDARD iNORMAL DEVIATE MODEL AND TRAVEL TECHIE INFORMATION FROM PROBE VEHICLES A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER EUGENE MOUNTAIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTFR OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Civil Engineering INCIDENT DETECTION USING THE STANDARD NORMAL DEVIATE MODEL AND TRAVEL TIME INFORMATION FROM PROBE VEHICLES A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER EUGENE MOUNTAIN Submitted...

Mountain, Christopher Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

473

Detection and quantification of inverse spin Hall effect from spin pumping in permalloy/normal metal bilayers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spin pumping is a mechanism that generates spin currents from ferromagnetic resonance over macroscopic interfacial areas, thereby enabling sensitive detection of the inverse spin Hall effect that transforms spin into charge currents in nonmagnetic conductors. Here we study the spin-pumping-induced voltages due to the inverse spin Hall effect in permalloy/normal metal bilayers integrated into coplanar waveguides for different normal metals and as a function of angle of the applied magnetic field direction, as well as microwave frequency and power. We find good agreement between experimental data and a theoretical model that includes contributions from anisotropic magnetoresistance and inverse spin Hall effect. The analysis provides consistent results over a wide range of experimental conditions as long as the precise magnetization trajectory is taken into account. The spin Hall angles for Pt, Pd, Au, and Mo were determined with high precision to be 0.013 {+-} 0.002, 0.0064 {+-} 0.001, 0.0035 {+-} 0.0003, and -0.0005 {+-} 0.0001, respectively.

Mosendz, O.; Vlaminck, V.; Pearson, J. E.; Fradin, F. Y.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Bader, S. D.; Hoffmann, A.; Delft Univ. of Technology

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Climate-Soil-Vegetation Control on Groundwater Table Dynamics and its Feedbacks in a Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the three dynamically linked branches of the water cycle, including atmospheric, surface, and subsurface water, groundwater is the largest reservoir and an active component of the hydrologic system. Because of the inherent slow response time, groundwater may be particularly relevant for long time-scale processes such as multi-years or decadal droughts. This study uses regional climate simulations with and without surface water Ė groundwater interactions for the conterminous U.S. to assess the influence of climate, soil, and vegetation on groundwater table dynamics, and its potential feedbacks to regional climate. Analysis shows that precipitation has a dominant influence on the spatial and temporal variations of groundwater table depth (GWT). The simulated GWT is found to decrease sharply with increasing precipitation. Our simulation also shows some distinct spatial variations that are related to soil porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Vegetation properties such as minimum stomatal resistance, and root depth and fraction are also found to play an important role in controlling the groundwater table. Comparing two simulations with and without groundwater table dynamics, we find that groundwater table dynamics mainly influences the partitioning of soil water between the surface (0 Ė 0.5 m) and subsurface (0.5 Ė 5 m) rather than total soil moisture. In most areas, groundwater table dynamics increases surface soil moisture at the expense of the subsurface, except in regions with very shallow groundwater table. The change in soil water partitioning between the surface and subsurface is found to strongly correlate with the partitioning of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The evaporative fraction (EF) is generally higher during summer when groundwater table dynamics is included. This is accompanied by increased cloudiness, reduced diurnal temperature range, cooler surface temperature, and increased cloud top height. Although both convective and non-convective precipitation are enhanced, the higher EF changes the partitioning to favor more non-convective precipitation, but this result could be sensitive to the convective parameterization used. Compared to simulations without groundwater table dynamics, the dry bias in the summer precipitation is slightly reduced over the central and eastern U.S. Groundwater table dynamics can provide important feedbacks to atmospheric processes, and these feedbacks are stronger in regions with deeper groundwater table, because the interactions between surface and subsurface are weak when the groundwater table is deep. This increases the sensitivity of surface soil moisture to precipitation anomalies, and therefore enhances land surface feedbacks to the atmosphere through changes in soil moisture and evaporative fraction. By altering the groundwater table depth, land use change and groundwater withdrawal can alter land surface response and feedback to the climate system.

Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun; Liang, Xu

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

475

Low-Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria. |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration - RockyTemperature 65 CupastesVersusEMSL

476

Attenuation Tomography of Northern California and the Yellow Sea / Korean Peninsula from Coda-source Normalized and Direct Lg Amplitudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inversions for regional attenuation (1/Q) of Lg are performed in two different regions. The path attenuation component of the Lg spectrum is isolated using the coda-source normalization method, which corrects the Lg spectral amplitude for the source using the stable, coda-derived source spectra. Tomographic images of Northern California agree well with one-dimensional (1-D) Lg Q estimated from five different methods. We note there is some tendency for tomographic smoothing to increase Q relative to targeted 1-D methods. For example in the San Francisco Bay Area, which contains high attenuation relative to the rest of it's region, Q is over-estimated by {approx}30. Coda-source normalized attenuation tomography is also carried out for the Yellow Sea/Korean Peninsula (YSKP) where output parameters (site, source, and path terms) are compared with those from the amplitude tomography method of Phillips et al. (2005) as well as a new method that ties the source term to the MDAC formulation (Walter and Taylor, 2001). The source terms show similar scatter between coda-source corrected and MDAC source perturbation methods, whereas the amplitude method has the greatest correlation with estimated true source magnitude. The coda-source better represents the source spectra compared to the estimated magnitude and could be the cause of the scatter. The similarity in the source terms between the coda-source and MDAC-linked methods shows that the latter method may approximate the effect of the former, and therefore could be useful in regions without coda-derived sources. The site terms from the MDAC-linked method correlate slightly with global Vs30 measurements. While the coda-source and amplitude ratio methods do not correlate with Vs30 measurements, they do correlate with one another, which provides confidence that the two methods are consistent. The path Q{sup -1} values are very similar between the coda-source and amplitude ratio methods except for small differences in the Da-xin-anling Mountains, in the northern YSKP. However there is one large difference between the MDAC-linked method and the others in the region near stations TJN and INCN, which point to site-effect as the cause for the difference.

Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

477

Border flow rights and Contracts for differences of differences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marginal price for energy that it delivers to the rest of the system and pays the locational marginal price analogously to "contracts for differences" (CFDs) that are used to hedge locational marginal price variation implementation of the border flow rights model, the owner of a transmission line or lines is paid the locational

Baldick, Ross

478

Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Current vegetation characteristics within tree-kill zones of F- and H-Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation of two wetland areas previously adversely affected by outcropping groundwater was characterized to evaluate the type and extent of revegetation. When the damage first became evident in the late 1970s and early 1980s the areas were examined and described to try to establish the cause of the extensive tree mortality. The F- and H-Area seepage basins above the wetland areas received waste products from the separation areas beginning in 1955. The operation, estimated loading, and current status of the basins were summarized by Killian et al. Analysis of soil and water at the affected seeplines where the tree-kill was occurring confirmed that the surface water was strongly influenced by constituents of the F- and H-Area seepage basins. While no single cause of the forest mortality was defined, alterations in the hydrology and siltation patterns, pH changes, increased conductivity, and increased levels of sodium, nitrogen compounds, and aluminum were believed to be interacting to cause the mortality.

Nelson, E.A.; Irwin, J.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

Kalu, E. Eric (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL); Chen, Ken Shuang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Mapping of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in Nearshore Regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with sidescan sonar was investigated for determining the boundaries of nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation beds, specifically eelgrass (Zostera marina). Shifts in eelgrass bed morphology, size, and distribution are used as indicators in monitoring programs to measure the impacts of coastal development and environmental stressors on eelgrass and to establish the efficacy of restoration programs. However, many monitoring programs necessarily extend over multiple-year time periods. Therefore, techniques that are easily reproducible, accurate, and cost-effective can demonstrate distinct advantages over some of the more traditional and labor-intensive methods, such as diver assessments and transects of shoot counts. Remote monitoring of eelgrass beds using satellite and aerial imagery has been demonstrated with moderate success, but requires groundtruthing, which can be costly and which frequently cannot delineate the deeper boundaries of eelgrass beds. One possible means for low-cost mapping is the use of AUVs equipped with acoustic imaging hardware. AUVs provide an ideal platform, because they can be deployed by small teams (two people), they are highly maneuverable, they can cover large areas over a relatively short time period (3knot operational speed), and they are equipped with multiple oceanographic instruments for correlated data collection. This paper describes the use of sidescan-equipped AUV technology deployed over multiple time periods at the same location where imagery of eelgrass beds was obtained and analyzed for comparative purposes.

Jones, Mark E.; Miller, Lee M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Ewert, Daniel W.

