National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for normal seasonal temperatures

  1. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S SURFACE TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Romani, P. N.; Hesman, B. E. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Carlson, R. C.; Gorius, N. J. P. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Coustenis, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Tokano, T., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Institut fuer Geophysik und Meteorologie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, 50923 Koeln (Germany)

    2011-08-10

    Seasonal changes in Titan's surface brightness temperatures have been observed by Cassini in the thermal infrared. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer measured surface radiances at 19 {mu}m in two time periods: one in late northern winter (LNW; L{sub s} = 335 deg.) and another centered on northern spring equinox (NSE; L{sub s} = 0 deg.). In both periods we constructed pole-to-pole maps of zonally averaged brightness temperatures corrected for effects of the atmosphere. Between LNW and NSE a shift occurred in the temperature distribution, characterized by a warming of {approx}0.5 K in the north and a cooling by about the same amount in the south. At equinox the polar surface temperatures were both near 91 K and the equator was at 93.4 K. We measured a seasonal lag of {Delta}L{sub S} {approx} 9{sup 0} in the meridional surface temperature distribution, consistent with the post-equinox results of Voyager 1 as well as with predictions from general circulation modeling. A slightly elevated temperature is observed at 65{sup 0} S in the relatively cloud-free zone between the mid-latitude and southern cloud regions.

  2. The seasons, global temperature, and precession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis of instrumental temperature records beginning in 1659 shows that in much of the world the dominant frequency of the seasons is one cycle per anomalistic year (the time from perihelion to perihelion, 265.25964 days), not one cycle per tropical year (the time from equinox to equinox, 265.24220 days), and that the timing of the annual temperature cycle is controlled by perihelion. The assumption that the seasons were timed by the equinoxes has caused many statistical analyses of climate data to be badly biased. Coherence between changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle and those in the average temperature show that between 1854 and 1922 there were small temperature variations, probable of solar origin. Since 1922, the phase of the Northern Hemisphere coherence between these quantities switched from 0{degrees} to 180{degrees} and implies that solar variability cannot be the sole cause of the increasing temperature over the last century. About 1940, the phase patterns of the previous 300 years began to change and now appear to be changing at an unprecendented rate. The average change in phase is not coherent with the logarithm of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration.

  3. The seasons, global temperature, and precession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, D.J. [AT& T Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1995-04-07

    Analysis of instrumental temperature records beginning in 1659 shows that in much of the world the dominant frequency of the seasons is one cycle per anomalistic year (the time from perihelion to perihelion, 365.25964 days), not one cycle per tropical year (the time from equinox to equinox, 365.24220 days), and that the timing of the annual temperature cycle is controlled by perihelion. The assumption that the seasons were timed by the equinoxes has caused many statistical analyses of climate data to be badly biased. Coherence between changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle and those in the average temperature show that between 1854 and 1922 there were small temperature variations, probably of solar origin. Since 1922, the phase of the Northern Hemisphere coherence between these quantities switched from 0{degrees} to 180{degrees} and implies that solar variability cannot be the sole cause of the increasing temperature over the last century. About 1940, the phase patterns of the previous 300 years began to change and now appear to be changing at an unprecedented rate. The average change in phase is now coherent with the logarithm of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. 80 refs., 13 figs.

  4. AT 351 Lab 3: Seasons and Surface Temperature (Ch. 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    an important role in an area's local vertical temperature distribution. Below, Figure 1 shows the verticalAT 351 Lab 3: Seasons and Surface Temperature (Ch. 3) Question #1: Seasons (20 pts) A. In your own words, describe the cause of the seasons. B. In the Northern Hemisphere we are closer to the sun during

  5. Seasonal variations in the subauroral electron temperature enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fok, M.C.; Kozyra, J.U.; Warren, M.F. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA)); Brace, L.H. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The subauroral nightside electron temperature peak is one of the phenomena showing the response of the subauroral ionosphere to the influx of magnetic storm energy in the vicinity of the plasmapause. A statistical study of the seasonal variations of the subauroral electron temperature enhancement was undertaken using data from the Langmuir probe experiment on the DE 2 satellite throughout most of the mission (1981-1982). In the winter hemisphere the nighttime background electron temperature is the highest and the magnitude of the peak T{sub e} responds most weakly to the geomagnetic activity. This behavior can be explained by seasonal trends in the nighttime downward heat flux due to conjugate photoelectrons. Moreover, model results indicate that a factor of {approximately}3 increase in heat inflow during equinox relative to solstice is required to raise the electron temperature to a given level. This is a consequence of the higher electron densities at the T{sub e} peak near equinox. The T{sub e} peak occurs on field lines which thread the outer plasmasphere in the vicinity of the plasmapause and thus can be used as a tracer of the plasmapause position. Correlating the position of the T{sub e} peak with K{sub p} (the highest value of 3-hour K{sub p} in the preceding 12 hours) indicates a trend toward a more expanded quiet time plasmasphere and one which is more easily compressed by magnetic storms at equinox than during the solstice period.

  6. Seasonal Evolution of Saturn's Polar Temperatures and Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Leigh N; Sinclair, J A; Orton, G S; Giles, R S; Hurley, J; Gorius, N; Achterberg, R K; Hesman, B E; Bjoraker, G L

    2014-01-01

    The seasonal evolution of Saturn's polar atmospheric temperatures and hydrocarbon composition is derived from a decade of Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) 7-16 $\\mu$m thermal infrared spectroscopy. We construct a near-continuous record of atmospheric variability poleward of 60$^\\circ$ from northern winter/southern summer (2004, $L_s=293^\\circ$) through the equinox (2009, $L_s=0^\\circ$) to northern spring/southern autumn (2014, $L_s=56^\\circ$). The hot tropospheric polar cyclones and the hexagonal shape of the north polar belt are both persistent features throughout the decade of observations. The hexagon vertices rotated westward by $\\approx30^\\circ$ longitude between March 2007 and April 2013, confirming that they are not stationary in the Voyager-defined System III longitude system as previously thought. The extended region of south polar stratospheric emission has cooled dramatically poleward of the sharp temperature gradient near 75$^\\circ$S, coinciding with a depletion in the abundances of ...

  7. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  8. The seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, Bridget Frances

    1994-01-01

    differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter. 40 years of monthly mean surface data and 25 years of monthly mean 700mb and 500mb data is averaged over the seasons. The spatial correlation of four northern hemisphere midlatitude test sites...

  9. Diurnal-seasonal and weather-related variations of land surface temperature observed from geostationary satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinnikov, Konstantin

    Surface Temperature (SST) monitoring using infrared observations from NOAA satellites is relatively easy temperature from a satellite is possible only for cloudless sky, such monitoring is an important componentDiurnal-seasonal and weather-related variations of land surface temperature observed from

  10. Seasonal variations of semidiurnal tidal perturbations in mesopause region temperature and zonal and meridional winds above

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to conserve wave energy. When propagating into the MLT region, the horizontal wind tidal amplitude can reachSeasonal variations of semidiurnal tidal perturbations in mesopause region temperature and zonal, Colorado (40.6°N, 105.1°W). The observed monthly results are in good agreement with MF radar tidal

  11. Diurnal and seasonal cycles of trends of surface air temperature Konstantin Y. Vinnikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA Alan Basist National Climate Data Center for every day and hour of the period of observation. INDEX TERMS: 1620 Global Change: Climate dynamics (3309, seasonal cycle, climate change, climate variability, trends, temperature Citation: Vinnikov, K. Y., A

  12. Feedback cooling of the normal modes of a massive electromechanical system to submillikelvin temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vinante; M. Bignotto; M. Bonaldi; M. Cerdonio; L. Conti; P. Falferi; N. Liguori; S. Longo; R. Mezzena; A. Ortolan; G. A. Prodi; F. Salemi; L. Taffarello; G. Vedovato; S. Vitale; J. -P. Zendri

    2008-09-18

    We apply a feedback cooling technique to simultaneously cool the three electromechanical normal modes of the ton-scale resonant-bar gravitational wave detector AURIGA. The measuring system is based on a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) amplifier, and the feedback cooling is applied electronically to the input circuit of the SQUID. Starting from a bath temperature of 4.2 K, we achieve a minimum temperature of 0.17 mK for the coolest normal mode. The same technique, implemented in a dedicated experiment at subkelvin bath temperature and with a quantum limited SQUID, could allow to approach the quantum ground state of a kilogram-scale mechanical resonator.

  13. Seasonal trend of photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, L; Baldocchi, DD

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 Understanding seasonal changes in photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance is crucial for modeling long-term carbon uptake and energy fluxes of ecosystems. Gas exchange measurements of CO{sub 2} and light response curves on blue oak leaves (Quercus douglasii H. & A.) were conducted weekly throughout the growing season to study the seasonality of photosynthetic capacity (V{sub cmax}) and Ball-Berry slope (m) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature. A leaf photosynthetic model was used to determine V{sub cmax}. There was a pronounced seasonal pattern in V{sub cmax}. The maximum value of V{sub cmax}, 127 {micro}molm{sup -2} s{sup -1},was reached shortly after leaf expansion in early summer, when air temperature was moderate and soil water availability was high. Thereafter, V{sub cmax} declined as the soil water profile became depleted and the trees experienced extreme air temperatures, exceeding 40 C. The decline in V{sub cmax} was gradual in midsummer, however, despite extremely low predawn leaf water potentials ({Psi}{sub pd}, {approx} -4.0 MPa). Overall, temporal changes in V{sub cmax} were well correlated with changes in leaf nitrogen content. During spring leaf development, high rates of leaf dark respiration (R{sub d}, 5-6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were observed. Once a leaf reached maturity, R{sub d} remained low, around 0.5 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. In contrast to the strong seasonality of V{sub cmax}, m and marginal water cost per unit carbon gain ({partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A) were relatively constant over the season, even when leaf {Psi}{sub pd} dropped to -6.8 MPa. The constancy of {partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A suggests that stomata behaved optimally under severe water-stress conditions. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of modeling carbon and water vapor exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere.

  14. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-58 LAKE SUPERIOR COOLING SEASON TEMPERATURE CLIMATOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and extreme temperatures over period of record. Table 51. Summary of Lake Superior, area 8, temperature period of record. Table 51. Summary of Lake Superior, area 11, temperature climatology and extreme profiles. Survey route and lake area locations. Mean survey temperature climatology and stages in cooling

  15. Diurnal and seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature over western Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    industry has installed a total of 46,919 megawatts (MW) of capac- ity, making it second in the world behind are located. Seasonal anomalies are created from MODIS Terra (*10:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m. local solar time) and Aqua (*1:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. local solar time) LSTs, and their spatiotemporal variability is analyzed

  16. Year-ahead Prediction of Hurricane Season Sea Surface Temperature in the Tropical Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, J; Meagher, Jonathan; Jewson, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    One possible method for the year-ahead prediction of hurricane numbers would be to make a year-ahead prediction of sea surface temperature (SST), and then to apply relationships that link SST to hurricane numbers. As a first step towards setting up such a system this article compares three simple statistical methods for the year-ahead prediction of the relevant SSTs.

  17. The Assessment and Calibration of Ensemble Seasonal Forecasts of Equatorial Pacific Ocean Temperature and the Predictability of Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewson, S; Hagedorn, Rolf; Jewson, Stephen; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; Hagedorn, Renate

    2003-01-01

    We evaluate the performance of two 44 year ensemble seasonal hindcast time series for the Nino3 index produced as part of the DEMETER project. We show that the ensemble mean carries useful information out to six months. The ensemble spread, however, only carries useful information out to four months in one of the models, and two months in the other.

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 44, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2006 2779 Seasonal Variations in Diurnal Temperature Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    Variations in Diurnal Temperature Range From Satellites and Surface Observations Donglian Sun, Menas Kafatos temperature (Ta). Station-based observations are sparse and unevenly distributed, making the use of satellites, Rachel T. Pinker, and David R. Easterling Abstract--The diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an im- portant

  19. Pressure and concentration dependences of the autoignition temperature for normal butane + air mixtures in a closed vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandraratna, M.R.; Griffiths, J.F. . School of Chemistry)

    1994-12-01

    The condition at which autoignition occurs in lean premixed n-butane + air mixtures over the composition range 0.2%--2.5% n-butane by volume (0.06 < [phi] < 0.66) were investigated experimentally. Total reactant pressure from 0.1 to 0.6 MPa (1--6 atm) were studied in a spherical, stainless-steel, closed vessel (0.5 dm[sup 3]). There is a critical transition from nonignition to ignition, at pressures above 0.1 MPa, as the mixture is enriched in the vicinity of 1% fuel vapor by volume. There is also a region of multiplicity, which exhibits three critical temperatures at a given composition. Chemical analyses show that partially oxygenated components,including many o-heterocyclic compounds, are important products of the lean combustion of butane at temperatures up to 800 K. The critical conditions for autoignition are discussed with regard to industrial ignition hazards, especially in the context of the autoignition temperature of alkanes given by ASTM or BS tests. The differences between the behavior of n-butane and the higher n-alkanes are explained. The experimental results are also used as a basis for testing a reduced kinetic model to represent the oxidation and autoignition of n-butane or other alkanes.

  20. Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    NORMAL DlSTRlBUTION TABLE. Entries represent the area under the standardized normal distribution from -w to z, Pr(Z

  1. Open Season in Sacramento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brosnan, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    egislative Open Season in Sacramento Douglas Brosnan, MD, JDs open season again in Sacramento: The legislative session

  2. St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but has a high tolerance for shade-season grass. It does best in full sun and high temperatures. Goes dormant and turns brown in winter. Very

  3. Seasonal Run Distribution Seasonal Run Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The term "total run" defines the number of adult sockeye salmon that home to the Karluk River before197 Seasonal Run Distribution CHAPTER 6 Seasonal Run Distribution They arrived from the sea in one, what was the seasonal run distribution of its sockeye salmon? Was the original run distribution which

  4. Nocturnal temperature structure in the mesopause region over the Arecibo Observatory (18.35N, 66.75W): Seasonal variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xinzhao

    around equinoxes, particularly late autumn when it is near 195 K, while the spring mesopause temperature in summer ($100 km), a medium altitude in late autumn and winter ($96 km), and a low altitude in early

  5. The signature of ozone depletion on tropical temperature trends, as revealed by their seasonal cycle in model integrations with single forcings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    [1] The effect of ozone depletion on temperature trends in the tropical lower stratosphere is explored with an atmospheric general circulation model, and directly contrasted to the effect of increased greenhouse gases and ...

  6. Normal and refractory concretes for LMFBR applications. Volume 1. Review of literature on high-temperature behavior of portland cement and refractory concretes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazant, Z.P.; Chern, J.C.; Abrams, M.S.; Gillen, M.P.

    1982-06-01

    The extensive literature on the properties and behavior at elevated temperature of portland cement concrete and various refractory concretes was reviewed to collect in concise form the physical and chemical properties of castable refractory concretes and of conventional portland cement concretes at elevated temperature. This survey, together with an extensive bibliography of source documents, is presented in Volume 1. A comparison was made of these properties, the relative advantages of the various concretes was evaluated for possible liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications, and a selection was made of several materials of interest for such applications. Volume 2 concludes with a summary of additional knowledge needed to support such uses of these materials together with recommendations on research to provide that knowledge.

  7. Atom beam triangulation of organic layers at 100 meV normal energy: self-assembled perylene on Ag(110) at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalashnyk, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    The controlled growth of organic layer on surface is still awaiting for an on-line reliable monitoring that would allow improvement of its quality. We show here that the self-assembly of the perylene monolayer deposited on Ag(110) at room temperature can be tracked with low energy atoms in a regime where the energy perpendicular to the layer is less than 0.1 eV preventing damage to the layer. The image processing required for this triangulation technique with atoms is described in details.

  8. Temperature Normals/Extremes-October - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Year Low Year 1 76 47 88 1991+ 61 1959 59 1992 30 1954 2 75 47 86 1993+ 56 1967 60 1988 32 1954 3 74 46 89 1958 55 1950 58 2010+ 33 1999+ 4 73 45 89 1980 55 1950 57 1988 32...

  9. Temperature Normals/Extremes-August - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maximum Minimum Day Max Min High Year Low Year High Year Low Year 1 94 63 109 2009+ 77 1976+ 80 1949 51 1987 2 94 63 106 1994 74 2013 77 2009 46 1964 3 94 63 107 1961 77 1962 75...

  10. Temperature Normals/Extremes-June - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maximum Minimum Day Max Min High Year Low Year High Year Low Year 1 81 54 103 1986 64 1976 69 1986 37 1984 2 81 54 101 2007 65 1999+ 69 1989+ 37 1976 3 80 54 104 2007 55 1966 69...

  11. The Third Season of Rape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ali Jimale

    1988-01-01

    UFAHAMU THE THIRD SEASON OF RAPE by Ali Jimale Ahmed Andin the third season of rape. ·Somali for blood-sucking

  12. The Second Season of Rape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keynan, Hassan A.

    1988-01-01

    POETRY THE SECOND SEASON OF RAPE by Hassan A Keynan I datedFor the second season of Rape. Then, in her womb, did I

  13. Mammalian Seasonal Rhythms: Behavior and Neuroendocrine Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zucker, Irving

    . The amount and intensity of solar radiation varies with latitude; the greater the distance from the equator, the more pronounced the interseasonal differences in ambient temperature and solar radiation. Plant growth to melatonin in mammals to date." (Arendt, 2000) I. INTRODUCTION Seasonal phenotypes in behavior and physiology

  14. Normal, Not Paracompact Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleissner, William G.

    1982-07-01

    We describe some recently constructed counterexamples in general topology, including a normal, nonmetrizable Moore space, a normal para-Lindelof, not paracompact space, and a normal, screenable, not paracompact space....

  15. Oxygen isotope records of carboniferous seasonality on the Russian platform 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Huayu

    1998-01-01

    Seven isotopic and eight trace element (TE) profiles across shell growth lines are presented, based on over 1000 stable isotope and electron microprobe analyses on six brachiopod shells (Gigantoproductus), to quantify seasonal temperature change...

  16. On the Persistence of Cold-Season SST Anomalies Associated with the Annular Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Matthew

    On the Persistence of Cold-Season SST Anomalies Associated with the Annular Modes LAURA M. CIASTO fluxes, and Ekman currents on the persistence of cold-season extratropical sea surface temperature (SST. Observational analysis reveals that during the cold season, SST anomalies associated with the southern annular

  17. Seasonality in air transportation demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichard Megwinoff, H?tor Nicolas

    1988-01-01

    This thesis investigates the seasonality of demand in air transportation. It presents three methods for computing seasonal indices. One of these methods, the Periodic Average Method, is selected as the most appropriate for ...

  18. Interior Structure and Seasonal Mass Redistribution of Mars from Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Interior Structure and Seasonal Mass Redistribution of Mars from Radio Tracking of Mars Pathfinder. Analysis of radio tracking measurements from the Vi- king landers has determined the normal- ized polar. The precession is driven by the gravita- tional torque of the sun acting on Mars' oblate figure

  19. The bi-variate frequency distribution of two concurrent climatic variables: a study of temperature and dew point 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeitler, Jon William

    1991-01-01

    Study of Temperature and Dew Point (December 1991). Jon William Zeitler, B. S. , iowa State University Chair of Advisory Comminee; Prof. John F. Griffiths The bi-variate normal distribution was fitted for the mid-season months of January, April, July... as to style and content by: Jo F. Griffnhs "' (Chair of Committee) Robert C. Runnels (Member) J. ' e (Mem r) Edward J. ser (Head of Department) December 1991 ABSTRACT The Bi-Variate Frequency Distribution of Two Concurrent Climatic Variables: A...

