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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Timing and patterns of ENSO signal in Africa over the last 30 years: insights from Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A more complete picture of the timing and patterns of ENSO signal during the seasonal cycle for the whole of Africa over the three last decades is provided using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index. Indeed, NDVI has a higher spatial ...

N Philippon; N Martiny; P Camberlin; M. T Hoffman; V Gond

2

Applicability of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in Index-Based Crop Insurance Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Index insurance is becoming increasingly popular because of its ability to provide low-cost, relatively easy to implement agricultural insurance for vegetation types whose productivity has been notoriously difficult to measure and to farmers in ...

Calum G. Turvey; Megan K. Mclaurin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Predictability of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index in Kenya and Potential Applications as an Indicator of Rift Valley Fever Outbreaks in the Greater Horn of Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the progress made in producing predictions of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) over Kenya in the Greater Horn of Africa (GHA) for the October–December (OND) season is discussed. Several studies have identified a ...

Matayo Indeje; M. Neil Ward; Laban J. Ogallo; Glyn Davies; Maxx Dilley; Assaf Anyamba

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Intraseasonal Interactions between Temperature and Vegetation over the Boreal Forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper uses statistical and analytical techniques to investigate intraseasonal interactions between temperature and vegetation [surrogated by the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)] over the boreal forests. Results indicate that ...

Weile Wang; Bruce T. Anderson; Dara Entekhabi; Dong Huang; Yin Su; Robert K. Kaufmann; Ranga B. Myneni

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Cost-effectiveness of Different Herbicide and Non-herbicide Alternatives for Treating Transmission Rights of Way Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a guide to using cost-effectiveness analysis to compare different programs of vegetation management for electric transmission line rights of way.BackgroundCost effectiveness is an important economic measure for describing and comparing the relative acceptability of different vegetation management programs. Cost-effectiveness analysis is apparently rarely used in the utility industry. This might be related to its apparent complexity, but it can ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

6

A Sensitivity Study of Convective Cloud Formation by Vegetation Forcing with Different Atmospheric Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable vegetation cover is a possible trigger for convection, especially in semiarid areas due to differential surface forcing. A two-dimensional numerical model with explicit cloud physics and a detailed vegetation parameterization scheme is ...

Xiaodong Hong; Martin J. Leach; Sethu Raman

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Feedbacks of Vegetation on Summertime Climate Variability over the North American Grasslands. Part I: Statistical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedbacks of vegetation on summertime climate variability over the North American Grasslands are analyzed using the statistical technique of Granger causality. Results indicate that normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) anomalies early in ...

Weile Wang; Bruce T. Anderson; Nathan Phillips; Robert K. Kaufmann; Christopher Potter; Ranga B. Myneni

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Intraseasonal Variability of Satellite-Derived Rainfall and Vegetation over Southern Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-derived rainfall and vegetation [normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)] data for the period 1981–2000 are used to reveal spatial and temporal interrelationships via principal component analysis. The unimodal seasonal cycle peaks ...

Hector Chikoore; Mark R. Jury

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Effects of Satellite-Derived Vegetation Cover Variability on Simulated Land–Atmosphere Interactions in the NAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Substantial evolution of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NVDI)-derived vegetation cover (Fg) exists in the southwestern United States and Mexico. The intraseasonal and wet-/dry-year fluctuations of Fg are linked to observed precipitation ...

Toshihisa Matsui; Venkataraman Lakshmi; Eric E. Small

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Global and Seasonal Assessment of Interactions between Climate and Vegetation Biophysical Processes: A GCM Study with Different Land–Vegetation Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global and seasonal assessment of regions of the earth with strong climate–vegetation biophysical process (VBP) interactions is provided. The presence of VBP and degree of VBP effects on climate were assessed based on the skill of simulations ...

Yongkang Xue; Fernando De Sales; Ratko Vasic; C. Roberto Mechoso; Akio Arakawa; Stephen Prince

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and-atmosphere interactions are an important component of climate, especially in semi-arid regions such as the Southern Great Plains. Interactions between soil moisture and vegetation modulate land-atmosphere coupling and thus represent a crucial, but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet soil moisture observation sites, and vegetation health is represented by MODIS-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). For the modeling study, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) hydrologic model is employed with two different vegetation parameterizations. The first is the model default vegetation parameter which is interannually-invariant leaf area index (LAI). This parameter is referred to as the control parameter. The second is MODIS-derived LAI, which captures interannual differences in vegetation health. Soil moisture simulations from both vegetation parameterizations are compared and the VIC-simulated soil moisture’s sensitivity to the vegetation parameters is also examined. Correlation results from the observation study suggest that soil moisture-vegetation interactions in Oklahoma are inconsistent, varying both in space and time. The modeling results show that using a vegetation parameterization that does not capture interannual vegetation health variability could potentially result in dry or wet biased soil moisture simulations.

Ford, Trenton W.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Characterization of the Interannual and Intraseasonal Variability of West African Vegetation between 1982 and 2002 by Means of NOAA AVHRR NDVI Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interannual and intraseasonal variability of West African vegetation over the period 1982–2002 is studied using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR).

N. Philippon; L. Jarlan; N. Martiny; P. Camberlin; E. Mougin

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Doses delivered to normal brain under different treatment protocols at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

As of October 31, 1996, 23 glioblastoma multiforme patients underwent BNCT under several treatment protocols at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. For treatment planning and dosimetry purposes, these protocols may be divided into four groups. The first group comprises protocols that used an 8-cm collimator and allowed a peak normal brain dose of 10.5 Gy-Eq to avolume of 1 cm{sup 3} were the thermal neutron flux was maximal (even if it happened to be in the tumor volume). The second group differs from the first in that it allowed a peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq. The protocols of the third and fourth groups allowed the prescribed peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq to be outside of the tumor volume, used a 12-cm collimator and, respectively, uni- or bilateral irradiations. We describe the treatment planning procedures and report the doses delivered to various structures of the brain.

Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Liu, H.B. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Correlated change in normalized difference vegetation index and the seasonal trajectory of photosynthetic capacity in a conifer stand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal changes in canopy photosynthetic activity play an important role in carbon assimilation. However, few simulation models for estimating carbon balances have included them due to scarcity in quality data. This paper investigates some important ...

Q. Wang; J. Tenhunen; T. Vesala

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Using LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index to remotely determine LAI and percent canopy cover at varying scales.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) as a direct method to evaluate forest canopy parameters is vital in addressing both forest management… (more)

Griffin, Alicia Marie Rutledge

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Rock Joint Surfaces Measurement and Analysis of Aperture Distribution under Different Normal and Shear Loading Using GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geometry of the rock joint is a governing factor for joint mechanical and hydraulic behavior. A new method of evaluating aperture distribution based on measurement of joint surfaces and three dimensional characteristics of each surface is developed. Artificial joint of granite surfaces are measured,processed, analyzed and three dimensional approaches are carried out for surface characterization. Parameters such as asperity's heights, slope angles, and aspects distribution at micro scale,local concentration of elements and their spatial localization at local scale are determined by Geographic Information System (GIS). Changes of aperture distribution at different normal stresses and various shear displacements are visualized and interpreted. Increasing normal load causes negative changes in aperture frequency distribution which indicates high joint matching. However, increasing shear displacement causes a rapid increase in the aperture and positive changes in the aperture frequency distribution which could be ...

Sharifzadeh, Mostafa; Esaki, Tetsuro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Differences in the Potential Hydrologic Impact of Climate Change to the Athabasca and Fraser River Basins of Canada with and without Considering Shifts in Vegetation Patterns Induced by Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research objectives are to estimate differences between the potential impact of climatic change to the Athabasca River basin (ARB) and Fraser River basin (FRB) of Canada with and without considering shifts in vegetation patterns induced by ...

E. Kerkhoven; T. Y. Gan

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The influence of temperature and precipitation climate regimes on vegetation dynamics in the US Great Plains: a satellite bioclimatology case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data are widely used in global-change research, yet relationships between the NDVI and ecoclimatological variables are not fully understood. This study ...

S. -Y. Tan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Global Vegetation Root Distribution for Land Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation root distribution is one of the factors that determine the overall water holding capacity of the land surface and the relative rates of water extraction from different soil layers for vegetation transpiration. Despite its importance, ...

Xubin Zeng

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Vegetation Collections Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation Collections Overview Vegetation regulates the flow of numerous biogeochemical cycles, most critically those of water, carbon, and nitrogen; it is also of great importance in local and global energy balances. Vegetation collections data include: Biomass Biome Characteristics Litter Chemistry and Decomposition Geoecology Nutrient Concentration, Profiles, and Turnover Global Fire Emissions, Vegetation, and Leaf Area Index (LAI) Ecosystem Structure and Function Phenoregions Carbon Flux Vegetation Resources The following resources related to Vegetation Collections are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: Global Leaf Area Index Data Net Primary Production Project Get Vegetation Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Uranium Availability and Uptake in the Vegetables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research of a potted experiment ruling uranium availability and uptake by four kinds of vegetables (lettuce,carrot , potatoes , peas) are described. Four kinds of vegetables spiked with the different uranium concentration in the aqueous and different ... Keywords: vegetables, uranium, Soil-liquid distribution, Uptake, Soil-to-plant transfer

Zhang Jing; Chen Diyun; Liu Juan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils offers new insights into these important (and growing) products of vegetable oils, while also covering developments in biodegradable grease, vegetable oils-based polyols, and the synthesis of surfactants from vegetable oil

23

Modeling antimicrobial effect of different grape pomace and extracts on S.aureus and E.coli in vegetable soup using artificial neural network and fuzzy logic system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, antibacterial activities of the grape pomace powders (GPP) and grape pomace extracts (GPE) of Turkeys' five different grape varieties (Emir, Gamay, Kalecik Karasi, Narince and Okuzgozu grape varieties) were determined against Staphylococcusaureus ... Keywords: ANFIS, ANN, Antimicrobial effects, Extract, Grape pomace, Modeling

Osman Sagdic; Ismet Ozturk; Ozgur Kisi

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Multi-Spectral imaging of vegetation for detecting CO2 leaking from underground  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration will require long-term monitoring for detection of possible leakage back into the atmosphere. One potential monitoring method is multi-spectral imaging of vegetation reflectance to detect leakage through CO{sub 2}-induced plant stress. A multi-spectral imaging system was used to simultaneously record green, red, and near-infrared (NIR) images with a real-time reflectance calibration from a 3-m tall platform, viewing vegetation near shallow subsurface CO{sub 2} releases during summers 2007 and 2008 at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology field site in Bozeman, Montana. Regression analysis of the band reflectances and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index with time shows significant correlation with distance from the CO{sub 2} well, indicating the viability of this method to monitor for CO{sub 2} leakage. The 2007 data show rapid plant vigor degradation at high CO{sub 2} levels next to the well and slight nourishment at lower, but above-background CO{sub 2} concentrations. Results from the second year also show that the stress response of vegetation is strongly linked to the CO{sub 2} sink-source relationship and vegetation density. The data also show short-term effects of rain and hail. The real-time calibrated imaging system successfully obtained data in an autonomous mode during all sky and daytime illumination conditions.

Rouse, J.H.; Shaw, J.A.; Lawrence, R.L.; Lewicki, J.L.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Spangler, L.H.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Special study on vegetative covers. [UMTRA Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Sensitivity of the Simulated Normal and Enhanced C02 Climates to Different Heat Transport Parameterizations in a Two-Dimensional Multilevel Energy Balance Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric sensible and latent heat fluxes constitute an important component of the total poleward energy transport in the climate system. The authors investigate the relative role of these heat fluxes in normal and enhanced C02 warming ...

Douglas Chan; Kaz Higuchi; Charles A. Lin

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

FT Duplication Coordinates Reproductive and Vegetative Growth  

SciTech Connect

Annual plants grow vegetatively at early developmental stages and then transition to the reproductive stage, followed by senescence in the same year. In contrast, after successive years of vegetative growth at early ages, woody perennial shoot meristems begin repeated transitions between vegetative and reproductive growth at sexual maturity. However, it is unknown how these repeated transitions occur without a developmental conflict between vegetative and reproductive growth. We report that functionally diverged paralogs FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (FT1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T2 (FT2), products of whole-genome duplication and homologs of Arabidopsis thaliana gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), coordinate the repeated cycles of vegetative and reproductive growth in woody perennial poplar (Populus spp.). Our manipulative physiological and genetic experiments coupled with field studies, expression profiling, and network analysis reveal that reproductive onset is determined by FT1 in response to winter temperatures, whereas vegetative growth and inhibition of bud set are promoted by FT2 in response to warm temperatures and long days in the growing season. The basis for functional differentiation between FT1 and FT2 appears to be expression pattern shifts, changes in proteins, and divergence in gene regulatory networks. Thus, temporal separation of reproductive onset and vegetative growth into different seasons via FT1 and FT2 provides seasonality and demonstrates the evolution of a complex perennial adaptive trait after genome duplication.

Hsu, Chuan-Yu [Mississippi State University (MSU); Adams, Joshua P. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Kim, Hyejin [Mississippi State University (MSU); No, Kyoungok [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ma, Caiping [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Strauss, Steven [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Drnevich, Jenny [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Wickett, Norman [Pennsylvania State University; Vandervelde, Lindsay [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ellis, Jeffrey D. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Rice, Brandon [Mississippi State University (MSU); Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Brunner, Amy M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Page, Grier P. [RTI International; Carlson, John E. [Pennsylvania State University; DePamphilis, Claude [Pennsylvania State University; Luthe, Dawn S. [Pennsylvania State University; Yuceer, Cetin [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Inspection Technologies for Vegetation Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent regulatory changes and budgetary pressures have prompted utilities to seek a more in-depth understanding of the terrain along their transmission line corridor rights-of-way (ROW) and the vegetation on that terrain. Vegetation inspections play an important role in acquiring this information and in avoiding costly vegetation-related outages. While the methods by which the inspections are conducted vary from utility to utility, some form of periodic inspections of transmission ROWs are ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

29

Causes of spring vegetation greenness trends in the northern mid-high latitudes from 1982 to 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) is applied to explore the spatial temporal patterns of spring (April May) vegetation growth trends over the northern mid high latitudes (NMH) (>25 N) between 1982 and 2004. During the spring season through the 23 yr period, both the satellite-derived and simulated normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) anomalies show a statistically significant correlation and an overall greening trend within the study area. Consistently with the observed NDVI temperature relation, the CLM4 NDVI shows a significant positive association with the spring temperature anomaly for the NMH, North America and Eurasia. Large study areas experience temperature discontinuity associated with contrasting NDVI trends. Before and after the turning point (TP) of the temperature trends, climatic variability plays a dominant role, while the other environmental factors exert minor effects on the NDVI tendencies. Simulated vegetation growth is broadly stimulated by the increasing atmospheric CO2. Trends show that nitrogen deposition increases NDVI mostly in southeastern China, and decreases NDVI mainly in western Russia after the temperature TP. Furthermore, land use-induced NDVI trends vary roughly with the respective changes in land management practices (crop areas and forest coverage). Our results highlight how non-climatic factors mitigate or exacerbate the impact of temperature on spring vegetation growth, particularly across regions with intensive human activity.

Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Shilong, Dr. Piao [Peking University; Xuhui, Dr. Wang [Peking University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmission System Vegetation Management Program June 23, 2000 EIS-0285: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Transmission System Vegetation...

31

Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

Ortiz, Alejandra C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

Murphy, Enda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings from the book ...

34

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 6 Vegetable Oils-Based Polyols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 6 Vegetable Oils-Based Polyols Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Vegetable Oils-Based Polyols from the book ...

35

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 10 Synthesis of Surfactants from Vegetable Oil Feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 10 Synthesis of Surfactants from Vegetable Oil Feedstocks Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Synthesis of Surfactants from Vegetable Oil

36

Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetables Vegetables Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Vegetables Address 45 Rosemary Street, Suite F Place Needham, MA Zip 02494 Sector Solar Website http://www.skyvegetables.com/i Coordinates 42.2882945°, -71.2335259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2882945,"lon":-71.2335259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Climatic Temperature Normals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The published 1951–80 daily normals of maximum and minimum temperatures were prepared by interpolating between average monthly values. This study compares the published normal and 30-yr average daily temperatures in the eastern half of the United ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; Marc S. Plantico

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal...

39

NDVI-based vegetation rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area of terrain rendering has seen great improvements both in rendering performance and image quality. The latest terrain rendering algorithms efficiently utilize the capabilities of actual programmable graphics hardware in order to achieve real-time ... Keywords: continuous level of detail, terrain rendering, texture splatting, vegetation rendering

Stefan Roettger

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Exploring the relationships between vegetation measurements and temperature in residential areas by integrating LIDAR and remotely sensed imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population growth and urban sprawl have contributed to the formation of significant urban heat island phenomena in Houston, Texas, the fourth largest city in the United States. The population growth in Houston was 25.8% between 1990 and 2000 nearly double the national average. The demand for information concerning the effects of urban and suburban development is growing. Houston is currently the only major US city lacking any kind of comprehensive city zoning ordinances. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been used as a surrogate variable to estimate land surface temperatures at higher spatial resolutions, given the fact that a high-resolution remotely sensed NDVI can be created almost effortlessly and remotely sensed thermal data at higher resolutions is much more difficult to obtain. This has allowed researchers to study urban heat island dynamics at a micro-scale. However, this study suggests that a vegetation index alone might not be the best surrogate variable for providing information regarding the independent effects and level of contribution that tree canopy, grass, and low-lying plants have on surface temperatures in residential neighborhoods. This research combines LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) feature height data and high-resolution infrared aerial photos to measure the characteristics of the micro-structure of residential areas (residentialstructure), derives various descriptive vegetation measurement statistics, and correlates the spatial distribution of surface temperature to the type and amount of vegetation cover in residential areas. Regression analysis is used to quantify the independent influence that different residential-structures have on surface temperature. In regard to implementing changes at a neighborhood level, the descriptive statistics derived for residential-structure at a micro-scale may provide useful information to decision-makers and may reveal a guide for future developers concerned with mitigating the negative effects of urban heat island phenomena.

Clemonds, Matthew A

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

NPP and Vegetation Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Data Sets Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of three new net primary production (NPP) and two vegetation data sets. The NPP data sets contain data for...

43

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM many ecosystem services, including carbon storage, soil retention, and water cycling. One in dominant vegetation, often termed state change, will occur. The complex nature of state change requires

44

VEGETABLE LIPIDS AS COMPONENTS OF FUNCTIONAL FOODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nutritionally beneficial compounds naturally present in vegetable lipids will be subject of this minireview. This article will discuss lipidic compounds from less known vegetable sources and potential advantages of its incorporation into human diet as a functional ingredient.

M. Stuchlík; S. Žák; Milan Stuchlík; Stanislav Žák

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Reactive glass and vegetation patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of vegetation patterns in the arid and the semi-arid climatic zones is studied. Threshold for the biomass of the perennial flora is shown to be a relevant factor, leading to a frozen disordered patterns in the arid zone. In this ``glassy'' state, vegetation appears as a singular plant spots separated by irregular distances, and an indirect repulsive interaction among shrubs is induced by the competition for water. At higher precipitation rates, the diminish of hydrological losses in the presence of flora becomes important and yields spatial attraction and clustering of biomass. Turing-like patterns with characteristic length scale may emerge from the disordered structure due to this positive feedback instability.

N. M. Shnerb; P. Sara; H. Lavee; S. Solomon

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

MAPSS Vegetation Modeling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MAPSS Vegetation Modeling MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Biomass, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.us/pnw/mdr/mapss/ MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Screenshot References: MAPSS[1] Applications "A landscape- to global-scale vegetation distribution model that was developed to simulate the potential biosphere impacts and biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks from climatic change. Model output from MAPSS has been used extensively in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate

48

ORNL DAAC, Vegetation Data, March 10, 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data pertaining to terrain and soils, water resources, forestry, vegetation, agriculture, land use, wildlife, air quality, climate, natural areas, and endangered species at...

49

Monte Carlo simulation model for electromagnetic scattering from vegetation and inversion of vegetation parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis research, a coherent scattering model for microwave remote sensing of vegetation canopy is developed on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations. An accurate model of vegetation structure is essential for the ...

Wang, Li-Fang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A Green Planet versus a Desert World: Estimating the Effect of Vegetation Extremes on the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of vegetation extremes on the general circulation is estimated by two atmospheric GCM simulations using global desert and forest boundary conditions over land. The difference between the climates of a “green planet” and a “desert world”...

Klaus Fraedrich; Axel Kleidon; Frank Lunkeit

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Vegetation Dynamics Enhancing Long-Term Climate Variability Confirmed by Two Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different coupled climate–vegetation models, the Community Climate Model version 3 coupled to the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (CCM3–IBIS) and the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique’s climate model coupled to the Organizing Carbon and ...

Christine Delire; Nathalie de Noblet-Ducoudré; Adriana Sima; Isabelle Gouirand

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is a must-have for vegetable oil processing and maintenance personnel, as well as equipment manufacturers. Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Processing Hardback Books Processing 02C0292F90CD6AE7B6963975D2B0BF64 1st Edition, 2008

53

VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of the World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil Utilization World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil Utilization Istanbul, Turkey World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil U

55

The effect of school gardens on children's attitudes and related behaviors regarding fruits and vegetables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nutrition plays an important role in the life of a child because of the impact it has on growth and development. One part of proper nutrition is consumption of five servings of fruits and vegetables every day. American children fall short of reaching this recommended daily minimum, indicating a need for educational intervention. School gardens can serve as a tool to teach nutrition education related to fruits and vegetables. The purpose of this research study was to evaluate the effect gardening can have on nutritional attitudes and behaviors regarding fruits and vegetables. Three hundred and thirty two students, representing second through fifth grades from eight schools in Texas, participated in the study from the spring of 1998 to the spring of 1999. The sample consisted of-an experimental group that completed a pretest, participated in the curriculum and gardening and then completed a posttest, an experimental group that participated in the curriculum and gardening and then completed a posttest only, and a control group who was not currently gardening at school and completed a posttest. Students' nutritional attitudes regarding fruits and vegetables were measured with a fruit and vegetable preference questionnaire that investigated their vegetable, fruit and snack preferences. Their nutritional behaviors regarding fruits and vegetables were evaluated through 24-hour recall journals. Significant differences were found between the pretest and posttest scores of the children. After gardening, children had more positive attitudes toward vegetables and fruit and vegetable snacks. There was a greater improvement in vegetable preference by students who had lower scores initially. The greatest improvement in fruit and vegetable snack preferences was detected for female students and younger students. Attitudes toward fruits did not change significantly after gardening. However, preference scores indicated students possessed positive attitudes towards fruits. Fruit and vegetable consumption or behavior did not significantly improve due to gardening. Few differences were found between the preference scores and fruit and vegetable intake of the experimental versus the control group. The data may have been influenced by variations in teacher administration of-the testing, grade level, economic status, gender, ethnicity and previous gardening experience.

Lineberger, Sarah Elizabeth

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical? Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practi

57

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona...

58

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Area and Carbon Content of Sphagnum Since Last Glacial Maximum (2002) TDE Model Intercomparison Project Data Archive Presentations and abstracts from the recent DOE Terrestrial Science Team Meeting (Argonne National Laboratory, October 29-31, 2001) FACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth (2001), NDP-078A | PDF Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: 1990-1999 Literature (2000), CDIAC-129 Direct effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on plants and ecosystems: An updated bibliographic data base (1994), CDIAC-70 A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated

59

Green Vegetable Oil Processing, Revised First Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book addresses alternative green technologies at various stages of oilseed and vegetable oil processing. The Revised First Edition includes much of the content of the first edition, but incorporates updated data, details, images, figures, and captions

60

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 19, 2002 July 19, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-96: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Snohomish District Substations July 19, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-70: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 9, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-81: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-84: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-80: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-78: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program June 21, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-75: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program May 31, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-58: Supplement Analysis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 20, 2003 February 20, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-123: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 19, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-126: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 18, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-125: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 18, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-124: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 12, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-121: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 10, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-120: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Benton County, Washington January 16, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program December 24, 2002

62

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Operation Redwing. Project 1. 10. Blast over vegetated and cleared areas  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were made to determine the difference in blast effects over a surface covered with low shrubs and grass and over a cleared sandy surface in the precursor region, and an attempt was made to correlate this difference with measurements of preshock sound speed over the surface. Overpressure was measured with ground-baffle gages and with pivot-static gages at 3-foot elevations. Dynamic pressures were measured at the 3-foot elevation with the same gages. Measurements were made at the same ground ranges for vegetated surface as for the sandy surface. The vegetation reduced the severity of the precursor, showing later arrival times and smaller dynamic pressures than over the cleared area. The overpressures over the vegetation were the same at the ground and 3-foot levels. No measurements of sound speed after zero time were obtained, so a correlation is not possible.