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

482

Regional Normal Lung Tissue Density Changes in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe regional lung tissue density changes in normal lung tissue of patients with primary and metastatic lung tumors who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 179 post-SBRT follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 62 patients who received SBRT between 2003 and 2009 were studied. Median prescription dose was 54 Gy (range, 30-60 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions. SBRT-induced lung density changes on post-SBRT follow-up CT were evaluated at approximately 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months after treatment. Dose-response curves (DRC) were generated for SBRT-induced lung damage by averaging CT number (HU) changes for regions of the lungs receiving the same dose at 5-Gy intervals. Results: For all follow-up interval periods, CT numbers linearly increased with dose until 35 Gy and were constant thereafter. For 3, 18, 24, and 30 months, the rate of relative electron density increase with dose was approximately 0.24% per Gy. At 6 months, the rate was also similar below 20 Gy but then rose to 0.6% per Gy above this threshold. After 6 months, DRCs were mostly time-independent. When split between patients treated with 3 fractions of 12 to 20 Gy (median, 20 Gy; average tumor volume, 12 {+-} 16 cm{sup 3}) and with >3 fractions of 6 to 12.5 Gy (median, 9 Gy; average tumor volume, 30 {+-} 40 cm{sup 3}), DRCs differed significantly. In both cases, CT changes at 3, 18, 24, and 30 months were identical to those of the population DRC; however, patients who received >3 fractions showed 6-month CT changes that were more than twice those for the group that received 3 fractions. Conclusions: This analysis of SBRT-induced normal lung density changes indicates that lung normal tissue has more pronounced self-limited acute effects than late effects. Differences in acute CT changes following treatments in 3 fractions were considerably less than for treatments in >3 fractions.

Diot, Quentin, E-mail: quentin.diot@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Stuhr, Kelly; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Air flow and particle control with different ventilation systems in a classroom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air flow and particle control with different ventilation systems in a classroom Sture Holmberg, Ph. For displacement ventilation systems, designers normally assume that all pollutants follow the buoyant air flow of the ventilation air flow are shown to play an important role in the control of air quality. Computer simulation

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

484

Cow-Calf and Vegetation Response to Heavy Rates of Stocking at the Texas Experimental Ranch.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRIAL J A 0 D F A J A 0 D F A J 1978 1979 1980 Figure 2. Monthly precipitation (em) from June 1978 through August 1980 at the Texas Experimental Ranch and 20-year monthly average. A 3 that the most frequently occurring species on this site... from November 1979 through August 1980 showed both date and grazing treatment effects were highly signif icant (P<0.01). Both-years the date effect reflected annual variations in weight considered normal for producing cows in this region (Fig. 3...

Heitschmidt, R.K.; Johnson, A.B.; Frasure, J.R.; Price, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Using a hand-held, two-channel radiometer to monitor trends in bunchgrass vegetation conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle 1 I Cycle Cycle 3 1 1909 1980 Fig. 5. Osan resn standing croo eeight tn kg/ha (08'!) and normalized diiierance (VO) ior ei ht short-duracion grazing c cles near College Station, Texas, in 1979 and 1980. concurrent decreases still occurred... two growing seasons on three pastures of a short-duration grazing system near College Station, Texas. Fifteen 0. 25m plots were sampled in each pasture on a pregrazing, postgrazing, and rest cycle basis. Estimates were made on each plot for percent...

Wright, Douglas Charles

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Flue gas desulfurization sludge: establishment of vegetation on ponded and soil-applied waste. Final report January 1977-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of research to identify and evaluate forms of vegetation and methods of their establishment for reclaiming retired flue gas desulfurization sludge ponds. Also studied were the soil liming value of limestone scrubber sludge (LSS) and plant uptake and percolation losses of some chemical nutrients in the sludge. Several vegetation schemes were evaluated between 1977 and 1982 for covering and stabilizing LSS at Colbert Steam Plant, Cherokee, AL, and Shawnee Steam Plant, Paducah, KY. Eleven tree and 10 grass or legume species were tested for adaptability and survival when planted directly in LSS or in LSS amended with soil, municipal sewage sludge, or standard potting mix. Other studies indicated that LSS apparently has sufficient unreacted limestone to be a satisfactory soil liming agent.

Giordano, P.M.; Mays, D.A.; Soileau, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Baseline concentrations of radionuclides and heavy metals in soils and vegetation around the DARHT facility: Construction phase (1996)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy`s Mitigation Action Plan for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), baseline concentrations of radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, total U), and heavy metals (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and Tl) in soil, sediment, and vegetation (overstory and understory) around the DARHT facility during the construction phase in 1996 were determined. Also, U and Be concentrations in soil samples collected in 1993 from within the proposed DARHT facility area are reported. Most radionuclides in soils, sediments, and vegetation were within current background and/or long-term regional statistical reference levels.