  20. Improving Groundwater Predictions Utilizing Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts from General Circulation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    Improving Groundwater Predictions Utilizing Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts from General. The research reported in this paper evaluates the potential in developing 6-month-ahead groundwater Surface Temperature forecasts. Ten groundwater wells and nine streamgauges from the USGS Groundwater

  1. 2D and 3D Dense-Fluid Shear Flows via Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics. Comparison of Time-and-Space-Averaged Tensor Temperature and Normal Stresses from Doll's, Sllod, and Boundary-Driven Shear Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wm. G. Hoover; Carol G. Hoover; Janka Petravic

    2008-07-19

    Homogeneous shear flows (with constant strainrate du/dy) are generated with the Doll's and Sllod algorithms and compared to corresponding inhomogeneous boundary-driven flows. We use one-, two-, and three-dimensional smooth-particle weight functions for computing instantaneous spatial averages. The nonlinear stress differences are small, but significant, in both two and three space dimensions. In homogeneous systems the sign and magnitude of the shearplane stress difference, P(xx) - P(yy), depend on both the thermostat type and the chosen shearflow algorithm. The Doll's and Sllod algorithms predict opposite signs for this stress difference, with the Sllod approach definitely wrong, but somewhat closer to the (boundary-driven) truth. Neither of the homogeneous shear algorithms predicts the correct ordering of the kinetic temperatures, T(xx) > T(zz) > T(yy).

  2. FINAL REPORT A HIGH SEASONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;'I MTI 79TR68 FINAL REPORT A HIGH SEASONAL PERFORMANCE FACTOR GAS HEAT PUMP FOR THE NORTH Model Gas Heat Pump ......... 11-4 11.4 CNG Typical Weather Year Selection Method. . . . 11-5 11 of the subject gas-fueled heat pump under development in comparison with other equipment which

  3. Normal Conducting CLIC Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, E

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) multi-lateral study group based at CERN is studying the technology for an electron-positron linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy up to 5 TeV. In contrast to the International Linear Collider (ILC) study which has chosen to use super-conducting cavities with accelerating gradients in the range of 30-40 MV/m to obtain centre-of-mass collision energies of 0.5-1 TeV, the CLIC study aims to use a normal-conducting system based on two-beam technology with gradients of 150 MV/m. It is generally accepted that this change in technology is not only necessary but the only viable choice for a cost-effective multi-TeV collider. The CLIC study group is studying the technology issues of such a machine, and is in particular developing state-of-the-art 30 GHz molybdenum-iris accelerating structures and power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The accelerating structure has a new geometry which includes fully-profiled RF surfaces optimised to minimize surface fields, and hybri...

  4. Normal Conducting CLIC Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Erk

    2006-01-03

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) multi-lateral study group based at CERN is studying the technology for an electron-positron linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy up to 5 TeV. In contrast to the International Linear Collider (ILC) study which has chosen to use super-conducting cavities with accelerating gradients in the range of 30-40 MV/m to obtain centre-of-mass collision energies of 0.5-1 TeV, the CLIC study aims to use a normal-conducting system based on two-beam technology with gradients of 150 MV/m. It is generally accepted that this change in technology is not only necessary but the only viable choice for a cost-effective multi-TeV collider. The CLIC study group is studying the technology issues of such a machine, and is in particular developing state-of-the-art 30 GHz molybdenum-iris accelerating structures and power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The accelerating structure has a new geometry which includes fully-profiled RF surfaces optimised to minimize surface fields, and hybrid damping using both iris slots and radial waveguides. A newly-developed structure-optimisation procedure has been used to simultaneously balance surface fields, power flow, short and long-range transverse wakefields, RF-to-beam efficiency and the ratio of luminosity to input power. The slotted irises allow a simple structure fabrication by high-precision high-speed 3D milling of just four pieces, and an even easier bolted assembly in a vacuum chamber.

  5. Extreme seasonality of litter breakdown in an arctic spring-fed stream is driven by shredder phenology, not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benstead, Jon

    regimes. We used an alternative approach to investigate the importance of temperature by quantifying seasonal patterns in litter breakdown in an arctic spring-fed stream (Ivishak Spring, North Slope, Alaska) that experiences extreme seasonality in light availability and energy inputs while fluctuations in water

  6. FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    1 FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2014 We are higher than normal, and vertical wind shear throughout the Atlantic basin has been much stronger than-period average values. (as of 31 July 2014) By Philip J. Klotzbach1 and William M. Gray2 This forecast as well

  7. Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Better Buildings Neighborhood Program...

  8. Photoperiodic Regulation of the Seasonal Pattern of Photosynthetic Capacity and the Implications for Carbon Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauerle, William L. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Way, Danielle A. [Duke University; Qian, Song S. [Duke University; Stoy, Paul C. [Montana State University; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bowden, Joseph D. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Reynolds, Robert F. [Clemson University

    2012-01-01

    Although temperature is an important driver of seasonal changes in photosynthetic physiology, photoperiod also regulates leaf activity. Climate change will extend growing seasons if temperature cues predominate, but photoperiod-controlled species will show limited responsiveness to warming. We show that photoperiod explains more seasonal variation in photosynthetic activity across 23 tree species than temperature. Although leaves remain green, photosynthetic capacity peaks just after summer solstice and declines with decreasing photoperiod, before air temperatures peak. In support of these findings, saplings grown at constant temperature but exposed to an extended photoperiod maintained high photosynthetic capacity, but photosynthetic activity declined in saplings experiencing a naturally shortening photoperiod; leaves remained equally green in both treatments. Incorporating a photoperiodic correction of photosynthetic physiology into a global-scale terrestrial carbon-cycle model significantly improves predictions of seasonal atmospheric CO{sub 2} cycling, demonstrating the benefit of such a function in coupled climate system models. Accounting for photoperiod-induced seasonality in photosynthetic parameters reduces modeled global gross primary production 2.5% ({approx}4 PgC y{sup -1}), resulting in a >3% ({approx}2 PgC y{sup -1}) decrease of net primary production. Such a correction is also needed in models estimating current carbon uptake based on remotely sensed greenness. Photoperiod-associated declines in photosynthetic capacity could limit autumn carbon gain in forests, even if warming delays leaf senescence.

  9. Seasonal Tips | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4 » Search results SearchMiddle SchoolDownloadSeasonal Tips

  10. Root functioning modifies seasonal climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, J E; Oliveira, R S; Dawson, T E; Fung, I

    2005-01-01

    cooling associated with the increased plant transpiration (transpiration (c) and land temperature (d) in the HR run relative to that in the control run, showing moistening and cooling

  11. Seasonal persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Seasonal persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies Article Published Version Fioletov, V. E. and Shepherd, T. G. (2003) Seasonal persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies. Geophysical Research persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies Vitali E. Fioletov Meteorological Service of Canada, Toronto

  12. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  13. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  14. Seasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Grand CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands - Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 Protected Areas Seasonally Flooded Grasslands V.A.1.N.g. #12;Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Little CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity

  15. ContentsContents3399the normal distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents3399the normal distribution 1. The normal distribution 2. The normal approximation to the binomial distribution 3. Sums and differences of random variables Learning outcomes In a previous Workbook of a continuous random variables: the normal distribution. The probabilities of the normal distribution have

  16. Chapter 6 Continuous Distribution: The Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    Chapter 6 Continuous Distribution: The Normal Distribution 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Properties of a Normal Distribution 6.3 The Standard Normal Distribution 6.4 Applications of Normal Distribution 6.5 The Central Limit Theorem 6.6 The Normal Approximation to the Binomial Distribution Definition. A continuous

  17. cole normale suprieure de Lyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallette, Bruno

    école normale supérieure de Lyon ENS Lyon Electron quantum optics P. Degiovanni (ENS Lyon) C T. Martin(CPT Marseille) T. Jonckheere J. Rech C. Wahl #12;ENS Lyon A message from G. Fève Gwendal. #12;ENS Lyon ENS Lyon Outline · Introduction and motivation · Single electron coherence · Relaxation

  18. Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for total global heat flow Venus, geotherm for total global heat flow, 500 Ma #12;Temperature, Temperature, #12;Earth's modern regional continental geotherms Venusian Geotherms, 500 Ma Temperature, Temperature, After Blatt, Tracy, and Owens Petrology #12;Ca2Mg5Si8

  19. Normal force controlled rheology for thermoreversible gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosi Mao; Thibaut Divoux; Patrick Snabre

    2015-08-07

    A wide range of thermoreversible gels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature hot aqueous solutions of polymers. During the sol-gel transition, such soft solids may experience a volume contraction leading to experimental issues regarding rheological measurements such as the stress-induced release of solvent, and the partial loss of contact between the sample and the shear cell. In this article, we revisit the formation of thermoreversible gels through a series of benchmark experiments conducted on agar gels in a plate-plate geometry. Monitoring the gelation with a constant gap results in an artificial drift of the gel elastic modulus $G'$ because of the sample contraction. We show that maintaining a constant normal force equals to zero instead of a constant gap allows $G'$ to reach a plateau as the gap variation compensates the sample contraction. The latter method provides a way to measure more reliably the gel linear properties with either rough or smooth boundary conditions, and allows us to quantify the sample contraction. Furthermore, we also unravel two subtle artifacts associated with metallic boundary conditions that may impact rheological measurements during the early stage of the gelation. We show that the slow oxidation of the plate by the solution and/or the presence of an oil layer around the sample, that is traditionally used to prevent evaporation, may both lead to a premature and artificial growth of $G'$ which should not be misinterpreted as the formation of a pre-gel. Finally, we illustrate the relevance of the controlled normal force protocol, by investigating the influence of thermal history on the mechanical properties of agar gels. Our work offers an extensive review of the artifacts associated with the rheology of thermoreversible gels and paves the way for a more systematic use of normal force controlled rheology.

  20. Energy Resources for Tornado Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tornado Season Energy Resources for Tornado Season The aftermath of a tornado in Greensburg, Kansas. | Photo courtesy of Federal Emergency Mgmt. Agency, NREL 16290 The aftermath of...

  1. Vegetation Dynamics in Seasonally Grazed Upland Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Meg L

    This thesis addresses the effects of seasonality of grazing on vegetation dynamics. Background to the thesis is provided by the Hill Sheep and Native Woodland (HSNW) project, a system-scale experiment with the long-term ...

  2. Potential Economic Value of Seasonal Hurricane Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

    This paper explores the potential utility of seasonal Atlantic hurricane forecasts to a hypothetical property insurance firm whose insured properties are broadly distributed along the U.S. Gulf and East Coasts. Using a ...

  3. Table of Contents Our Season Page 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    1 #12;2 Table of Contents 2011-2012 Our Season Page 3 People Page 8 Outreach Page 11 Curricular-Curtain 546 $3,631.16 Hell In High Water-Rand 1252 $7,102.47 Solstice-Curtain 506 $2,583.42 Urinetown - Rand-stage season this spring. Hell in High Water by Marcus Gardley The Rand Theater Nov. 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19

  4. Reversible temperature regulation of electrical and thermal conductivity using liquid–solid phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Ruiting

    Reversible temperature tuning of electrical and thermal conductivities of materials is of interest for many applications, including seasonal regulation of building temperature, thermal storage and sensors. Here we introduce ...

  5. Power Normal Distribution Debasis Kundu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Power Normal Distribution Debasis Kundu1 and Rameshwar D. Gupta2 Abstract Recently Gupta and Gupta [10] proposed the power normal distribution for which normal distribution is a special case. The power normal distribution is a skewed distri- bution, whose support is the whole real line. Our main aim

  6. NOVA Making Stuff Season 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leombruni, Lisa; Paulsen, Christine Andrews

    2014-12-12

    Over the course of four weeks in fall 2013, 11.7 million Americans tuned in to PBS to follow host David Pogue as he led them in search of engineering and scientific breakthroughs poised to change our world. Levitating trains, quantum computers, robotic bees, and bomb-detecting plants—these were just a few of the cutting-edge innovations brought into the living rooms of families across the country in NOVA’s four-part series, Making Stuff: Faster, Wilder, Colder, and Safer. Each of the four one-hour programs gave viewers a behind-the-scenes look at novel technologies poised to change our world—showing them how basic research and scientific discovery can hold the keys to transforming how we live. Making Stuff Season 2 (MS2) combined true entertainment with educational value, creating a popular and engaging series that brought accessible science into the homes of millions. NOVA’s goal to engage the public with such technological innovation and basic research extended beyond the broadcast series, including a variety of online, educational, and promotional activities: original online science reporting, web-only short-form videos, a new online quiz-game, social media engagement and promotion, an educational outreach “toolkit” for science educators to create their own “makerspaces,” an online community of practice, a series of nationwide Innovation Cafés, educator professional development, a suite of teacher resources, an “Idealab,” participation in national conferences, and specialized station relation and marketing. A summative evaluation of the MS2 project indicates that overall, these activities helped make a significant impact on the viewers, users, and participants that NOVA reached. The final evaluation conducted by Concord Evaluation Group (CEG) confidently concluded that the broadcast, website, and outreach activities were successful at achieving the project’s intended impacts. CEG reported that the MS2 series and website content were successful in raising awareness and sparking interest in innovation, and increased public awareness that basic research leads to technological innovation; this interest was also sustained over a six month period. Efforts to create an online community of practice were also successful: the quality of collaboration increased, and community members felt supported while using Maker pedagogy. These findings provide clear evidence that large-scale science media projects like MS2 are an effective means of “moving the needle” on attitudes about and excitement for science. NOVA’s broadcast audience and ratings have always indicated that a large portion of the population is interested in and engages with educational science media on a weekly basis. Yet these evaluation results provide the empirical evidence that beyond being capable of attracting, maintaining, and growing a dedicated group of citizens interested in science, these shows—with their diverse content provided on a variety of media channels—are capable of sparking new interest in science, raising public awareness of the importance of science, and maintaining and growing that interest over time. In a country where approximately a quarter of the population doesn’t know the earth rotates around the sun,1 roughly half still don’t accept evolution,2 and about 20% don’t think climate change is happening,3 the importance of these findings cannot be overstated. The success of MS2 suggests that large-scale media projects dedicated to and linked by coverage of scientific “big ideas” are an effective means of shifting public opinion on—and improving understanding of—science. REFERENCES 1, 2 National Science Foundation, Science and Engineering Indicators (2014). Chapter 7: Science and Technology: Public Attitudes and Understanding. 3 Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., Roser-Renouf, C., Feinberg, G., & Rosenthal, S. (2014) Climate change in the American mind: April, 2014. Yale University and George Mason University. New Haven, CT: Yale Project on Climate Change Communication.

  7. Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2013-11-15

    A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

  8. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  9. Turing's normal numbers: towards randomness Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presumably in 1938 Alan Turing gave an algorithm that produces real numbers normal to every integer base- putable normal numbers, and this result should be attributed to Alan Turing. His manuscript entitled "A

  10. Seasonal ozone variations in the upper mesosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, R.J. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1990-05-20

    The global daytime ozone was measured by the Solar Mesosphere Explorer satellite (SME) for 5 years. The measurements extend through the mesosphere, covering from 50 km to over 90 km. The ozone in the upper mesosphere varies annually by up to a factor of 3. The observed seasonal variations may be summarized in several different ways. From year to year there is a great deal of repeatability of these variations. This repeatability occurs in most of the upper mesosphere outside the tropics. Near 0.01 mbar (80 km) the mid- and high-latitude mixing ratio peaks each year in mid-April. A secondary maximum in the altitude profile of ozone density usually occurs near 85 km. Changes in this structure are directly related to the April maximum and other seasonal changes seen at 0.01 mbar. The changing seasonal structure produces a bump at the ozone mixing ratio minimum that is largest just after spring equinox. This perturbation to the mixing ratio profile seems to move upward during the first half of the year. The seasonal changes of ozone were analyzed in terms of annual and semiannual structure. The variations generally have both an annual and semiannual component depending on altitude and latitude. The phases of the variations change quickly with both altitude and latitude. The semiannual component peaks in April, over most of the upper mesosphere.

  11. 2005 Season Review Small Fruit and Grapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    1 INDEX 2005 Season Review Small Fruit and Grapes Tree Fruit Plant Pathology Entomology Indiana Horticultural Congress Horticultural Therapy FFF05-09 December, 2005 Small Fruit and Grapes: Blueberries Large, especially on flowers of Arkan- sas Primocane Fruiters. ·Potato leafhoppers, very severe damage this year

  12. Minor League Fan Satisfaction with the Season Ticket Selling Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Jason D.

    2011-08-08

    The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with the season ticket selling process administered by a minor league baseball franchise. Minor league sport organizations rely heavily on season ticket sales and retention, therefore, knowing...

  13. Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season This presentation is from a DOE-NASEO webinar held June 23, 2015, on...

  14. The Dhiban Excavation and Development Project's 2005 Season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    The Dh?bån Excavation and Development Project’s 2005 SeasonThe Dh?bån Excavation and Development Project’s 2005 SeasonDh?bån Excavation and Development Project (DEDP hereafter)

  15. Seasonal climatology of winddriven circulation on the New Jersey Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    season and more to the right of the wind during the stratified season. During the stratified summer et al., 2008], river dis- charge [Fong and Geyer, 2001; ByoungJu and Wilkin, 2007; Chant et al., 2008

  16. Seasonal sand level changes on southern california beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Marissa L.

    2009-01-01

    Guza, R. Gutierrez, and R. Seymour, 2008: A Technique forW.C. O’ Reilly, and R.J. Seymour, 2009: Overview of SeasonalW.C. O’Reilly, and R.J. Seymour, 2009: Seasonal Persis-

  17. Seasonal Sand Level Changes on Southern California Beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Marissa L

    2009-01-01

    Guza, R. Gutierrez, and R. Seymour, 2008: A Technique forW.C. O’ Reilly, and R.J. Seymour, 2009: Overview of SeasonalW.C. O’Reilly, and R.J. Seymour, 2009: Seasonal Persis-

  18. Warm-Season (C4) Grasses Lowell E. Moser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -season perennial grasses as biomass feedstock candidates (Table II-I). Most of this research has focused

  19. Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Reduce waste and save energy this holiday season whether you're shopping, eating, partying, decorating, or wrapping.