Broyles, C.D.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Vegetable Oil for Color Only Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Vegetable Oil for Color Only. Sample Includes soybean oil. Vegetable Oil for Color Only Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laborat

66

Momentum and scalar transport in vegetated shear flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental aquatic flows are seldom free of vegetative influence. However, the impact of submerged vegetation on the hydrodynamics and mixing processes in aquatic flows remains poorly understood. In this thesis, I present ...

Ghisalberti, Marco (Marco Andrea), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation feedbacks on climate, on the subannual time scale, are examined across six monsoon regions with a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice–land model with dynamic vegetation. Initial value ensemble experiments are run in which the total ...

Michael Notaro; Guangshan Chen; Zhengyu Liu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A Representation of Variable Root Distribution in Dynamic Vegetation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Root distribution is treated as a static component in most current dynamic vegetation models (DVMs). While changes in leaf and stem biomass are reflected in leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation height via specific leaf area (SLA) and allometric ...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Vegetation Dynamics within the North American Monsoon Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American monsoon (NAM) leads to a large increase in summer rainfall and a seasonal change in vegetation in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Understanding the interactions between NAM rainfall and vegetation ...

Giovanni Forzieri; Fabio Castelli; Enrique R. Vivoni

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Production of Oil in Vegetative Tissues - Energy Innovation Portal  

Production of Oil in Vegetative Tissues Inventors: Christoph Benning, Changcheng Xu, Binbin Lu, Jinpeng Gao Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center

72

Normal matter storage of antiprotons  

SciTech Connect

Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

Campbell, L.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Herbicide Use Safety for Vegetation Management on Powerline Corridors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents original research on herbicide use safety in association with vegetation management on electric transmission line rights of way.BackgroundThe Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted integrated vegetation management assessments for five electric utilities between 2006 and 2009, using EPRI-developed procedures and standards of integrated vegetation management performance. Observations during the assessments indicated that utility ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

Simulating Future Changes in Arctic and Subarctic Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic is a sensitive system undergoing dramatic changes related to recent warming trends. Vegetation dynamics—increases in the quantity of green vegetation and a northward migration of trees into the arctic tundra—are a component of ... Keywords: Arctic, biogeography, boreal forest, climate change, forest migration, shrub encroachment, subarctic, tundra, vegetation dynamics models

Howard E. Epstein; Jed O. Kaplan; Heike Lischke; Qin Yu

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Diesel Fuel from Vegetable Oils or Animal Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Diesel Fuel from Vegetable Oils or Animal Fats Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Di

76

Species and community response to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought in the northern Mojave Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Little information is available on how desert plant communities that are dominated by perennial species respond to normal and above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. Intuitively, one would expect total canopy cover to increase. Whether a concomitant increase in the density of perennial species also occurs is unknown. Even less is known about how individual species respond to above normal precipitation following drought. From 1987 through 1991 a prolonged drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the northern Mojave Desert. In March 1991 the northern Mojave Desert received well above normal precipitation. The following two winters (December--March) also had above normal precipitation (150 to 200 % of normal, unpublished data). Ongoing vegetation characterization studies by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG&G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both vegetation associations and individual species respond to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. This paper reports the preliminary results.

Schultz, B.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

normal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4202010 Cushman & Wakefield Marks 40 th Earth Day Celebrating New Milestones in Sustainability NEW YORK, April 22, 2010 -- Global real estate services firm Cushman & Wakefield...

78

The gas emissions variation of diesel engine from the combustion of used vegetable oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution is any gas or particulate that originates from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Anthropogenic sources mostly related to burning different kinds of fuel for energy. Moreover, the exhaust from burning fuels in automobiles, homes and ... Keywords: biofuels, gas emissions, vegetable oil

Charalampos Arapatsakos; Dimitrios Christoforidis; Anastasios Karkanis

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models  

SciTech Connect

Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOI: 10.1017/S1464793103006419 Printed in the United Kingdom Vegetation dynamics – simulating responses to climatic change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modelling approach to simulating vegetation dynamics is described, incorporating critical processes of carbon sequestration, growth, mortality and distribution. The model has been developed to investigate the responses of vegetation to environmental change, at time scales from days to centuries and from the local to the global scale. The model is outlined and subsequent tests, against independent data sources, are relatively successful, from the small scale to the global scale. Tests against eddy covariance observations of carbon exchange by vegetation indicated significant differences between measured and simulated net ecosystem production (NEP). NEP is the net of large fluxes due to gross primary production and respiration, which are not directly measured and so there is some uncertainty in explaining differences between observations and simulations. In addition it was noted that closer agreement of fluxes was achieved for natural, or long-lived managed vegetation than for recently managed vegetation. The discrepancies appear to be most closely related to respiratory carbon losses from the soil, but this area needs further exploration. The differences do not scale up to the global scale, where simulated and measured global net biome production were similar, indicating that fluxes measured at the managed observed sites are not typical globally. The model (the Sheffield Dynamic Global Vegetation Model, SDGVM) has been applied to contemporary

F. I. Woodward; M. R. Lomas

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

direct normal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

normal normal Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A map depicting model estimates of monthly average daily total radiation using inputs derived from satellite and surface observations of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, albedo, atmospheric pressure and ozone sampled at a 40km resolution. (Purpose): A visual depiction of solar energy resource for concentrating solar power systems. Source NREL Date Released December 11th, 2003 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Central America direct normal DNI map NREL solar SWERA UNEP Data application/pdf icon Download Map (pdf, 67.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

83

Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who are looking for alternative methods to improve conventional refining methods. During the last decade, energy efficient membrane separation technology has evolved dramatically. This thesis reports a study on degumming crude vegetable oil using membrane separation. In the bench-scale study, two membranes were evaluated for their flux and rejection properties. Process parameters including pressure, temperature, feed velocity and volumetric concentration factor were examined. A 99.6% rejection of phospholipids and a flux of 22.4 LMH were achieved at pressure 300 psi, temperature 40'C and feed velocity 220 1/hr using DS-7 membrane, and significant reduction of the coloring pigments was observed as well. In the pilot-scale study, the spiral wound DS-7 membrane was found effective for 100% rejection of phospholipids with a permeate flux of 57.6 LMH. The rejection rates of phospholipids, Mg and Ca were 100%, 99.6% and 54.6%, respectively. Resistance-in-series model of the membrane system was also studied. The membrane resistance, the fouling resistance, and the polarization resistance for the pilotscale system were 0.29, 0.043, and 4.49, respectively. Evaluation on membrane fouling and cleaning showed that flux decreased rapidly during the first several hours and membrane cleaning presented no significant problem. The pilot-scale study confirmed results of the bench-scale system and provides useful data for commercializing membrane refining process in the near future. KEY WORDS: Membrane separation, crude vegetable oil, degumming, phospholipids.

Lin, Lan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program 285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This electric transmission system operates in seven states of the Pacific Northwest. (See Figure I-1). The seven states offer a great diversity of vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and neighboring members of the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to keep vegetation a safe distance away from our electric power facilities and control noxious weeds at our

85

Best Management Practices for Vegetation Management at Electric Utility Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling vegetation inside key electric utility facilities is a necessary maintenance activity for a utility’s safe and reliable operation. Substations, switchyards, and other facilities require perpetual maintenance to maintain a vegetation-free environment. At a minimum, vegetation-maintenance treatment needs to be conducted annually; in some climatic regions, multiple treatments may be required. The objective of this research paper was to define current industry practices by means of a ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

Transmission Rights-of-Way Vegetation Management Plan Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) FAC-003-1 standards for vegetation management on electric transmission line rights-of-way (ROWs) have been in place since April 2006. These mandatory standards regulate electric transmission line vegetation management across the United States, and are narrowly focused on minimizing vegetation caused outages in electricity transmission. The NERC FAC-003-1 standards are potentially broadened by the voluntary American National Standards Institute (A...

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

87

Weather Normalization of Reliability Indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather significantly increases variability of reliability indices. This project focuses on exploring statistical correlations between weather parameters and system performance indices using historical utility reliability data and weather data. Using this information, various approaches for normalizing utility performance indices for variability in weather can be developed.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

88

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOEEIS-0285SA-21) Joe Johnson - TFSKalispell - Natural Resource...

89

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Local Incentive-Based Policy...

90

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 9 Printing Inks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 9 Printing Inks Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Printing Inks from the book ...

91

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

methods, (2) the red-edge positioning (REP) methods, and (3) the use of machine learning regression trees. Although there are numerous vegetation indices, we evaluated...

92

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 4 Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 4 Refining Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Refining from the book ...

93

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 5 Bleaching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 5 Bleaching Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Bleaching from the book ...

94

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 6 Hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 6 Hydrogenation Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Hydrogenation from the book ...

95

A phrase-based statistical model for SMS text normalization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short Messaging Service (SMS) texts behave quite differently from normal written texts and have some very special phenomena. To translate SMS texts, traditional approaches model such irregularities directly in Machine Translation (MT). However, such ...

AiTi Aw; Min Zhang; Juan Xiao; Jian Su

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

On the “Best” Temperature and Precipitation Normals: The Illinois Situation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical (1901–79) temperature and precipitation data for four Illinois stations were used to determine the frequency with which summer and winter averages for periods of various length (i.e., different climatic normals) are closest to the ...

Peter J. Lamb; Stanley A. Changnon Jr.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Normalization method for video images  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for automatically and adaptively normalizing analog signals representative of video images in object detection systems. Such normalization maximizes the average information content of the video images and, thereby, provides optimal digitized images for object detection and identification. The present invention manipulates two system control signals -- gain control signal and offset control signal -- to convert an analog image signal into a transformed analog image signal, such that the corresponding digitized image contains the maximum amount of information achievable with a conventional object detection system. In some embodiments of the present invention, information content is measured using parameters selected from image entropy, image mean, and image variance.

Donohoe, G.W.; Hush, D.R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Normalized information-based divergences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the mathematical study of some divergences based on the mutual information well-suited to categorical random vectors. These divergences are generalizations of the“entropy distance”and“information distance”. Their main characteristic is that they combine a complexity term and the mutual information. We then introduce the notion of (normalized) informationbased divergence, propose several examples and discuss their mathematical properties.

J. -f. Coeurjolly; R. Drouilhet; J. -f. Robineau

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Normal Modes of Black Hole Accretion Disks  

SciTech Connect

This paper studies the hydrodynamical problem of normal modes of small adiabatic oscillations of relativistic barotropic thin accretion disks around black holes (and compact weakly magnetic neutron stars). Employing WKB techniques, we obtain the eigen frequencies and eigenfunctions of the modes for different values of the mass and angular momentum of the central black hole. We discuss the properties of the various types of modes and examine the role of viscosity, as it appears to render some of the modes unstable to rapid growth.

Ortega-Rodriguez, Manuel; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Costa Rica U.; Silbergleit, Alexander S.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Wagoner, Robert V.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

GIMS-based method for vegetation microwave monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) To present a working methodology for the combined use of modeling technology and microwave remote-sensing measurements in the assessment of attenuation of electromagnetic waves by the vegetation cover; (2) ... Keywords: GIMS, Microwave, Remote sensing, Vegetative cover

Vladimir F. Krapivin; Anatolij M. Shutko; Alexander A. Chukhlantsev; Sergei P. Golovachev; Gary W. Phillips

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain water. This publication illustrations the effects of vegetation management on water availability.

Schuster, Joseph L.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

102

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT@nmsu.edu #12;i HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT OF BROOM both burning and spraying with herbicide. However, the broom snakeweed was not eradicated, and numbers

Johnson, Eric E.

103

Definition: Direct normal irradiance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Direct normal irradiance the amount of solar radiation received per unit area by a surface perpendicular (normal) to the rays...

104

Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Salt Marsh Vegetation across Scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogeographic patterns across a landscape are developed by the interplay of environmental processes operating at different spatial and temporal scales. This research investigated dynamics of salt marsh vegetation on the Skallingen salt marsh in Denmark responding to environmental variations at large, medium, and fine scales along both spatial and temporal spectrums. At the broad scale, this research addressed the importance of wind-induced rise of the sea surface in such biogeographic changes. A new hypothetical chain was suggested: recent trends in the North Atlantic Oscillation index toward its positive phase have led to increased storminess and wind tides on the ocean surface, resulting in increased frequency, duration, and magnitude of submergence and, hence, waterlogging of marsh soils and plants, which has retarded ecological succession. At the mid-scale, spatial patterns of vegetation and environmental factors were examined across tidal creeks. Sites closer to tidal creeks, compared to marsh interiors, were characterized by the dominance of later-successional species, higher bulk density, and lower nutrient contents and electrical conductivity. This finding implies that locations near creeks have experienced a better drainage condition than the inner marshes, which eventually facilitated the establishment of later-successional plants that are intolerant to physical stress. At the micro-scale, this research examined how the extent and mode of facilitation and competition vary for different combinations of plant species along physical gradients. Both positive and negative relationships were spatially manifested to a greater degree on the low marsh than on the mid marsh. This insight extends our current knowledge of scale-dependent interactions beyond pioneer zones to higher zones. On the low marsh, different types of bivariate point pattern (i.e., clustered, random, and regular) were observed for different combinations of species even at similar spatial scales. This finding implies that it is difficult to generalize at which scales competition and facilitation occur. To conclude, this research stresses the need for a holistic approach in future investigations of salt marsh biogeography. For example, based on results of this current research, it would be meaningful to develop a comprehensive simulation model that incorporates salt marsh ecology, geomorphology, and hydrology observed across scales.

Kim, Daehyun

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

107

Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Dataset Summary Description Production, acreage, value, prices, imports, exports, per capita use, and beginning stocks for major fresh market and processed vegetables, 1970 onward. Also includes data for potatoes, sweet potatoes, dry beans and peas, and fresh and processed mushrooms. Tags {"United States","Economic Research Service",prices,value,imports,exports,"per capita use","beginning stocks",vegetables,"fresh market",processed,potatoes,"sweet potatoes","dry beans",peas,"fresh muschrooms","processed mushrooms",mushrooms}

108

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

109

The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

NONE

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

8. Corn Hybrid Options for Replanting 1. Determining Vegetative Growth Stages of Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowing the growth stage of corn is critical to understanding the management practices and potential yield impact from wet weather and/or hail damage. There are a couple methods for determining vegetative growth stages in corn. These different staging methods are used by different disciplines and often occur on different herbicide labels. Knowing the differences between these staging methods will help to reduce confusion when determining corn growth and development. These stages are determined either by the number of visible leaf collars or the number of leaves. Collars and V-Stages The collar is the part of the leaf that wraps

Hail Damage To Corn; Corn Flood Survival; Chad Lee Agronomy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National Seashore Satellite Remote Sensing Data in FIIS Vegetation Mapping The vegetation communities and spatial patterns necessary. #12;Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in Seagrass Habitat Mapping Recent development of hyperspectral

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

112

Predicting Regional Transpiration at Elevated Atmospheric CO2: Influence of the PBL–Vegetation Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled planetary boundary layer (PBL)–vegetation model is used to study the influence of the PBL–vegetation interaction and the ambient CO2 concentration on surface resistance rs and regional transpiration ?E. Vegetation is described using the ...

Cor M. J. Jacobs; Henk A. R. de Bruin

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nonlinear Dynamics in a Coupled Vegetation–Atmosphere System and Implications for Desert–Forest Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the global vegetation distribution is largely controlled by the large-scale climate pattern, the observed vegetation–rainfall relationship is also influenced by vegetation feedback and climate variability. Using a simplified coupled ...

Ning Zeng; Katrina Hales; J. David Neelin

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosytstems  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

Robert P. Breckenridge

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Normalized Compression Distance of Multiples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normalized compression distance (NCD) is a parameter-free similarity measure based on compression. The NCD between pairs of objects is not sufficient for all applications. We propose an NCD of finite multisets (multiples) of objacts that is metric and is better for many applications. Previously, attempts to obtain such an NCD failed. We use the theoretical notion of Kolmogorov complexity that for practical purposes is approximated from above by the length of the compressed version of the file involved, using a real-world compression program. We applied the new NCD for multiples to retinal progenitor cell questions that were earlier treated with the pairwise NCD. Here we get significantly better results. We also applied the NCD for multiples to synthetic time sequence data. The preliminary results are as good as nearest neighbor Euclidean classifier.

Cohen, Andrew R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Multitemporal Analysis of Degraded Forests in the Southern Brazilian Amazon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, statistical multitemporal analysis was applied to evaluate the capability of reflectance, vegetation indices [normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI)], normalized difference infrared ...

Carlos M. Souza Jr.; Dar A. Roberts; AndréL. Monteiro

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Major Normal Fault Major Normal Fault Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Major Normal Fault Dictionary.png Major Normal Fault: Normal faults are structures in which the hanging wall is down dropped along the fault plane relative to the foot wall. They are the predominant type of structure in extensional tectonic environments, but are commonly encountered in a number of geologic settings. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone

120

Observed Vegetation–Climate Feedbacks in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed vegetation feedbacks on temperature and precipitation are assessed across the United States using satellite-based fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) and monthly climate data for the period of 1982–2000. This study ...

M. Notaro; Z. Liu; J. W. Williams

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation 42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah Summary This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western's proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska. The EIS website is http://ww2.wapa.gov/sites/western/transmission/infrastruct/Pages/Western%20FS%20EIS.aspx.

122

Microsoft PowerPoint - Town Bluff Vegetation impact.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

's. In 1989 the used for the Lake constructed in the 1950's. In 1989 the 's. In 1989 the used for the Lake constructed in the 1950's. In 1989 the dam was modified for the installation of Robert D. Willis dam was modified for the installation of Robert D. Willis Power Plant. The plant has two S Power Plant. The plant has two S - - Tube type turbines Tube type turbines which operate generators nominally rated at 4Mwh each. which operate generators nominally rated at 4Mwh each. Actual power production has rarely exceeded 3.6Mwh Actual power production has rarely exceeded 3.6Mwh Invasive species of Vegetation has increased to the Invasive species of Vegetation has increased to the point that an aquatic vegetation control program is being point that an aquatic vegetation control program is being managed by Town Bluff in coordination with TPWD and managed by Town Bluff in coordination with TPWD and

123

Interpretation of Surface and Planetary Directional Albedos for Vegetated Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric solar radiation model has been coupled with surface reflectance measurements for two vegetation types, pasture land and savannah, in order to address several issues associated with understanding the directional planetary albedo; ...

Inna L. Vulis; Robert D. Cess

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 12 Enzymatic Interesterfication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 12 Enzymatic Interesterfication Processing eChapters Processing 716316455FE47FB5D9A86E048BC2AE36 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Enzymatic Interesterfication...

125

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 10 Hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 10 Hydrogenation Processing eChapters Processing 7672D25097D246FF512E7AB73F722C4B AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Hydrogenation from the book ...

126

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 6 Enzymatic Degumming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 6 Enzymatic Degumming Processing eChapters Processing 57ACA7723A9727237283ACEAD636027C AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Enzymatic Degumming from the book ...

127

How important is vegetation phenology for European climate and heatwaves?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that vegetation phenology may play an important role for the mid-latitude climate. In this study, we investigate the impact of interannual and intraseasonal variations in phenology on European climate using Regional ...

Ruth Lorenz; Edouard L. Davin; David M. Lawrence; Reto Stöckli; Sonia I. Seneviratne

128

Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

Nepf, Heidi

129

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are discussed below. Planning Steps: 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. Work will take place along Custer-Intalco 1 230 kV transmission line. The...

130

Global Vegetation Indices from the NOAA-7 Meteorological Satellite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern and Southern Hemisphere polar stereographic maps of “vegetation index” are now being produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The maps are derived from visible and near-infrared data from NOAA's operational polar ...

J. D. Tarpley; S. R. Schneider; R. L. Money

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Sensible Heat Transfer Parameterization for Surfaces with Anisothermal Dense Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scalar roughness for sensible beat can be directly formulated in terms of the surface temperature. Therefore, in the case of an anisothermal vegetation canopy, the concept of a scalar roughness is ill defined and it may vary greatly depending ...

Wilfried Brutsaert; Michiaki Sugita

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Asymptotic normalization coefficients from ab initio calculations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present calculations of asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for one-nucleon removals from nuclear states of mass numbers 3 {le} A {le} 9. Our ANCs were computed from variational Monte Carlo solutions to the many-body Schroedinger equation with the combined Argonne v{sub 18} two-nucleon and Urbana IX three-nucleon potentials. Instead of computing explicit overlap integrals, we applied a Green function method that is insensitive to the difficulties of constructing and Monte Carlo sampling the long-range tails of the variational wave functions. This method also allows computation of the ANC at the physical separation energy, even when it differs from the separation energy for the Hamiltonian. We compare our results, which for most nuclei are the first ab initio calculations of ANCs, with existing experimental and theoretical results and discuss further possible applications of the technique.

Nollett, K. M.; Wiringa, R. B. (Physics)

2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

A simple proof of Jordan normal form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note, a simple proof Jordan normal form and rational form of matrices over a field is given.

Chen, Yuqun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Size, shape, and appearance of the normal female pituitary gland  

SciTech Connect

One hundred seven women 18-65 years old were studied who were referred for suspected central nervous system disease not related to the pituitary gland or hypothalamus. High-resolution, direct, coronal, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) was used to examine the size; shape, and density of the normal pituitary gland. There were three major conclusions: (1) the height of the normal gland can be as much as 9 mm; (2) the superior margin of the gland may bulge in normal patients; and (3) both large size and convex contour appear to be associated with younger age. It was also found that serum prolactin levels do not appear to correlate with the CT appearances. Noise artifacts inherent in high-detail, thin-section, soft-tissue scanning may be a limiting factor in defining reproducible patterns in different parts of the normal pituitary gland.

Wolpert, S.M.; Molitch, M.E.; Goldman, J.A.; Wood, J.B.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by Homogenized Monthly Temperature Normals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOAA released the new 1981–2010 climate normals in July 2011. These included monthly and daily normals of minimum and maximum temperature. Monthly normals were computed from monthly temperature values that were corrected for biases (i.e., ...

Anthony Arguez; Scott Applequist

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Global Vegetation and Climate Change due to Future Increases in CO2 as Projected by a Fully Coupled Model with Dynamic Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transient simulations are presented of future climate and vegetation associated with continued rising levels of CO2. The model is a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean–land–ice model with dynamic vegetation. The impacts of the radiative and ...

Michael Notaro; Steve Vavrus; Zhengyu Liu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Process analysis and optimization of biodiesel production from vegetable oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dwindling resources of fossil fuels coupled with the steady increase in energy consumption have spurred research interest in alternative and renewable energy sources. Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternatives for fossil fuels. It can be made from various renewable sources, including recycled oil, and can be utilized in lieu of petroleum-based diesel. To foster market competitiveness for biodiesel, it is necessary to develop cost-effective and technically sound processing schemes, to identify related key design criteria, and optimize performance. The overall goal of this work was to design and optimize biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester “FAME”) production from vegetable oil. To achieve this goal, several interconnected research activities were undertaken. First, a base-case flow sheet was developed for the process. The performance of this flow sheet along with the key design and operating criteria were identified by conducting computer-aided simulation using ASPEN Plus. Various scenarios were simulated to provide sufficient understanding and insights. Also, different thermodynamic databases were used for different sections of the process to account for the various characteristics of the streams throughout the process. Next, mass and energy integration studies were performed to reduce the consumption of material and energy utilities, improve environmental impact, and enhance profitability. Finally, capital cost estimation was carried out using the ICARUS Process Evaluator computer-aided tools linked to the results of the ASPEN simulation. The operating cost of the process was estimated using the key information on process operation such as raw materials, utilities, and labor. A profitability analysis was carried out by examining the ROI (Return of Investment) and PP (Payback Period). It was determined that the single most important economic factor is the cost of soybean oil, which accounted for more than 90% of the total annualized cost. Consequently, a sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the effect of soybean oil cost on profitability. It was determined that both ROI and PP quickly deteriorate as the cost of soybean oil increases.

Myint, Lay L.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Some Effects of Soil and Vegetation Databases on Spectra of Limited-Area Mesoscale Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from an analysis of variance as a function of horizontal scale. The normalized difference-field spectra of kinetic energy, temperature, vapor mixing ratio, and cloud-water mixing ratio were computed as a function of ...