Fresquez, P.R.; Haagenstad, H.T.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Production of Biodiesel from Vegetable Oil Using CaO Catalyst & Analysis of Its Performance in Four Stroke Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract- The production of biodiesel from vegetable oils stands as a new versatile method of energy generation in the present scenario. Biodiesel is obtained by the transesterification of long chain fatty acids in presence of catalysts. Transesterification is an attractive and widely accepted technique. The purpose of the transesterification process is to lower the viscosity of the oil. The most important variables affecting methyl ester yield during the transesterification reaction are the molar ratio of alcohol to vegetable oil, reaction temperature, catalyst amount and time. Biodiesel is renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics. It can be used in diesel engines by blending with conventional diesel in various proportions. Biodiesel seems to be a realistic fuel for future. It has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits. This paper discuses the production of biodiesel from

Sruthi Gopal; Sajitha C. M; Uma Krishnakumar

489

EA-1982: Parker-Davis Transmission System Routine Operation and Maintenance Project and Proposed Integrated Vegetation Management Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed continuation of operations and maintenance activities and implementation of a vegetation management program on Westernís Parker-Davis Transmission System. These actions would occur on existing transmission line and access road rights-of-way, and at substations and maintenance facilities associated with the transmission system.

490

Applicability of the ďGallet equationĒ to the vegetation clearances of NERC Reliability Standard FAC-003-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NERC has proposed a standard to use to specify clearances between vegetation and power lines. The purpose of the rule is to reduce the probability of flashover to a calculably low level. This report was commissioned by FERCís Office of Electrical Reliability. The scope of the study was analysis of the mathematics and documentation of the technical justification behind the application of the Gallet equation and the assumptions used in the technical reference paper

Kirkham, Harold

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of Iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947: Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Note: A novel normalization scheme for laser-based plasma x-ray sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A kHz repetition rate laser pump-X-ray probe system for ultrafast X-ray diffraction is set up based on a laser-driven plasma X-ray source. A simple and reliable normalization approach has been developed to minimize the impact of large X-ray pulse intensity fluctuation on data quality. It utilizes one single X-ray area detector to record both sample and reference signals simultaneously. Performance of this novel normalization method is demonstrated in reflectivity oscillation measurement of a superlattice sample at sub-ps resolution.

Zhang, B. B.; Sun, D. R.; Tao, Y., E-mail: taoy@ihep.ac.cn [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, S. S. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100090 (China)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

493

Fermion Quasi-normal modes of the Kerr Black-Hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the fermion quasi-normal modes of a 4-dimensional rotating black-hole using the WKB(J) (to third and sixth order) and the AIM semi-analytic methods in the massless Dirac fermion sector. These semi-analytic approximations are computed in a pedagogical manner with comparisons made to the numerical values of the quasi-normal mode frequencies presented in the literature. It was found that The WKB(J) method and AIM show good agreement with direct numerical solutions for low values of the overtone number $n$ and angular quantum number l.

W. A. Carlson; A. S. Cornell; B. Jordan

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

494

Acoustic wave propagation through a supercooled liquid: A normal mode analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanism of acoustic wave propagation in supercooled liquids is not yet fully understood since the vibrational dynamics of supercooled liquids are strongly affected by their amorphous inherent structures. In this paper, the acoustic wave propagation in a supercooled model liquid is studied by using normal mode analysis. Due to the highly disordered inherent structure, a single acoustic wave is decomposed into many normal modes in broad frequency range. This causes the rapid decay of the acoustic wave and results in anomalous wavenumber dependency of the dispersion relation and the rate of attenuation.

Yuki Matsuoka; Hideyuki Mizuno; Ryoichi Yamamoto

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

495

Learned helplessness in mentally retarded and learning disabled versus normal subjects: an attributional approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this project, he/she is free to do so. Upon completion of the project, a copy of the results will be mailed to you. 31 APPENDIX A (CONT. ) We feel that this study is important because it will help us to better understand motivation in children. We would... students and eighty normal subjects partic1pated 1n the study. Normal children were found to be signficantly more persistent than nonretarded children. Older retarded ch11dren showed signf1cantly more helplessness than e1ther of the other two retarded...