  20. ACCLIMATION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESPIRATION TO INCREASING TEMPERATURES IN TREES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    in mean growing season temperature. This allowed us to determine whether net photosynthesis and dark the #12;rate and magnitude of temperature acclimation of net photosynthesis and dark respiration. After ten days of pre-treatment at 20o C, we measured rates of net photosynthesis (Anet), dark respiration

  1. Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging: the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging: the case of the North. (2015) Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging: the case of the North;Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging:1 the case of the North Atlantic jet

  2. Large seasonal swings in leaf area of Amazon rainforests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    tropical forests stud- ied to date display seasonal variations in the presence of new leaves, flowers of 25% in a majority of the Amazon rainforests. This seasonal cycle is timed to the seasonality of solar radiation in a manner that is suggestive of anticipatory and opportunistic pat- terns of net leaf flushing

  3. Part 1. Energy and Mass Solar Radiation and the Seasons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    Part 1. Energy and Mass Chapter 2. Solar Radiation and the Seasons #12;Introduction Solar Radiation radiation = 10 m peak #12;#12;The Solar Constant Energy intensity decreases in proportion to the distance of the Earth's Seasons Orbital alignment to the Sun = seasonal variations in solar energy Revolution

  4. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport of cold, fresh surface waters onto the continental shelf. Offshore, the warmer, saltier Warm DeepSeasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year

  5. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part I: Seasonal variation of atmospheric composition without meridional transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hue, Vincent; Dobrijevic, Michel; Hersant, Franck; Greathouse, Thomas K

    2015-01-01

    Saturn's axial tilt of 26.7{\\deg} produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along Saturn's orbital path. A new time dependent 2D photochemical model is presented to study the seasonal evolution of Saturn's stratospheric composition. This study focuses on the impact of the seasonally variable thermal field on the main stratospheric C2 hydrocarbon chemistry (C2H2 and C2H6) using a realistic radiative climate model. Meridional mixing and advective processes are implemented in the model but turned off in the present study for the sake of simplicity. The results are compared to a simple study case where a latitudinally and temporally steady thermal field is assumed. Our simulations suggest that, when the seasonally variable thermal field is accounted for, the downward diffusion of the seasonally produced hydrocarbons is faster due to the seasonal compression of the atmospheric column during winter. This ef...

  6. Appearance Normalization of Histology Slides Jared Vicorya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and intensity normalization of digitized histology slides stained with two different agents. In comparison to adjustment of faded slides are given, and the effectiveness of the method in aiding statistical classification is shown. Keywords: appearance normalization, histology 1. Introduction Stains are often used

  7. Seasonal and multiannual roost use by Rafinesque's Big-eared Bats in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, Susan, C.; Zarnoch, Stanley, J.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about factors affecting year-round use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) or the long-term fidelity of this species to anthropogenic or natural roosts. The objectives of this study were to test whether seasonal use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats varied with roost type and environmental conditions within and among seasons and to document multiannual use of natural and anthropogenic structures by this species. We inspected 4 bridges, 1 building, and 59 tree roosts possessing basal cavity openings; roosts were inspected at least once per week from May through October in every year from 2005 through 2008 and once a month from November through April in every year from 2005 through 2009. We found that use of anthropogenic roosts was significantly greater than the use of tree roosts in summer but that the use of structure types did not differ in other seasons. There was significant seasonal variation in use of anthropogenic and tree roosts. Anthropogenic roost use was higher in summer than in all other seasons. There was no significant difference in tree use among spring, summer, and fall, but use in winter was significantly lower in 2 years of the study. Overall use of anthropogenic and tree roosts was positively related to minimum temperature, but the relationship between use of roosts and minimum temperature varied among seasons. Bats showed multiannual fidelity ({ge} 4 years) to all anthropogenic roosts and to some tree roosts, but fidelity of bats to anthropogenic roosts was greater and more consistent than to tree roosts. Our data indicate that Rafinesque's big-eared bats responded differently to environmental conditions among seasons; thus, a variety of structure types and characteristics are necessary for conservation of these bats. We suggest long-term protection of roost structures of all types is necessary for conservation of Rafinesque's big-eared bats in the southeast Coastal Plain.

  8. Normalizing the causality between time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, X San

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a rigorous yet concise formula has been derived to evaluate the information flow, and hence the causality in a quantitative sense, between time series. To assess the importance of a resulting causality, it needs to be normalized. The normalization is achieved through distinguishing three types of fundamental mechanisms that govern the marginal entropy change of the flow recipient. A normalized or relative flow measures its importance relative to other mechanisms. In analyzing realistic series, both absolute and relative information flows need to be taken into account, since the normalizers for a pair of reverse flows belong to two different entropy balances; it is quite normal that two identical flows may differ a lot in relative importance in their respective balances. We have reproduced these results with several autoregressive models. We have also shown applications to a climate change problem and a financial analysis problem. For the former, reconfirmed is the role of the Indian Ocean Dipole as ...

  9. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~began working on seasonal thermal energy storage in aquifers

  10. A simple correlation to predict the hydrate quadruple point temperature for LPG mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousif, M.H.

    1997-12-31

    A simple correlation to predict the hydrate upper quadruple point temperature, T{sub Q2B} for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) mixtures was developed. It was developed for use as a part of a modeling and control system for a LPG pipeline in Russia. For performance reasons, a simple hydrate prediction correlation was required that could be incorporated into the real-time and predictive pipeline simulation models. The operating company required both real time and predictive simulation tools be developed to assist in preventing hydrate blockages while minimizing the use of methanol. In this particular pipeline, LPG fluid moves through the pipeline as a single phase liquid above its bubble point pressure. Because of the very low flow rates, the trace amount of water present in the LPG drops out and creates water pools at low points in the pipeline. The pipeline pressure and seasonal temperatures are conducive for hydrate formation in these pools. Methanol and monoethylene glycol (MEG) are injected in the pipeline to help prevent hydrate formation. The newly developed correlation predicts the hydrate quadruple point temperature using only the composition and the molecular weight of the LPG mixture while retaining an accuracy comparable to the statistical thermodynamic models throughout the range of normal operating conditions.

  11. Pharmacological enhancement of memory or cognition in normal subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Gary; Cox, Conor D.; Gall, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    enhancement in normal subjects Demeter, E. , and Sarter,enhancement in normal subjects Katche, C. , Goldin, A. ,enhancement in normal subjects by an ampakine (CX717) in

  12. Seasonal demand and supply analysis of turkeys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blomo, Vito James

    1972-01-01

    (percentage) responsiveness of price to changes (usually one percent) in quantity. Assuming a linear demand function, flexibility is shown to be less than one in the upper half of the function, equal to one (unitary) at the midpoint, and greater than one...SEASONAL DEMAND AND SUPPLY ANALYSIS OF TURKEYS A Thesis by VITO JAMES BLOMO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1972 Ma)or Sub...

  13. A normal metal tunnel-junction heat diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornieri, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.fornieri@sns.it; Martínez-Pérez, María José; Giazotto, Francesco, E-mail: giazotto@sns.it [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-05-05

    We propose a low-temperature thermal rectifier consisting of a chain of three tunnel-coupled normal metal electrodes. We show that a large heat rectification is achievable if the thermal symmetry of the structure is broken and the central island can release energy to the phonon bath. The performance of the device is theoretically analyzed and, under the appropriate conditions, temperature differences up to ?200 mK between the forward and reverse thermal bias configurations are obtained below 1?K, corresponding to a rectification ratio R?2000. The simplicity intrinsic to its design joined with the insensitivity to magnetic fields make our device potentially attractive as a fundamental building block in solid-state thermal nanocircuits and in general-purpose cryogenic electronic applications requiring energy management.

  14. 100 E. Normal Street Kirksville, MO 63501

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    . Curran Prendergast Repertoire The 2015 Midwest Band Conductors' Symposium" and address to: Dr. Curran Prendergast, 100 East Normal St. Kirksville, MO 63501.truman.edu/mbcs Clinicians: Dr. Paul Popiel, Director of Bands, University of Kansas Dr. Curran

  15. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization a program can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness

  16. NORMALITY VERSUS COUNTABLE PARACOMPACTNESS IN PERFECT SPACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, M. L.; Fleissner, William G.; Reed, G. M.

    1976-07-01

    BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY Volume 82, Number 4, July 1976 NORMALITY VERSUS COUNTABLE PARACOMPACTNESS IN PERFECT SPACES BY M. L. WAGE, W. G. FLEISSNER, AND G. M. REED Communicated March 5, 1976 Introduction. The purpose... of this announcement is to present, in a unified fashion, solutions to long outstanding questions concerning the relationship between countable paracompactness and normality conditions in perfect spaces. Each section of this paper is the contribution of a single...

  17. Seasonal changes in Titan's meteorology E. P. Turtle,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during the approach to the northern spring equinox in August 2009. Recent observations have shown, Titan's seasons have progressed from southern summer to early southern autumn, and changes

  18. BPA revises policy for managing seasonal power oversupply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    policy-for-managing-seasonal-power-oversupply Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  19. Sandia Energy - Understanding Seasonal Effects of WEC Operation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding Seasonal Effects of WEC Operation using the SNL-SWAN Wave Model Application Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power News News & Events Systems Analysis Computational...

  20. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; Edwards, Nelson T [ORNL; Walker, Ashley V [ORNL; O'Hara, Keiran H [ORNL; Campion, Christina M [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and temperature sensitivity that remain largely untested. Observational studies have related current and historical temperatures to phenological shifts, but experimental evidence is sparse, particularly for autumn responses. A five-year field experiment exposed four deciduous forest species from contrasting climates (Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus rubra, Populus grandidentata, and Betula alleghaniensis) to air temperatures 2 and 4 C above ambient controls. Impacts of year-round warming on bud burst (BB), senescence and abscission were evaluated in relation to thermal provenance. Leaves emerged earlier in all species, by an average of 6-9 days at +2 and +4 C. Magnitude of advance varied with species and year, but was larger for the first 2 C increment than the second. The effect of warming increased with early BB, favoring Liquidambar, from the warmest climate, but even BB in northern species advanced, despite temperatures well beyond those of the realized niche. Treatment differences in BB were poorly explained by temperature sums, which increased with treatment. In autumn, chlorophyll was retained an average of 4 and 7 days longer in +2 and +4 C treatments, and abscission delayed by 8 and 13 days. Species differences in autumn responses were marginally significant. Growing seasons in the warmer atmospheres were 6 - 28 days longer, with the least impact in Quercus. Results are compared with a 16-year record of canopy onset and offset in a nearby upland deciduous forest, where BB showed similar responsiveness to spring temperatures (2 - 4 days C-1). Offset dates in the stand tracked August-September temperatures, except when late summer drought caused premature senescence. The common garden-like experimental approach provides evidence that warming alone extends the growing season, at both ends, even if stand-level impacts are complicated by other environmental factors.

  1. Seasonality of soil CO2 efflux in a temperate forest: Biophysical effects of snowpack and spring freeze–thaw cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chuankuan; Han, Yi; Chen, Jiquan; Wang, Xingchang; Zhang, Quanzhi; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-08-15

    Changes in characteristics of snowfall and spring freeze–thaw-cycle (FTC) events under the warming climate make it critical to understand biophysical controls on soil CO2 efflux (RS) in seasonally snow-covered ecosystems. We conducted a snow removal experiment and took year-round continuous automated measurements of RS, soil temperature (T5) and soil volumetric water content at the 5 cm depth (W5) with a half-hour interval in a Chinese temperate forest in 2010–2011. Our objectives were to: (1) develop statistical models to describe the seasonality of RS in this forest; (2) quantify the contribution of seasonal RS to the annual budget; (3) examine biophysical effects of snowpack on RS; and (4) test the hypothesis that an FTC-induced enhancement of RS is jointly driven by biological and physical processes.

  2. Seasonal mass balance gradients in Norway L. A. Rasmussen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, L.A.

    16 Aug 05 Seasonal mass balance gradients in Norway L. A. Rasmussen1 and L. M. Andreassen2 1 Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) P. O. Box 5091 Majorstua, N-0301 Oslo, Norway in Norway exists in their profiles of both seasonal balances, winter bw(z) and summer bs(z). Unlike many

  3. A global picture of the seasonal persistence of stratospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    A global picture of the seasonal persistence of stratospheric ozone anomalies Article Published persistence of stratospheric ozone anomalies. Journal of Geophysical Research, 115. D18119. ISSN 0148-0227 doi global picture of the seasonal persistence of stratospheric ozone anomalies S. Tegtmeier,1,2 V. E

  4. Environmental Patterns Associated with Active and Inactive Caribbean Hurricane Seasons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Patterns Associated with Active and Inactive Caribbean Hurricane Seasons MARK R. JURY of hurricanes passing through the Caribbean in the 1950­2005 period reveals that seasons with more intense hurricanes occur with the onset of Pacific La Nin~a events and when Atlantic SSTs west of Africa are above

  5. NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell Lead Seasonal Forecaster Climate Prediction Center NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Collaboration With National Hurricane Center/ NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Hurricane Research Division/ NOAA/ OAR/ AOML/ HRD www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/hurricane #12;Outline 1. Features

  6. Handbook of normal frames and coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozhidar Z. Iliev

    2006-10-01

    The main subject of the book is an up-to-date and in-depth survey of the theory of normal frames and coordinates in differential geometry. The book can be used as a reference manual, review of the existing results and introduction to some new ideas and developments. In the book can be found practically all existing essential results and methods concerning normal frames and coordinates. Most of the results are represented in full detail with full, in some cases new, proofs. All classical results are expanded and generalized in various directions. Theorems of existence, uniqueness and, possibly, holonomicity of the normal frames and coordinates are proved; mostly, the proofs are constructive and some their parts can be used independently for other tasks. Besides published results, their extensions and generalizations, the book contains completely new results which appear for the first time.

  7. Computing Instantaneous Frequency by normalizing Hilbert Transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Norden E.

    2005-05-31

    This invention presents Normalized Amplitude Hilbert Transform (NAHT) and Normalized Hilbert Transform(NHT), both of which are new methods for computing Instantaneous Frequency. This method is designed specifically to circumvent the limitation set by the Bedorsian and Nuttal Theorems, and to provide a sharp local measure of error when the quadrature and the Hilbert Transform do not agree. Motivation for this method is that straightforward application of the Hilbert Transform followed by taking the derivative of the phase-angle as the Instantaneous Frequency (IF) leads to a common mistake made up to this date. In order to make the Hilbert Transform method work, the data has to obey certain restrictions.

  8. Temperature System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConference Tight Oil1 Soil Water and Temperature

  9. AVIAN NEST DENSITIES AND SUCCESS IN INTRODUCED COOL-SEASON GRASS-LEGUME PLANTINGS VERSUS WARM-SEASON NATIVE GRASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of prairie and idle grassland. Studies indicate that warm-season native grass plantings (WSN) generally provide good winter cover. Recently a trend favoring WSN has emerged, but limited information exists on nesting density and success of cool-season grass-legume plantings (dense nesting cover [DNC]) versus WSN

  10. Normal butane/iso-butane separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volles, W.K.; Cusher, N.A.

    1986-08-26

    This patent describes an improved pressure swing adsorption process for the separation of iso-butane from normal butane in an adsorption system having at least three adsorbent beds, each bed of which undergoes, on a cyclic basis and a processing sequence comprising: introducing a feed gas mixture of iso-butane and normal butane at an upper adsorption pressure to the feed end of the bed capable of selectively adsorbing normal butane as the more selectivity adsorbable component of the gas mixture. The iso-butane as the less readily adsorbable component passes through the bed and is discharged from the discharge end. The feed gas introduction is continued as a normal butane adsorption front is formed in the bed and passes through the bed from the feed end and breaks through at the discharge end of the bed, a portion of the iso-butane effluent stream thus discharged being diverted for passage as purge gas to another bed in the system; and countercurrently depressurizing the bed with release of gas from the feed end.

  11. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for Mendler­Style Course­Of­Value Recursion can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness. For practical

  12. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for Mendler-Style Course-Of-Value Recursion can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness. For practical

  13. Conductance characteristics between a normal metal and a clean superconductor carrying a supercurrent 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, DG; Ting, CS; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of a transverse supercurrent I-s up to the thermodynamic critical current on the low-temperature conductance characteristics between a normal metal N and a clean s- or d-wave superconductor (S) is theoretically investigated, covering from...

  14. Insolation data manual and direct normal solar radiation data manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-07-01

    The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24--25 years of data, generally from 1952--1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/m{sup 2} per day, Btu/ft{sup 2} per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global {bar K}{sub T} (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global {bar K}{sub T} is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

  15. Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

  16. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing Wave Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short...

  17. South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20,...

  18. Room Temperature Control During Season Switchover with Single Duct Variable Air Volume System Without Reheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Langford “A” building houses the College of Architecture on TAMU campus. There are ten singleduct variable air volume (VAV) air-handling units (AHUs) without reheat serving the building. The local pneumatic thermostats modulate the dampers...

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Social dominance, seasonal movements, and spatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getz, Wayne M.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Social dominance, seasonal movements, and spatial segregation in African elephants system radio telemetry provide data to evaluate the influence of social relationships on population elephant social groups despite the infrequent occur- rence of contests over resources and lack

  20. Vitamin D (25OHD) Serum Seasonality in the United States.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasahara, Amy K; Singh, Ravinder J; Noymer, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    on the interaction of vitamin D with the immune system.8 | Issue 6 | e65785 Vitamin D (25OHD) Serum Seasonality inn F, Aujla SJ, et al. (2012) Vitamin D and asthma. American

  1. Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory I'm sure you've noticed the change in seasons by now. Fall brings cooler weather, and with it my thoughts turn to warm things like putting blankets on the couch,...

  2. The seasonality of aerosol properties in Big Bend National Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Christopher Lee

    2007-04-25

    ), to characterize the seasonal variability of the Big Bend regions aerosol optical properties. Mass extinction efficiencies and relative humidity scattering enhancement factors were calculated for both externally and internally mixed aerosol populations for all size...

  3. 28 CITRUS INDUSTRY February 2012 he season for fungal foliar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    28 CITRUS INDUSTRY · February 2012 T he season for fungal foliar diseases is just around the corner-Drive · Heavy duty Stainless Steel Pump ­ handles virtually any tank mix · Multi-Directional, Adjustable Nozzles

  4. Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Look for the ENERGY STAR label to find energy-efficient appliances. It's the holiday season, which is a perfect time...

  5. Analysis of temperatures and water levels in wells to estimatealluvial aquifer hydraulic conductivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Grace W.; Jasperse, James; Seymour, Donald; Constantz, Jim

    2003-06-19

    Well water temperatures are often collected simultaneously with water levels; however, temperature data are generally considered only as a water quality parameter and are not utilized as an environmental tracer. In this paper, water levels and seasonal temperatures are used to estimate hydraulic conductivities in a stream-aquifer system. To demonstrate this method, temperatures and water levels are analyzed from six observation wells along an example study site, the Russian River in Sonoma County, California. The range in seasonal ground water temperatures in these wells varied from <0.28C in two wells to {approx}88C in the other four wells from June to October 2000. The temperature probes in the six wells are located at depths between 3.5 and 7.1 m relative to the river channel. Hydraulic conductivities are estimated by matching simulated ground water temperatures to the observed ground water temperatures. An anisotropy of 5 (horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) generally gives the best fit to the observed temperatures. Estimated conductivities vary over an order of magnitude in the six locations analyzed. In some locations, a change in the observed temperature profile occurred during the study, most likely due to deposition of fine-grained sediment and organic matter plugging the streambed. A reasonable fit to this change in the temperature profile is obtained by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity in the simulations. This study demonstrates that seasonal ground water temperatures monitored in observation wells provide an effective means of estimating hydraulic conductivities in alluvial aquifers.