George D. Modica; Samuel Y-K. Yee; Joseph Venuti

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Normalization of Process Safety Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is aimed at exploring new process safety metrics for measuring the process safety performance in processing industries. Following a series of catastrophic incidents such as the Bhopal chemical tragedy (1984) and Phillips 66 explosion (1989), process safety became a more important subject than ever. These incidents triggered the development and promulgation of the Process Safety Management (PSM) standard in 1992. While PSM enables management to optimize their process safety programs and organizational risks, there is an emerging need to evaluate the process safety implementation across an organization through measurements. Thus, the process safety metric is applied as a powerful tool that measures safety activities, status, and performance within PSM. In this study, process safety lagging metrics were introduced to describe the contribution of process related parameters in determining the safety performance of an organization. Lagging metrics take process safety incidents as the numerator and divide it by different process-related denominators. Currently a process lagging metric (uses work hours as denominator) introduced by the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) has been used to evaluate the safety performance in processing industries. However, this lagging metric doesn't include enough process safety information. Therefore, modified denominators are proposed in this study and compared with the existing time-based denominator to validate the effectiveness and applicability of the new metrics. Each proposed metric was validated using available industry data. Statistical unitization method has converted incident rates of different ranges for the convenience of comparison. Trend line analysis was the key indication for determining the appropriateness of new metrics. Results showed that some proposed process-related metrics have the potential as alternatives, along with the time-based metric, to evaluate process safety performance within organizations.

Wang, Mengtian

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Major role of marine vegetation on the oceanic carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The carbon burial in vegetated sediments, ignored in past assessments of carbon burial in the ocean, was evaluated using a bottom-up approach derived from upscaling a compilation of published individual estimates of carbon burial in vegetated habitats (seagrass meadows, salt marshes and mangrove forests) to the global level and a top-down approach derived from considerations of global sediment balance and a compilation of the organic carbon content of vegeatated sediments. Up-scaling of individual burial estimates values yielded a total carbon burial in vegetated habitats of 111 Tmol C y ?1. The total burial in unvegetated sediments was estimated to be 126 Tg C y ?1, resulting in a bottom-up estimate of total burial in the ocean of about 244 Tg C y ?1, two-fold higher than estimates of oceanic carbon burial that presently enter global carbon budgets. The organic carbon

C. M. Duarte; J. J. Middelburg; N. Caraco

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

Ingley, H A

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

Phillip H. Henna

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

144

Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils  

SciTech Connect

Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

Phillip H. Henna

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

145

Making Forecasts and Weather Normalization Work Together  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility industry restructuring has changed the consistency between weather-normalized sales and energy forecasts. This Technology Review discusses the feasibility of integrating weather normalization and forecasting processes, and addresses whether the conflicting goal of obtaining greater consistency and accuracy with fewer staff resources can be met with more integrated approaches.

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

146

Asymptotically almost all -terms are strongly normalizing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymptotically almost all -terms are strongly normalizing Ren´e David, Christophe Raffalli) properties of random -terms. Our main results show that asymptotically, almost all terms are strongly normalizing and that any fixed closed term almost never appears in a random term. Surprisingly, in combinatory

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

147

Asymptotically almost all -terms are strongly normalizing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymptotically almost all -terms are strongly normalizing Ren´e David, Christophe Raffalli) properties of random -terms. Our main results are that asymptotically all the terms are strongly normalizing and that any fixed closed term almost never appears in a random term. Surprisingly, in combinatory logic (the

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

148

In lesion diagnostics, it is sometimes hard to choose which data normalization is the best among the other ones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract In lesion diagnostics, it is sometimes hard to choose which data normalization is the best part of the useful information can be lost. Different normalization techniques retrieve different information about the data classes. Sometimes it is quite hard to single out a normalization technique

Duin, Robert P.W.

149

Definition: Direct normal irradiance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

normal irradiance normal irradiance (Redirected from Definition:DNI) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Direct normal irradiance the amount of solar radiation received per unit area by a surface perpendicular (normal) to the rays that come in a straight line from the direction of the sun at its current position in the sky.[1] Also Known As DNI Related Terms Solar radiation, Irradiance, Concentrating solar power, Global horizontal irradiance References ↑ http://www.3tier.com/en/support/glossary/#dni Retrie LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Direct_normal_irradiance&oldid=423379" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

150

Influence of woody plant on spring and riparian vegetation in central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increase in human population, water resources have become more and more precious. A comprehensive study of water yield characteristics is imperative, especially in water-limited semiarid regions. The objective of this study is to examine spring flow and vegetation cover in a first-order watershed and investigate the herbaceous community structure of upland riparian zones. This study consists of two major components: (1) the effects of environmental factors and vegetation cover on spring flow at Pedernales River upland catchments, and (2) the ecological responses of vegetation to altered flow regimes that result from brush management at the upland riparian zones. The study finds that an average of 3.67% of the monthly water budget of first-order catchments in central Texas is made up of spring flow. The influence of woody plant cover on streamflow was evaluated by comparing spring sites with different percentages of woody cover three times during 2003 and 2004. Our findings indicate that changes in woody plant cover had no influence on the amounts of streamflow from these catchments, and the surface catchment area had only a minor influence. This suggests that the real spring catchment area might be different from the surface watershed boundaries that have been delineated by topography. Plant species richness and diversity gradually decreased with increasing lateral distances from the stream bank. Herbaceous richness and diversity declined with increasing Ashe juniper cover in the riparian zone. Ashe juniper canopy cover had a larger effect on the understory composition than the cover of other woody species. Herbaceous diversity and production was greater in areas with sparse tree density than in areas with no trees, but was lowest at high tree densities. The complete removal of Ashe juniper in the riparian zones is not recommended because of the potential loss of grass cover. The recommended management would be to leave a sparse cover of canopy trees to maintain understory plants.

Shen, Li

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Vegetation, soils, and surface hydrology of playa landforms in the Rio Grande Plains, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Playas in the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas were compared with respect to their: 1) size, shape, soil properties, and microtopography, 2) vegetation composition and structure, 3) surface water accumulation potential, and 4) disturbance history. Transitions from playa to drainage woodlands were also quantified with respect to soils and vegetation. Playas were typically oval shaped basins ranging from 0.14 to 3.81 ha in size. Physiognomy ranged from grassland (treeless) to savanna (woody basal area 70 m²/ha). When trees were present, Prosopis glandulosa or Acacia smallii were typically dominant or co-dominant. Neighboring woodlands on sandy loam drainage landforms had a greater overstory woody density (255 [] 58 stems/ha) than playas (18 [] 3.6 stems/ha); however, overstory woody basal area was not significantly different between the landforms. Three woody species (Acacia smallii, Sesbania drummondii, and Parkinsonia aculeata) were unique to playas. Herbaceous standing crop biomass was statistically different between playas (81 [] 24.4 to 198 [] 29.8 g/m²) and inversely correlated with tree basal area (r² = 0.36), with the contribution of grasses to total biomass ranging from 55% to 92%. Playa soils were Vertisols or vertic Mollisols consisting of clayey surfaces with shrink-swell properties. Mean surface pH values (6.5 [] 0.1), EC (0.231 [] 0.03 and 0.350 [] 0.05 dS/m), clay content (~ 40%), and bulk densities (1.8 [] 0.02 g/m³) for both subgroup classifications were not comparable. Thus, there was no apparent edaphic basis for the observed differences in vegetation. The extent and duration of inundation varied among playas, depending on basin microtopography. Despite anaerobic conditions associated with inundation, woody plant cover has increased in five of the eight playas in the past 44 years. Decreases in woody density occurred in two playas subjected to prescribed fire and herbicide treatments. The third basin has been grass-dominated and treeless since 1950, apparently owing to its retention of standing water for extended periods. With the exception of this deep playa basin, disturbance (e.g. fire, herbiciding, and chaining) appears to have been more important than topographic factors in shaping vegetation structure and composition in playas.

Farley, Andrea Lee

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Reliability Based Vegetation Management Through Intelligent System Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

number of recorded events which could be reliably tied to known outages. The project involved two years costly, and prolonged outages can have crippling effects. According #12;2 to some estimates, the U year to year. Vegetation-related outages not caused by hazard trees also remain relatively constant

153

Changes in Vegetation Condition and Surface Fluxes during NAME 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vegetation in the core region of the North American monsoon (NAM) system changes dramatically after the onset of the summer rains so that large changes may be expected in the surface fluxes of radiation, heat, and moisture. Most of this ...

Christopher J. Watts; Russell L. Scott; Jaime Garatuza-Payan; Julio C. Rodriguez; John H. Prueger; William P. Kustas; Michael Douglas

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 8 Nano-neutralization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 8 Nano-neutralization Processing eChapters Processing 11583F09728A04038E6F4D332D58B26A AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Nano-neutralization from the book ...

155

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 9 Physical Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 9 Physical Refining Processing eChapters Processing 7E84B6524348AB59C4DF2B6D388E2582 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Physical Refining from the book ...

156

24 Animal, Vegetable, Mineral Did you read chapter 24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chicken Fat & Marbling in Meat Solid Fat Shortening (Crisco) Solid Fat Butter Solid Fat Margarine Liquid CHEMISTRY Atomic-Level Structure of Complex Materials Determines Properties Animals & Vegetables Fats: Margarine and Olive oil Fats and oils at room temperature ­ What observations can we make? Butter Easy

Hart, Gus

157

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 7 Deodorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 7 Deodorization Processing eChapters Processing AOCS B581B45B54FDB5F113096DE186B3B999 Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Deodorization from the book ...

158

The Roughness Length for Heat of Sparse Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dual-source model that solves the energy balance over vegetation and soil separately can be inverted to obtain the roughness length for heat z0h of a single-source model. Model parameters for the dual-source model were taken from previous ...

E. M. Blyth; A. J. Dolman

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

Cai, D Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

Evaluation of Vegetation Effects on the Generation and Modification of Mesoscale Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the present study is to evaluate (i) the effect of vegetated surfaces on modifying sea breeze and daytime thermally induced upslope flows, and (ii) the generation of thermally induced flow by vegetated areas contrasted by bare soil ...

M. Segal; R. Avissar; M. C. McCumber; R. A. Pielke

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Studies on the Bulk Transfer Coefficients over a Vegetated Surface with a Multilayer Energy Budget Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multilayer energy budget model for vegetation canopy is developed to describe the fluxes of sensible and latent heat exchanged between the vegetated surface and the atmosphere. The model gives satisfactory results when the calculated radiative ...

Junsei Kondo; Tsutomu Watanabe

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes details, validation, and sensitivity analysis of a new atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and radiation schemes for the ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Climate and Vegetation in the Middle East: Interannual Variability and Drought Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Euphrates Plain (EP) experiences large interannual variability in vegetation cover, especially in areas of marginal rain-fed agriculture. Vegetation in this region is primarily limited by available soil moisture, as determined by winter ...

Benjamin F. Zaitchik; Jason P. Evans; Roland A. Geerken; Ronald B. Smith

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Simulating Competition and Coexistence between Plant Functional Types in a Dynamic Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global distribution of vegetation is broadly determined by climate, and where bioclimatic parameters are favorable for several plant functional types (PFTs), by the competition between them. Most current dynamic global vegetation models (...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Large-Scale Vegetation Feedbacks on a Doubled CO2 Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in vegetation cover are known to influence the climate system by modifying the radiative, momentum, and hydrologic balance of the land surface. To explore the interactions between terrestrial vegetation and the atmosphere for doubled ...

Samuel Levis; Jonathan A. Foley; David Pollard

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Influence of MODIS-derived dynamic vegetation on VIC-simulated soil moisture in Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture-vegetation interactions are an important component of land-atmosphere coupling, especially in semi-arid regions such as the North American Great Plains. However, many land surface models parameterize vegetation using an interannually-...

Trent W. Ford; Steven M. Quiring

167

Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover and Identify Biotic Resources in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems: Preliminary Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

Robert P. Breckenridge

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Normal Mode Initialization with Elementary Surface Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various normal-mode initialization techniques are applied to a simple 12-level linear model with boundary layer friction, and results are compared to exact solutions of the model. It is found that Machenhauer's initialization scheme gives an ...

Bradley A. Ballish; Ferdinand Baer

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

NORMAL EMISSION PHOTOELECTRON DIFFRACTION STUDIES AT SSRL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIFFRACTION STUDIES AT SSRL S. D. Kevan June 1980 TWO-WEEKDIFFRACTION STUDIES AT SSRL S.D. Kevan Materials andOur group has worked at SSRL using the normal emission

Kevan, S.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Perfect Implementation of Normal-Form Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Privacy and trust affect our strategic thinking, yet they have not been precisely modeled in mechanism design. In settings of incomplete information, traditional implementations of a normal-form mechanism ---by disregarding ...

Izmalkov, Sergei

171

Nonlinear Normal Mode Initialization with Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nonlinear normal mode initialization with physics was applied for analyses in FGGE IIIb data of the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). A convergence of the iteration in the initialization was attained by modifying ...

Takeo Kitade

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Vertical Normal Mode Transforms: Theory and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The separation of the vertical structure of the, solutions of the primitive (hydrostatic) meteorological equations is formalized as a vertical normal-mode transform. The transform is implemented for arbitrary static stability profiles by the ...

Scott R. Fulton; Wayne H. Schubert

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Evolving Rights-of-Way Vegetation Management Standards and Practices: Update 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current regulations are shaping how transmission vegetation management is implemented in North America. Regulations are maturing and fines for violations of the NERC standard FAC-003-1 are becoming larger and more consistently assessed. Transmission vegetation managers must maintain a transmission system with no vegetation caused outages and do so cost effectively in an environmental acceptable manner that meets landowner and public approval.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

What is a healthy A diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cup fat free milk + 1 tbsp vegetable oil 1 egg 2 egg whites 1 tbsp butter 3/4 tbsp liquid vegetableWhat is a healthy diet? A diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or fat-free milk and milk products; Includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, nuts; and Is low in saturated

Cantlon, Jessica F.

175

ForPeerReview From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to polyols and main industrial products Myriam and main industrial products Most of biobased polyols for polyurethanes are synthesized from vegetable oils literature; focus on the industrial synthetic routes. Keywords: vegetable oils; biobased polyols

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

176

Calibrating a Coupled SVAT–Vegetation Growth Model with Remotely Sensed Reflectance and Surface Temperature—A Case Study for the HAPEX-Sahel Grassland Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models simulating the seasonal growth of vegetation have been recently coupled to soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer schemes (SVATS). Such coupled vegetation–SVATS models (V–S) account for changes of the vegetation leaf area index (LAI) over ...

P. Cayrol; L. Kergoat; S. Moulin; G. Dedieu; A. Chehbouni

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Dry deposition of pan to grassland vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peroxyacetyl nitrate or PAN (CH{sub 3}C(O)OONO{sub 2}) is formed in the lower troposphere via photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). PAN has a lifetime in the free troposphere of about three months and is removed by photolysis or reaction with OH. Dry deposition will decrease its lifetime, although the few measurements that have been made indicate that this process is slow. Measurements of the uptake of PAN by alfalfa in growth chambers indicated that the dry deposition velocity (downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height) was 0.75 cm s{sup {minus}1}. Garland and Penkett measured a dry deposition velocity of 0.25 cm s{sup {minus}1} for PAN to grass and soil in a return-flow wind tunnel. Shepson et al. (1992) analyzed trends of PAN and O{sub 3} concentrations in the stable nocturnal boundary layer over mixed deciduous/coniferous forests at night, when leaf stomata were closed, and concluded that the deposition velocity for PAN was at least 0.5 cm s{sup {minus}1}. We measured the dry deposition velocity of PAN to a grassland site in the midwestern United States with a modified Bowen ratio technique. Experiments were conducted on selected days during September, October, and November of 1990. An energy balance Bowen ratio station was used to observe the differences in air temperature and water vapor content between heights of 3.0 and 0.92 m and to evaluate the surface energy balance. Air samples collected at the same two heights in Teflon {reg_sign} bags were analyzed for PAN by a gas chromatographic technique. We present an example of the variations of PAN concentrations and gradients observed during the day and compare measurements of the dry deposition velocity to expectations based on the physicochemical properties of PAN.

Doskey, P.V.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Gao, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Chain Transfer of Vegetable Oil Macromonomers in Acrylic Solution Copolymerization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of vegetable oil macromonomers (VOMMs) as comonomers in emulsion polymerization enables good film coalescence without the addition of solvents that constitute volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOMMs are derived from renewable resources and offer the potential of post-application crosslinking via auto-oxidation. However, chain transfer reactions of VOMMs with initiator and/or polymer radicals during emulsion polymerization reduce the amount of allylic hydrogen atoms available for primary auto-oxidation during drying. Vegetable oils and derivatives were reacted in combination with butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate via solution polymerization. The copolymerization was monitored using in situ infrared spectroscopy to determine the extent of chain transfer. 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the loci of chain transfer and the molecular weight characteristics of the polymers were characterized by SEC. Solution polymerization was utilized to minimize temperature fluctuations and maintain polymer solubility during the initial characterization.

Black, Micah [University of Southern Mississippi, The; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Rawlins, James [University of Southern Mississippi, The

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sigma Mesa: Background elemental concentrations in soil and vegetation, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979, soil and vegetation samples were collected on Sigma Mesa to provide background data before construction on the mesa. Elemental data are presented for soil, grass, juniper, pinon pine, and oak. None of the data looks out of the ordinary. The purpose of the sampling program was to acquire, before any disturbance, a set of data to be used as background for future impact analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Gladney, E.S.; Brooks, G.H. Jr.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Prediction of leaf area index in almonds by vegetation indexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three levels of scale for determining leaf area index (LAI) were explored within an almond orchard of alternating rows of Nonpareil and Monterey varieties using hemispherical photography and mule lightbar (MLB) at ground level up to airborne and satellite ... Keywords: Canopy light interception, EVI, GMI, LADP, LAI, Leaf area index, MASTER, MCARI, MLB, Multispectral indices, NDVI, NDWI, RMSE, SR, VI, Vegetation indices, fPAR

Jose L. Zarate-Valdez; Michael L. Whiting; Bruce D. Lampinen; Samuel Metcalf; Susan L. Ustin; Patrick H. Brown

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Agency/Company /Organization: World Agroforestry Centre Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Adaptation, Background analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.worldagroforestrycentre.org/sea/Publications/files/policybrief/PB0 Country: Philippines South-Eastern Asia Coordinates: 12.879721°, 121.774017° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":12.879721,"lon":121.774017,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

normal irradiance normal irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in broad bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4{mu}m, that comes directly from the Sun without being scattered or absorbed in the atmosphere, passes through a unit area perpendicular to the direction from the Sun. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments

183

direct normal irradiance | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

normal irradiance normal irradiance Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for horizontal and tilted flat-plates, and 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to solar collectors. Source NREL Date Released July 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords direct normal irradiance DNI GEF GHI GIS global horizontal irradiance insolation latitutde tilt irradiance NASA NREL South America SWERA TILT UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile and Cell Maps (zip, 13.9 MiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 3.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

184

Handbook of normal frames and coordinates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main subject of the book is an up-to-date and in-depth survey of the theory of normal frames and coordinates in differential geometry. The book can be used as a reference manual, review of the existing results and introduction to some new ideas and developments. In the book can be found practically all existing essential results and methods concerning normal frames and coordinates. Most of the results are represented in full detail with full, in some cases new, proofs. All classical results are expanded and generalized in various directions. Theorems of existence, uniqueness and, possibly, holonomicity of the normal frames and coordinates are proved; mostly, the proofs are constructive and some their parts can be used independently for other tasks. Besides published results, their extensions and generalizations, the book contains completely new results which appear for the first time.

Bozhidar Z. Iliev

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Projecting “Normals” in a Nonstationary Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate “normals” are statistical estimates of present and/or near-future climate means for such quantities as seasonal temperature or precipitation. In a changing climate, simply averaging a large number of previous years of data may not be the ...

D. S. Wilks

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Efficient Software Implementation for Finite Field Multiplication in Normal Basis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Finite field arithmetic is becoming increasingly important in today's computer systems, particularly for implementing cryptographic operations. Among various arithmetic operations, finite field multiplication is of particular interest since it is a major building block for elliptic curve cryptosystems. In this paper, we present new techniques for efficient software implementation of binary field multiplication in normal basis. Our techniques are more efficient in terms of both speed and memory compared with alternative approaches. 1 Introduction Finite field arithmetic is becoming increasingly important in today's computer systems, particularly for implementing cryptographic operations. Among the more common finite fields in cryptography are odd-characteristic finite fields of degree 1 and even-characteristic finite fields of degree greater than 1. The latter is conventionally known as GF (2m) arithmetic or binary field arithmetic. GF (2m) arithmetic is further classified according to the choice of basis for representing elements of the finite field; two common choices are polynomial basis and normal basis. Fast implementation techniques for GF (2m) arithmetic have been studied intensively in the past twenty years. Among various arithmetic operations, GF (2m) multiplication has attracted most of the attention since it is a major building block for implementing elliptic curve cryptosystems. Depending on the choice of basis, the mathematical formula for a GF (2m) multiplication can be quite different, thus making major differences in practical implementation. Currently, it seems that normal basis representation (especially optimal normal basis) offers the best performance in hardware [9-11], while in software polynomial basis representation is more efficient [2, 3, 8].

Peng Ning; Yiqun Lisa Yin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Potential of arid zone vegetation as a source of substrates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three aspects of the potential of vegetation in arid zones as a source of substrates are discussed. The first includes the limitations on efficiency of conversion of solar energy to the stored chemical energy of biomass in green plants, and the subsequent biochemical pathways of carbon dioxide fixation and biosynthesis. Second is the potential of plants endogenous to arid zones. Finally, the use of covered agriculture or controlled environmental agriculture (CEA) is considered both in its present form and in terms of possible extenion to the large scale production of stable crops. (JGB)

Bassham, J.A.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

An Experimental Investigation of Microexplosion in Emulsified Vegetable-Methanol Blend  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegetable oil is one of the most widely available renewable sources of energy that can be used to meet the world’s demands. Many vegetable oils also have the advantage of containing little to no detectable amounts of nitrogen. Recently, research studies have revealed that when two liquids with different vapor pressure values are formed into droplet-like emulsions, a micro-explosion effect can happen under specific environmental conditions. Understanding the micro-explosion phenomena can help increase the efficiency of bio-emulsion combustion as well as reduce pollution levels. Many researchers have conducted experiments to find the optimal condition that induces microexplosion effects. Microexplosion is also associated with the formation of shock waves characteristic of explosions at larger scales. However, little is known about how emulsion composition and droplet size affect the micro-explosion process. Through this research, methanol-in-vegetable oil emulsion has been studied from the microexplosion point of view using custom made electric furnace equipment with a high speed camera system and an acoustic sensor system. The main goal of this study is to understand the effect of emulsion compositions, chamber temperatures, and droplet sizes on the characteristics of microexplosion. First, an n-hexadecane-in-water emulsion was prepared to validate the performance of the custom-made experimental apparatus using previous published data. Methanol-in-canola oil emulsions with different compositions were also prepared and used to compare the micro-explosion phenomena with water as a volatile compound. Microexplosion events of the blended fuels were captured using a high speed camera and an acoustic sensor. The wave signals generated by the microexplosion were analyzed after converting the signals using a Fast Fourier Transform coded in Matlab. One of the major findings of this research work was that higher temperatures and higher concentrations of high vapor pressure fluids such as methanol and water in emulsions causes a high probability of microexplosion event due to the sudden expansion of the emulsified fluid. Also, the effect of size on microexplosion was evident in the greater probability of explosion. Methanol-in-canola oil emulsion with 15 % methanol with droplets size of 200 ?m placed in a furnace chamber heated to 980 ?C showed optimal microexplosion behavior based on the formation of fine droplets. Also, smaller droplets produced higher frequencies, which could be used to detect microexplosion without high speed imaging. When large droplets microexploded, lower frequencies were detected in all the blends.

Nam, Hyungseok

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Target Dependent Score Normalization Techniques and . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Score normalization methods in biometric verification, which encompass the more traditional user-dependent decision thresholding techniques, are reviewed from a test hypotheses point of view. These are classified into test dependent and target dependent methods. The focus of the paper is on target dependent methods, which are further classified into impostor-centric, target-centric and target-impostor. These are applied to an on-line signature verification system on signature data from SVC 2004. In particular, a target-centric technique based on a variant of the cross-validation procedure provides the best relative performance improvement both for skilled (19%) and random forgeries (53%) as compared to the raw verification performance without score normalization (7.14% EER and 1.06% EER for skilled and random forgeries respectively).