Davis, Veronica Ladell

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Individualized 3D Reconstruction of Normal Tissue Dose for Patients With Long-term Follow-up: A Step Toward Understanding Dose Risk for Late Toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Understanding the relationship between normal tissue dose and delayed radiation toxicity is an important component of developing more effective radiation therapy. Late outcome data are generally available only for patients who have undergone 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3D normal tissue dosimetry derived from reconstructed 2D treatment plans in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional lung, heart, and breast volumes were reconstructed from 2D planning radiographs for HL patients who received mediastinal radiation therapy. For each organ, a reference 3D organ was modified with patient-specific structural information, using deformable image processing software. Radiation therapy plans were reconstructed by applying treatment parameters obtained from patient records to the reconstructed 3D volumes. For each reconstructed organ mean dose (D{sub mean}) and volumes covered by at least 5 Gy (V{sub 5}) and 20Gy (V{sub 20}) were calculated. This process was performed for 15 patients who had both 2D and 3D planning data available to compare the reconstructed normal tissue doses with those derived from the primary CT planning data and also for 10 historically treated patients with only 2D imaging available. Results: For patients with 3D planning data, the normal tissue doses could be reconstructed accurately using 2D planning data. Median differences in D{sub mean} between reconstructed and actual plans were 0.18 Gy (lungs), -0.15 Gy (heart), and 0.30 Gy (breasts). Median difference in V{sub 5} and V{sub 20} were less than 2% for each organ. Reconstructed 3D dosimetry was substantially higher in historical mantle-field treatments than contemporary involved-field mediastinal treatments: average D{sub mean} values were 15.2 Gy vs 10.6 Gy (lungs), 27.0 Gy vs 14.3 Gy (heart), and 8.0 Gy vs 3.2 Gy (breasts). Conclusions: Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorbed dose to organs at risk can be estimated accurately many years after exposure by using limited 2D data. Compared to contemporary involved-field treatments, normal tissue doses were significantly higher in historical mantle-field treatments. These methods build capacity to quantify the relationship between 3D normal tissue dose and observed late effects.

Ng, Angela [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K.; Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moseley, Joanne L. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hodgson, David C., E-mail: David.Hodgson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

497

Radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in soil, vegetation, and fish collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, total U) and heavy metal (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Tl) contents were determined in soil, vegetation (overstory and understory), and fish (rainbow trout) collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon in 1995. All heavy metal and most radionuclide contents around or within the lake, except for U in soil, vegetation, and fish, were within or just above upper limit background. Detectable levels (where the analytical result was greater than two times counting uncertainty) of U in soils, vegetation, and fish were found in slightly higher concentrations than in background samples. Overall, however, maximum total committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)(95% confidence level)--based on consumption of 46 lb of fish--from Tsicoma Lake (0.066 mrem/y) was within the maximum total CEDE from the ingestion of fish from the Mescalero National Fish Hatchery (background)(0.113 mrem/y).

Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Different Mechanisms Govern the Two-Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,Physics Diagnostics

499

Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 2: Laboratory phytotoxicity studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation communities on metal- and arsenic-contaminated uplands surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana have been eliminated or highly modified. Laboratory toxicity tests were performed using site soils from the impacted areas to determine whether the soils limit the ability of plants to establish and grow. The germination and growth of alfalfa, lettuce, and wheat in impacted area soils was compared to germination and growth of the three species in reference soils. The degree of phytotoxicity was quantified using a species-endpoint toxicity score calculated on the magnitude of difference between germination and growth of plants in impacted and reference soils. The impacted soils exhibited substantial toxicity to plants: 5% of the sites were severely phytotoxic, 55% were highly phytotoxic, 10% were moderately phytotoxic, 20% were mildly phytotoxic, and 10% were nontoxic. Root growth was consistently the most affected endpoint (18 of 20 impacted soils) and reduction in root length and mass was observed. Correlation and partial correlation analysis was used to evaluate the causes of phytotoxicity. Concentrations of As, Cu, and Zn and, to a lesser extent, Pb and Cd were found to be positively correlated with phytotoxicity.

Kapustka, L.A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Lipton, J.; Galbraith, H.; Cacela, D.; LeJeune, K. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

On Strong Normalization of the Calculus of Constructions with Type-Based Termination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Strong Normalization of the Calculus of Constructions with Type-Based Termination Benjamin Gr.Gregoire,Jorge-Luis.Sacchini}@inria.fr Abstract. Termination of recursive functions is an important property in proof assistants based on dependent type theories; it implies con- sistency and decidability of type checking. Type-based termination

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de