  6. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S POLAR TRACE GAS ABUNDANCE OBSERVED BY CASSINI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teanby, N. A. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); De Kok, R. [SRON, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Nixon, C. A., E-mail: n.teanby@bristol.ac.u [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-11-20

    We use a six-year data set (2004-2010) of mid-infrared spectra measured by Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer to search for seasonal variations in Titan's atmospheric temperature and composition. During most of Cassini's mission Titan's northern hemisphere has been in winter, with an intense stratospheric polar vortex highly enriched in trace gases, and a single south-to-north circulation cell. Following northern spring equinox in mid-2009, dramatic changes in atmospheric temperature and composition were expected, but until now the temporal coverage of polar latitudes has been too sparse to discern trends. Here, we show that during equinox and post-equinox periods, abundances of trace gases at both poles have begun to increase. We propose that increases in north polar trace gases are due to a seasonal reduction in gas depletion by horizontal mixing across the vortex boundary. A simultaneous south polar abundance increase suggests that Titan is now entering, or is about to enter, a transitional circulation regime with two branches, rather than the single branch circulation pattern previously observed.

  7. Mexico's Second City: The 1971-72 Season.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leinaweaver, Richard E.

    1972-10-01

    was excellent, the music fit the word and the deed, and indeed it was the season's highpoint. Unión Nacional de Autores brought Felipe Santander's Luna de miel para . . . diez from Mexico and somewhat dishonestly attempted to capitalize on Zara tustra... was excellent, the music fit the word and the deed, and indeed it was the season's highpoint. Unión Nacional de Autores brought Felipe Santander's Luna de miel para . . . diez from Mexico and somewhat dishonestly attempted to capitalize on Zara tustra...

  8. Directions to the Ecole Normale Suprieure de Lyon The Ecole Normale Suprieure de Lyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauxois, Thierry

    Directions to the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon The Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon is located in Gerland, a neighborhood in the southern part of Lyon, not far from the Rhône river and the Halle Tony. How to get to l'ENS-Lyon ... #12;· From Lyon-Saint Exupéry (Satolas) airport Every 20 min, a shuttle

  9. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  10. Influences on seasonal ski worker intention to return and indicators and standards of quality for seasonal ski jobs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismert, Matthew D

    2002-01-01

    in the job experience; (6) the level of personal job satisfaction perceived by the seasonal employee. The relationship between these factors and intention to return was examined. Results revealed that more money and more job challenge have a significant...

  11. Columbia River Basin Seasonal Volumes and Statistics, 1928-1989. 1990 Level Modified Streamflows Computed Seasonal Volumes 61-Year Statistics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company

    1993-04-01

    This report was prepared by the A.G. Crook Company, under contract to Bonneville Power Administration, and provides statistics of seasonal volumes and streamflow for 28 selected sites in the Columbia River Basin.

  12. A laboratory study of the seasonal life history and seasonal abundance of the black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham, Elwin Eugene

    1973-01-01

    . Seasonal History of Agrotis ~l allen (Hufnagel) Development of Artificial Diets for Laboratory Use Laboratory Rearing of ~rotis ~l silon. Head Capsule Measurements . Seasonal Abundance of ~A retie ~i ellen in Texas MATERIALS AND METHODS Establishment.... 40 40 CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES CITED. 50 53 VITA. 57 f Table 1 LIST OF TABLES Ingredients of the artificial diet used for rearing black cutworm larvae Page . 21 Life history of black cutworm moths maintained in the laboratory at College...

  13. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Data Discoverydiffusedirect normal

  14. Applications of statistical models to synchronous climate variables: a case study of temperature and dew point for College Station, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Charles F.

    1995-01-01

    transformations. Generally speaking, temperature, dew point, and dew point depression values could be transformed to resemble a bivariate normal distribution. Of the 288 cases (6 mos. x 24 hrs. x 2 moisture variables) applied to the bivariate normal distribution...

  15. Local asymptotic normality in quantum statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madalin Guta; Anna Jencova

    2007-05-24

    The theory of local asymptotic normality for quantum statistical experiments is developed in the spirit of the classical result from mathematical statistics due to Le Cam. Roughly speaking, local asymptotic normality means that the family varphi_{\\theta_{0}+ u/\\sqrt{n}}^{n} consisting of joint states of n identically prepared quantum systems approaches in a statistical sense a family of Gaussian state phi_{u} of an algebra of canonical commutation relations. The convergence holds for all "local parameters" u\\in R^{m} such that theta=theta_{0}+ u/sqrt{n} parametrizes a neighborhood of a fixed point theta_{0}\\in Theta\\subset R^{m}. In order to prove the result we define weak and strong convergence of quantum statistical experiments which extend to the asymptotic framework the notion of quantum sufficiency introduces by Petz. Along the way we introduce the concept of canonical state of a statistical experiment, and investigate the relation between the two notions of convergence. For reader's convenience and completeness we review the relevant results of the classical as well as the quantum theory.

  16. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF NORMAL EMISSION PHOTOELECTRON DIFFRACTION AND ANALOGIES WITH EXAFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevan, S.D.

    2010-01-01

    NPD, though usually associated with LEED, in fact has strongenergy curve similar to a LEED I-V curve is generated which,energy curves resemble LEED I-V curves, their calculated

  17. SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS, 1950-52

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    summer and probably until late fall. Stafford (1912) gives the spawning season in Malpeque, Prince Edward

  18. Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 28, 2000/pp. 19731979 EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF TEMPERATURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Marshall B.

    -species C2 hydrocarbon mech- anism. This set of temperature and major species measurements affords. Measurements were made both in normal gravity and on the NASA KC-135 reduced-gravity aircraft. Computations that the predicted temperature profiles are in excellent agreement with measurement in both normal gravity

  19. Overview Report: Normal and Emergency Operation Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2011-05-01

    This is an overview report to document and illustrate methods used in a project entitled “Normal and Emergency Operations Visualization” for a utility company, conducted in 2009-2010 timeframe with funding from the utility company and the U.S. Department of Energy. The original final report (about 180 pages) for the project is not available for distribution because it alludes to findings that assessed the design of an operational system that contained proprietary information; this abridged version contains descriptions of methods and some findings to illustrate the approach used, while avoiding discussion of sensitive or proprietary information. The client has approved this abridged version of the report for unlimited distribution to give researchers and collaborators the benefit of reviewing the research concepts and methods that were applied in this study.

  20. Asymptotic normalization coefficients from ab initio calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth M. Nollett; R. B. Wiringa

    2011-04-14

    We present calculations of asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for one-nucleon removals from nuclear states of mass numbers 3 to 9. Our ANCs were computed from variational Monte Carlo solutions to the many-body Schroedinger equation with the combined Argonne v18 two-nucleon and Urbana IX three-nucleon potentials. Instead of computing explicit overlap integrals, we applied a Green's function method that is insensitive to the difficulties of constructing and Monte Carlo sampling the long-range tails of the variational wave functions. This method also allows computation of the ANC at the physical separation energy, even when it differs from the separation energy for the Hamiltonian. We compare our results, which for most nuclei are the first ab initio calculations of ANCs, with existing experimental and theoretical results and discuss further possible applications of the technique.

  1. Variable temperature seat climate control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karunasiri, Tissa R. (Van Nuys, CA); Gallup, David F. (Pasadena, CA); Noles, David R. (Glendale, CA); Gregory, Christian T. (Alhambra, CA)

    1997-05-06

    A temperature climate control system comprises a variable temperature seat, at least one heat pump, at least one heat pump temperature sensor, and a controller. Each heat pump comprises a number of Peltier thermoelectric modules for temperature conditioning the air in a main heat exchanger and a main exchanger fan for passing the conditioned air from the main exchanger to the variable temperature seat. The Peltier modules and each main fan may be manually adjusted via a control switch or a control signal. Additionally, the temperature climate control system may comprise a number of additional temperature sensors to monitor the temperature of the ambient air surrounding the occupant as well as the temperature of the conditioned air directed to the occupant. The controller is configured to automatically regulate the operation of the Peltier modules and/or each main fan according to a temperature climate control logic designed both to maximize occupant comfort during normal operation, and minimize possible equipment damage, occupant discomfort, or occupant injury in the event of a heat pump malfunction.

  2. Stone-Cech remainder which make continuous images normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleissner, William G.; Levy, Ronnie

    1989-07-01

    from a normal space X onto a regular space Y , then there are a space Z and a perfect map bf : Z —» Y extending / such that X C Z C ßX . If / is a continuous surjection from normal X onto Tychonov Y and ßX\\X is sequential, then Y is normal. More... generally, if / is a continuous surjection from normal X onto regular Y and ßX\\X has the property that countably compact subsets are closed (this property is called C-closed), then Y is normal. There is an example of a normal space X such that ßX\\X is C...

  3. The Specific Heat of Normal, Degenerate Quark Matter: Non-Fermi Liquid Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boyanovsky; H. J. de Vega

    2001-02-26

    In normal degenerate quark matter, the exchange of dynamically screened transverse gluons introduces infrared divergences in the quark self-energies that lead to the breakdown of the Fermi liquid description. If the core of neutron stars are composed of quark matter with a normal component, cooling by direct quark Urca processes may be modified by non-Fermi liquid corrections. We find that while the quasiparticle density of states is finite and non-zero at the Fermi surface, its frequency derivative diverges and results in non-Fermi liquid corrections to the specific heat of the normal, degenerate component of quark matter. We study these non-perturbative non-Fermi liquid corrections to the specific heat and the temperature dependence of the chemical potential and show that these lead to a reduction of the specific heat.

  4. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We presentmore »new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying ?13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and ?18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (?18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on ?13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for fossil algae.« less

  5. Multivariate Non-Normality in the WMAP 1st Year Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Dineen; Peter Coles

    2005-11-29

    The extraction of cosmological parameters from microwave background observations relies on specific assumptions about the statistical properties of the data, in particular that the p-point distributions of temperature fluctuations are jointly-normal. Using a battery of statistical tests, we assess the multivariate Gaussian nature of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 1st year data. The statistics we use fall into three classes which test different aspects of joint-normality: the first set assess the normality of marginal (one-point) distributions using familiar univariate methods; the second involves statistics that directly assess joint-normality; and the third explores the evidence of non-linearity in the relationship between variates. We applied these tests to frequency maps, `foreground-cleaned' assembly maps and all-sky CMB-only maps. The assembly maps are of particular interest as when combined with the kp2 mask, we recreate the region used in the computation of the angular power spectrum. Significant departures from normality were found in all the maps. In particular, the kurtosis coefficient, D'Agostino's statistic and bivariate kurtosis calculated from temperature pairs extracted from all the assembly maps were found to be non-normal at 99% confidence level. We found that the results were unaffected by the size of the Galactic cut and were evident on either hemisphere of the CMB sky. The latter suggests that the non-Gaussianity is not simply related to previous claims of north-south asymmetry or localized abnormalities detected through wavelet techniques.

  6. Effects of the seasonal cycle on superrotation in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Jonathan L. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Vallis, Geoffrey K. [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Science, Exeter University, Exeter (United Kingdom); Potter, Samuel F. [Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    The dynamics of dry atmospheric general circulation model simulations forced by seasonally varying Newtonian relaxation are explored over a wide range of two control parameters and are compared with the large-scale circulation of Earth, Mars, and Titan in their relevant parameter regimes. Of the parameters that govern the behavior of the system, the thermal Rossby number (Ro) has previously been found to be important in governing the spontaneous transition from an Earth-like climatology of winds to a superrotating one with prograde equatorial winds, in the absence of a seasonal cycle. This case is somewhat unrealistic as it applies only if the planet has zero obliquity or if surface thermal inertia is very large. While Venus has nearly vanishing obliquity, Earth, Mars, and Titan (Saturn) all have obliquities of ?25° and varying degrees of seasonality due to their differing thermal inertias and orbital periods. Motivated by this, we introduce a time-dependent Newtonian cooling to drive a seasonal cycle using idealized model forcing, and we define a second control parameter that mimics non-dimensional thermal inertia of planetary surfaces. We then perform and analyze simulations across the parameter range bracketed by Earth-like and Titan-like regimes, assess the impact on the spontaneous transition to superrotation, and compare Earth, Mars, and Titan to the model simulations in the relevant parameter regime. We find that a large seasonal cycle (small thermal inertia) prevents model atmospheres with large thermal Rossby numbers from developing superrotation by the influences of (1) cross-equatorial momentum advection by the Hadley circulation and (2) hemispherically asymmetric zonal-mean zonal winds that suppress instabilities leading to equatorial momentum convergence. We also demonstrate that baroclinic instabilities must be sufficiently weak to allow superrotation to develop. In the relevant parameter regimes, our seasonal model simulations compare favorably to large-scale, seasonal phenomena observed on Earth and Mars. In the Titan-like regime the seasonal cycle in our model acts to prevent superrotation from developing, and it is necessary to increase the value of a third parameter—the atmospheric Newtonian cooling time—to achieve a superrotating climatology.

  7. Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Ling; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Michelson, Sara A; Wilczak, James M

    2010-04-16

    This study presents detailed evaluation of the seasonal and episodic performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system applied to simulate air quality at a fine grid spacing (4 km horizontal resolution) in central California, where ozone air pollution problems are severe. A rich aerometric database collected during the summer 2000 Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) is used to prepare model inputs and to evaluate meteorological simulations and chemical outputs. We examine both temporal and spatial behaviors of ozone predictions. We highlight synoptically driven high-ozone events (exemplified by the four intensive operating periods (IOPs)) for evaluating both meteorological inputs and chemical outputs (ozone and its precursors) and compare them to the summer average. For most of the summer days, cross-domain normalized gross errors are less than 25% for modeled hourly ozone, and normalized biases are between {+-}15% for both hourly and peak (1 h and 8 h) ozone. The domain-wide aggregated metrics indicate similar performance between the IOPs and the whole summer with respect to predicted ozone and its precursors. Episode-to-episode differences in ozone predictions are more pronounced at a subregional level. The model performs consistently better in the San Joaquin Valley than other air basins, and episodic ozone predictions there are similar to the summer average. Poorer model performance (normalized peak ozone biases <-15% or >15%) is found in the Sacramento Valley and the Bay Area and is most noticeable in episodes that are subject to the largest uncertainties in meteorological fields (wind directions in the Sacramento Valley and timing and strength of onshore flow in the Bay Area) within the boundary layer.

  8. Lyapunov Exponents and Uniform Weak Normally Repelling Invariant Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hal

    Lyapunov Exponents and Uniform Weak Normally Repelling Invariant Sets Paul Leonard Salceanu and Hal repelling in directions normal to the boundary in which M resides provided all normal Lyapunov exponents that Lyapunov exponents can be used to establish the requisite repelling properties for both discrete

  9. Two tests for multivariate normality based on the characteristic function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arcones, Miguel A.

    Two tests for multivariate normality based on the characteristic function Miguel A. Arcones-mail:arcones@math.binghamton.edu April 10, 2007 Abstract We present two tests for multivariate normality. The presented tests are based on the L´evy characterization of the normal distribution and on the BHEP tests. The tests are affine

  10. Fractal Fluctuations and Statistical Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2008-05-22

    Dynamical systems in nature exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations and the corresponding power spectra follow inverse power law form signifying long-range space-time correlations identified as self-organized criticality. The physics of self-organized criticality is not yet identified. The Gaussian probability distribution used widely for analysis and description of large data sets underestimates the probabilities of occurrence of extreme events such as stock market crashes, earthquakes, heavy rainfall, etc. The assumptions underlying the normal distribution such as fixed mean and standard deviation, independence of data, are not valid for real world fractal data sets exhibiting a scale-free power law distribution with fat tails. A general systems theory for fractals visualizes the emergence of successively larger scale fluctuations to result from the space-time integration of enclosed smaller scale fluctuations. The model predicts a universal inverse power law incorporating the golden mean for fractal fluctuations and for the corresponding power spectra, i.e., the variance spectrum represents the probabilities, a signature of quantum systems. Fractal fluctuations therefore exhibit quantum-like chaos. The model predicted inverse power law is very close to the Gaussian distribution for small-scale fluctuations, but exhibits a fat long tail for large-scale fluctuations. Extensive data sets of Dow Jones index, Human DNA, Takifugu rubripes (Puffer fish) DNA are analysed to show that the space/time data sets are close to the model predicted power law distribution.

  11. SEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    these concerns? Waste Water Treatment Facilities treat water to Waste Water Treatment Facilities treat water and disinfect anyy microorganisms that may be present The majority of Recycled water produced in ArizonaSEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY

  12. Composting Successes and Failures Extending the Growing Season Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    3/18/2014 1 Composting Successes and Failures Extending the Growing Season Workshop LaMoine Nickel University of MN SWROC March 12, 2014 Beginning of compost process 9/6/2013 Finished compost product 11/19/2013 What is Composting Composting is a biological process in which microorganisms convert organic

  13. Seasonal migrations of morphometrically mature male snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for specific reproductive stages. Depth variation associated with this migration was examined to deter- mine in cara- pace width (CW), this migration is assumed to culminate on the outer shelf (depths of 100­200 m313 Seasonal migrations of morphometrically mature male snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio

  14. Heating Season Has Ended An Update On The Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . An Update On The Numbers The attached graphics illustrate electricity consumption over a number of years. As a reference point, electricity comprises 2/3rds of our total fuel costs. Consumption will vary from year)/May and September/October time-frames represent seasonal transition and an opportunity to save on fuel consumption

  15. Ch.2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Ch.2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons #12;Learning Objective One: The Solar System #12;Milky Aphelion ­ farthest, on July 4 152,083,000 km #12;Learning Objective Two: The Solar Energy #12;What is Solar Energy? Energy is the capacity of a physical system to do work. The unit is Joule (J). Solar

  16. Research Article Seasonal TOC export from seven boreal catchments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffam, Ishi

    Research Article Seasonal TOC export from seven boreal catchments in northern Sweden Hjalmar Laudon and its relationship with catchment characteristics. The annual average export of TOC ranged between 36, the four week long spring pe- riod contributed between 50% and 68% of the annual TOC export from the seven

  17. Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Power Plant with Seasonal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    hours for periods with high electricity tariff Sasolburg Gas Engine Power Plant 18 Wärtsila 34 SG statement · Gas engine power plant ­ 18 identical engines with generation capacity = 10 MW ­ Only 1Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Power Plant with Seasonal Electricity Tariffs Pedro M. Castro

  18. Radiative forcing from aircraft NOx emissions: mechanisms and seasonal dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, David

    Radiative forcing from aircraft NOx emissions: mechanisms and seasonal dependence David Stevenson aircraft NOx emissions in January, April, July and October of the 1st year. Figure 1 shows perturbations that the initial NOx anomaly mirrors the aircraft emissions distribution, with only limited transport and mixing

  19. Radiative forcing from surface NOx emissions: spatial and seasonal variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, David

    Radiative forcing from surface NOx emissions: spatial and seasonal variations R. G. Derwent & D. S distributions of methane CH4 and ozone O3 following the emission of pulses of the oxides of nitrogen NOx. Month-long emission pulses of NOx produce deficits in CH4 mixing ratios that bring about negative radiative forcing

  20. Brain Awareness Season OHSU Brain Awareness Lecture Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Brain Awareness Season OHSU Brain Awareness Lecture Series Fascinating lectures by nationally is an opportunity for educators to learn about brain-related issues. Expert speakers familiar with current for the workshop is available on-line in January at http://seo.ohsu.edu. OHSU Brain Fair The Brain Fair features

  1. Seismicity induced by seasonal groundwater recharge at Mt. Hood, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    and narrow-width pore-fluid pressure signal. Time delays between this seasonal groundwater recharge-fluid pressure fraction, PP/P0W0.1, of the applied near-surface pore-fluid pressure perturbation, P0W0.1 MPa Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: hydroseismicity; groundwater; pore-£uid pressure; permeability

  2. Incorporating Seasonality into Search Suggestions Derived from Intranet Query Logs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruschwitz, Udo

    Incorporating Seasonality into Search Suggestions Derived from Intranet Query Logs Stephen Dignum performed on query logs collected for major Web search engines, query log analysis to enhance search search engine can be enhanced by adapting the search system to real users' search behaviour through

  3. QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2012 We are discontinuing our early December quantitative hurricane forecast for the next year and giving a more qualitative discussion of the factors which will determine next year's Atlantic basin hurricane activity. Our early

  4. Before the Hurricane Season Determine safe evacuation routes inland.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Before the Hurricane Season Determine safe evacuation routes inland. Learn location of official. Live in a high-rise. Hurricane winds can knock out electricity to elevators, break windows and more bulletins. Hurricane Watch: Hurricane conditions are possible within the specified coastal area. Because

  5. QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    1 QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2015 We discontinued our early December quantitative hurricane forecast in 2012 and are now giving a more qualitative discussion of the factors which will determine next year's Atlantic basin hurricane activity. One of the big uncertainties

  6. Transmission resonances, quasi-normal modes and quasi-normal frequencies: Key analytic results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonserm, Petarpa

    2010-01-01

    Exact solutions for transmission amplitudes and transmission probabilities, the existence of transmission resonances, and the closely related study of exact quasi-normal modes [QNMs] and quasi-normal frequencies [QNFs], has had a long and convoluted history - replete with many rediscoveries of previously known results. In this article we shall collect and survey a number of analytic results, and develop several new results, in a form amenable to comparison with the extant literature. In particular we shall discuss the delta-function potential, double-delta-function potential, and asymmetric double-delta-function potential; the step barrier, symmetric rectangular potential barrier, and asymmetric rectangular potential barrier; and then discuss the Eckart potential and its simplifications - the tanh potential and sech^2 potential. The history of the Eckart potential is particularly complicated: Apart from the special case of the Morse potential, other special cases and equivalent reformulations of Eckart's resu...