J. Fierrez-Aguilar; J. Ortega-Garcia; J. Gonzalez-Rodriguez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

What Is the New Normal Unemployment Rate?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent labor markets developments, including mismatches in the skills of workers and jobs, extended unemployment benefits, and very high rates of long-term joblessness, may be impeding the return to “normal ” unemployment rates of around 5%. An examination of alternative measures of labor market conditions suggests that the “normal ” unemployment rate may have risen as much as 1.7 percentage points to about 6.7%, although much of this increase is likely to prove temporary. Even with such an increase, sizable labor market slack is expected to persist for years. In the past, the U.S. labor market has proven to be very flexible and recessions have not usually been followed by long-lasting increases in the unemployment rate. But, in the wake of the most recent recession, many economists are concerned that developments such as mismatches in the skills of workers and jobs, extended unemployment benefits, and a rise in long-term joblessness may have raised the “normal ” or “natural ” rate of unemployment above the 5 % level that was thought to be typical before the downturn. Indeed, a few economists have gone so far as to argue that the rise in the unemployment rate to its current level of 9 % primarily reflects an increase in the natural rate, implying there is little slack in labor markets and therefore little downward pressure on inflation. This Economic Letter

Weidner; John C. Williams

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Electric Transmission Line Right-of-Way Post-Blackout Vegetation Management Strategies: 2008 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the federal government in regulating vegetation management on power line corridors changed significantly after the August 2003 blackout that affected more than 50 million people in the eastern United States and Canada. In 2004, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released a series of reports on vegetation management associated with the blackout, with a respondent sequence of draft standards for vegetation management released from 2005-2006. These standards are being promulgated an...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Do flowers affect biomass estimate accuracy from NDVI and EVI?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) are vegetation indices widely used in remote sensing of above-ground biomass. Because both indexes are based on spectral features of plant canopy, NDVI and EVI may ...

Miaogen Shen; Jin Chen; Xiaolin Zhu; Yanhong Tang; Xuehong Chen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

West Coast (PADD 5) Exports of Normal Butane-Butylene ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Normal Butane/Butylene Exports; Normal Butane/Butylene Supply and Disposition; West Coast (PADD 5) Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

197

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Product Supplied of Normal Butane ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Normal Butane/Butylene Supply and Disposition; Product Supplied for Normal Butane/Butylene ; Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Product Supplied for Crude Oil ...

198

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry from the book ...

199

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 14 Process Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 14 Process Equipment Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 14 Process Equipment from the book ...

200

Simulation of vegetation and hydrology for climate change analysis of a mountain watershed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climate change is expected to have both direct and indirect effects on water resources. Hydrologic impacts of two indirect effects, vegetation density and stomata! conductance,… (more)

[No author

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assessing the impacts of carbohydrate information on the market demand of US meats, vegetables, and fruits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impacts of low carbohydrate information on the market demand of US meats, vegetables, and fruits. The study further explores the combined… (more)

Paudel, Laxmi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation from the book ...

203

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 9 Fat Crystallization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 9 Fat Crystallization Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Fat Crystallization from the book ...

204

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 15 Plant Safety Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 15 Plant Safety Procedures Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 15 Plant Safety Procedures from the book ...

205

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 12 Loss Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 12 Loss Management Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Loss Management from the book ...

206

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 11 Oil Quality Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 11 Oil Quality Management Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 11 Oil Quality Management from the book ...

207

A Study of the Sensitivity of Land Surface parameterizations to the Inclusion of Different Fractional Covers and Soil Textures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inclusion of processes relating to soil type and vegetation is very important in an attempt to improve a land surface parameterization for use in different scale atmospheric models. There is already sample micro-meteorological information ...

D. T. Mihailovic; H. A. R. de Bruin; M. Jeftic; A. Van Dijken

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

CHANGES IN 137 CS CONCENTRATIONS IN SOIL AND VEGETATION ON THE FLOODPLAIN OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER OVER A 30 YEAR PERIOD  

SciTech Connect

{sup 137}Cs released during 1954-1974 from nuclear production reactors on the Savannah River Site, a US Department of Energy nuclear materials production site in South Carolina, contaminated a portion of the Savannah River floodplain known as Creek Plantation. {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations have been measured in Creek Plantation since 1974 making it possible to calculate effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in soil and vegetation and assess the spatial distribution of contaminants on the floodplain. Activity concentrations in soil and vegetation were higher near the center of the floodplain than near the edges as a result of frequent inundation coupled with the presence of low areas that trapped contaminated sediments. {sup 137}Cs activity was highest near the soil surface, but depth related differences diminished with time as a likely result of downward diffusion or leaching. Activity concentrations in vegetation were significantly related to concentrations in soil. The plant to soil concentration ratio (dry weight) averaged 0.49 and exhibited a slight but significant tendency to decrease with time. The effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in shallow (0-7.6 cm) soil and in vegetation were 14.9 (95% CI = 12.5-17.3) years and 11.6 (95% CI = 9.1-14.1) years, respectively, and rates of {sup 137}Cs removal from shallow soil and vegetation did not differ significantly among sampling locations. Potential health risks on the Creek Plantation floodplain have declined more rapidly than expected on the basis of radioactive decay alone because of the relatively short effective half-life of {sup 137}Cs.

Paller, M.; Jannik, T.; Fledderman, P.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

209

A signal-to-noise approach to score normalization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Score normalization is indispensable in distributed retrieval and fusion or meta-search where merging of result-lists is required. Distributional approaches to score normalization with reference to relevance, such as binary mixture models like the normal-exponential, ... Keywords: Zipf's law, distributed retrieval, filtering, fusion, meta-search, power-law, query length distribution, query model, resource selection, score distribution, score normalization

Avi Arampatzis; Jaap Kamps

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Apex or Salient of Normal Fault | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Dictionary.png Apex or Salient of Normal Fault: Normal faults may intersect in the subsurface to form a fault apex or salient. Apices or salients of normal faults account for 3% of structural controls in the Great Basin. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Stratigraphic Boundaries

211

Optimizing Normal Tissue Sparing in Ion Therapy Using Calculated Isoeffective Dose for Ion Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate how the selection of ion type affects the calculated isoeffective dose to the surrounding normal tissue as a function of both normal tissue and target tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratios. Methods and Materials: A microdosimetric biologic dose model was incorporated into a Geant4 simulation of parallel opposed beams of protons, helium, lithium, beryllium, carbon, and neon ions. The beams were constructed to give a homogeneous isoeffective dose to a volume in the center of a water phantom for target tissues covering a range of cobalt equivalent {alpha}/{beta} ratios of 1-20 Gy. Concomitant normal tissue isoeffective doses in the plateau of the ion beam were then compared for different ions across the range of normal tissue and target tissue radiosensitivities for a fixed isoeffective dose to the target tissue. Results: The ion type yielding the optimal normal tissue sparing was highly dependent on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of both the normal and the target tissue. For carbon ions, the calculated isoeffective dose to normal tissue at a 5-cm depth varied by almost a factor of 5, depending on the {alpha}/{beta} ratios of the normal and target tissue. This ranges from a factor of 2 less than the isoeffective dose of a similar proton treatment to a factor of 2 greater. Conclusions: No single ion is optimal for all treatment scenarios. The heavier ions are superior in cases in which the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of the target tissue is low and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of normal tissue is high, and protons are superior in the opposite circumstances. Lithium and beryllium appear to offer dose advantages similar to carbon, with a considerably lower normal tissue dose when the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the target tissue is high and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the normal tissue is low.

Remmes, Nicholas B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Herman, Michael G., E-mail: Herman.Michael@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Kruse, Jon J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Vegetation Management by Electric Utilities: Use of Herbicides and Other Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the essential elements and principles comprising electric utility vegetation management programs, defines management problems, and discusses possible research on vegetation management issues. The report particularly focuses on the use of herbicides and their effects on wildlife and human health. Legal and regulatory aspects and cost control issues are also covered.

1995-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

213

Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions Michael Notaro *, Guangshan Chen, Zhengyu Liu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions Michael Notaro *, Guangshan across six monsoon regions with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice-land model with dynamic vegetation monsoon regions is reduced and the climatic response assessed. Consistent responses among the regions

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

214

A Coupled Soil-Vegetation Scheme: Description, Parameters, Validation, and, Sensitivity Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled soil-vegetation scheme is presented. A one-layer canopy and a three-layer soil representation is used. The impact of canopy morphological properties on radiation and momentum transfer in the vegetation is modeled as simply as possible. ...

Ferenc Ács

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Bound 3-MCPD in Foods, Vegetable Oils and Fats (3-MCPD Esters)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reference papers for bound 3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol and 3-MCPD esters)in foods, vegetable oils, and fats. Bound 3-MCPD in Foods, Vegetable Oils and Fats (3-MCPD Esters) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis ao

216

Classification of floodplain vegetation by data fusion of spectral (CASI) and LiDAR data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To safeguard the goals of flood protection and nature development, a river manager requires detailed and up-to-date information on vegetation structures in floodplains. In this study, remote-sensing data on the vegetation of a semi-natural floodplain ...

G. W. Geerling; M. Labrador-Garcia; J. G. P. W. Clevers; A. M. J. Ragas; A. J. M. Smits

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Overview Report: Normal and Emergency Operation Visualization  

SciTech Connect

This is an overview report to document and illustrate methods used in a project entitled “Normal and Emergency Operations Visualization” for a utility company, conducted in 2009-2010 timeframe with funding from the utility company and the U.S. Department of Energy. The original final report (about 180 pages) for the project is not available for distribution because it alludes to findings that assessed the design of an operational system that contained proprietary information; this abridged version contains descriptions of methods and some findings to illustrate the approach used, while avoiding discussion of sensitive or proprietary information. The client has approved this abridged version of the report for unlimited distribution to give researchers and collaborators the benefit of reviewing the research concepts and methods that were applied in this study.

Greitzer, Frank L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge. The two map products described in this report are 1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and 2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-11)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-10)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-13)  

SciTech Connect

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-12)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluating Aspects of the Community Land and Atmosphere Models (CLM3 and CAM3) Using a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM–DGVM) is used diagnostically to identify land and atmospheric model biases that lead to biases in the simulated vegetation. The CLM–DGVM driven with observed ...

Gordon B. Bonan; Samuel Levis

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY AND VEGETATION IN INTERIOR ALASKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY likely to change vegetation type. Finally, vegetation recovery, estimated using a remotely-sensed................................................................................6 Chapter 2. Mapping Burn Severity Using Satellite Remote Sensing..........................8

Ruess, Roger W.

226

Diagnosing Seasonal Vegetation Impacts on Evapotranspiration and Its Partitioning at the Catchment Scale during SMEX04–NAME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fundamental problem in ecohydrology is diagnosing impacts of vegetation dynamics on the catchment response. This study uses a distributed hydrologic model and remote sensing data to evaluate the effects of seasonal vegetation greening on the ...

Enrique R. Vivoni

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Thermal Remote Sensing of Surface Soil Water Content with Partial Vegetation Cover for Incorporation into Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study outlines a method for the estimation of regional patterns of surface moisture availability (M0) and fractional vegetation (Fr) in the presence of spatially variable vegetation cover. The method requires relating variations in satellite-...

Robert R. Gillies; Toby N. Carlson

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Synthetic Aperture Radar (L band) and Optical Vegetation Indices for Discriminating the Brazilian Savanna Physiognomies: A Comparative Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The all-weather capability, signal independence to the solar illumination angle, and response to 3D vegetation structures are the highlights of active radar systems for natural vegetation mapping and monitoring. However, they may present ...

Edson E. Sano; Laerte G. Ferreira; Alfredo R. Huete

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A spatially-distributed model to simulate water, energy and vegetation dynamics using information from regional climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the strong interaction between vegetation and the terrestrial phase of the hydrologic cycle, the dynamics of vegetation needs to be taken into account in any study seeking to understand the impacts of management or changing atmospheric ...

M. P. Maneta; N. Silverman

230

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)  

SciTech Connect

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

N /A

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

231

Record of Decision for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program (DOE/EIS-0285) (07/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SYSTEM VEGETATION SYSTEM VEGETATION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Record of Decision DOE/EIS-0285 Cooperating Agencies J U L Y 2 0 0 0 Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Record of Decision Table of Contents Summary of Decision .................................................................................................................................... 1 For Further Information .............................................................................................................................. 2 Background ................................................................................................................................................... 3 Decisions ........................................................................................................................................................

232

Fractal Fluctuations and Statistical Normal Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamical systems in nature exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations and the corresponding power spectra follow inverse power law form signifying long-range space-time correlations identified as self-organized criticality. The physics of self-organized criticality is not yet identified. The Gaussian probability distribution used widely for analysis and description of large data sets underestimates the probabilities of occurrence of extreme events such as stock market crashes, earthquakes, heavy rainfall, etc. The assumptions underlying the normal distribution such as fixed mean and standard deviation, independence of data, are not valid for real world fractal data sets exhibiting a scale-free power law distribution with fat tails. A general systems theory for fractals visualizes the emergence of successively larger scale fluctuations to result from the space-time integration of enclosed smaller scale fluctuations. The model predicts a universal inverse power law incorporating the golden mean for fractal fluctuations and for the corresponding power spectra, i.e., the variance spectrum represents the probabilities, a signature of quantum systems. Fractal fluctuations therefore exhibit quantum-like chaos. The model predicted inverse power law is very close to the Gaussian distribution for small-scale fluctuations, but exhibits a fat long tail for large-scale fluctuations. Extensive data sets of Dow Jones index, Human DNA, Takifugu rubripes (Puffer fish) DNA are analysed to show that the space/time data sets are close to the model predicted power law distribution.

A. M. Selvam

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

The theory of normal zone propagation in superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains a study of properties of stable normal (N) regions of finite size-resistive domains (R.D.), in superconductors (S) with transport current I. It is demonstra-ted that in homogeneous superconductors R.D. are moving due to thermoelectric effect (Thom-son heat) while the rate of R.D., vdi for dif-ferent materials ranges from 1 to 10 cm/s. It is also shown that the thermoelectric effect leads to asymmetry i n the rate of the N-S boundary av, relative to the direction of I, with AV N vd. The conditions for localizing R.D. in an inhomogeneous superconductor have been obtained, as well as the I-V characteric-tics of a sample with R.D. Hysteresis effects are discussed associated with the localization of R.D and the thermoelectric effect. 1.

A. V. Gurevich; R. G. Mints

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

235

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from the electric facilities; (2) increase the program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This DEIS establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this EIS). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed: manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 24 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, they consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would factor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

Empirical Normal Modes versus Empirical Orthogonal Functions for Statistical Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of empirical normal modes (ENMs) for a shallow water fluid is developed. ENMs are basis functions that both have the statistical properties of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) and the dynamical properties of normal modes. In fact, ...

Gilbert Brunet; Robert Vautard

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Optimizing Input Data for Gridding Climate Normals for Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial models of 1971–2000 monthly climate normals for daily maximum and minimum temperature and total precipitation are required for many applications. The World Meteorological Organization’s recommended standard for the calculation of a normal ...

Ron F. Hopkinson; Michael F. Hutchinson; Daniel W. McKenney; Ewa J. Milewska; Pia Papadopol

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fire Regimes of the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Temporal and Spatial Variability and Implications for Vegetation Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecologists continue to debate the role of fire in forests of the southern Appalachian Mountains. How does climate influence fire in these humid, temperate forests? Did fire regimes change during the transition from Native American settlement to Euro-American settlement? Are fire regime changes resulting in broad vegetation changes in the forests of eastern North America? I used several approaches to address these questions. First, I used digitized fire perimeter maps from Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Shenandoah National Park for 1930-2009 to characterize spatial and temporal patterns of wildfire by aspect, elevation, and landform. Results demonstrate that fuel moisture is a primary control, with fire occurring most frequently during dry years, in dry regions, and at dry topographic positions. Climate also modifies topographic control, with weaker topographic patterns under drier conditions. Second, I used dendroecological methods to reconstruct historical fire frequency in yellow pine (Pinus, subgenus Diploxylon Koehne) stands at three field sites in the southern Appalachian Mountains. The fire history reconstructions extend from 1700 to 2009, with composite fire return intervals ranging from 2-4 years prior to the fire protection period. The two longest reconstructions record frequent fire during periods of Native American land use. Except for the recent fire protection period, temporal changes in land use did not have a significant impact on fire frequency and there was little discernible influence of climate on past fire occurrence. Third, I sampled vegetation composition in four different stand types along a topographic moisture gradient, including mesic cove, sub-mesic white pine (Pinus strobus L.) hardwood, sub-xeric oak (Quercus L.), and xeric pine forests in an unlogged watershed with a reconstructed fire history. Stand age structures demonstrate changes in establishment following fire exclusion in xeric pine stands, sub-xeric oak stands, and sub-mesic white pine-hardwood stands. Fire-tolerant yellow pines and oaks are being replaced by shade-tolerant, fire sensitive species such as red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L. Carr.). Classification analysis and ordination of species composition in different age classes suggest a trend of successional convergence in the absence of fire with a shift from four to two forest communities.

Flatley, William 1977-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Quantification of neural images using grey difference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present new algorithms for segmenting neuron images which are taken from cells being grown in culture with oxidative agents. Information from changing images can be used to compare changes in neurons from the Zellweger mice to those from normal mice. ... Keywords: distance difference, filtering window, grey difference, neuron cell imaging, segmentation

Donggang Yu; Tuan D. Pham; Hong Yan; Denis I Crane

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Exports of Normal Butane-Butylene ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Normal Butane/Butylene Supply and Disposition; Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

N /A

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Research and Development Planning: Program 57 Siting, Vegetation Management, and Avian Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the outcome of two planning sessions conducted in 2006 and 2007 to support research and development planning for Program 57Rights of Way: Siting, Vegetation Management, and Avian Issues.

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hemispherical Reflectance Variations of Vegetation Canopies and Implications for Global and Regional Energy Budget Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variations of spectral hemispherical reflectance (albedo) in vegetation canopies were studied as a function of solar zenith angle, leaf area index, led orientation distribution, and leaf and soil optical, properties. A three dimensional ...

D. S. Kimes; P. J. Sellers; W. W. Newcomb

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Regional Climate Change in East Asia Simulated by an Interactive Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional coupled soil–vegetation–atmosphere model is used to study changes and interactions between climate and the ecosystem in East Asia due to increased atmospheric CO2. The largest simulated climate changes are due to the radiative ...

Ming Chen; David Pollard; Eric J. Barron

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Comparison of a Hierarchy of Models for Determining Energy Balance Components over Vegetation Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods for estimating surface energy balance components over a vegetated surface are compared. These include Penman-Monteith, Deardorff, and multilayer canopy (CANWHT) models for evaporation. Measurements taken during the 1991 DOE-...

Christoph A. Vogel; Dennis D. Baldocchi; Ashok K. Luhar; K. Shankar Rao

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak 63: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western's Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona. For more information on this EA, contact: Ms. Linette King at: lking@wapa.gov. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

247

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and around the resurgent dome of Long Valley caldera California was performed to evaluate the premise that gaseous and thermal anomalies are related to renewed intrusion of magma. Some kill sites are long-lived features and others have developed in the past few years. Total anomalous CO2 emissions from the

248

Microsoft Word - Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello df.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Linda Sheader and Marilyn Kastens The Monticello Disposal Site, located just south of the town of Monticello, Utah, contains a uranium mill tailings disposal cell with a vegetated cover. Successful long-term performance of the cover is in part dependent upon the success of the cover's plantings. The plants remove moisture from the cover's soil layer, thus minimizing percolation through the tailings and preventing leaching of contaminants from the tailings into groundwater. Since 2000, when revegetation was complete, annual monitoring has been conducted at the site to track the development of the plant communities and to compare them to final success criteria. This paper summarizes changes in vegetation across the site over seven growing seasons.

249

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak 3: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western's Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona. For more information on this EA, contact: Ms. Linette King at: lking@wapa.gov. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

250

Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The likelihood and magnitude of the impacts of climate change on potential vegetation and the water cycle in Mesoamerica is evaluated. Mesoamerica is a global biodiversity hotspot with highly diverse topographic and climatic conditions and is ...

Pablo Imbach; Luis Molina; Bruno Locatelli; Olivier Roupsard; Gil Mahé; Ronald Neilson; Lenin Corrales; Marko Scholze; Philippe Ciais

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Role of Vegetation in the Dynamics of West African Monsoons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this paper is the role of meridional distribution of vegetation in the dynamics of monsoons and rainfall over West Africa. A moist zonally symmetric atmospheric model coupled with a simple land surface scheme is developed to ...

Xinyu Zheng; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 1 Genetic Modification of Seed Oils for Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 1 Genetic Modification of Seed Oils for Industrial Applications Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Genetic Modification of Seed Oils for I

253

Global Vegetation and Land Use: New High-Resolution Data Bases for Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global vegetation and land-use data bases (1° latitude by 1° longitude resolution), designed for use in studies of climate and climate change, were compiled in digital form drawing upon approximately 100 published sources complemented by a large ...

Elaine Matthews

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Evaluation of a Surface/Vegetation Parameterization Using Satellite Measurements of Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares surface sensible heat flux and soil moisture values derived by inverting two boundary layers models with a surface/vegetation formulation, using surface temperature measurements made from NOAA-7 satellite (the AVHRR) with ...

O. Taconet; T. Carlson; R. Bernard; D. Vidal-Madjar

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle)Chapter 4 Vegetable Fats and Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle) Chapter 4 Vegetable Fats and Oils Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

256

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle)Chapter 5 Production of Vegetable Oils and Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle) Chapter 5 Production of Vegetable Oils and Fats Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Down

257

Incorporation of CO2 Exchange Processes into a Multilayer Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange processes were incorporated into a multilayer atmosphere–soil–vegetation model known as SOLVEG, and its performance was examined using measurements obtained from a grassland site. It was also applied for the CO2 ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Phenomenological Model for Wind Speed and Shear Stress Profiles in Vegetation Cover Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A phenomenological model for the mean wind speed and Reynolds shear stress profiles with height in a vegetation cover layer is derived from forms suggested by truncation of the equations of turbulent fluid motion at second order in fluctuating ...

F. A. Albini

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 2 Crude Oil Receiving and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 2 Crude Oil Receiving and Storage Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Crude Oil Receiving and Storage from the book ...

260

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed ProcessingChapter 9 Filtration Techniques in Vegetable Oil Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed Processing Chapter 9 Filtration Techniques in Vegetable Oil Processing Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Filtration Techniques in Veg

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The coupled development of terrain and vegetation : the case of semiarid grasslands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distribution of vegetation in semiarid landscapes organizes as a function of moisture availability, which is often mediated by the form of the land surface. Simultaneously the processes that shape the land surface are ...

Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 8 Finished Product Storage and Handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 8 Finished Product Storage and Handling Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Finished Product Storage and Handling from the book ...

263

WILD RICE SALAD RECIPE 1 quart water, chicken stock or vegetable stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WILD RICE SALAD RECIPE 1 quart water, chicken stock or vegetable stock 1 cup wild rice, rinsed Sea ground pepper to taste 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons buttermilk or plain low-fat

Blanchette, Robert A.

264

Global Interannual Variations in Sea Surface Temperature and Land Surface Vegetation, Air Temperature, and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalies in global vegetation greenness, SST, land surface air temperature, and precipitation exhibit linked, low-frequency interannual variations. These interannual variations were detected and analyzed for 1982–90 with a multivariate spectral ...

Sietse O. Los; G. James Collatz; Lahouari Bounoua; Piers J. Sellers; Compton J. Tucker

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Relations between Soil Moisture and Satellite Vegetation Indices in the U.S. Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-derived vegetation indices extracted over locations representative of midwestern U.S. cropland and forest for the period 1990–94 are analyzed to determine the sensitivity of the indices to neutron probe soil moisture measurements of the ...

Jimmy O. Adegoke; Andrew M. Carleton

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 2 Current Developments of Biodegradable Grease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 2 Current Developments of Biodegradable Grease Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Current Developments of Biodegradable Grease from the bo

267

The use of oil shale ash in the production of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale ash obtained from combustion of local oil shale deposits was used in this study as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oil (WVO). Two alcohols with high and low boiling points

A. Al-Otoom; M. Allawzi; A. Ajlouni; F. Abu-Alrub; M. Kandah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Effects of dynamic vegetation and topography on hydrological processes in semi-arid areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecosystems of dry climates represent a particularly interesting object for ecohydrological studies, as water is generally considered to be the key limiting resource. This work focuses on vegetation-water-energy dynamics ...

Ivanov, Valeri Yuryevich, 1974-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Modeling Regional Vegetation NPP Variations and Their Relationships with Climatic Parameters in Wuhan, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net primary productivity (NPP) is an important component of the carbon cycle and a key indicator of ecosystem performance. The aim of this study is to construct a more accurate regional vegetation NPP estimation model and explore the relationship ...

Lunche Wang; Wei Gong; Yingying Ma; Miao Zhang

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Integrated use of remote sensing and geographic information systems in riparian vegetation delineation and mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a pilot study on riparian vegetation delineation and mapping using remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) in the Hunter Region, Australia. The aim of the study was to develop appropriate and repeatable assessment ...

X. Yang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 7 Development of Soy Composites by Direct Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 7 Development of Soy Composites by Direct Deposition Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Development of Soy Composites by Direct Deposition

272

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 13 Trans Fat Alternatives and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 13 Trans Fat Alternatives and Challenges Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 13 Trans Fat Alternatives and Challenges from the book

273

Advantages of a Topographically Controlled Runoff Simulation in a Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two methods to incorporate subgrid variability in soil moisture and runoff production into soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models are compared: 1) the variable infiltration capacity model approach (VIC), and 2) a modified “TOPMODEL” ...

Kirsten Warrach; Marc Stieglitz; Heinz-Theo Mengelkamp; Ehrhard Raschke

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Potential of Vegetation in Reducing Summer Cooling Loads in Residential Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential of trees and other vegetation to reduce building cooling loads has been recorded in a number of studies but the meso- and microclimate changes producing such savings are not well understood. This paper describes a preliminary ...

Y. J. Huang; H. Akbari; H. Taha; A. H. Rosenfeld

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 5 Biofuels for Home Heating Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 5 Biofuels for Home Heating Oils Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Biofuels for Home Heating Oils from the book ...

276

Estimation of foliar pigment concentration in floating macrophytes using hyperspectral vegetation indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foliar pigment concentrations of chlorophylls and cartenoids are important indicators of plant physiological status, photosynthesis rate, and net primary productivity. Although the utility of hyperspectral derived vegetation indices for estimating foliar ...

Cameron Proctor; Yuhong He

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Terrestrial Vegetation Dynamics and Global Climate Controls in North America: 2001–05  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly composite data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor was used to reconstruct vegetation dynamics in response to climate patterns over the period 2001–05 for North America. Results imply that plant ...

Christopher Potter; Shyam Boriah; Michael Steinbach; Vipin Kumar; Steven Klooster

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Predictability of Evapotranspiration Patterns Using Remotely Sensed Vegetation Dynamics during the North American Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The links between vegetation, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture (SM) are prominent in western Mexico—a region characterized by an abrupt increase in rainfall and ecosystem greenup during the North American monsoon (NAM). Most regional-...

Qiuhong Tang; Enrique R. Vivoni; Francisco Muñoz-Arriola; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Intercomparison of Simulated Global Vegetation Distributions in Response to 6 kyr BP Orbital Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of ten atmospheric general circulation models to orbital forcing at 6 kyr BP has been investigated using the BIOME model, which predicts equilibrium vegetation distribution, as a diagnostic. Several common features emerge: (a) ...

S. P. Harrison; D. Jolly; F. Laarif; A. Abe-Ouchi; B. Dong; K. Herterich; C. Hewitt; S. Joussaume; J. E. Kutzbach; J. Mitchell; N. de Noblet; P. Valdes

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Influence of Vegetation on the Development and Structure of Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of vegetative cover on the development of mountain waves is analyzed using a two-dimensional meso-? model. The model includes a detailed representation of surface fluxes and friction that evolve in time as the incoming solar ...

Romualdo Romero; Sergio Alonso; Everett C. Nickerson; Clemente Ramis

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17 17 Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A Database (Revised November 2000) J. S. Olson, J. A. Watts, and L. J. Allison DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp017 In 1980, this data base and the corresponding map were completed after more than 20 years of field investigations, consultations, and analyses of published literature. They characterize the use and vegetative cover of the Earth's land surface with a 0.5° × 0.5° grid. This world-ecosystem-complex data set and the accompanying map provide a current reference base for interpreting the role of vegetation in the global cycling of CO2 and other gases and a basis for improved estimates of vegetation and soil carbon, of natural exchanges of CO2, and of net historic shifts of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The

282

Enhancement of Convective Precipitation by Mesoscale Variations in Vegetative Covering in Semiarid Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that planting bands of vegetation with widths of the order of 50–100 km in semiarid regions could, under favorable large-scale atmospheric conditions, result in increases of convective precipitation. These increases, which ...

Richard A. Anthes

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Utility Vegetation Management: Use of Reliability-Centered Maintenance Concepts to Improve Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the approach taken to adapt and apply the principles of reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) to vegetation management (VM) activities on an overhead electric distribution system. The project included a review of relevant literature, production of an RCM primer for vegetation managers, development of VM-specific failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) methods, and production of a structured process and information tool useful in completing an RCM-based assessment of a distributio...

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Use of vegetation to ameliorate building microclimates: an assessment of energy-conservation potentials  

SciTech Connect

The space-conditioning energy conservation potentials of landscapes designed to ameliorate building microclimates are evaluated. The physical bases for vegetative modifications of climate are discussed, and results of past study of the effects of vegetation on space-conditioning energy consumption in buildings are reviewed. The state-of-the-art of energy-conserving landscape designs is assessed and recommendations are presented for further research.

Hutchison, B.A.; Taylor, F.G.; Wendt, R.L.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Diagenesis in seagrass vegetated sediments: biogeochemical processes on diurnal time scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seagrass productivity is largely limited by nutrient and light availability. However, increasing evidence suggests that sedimentary geochemical processes may play an essential role in seagrass productivity/health. Much of this work has been largely phenomenalistic and has not clearly identified the spatio-temporal behavior of the major geochemical parameters involved in diagenesis of seagrass sediments. In this study, a much broader range of both dissolved and solid phase chemical parameters in eelgrass vegetated sediments was investigated. Parallel measurements were made on adjacent unvegetated sediments (ACF) was used to determine the optimum scaling length for sample intervals (?x) of ?H2S and Fe2+. Characteristic scale lengths obtained for sediments from seagrass environments are not significantly different from those observed for unvegetated sediments and averaged 13.7?? 2.2 mm. Lateral variations in our scales analyses showed that scale length approximated our sampling interval and that lateral sampling intervals were smaller than the vertical sampling intervals. Our results indicate that macrofauna dwelling in the sediment, the seagrass root/rhizomes, and aggregations of bacteria, microalgae, and meiofauna may be responsible for the vertical and lateral variability. Model calibrations and sensitivity analyses from a sediment-seagrass diagenetic model revealed that changes in physical parameters of the sediments (irrigation, advection, and porosity, for example) had the greatest effect on organic carbon and total dissolved sulfides. This study revealed that sedimentary geochemical parameters that are both vertically and laterally heterogeneous may also affect seagrass productivity.

Hebert, Andrew Brian

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Comparing of Normal Stress Distribution in Static and Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is important to consider the vertical component of earthquake loading and inertia force in soil-structure interaction analyses. In most circumstances, design engineers are primarily concerned about the analysis of behavior of foundations subjected to earthquake-induced forces transmitted from the bedrock. In this research, a single rigid foundation with designated geometrical parameters located on sandy-clay soil has been modeled in FLAC software with Finite Different Method and subjected to three different vertical components of earthquake records. In these cases, it is important to evaluate effect of footing on underlying soil and to consider normal stress in soil with and without footing. The distribution of normal stress under the footing in static and dynamic states has been studied and compared. This Comparison indicated that, increasing in normal stress under the footing caused by vertical component of ground excitations, has decreased dynamic vertical settlement in comparison with static state.

Kholdebarin, Alireza; Massumi, Ali [Graduate School of Engineering, Tarbiat Moallem University of Tehran (Kharazmi), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davoodi, Mohammad [Dept. of Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, IIEES, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabatabaiefar, Hamid Reza

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation Management on section of three ROWs. The ROWs include selected sections of the McNary Powerhouse, the present and proposed new sections of the McNary-Roundup and the McNary Switchyard South Transmission lines. BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for pertinent information on each section of referenced transmission line. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way and to clear vegetation from new rights-of-way corridors. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

288

The soil organic matter dynamic by using different compost organic manure in a vegetable system in North China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to cattle manure compost and biogas residue compost. Higherafter crop harvest in biogas residue compost treatment.2) cattle compost, 3) biogas residue, 4) control, no

Sun, Qinping; Li, Jijin; Liu, Bensheng; Zou, Guoyuan; Liu, Baocun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Impact of Using Different Time-Averaged Inputs for Estimating Sensible Heat Flux of Riparian Vegetation Using Radiometric Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A riparian corridor along the Rio Grande dominated by the Eurasian tamarisk or salt cedar (Tamarix spp.) is being studied to determine water and energy exchange rates using eddy covariance instrumentation mounted on a 12-m tower. The potential of ...

William P. Kustas; John H. Prueger; Lawrence E. Hipps

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The soil organic matter dynamic by using different compost organic manure in a vegetable system in North China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

following the long-term application of manure compost.Chicken manure compost showed the highest soil organicwhen compared to cattle manure compost and biogas residue

Sun, Qinping; Li, Jijin; Liu, Bensheng; Zou, Guoyuan; Liu, Baocun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Neural Effects of Beta Amyloid in Normal Aging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

age   categories.  Neurobiol  Aging  1997;  18:  351-­?7.  JK,  McIntosh  AR.  Aging  gracefully:  compensatory  B.  The  effect  of  normal  aging  on  the  coupling  of  

Mormino, Elizabeth Charlotte

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading...

293

Enhanced Methods for Normalizing Data for Analysis of Search Results  

Enhanced Methods for Normalizing Data for Analysis of Search Results Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

294

System and method for normalizing data for analysis of search ...  

System and method for normalizing data for analysis of search results. Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing ...

295

Predictability of normal heart rhythms and deterministic chaos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evidence for deterministic chaos in normal heart rhythms is examined. Electrocardiograms were recorded of 29 subjects falling into four groups—a young healthy group

J. H. Lefebvre; D. A. Goodings; M. V. Kamath; E. L. Fallen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Effects of Vegetation Structure and Elevation on Lower Keys Marsh Rabbit Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lower Keys marsh rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris hefneri, LKMR), 1 of 3 subspecies of Sylvilagus palustris, is endemic to the Lower Florida Keys. The LKMR is listed as an endangered species due to predation by feral and free roaming domestic cats (Felis catus) and raccoons (Procyon lotor), road mortality, effects of storm surges, sea level rise, the small declining metapopulation size, and possible habitat loss from hardwood encroachment. The purpose of this study was to determine the current LKMR density on lands managed by the United States Navy, Naval Air Station Key West and evaluate how vegetation structure and patch elevation effect LKMR population density. I conducted fecal pellet counts to determine LKMR density, collected vegetation data using percent composition of ground cover, Robel range pole, and point-centered quarter methods, and obtained data on patch area and elevation. I used simple linear regression to assess the relationship between LKMR density and 9 measured vegetation characteristics, patch area, and patch elevation to determine which variables have an influence on LKMR density and the relationship between them. In my examination of the simple regression models, 6 out of the 11 variables appeared to influence LKMR population density. The average per patch percent composition of nonliving material and grasses, maximum height of vegetation at the range pole, distance to nearest woody vegetation, patch elevation, and visual obstruction readings (VOR) individually accounted for 26.4%, 30.4% , 18.1%, 8.5%, 6.8%, and 1.4% of the variability in LKMR density, respectively. According to the regression models, LKMR density increased in patches with greater amounts of grasses and with greater distance to woody vegetation. Habitat management is vital to the recovery of the LKMR and needs to focus on providing greater amounts of grasses and reducing the amount of woody vegetation encroachment to enhance LKMR population density.

Dedrickson, Angela

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Use of a vegetative filter zone to control fine-grained sediments from surface mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a vegetative filter zone in trapping fine-grained sediments from surface mining operations. The area selected for study was located in Whitley County, Kentucky, directly below an active surface mining operation. The outslope above the filter was the primary drainage area monitored during the study. This project was initiated with the specific purpose of conducting a field test on vegetation as a viable sediment trapping medium. From the onset, the project was wholly designed for a field evaluation under typical mining conditions. The filter area was constructed directly below an abandoned surface mine bench, on typical soil types found in mined areas of Eastern Kentucky. The outslope located above the filter was the primary source area for sediment flow. Sediment-laden water samples were collected at the inlet flume for comparison with samples collected at the outlet flume to permit evaluation of the sediment removal capability of the vegetative filter. Results of the monitoring efforts revealed that a dramatic reduction in sediment load was achieved by vegetative filtration with trapping efficiencies ranging from 70 to 99% for the storms monitored. Based on results of this study, it is concluded that vegetative filters are an effective method for reducing the quantity of sediment transported into surface streams and rivers from disturbed mined lands.

Barfield, B.J.; Albrecht, S.C.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at radioactive-waste disposal Area G during the 1994 growing season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overstory (pinon pine) and understory (grass and forb) vegetation samples were collected within and around selected points at Area G-a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory-for the analysis of tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238} Pu and {sup 239}Pu), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), americium ({sup 241}Am), and total uranium. In general, most vegetation samples collected within and around Area G contained radionuclide levels in higher concentrations than vegetation collected from background areas. Tritium, in particular, was detected as high as 5,800 pCi/mL in overstory vegetation collected outside the fence just west of the tritium shafts; this suggests that tritium is migrating from this waste repository through subsurface pathways. Also, understory vegetation collected north of the transuranic (TRU) pads (outside the fence of Area G) contained the highest values of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am, and may be a result of surface holding, storage, or disposal activities.

Fresquez, P.R.; Biggs, J.B.; Bennett, K.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Convergence of normal form transformations: The role of symmetries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the convergence problem for coordinate transformations which take a given vector field into Poincar\\'e-Dulac normal form. We show that the presence of linear or nonlinear Lie point symmetries can guaranteee convergence of these normalizing transformations, in a number of scenarios. As an application, we consider a class of bifurcation problems.

G. Cicogna; S. Walcher

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen;Abstract The normal curve has been used to fit the rate of both world and U.S.A. oil production. In this paper we give the first theoretical basis for these curve fittings. It is well known that oil field

Stark, Dudley

302

Shape mixtures of multivariate skew-normal distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classes of shape mixtures of independent and dependent multivariate skew-normal distributions are considered and some of their main properties are studied. If interpreted from a Bayesian point of view, the results obtained in this paper bring tractability ... Keywords: 62E15, 62H05, Bayes, Conjugacy, Regression model, Robustness, Shape parameter, Skew-normal distribution, Skewness

Reinaldo B. Arellano-Valle; Marc G. Genton; Rosangela H. Loschi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies, and discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this

304

Characterization of Rhizoctonia solani and Rhizoctonia-like Fungi infecting Vegetables in New York and their Pathogenicity to Corn .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vegetable growers in New York have recently observed that the corn rotation is no longer effective in suppressing diseases caused by Rhizoctonia solani and Rhizoctonia-like… (more)

Ohkura, Mana

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Human Health Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the human health risk assessment of chemicals encountered in vegetation management on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs).

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

Use of a 600?kHz ADCP to characterize submerged aquatic vegetation in a very shallow estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) serves as a key habitat for the larval forms of many commercially important marine organisms. In coastal waters

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Effects of burial history, rock ductility and recovery magnitude on inversion of normal faulted strata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inversion of normal faults at different burial depths is studied using physical models constructed with rock and deformed at confining pressure. Models consist of a 1 cm thick limestone layer above a fault dipping 70° in a rigid medium, and are subjected to a two-stage deformation path of layer-parallel extension followed by coaxial contraction. To investigate the effects of burial depth and relative ductility on kinematics of inversion, five model suites were run in which confining pressure and recovery magnitudes were varied. In all models, a normal fault forms in the limestone during extension. Subsequent inversion is accommodated in the limestone by reverse slip on the normal fault, creation and movement along new reverse faults, and distributed fracturing and folding. The relative contribution of these mechanisms depends on the relative ductility of the rock and magnitude of inversion. Reverse slip on the normal fault and distributed fracturing occur during early stages of inversion and new reverse faults form at intermediate stages. During late stage inversion, strata with low mean ductility shorten primarily by reverse slip on the pre-existing normal fault, whereas strata with high mean ductility shorten by continued slip on reverse faults. Evidence for inversion is provided by superposed fracture fabrics in the footwall at early stages (100% recovery). This change in fracture fabric during inversion could lead to an overpressured footwall in natural inversion structures. Reverse reactivation of the normal faults may occur during coaxial contraction even though such faults are unfavorably oriented assuming typical rock friction behavior and a homogeneous stress state. Localized reverse slip on normal faults is favored when strata display low ductility and less favored when strata work-harden during extension, however, the models show that the final inversion geometry is dependent on the ductility during both phases of deformation. Even a fault that is work-hardened during extension can reactivate if the ductility during contraction is low enough.

Kuhle, Nathan John

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A method for estimating direct normal solar irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment  

SciTech Connect

In order to investigate a potential use of concentrating solar power technologies and select an optimum site for these technologies, it is necessary to obtain information on the geographical distribution of direct normal solar irradiation over an area of interest. In this work, we have developed a method for estimating direct normal irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment. The method starts with the estimation of global irradiation on a horizontal surface from MTSAT-1R satellite data and other ground-based ancillary data. Then a satellite-based diffuse fraction model was developed and used to estimate the diffuse component of the satellite-derived global irradiation. Based on this estimated global and diffuse irradiation and the solar radiation incident angle, the direct normal irradiation was finally calculated. To evaluate its performance, the method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation at seven pyrheliometer stations in Thailand. It was found that values of monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation from the measurements and those estimated from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement, with a root mean square difference of 16% and a mean bias of -1.6%, with respect to mean measured values. After the validation, this method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation over Thailand by using MTSAT-1R satellite data for the period from June 2005 to December 2008. Results from the calculation were displayed as hourly and yearly irradiation maps. These maps reveal that the direct normal irradiation in Thailand was strongly affected by the tropical monsoons and local topography of the country. (author)

Janjai, Serm [Solar Energy Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-35)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2001 14, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-35) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Chehalis-Mayfield No. 1 230 kV Transmission Line ROW and the Mossy Rock-Chehalis Transmission Line ROW, between 7/1 to 27/10. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with an average corridor width of 162 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Lewis County, WA, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

311

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-40)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2002 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-40) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Allston-Keeler 500 kV Transmission Line ROW exclusive to BLM lands between 8/4 through 27/4. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with an average corridor width of 150 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Washington and Columbia County, in the State of Oregon, Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

312

Frequently Asked Questions About Southwesterns Vegetation Management Strategy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OK 74103-3502 OK 74103-3502 918-595-6600 www.swpa.gov Vegetation Management Program - Frequently Asked Questions Question. Why does Southwestern have to keep its transmission corridor clear of trees? Answer. Southwestern's vegetation management goals are to promote safety, provide for main- tenance access, and ensure electric system reliability. Trees or other vegetation near a trans- mission line can conduct electricity and increase the chance of unintentional contact with people and pets. If electricity flows through a tree to the ground, that tree essentially becomes "electrified," and anyone touching that tree could sustain serious injury, even death, as electricity seeks a path to ground. Additionally, as the operator of nearly 1,400 miles

313

Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1162  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COLUMBIA COLUMBIA RIVER MANAGEMENT PR GORGE OJECT VEGETAT ON Final Environmental Assessment DO E/EA-l 162 BONNEVILLE row,. ..", ",,,,.,,0. W x ? -- -- ------ .- .-- b I . , (, I I I ( t ,1 ,0 , . ,' I , ,- , !" 1 , I I ,; ,, 1 1 I .1 . . COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE VEGETATION MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (Hanford-Ostrander and North BonnevilI&Midway Transmission Line Rights-of-Way) Table of Contents Page . 2 3 pqose and Need Background hbfic evolvement Swq ' ' Decbions to Be Made PROPOSED A~ON AND ~~RNA~S Mtemative k No Action " Manual, Mechnical, and Biological Metbh - Ntemative W. Proposed Action- htegrated Vegetation Management ~) tih Herbicides Herbici& Meth& -. PhedActions Comparison of Mtematives ~ . . . . . . ti~D E~OW~ ~ E_O_~m .. CONSEQ~N~S Affmd Environment . Environment Consquen~ hti Use Soils Vegetation Water Resources WildlfeResources Air Quali@lGlobal Warning

314

Response of Peanuts to Irrigation Management at Different Crop Growth Stages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past irrigation research on peanuts has shown that when the plant is exposed to soil moisture stress at different crop growth stages, different responses seem to exist between the Spanish and the Florunner peanut varieties. The Spanish peanuts appear more susceptible to soil moisture stress during the blooming and pegging stage, while the Florunners seem more susceptible during the late maturation stage. The objective of this experiment was to determine the optimum irrigation schedule for peanuts at different crop growth stages for the Spanish and the Florunner varieties. The yield of the two varieties was evaluated under seven different irrigation treatments including a "no stress" check treatment and a dryland treatment. Each treatment had a different schedule of either irrigating or stressing the peanut plant during one or more of three crop growth stages. The three crop growth stages were: (1) pegging; (2) early maturation; and (3) late maturation. Rainfall during the vegetative and blooming stage ensured adequate moisture for both of the crop growth stages. Evapotranspiration was monitored throughout the life cycle for both peanut varieties. The evapotranspiration was determined using a soil moisture balance equation. Plant growth in the form of dry matter accumulation and leaf area index was also studied for the Spanish variety. No significant differences in the leaf area index existed between the treatments. The dry matter growth analysis showed that an irrigation during the pegging stage resulted in a faster pod weight accumulation during the early maturation stage than if no irrigation occurred during that stage. The yield and evapotranspiration results showed that differences existed between the two peanut varieties. First, for the Spanish variety, the results indicated that soil moisture is needed during the pegging stage to obtain near maximum yields. Treatments with an irrigation during the pegging stage had a greater evapotranspiration and larger yields, than the treatments without an irrigation during this stage. Second, if an irrigation is made during the pegging stage, an additional irrigation during the early maturation stage is unnecessary. Third, an irrigation during the late maturation stage will increase yield if dry climatic conditions normally exist during this stage. In the case of the Florunner variety, the yield results indicated that moisture stress should occur in no more than one of the crop growth stages if yield reductions are to be minimized. Also, an adequate supply of soil moisture during the late maturation stage is absolutely necessary in order to obtain maximum yields for Florunner peanuts. Treatments which had an irrigation during the late maturation stage had a steady evapotranspiration rate during this crop growth stage and had near maximum yields. Treatments which showed a decrease in the evapotranspiration rate during the late maturation stage produced a significantly lower yield.

Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Dahmen, P.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The CharXive Challenge. Regulation of global carbon cycles by vegetation fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is an open, but not unanswerable, question as to how much atmospheric CO2 is sequestered globally by vegetation fires. In this work I conceptualise the question in terms of the general CharXive Challenge, discuss a mechanism by which thermoconversion of biomass may regulate the global distribution of carbon between reservoirs, show how suppression of vegetation fires by human activities may increase the fraction of carbon in the atmospheric pool, and pose three specific CharXive Challenges of crucial strategic significance to our management of global carbon cycles.

Ball, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: non-normal innovations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from the sixth stage of a project to build a statistical hurricane model. Previous papers have described our modelling of the tracks, genesis, and lysis of hurricanes. In our track model we have so far employed a normal distribution for the residuals when computing innovations, even though we have demonstrated that their distribution is not normal. Here, we test to see if the track model can be improved by including more realistic non-normal innovations. The results are mixed. Some features of the model improve, but others slightly worsen.

Hall, T; Hall, Tim; Jewson, Stephen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Response of vegetation to carbon dioxide - effect of elevated levels of CO{sub 2} on winter wheat under two moisture regimes  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with the second-year (1985-86) findings of an on going experiment with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) at different carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels and under two moisture regimes. The results for the first year are given in the U.S. Department of Energy, Carbon Dioxide Research Division Response of Vegetation to Carbon Dioxide. The purpose of the second year`s experiment was to verify the results of 1984-85. However, based on the performance and the results of 1984-85 experiments, a few modifications were made.

Chaudhuri, U.N.; Burnett, R.B.; Kanemasu, E.T.; Kirkham, M.B.