  7. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are appliedmore »to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.« less

  8. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are applied to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.

  9. Variability in Measured Space Temperatures in 60 Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, D.; Lay, K.

    2013-03-01

    This report discusses the observed variability in indoor space temperature in a set of 60 homes located in Florida, New York, Oregon, and Washington. Temperature data were collected at 15-minute intervals for an entire year, including living room, master bedroom, and outdoor air temperature (Arena, et. al). The data were examined to establish the average living room temperature for the set of homes for the heating and cooling seasons, the variability of living room temperature depending on climate, and the variability of indoor space temperature within the homes. The accuracy of software-based energy analysis depends on the accuracy of input values. Thermostat set point is one of the most influential inputs for building energy simulation. Several industry standards exist that recommend differing default thermostat settings for heating and cooling seasons. These standards were compared to the values calculated for this analysis. The data examined for this report show that there is a definite difference between the climates and that the data do not agree well with any particular standard.

  10. Normal state properties of high-angle grain Y1-xCaxBa2Cu3O7-delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mennema, Sibe

    This dissertation describes the investigation of the normal-state properties of high-angle grain boundaries in YBa2Cu3O7-d (YBCO) and Y1-xCaxBa2Cu3O7-d (calcium-doped YBCO). YBCO is a high-temperature superconducting material with a...

  11. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project is to develop a down-hole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole temperature up to 300 °C for measuring motor temperature; pump discharge pressure; and formation temperature and pressure.

  12. Finite Temperature Schrödinger Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Yao Wu; Bai-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Nuo Ba; Yi-Heng Wu; Qing-Cai Wang; Yan Wang

    2011-06-11

    We know Schr\\"{o}dinger equation describes the dynamics of quantum systems, which don't include temperature. In this paper, we propose finite temperature Schr\\"{o}dinger equation, which can describe the quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature. When the temperature T=0, it become Shr\\"{o}dinger equation.

  13. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  14. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  15. Snow cover and precipitation impacts on dry season streamflow in the Lower Mekong Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­October) and lowest discharge at the tail end of the dry season (March­ May). The wet season flood pulse is controlled in the region, including deforestation [Costa-Cabral et al., 2008] and dam construction [Campbell, 2007

  16. Water quality as affected by season and prescribed burning, Post Oak Savannah, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landry, Mark S

    1998-01-01

    . For example, total phosphorus (TP) concentration in first post-bum runoff averaged about 500 jig L-1 compared with 100 [tg L-1 TP concentration typical of winter season runoff. Relatively low standard deviations associated with mean seasonal concentrations...

  17. Assessment of Expert Opinion: Seasonal Sheep Preference and Plant Response to Grazing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Meg L; Legg, Colin J; Holland, John P; Theobald, Chris M

    2007-01-01

    Expert opinion was sought on two issues relating to herbivory: seasonal sheep preferences for plant species and seasonal plant response to grazing. Expert opinion is commonly used to parameterize models: it is therefore ...

  18. THE COLEOPTERISTS BULLETIN 34(3), 1980 305 SEASONAL AND SIZE PATTERNS, TROPHIC STRUCTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    obtained by fogging trees (Lueheaseeman- nii Triana and Planch) in a moist seasonal forest in the Canal

  19. Impact of the 2008 Hurricane Season on the Natural Gas Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season and its impacts on the natural gas industry

  20. SEASONAL MIGRATION, SPECIATION, AND MORPHOLOGICAL CONVERGENCE IN THE GENUS CATHARUS (TURDIDAE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winker, Kevin

    of North American bird species north of Mexico are Nearctic­Neotropic migrants, migrating seasonally1052 SEASONAL MIGRATION, SPECIATION, AND MORPHOLOGICAL CONVERGENCE IN THE GENUS CATHARUS (TURDIDAE effects of seasonal migration on evolutionary change within lin- eages is poorly understood, in terms

  1. Seasonal persistence of northern low-and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other trace gases) Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other trace gases outputs online #12;Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other

  2. Seasonal mixed layer salinity balance of the tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), seasonal variations of precipitation are more significant and drive a pronounced seasonal cycle of mixed; published 15 February 2008. [1] In this study the causes of the seasonal cycle of mixed layer salinity cycle in sea surface salinity (SSS) with significant spatial inhomogeneity. For example, horizontal

  3. Holocene precipitation seasonality captured by a dual hydrogen and oxygen isotope approach at Steel Lake, Minnesota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Feng Sheng

    Holocene precipitation seasonality captured by a dual hydrogen and oxygen isotope approach at SteelMenocal Keywords: seasonal precipitation middle Holocene oxygen isotopes hydrogen isotopes forest­prairie boundary midcontinental North America. However, neither the climatic driver nor the seasonal character of precipitation

  4. Extendedrange seasonal hurricane forecasts for the North Atlantic with a hybrid dynamicalstatistical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    Extendedrange seasonal hurricane forecasts for the North Atlantic with a hybrid 20 September 2010; published 9 November 2010. [1] A hybrid forecast model for seasonal hurricane between the number of seasonal hurricane and the large scale variables from ECMWF hindcasts. The increase

  5. 5/19/2014 Pulley Radwan 1 Hurricane Season Q&A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    5/19/2014 Pulley Radwan 1 Hurricane Season Q&A When is hurricane season? Hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30, although hurricanes sometimes can develop at other times of the year time the Tampa Bay area was hit by a hurricane or tropical storm? The last named storm hit on September

  6. Energy Resources for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyInformation FormManufacturingEnergy |OctoberHurricane Season

  7. Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly. McConnell, Paul E.; Wauneka, Robert; Saltzstein, Sylvia J.; Sorenson, Ken B. Abstract not provided. Sandia...

  8. Log-normal distribution for correlators in lattice QCD?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas DeGrand

    2012-04-20

    Many hadronic correlators used in spectroscopy calculations in lattice QCD simulations appear to show a log-normal distribution at intermediate time separations.

  9. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013 Rocke,...

  10. Flavor dependence of normalization constant for an infrared renormalon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taekoon Lee

    2015-02-09

    An ansatz is proposed for the flavor dependence of the normalization constant for the first IR renormalon in heavy quark pole mass.

  11. Neural Effects of Beta Amyloid in Normal Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mormino, Elizabeth Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    age   categories.  Neurobiol  Aging  1997;  18:  351-­?7.  JK,  McIntosh  AR.  Aging  gracefully:  compensatory  B.  The  effect  of  normal  aging  on  the  coupling  of  

  12. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading...

  13. Rayleigh lidar observations of mesosphere temperature structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meriwether, J.W.; Dao, P.D.; Mcnutt, R.T.; Klemetti, W.; Moskowitz, W.; Davidson, G. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)]|[PhotoMetrics, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Ground-based observations of atmospheric density profiles to 92 km were obtained for four successive seasons between summer 1989 and spring 1990. These results were obtained with a powerful Rayleigh lidar facility located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, Ohio). This instrument combined a 14-W XeF laser transmitter with a 2.54-m receiver mirror to observe returns from altitudes between 40 and 95 km. Analysis of the scale height dependence of the density profiles produced temperatures with a measurement error of about 5 K (approximately 2.5%) at 90 km when the lidar data was averaged for 20 min. and smoothed in height over 2.7 km. Examination of these profiles for the total of 18 nights showed that there often existed in the mesophere a layer of enhanced temperatures when compared with the U.S. standard profile. The layer centroid height was about 85 km for summer and 70 to 75 km for winter. Data obtained for the equinoctial periods showed the amplitude of these layers to be weak. The winter temperature profiles showed evidence for long-period waves passing through the region of the thermal anomaly while the equinox profiles revealed more sporadic wave activity with shorter vertical wavelengths. Both the winter and summer temperature data displayed regions where the observed lapse rate approached the adiabatic lapse rate. In the summer the wave activity near the iversion layer was weak.

  14. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-02-01

    The structural properties of spent nuclear fuel shipping containers vary as a function of the cask wall temperature. An analysis is performed to determine the effect of a realistic, though bounding, hot day environment on the thermal behavior of spent fuel shipping casks. These results are compared to those which develop under a steady-state application of the prescribed normal thermal conditions of 10CFR71. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by using the steady-state application of the regulatory boundary conditions. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the regulatory condition. This is due to the conservative assumptions present in the ambient conditions used. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations which penetrate the cask wall have maxima substantially less than the corresponding temperatures obtained when applying the steady-state regulatory boundary conditions. Therefore, it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the steady-state interpretation of the 10CFR71 normal conditions.

  15. Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

    2006-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

  16. Natural Swimming Speed of Dascyllus reticulatus Increases with Water Temperature1 Cigdem Beyan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Abstract13 Recent research on the relationship between coral reef water temperature and fish14 swimming; Lough, 2007; Johansen and Jones,18 2011). Evaluating the behaviour of coral reef associated fish species, the speed20 of freely swimming fish in a natural setting is investigated as a function of seasonal21 changes

  17. Normal Basis Multiplication Algorithms for GF(2n ) (Full Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    1 Normal Basis Multiplication Algorithms for GF(2n ) (Full Version) Haining Fan, Duo Liu and Yiqi. fan_haining@yahoo.com Abstract - In this paper, we propose a new normal basis multiplication algorithm for GF(2n ). This algorithm can be used to design not only fast software algorithms but also low

  18. Ordered Spaces all of whose Continuous Images are Normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleissner, William G.; Levy, Ronnie

    1989-01-01

    Some spaces, such as compact Hausdorff spaces, have the property that every regular continuous image is normal. In this paper, we look at such spaces. In particular, it is shown that if a normal space has finite Stone-Cech remainder, then every...

  19. N d'ordre: 011 Ecole Normale Suprieure de Lyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Anne

    N d'ordre: 011 Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon Laboratoire de l'Informatique du Parallélisme recherches in Computer Science from Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon. Scheduling Pipelined Applications. Yves Robert Professor, ENS Lyon, France M. Denis Trystram Professor, IMAG, Grenoble, France #12

  20. DATA NORMALIZATION : A KEY FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.); Sohn, H. (Hoon); Worden, K.

    2001-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. For SHM strategies that rely on vibration response measurements, the ability to normalize the measured data with respect to varying operational and environmental conditions is essential if one is to avoid false-positive indications of damage. Examples of common normalization procedure include normalizing the response measurements by the measured inputs as is commonly done when extracting modal parameters. When environmental cycles influence the measured data, a temporal normalization scheme may be employed. This paper will summarize various strategies for performing this data normalization task. These strategies fall into two general classes: (1) Those employed when measures of the varying environmental and operational parameters are available; (2) Those employed when such measures are not available. Whenever data normalization is performed, one runs the risk that the damage sensitive features to be extracted from the data will be obscured by the data normalization procedure. This paper will summarize several normalization procedures that have been employed by the authors and issues that have arose when trying to implement them on experimental and numerical data.

  1. Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Dudley

    Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen;Abstract The normal curve has been used to fit the rate of both world and U.S.A. oil production. In this paper we give the first theoretical basis for these curve fittings. It is well known that oil field

  2. New Equipartition Results for Normal Mode Energies of Anharmonic Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Bruce Ian

    New Equipartition Results for Normal Mode Energies of Anharmonic Chains B.I. Henry 1 and T. Szeredi 2;3 Date: 26 September 1995 The canonical and micro­canonical distribution of energy among. If the inter­particle potential is an even function then energy is distributed uniformly among the normal modes

  3. Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs Andrew P. Mullhaupt #3 if and only if A is triangular and AA #3; + BB #3; = I n , where I n is the identity matrix. Input normal and A is a matrix fraction, A = M 1 N , where M and N are triangular matrices of low bandwidth. For single input

  4. On the normalization of the HBT correlation function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Miskowiec; S. Voloshin

    1998-03-16

    We discuss the question of the normalization of the correlation function and its consistency with the often used form C(p1,p2) = 1+|f(p1,p2)|^2. We suggest an event mixing method which allows one to obtain absolutely normalized correlation functions from experimental data.

  5. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  6. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  7. WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY 1939-1948 Marine Biological i STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;a WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM arid to avoid delay in publication. Washington D. CWATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

  8. Vibrational excitation induced by electron beam and cosmic rays in normal and superconductive aluminum bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bassan; B. Buonomo; G. Cavallari; E. Coccia; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; L. G. Foggetta; C. Ligi; A. Marini; G. Mazzitelli; G. Modestino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; F. Ronga; P. Valente; S. M. Vinko

    2011-08-02

    We report new measurements of the acoustic excitation of an Al5056 superconductive bar when hit by an electron beam, in a previously unexplored temperature range, down to 0.35 K. These data, analyzed together with previous results of the RAP experiment obtained for T > 0.54 K, show a vibrational response enhanced by a factor 4.9 with respect to that measured in the normal state. This enhancement explains the anomalous large signals due to cosmic rays previously detected in the NAUTILUS gravitational wave detector.

  9. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  10. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  11. Bibliography of the seasonal thermal energy storage library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.; Casper, G.; Kawin, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    The Main Listing is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the first author. Each citation includes the author's name, title, publisher, publication date, and where applicable, the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) number or other document number. The number preceding each citation is the identification number for that document in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Library. Occasionally, one or two alphabetic characters are added to the identification number. These alphabetic characters indicate that the document is contained in a collection of papers, such as the proceedings of a conference. An Author Index and an Identification Number Index are included. (WHK)

  12. Two Strain Dengue Model with Temporary Cross Immunity and Seasonality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguiar, Maira; Ballesteros, Sebastien; Stollenwerk, Nico [Centro de Matematica e Aplicacoes Fundamentais CMAF, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-30

    Models on dengue fever epidemiology have previously shown critical fluctuations with power law distributions and also deterministic chaos in some parameter regions due to the multi-strain structure of the disease pathogen. In our first model including well known biological features, we found a rich dynamical structure including limit cycles, symmetry breaking bifurcations, torus bifurcations, coexisting attractors including isola solutions and deterministic chaos (as indicated by positive Lyapunov exponents) in a much larger parameter region, which is also biologically more plausible than the previous results of other researches. Based on these findings we will investigate the model structures further including seasonality.

  13. "Season of Giving" launches

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXuRod Hunt (208) 386-52542Devices"Princeton"Season

  14. Laboratory's Season of Giving was a big success

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and masthead BerkeleySiteSeason of Giving big

  15. Normal Agricultural Operations and Dove Hunting in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redmon, Larry

    2009-06-01

    of Texans to the field each year for the kickoff of the annual fall hunting season. To increase dove harvest, many hunters engage in preseason scouting to determine flyways and bird concentrations over natural feeding areas and water sources. Over... it is the hunter who is responsible for determining whether a field has been seeded legally, hunters need to know and make sure areas they hunt are in accordance with Texas State and Federal laws prohibiting baiting. Hunters can also benefit from understanding...

  16. Room Temperature Aryl Trifluoromethylation via Copper- Mediated Oxidative Cross-Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchwald, Stephen Leffler

    A method for the room temperature copper-mediated trifluoromethylation of aryl and heteroaryl boronic acids has been developed. This protocol is amenable to normal benchtop setup and reactions typically require only 1?4 ...

  17. Automatic coke oven heating control system at Burns Harbor for normal and repair operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, E.T.; Chen, K.L. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., Burns Harbor, IN (United States); [Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    An automatic heating control system for coke oven batteries was developed in 1985 for the Burns Harbor No. 1 battery and reported in the 1989 Ironmaking Conference Proceedings. The original system was designed to maintain a target coke temperature at a given production level under normal operating conditions. Since 1989, enhancements have been made to this control system so that it can also control the battery heating when the battery is under repair. The new control system has improved heating control capability because it adjusts the heat input to the battery in response to anticipated changes in the production schedule. During a recent repair of this 82 oven battery, the pushing schedule changed from 102 ovens/day to 88 ovens/day, then back to 102 ovens/day, then to 107 ovens/day. During this repair, the control system was able to maintain the coke temperature average standard deviation at 44 F, with a maximum 75 F.

  18. Statistical Inference for Models with Intractable Normalizing Constants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Ick Hoon

    2011-06-27

    In this dissertation, we have proposed two new algorithms for statistical inference for models with intractable normalizing constants: the Monte Carlo Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Bayesian Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo algorithm...

  19. The normalization of citation counts based on classification systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bornmann, Lutz; Barth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    If we want to assess whether the paper in question has had a particularly high or low citation impact compared to other papers, the standard practice in bibliometrics is to normalize citations in respect of the subject category and publication year. A number of proposals for an improved procedure in the normalization of citation impact have been put forward in recent years. Against the background of these proposals this study describes an ideal solution for the normalization of citation impact: in a first step, the reference set for the publication in question is collated by means of a classification scheme, where every publication is associated with a single principal research field or subfield entry (e. g. via Chemical Abstracts sections) and a publication year. In a second step, percentiles of citation counts are calculated for this set and used to assign the normalized citation impact score to the publications (and also to the publication in question).