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Characterizing the Performance of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer An Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments, the NIP was seated on a piece of closed-cell insulating foam without any clamping. For outdoor to the cold side of the thermopile and the disc that is directly connected to the "hot" side of the thermopile determined by the temperature difference between the hot and cold junctions inside the instrument. Without

Oregon, University of

319

Influence of vegetation and seasonal forcing on carbon dioxide fluxes across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for regional scaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER and GEP to be 290 89, 408, 48, and 698, 73 gC m-2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then reaggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

Desai, Desai Ankur R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Cook, Bruce D [University of Minnesota, St Paul; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Euskirchen, Eugenie S [University of Alaska; Gough, Christopher M [Ohio State University; Martin, Jonathan G [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Schmid, Hans Peter [Indiana University; Tang, Jianwu [Chicago Botanical Garden, Glencoe, Illiinois; Wang, Weiguo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Influence of Vegetation and Seasonal Forcing on Carbon Dioxide Fluxes Across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for Regional Scaling  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in the Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem–atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens, and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER, and GEP to be ?290 ± 89, 408 ± 48, and 698 ± 73 gC m?2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER, and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447 m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then re-aggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER, and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error, and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

Desai, Ankur R.; Noormets, Asko; Bolstad, Paul V.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, Bruce D.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S.; Gough, Christopher; Martin, Jonathan G.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Schmid, Hans P.; Tang, Jianwu; Wang, Weiguo

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal springs associated with normal faults in Utah have been analyzed for major cations and anions, and oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. Springs with measured temperatures averaging greater than 40°C are characterized by Na + K- and SO4 + Cl-rich waters containing 103 to 104 mg/l of dissolved solids. Lower temperature springs, averaging less than 40°C, are more enriched in Ca + Mg relative to Na + K. Chemical variations monitored through time in selected thermal springs are probably produced by

322

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Application of thermochronological techniques to major normal fault systems can resolve the timing of initiation and duration of extension, rates of motion on detachment faults, timing of ductile mylonite formation and passage of rocks through the crystal-plastic to brittle transition, and multiple events of extensional unroofing. Here we determine

323

Definition: Apex or Salient of Normal Fault | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Normal faults may intersect in the subsurface to form a fault apex or salient. Apices or salients of normal faults account for 3% of structural controls in the Great Basin.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ James E. Faulds,Nicholas H. Hinz,Mark F. Coolbaugh,Patricia H. Cashman,Christopher Kratt,Gregory Dering,Joel Edwards,Brett Mayhew,Holly McLachlan. 2011. Assessment of Favorable Structural Settings of Geothermal Systems in the Great Basin, Western USA. In: Transactions. GRC Anual Meeting; 2011/10/23; San Diego, CA. Davis, CA: Geothermal Resources Council; p. 777-783

324

Long-Lead Seasonal Temperature Prediction Using Optimal Climate Normals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is intended to determine the spatially varying optimal time periods for calculating seasonal climate normals over the entire United States based on temperature data at 344 United States climate divisions during the period of 1931–1993. ...

Jin Huang; Huug M. van den Dool; Anthony G. Barnston

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Production and Handling Slide 27: Feed Cylinder with Normal Assay...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Normal Assay (0.711%U) Arriving at Plant Refer to caption below for image description The enrichment process begins with "feed material," natural uranium that contains 0.711%...

326

Characteristics of Wind Turbines Under Normal and Fault Conditions: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the characteristics of a variable-speed wind turbine connected to a stiff or weak grid under normal and fault conditions and the role of reactive power compensation.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Parsons, B.; Ellis, A.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Champernowne's Number, Strong Normality, and the X ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number ? is simply normal in the base r if every 1-string in its .... The results for [ 0, 1) are extended to R in the same way. 5. .... Science and Applications), 1988.

328

Normal-Mode Decomposition of Small-Scale Oceanic Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale oceanic motions consist of vortical motion and internal waves. In a linear or weakly nonlinear system these two types of motions can be unambiguously separated using normal-mode decomposition in which the vortical mode carries the ...

Ren-Chieh Lien; Peter Müller

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Normalized Maximum-Likelihood Estimators of the Directional Wave Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new family of data-adaptative directional wave spectrum estimators is proposed. These estimators may be considered as an improvement over the well-known extended maximum-likelihood method (EMLM). The normalization is based on the idea of ...

M. A. Arribas; J. J. Egozcue

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal irradiance GIS...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

>  
Direct Normal Irradiance (kWhm2day)
NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Jan 2008)
22-year Monthly & Annual Average...

331

East Coast (PADD 1) Normal Butane-Butylene Stock Change ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Normal Butane-Butylene Stock Change (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 4-3: 1: ...

332

East Coast (PADD 1) Gas Plant Production of Normal Butane ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Gas Plant Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

333

Midwest (PADD 2) Exports of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) Exports of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 0: 0: 0: 0: ...

334

Midwest (PADD 2) Normal Butane-Butylene Stock Change (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) Normal Butane-Butylene Stock Change (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981-4-34-7: 14: ...

335

West Coast (PADD 5) Imports of Normal Butane-Butylene ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Coast (PADD 5) Imports of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 9: 18: ...

336

Why Do Forecasts for “Near Normal” Often Fail?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been observed by many that skill of categorical forecasts, when decomposed into the contributions from each category separately, tends to be low, if not absent or negative, in the “near normal” (N) category. We have witnessed many ...

Huug M. Van Den Dool; Zoltan Toth

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Time-Extrapolated Rainfall Normals for Central Equatorial Pacific Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Normal annual rainfalls (means and medians) for the period 1910–75 are estimated for islands in the central equatorial Pacific. Ridge regression, with an empirically determined bias constant, is used to establish the relationships among the ...

Bernard N. Meisner

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Use of Two-Stream Approximations for the Parameterization of Solar Radiative Energy Fluxes through Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-stream approximations have been used widely and for a long time in the field of radiative transfer through vegetation in various contexts and in the last 10 years also to model the hemispheric reflectance of vegetated surfaces in numerical ...

Joachim H. Josepoh; Jean Laquinta; Bernard Pinty

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Performance analysis of developed vegetable-based cutting fluids by D-optimal experimental design in turning process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to determine the performances of developed vegetable-based cutting fluids VBCFs evaluated as a categorical factor with mineral and semi-synthetic cutting fluids CFs. D-optimal experimental design method in machining was used ... Keywords: D-optimal, EP additive, cutting force, surface roughness, turning, vegetable-based cutting fluids

Emel Kuram; M. Huseyin Cetin; Babur Ozcelik; Erhan Demirbas

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Introduction Aphids, or plant lice, feed on most vegetable crops, many houseplants and many ornamentals grown in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and vegetable crops. Horticultural oil sprays can help to control some aphids on fruit trees and ornamentalsAphids Introduction Aphids, or plant lice, feed on most vegetable crops, many houseplants and many tissue and remove the sap. Aphids can easily be distinguished by the two tube like appendages (cornicles

New Hampshire, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction Processing eChapters Processing 88DDAD55B737C030383E11F3785E5D6C AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction fr

342

Global latitudinal-asymmetric vegetation growth trends and their driving mechanisms: 1982-2009  

SciTech Connect

Using a recent Leaf Area Index (LAI) dataset and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), we investigate percent changes and controlling factors of global vegetation growth for the period 1982 to 2009. Over that 28-year period, both the remote-sensing estimate and model simulation show a significant increasing trend in annual vegetation growth. Latitudinal asymmetry appeared in both products, with small increases in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and larger increases at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The south-to-north asymmetric land surface warming was assessed to be the principal driver of this latitudinal asymmetry of LAI trend. Heterogeneous precipitation functioned to decrease this latitudinal LAI gradient, and considerably regulated the local LAI change. CO2 fertilization during the last three decades, was simulated to be the dominant cause for the enhanced vegetation growth. Our study, though limited by observational and modeling uncertainties, adds further insight into vegetation growth trends and environmental correlations. These validation exercises also provide new quantitative and objective metrics for evaluation of land ecosystem process models at multiple spatio-temporal scales.

Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Zhu, Zaichun [Boston University; Myneni, Ranga B. [Boston University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1 *, Yew , Krishnan Subramaniam5 , Soon-Sen Leow1 , Kenneth C. Hayes6 and Mohd Basri Wahid1 1 Malaysian Palm Oil Board, 6, Persiaran Institusi, Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang Selangor, Malaysia 2 Malaysian Palm Oil

Sinskey, Anthony J.

344

The Midsummer Dry Spell’s Impact on Vegetation in Jamaica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual rainfall pattern of the intra-Americas sea reveals a bimodal feature with a minimum during the midsummer known as the midsummer dry spell (MSD). A first attempt is made to examine the impact of the MSD on vegetation through a ...

Theodore L. Allen; Scott Curtis; Douglas W. Gamble

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

El Niño–Southern Oscillation Impacts on Winter Vegetable Production in Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Florida’s mild winters allow the state to play a vital role in supplying fresh vegetables for U.S. consumers. Producers also benefit from premium prices when low temperatures prevent production in most of the country. This study characterizes the ...

James W. Hansen; James W. Jones; Clyde F. Kiker; Alan W. Hodges

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ground surface as snow- drift and the ice sheet during a growing phase, with a mixing ratio of the localGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, Jérôme

347

Some Practical Notes on the Parameter kB?1 for Sparse Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the parameter kB?1, the logarithm of the ratio between momentum and heat roughness length, of sparsely vegetated surfaces and bare soil. The bare soil surface is included as a reference, since it is fairly homogenous and ...

A. Verhoef; H. A. R. De Bruin; B. J. J. M. Van Den Hurk

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The market situation and political framework in Germany for biodiesel and vegetable oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The final details compiled by the Federal Statistics Office and Federal Office of Economics and Export Control (BAFA) confirmed the drop in sales of biodiesel and vegetable oil in Germany in 2008 in comparison to 2007. Although utilization of biodiesel as

349

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-64): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/26/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2002 6, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-64) Truman Conn - TFP Regional Manager, Walla Walla Region Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for Substations and Non-Electric Facilities in the Walla Walla Region (See Attachment A for a complete list of facilities) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical substations and associated facilities. Vegetation management within the substation shall include the bare ground management of all graveled areas. These areas shall primarily be maintained with the use of herbicides. The management of vegetation outside the substation and associated facilities

350

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-22)(8/17/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 17, 2001 August 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-22) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Chief Joseph - Snohomish No.3 and 4 Transmission Line ROW. From STR 94/1 to STR 113/1 Location: The ROW is located in King and Snohomish Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is

351

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-26)(9/11/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11, 2001 11, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-26) Ben Tilley - TFE/Alvey Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on Reedsport-Fairview #1 Transmission Line Structure 1/5 to 39/4. Location: All ROW are located in Coos and Douglas Counties, OR, all being in the Eugene Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Eugene Region. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently

352

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-28)(9/5/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 5, 2001 September 5, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-28) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Port Angeles - Sappo No.1 Transmission Line ROW, from struture 1/1 to structure 42/10. Location: The ROW is located in Clallum County, WA, all in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Olympia Region. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is

353

(DOE/EIS-0285-126): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program 2/19/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KEP-4 KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-126- Alvey Fairview Benjamin Tilley - TFE/Alvey Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Alvey Fairview 230kV transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 64/7. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region in Coos, Douglas, and Lane Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, along access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently

354

Overview of Opportunities for Co-Location of Solar Energy Technologies and Vegetation  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale solar facilities have the potential to contribute significantly to national electricity production. Many solar installations are large-scale or utility-scale, with a capacity over 1 MW and connected directly to the electric grid. Large-scale solar facilities offer an opportunity to achieve economies of scale in solar deployment, yet there have been concerns about the amount of land required for solar projects and the impact of solar projects on local habitat. During the site preparation phase for utility-scale solar facilities, developers often grade land and remove all vegetation to minimize installation and operational costs, prevent plants from shading panels, and minimize potential fire or wildlife risks. However, the common site preparation practice of removing vegetation can be avoided in certain circumstances, and there have been successful examples where solar facilities have been co-located with agricultural operations or have native vegetation growing beneath the panels. In this study we outline some of the impacts that large-scale solar facilities can have on the local environment, provide examples of installations where impacts have been minimized through co-location with vegetation, characterize the types of co-location, and give an overview of the potential benefits from co-location of solar energy projects and vegetation. The varieties of co-location can be replicated or modified for site-specific use at other solar energy installations around the world. We conclude with opportunities to improve upon our understanding of ways to reduce the environmental impacts of large-scale solar installations.

Macknick, J.; Beatty, B.; Hill, G.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Observed local and remote influences of vegetation on the atmosphere across North America using a model-validated statistical technique that first excludes oceanic forcings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed local and non-local influences of vegetation on the atmosphere across North America are quantified after first removing the ocean’s impact. The interaction between vegetation and the atmosphere is dominated by forcing from the ...

Fuyao Wang; Michael Notaro; Zhengyu Liu; Guangshan Chen

356

Spring Thaw and Its Effect on Terrestrial Vegetation Productivity in the Western Arctic Observed from Satellite Microwave and Optical Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global satellite remote sensing records show evidence of recent vegetation greening and an advancing growing season at high latitudes. Satellite remote sensing–derived measures of photosynthetic leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation gross and net ...

J. S. Kimball; K. C. McDonald; M. Zhao

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Evaluation of the New CNDV Option of the Community Land Model: Effects of Dynamic Vegetation and Interactive Nitrogen on CLM4 Means and Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4) includes the option to run the prognostic carbon–nitrogen (CN) model with dynamic vegetation (CNDV). CNDV, which simulates unmanaged vegetation, modifies the CN framework to implement plant biogeography ...

C. Kendra Gotangco Castillo; Samuel Levis; Peter Thornton

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Biodiversity Analysis of Vegetation on the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) located in south central Nevada encompasses approximately 3,561 square kilometers and straddles two major North American deserts, Mojave and Great Basin. Transitional areas between the two desert types have been created by gradients in elevation, precipitation, temperature, and soils. From 1996-1998, more than 1,500 ecological landform units were sampled at the NTS for numerous biotic and abiotic parameters. These data provide a basis for spatial evaluations of biodiversity over landscape scales at the NTS. Species diversity maps (species richness vs. species abundance) have been produced. Differences in ecosystem diversity at the ecoregion, alliance, association, and ecological landform unit levels are presented. Spatial distribution maps of species presence and abundance provide evidence of where transition zones occur and the resulting impact on biodiversity. The influences of abiotic factors (elevation, soil, precipitation) and anthropogenic disturbance on biodiversity are assessed.

W. K. Ostler; D. J. Hansen

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used nuclear fuel (UNF) must maintain its integrity during the storage period in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and transporting it to treatment or recycling facilities, or to a geologic repository. This RD&D plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. The plan objective is to

360

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used nuclear fuel (UNF) must maintain its integrity during the storage period in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and transporting it to treatment or recycling facilities, or to a geologic repository. This RD&D plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. The plan objective is to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name A complete and normalized 61850 substation Country Spain Headquarters Location Madrid, Spain Coordinates 40.488735°, -3.284912° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.488735,"lon":-3.284912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

362

Gradually Truncated Log-normal distribution- Size distribution of firms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many natural and economical phenomena are described through power law or log-normal distributions. In these cases, probability decreases very slowly with step size compared to normal distribution. Thus it is essential to cut-off these distributions for larger step size. Recently we introduce the gradually truncated power law distribution to successfully describe variation of financial, educational, physical and citation index. In the present work, we introduce gradually truncated log-normal distribution in which we gradually cut-off larger steps due to physical limitation of the system. We applied this distribution successfully to size distribution of USA´s manufactoring firms which is measured through their annual sell. The physical limitation are due to limited market size or shortage of highly competent executives. I.

Hari M. Gupta; José R. Campanha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Title: Sampling Soil and Vegetation at Facility Sites No.: SOP-5139 Page 2 of 9 Revision: 1 Effective Date: June 24, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Title: Sampling Soil and Vegetation at Facility Sites No.: SOP-5139 Page 2 of 9 Revision: 1 for collecting soil, sediment, and vegetation samples at facilities such as the Material Disposal Area G (Area G the basic requirements for collecting soil, sediment and vegetation samples at certain facilities. Work

364

Defining the normal turbine inflow within a wind park environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brief paper discusses factors that must be considered when defining the [open quotes]normal[close quotes] (as opposed to [open quotes]extreme[close quotes]) loading conditions seen in wind turbines operating within a wind park environment. The author defines the [open quotes]normal[close quotes] conditions to include fatigue damage accumulation as a result of: (1) start/stop cycles, (2) emergency shutdowns, and (3) the turbulence environment associated with site and turbine location. He also interprets [open quotes]extreme[close quotes] loading conditions to include those events that can challenge the survivability of the turbine.

Kelley, N.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Defining the normal turbine inflow within a wind park environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brief paper discusses factors that must be considered when defining the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} (as opposed to {open_quotes}extreme{close_quotes}) loading conditions seen in wind turbines operating within a wind park environment. The author defines the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} conditions to include fatigue damage accumulation as a result of: (1) start/stop cycles, (2) emergency shutdowns, and (3) the turbulence environment associated with site and turbine location. He also interprets {open_quotes}extreme{close_quotes} loading conditions to include those events that can challenge the survivability of the turbine.

Kelley, N.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form. The method comprises: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

367

Hepatoscintiangiography of normal liver and its alteration in hepatomas and liver abscess  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to establish normal hepatoscintiangiographic (HSA) pattern of hepatic blood flow and to investigate differential HSA findings of primary and metastatic carcinomas and abscess of the liver. HSA was carried out after intravenous bolus injection of l0 mCi of Tc-99m-phytate by obtaining sequential anterior images of 1-second exposure for 16 seconds. Observations included (1) baseline study of normal hepatic blood flow patterns by correlating with contrast angiogram, (2) time-sequence phasing of normal HSA, and (3) analysis of altered patterns in primary and metastatic carcinomas and abscess of the liver. Results were: (1) Normal HSA demonstrated 3 distinct phases of arterialization (AP), arterial hepatrogram (AHP), and portal venous hepatogram (PVHP). The means of each phase were 5.3, 6.3, and 8.3 seconds, respectively. Portal vein could be seen in all but one of 20 normal subjects. (2) Pattern changes in disease groups were early start of AP in carcinomas and very early start of AP in abscess. AP became prolonged in all disease groups. (3) Distinction between AHP and PVHP was sharp in metastasis and abscess but was unsharp in primary hepatoma. Cold area or areas became vascularized in primary hepatoma but not in abscess. Cold areas of metastasis were inhomogenously vascularized in late AP and throughout AHP and became relatively avascular as PVHP began. The cold area of abscess showed rim enhancement during AH and APH. These differences in HSA pattern were very useful in differential diagnosis of the diseases studied.

Bahk, Y.W.; Chung, S.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-41): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 27, 2002 February 27, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-41) William Erickson - TPF/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management around wood poles in Transmission Line ROW's in the Walla Walla Region (see attached checklist for identification). The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridors with the easement width ranging from 0 to 200 feet. Location: The ROWs are located in Walla Walla Region (see checklist). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation around

369

Long-term Differences in Tillage and Land Use Affect Intra-aggregate Pore Heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in computed tomography provide measurement tools to study internal structures of soil aggregates at micrometer resolutions and to improve our understanding of specific mechanisms of various soil processes. Fractal analysis is one of the data analysis tools that can be helpful in evaluating heterogeneity of the intra-aggregate internal structures. The goal of this study was to examine how long-term tillage and land use differences affect intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity. The specific objectives were: (i) to develop an approach to enhance utility of box-counting fractal dimension in characterizing intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity; (ii) to examine intra-aggregate pores in macro-aggregates (4-6 mm in size) using the computed tomography scanning and fractal analysis, and (iii) to compare heterogeneity of intra-aggregate pore space in aggregates from loamy Alfisol soil subjected to 20 yr of contrasting management practices, namely, conventional tillage (chisel plow) (CT), no-till (NT), and native succession vegetation (NS). Three-dimensional images of the intact aggregates were obtained with a resolution of 14.6 {micro}m at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL. Proposed box-counting fractal dimension normalization was successfully implemented to estimate heterogeneity of pore voxel distributions without bias associated with different porosities in soil aggregates. The aggregates from all three studied treatments had higher porosity associated with large (>100 {micro}m) pores present in their centers than in their exteriors. Pores 15 to 60 {micro}m were equally abundant throughout entire aggregates but their distributions were more heterogeneous in aggregate interiors. The CT aggregates had greater numbers of pores 15 to 60 {micro}m than NT and NS. Distribution of pore voxels belonging to large pores was most heterogeneous in the aggregates from NS, followed by NT and by CT. This result was consistent with presence of very large pores associated with former root channels in NT and NS aggregates. Our findings indicate that mechanisms of macro-aggregate formation might differ in their importance in different land use and management practices.

Kravchenko, A.N.; Wang, A.N.W.; Smucker, A.J.M.; Rivers, M.L. (MSU); (UC)

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

Automated geometric features evaluation method for normal foot skeleton model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Normal foot model" is a geometric model of a healthy human foot. As the comparison of the processed feet requires a reference ideal healthy foot parameterization it was necessary to create such a model by defining skeleton geometric features and generating ...

Bartosz Borucki; Krzysztof Nowi?Ski; Micha? Chlebiej; Andrzej Rutkowski; Pawe? Adamczyk; Jacek Laskowski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Normal accidents: Data quality problems in ERP-enabled manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficient operation of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems largely depends on data quality. ERP can improve data quality and information sharing within an organization. It can also pose challenges to data quality. While it is well known that ... Keywords: Data quality, ERP, complexity, enterprise resource planning, normal accident, tight coupling

Lan Cao, Hongwei Zhu

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Nonlinear Normal-Mode Balancing and the Ellipticity Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a low-order, spectral, shallow-water model on an f-plane, the conditions under which height-constrained nonlinear normal mode initialization fails and the existence of realizable balancing wind fields are examined. The relationship of this ...

Joseph J. Tribbia

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Strong Normality of Numbers - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dence of the patterning and review some relevant results in normality. We propose ... outstanding historical results. .... will work in R/Z by discarding all digits to the left of the decimal point in. 5 ..... puting 88 (II, Science and Applications), 1988.

374

Recent Studies of RF Breakdown Physics in Normal Conducting Cavities  

SciTech Connect

The operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The behavior of the rf breakdown depends on multiple parameters, including the input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Here we discuss recent experimental data and theoretical studies of rf breakdown physics.

Dolgashev, Valery; /SLAC

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

375

DYNAMICS OF DISTANT NORMAL GALAXIES David C. Koo 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a new and very powerful dimension has been added to the suite of tools to explore distant galaxiesDYNAMICS OF DISTANT NORMAL GALAXIES David C. Koo 1 1 UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy of techniques for measuring total dynamical masses are being explored and found practical. I highlight three

376

Projecting diffusion along the normal bundle of a plane curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to provide new formulas for the estimation of the effective diffusion coefficient of an equation of Fick-Jacob's type obtained by projecting the two-dimensional diffusion equation along the normal direction of an arbitrary plane curve.

Carlos Valero Valdes; Rafael Herrera Guzman

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Gamma Ray Bursts, The Principle of Relative Locality and Connection Normal Coordinates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The launch of the Fermi telescope in 2008 opened up the possibility of measuring the energy dependence of the speed of light by considering the time delay in the arrival of gamma ray bursts emitted simultaneously from very distant sources.The expected time delay between the arrival of gamma rays of significantly different energies as predicted by the framework of relative locality has already been calculated in Riemann normal coordinates. In the following, we calculate the time delay in more generality and then specialize to the connection normal coordinate system as a check that the results are coordinate independent. We also show that this result does not depend on the presence of torsion.