  20. Testicular function in normal and poor semen quality stallions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Tina Michelle

    2006-04-12

    The chromosomal location of endocrine genes was established, and relationships between expression of specific endocrine genes and measures of testis function in normal and poor semen quality stallions was assessed. Consensus ...

  1. Mapping Technology Space by Normalizing Technology Relatedness Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstott, Jeff; Yan, Bowen; Luo, Jianxi

    2015-01-01

    Technology is a complex system, with technologies relating to each other in a space that can be mapped as a network. The technology relatedness network's structure can reveal properties of technologies and of human behavior, if it can be mapped accurately. Technology networks have been made from patent data, using several measures of relatedness. These measures, however, are influenced by factors of the patenting system that do not reflect technologies or their relatedness. We created technology networks that precisely controlled for these impinging factors and normalized them out, using data from 3.9 million patents. The normalized technology relatedness networks were sparse, with only ~20% of technology domain pairs more related than would be expected by chance. Different measures of technology relatedness became more correlated with each other after normalization, approaching a single dimension of technology relatedness. The normalized network corresponded with human behavior: we analyzed the patenting his...

  2. Electron transport in normal-metal/superconductor junctions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, XZ; Zhao, HW; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the Keldysh method of nonequilibrium systems, we develop a theory of electron tunneling in normal-metal-superconductor junctions. By using the tunneling Hamiltonian model (being appropriate for the tight-binding systems...

  3. NORMALITY OF NILPOTENT VARIETIES IN E6 ERIC SOMMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommers, Eric

    NORMALITY OF NILPOTENT VARIETIES IN E6 ERIC SOMMERS ABSTRACT. We determine which nilpotent orbits for a careful reading of the paper leading to its improvement. 1 #12;2 ERIC SOMMERS Our proof is direct

  4. Converting normal insulators into topological insulators via tuning orbital levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Wu-Jun

    Tuning the spin-orbit coupling strength via foreign element doping and modifying bonding strength via strain engineering are the major routes to convert normal insulators to topological insulators. We here propose an ...

  5. Connection between asymptotic normalization coefficients, subthreshold bound states, and resonances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Tribble, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    We present here useful relations showing the connection between the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) and the fitting parameters in K- and R-matrix theory methods which are often used when analyzing low energy experimental data. It is shown...

  6. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  7. Superconductivity at Any Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anber, Mohamed M; Sabancilar, Eray; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    We construct a 2+1 dimensional model that sustains superconductivity at all temperatures. This is achieved by introducing a Chern Simons mixing term between two Abelian gauge fields A and Z. The superfluid is described by a complex scalar charged under Z, whereas a sufficiently strong magnetic field of A forces the superconducting condensate to form at all temperatures. In fact, at finite temperature, the theory exhibits Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition due to proliferation of topological vortices admitted by our construction. However, the critical temperature is proportional to the magnetic field of A, and thus, the phase transition can be postponed to high temperatures by increasing the strength of the magnetic field. This model can be a step towards realizing the long sought room temperature superconductivity.

  8. High-temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  9. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  10. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  11. Plan INTRODUCTION DEPHASING MODEL LOSSES TEMPERATURE Limits of Spin Squeezing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    -Einstein condensates A. Sinatra, Y. Castin, E. Witkowska , Li Yun, J.-C. Dornsetter Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Sup´erieure, Paris Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw Grenoble, October 11 TEMPERATURE Dynamical generation of spin squeezing in a BEC At t condensate a

  12. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B.

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  13. Resource Stewardship Tips for 2012 Recreational Red Snapper Season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    trying to catch a bigger fish may have unintended consequences when water temperatures approach the mid creating a thermocline. The result is temperature shock and possibly death for the fish which remains rebuild and are reflected by the numerous large fish landed. Red Snapper dominate many Gulf of Mexico

  14. Diversity, abundance, seasonality and interactions of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in pecans in Mumford, Robertson Co., Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calixto Sanchez, Alejandro Antonio

    2005-02-17

    of ants/8 trees) and seasonality in Mumford, TX, in three different treatments ??? 52 22. Dorymyrmex flavus relative nest abundance (number of nests/4 transects) and seasonality in Mumford, TX, in three different treatments..., in three different treatments ??? 56 25. Forelius pruinosus relative abundance (number of ants/8 trees) and seasonality in Mumford, TX, in three different treatments ??? 57 26. Forelius pruinosus relative nest abundance (number of nests/4...

  15. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  16. State of Maine residential heating oil survey 2001-02 season summary [SHOPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, Betsy

    2002-05-22

    This, as the title implies, is a summary report of the price trends for heating oil, propane and kerosene heating fuels for the heating season.

  17. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence Berkeleythe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  18. Research Papers Seasonal variability of chlorophyll a in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presumably replenishes nutrients to the surface waters on the MAB shelf. Thermal stratification re). In temperate seas, seasonal phytoplankton variability has been related to stratification, destratification

  19. Extending the Growing Season Workshop Registration Form. Preregister by Wednesday, March 5, 2014.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    the Growing Season Workshop Wednesday, March 12, 2014 from 9:00 to 2:30 ChuckDahn 1804Broadway Emmetsburg

  20. North Pacific carbon cycle response to climate variability on seasonal to decadal timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    in the subarctic North Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem.of the tropical Pacific Ocean: I. Seasonal and interannualthe subtropical North Pacific Ocean, Nature, 424, 754 – 757.

  1. Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    seasons lead to less carbon sequestration by a subalpineboreal forests to global carbon sequestration (Kurz et al. ,off- set point when carbon sequestration equals carbon loss

  2. Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly.

  3. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-04-01

    An examination of the effect of a realistic (though conservative) hot day environment on the thermal transient behavior of spent fuel shipping casks is made. These results are compared to those that develop under the prescribed normal thermal condition of 10 CFR 71. Of specific concern are the characteristics of propagating thermal waves, which are set up by diurnal variations of temperature and insolation in the outdoor environment. In order to arrive at a realistic approximation of these variations on a conservative hot day, actual temperature and insolation measurements have been obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for representatively hot and high heat flux days. Thus, the use of authentic meteorological data ensures the realistic approach sought. Further supporting the desired realism of the modeling effort is the use of realistic cask configurations in which multiple laminations of structural, shielding, and other materials are expected to attenuate the propagating thermal waves. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by enforcement of the regulatory environmental conditions of 10 CFR 71. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the prescribed regulatory conditions. However, the temperature differences are small enough that the normal conservative assumptions that are made in the course of typical cask evaluations should correct for any potential violations. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations that penetrate the cask wall all have maxima substantially less than the corresponding regulatory solutions. Therefore it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the conditions of 10 CFR 71.

  4. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  5. Thermoelectric Temperature Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    NOTE 201TM TECHNICAL Optimizing Thermoelectric Temperature Control Systems #12;2 May 1995 92-040000A © 1995 Wavelength Electronics, Inc. Thermoelectric coolers (TECs) are used in a variety understanding of thermal management techniques and carefully select the thermoelectric module, temperature

  6. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  7. Seasonal changes in the composition of passively ventilated waste tank headspaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Hayes, J.C.; Buckley, L.L.; Jensen, L.; Pennington, L.D.; Wilmarth, S.R.

    1997-08-01

    The headspaces of four passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks were sampled five times over a one-year period to evaluate seasonal changes in composition. Tanks BX-104, BY-108, C-107, and SX-102 were selected for the study on the bases of their widely varying headspace compositions, waste types, and physical headspace conditions. Samples were collected and analyzed for inorganic vapors, permanent gases, and organic vapors. Data from the 20 sampling events were compiled and reviewed. Raw mass spectral data for organic vapors were reprocessed by a single analyst. Measurement precision for results within individual sampling events, which includes both sampling and analytical random errors, was generally within the requirement of a 25% relative standard deviation. Data were fit to an analysis of variance (ANOVA) model and tested for correlation with headspace temperature. The ANOVA results indicate that the majority of headspace constituents studied were at relatively constant levels during the year-long study. The percent relative standard deviation (RSD{sub TIME}) of analyte means obtained for the five sampling events were generally low; only 15 of the 152 analytes had RSD{sub TIME} values above 60%. These highest RSD{sub TIME} values were obtained for 13 organic vapors in Tank BX-104 and two permanent gases in Tank C-107.

  8. Oceanic stochastic parametrizations in a seasonal forecast system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrejczuk, M; Juricke, S; Palmer, T N; Weisheimer, A; Zanna, L

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of three stochastic parametrizations in the ocean component of a coupled model, on forecast reliability over seasonal timescales. The relative impacts of these schemes upon the ocean mean state and ensemble spread are analyzed. The oceanic variability induced by the atmospheric forcing of the coupled system is, in most regions, the major source of ensemble spread. The largest impact on spread and bias came from the Stochastically Perturbed Parametrization Tendency (SPPT) scheme - which has proven particularly effective in the atmosphere. The key regions affected are eddy-active regions, namely the western boundary currents and the Southern Ocean. However, unlike its impact in the atmosphere, SPPT in the ocean did not result in a significant decrease in forecast error. Whilst there are good grounds for implementing stochastic schemes in ocean models, our results suggest that they will have to be more sophisticated. Some suggestions for next-generation stochastic schemes are made.

  9. Patches in the polar ionosphere: UT and seasonal dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sojka, J.J.; Bowline, M.D.; Schunk, R.W. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)] [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The seasonal and UT dependencies of patches in the polar ionosphere are simulated using the Utah State University time dependent ionospheric model (TDIM). Patch formation is achieved by changing the plasma convection pattern in response to temporal changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B{sub y} component during periods of southward IMF. This mechanism redirects the plasma flow from the dayside high-density region, which is the source of the tongue of ionization (TOI) density feature, through the throat and leads to patches, rather than a continuous TOI. The model predicts that the patches are absent at winter solstice (northern hemisphere) between 0800 and 1200 UT and that they have their largest seasonal intensity at winter solstice between 2000 and 2400 UT. Between winter solstice and equinox, patches are strong and present all day. Patches are present in summer as well, although their intensity is only tens of percent above the background density. These winter-to-equinox findings are also shown to be consistent with observations. The model was also used to predict times at which patch observations could be performed to determine the contributions from other patch mechanisms. This observational window is {+-} 20 days about winter solstice between 0800 and 1200 UT in the northern hemisphere. In this observational window the TOI is either absent or reduced to a very low density. Hence the time dependent electric field mechanism considered in this study does not produce patches, and if they are observed, then they must be due to some other mechanism. 32 refs., 10 figs.

  10. The seasonal dynamics of Arctic surface hydrology in permafrost environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trofaier, Anna Maria

    2014-11-11

    Climate-induced landscape evolution is resulting in changes to biogeochemical and hydrologi- cal cycling. In the Arctic and sub-Arctic permafrost zones, rising air temperatures are warming, and in some regions even thawing, the frozen ground...

  11. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  12. Non-Fermi-Liquid Specific Heat of Normal Degenerate Quark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gerhold; A. Ipp; A. Rebhan

    2004-08-31

    We compute the low-temperature behavior of the specific heat of normal (non-color-superconducting) degenerate quark matter as well as that of an ultradegenerate electron gas. Long-range magnetic interactions lead to non-Fermi-liquid behavior with an anomalous leading $T\\ln T^{-1}$ term. Depending on the thermodynamic potential used as starting point, this effect appears as a consequence of the logarithmic singularity in the fermion self-energy at the Fermi surface or directly as a contribution from the only weakly screened quasistatic magnetic gauge bosons. We show that a calculation of Boyanovsky and de Vega claiming the absence of a leading $T\\ln T^{-1}$ term missed it by omitting vector boson contributions to the internal energy. Using a formulation which collects all nonanalytic contributions in bosonic ring diagrams, we systematically calculate corrections beyond the well-known leading-log approximation. The higher-order terms of the low-temperature expansion turn out to also involve fractional powers $T^{(3+2n)/3}$ and we explicitly determine their coefficients up to and including order $T^{7/3}$ as well as the subsequent logarithmically enhanced term $T^3 \\ln (c/T)$. We derive also a hard-dense-loop resummed expression which contains the infinite series of anomalous terms to leading order in the coupling and which we evaluate numerically. At low temperatures, the resulting deviation of the specific heat from its value in naive perturbation theory is significant in the case of strongly coupled normal quark matter and thus of potential relevance for the cooling rates of (proto-)neutron stars with a quark matter component.

  13. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1998-11-03

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries. 19 figs.

  14. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries.

  15. Closeness to spheres of hypersurfaces with normal curvature bounded below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisenko, A A; Drach, K D

    2013-11-30

    For a Riemannian manifold M{sup n+1} and a compact domain ?? M{sup n+1} bounded by a hypersurface ?? with normal curvature bounded below, estimates are obtained in terms of the distance from O to ?? for the angle between the geodesic line joining a fixed interior point O in ? to a point on ?? and the outward normal to the surface. Estimates for the width of a spherical shell containing such a hypersurface are also presented. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  16. The normalized Laplacian spectrum of subdivisions of a graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinchen Xie; Zhongzhi Zhang; Francesc Comellas

    2015-10-07

    Determining and analyzing the spectra of graphs is an important and exciting research topic in theoretical computer science. The eigenvalues of the normalized Laplacian of a graph provide information on its structural properties and also on some relevant dynamical aspects, in particular those related to random walks. In this paper, we give the spectra of the normalized Laplacian of iterated subdivisions of simple connected graphs. As an example of application of these results we find the exact values of their multiplicative degree-Kirchhoff index, Kemeny's constant and number of spanning trees.

  17. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1996-01-09

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form. The method comprises: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  18. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1996-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  19. The effects of temperature and soil moisture on the germination and emergence of three perennial warm season grasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohlenbusch, Paul Dietrich

    1966-01-01

    selected IY!' speci?!s ??ere can&! blues tel!?(nndto pogon barbinodis Lag ), Sideoats grams (Sosteloaa eurti eachwla m. 7 soar. ), aalu gceen syraaqaetop (mpteen~ @usta QH. B. K Q Ness) The test sLaterial used was collected feed contrasting climatic... HAP TER X X REVXEW OF I XTERATVRE A seed, to germinates s&ust have (1) an adequate supply of water, (2) a suitable tes&perature, and (3) an ada&(uate supply of oxygen (F)eyer and Pol)akoff-Nayber, 1963) ~ Xn order for a plant to grow fros& a seed...

  20. Seasonal trends in air temperature and precipitation in IPCC AR4 GCM output for Kansas, USA: evaluation and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Jones, Aubrey R.; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2009-01-08

    averaged monthly output of 21 global climate models under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B scenario used in the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change Assessment Report 4 are examined for six grid cells representing Kansas. To ascertain...

  1. The Hot Interstellar Medium in Normal Elliptical Galaxies III: The Thermal Structure of the Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven Diehl; Thomas S. Statler

    2008-06-11

    This is the third paper in a series analyzing X-ray emission from the hot interstellar medium in a sample of 54 normal elliptical galaxies observed by Chandra, focusing on 36 galaxies with sufficient signal to compute radial temperature profiles. We distinguish four qualitatively different types of profile: positive gradient (outwardly rising), negative gradients (falling), quasi-isothermal (flat) and hybrid (falling at small radii, then rising). We measure the mean logarithmic temperature gradients in two radial regions: from 0--2 $J$-band effective radii $R_J$ (excluding the central point source), and from 2--$4R_J$. We find the outer gradient to be uncorrelated with intrinsic host galaxy properties, but strongly influenced by the environment: galaxies in low-density environments tend to show negative outer gradients, while those in high-density environments show positive outer gradients, suggesting influence of circumgalactic hot gas. The inner temperature gradient is unaffected by the environment but strongly correlated with intrinsic host galaxy characteristics: negative inner gradients are more common for smaller, optically faint, low radio-luminosity galaxies, whereas positive gradients are found in bright galaxies with stronger radio sources. There is no evidence for bimodality in the distribution of inner or outer gradients. We propose three scenarios to explain the inner temperature gradients: (1) Weak AGN heat the ISM locally, higher-luminosity AGN heat the system globally through jets inflating cavities at larger radii; (2) The onset of negative inner gradients indicates a declining importance of AGN heating relative to other sources, such as compressional heating or supernovae; (3) The variety of temperature profiles are snapshots of different stages of a time-dependent flow.

  2. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  3. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Z.F.

    1988-04-12

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

  4. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  5. VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND KU for submission to the university library. Date Dr. David Long Chair, Graduate Committee Accepted of Engineering and Technology #12;ABSTRACT VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER

  6. 8-14 Day Outlook 30-Day and 90-Day Seasonal Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8-14 Day Outlook 30-Day and 90-Day Seasonal Outlook ENSO Advisory Climate Diagnostics and Prediction Workshop Monthly Climate Bulletin Drought Advisory Drought Outlook Ozone Winter Summary UV Index Forecast Seasonal Hurricane Outlook CDAS Reanalysis NATIONAL CENTERS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PREDICTION

  7. Sex Differences, but No Seasonal Variations in the Hippocampus of Food-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    - onstrated in food-caching animals. Such results suggest that sexually dimorphic spatial learning (sex in the structure of the hippocampus; however, this sexual dimorphism does not vary seasonally in adulthood; sexual dimorphism; spatial learning; seasonal behavior; wild adult eastern gray squirrels A number

  8. Seasonal and Radial Trends in Saturn's Thermal Plasma Between the Main Rings1 and Enceladus2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Seasonal and Radial Trends in Saturn's Thermal Plasma Between the Main Rings1 and Enceladus2 that the16 magnetospheric plasma between the main rings and Enceladus exhibited a time17 dependence that we attributed to a seasonally variable source of oxygen from the main18 rings (Elrod et al., 2012

  9. Seasonal Mean Circulation in the Yellow Sea A ModelGenerated Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Data in­ puts include seasonal hydrography, seasonal mean wind and river input, and oceanic tides pattern. The Changjiang discharge is driven offshore toward the Korean Strait by the summer wind. Results for winter and summer exhibit two distinct circulation modes. In winter, strong northerly wind

  10. Assessing Seasonal Transport and Deposition of Agricultural Emissions in Eastern North Carolina, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    Assessing Seasonal Transport and Deposition of Agricultural Emissions in Eastern North Carolina, U strategies. The eastern portion of North Carolina is used as a case example due to its high, localized eastern North Carolina. Diurnal and seasonal patterns were identified for dispersion and concentration

  11. Seasonal Mesoscale and Submesoscale Eddy Variability along the North Pacific Subtropical Countercurrent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Seasonal Mesoscale and Submesoscale Eddy Variability along the North Pacific Subtropical abundant in mesoscale eddies, but also exhibits prominent submesoscale eddy features. Output from a 1 the seasonal STCC variability in the mesoscale versus submesoscale ranges. Resolving the eddy scales of .150 km

  12. Preliminary Analysis of a Solar Heat Pump System with Seasonal Storage for Heating and Cooling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, G.; Chen, P.; Dalenback, J.

    2006-01-01

    For higher solar fraction and suitability for both heating and cooling, a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage was studied in this paper. The system scheme and control strategy of a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage for heating...