A. E. McCoy

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

378

Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an Elevation Gradient Speaker(s): Marc Fischer Date: September 25, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Release or uptake of soil carbon has the potential to affect atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and hence feedback to greenhouse gas forced climate change. We conducted extensive observations of soil carbon cycling in three montane meadows spaced at elevation intervals (~300 m) that effect average temperature variations in the range expected under a doubled CO2 climate (~2 C). We find that carbon in the top 10 cm of soil can be explained (R2~0.7) by a simple function of plant productivity, litter quality, and soil microclimate that is derived from a steady-state model of carbon pools and flows. Because the variables used in this

379

UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING  

SciTech Connect

UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-70)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(8-89) memorandum DATE: 7/19/02 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-70) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist TO: Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on sections of the McNary-Ross, McNary-Horse Heaven, Horse Heaven-Harvarlum, Harvarlum-Big Eddy, and Hanford-John Day Transmission lines. The treatment areas are identified in Step 1 of the Planning Steps shown below. The work will involve the control of noxious weeds in the subject rights-of-ways (ROWs). Location: The ROWs are located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, all being in the Walla Walla and Redmond Regions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-42)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2002 5, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-42) Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Bob Sweet - TFNF/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Snohomish - Murray #1 from str 1\4 to str 18\5. The proposed work will be to remove both danger and reclaim trees outside and inside the right-of-way, respectively. Right-of-way width varies from 125 to 300 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Snohomish County, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to remove both reclaim and danger trees inside and outside the transmission line right of way. BPA crews or contract crews will cut only trees that have

382

Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A Database (NDP-017) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp017 data Data Contributed Jerry S. Olson1, Julia A. Watts1, and Linda J. Allison1 1Work completed while a member of the Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Prepared by R.M. Cushman, D.P. Kaiser, S.B. Jones and L.M. Olsen. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Managed by University of Tennessee-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 Date Published: September, 1985 (Revised for the web: 2001) Please note that updated versions of this database are available. An updated database using the GLC2000 land cover product (ndp107b) is now

383

Keyword index to citations in "Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Eco  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keyword index to citations in "Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: Keyword index to citations in "Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: 1990-1999 Literature" (Michael H. Jones and Peter S. Curtis, editors), ORNL/CDIAC-129, July 2000 (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/epubs/cdiac/cdiac129/cdiac129.html) Numbers following each keyword refer to the numbers preceding the citations in the WordPerfect and ASCII text listings of the bibliography. 1,5-BISPHOSPHATE 1965 1,5-BISPHOSPHATE CARBOXYLASE 98, 878 1,5-BISPHOSPHATE CARBOXYLASE OXYGENASE 370 1,5-DIPHOSPHATE CARBOXYLASE 253 16S RDNA 1452 18TH-CENTURY ENGLAND 45 1989 FACE EXPERIMENT 1155 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLATE OXIDASE 667 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID 524, 762-764, 1241, 1471, 1472, 1622, 1696, 2632 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOL 1368 24-H 317 280-320 NM 2475

384

A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 (NDP-073) image Data image PDF file image Contributed by Michael H. Jones Peter S. Curtis Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio Prepared by Robert M. Cushman and Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4909 Date Published: November 1999 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP. for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464

385

Use of Papyrus Files: 1990-1999 Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Papyrus Files: 1990-1999 Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation Use of Papyrus Files: 1990-1999 Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems Use of PapyrusTM Files Users of PapyrusTM on IBM-compatible personal computers (Full Version or Retriever) should use the seven *.bib files constituting this database, whereas users of PapyrusTM on Macintosh personal computers (Full Version or Limited Version) should use the nine *.bb files. How to Download Free Read-Only PapyrusTM software Limited (read-only) versions of PapyrusTM may be downloaded from Research Software Design's web site (http://www.rsd.com/~rsd/). The Retriever for IBM-compatible personal computers may be obtained from web page http://www.teleport.com/~rsd/Utilities7.html by downloading and installing the self-extracting compressed files papzip.exe and paprdoc.exe. In this

386

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-06)  

SciTech Connect

BPA proposes to apply selected herbicides to control annual weeds that are competing with native grasses that were seeded two years ago. Herbicides will also be applied at the base of the existing wooden transmission line poles located in the pasture area. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of promoting native grass growth and to provide fire protection for the wooden transmission line poles. The pasture area is, for the most part, flat with elevation increasing towards the northwest corner. Slopes are not steep in that area. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

387

Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Working Document 2. Vegetative propagation of Eucalypts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of large-scale plantation establishment by various methods was examined, and the following conclusions were reached: seedling plantations are limited in potential yield due to genetic variation among the planting stock and often inadequate supplies of appropriate seed; vegetative propagation by rooted cuttings can provide good genetic uniformity of select hybrid planting stock; however, large-scale production requires establishment and maintenance of extensive cutting orchards. The collection of shoots and preparation of cuttings, although successfully implemented in the Congo and Brazil, would not be economically feasible in Florida for large-scale plantations; tissue culture propagation of select hybrid eucalypts offers the only opportunity to produce the very large number of trees required to establish the energy plantation. The cost of tissue culture propagation, although higher than seedling production, is more than off-set by the increased productivity of vegetative plantations established from select hybrid Eucalyptus.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

NONE

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

389

A Database of Woody Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2  

SciTech Connect

To perform a statistically rigorous meta-analysis of research results on the response by woody vegetation to increased atmospheric CO2 levels, a multiparameter database of responses was compiled. Eighty-four independent CO2-enrichment studies, covering 65 species and 35 response parameters, met the necessary criteria for inclusion in the database: reporting mean response, sample size, and variance of the response (either as standard deviation or standard error). Data were retrieved from the published literature and unpublished reports.

Curtis, P.S.; Cushman, R.M.; Brenkert, A.L.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Transforming Knowledge of Shrub Ecology and Management to Promote Integrated Vegetation Management on Power Line Corridors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key to integrated vegetation management (IVM) is culturing desirable plant communities that minimize undesirable plants, typically trees. Shrubs are most commonly considered desirable plants. Over time, knowledge of shrubs and other aspects of management have been woven into the IVM approach. In summer 2002, EPRI formally began developing training materials as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program. The program has a societal goal of reducin...

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

391

Radiological survey of shoreline vegetation from the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1990--1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A great deal of interest exists concerning the seepage of radiologically contaminated groundwater into the Columbia River where it borders the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site (Hanford Reach). Areas of particular interest include the 100-N Area, the Old Hanford Townsite, and the 300 Area springs. While the radiological character of the seeps and springs along the Hanford Site shoreline has been studied, less attention has been given to characterizing the radionuclides that may be present in shoreline vegetation. The objective of this study was to characterize radionuclide concentrations in shoreline plants along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River that were usable by humans for food or other purposes. Vegetation in two areas was found to have elevated levels of radionuclides. Those areas were the 100-N Area and the Old Hanford Townsite. There was also some indication of uranium accumulation in milfoil and onions collected from the 300 Area. Tritium was elevated above background in all areas; {sup 60}Co and {sup 9O}Sr were found in highest concentrations in vegetation from the 100-N Area. Technetium-99 was found in 2 of 12 plants collected from the Old Hanford Townsite and 1 of 10 samples collected upstream from the Vernita Bridge. The concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and isotopes of uranium were just above background in all three areas (100-N Area, Old Hanford Townsite, and 300 Area).

Antonio, E.J.; Poston, T.M.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All work is to be done on the south side of centerline. Target vegetation is the tall growing Firs along the edge of the ROW, all of which is located within the back yards of the property owners along the right-of-way. The density of vegetation is low and consists of C-Trees located within backyards, with the branches growing towards the lines. Due to lack of access and past verbal agreements with the landowners, permission/agreement has been difficult to obtain from the property owners. Permission has now been obtained to remove the C-Trees within their back yards which, will soon be a hazard to our transmission line facility. We are working with the landowners to get them to plant low growing scrubs and ornamentals within the right-of-way and adjacent to the right-of-way. A follow up herbicide treatment is not planned because the trees being cut will not re-sprout. This right-of-way or project area is on a three to four year maintenance schedule. Little or no treatment should be required in the immediate future.

N /A

2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-58) 5/31/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31, 2002 31, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-58) Bill Erickson - TPF/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management at the Lines Creek Microwave site. The proposed work will be accomplished within the fenced area of the facility. Location: The Lines Creek Microwave site is located at SWSW Section 33 T44N R2E within Shoshone County, Idaho, Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes bare ground vegetation management at the microwave site. Bare ground management is needed to prevent fire damage and maintain a vegetation free environment on the site.

395

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-12): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 5/15/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2) 2) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 Transmission Line ROW. Location: The ROW is located in Pierce and King Counties, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the

396

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-04): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 3/27/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 27, 2001 March 27, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-04) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on Ponderosa - Pilot Butte 18/2 to 18/4 Relocation Location: The project area is in the City of Bend, OR, in Deschutes County. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from a section of BPA's Ponderosa - Pilot Butte Transmission Line Right-of-way to facilitate relocation of structure 18/3. Work would begin in mid-March and end in April, 2001. Analysis: 1. Description of right-of-way and vegetation management needed: The project involves

397

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-62: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (4/16/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE April 16, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Covington SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-62) Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Rocky Reach - Maple Valley No. 1 Transmission Line ROW from structure 98/2 to structure 110/1. The transmission line is a 500 kV line. Location: The ROW is located King County, WA. Proposed by: Snohomish Regional Headquarters, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation along access roads and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation management along existing access road and

398

An algorithm to estimate soil moisture over vegetated areas based on in situ and remote sensing information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm is proposed for estimating soil moisture over vegetated areas. The algorithm uses in situ and remote sensing information and statistical tools to estimate soil moisture at 1 km spatial resolution and at 20 cm ...

N. D. Ramírez-Beltran, C. Calderón-Arteaga, E. Harmsen, R. Vasquez, J. Gonzalez

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 2 Modern Aqueous Oil Extraction: Centrifugation Systems for Olive and Avocado Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 2 Modern Aqueous Oil Extraction: Centrifugation Systems for Olive and Avocado Oils Processing eChapters Processing A3F98FD75CFE9AEC675B07DDCFFE4506 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf ...

400

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 3 Crude Oil De-gumming and Acid Pre-treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 3 Crude Oil De-gumming and Acid Pre-treatment Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Crude Oil De-gumming and Acid Pre-treatment fro

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Impact of Vegetation Feedback on the Response of Precipitation to Antecedent Soil Moisture Anomalies over North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies support a positive soil moisture–precipitation feedback over a major fraction of North America; that is, initial soil moisture anomalies lead to precipitation anomalies of the same sign. To investigate how vegetation feedback ...

Yeonjoo Kim; Guiling Wang

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Spatially Distributed Model to Simulate Water, Energy, and Vegetation Dynamics Using Information from Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies seeking to understand the impacts of climate variability and change on the hydrology of a region need to take into account the dynamics of vegetation and its interaction with the hydrologic and energy cycles. Yet, most of the hydrologic ...

M. P. Maneta; N. L. Silverman

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Wear, durability, and lubricating oil performance of a straight vegetable oil (Karanja) blend fueled direct injection compression ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depletion of fossil fuel resources and resulting associated environmental degradation has motivated search for alternative transportation fuels. Blending small quantity of Karanja oil (straight vegetable oil) with mineral diesel is one of the simplest available alternatives

Avinash Kumar Agarwal; Atul Dhar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Feedbacks of Vegetation on Summertime Climate Variability over the North American Grasslands. Part II: A Coupled Stochastic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled linear model is derived to describe interactions between anomalous precipitation and vegetation over the North American Grasslands. The model is based on biohydrological characteristics in the semiarid environment and has components to ...

Weile Wang; Bruce T. Anderson; Dara Entekhabi; Dong Huang; Robert K. Kaufmann; Christopher Potter; Ranga B. Myneni

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Retrieval of Soil Moisture and Vegetation Water Content Using SSM/I Data over a Corn and Soybean Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for soil moisture and vegetation water content retrieval using Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) brightness temperature over a corn and soybean field region was analyzed and assessed using datasets from the Soil Moisture ...

Jun Wen; Thomas J. Jackson; Rajat Bindlish; Ann Y. Hsu; Z. Bob Su

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale-waste lands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale and total Al concentrations showed a significant decrease after planting S. cumini plantation onto the shale

Neher, Deborah A.

407

Simulating Surface Energy Fluxes and Radiometric Surface Temperatures for Two Arid Vegetation Communities Using the SHAW Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While land–atmosphere transfer models have been pursued for over 30 years, Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere–Transfer (SVAT) models are gaining attention only recently as the need to better represent the interaction between the soil and atmosphere in ...

G. N. Flerchinger; W. P. Kustas; M. A. Weltz

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 11 Dry Condensing Vacuum Systems for Deodorizers for Substantial Energy Savings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 11 Dry Condensing Vacuum Systems for Deodorizers for Substantial Energy Savings Processing eChapters Processing F2B58D30B351BCBE5723B760220C94BD AOCS Press   ...

409

Climatic Impact of Vegetation Change in the Asian Tropical Region. Part I: Case of the Northern Hemisphere Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several numerical simulations were performed, using a global climate model that includes a realistic land surface model, to investigate the impact of Asian tropical vegetation changes on the climate. The control simulation, under conditions of ...

Kazuo Mabuchi; Yasuo Sato; Hideji Kida

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Impacts of meteorology-driven seed dispersal on plant migration : implications for future vegetation structure under changing climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the impacts among land cover change, future climates and ecosystems are expected to be substantial (e.g., Feddema et al., 2005), there are growing needs for improving the capability of simulating the dynamics of vegetation ...

Lee, Eunjee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Influence of the Interannual Variability of Vegetation on the Surface Energy Balance—A Global Sensitivity Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The degree to which the interannual variability of vegetation phenology affects hydrological fluxes over land is investigated through a series of simulations with the Mosaic land surface model, run both offline and coupled to the NASA Seasonal-to-...

P. Guillevic; R. D. Koster; M. J. Suarez; L. Bounoua; G. J. Collatz; S. O. Los; S. P. P. Mahanama

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Value of Real-Time Vegetation Fraction to Forecasts of Severe Convection in High-Resolution Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-real-time values of vegetation fraction are incorporated into a 2-km nested version of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (ARW) model and compared to forecasts from a control run that uses climatological values of ...

Kenneth A. James; David J. Stensrud; Nusrat Yussouf

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Biodiesel Handbook, 2nd EditionChapter 2 History of Vegetable Oil-Based Diesel Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biodiesel Handbook, 2nd Edition Chapter 2 History of Vegetable Oil-Based Diesel Fuels Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioproducts eChapters Press   Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2

414

Global Percent Tree Cover at a Spatial Resolution of 500 Meters: First Results of the MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first results of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation continuous field algorithm's global percent tree cover are presented. Percent tree cover per 500-m MODIS pixel is estimated using a supervised regression ...

M. C. Hansen; R. S. DeFries; J. R. G. Townshend; M. Carroll; C. Dimiceli; R. A. Sohlberg

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Numerical Simulations of the Effect of Soil Moisture and Vegetation Cover on the Development of Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional (column) version of a primitive equations model has been used to study the impact of soil moisture and vegetation cover on the development of deep cumulus convection in the absence of dynamical forcing. The model includes ...

Craig A. Clark; Paymond W. Arritt

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-141- SalemAlbany #2)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1- SalemAlbany #2) 1- SalemAlbany #2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #2 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, within Marion, Polk, and Benton Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission

417

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-140- SalemAlbany1)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0- SalemAlbany1) 0- SalemAlbany1) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #1 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Marion, Linn, and Benton County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission

418

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-10): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 5/15/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0) 0) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Covington-Duwamish No. 1 ROW from the Covington Substation to tower 10/4. Location: The ROW is located in King County, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to

419

Determination of locational error associated with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars in relation to vegetation and topography in north-central New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, a study was initiated to assess seasonal habitat use and movement patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using global positioning system (GPS) radio collars. As part of this study, the authors attempted to assess the accuracies of GPS (non-differentially corrected) positions under various vegetation canopies and terrain conditions with the use of a GPS ``test`` collar. The test collar was activated every twenty minutes to obtain a position location and continuously uplinked to Argos satellites to transfer position data files. They used a Telonics, Inc. uplink receiver to intercept the transmission and view the results of the collar in real time. They placed the collar on a stand equivalent to the neck height of an adult elk and then placed the stand within three different treatment categories: (1) topographical influence (canyon and mesa tops), (2) canopy influence (open and closed canopy), and (3) vegetation type influence (ponderosa pine and pinion pine-juniper). The collar was kept at each location for one hour (usually obtaining three fixes). In addition, the authors used a hand-held GPS to obtain a position of the test collar at the same time and location.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Spectral asymptotics via the semiclassical Birkhoff normal form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article gives a simple treatment of the quantum Birkhoff normal form for semiclassical pseudo-differential operators with smooth coefficients. The normal form is applied to describe the discrete spectrum in a generalised non-degenerate potential well, yielding uniform estimates in the energy $E$. This permits a detailed study of the spectrum in various asymptotic regions of the parameters $(E,\\h)$, and gives improvements and new proofs for many of the results in the field. In the completely resonant case we show that the pseudo-differential operator can be reduced to a Toeplitz operator on a reduced symplectic orbifold. Using this quantum reduction, new spectral asymptotics concerning the fine structure of eigenvalue clusters are proved. In the case of polynomial differential operators, a combinatorial trace formula is obtained.

Laurent Charles; San Vu Ngoc

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 1 fig.

Bonaldo, M.D.; Soares, M.B.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE February 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management FINAL: ESD Weldon Spring Site February 2005 1 EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE I Introduction This document is an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) for three Records of Decision (RODs) for the Weldon Spring site located in St. Charles County, Missouri. These RODs were signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RODs addressed by this ESD are the following: * Chemical Plant Operable Unit (CPOU) ROD, signed in September 1993. This ROD

423

AC-DC Difference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The NIST ac-dc Difference Project provides US industry with the essential link between ac ... Facilities/Tools Used: ... NIST CNST Nanofabrication facility. ...

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

424

Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous, and ATM{sup +/+}wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating gammaH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID{sup -/-} and ATM{sup -/-}homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal tissue responses in clinical radiotherapy.

Ruebe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.e [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Fricke, Andreas; Wendorf, Juliane; Stuetzel, Annika; Kuehne, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ong, Mei Fang [Institute of Medical Biometrics, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Lipp, Peter [Institute for Molecular Cell Biology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ruebe, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

- Vegetation Inspection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Violation Severity Levels (“VSLs”), included in Exhibit A to the petition, effective the first day of the first calendar quarter one year following approval; 1 approval of three proposed definitions to be added to the NERC Glossary of Terms used in the NERC Reliability Standards effective the first day of the first calendar quarter one year following approval:- Right-of-Way

Kirsten Walli; Board Secretary

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

427

Differences of Random Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of woodscrews containing a variety of sizes for a local DIY store. The weight W (in kilograms) of boxes happen if the DIY store bought in similar products from different manufacturers. Before we can solve

Vickers, James

428

Radionuclide concentrations in terrestrial vegetation and soil on and around the Hanford Site, 1983 through 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews concentrations of {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, U isotopes, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soil and vegetation samples collected from 1983 through 1993 during routine surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling locations were grouped in study areas associated with operational areas on the Site. While radionuclide concentrations were very low and representative of background concentrations from historic fallout, some study areas on the Site contained slightly elevated concentrations compared to other study areas onsite and offsite. The 100 Areas had concentrations of {sup 60}Co comparable to the minimum detectable concentration of 0.02 pCi/g in soil. Concentrations of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in 200 Area soils were slightly elevated. The 300 Area had a slight elevation of U in soil. These observations were expected because many of the sampling locations were selected to monitor specific facilities or operations at the operational areas. Generally, concentrations of the radionuclides studied were greater and more readily measured in soil samples compared to vegetation samples. The general pattern of concentrations of radionuclide concentrations in vegetation by area mirrored that observed in soil. Declines in {sup 90}Sr in soil appear to be attributed to radioactive decay and possibly downward migration out of the sampling horizon. The other radionuclides addressed in this report strongly sorb to soil and are readily retained in surface soil. Because of their long half-lives compared to the length of the study period, there was no significant indication that concentrations of U isotopes and Pu isotopes were decreasing over time.

Poston, T.M.; Antonio, E.J.; Cooper, A.T.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excessive phosphorus (P) in runoff contributes to eutrophication of fresh water bodies. Studies have shown that manure and effluent applied from animal feeding operations to waste application fields (WAFs) have contributed to excess P in segments of the North Bosque River in east central Texas. There is a growing need for environmentally sound, economically viable, and easy to establish best management practices to control such pollution. Vegetative buffer strips offer a potential solution for reducing runoff P from WAFs by extracting it from soil and by reducing sediment P delivery (due to reduced runoff and soil erosion) to streams. In a field study, ten plots (5m x 5m) were assigned to five replicated treatments, namely control (bare, without having any plant cover), cool season grass, warm season forb, warm season grass, and warm season legume to assess their efficacy of runoff sediment control and P sequestration potential from soil. These plots were established on a coastal Bermuda grass WAF that received dairy lagoon effluent. A runoff collection system, a 1m x 1m sub-plot with a runoff conveyance and collection apparatus, was installed on the upstream and downstream margins of each plot. Natural rainfall runoff samples were collected and analyzed subsequently for total P, soluble P, and total suspended solids in the laboratory. Additionally, the total mass of runoff collected from each sub-plot was calculated. Results suggested that the warm season forb and warm season grass were the most effective vegetative covers for the reduction of runoff P, followed by coastal Bermuda and cool season grass, respectively. The lesser amount of runoff total P in these two treatments was due to lesser runoff mass and lesser sediments in the runoff due to initial interception of rain and less raindrop impact on soil because of denser vegetative cover in both treatments compared to all other treatments.

Giri, Subhasis

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Late Light Curves of Normally-Luminous Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological tools has reinforced the need to better understand these objects and their light curves. The light curves of Type Ia supernovae are powered by the nuclear decay of $^{56}Ni \\to ^{56}Co \\to ^{56}Fe$. The late time light curves can provide insight into the behavior of the decay products and their effect of the shape of the curves. We present the optical light curves of six "normal" Type Ia supernovae, obtained at late times with template image subtraction, and the fits of these light curves to supernova energy deposition models.

J. C. Lair; M. D. Leising; P. A. Milne; G. G. Williams

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

431

Overview of the BlockNormal Event Trigger Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the search for unmodeled gravitational wave bursts, there are a variety of methods that have been proposed to generate candidate events from time series data. Block Normal is a method of identifying candidate events by searching for places in the data stream where the characteristic statistics of the data change. These change-points divide the data into blocks in which the characteristics of the block are stationary. Blocks in which these characteristics are inconsistent with the long term characteristic statistics are marked as Event-Triggers which can then be investigated by a more computationally demanding multi-detector analysis.

J W C McNabb; M Ashley; L S Finn; E Rotthoff; A Stuver; T Summerscales; P Sutton; M Tibbits; K Thorne; K Zaleski

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

432

Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

NONE

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

433

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-113-1): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Updates 9/27/02 SA-113 12/2/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12/02/02 12/02/02 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-113-1) Updates 9/27/02 SA-113 Bill Erickson, TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: To perform remedial vegetation management for keeping vegetation a safe distance away from electric power facilities and controlling noxious weeds within a section of BPA's Big Eddy-Ostrander Transmission Corridor. During a site review conducted in late fall of 2001, the inspector observed various species of hardwood trees resprouted from stumps. The new vegetative growth encroached on the required "Minimum Safe Distance" between the top of vegetation and the conductor cables. The management action is necessary to reduce the current and potential future hazards that tall- growing vegetation poses to transmission

434

POWER COST NORMALIZATION STUDIES CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM--Sept. 1, 1959  

SciTech Connect

In connection with the development of a comprehensive plan for a ten- year civilian power reactor program, the AEC has had a series of status reports prepared to present a comprehensive review of the technical and economic status of various nuclear power reactor concepts. In as much as the economic data reported by the various contractors reflected different design philosophies, different estimating policies, and in some cases a technology not verified by the AEC definition of current status, Sargent and Lundy was requested to review the aforementioned status reports and to prepare normalized cost estimates of each of eight reactor concepts. The reactors were studied in three plant sizes: 75, 200, and 300 Mw(e). The reactor concepts considered were pressurized water, boiling water, organic cooled, sodium graphite, liquid metal cooled, fluid fuel (aqueous homogeneous), heavy water moderated, and gas cooled. (W.D.M.)

1960-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Radionuclide concentrations in soils and vegetation at radioactive-waste disposal Area G during the 1996 growing season. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Soil and overstory and understory vegetation (washed and unwashed) collected at eight locations within and around Area G--a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National laboratory--were analyzed for {sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup tot}U, {sup 228}Ac, {sup 214}Bi, {sup 60}Co, {sup 40}K, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 22}Na, {sup 214}Pb, and {sup 208}Tl. Also, heavy metals (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl) in soil and vegetation were determined. In general, most radionuclide concentrations, with the exception of {sup 3}H and {sup 239}Pu, in soils and washed and unwashed overstory and understory vegetation collected from within and around Area G were within upper limit background concentrations. Tritium was detected as high as 14,744 pCi mL{sup {minus}1} in understory vegetation collected from transuranic (TRU) waste pad {number_sign}4, and the TRU waste pad area contained the highest levels of {sup 239}Pu in soils and in understory vegetation as compared to other areas at Area G.

Fresquez, P.R.; Vold, E.L.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Evaluation of Vegetative Roofs' Performance on Energy Consumption in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green roofs have been widely used in Europe proved to be beneficial. However, in the US they are not widespread. Previous studies have concluded that the main obstacle that makes architects, developers, etc. reluctant to introduce vegetative roofs is their preference for the traditional roofing since it is a tried-and-true technology. A positive feedback on the performance of vegetative roofs will encourage developers and possibly government authorities to invest more in them. Therefore, a survey was conducted to determine the performance of green roofs in existing buildings in hot and humid climates. This paper presents the results of this survey of around 40 buildings. The methodology and pertinent questions are also presented. Due to the many parameters involved in determining the rate of energy consumption in a building, a definite conclusion regarding how much exactly they can effect on saving can not be drawn, however, the results showed that green roofs can result in saving in the annual energy consumption and using shrubs as well as increasing soil thickness were found to be most effective in reducing building energy consumption.

Anderson, J.; Azarbayjani, M.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Calculation set for design and optimization of vegetative soil covers Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study demonstrates that containment of municipal and hazardous waste in arid and semiarid environments can be accomplished effectively without traditional, synthetic materials and complex, multi-layer systems. This research demonstrates that closure covers combining layers of natural soil, native plant species, and climatic conditions to form a sustainable, functioning ecosystem will meet the technical equivalency criteria prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. In this study, percolation through a natural analogue and an engineered cover is simulated using the one-dimensional, numerical code UNSAT-H. UNSAT-H is a Richards. equation-based model that simulates soil water infiltration, unsaturated flow, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, and deep percolation. This study incorporates conservative, site-specific soil hydraulic and vegetation parameters. Historical meteorological data are used to simulate percolation through the natural analogue and an engineered cover, with and without vegetation. This study indicates that a 3-foot (ft) cover in arid and semiarid environments is the minimum design thickness necessary to meet the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-prescribed technical equivalency criteria of 31.5 millimeters/year and 1 x 10{sup -7} centimeters/second for net annual percolation and average flux, respectively. Increasing cover thickness to 4 or 5 ft results in limited additional improvement in cover performance.

Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The effects of applied water at various fractions of measured evapotranspiration on water relations and vegetative growth of Thompson Seedless grapevines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on reproductive growth and water productivity of ThompsonPAPER The effects of applied water at various fractionsevapotranspiration on water relations and vegetative growth

Williams, L. E.; Grimes, D. W.; Phene, C. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

A Symplectic Method to Generate Multivariate Normal Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AMAS group at the Paul Scherrer Institute developed an object oriented library for high performance simulation of high intensity ion beam transport with space charge. Such particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations require a method to generate multivariate particle distributions as starting conditions. In a preceeding publications it has been shown that the generators of symplectic transformations in two dimensions are a subset of the real Dirac matrices (RDMs) and that few symplectic transformations are required to transform a quadratic Hamiltonian into diagonal form. Here we argue that the use of RDMs is well suited for the generation of multivariate normal distributions with arbitrary covariances. A direct and simple argument supporting this claim is that this is the "natural" way how such distributions are formed. The transport of charged particle beams may serve as an example: An uncorrelated gaussian distribution of particles starting at some initial position of the accelerator is subject to linear deformat...

Baumgarten, Christian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Hard Sphere Dynamics for Normal and Granular Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fluid of N smooth, hard spheres is considered as a model for normal (elastic collisions) and granular (inelastic collisions) fluids. The potential energy is discontinuous for hard spheres so the pairwise forces are singular and the usual forms of Newtonian and Hamiltonian mechanics do not apply. Nevertheless, particle trajectories in the N particle phase space are well defined and the generators for these trajectories can be identified. The first part of this presentation is a review of the generators for the dynamics of observables and probability densities. The new results presented in the second part refer to applications of these generators to the Liouville dynamics for granular fluids. A set of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the generator for this Liouville dynamics is identified in a special "stationary representation". This provides a class of exact solutions to the Liouville equation that are closely related to hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

James W. Dufty; Aparna Baskaran

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Insolation data manual and direct normal solar radiation data manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24--25 years of data, generally from 1952--1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/m{sup 2} per day, Btu/ft{sup 2} per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global {bar K}{sub T} (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global {bar K}{sub T} is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

none,

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-105): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (08/22/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 105 Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No. 1 James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No.1 and 115kV transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 7/17. Corridor width varies. The project area is located within Whatcom County, Washington. Location: Transmission line is located at and west of Elbe, Pierce County Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing

443

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-100): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 8/15/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 5, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-100) Joe Johnson Natural Resource Specialist TFS/Kalispell Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Libby-Conkelly, 1/2 to 26/4 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 230kV Double Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 125 feet to 250 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in both Lincoln and Flathead County, MT, being in the Spokane Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in

444

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-56): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/9/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09, 2002 09, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-56) 2ULRQ $OEUR 2O\PSLD 5HJLRQDO 0DQDJHU Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the following electric yards located in the Ross District: Cape Horn North Bonneville Stevenson Carson Underwood Troutdale Cascade Locks Acton Ross 345kV and J.D. Alcoa Sifton St. Johns Ostrander McLoughlin Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to maintain a weed-free environment in the electrical substations located within the Olympia Region's Ross District. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical

445

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-59): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/19/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 19, 2002 April 19, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-59) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Chehalis Covington/ Raver Paul / Paul Alston 230 and 500 kV Transmission line Corridor ROW 48/2 to 70/6 and 1/1 to 13/4. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with a corridor width of 250 to 442 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Thurston County, WA, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

446

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-13): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 6/6/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3) 3) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Region - Natural Resource Specialist Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Region - Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Naselle Tarlett #1 and #2 transmission line Right of Way (ROW). Location: The ROW is located in Pacific County, WA, Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of

447

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-96) Snohomish District Substations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6) 6) - Snohomish District Substations Dennis Sjoquist - TFN/Snohomish Snohomish Regional Manager Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the following facilities located in the Snohomish District: Bellingham Custer Fidalgo Intalco Lopez Island Monroe Murray, V.M. Snohomish Snoking Whatcom Whatcom Skagit Whatcom San Juan Snohomish Snohomish Snohomish Snohomish Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bareground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Snohomish District of the Snohomish Region. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical substations and associated facilities.

448

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-23)(8/17/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: August 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-23) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Schultz - Raver No.1 and 2 from 60/3 to 75/5 and the Olympia - Grand Coulee from 70/2 to 70/5 Transmission Line ROW's. Location: The ROW is located in King County, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways, around tower structures, and along access roads that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety

449

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-94) Covington District Substations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4) 4) - Covington District Substations Dennis Sjoquist - TFN/Snohomish Snohomish Regional Manager Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the following facilities located in the Covington District: Covington Echo Lake Lynch Creek Maple Valley Narrows Raver, P.J. South Tacoma Steilacoom Surprise Lake Tacoma King King Pierce King Pierce King Pierce Pierce Pierce Pierce Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bareground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Covington District of the Snohomish Region. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical substations and associated facilities.

450

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/23/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2001 23, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08 Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. Location: Raver - Covington Line 1, between towers 6/5 and 7/2. Work will be performed in the State of Washington. Proposed by: BPA Snohomish Region. Analysis: This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All

451

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/18/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2001 18, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on section of three ROWs. The ROWs include selected sections of the McNary Powerhouse, the present and proposed new sections of the McNary-Roundup and the McNary Switchyard South Transmission lines. Location: All ROW are located east Umatilla, OR., all being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject

452

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-17)(7/24/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: July 24, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-17) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along selected sections of the Schulz - Raver No.1, 2, 3 & 4, Olymplia - Grand Coulee NO. 1 Transmission Line ROW's. Location: The ROW's are located in Pierce and King Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA

453

Combining MSS and AVHRR imagery to assess vegetation biomass and dynamics in an arid pastoral ecosystem, Turkana District, Kenya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) imagery was used to develop a vegetation type-biomass map of the 84,000 Km/sup 2/ Turkana District, Kenya. NOAA satellite advanced very high resolution radiometry (AVHRR) imagery was overlaid on the MSS map to trace the seasonal and annual dynamics of vegetation communities used by Turkana pastoral nomads, 1981-1984. Four regions (sub-sectional territories) were compared with respect to peak herbaceous biomass, woody canopy cover, and seasonal fluxes in total green biomass. Results demonstrated major variations among regions and between wet and dry season ranges within regions. Pastoral land use patterns appear to minimize effects of seasonal vegetation fluxes on livestock herds.

Ellis, J.E.; Swift, D.M.; Hart, T.C.; Dick, O.B.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-36): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (01/22/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2002 24, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-38) Benjamin J. Tilley - TFE/Alvey Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Wendson-Tahkenith #1 & #2 1/1-20/4, Tahkenitch-Gardiner #1/1-2/3 and Tahkenitch-Reedsport #1/1-4/2 Transmission Line ROW's. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with and average corridor width of 100 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Douglas and Lane County, OR, being in the Eugene Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

455

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-43): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 27, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-43) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Lower Monumental - McNary 57/2 to 63/5, and Radar Tap 0/4 to 0/10 Transmission Line ROW's. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with and average corridor width of 165 and 80 feet respectively. Location: The ROW is located in Umatilla and Franklin County, OR, being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

456

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 150 East Ellensburg Tap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2003 5, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 150 East Ellensburg Tap Tom Murphy Natural Resource Specialist - TFS/Bell-1 Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the East Ellensburg Tap, 1/6 to 3/19 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 115 kV Single Circuit Transmission Line with no easement width. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Kittatas County, WA being in the Spokane Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around transmission line structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the

457

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-119): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 1/29/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2003 9, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-119 Snohomish-Murray No. 1 Transmission Line Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Snohomish-Murray No. 1 Transmission Line from structure 2/6 through structure 18/6. Right of way width is 95 feet. Location: The project area is located within Snohomish County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Total right-of-way acreage is approximately 182.8 acres. Approximately 17 miles of access roads will

458

DOE/EIS-0285; Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (May 2000)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement Statement DOE/EIS-0285 Arrow-leaf Balsamroot Cooperating Agencies Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0285) Responsible Agency: Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville), U.S. Department of Energy Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Forest Service (FS), U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Land Management (BLM), U.S. Department of Interior Title of Proposed Action: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program States Involved: California, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming Abstract: Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation.

459

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-25)(9/5/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2001 5, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-25) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along selected ROW sections of the Ostrander-Pearl transmission line. The ROWs include sections of the Ostrander-Pearl 500 kV line; the Ostrander-McLoughlin 500 kV line; the Big Eddy-Chemawa 230 kV line and the Big Eddy- McLoughlin 230 kV line. Location: The ROW is located in Clackamas County, Oregon, within the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights- of-way and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the

460

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-122): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/19/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CSB-2 CSB-2 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-122- Bonneville-Alcoa Ed Tompkins, TFO/LMT Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Bonneville-Alcoa 115kV transmission line Location: The project is located in the BPA Olympia Region in Skamania and Clark Counties, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, along access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-81): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 7/9/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 9,2002 July 9,2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-81) Randy Melzer Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFR/REDMOND Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for fifteen Substations in The Dalles District. (See list of facilities under planning step 1). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within The Dalles District of the Redmond Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what

462

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-50: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission Vegetation Management Program FEIS (3/15/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2/27/01 1 2/27/01 1 United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration DATE: March 15, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-50) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on Grizzly-Summerlake (Structures 102/1-104/2) and Grizzly-Captain Jack (Structures 103/1-140/4) Transmission Line Corridors. Location: The project area lies east and northeast Klamath Falls, OR, and is located in Lake and Klamath Counties, Redmond Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the rights of

463

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-74): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 7/1/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2002 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-74) Randy Melzer Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFR/REDMOND Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for five Substations in the Malin District. (See list of facilities under planning step 1). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Malin District of the Redmond Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what mitigation measures are required to protect those resources. In addition,

464

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-127): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/19/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KEP/4 KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-127- Eugene-Alvey#2 Benjamin Tilley - TFE/Alvey Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Eugene-Alvey 115 kV transmission line from structure 7/1 through structure 12/2m, and along portions of the following adjacent transmission lines: Hawkins-Alvey 115KV and Alvey-Lane 115KV. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region in Lane County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to

465

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-52): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (03/22/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2002 22, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-52) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on the Ashe-Marion #2 (138/1-150/2), Buckley- Marion (12/1-24/2), McNary-Santiam (109/1-119/3), and John Day-Marion (49/4-50/5) Transmission Line Corridors. Location: The project area lies between Maupin and Pine Grove Oregon, and is in the Redmond Region. The project area begins at on the Ashe-Marion at structure 138/1 and terminates at Wapinitia Road, Pine Grove. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the

466

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-57): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/10/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2002 0, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-57) Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Trojan-Allston Transmission Lines 1 & 2 ROW between 1/1 and 9/1. The lines are 230 kV Single Circuit Transmission Lines having an easement width of 125 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Columbia County, OR, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject

467

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-20)(8/2/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2001 2, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-20) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla - Natural Resource Specialist Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia - Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the McNary-Ross 161/1 to 166/5+346 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 345kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 175 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Clark County, WA, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

468

(DOE/EIS-0285//SA-80): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (07/01/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SA80 SA80 Rocky Reach - Maple Valley Don Atkinson -- - TFN/Snohomish Bill Erickson -- - TFP/Walla Walla Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for USDA Forest Service Lands Along the Rocky Reach - Maple Valley Transmission Line. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along access roads and around tower structures on USDA Forest Service lands that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposal. Analysis: Please see the attached checklist for the resources present. Applicable findings and mitigation measures are discussed below. Planning Steps: 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. Access roads (only) and tower sites (only) will be treated using non-selective methods

469

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-75): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (06/21/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June June 21, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z-992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA- 75-Ross-Lexington. Jim Jellison -- - TFO/Olympia Ed Tompkins -- - TFO/Ross Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Ross Lexington Transmission Line. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove danger trees as well as unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways, along access roads and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposed action. Analysis: Please see the attached checklist for the resources present. Applicable findings and mitigation measures are discussed below. Planning Steps: 1. Identify facility and

470

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-82): Supplemental Analysis for Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (August 13, 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3,2002 3,2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-82 Jeffrey Hathhorn Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFI/IDAHO FALLS Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for twenty-four Substations in the Burley District. See list of facilities under planning step 1). Location: See list of facilities under Planning Step 1. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Burley District of the Idaho Falls Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what

471

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-103): Supplemental Analysis for Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (August 12, 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-103-Keeler-Pennwalt). Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Ed Tompkins - TFO/Ross Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Keeler-Pennwalt transmission line and parts of the St. John-Keeler, Rivergate-Keeler, Keeler-Oregon City, & St. John-St. Helens lines. Location: Washington and Multnomah Counties, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the Right-of-Ways along access roads and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposed action. Analysis: See the attached checklist for the

472

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-78): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (07/01/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-78) Randy Melzer Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFR/REDMOND Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for ten Substations in the Redmond District. (See list of facilities listed under planning step 1). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Redmond District of the Redmond Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what mitigation measures are required to protect those resources. In

473

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-55): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/12/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2002 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Covington SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-55) Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Raver - Paul No. 1 Transmission Line ROW from structure 15/5 to 29/3. The transmission line is a 500 kV line. Location: The ROW is located Pierce County, WA. Proposed by: Snohomish Regional Headquarters, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line, including both Reclaim and Danger Trees. Also, access road clearing will be

474

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-27): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 10/22/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 22, 2001 October 22, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-27) Ben Tilley - TFE/Alvey Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Marion-Alvey #1 from structure 14/5 to 64/3 and the Marion-Lane #1 from structure 14/5 to 70/2. Both lines describe the same segment of ROW between structures 14/5 and 45/2. Location: All ROW are located in Marion, Linn, and Lane Counties, OR, all being in the Eugene Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Eugene Region. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways, around tower structures, and associated access roads that may impede the operation and

475

Normalization of the scattered light from an isolated defect illuminated by a Gaussian beam  

SciTech Connect

The intensity distribution of the beam from a laser operated in the zero order configuration for the transverse electromagnetic field (TEM/sub 00/ mode) is Gaussian in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the beam. In some applications it is desirable to have a uniform intensity over a certain region in space. For example, when a Gaussian beam is incident on a smooth surface containing small isolated defects, the light scattered by a defect will depend on the position of the defect relative to the center of the beam. In the past, several techniques have been devised to convert a Gaussian intensity profile into a uniform intensity over a specified region in space. In the present work a different approach is taken. A method of normalization is described which makes direct use of the Gaussian intensity distribution of the TEM/sub 00/ mode. By this method the amount of light scattered by a defect can be normalized to the value which would be observed if the defect were located at the center of the beam, for a defect small in size compared with the 1/e/sup 2/ diameter of the Gaussian profile. The normalization requires that three measurements be made of the scattering by the defect for an arbitrary location of the defect relative to the center of the Gaussian beam, and that the 1/e/sup 2/ radius of the Gaussian beam and the interval between adjacent illuminated spots on the surface are known. Experimental data verifying the theory were obtained from isolated defects on a superfinished spherical surface.

Klingsporn, P.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Radiobiology of normal rat lung in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary cancer radiation therapy that utilizes biochemical tumor cell targeting and provides a mixed field of high and low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation with differing ...

Kiger, Jingli Liu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 327-353; doi:10.3390/rs4020327 Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 327-353; doi:10.3390/rs4020327 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing Article Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Jungho Im 1, *, John R. Jensen 2 , Ryan R. Jensen 3 , John Gladden 4 , Jody Waugh 5 and Mike Serrato 4 1 Department of Environmental Resources Engineering, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA 2 Department of Geography, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA; E-Mail: johnj@mailbox.sc.edu 3 Department of Geography, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84605, USA; E-Mail: ryan.jensen@byu.edu 4 Savannah River National Laboratory, Department of Energy, Aiken, SC 29808, USA;

478

Feasibility of irradiating Washington fruits and vegetables for Asian export markets  

SciTech Connect

US agricultural export marketing opportunities are limited by the existence of trade barriers in many overseas countries. For example, Japan and South Korea do not permit the importation of apples due to their stated concern over codling moth infestation. One of the purposes of this study was to evaluate the potential of exporting irradiated fruits and vegetables from Washington State to overcome existing trade barriers and prevent the establishment of future barriers. The Asian countries specifically evaluated in this study are Japan, Hong Kong and Singapore. Another purpose of this project was to determine the feasibility of locating an irradiation facility in Washington State. Advantages that irradiated agricultural products would bring in terms of price and quality in export markets were also evaluated.

Eakin, D.E.; Hazelton, R.F.; Young, J.K.; Prenguber, B.A.; O'Rourke, A.D.; Heim, M.N.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Hierarchical set of models for estimating the effects of air pollution on vegetation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three models have been developed to estimate the effects of air pollutants on vegetation at the photosynthetic process (PHOTO), plant (GROWl), and community (SILVA) levels of resolution. PHOTO simulates the enhancement of photosynthesis at low H/sub 2/S levels, depression of photosynthesis at high H/sub 2/S levels, and the threshold effects for sulfur pollutants. GROWl simulates the growth and development of a plant during a growing season. GROWl has been used to assess the effects on sugar beets of geothermal energy development in the Imperial Valley, California. SILVA is a community-level model simulating the effects of SO/sub 2/ on growth, species composition, and succession, for the mixed conifer forest types of the Sierra Nevada, California.

Kercher, J.R.; Axelrod, M.C.; Bingham, G.E.

1981-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

480

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, Vincent P. (Los Alamos, NM); Barron, Michael H. (Los Alamos, NM); Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "normalized difference vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

482

A comparison of a hierarchy of models for determining energy balance components over vegetation canopies  

SciTech Connect

Several methods for estimating surface energy balance components over a vegetated surface are compared. These include Penman-Monteith, Deardorff, and multilayer canopy (CANWHT) models for evaporation. Measurements taken during the 1991 DOE-sponsored Boardman Area Regional Flux Experiment over a well-irrigated, closed wheat canopy are used in the comparison. The relative performance of each model is then evaluated. It is found that the Penman-Monteith approach using a simple parameterization for stomatal conductance performs best for evaporation flux. The Deardorff model is found to have the best relative performance for sensible heat, while the CANWHT model gives the best results for net radiation and soil heat flux. The Priestley-Taylor model for evaporation and a resistance-analog equation for sensible heat flux are also tested. 35 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Vogel, C.A.; Baldocchi, D.D.; Luhar, A.K.; Rao, K.S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Performance of SVO Performance of SVO While straight vegetable oil or mixtures of SVO and diesel fuel have been used by some over the years, research has shown that SVO has technical issues that pose barriers to widespread acceptance. The published engineering literature strongly indicates that the use of SVO will lead to reduced engine life. This reduced engine life is caused by the buildup of carbon deposits inside the engine, as well as negative impacts of SVO on the engine lubricant. Both carbon deposits and excessive buildup of SVO in the lubricant are caused by the very high boiling point and viscosity of SVO relative to the required boiling range for diesel fuel. The carbon buildup doesn't necessarily happen quickly but instead over a longer period. These conclusions are

484

Sampling Plan for Assaying Plates Containing Depleted or Normal Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the rationale behind the proposed method for selecting a 'representative' sample of uranium metal plates, portions of which will be destructively assayed at the Y-12 Security Complex. The total inventory of plates is segregated into two populations, one for Material Type 10 (depleted uranium (DU)) and one for Material Type 81 (normal [or natural] uranium (NU)). The plates within each population are further stratified by common dimensions. A spreadsheet gives the collective mass of uranium element (and isotope for DU) and the piece count of all plates within each stratum. These data are summarized in Table 1. All plates are 100% uranium metal, and all but approximately 60% of the NU plates have Kel-F{reg_sign} coating. The book inventory gives an overall U-235 isotopic percentage of 0.22% for the DU plates, ranging from 0.19% to 0.22%. The U-235 ratio of the NU plates is assumed to be 0.71%. As shown in Table 1, the vast majority of the plates are comprised of depleted uranium, so most of the plates will be sampled from the DU population.

Ivan R. Thomas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Standard Test Method for Normal Spectral Emittance at Elevated Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method describes a highly accurate technique for measuring the normal spectral emittance of electrically conducting materials or materials with electrically conducting substrates, in the temperature range from 600 to 1400 K, and at wavelengths from 1 to 35 ?m. 1.2 The test method requires expensive equipment and rather elaborate precautions, but produces data that are accurate to within a few percent. It is suitable for research laboratories where the highest precision and accuracy are desired, but is not recommended for routine production or acceptance testing. However, because of its high accuracy this test method can be used as a referee method to be applied to production and acceptance testing in cases of dispute. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this stan...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Ciccotelli et al. --Vernal Pool Plants of Acadia A preliminary study of the vegetation of vernal pools of Acadia National Park, Maine, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Maine's wetlands, including those of Acadia National Park (ANP) on Mt. Desert Island (MDI; Calhoun et al vegetation of ANP. Recent floristic treatments for ANP make no reference to vernal pool vegetation (Greene et al. 2005; Mittelhau- ser et al. 2010). Nearly 12% (133 taxa) of vascular plants in ANP have been

Rajakaruna, Nishanta

487

Vegetation Dynamics Along Utility Rights-of-Way Factors Affecting the Ability of Shrub and Herbaceous Communities to Resist Invasion by Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional vegetation management programs along utility rights-of-way (ROW) have been designed to prevent tree growth into transmission wire security zones. This study of vegetation dynamics describes factors affecting the ability of shrub and herbaceous communities to resist tree invasion. Such information will allow ecologists to identify the critical pressure points where intervention in natural ecological processes will prove most effective.

1999-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

488

Hydrogen bonding and coordination in normal and supercritical water from X-ray inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A direct measure of hydrogen bonding in water under conditions ranging from the normal state to the supercritical regime is derived from the Compton scattering of inelastically-scattered X-rays. First, we show that a measure of the number of electrons $n_e$ involved in hydrogen bonding at varying thermodynamic conditions can be directly obtained from Compton profile differences. Then, we use first-principles simulations to provide a connection between $n_e$ and the number of hydrogen bonds $n_{HB}$. Our study shows that over the broad range studied the relationship between $n_e$ and $n_{HB}$ is linear, allowing for a direct experimental measure of bonding and coordination in water. In particular, the transition to supercritical state is characterized by a sharp increase in the number of water monomers, but also displays a significant number of residual dimers and trimers.

Patrick H. -L. Sit; Christophe Bellin; Bernardo Barbiellini; D. Testemale; J. -L. Hazemann; T. Buslaps; Nicola Marzari; Abhay Shukla

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z