  13. Seasonal Sensitivity on COBEL-ISBA Local Forecast System for Fog and Low Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seasonal Sensitivity on COBEL-ISBA Local Forecast System for Fog and Low Clouds STEVIE ROQUELAURE of uncertainty that lead to dispersion. Key words: Local numerical forecast system, fog and low clouds, seasonal prediction system. 1. Introduction Accurate prediction of fog and low clouds is one of the main issues

  14. Spatial coherence and seasonal predictability of monsoon onset over Indonesia1 Vincent Moron*,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Andrew W.

    1 Spatial coherence and seasonal predictability of monsoon onset over Indonesia1 2 3, Bogor, Indonesia9 10 11 submitted to Journal of Climate12 13 revised version14 15 May 200816 17 predictability of monsoon onset during the August­December season over Indonesia is19 studied through analysis

  15. Cattle grazing behavior with season-long free-choice access to four forage types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

    Cattle grazing behavior with season-long free-choice access to four forage types Jeffrey S. Fehmi Abstract This experiment investigated how season-long, free-choice grazing affected weekly cattle grazing pastures was uneven and negatively correlated with salt and water sites. Cattle can rotate themselves among

  16. Transport pathways for Asian pollution outflow over the Pacific: Interannual and seasonal variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    is frontal lifting ahead of southeastward-moving cold fronts (the leading edge of cold surges) and transport with the cold fronts to promote the transport of Chinese pollution to the free troposphere. Outflow of seasonalTransport pathways for Asian pollution outflow over the Pacific: Interannual and seasonal

  17. Monitoring groundwater storage changes in the highly1 seasonal humid tropics: validation of GRACE measurements2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Monitoring groundwater storage changes in the highly1 seasonal humid tropics: validation of GRACE the seasonality and trend in groundwater storage associated with intensive groundwater19 abstraction for dry to 2007) groundwater storage changes21 (GWS) correlate well (r=0.77 to 0.93, p-value

  18. Temperature measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Sohns, Carl W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  19. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  20. Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties: The Boiling and Critical Temperatures of Polyethylene and Polytetrafluoroethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties: The Boiling and Critical Temperatures of Polyethylene value asymptotically approaches TB() ) (1217 ( 246) K for series related to polyethylene by the melting temperature of polyethylene.4,5 In this article, the question of whether the normal boiling tem

  1. T emporal structure in the deep-water temperature of four Swiss lakes: A short-term climatic change indicator?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingstone, David M.

    7 T emporal structure in the deep-water temperature of four Swiss lakes: A short-term climatic in the hypolimnion. Since in temperate latitudes coupling between deep water and atmosphere is at its strongest in atmospheric forcing on the deep-water temper- ature may well be greater than any seasonal influences. The deep-water

  2. Incomplete cooling down of Saturn's A ring at solar equinox: Implication for seasonal thermal inertia and internal structure of ring particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morishima, Ryuji; Brooks, Shawn; Deau, Estelle; Pilorz, Stu

    2015-01-01

    At the solar equinox in August 2009, the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard Cassini showed the lowest Saturn's ring temperatures ever observed. Detailed radiative transfer models show that the observed equinox temperatures of Saturn's A ring are much higher than model predictions as long as only the flux from Saturn is taken into account. This indicates that the A ring was not completely cooled down at the equinox. We develop a simple seasonal model for ring temperatures and first assume that the internal density and the thermal inertia of a ring particle are uniform with depth. The particle size is estimated to be 1-2 m. The seasonal thermal inertia is found to be 30-50 Jm$^{-2}$K$^{-1}$s$^{-1/2}$ in the middle A ring whereas it is $\\sim$ 10 Jm$^{-2}$K$^{-1}$s$^{-1/2}$ or as low as the diurnal thermal inertia in the inner and outermost regions of the A ring. An additional internal structure model, in which a particle has a high density core surrounded by a fluffy regolith mantle, shows that the c...

  3. Convex Deep Learning via Normalized Kernels Ozlem Aslan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuurmans, Dale

    Convex Deep Learning via Normalized Kernels ¨Ozlem Aslan Dept of Computing Science University Deep learning has been a long standing pursuit in machine learning, which until recently was hampered meth- ods while expanding the range of representable structures toward deep models. In this paper, we

  4. Computation of Normal Logic Programs by Fibring Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seda, Anthony Karel

    Computation of Normal Logic Programs by Fibring Neural Networks Vladimir Komendantsky1 and Anthony of the integration of fibring neural net- works (a generalization of conventional neural networks) into model by fibring neural networks of semantic immediate consequence operators TP and TP , where TP denotes

  5. RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES The secret are going to say. Many people with radios have a tendency to talk and/or repeat too much. Say what you need until it is second nature. Practicing proper day-to-day radio procedures will make emergency radio

  6. PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutter, Jared

    PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance Huai-Xiang Hao*, Caleb M. Cardon*, Wojtek in a cell-autonomous manner to maintain cellular energy homeostasis and is a potential therapeutic target). The World Health Organization estimates that the current decade will witness a 46% increase in diabetes

  7. Coarser connected topologies and non-normality points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengulalp, Lynne Christine

    2009-01-01

    point of the Stone-Cech remainder of a space a non-normality point of the remainder? We will discuss the question in the case that X is a discrete space and then when X is a metric space without isolated points. We show that under certain set...

  8. Extremal unital completely positive normal maps and its symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anilesh Mohari

    2015-07-30

    We consider the convex set of ( unital ) positive ( completely ) maps from a $C^*$ algebra $\\cla$ to a von-Neumann sub-algebra $\\clm$ of $\\clb(\\clh)$, the algebra of bounded linear operators on a Hilbert space $\\clh$ and study its extreme points via its canonical lifting to the convex set of ( unital ) positive ( complete ) normal maps from $\\hat{\\cla}$ to $\\clm$, where $\\hat{\\cla}$ is the universal enveloping von-Neumann algebra over $\\cla$. If $\\cla=\\clm$ and a ( complete ) positive operator $\\tau$ is a unique sum of a normal and a singular ( complete ) positive maps. Furthermore, a unital complete positive map is a unique convex combination of unital normal and singular complete positive maps. We used a duality argument to find a criteria for extremal elements in the convex set of unital completely positive maps having a given faithful normal invariant state. In our investigation, gauge symmetry in Stinespring representation and Kadison theorem on order isomorphism played an important role.

  9. Mixed Inductive/Coinductive Types and Strong Normalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    and coinductive types. Most research on inductive types has focused on the iso-style, i. e., there are explicit programming language. Research partially supported by the EU coordination action TYPES (510996). #12;InMixed Inductive/Coinductive Types and Strong Normalization Andreas Abel Department of Computer

  10. Some Properties of Realcompact Subspaces and Coarser Normal Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niknejad, Jila

    2009-04-23

    William Fleissner. In 1997 Buzjakova proved that for a pseudocompact space X, there exists an ordinal such that the product of X and that ordinal condenses onto a normal space if and only if X condenses onto a compact space. In the third chapter, we extend...

  11. LARGE-SCALE NORMAL COORDINATE ANALYSIS ON DISTRIBUTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Padma

    is presented in this paper. This method combines the implicitly restarted Lanczos algorithm with a state) plays an important role in the study of vibrational and thermal properties of various molecular by a collection of fundamental (normal) vibrational modes. These modes correspond to eigenvectors of a matrix

  12. Electromechanical imaging of the myocardium at normal and pathological states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Electromechanical imaging of the myocardium at normal and pathological states Mathieu Pernot here a method for measuring the electromechanical coupling properties in the myocardium. Our method of the electromechanical wave is found to decrease to approximately 0.66 m/s in the ischemic region. I. INTRODUCTION

  13. Computational Model for Forced Expiration from Asymmetric Normal Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Computational Model for Forced Expiration from Asymmetric Normal Lungs ADAM G. POLAK 1 losses along the airway branches. Calculations done for succeeding lung volumes result in the semidynamic to the choke points, characteristic differences of lung regional pressures and volumes, and a shape

  14. Jacobi's bound and normal forms computations. A historical survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier, François

    Jacobi's bound and normal forms computations. A historical survey F. Ollivier, LIX UMRS CNRS'evich Pankratiev. Abstract Jacobi is one of the most famous mathematicians of his century. His name is attached of Jacobi's results on ordinary differential equations and the available, published or unpublished material

  15. TESTS FOR NORMALITY BASED ON DENSITY ESTIMATORS OF CONVOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wefelmeyer, Wolfgang

    TESTS FOR NORMALITY BASED ON DENSITY ESTIMATORS OF CONVOLUTIONS ANTON SCHICK, YISHI WANG-type kernel density estimator, goodness-of-fit test. Anton Schick was supported by NSF Grant DMS0906551. 1 #12;2 ANTON SCHICK, YISHI WANG AND WOLFGANG WEFELMEYER Instead of comparing distribution functions, we can

  16. Microwaving of normally opaque and semi-opaque substances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-07-17

    Disclosed is a method of heating small particles using microwave radiation which are not normally capable of being heated by microwaves. The surfaces of the particles are coated with a material which is transparent to microwave radiation in order to cause microwave coupling to the particles and thus accomplish heating of the particles.

  17. Deep Borehole Disposal Remediation Costs for Off-Normal Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, John T.; Cochran, John R.; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-08-17

    This memo describes rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) cost estimates for a set of off-normal (accident) scenarios, as defined for two waste package emplacement method options for deep borehole disposal: drill-string and wireline. It summarizes the different scenarios and the assumptions made for each, with respect to fishing, decontamination, remediation, etc.

  18. Multi-year SeaSonal Sex-allocation PatternS in red-winged BlackBirdS (AgelAius phoeniceus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherhead, Patrick J.

    Multi-year SeaSonal Sex-allocation PatternS in red-winged BlackBirdS (AgelAius phoeniceus) Patrick had been proposed. Instead, seasonal sex-allocation patterns interacted with season length. Early late in the season and those earlier (early plus midseason) was a strong function of season length

  19. Assessing seasonal greenhouse gas emissions and belowground C anAssessing seasonal greenhouse gas emissions and belowground C and N processes under different fired N processes under different fire frequencies in soils of Sierra Nevada chaparral shrublands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    Assessing seasonal greenhouse gas emissions and belowground C anAssessing seasonal greenhouse gas of greenhouse gases (GHG) to the atmosphere is lacking. ·Historically, fire played a critical role in shaping

  20. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  1. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  2. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  3. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  4. Influence of hydrological seasonality on sandbank benthos: algal biomass and shrimp abundance in a large neotropical river 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montoya Ceballos, Jose Vicente

    2009-05-15

    In this study, I examined the influence of hydrological seasonality on spatiotemporal variation of algal biomass and shrimp abundance on sandbanks of the Cinaruco River in southwestern Venezuela. Seasonal variations of ...

  5. High temperature lubricating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Shell, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    It has been difficult to provide adaquate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475.degree. C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface (14), such as in an engine (10) being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475.degree. C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining steps. A gas phase (42) is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant. The gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface. The load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant. The solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  6. Seasonal versus permanent thermocline warming by tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    layer and lost to the atmosphere. Analysis of satellite sea surface temperature and sea surface height of TCs by simulating all storms during the year 1996 using a simple axisymmetric hurricane model coupled of the heat was transported out of the mixing region while the other half was lost back to the atmosphere

  7. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and, in some cases, return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential.

  8. Dynamics and instantaneous normal modes in a liquid with density anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Pica Ciamarra; Peter Sollich

    2015-08-19

    We investigate the relation between the dynamical features of a supercooled liquid and those of its potential energy landscape, focusing on a model liquid with density anomalies. We consider, at fixed temperature, pairs of state points with different density but the same diffusion constant, and find that surprisingly they have identical dynamical features at all length and time scales. This is shown by the collapse of their mean square displacements and of their self--intermediate scattering functions at different wavevectors. We then investigate how the features of the energy landscape change with density, and establish that state points with equal diffusion constant have different landscapes. In particular, we find a correlation between the fraction of instantaneous normal modes connecting different energy minima and the diffusion constant, but unlike in other systems these two quantities are not in one--to--one correspondence with each other, showing that additional landscape features must be relevant in determining the diffusion constant.

  9. Nonequilibrium theory of a hot-electron bolometer with normal metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golubev, Dmitri; Kuzmin, Leonid

    2001-06-01

    The operation of the hot-electron bolometer with normal metal-insulator-superconductor (NIS) tunnel junction as a temperature sensor is analyzed theoretically. The responsivity and the noise equivalent power (NEP) of the bolometer are obtained numerically for typical experimental parameters. Relatively simple approximate analytical expressions for these values are derived. The time constant of the device is also found. We demonstrate that the effect of the electron cooling by the NIS junction, which serves as a thermometer, can improve the sensitivity. This effect is also useful in the presence of the finite background power load. We discuss the effect of the correlation of the shot noise and the heat flow noise in the NIS junction. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration based on the laser relativistic self-focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B., E-mail: hongbin.zhuo@gmail.com; Yang, X. H.; Shao, F. Q.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yu, T. P.; Yin, Y.; Ge, Z. Y.; Li, X. H. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Wu, H. C. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-06-15

    The enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of ions in laser target interaction via the laser relativistic self-focusing effect is investigated by theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations. The temperature of the hot electrons in the underdense plasma is greatly increased due to the occurrence of resonant absorption, while the electron-betatron-oscillation frequency is close to its witnessed laser frequency [Pukhov et al., Phys. Plasma 6, 2847 (1999)]. While these hot electrons penetrate through the backside solid target, a stronger sheath electric field at the rear surface of the target is induced, which can accelerate the protons to a higher energy. It is also shown that the optimum length of the underdense plasma is approximately equal to the self-focusing distance.

  11. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and in some cases return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential. PARR installed and monitored the performance of one type of ALM controller, the M2G from Greffen Systems, at multifamily sites in the city of Chicago and its suburb Cary, IL, both with existing OTR control. Results show that energy savings depend on the degree to which boilers are over-sized for their load, represented by cycling rates. Also savings vary over the heating season with cycling rates, with greater savings observed in shoulder months. Over the monitoring period, over-sized boilers at one site showed reductions in cycling and energy consumption in line with prior laboratory studies, while less over-sized boilers at another site showed muted savings.

  12. Low temperature reactive bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Bionta, R.M.

    1995-01-17

    The joining technique is disclosed that requires no external heat source and generates very little heat during joining. It involves the reaction of thin multilayered films deposited on faying surfaces to create a stable compound that functions as an intermediate or braze material in order to create a high strength bond. While high temperatures are reached in the reaction of the multilayer film, very little heat is generated because the films are very thin. It is essentially a room temperature joining process. 5 figures.

  13. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  14. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  15. Coupling RELAP5-3D and Fluent to analyze a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) outlet plenum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Nolan Alan

    2006-10-30

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system behavior should be predicted during normal operating conditions and during transient conditions. To predict the VHTR system behavior there is an urgent need for development, ...

  16. Stress-dependent normal mode frequencies from the effective mass of granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanqing Hu; David L. Johnson; John J. Valenza; Francisco Santibanez; Hernán A. Makse

    2014-10-20

    A zero-temperature critical point has been invoked to control the anomalous behavior of granular matter as it approaches jamming or mechanical arrest. Criticality manifests itself in an anomalous spectrum of low-frequency normal modes and scaling behavior near the jamming transition. The critical point may explain the peculiar mechanical properties of dissimilar systems such as glasses and granular materials. Here, we study the critical scenario via an experimental measurement of the normal modes frequencies of granular matter under stress from a pole decomposition analysis of the effective mass. We extract a complex-valued characteristic frequency which displays scaling $|\\omega^*(\\sigma)|\\sim\\sigma^{\\Omega'}$ with vanishing stress $\\sigma$ for a variety of granular systems. The critical exponent is smaller than that predicted by mean-field theory opening new challenges to explain the exponent for frictional and dissipative granular matter. Our results shed light on the anomalous behavior of stress-dependent acoustics and attenuation in granular materials near the jamming transition.

  17. A comparison of normal and worst case cement plant emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodford, J.; Gossman, D.; Johnson, N.

    1996-12-31

    Lone Star Industries, Inc. in Cape Girardeau, Missouri conducted a trial burn in October, 1995. Two metals emissions test days were conducted. One of the test days was a worst case metals spiking day and one of the test days was a normal emissions day. This paper examines and compares the emissions from these two test days. Much has been made of metals emissions from hazardous waste burning cement kilns, but for the most part, this has been due to the worst case metals emissions data that became available from the 1992 BIF compliance testing performed and reported by 24 cement plants. By comparison, very little data exists on normal cement kiln emissions. This paper provides one comparison.

  18. High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; /SLAC; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-11-07

    We report the results of the first high power tests of single-cell traveling-wave and standing-wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the gradient potential of normal-conducting rf-powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode converters and short test structures and is powered by SLAC's XL-4 klystron. This setup was created for economical testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested in the SLAC Klystron Test Lab.

  19. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonaldo, Maria DeFatima (New York, NY); Soares, Marcelo Bento (New York, NY)

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  20. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonaldo, M.D.; Soares, M.B.

    1997-12-30

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 1 fig.

  1. De-coupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar moisture content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-coupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar growing seasons and quantified their LFMC, relative water content (RWC) and dry matter chemistry. LFMC a stronger control on seasonal LFMC dynamics than actual changes in water content, and they challenge

  2. Surface Tension between Kaon Condensate and Normal Nuclear Matter Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael B. Christiansen; Norman K. Glendenning; Jurgen Schaffner-Bielich

    2000-03-20

    We calculate for the first time the surface tension and curvature coefficient of a first order phase transition between two possible phases of cold nuclear matter, a normal nuclear matter phase in equilibrium with a kaon condensed phase, at densities a few times the saturation density. We find the surface tension is proportional to the difference in energy density between the two phases squared. Furthermore, we show the consequences for the geometrical structures of the mixed phase region in a neutron star.

  3. Qualitative properties of optimal portfolios in log-normal markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zariphopoulou, Thaleia

    ), t (stock allocation) · Value of allocation Xt = 0 t + t dXt = t( dt + dWt) ; = 4 #12;Value function-normal markets (with S. Kallblad) · Completely monotone functions and marginal utilities (with S. Kallblad securities dSt = St dt + St dWt , S0 > 0 dBt = 0 , B0 = 1 · Self-financing strategies 0 t (bond allocation

  4. Universal spectral correlations in ensembles of random normal matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi Prakash; Akhilesh Pandey

    2014-12-20

    We consider non-gaussian ensembles of random normal matrices with the constraint that the ensembles are invariant under unitary transformations. We show that the level density of eigenvalues exhibits disk to ring transition in the complex plane. We also show that the n-eigenvalue correlation and the spacing distribution are universal and identical to that of complex (Gaussian) Ginibre ensemble. Our results are confirmed by Monte Carlo calculations. We verify the universality for dissipative quantum kicked rotor system.

  5. High temperature storage battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1988-06-07

    A high temperature electrochemical cell is described comprising: a solid-state divalent cation conducting electrolyte; a positive electrode in contact with the electrolyte; a solid-state negative electrode contacting a divalent cation conducting molten salt mediating agent providing ionic mediation between the solid-state negative electrode and the solid-state electrolyte.

  6. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  7. Transition temperature in QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M.; Christ, N. H.; Mawhinney, R. D. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Datta, S.; Jung, C.; Schmidt, C.; Umeda, T. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Heide, J. van der; Kaczmarek, O.; Laermann, E.; Miao, C. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Karsch, F. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Petreczky, P. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Petrov, K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2006-09-01

    We present a detailed calculation of the transition temperature in QCD with two light and one heavier (strange) quark mass on lattices with temporal extent N{sub {tau}}=4 and 6. Calculations with improved staggered fermions have been performed for various light to strange quark mass ratios in the range, 0.05{<=}m-circumflex{sub l}/m-circumflex{sub s}{<=}0.5, and with a strange quark mass fixed close to its physical value. From a combined extrapolation to the chiral (m-circumflex{sub l}{yields}0) and continuum (aT{identical_to}1/N{sub {tau}}{yields}0) limits we find for the transition temperature at the physical point T{sub c}r{sub 0}=0.457(7) where the scale is set by the Sommer-scale parameter r{sub 0} defined as the distance in the static quark potential at which the slope takes on the value (dV{sub qq}(r)/dr){sub r=r{sub 0}}=1.65/r{sub 0}{sup 2}. Using the currently best known value for r{sub 0} this translates to a transition temperature T{sub c}=192(7)(4) MeV. The transition temperature in the chiral limit is about 3% smaller. We discuss current ambiguities in the determination of T{sub c} in physical units and also comment on the universal scaling behavior of thermodynamic quantities in the chiral limit.

  8. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  9. The Great Season Climatic Oscillation and the Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucenna, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    The present earth warming up is often explained by the atmosphere gas greenhouse effect. This explanation is in contradiction with the thermodynamics second law. The warming up by greenhouse effect is quite improbable. It is cloud reflection that gives to the earth s ground its 15 degres C mean temperature. Since the reflection of the radiation by gases is negligible, the role of the atmosphere greenhouse gases in the earth warming up by earth radiation reflection loses its importance. We think that natural climatic oscillations contribute more to earth climatic disturbances. The oscillation that we hypothesize to exist has a long period (800 to 1000 years). The glacier melting and regeneration cycles lead to variations in the cold region ocean water density and thermal conductibility according to their salinity. These variations lead one to think about a macro climate oscillating between maximum hot and minimum cold temperatures. This oscillation is materialized by the passages of the planet through hot, mil...

  10. Implications of the variable availability of seasonal foods on the home ranges of black bears, Ursus americanus, in the Sierra Nevada of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Rachel; Klimley, A P; Folger, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Implications of the variable availability of seasonal foodsImplications of the variable availability of seasonal foodsexamine how a change in availability of seed and acorn crops

  11. Test of modified BCS model at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Yu. Ponomarev; A. I. Vdovin

    2005-08-24

    A recently suggested modified BCS (MBCS) model has been studied at finite temperature. We show that this approach does not allow the existence of the normal (non-superfluid) phase at any finite temperature. Other MBCS predictions such as a negative pairing gap, pairing induced by heating in closed-shell nuclei, and ``superfluid -- super-superfluid'' phase transition are discussed also. The MBCS model is tested by comparing with exact solutions for the picket fence model. Here, severe violation of the internal symmetry of the problem is detected. The MBCS equations are found to be inconsistent. The limit of the MBCS applicability has been determined to be far below the ``superfluid -- normal'' phase transition of the conventional FT-BCS, where the model performs worse than the FT-BCS.

  12. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the outer part of the self-consistent potential in such a way that in the final state after photoexcitation or photoionization the newly occupied orbital sees the hole left in the initial state. This is very important to account for the large number of Rydberg states in the case of low densities. In the next Section we show calculated photoabsorptions compared with experimental data in figures with some rudimentary explanations.

  13. Impacts of precipitation seasonality and ecosystem types on evapotranspiration in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T; Yu, Guirui; Tieszen, Larry L

    2010-01-01

    physical properties alter water and energy fluxes of an oak-The model simulates the energy, water, carbon, and momentumSeasonal variation of energy and water vapor exchange rates

  14. Dynamic retail assortment models with demand learning for seasonal consumer goods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, Felipe

    2005-01-01

    The main research question we explore in this dissertation is: How should a retailer modify its product assortment over time in order to maximize overall profits for a given selling season? Historically, long development, ...

  15. Bedding and Seasonal Effects on Chemical and Bacterial Properties of Feedlot Cattle Manure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selinger, Brent

    cattle (Bos wood-chip bedding in their operations. Wood chips gen-taurus) feedlot in southern Alberta whereas season affected all four groups. Num- in straw and wood-chip bedding suggest there is a poten

  16. Design and evaluation of seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oloyede, Isaiah Olanrewaju

    2011-01-01

    The seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system (SSHPESS) is a gigawatt-year hydrogen storage system which stores excess electricity produced as hydrogen during off-peak periods and consumes the stored hydrogen ...

  17. Role of the seasonally-oscillating Hadley Cell in interhemispheric mixing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Peter J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of the seasonally-oscillating Hadley cell to the interhemispheric mixing of trace chemical species is studied using a zonally-symmetric kinematic model of the Hadley cell flow based upon the first steady-state ...

  18. Study of Applications of Solar Heating Systems with Seasonal Storage in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, G.; Zhao, X.; Chen, P.

    2006-01-01

    In most northern parts of China, it is cold in winter and needs space heating in winter. This paper studies applications of solar heating systems with seasonal storage in China. A typical residential district was selected, ...

  19. Seasonal variations of high-latitude field-aligned currents inferred from rsted and Magsat observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    equinox. The decrease in the size of the summer polar cap is caused by a shift of both daytime the pairs of downward/upward currents for all seasons as well as between hemispheres during equinox. We were

  20. Seasonal variation of upper-level mobile trough development upstream of the Pacific storm track 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myoung, Boksoon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate seasonal and interannual statistics of troughs associated with the Pacific storm track and quantify the influence of deformation on trough development upstream of the western ...

  1. Inventory optimization model for NIKE's long lifecycle highly seasonal replenishment products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, John H. (John Hyun-June)

    2015-01-01

    Currently, demand and inventory planners at NIKE Always Available (NIKE's replenishment business) experience difficulty in managing long-lifecycle highly-seasonal products like soccer equipment and fleece apparel. Very ...

  2. Timing and duration of European larch growing season along altitudinal gradients in the Swiss Alps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esper, Jan

    and matura- tion of the stem wood. Needles appeared ~3­4 weeks earlier than stem growth. The duration of ring growth throughout the entire growing season. Exceptions include a limited number of stud- ies that showed

  3. Citrus limonoids: seasonal changes and their potential in glutathione S-transferase induction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiaxing

    2002-01-01

    Seasonal changes of citrus limonids in 'Rio Red' grapefruit were investigated using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Several citrus limonoids, limonoid mixtures and a flavonone were evaluated for their ability to induce...

  4. Potato Late blight Update and Late Season Recommendations Willie Kirk. PLP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Potato Late blight Update and Late Season Recommendations Willie Kirk. PLP Potato late blight has this year. Growers should sample symptomatic tubers and send them for diagnosis to the Kirk lab

  5. Food webs of two Venezuelan clear-water streams with seasonal fluctuations in hydrology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Christopher Chase

    1997-01-01

    Two Venezuelan clear-water streams were sampled to describe resource use by fishes, community interactions, and the effects of seasonal environmental change and resource availability on food web structure. Previous studies ...

  6. The role of seasonal wetlands in the ecology of the American alligator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subalusky, Amanda Lee

    2009-05-15

    populations to determine the most effective method of studying alligators in seasonal wetlands. I then used systematic trapping, nest surveys and radio telemetry to determine habitat use and overland movement rates by different sex and size classes. I found...

  7. Supporting Online Material for: Carbon in Amazon forests: Unexpected seasonal fluxes and disturbance-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seasonal variations in important climatic variables at this site: solar radiation, net radiation, air; measurements at Km 83 after that date are not included here, since we focus on the dynamics of primary forests

  8. Seasonal patterns of forest canopy and their relevance for the global carbon cycle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizunuma, Toshie

    2015-06-30

    In the terrestrial biosphere forests have a significant role as a carbon sink. Under recent climate change, it is increasingly important to detect seasonal change or ‘phenology’ that can influence the global carbon cycle. ...

  9. Nonlinear equilibration of baroclinic eddies : the role of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the influence of boundary layer processes and seasonal forcing on baroclinic eddy equilibration is studied to understand how the baroclinic adjustment is modified when taking into account these two factors. ...

  10. Climate effects of seasonally varying Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Gill-Ran

    The climate impact of the seasonality of Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA) is studied using an aerosol-climate model coupled with a slab ocean model in a set of 60-year long simulations, driven by BBCA ...

  11. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  12. Dirac Equation at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Yao Wu; Bo-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Nuo Ba; Yi-Heng Wu; Si-Qi Zhang; Jing Wang; Chun-Hong Li

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose finite temperature Dirac equation, which can describe the quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature for a relativistic particle of spin-1/2. When the temperature T=0, it become Dirac equation. With the equation, we can study the relativistic quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature.

  13. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 ± 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001–2010 than in 1961–1970, suggesting that human land use and management contribute to seasonal changes in the CO2 exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere.

  14. BEMS-Assisted Seasonal Functional Performance Testing in the Initial Commissioning of Kista Entre and Katsan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isakson, P.; Wetterstrom, P.; Carling, P.

    2004-01-01

    detect and diagnose energy and other performance problems with building operations [1]. However, in Sweden the assessment of seasonal performance in commissioning typically uses trend-data from only a few days. Our hypothesis is that monitoring...-ASSISTED SEASONAL FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE TESTING IN THE INITIAL COMMISSIONING OF KISTA ENTRÉ AND KATSAN Per Isakson*, Per Wetterström** and Pär Carling*** * Building Sciences KTH, Stockholm SWEDEN. per.isakson@byv.kth.se ** Vasakronan, Stockholm, SWEDEN...

  15. Anthropogenic emissions of nonmethane hydrocarbons in the northeastern United States: Measured seasonal variations from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    in relative emissions for this series of trace gases. Seasonal changes in n-butane and i-butane emissions may [Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998]. [3] In this study, we present the seasonality of C2-C6 (ethane, propane, n-butane, i-butane, n-pentane, i-pentane and n-hexane) hydrocarbons, NOy and CO as measured at Harvard Forest

  16. Experiments with a time-dependent, zonally averaged, seasonal, enery balance climatic model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Starley Lee

    1977-01-01

    EXPERIMENTS WITH A TI&E-DEPENDENT, ZONALLY AVERAGED, SEASONAL, ENERGY BALANCE CLIMATIC MODEL A Thesis by STARLEY LEE THOMPSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the decree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology EXPERIMENTS WITH A TIME DEPENDENT~ ZONALLY AVERAGED~ SEASONAL, ENERGY BALANCE CLIMATIC MODEL A Thesis by STARLEY LEE THOMPSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee...

  17. Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Extensions on the Likelihood Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Topic 19 Extensions on the Likelihood Ratio Two-Sided Tests 1 / 12 #12;Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Outline Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Power Analysis 2 / 12 #12;Overview Normal Observations Two

  18. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    2014-01-10

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  19. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  20. Energy Spectrum of Superfluid Turbulence without Normal Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunehiko Araki; Makoto Tsubota; Sergey K. Nemirovskii

    2002-09-03

    The energy spectrum of the superfluid turbulence without the normal fluid is studied numerically under the vortex filament model. Time evolution of the Taylor-Green vortex is calculated under the full nonlocal Biot-Savart law. It is shown that for kenergy spectrum is very similar to the Kolmogorov's -5/3 law which is the most important statistical property of the conventional turbulence, where k is the wave number of the Fourier component of the velocity field and 1 the average intervortex spacing. The vortex length distribution becomes to obey a scaling property reflecting the self-similarity of the tangle.

  1. Quasi-normal acoustic oscillations in the transonic Bondi flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eliana Chaverra; Olivier Sarbach

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, we analyzed the dynamics of spherical and nonspherical acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow, describing the steady radial accretion of a relativistic perfect fluid into a nonrotating black hole. We showed that such perturbations undergo quasi-normal oscillations and computed the corresponding complex frequencies as a function of the black hole mass M and the radius r_c of the sonic horizon. It was found that when r_c is much larger than the Schwarzschild radius r_H = 2GM/c^2 of the black hole, these frequencies scale like the surface gravity of the analogue black hole associated with the acoustic metric. In this work, we analyze the Newtonian limit of the Michel solution and its acoustic perturbations. In this limit, the flow outside the sonic horizon reduces to the transonic Bondi flow, and the acoustic metric reduces to the one introduced by Unruh in the context of experimental black hole evaporation. We show that for the transonic Bondi flow, Unruh's acoustic metric describes an analogue black hole and compute the associated quasi-normal frequencies. We prove that they do indeed scale like the surface gravity of the acoustic black hole, thus providing an explanation for our previous results in the relativistic setting.

  2. Quasi-normal acoustic oscillations in the Michel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eliana Chaverra; Manuel D. Morales; Olivier Sarbach

    2015-06-09

    We study spherical and nonspherical linear acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow, which describes the steady radial accretion of a perfect fluid into a nonrotating black hole. The dynamics of such perturbations are governed by a scalar wave equation on an effective curved background geometry determined by the acoustic metric, which is constructed from the spacetime metric and the particle density and four-velocity of the fluid. For the problem under consideration in this article the acoustic metric has the same qualitative features as an asymptotically flat, static and spherically symmetric black hole, and thus it represents a natural astrophysical analogue black hole. As for the case of a scalar field propagating on a Schwarzschild background, we show that acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow exhibit quasi-normal oscillations. Based on a new numerical method for determining the solutions of the radial mode equation, we compute the associated frequencies and analyze their dependency on the radii of the event and sonic horizons and the angular momentum number. Our results for the fundamental frequencies are compared to those obtained from an independent numerical Cauchy evolution, finding good agreement between the two approaches. When the radius of the sonic horizon is large compared to the event horizon radius, we find that the quasi-normal frequencies scale approximately like the surface gravity associated with the sonic horizon.

  3. Thermionic converter temperature controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

    2001-04-24

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  4. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  5. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overeem, A.

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

  6. Observed Holiday Aerosol Reduction and Temperature Cooling over East Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Daoyi; Wang, Wenshan; Qian, Yun; Bai, Wenbing; Guo, Yuanxi; Mao, Rui

    2014-06-16

    The Spring Festival air pollution in China was investigated using the long-term observations from 2001-2012 over 323 stations. During the Spring Festival with nearly half of urban population leaving the cities for holidays, the particulate matter (PM10) concentration is about 24.5?gm-3 (23%) lower than normal days. Associated with the national-wide burning of firework, the PM10 concentration sharply increases to 123.8?gm-3 at Chinese New Year Day (increment of 35%). Similar to PM10, the SO2 and NO2 decrease from high values in normal days to a holiday minimum with reduction of 23.3% and 30.6%, respectively. The NO2 has no peak in New Year Day because of the different emission source. The night mean and minimum temperature co-vary with PM10. Both nighttime mean and minimum temperature decrease by about 2.1°C during the holidays. And in association with the pollution jump at New Year Day the night temperature simultaneously increase by about 0.89°C. The in-phase co-variations between PM10 and night temperature suggest an overall warming effect of holiday aerosol during winter in China.

  7. Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance will dim. Low temperature superconductivity was discovered in 1911 by Heike was explained by BCS theory. BCS theory explains superconductivity microscopically

  8. Quasi-normal acoustic oscillations in the Michel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaverra, Eliana; Sarbach, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    We study spherical and nonspherical linear acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow, which describes the steady radial accretion of a perfect fluid into a nonrotating black hole. The dynamics of such perturbations are governed by a scalar wave equation on an effective curved background geometry determined by the acoustic metric, which is constructed from the spacetime metric and the particle density and four-velocity of the fluid. For the problem under consideration in this article the acoustic metric has the same qualitative features as an asymptotically flat, static and spherically symmetric black hole, and thus it represents a natural astrophysical analogue black hole. As for the case of a scalar field propagating on a Schwarzschild background, we show that acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow exhibit quasi-normal oscillations. Based on a new numerical method for determining the solutions of the radial mode equation, we compute the associated frequencies and analyze their dependency on the radii of t...

  9. Normal Conducting Deflecting Cavity Development at the Cockcroft Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Woolley, B; Jones, R M; Grudiev, A; Dolgashev, V; Wheelhouse, A; Mackenzie, J; McIntosh, P A; Hill, C; Goudket, P; Buckley, S; Lingwood, C

    2013-01-01

    Two normal conducting deflecting structures are currently being developed at the Cockcroft Institute, one as a crab cavity for CERN linear collider CLIC and one for bunch slice diagnostics on low energy electron beams for Electron Beam Test Facility EBTF at Daresbury. Each has its own challenges that need overcome. For CLIC the phase and amplitude tolerances are very stringent and hence beamloading effects and wakefields must be minimised. Significant work has been undertook to understand the effect of the couplers on beamloading and the effect of the couplers on the wakefields. For EBTF the difficulty is avoiding the large beam offset caused by the cavities internal deflecting voltage at the low beam energy. Prototypes for both cavities have been manufactured and results will be presented.

  10. Galaxy rotation curves with log-normal density distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marr, John H

    2015-01-01

    The log-normal distribution represents the probability of finding randomly distributed particles in a micro canonical ensemble with high entropy. To a first approximation, a modified form of this distribution with a truncated termination may represent an isolated galactic disk, and this disk density distribution model was therefore run to give the best fit to the observational rotation curves for 37 representative galaxies. The resultant curves closely matched the observational data for a wide range of velocity profiles and galaxy types with rising, flat or descending curves in agreement with Verheijen's classification of 'R', 'F' and 'D' type curves, and the corresponding theoretical total disk masses could be fitted to a baryonic Tully Fisher relation (bTFR). Nine of the galaxies were matched to galaxies with previously published masses, suggesting a mean excess dynamic disk mass of dex0.61+/-0.26 over the baryonic masses. Although questionable with regard to other measurements of the shape of disk galaxy g...

  11. Semi-analytic results for quasi-normal frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skakala, Jozef

    2010-01-01

    The last decade has seen considerable interest in the quasi-normal frequencies [QNFs] of black holes (and even wormholes), both asymptotically flat and with cosmological horizons. There is wide agreement that the QNFs are often of the form omega_n = (offset) + i n (gap), though some authors have encountered situations where this behaviour seems to fail. To get a better understanding of the general situation we consider a semi-analytic model based on a piecewise Eckart (Poeschl--Teller) potential, allowing for different heights and different rates of exponential falloff in the two asymptotic directions. This model is sufficiently general to capture and display key features of the black hole QNFs while simultaneously being analytically tractable, at least for asymptotically large imaginary parts of the QNFs. We shall derive an appropriate "quantization condition" for the asymptotic QNFs, and extract as much analytic information as possible. In particular, we shall explicitly verify that the (offset)+ i n (gap) ...

  12. Generic master equations for quasi-normal frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skakala, Jozef

    2010-01-01

    Generic master equations governing the highly-damped quasi-normal frequencies [QNFs] of one-horizon, two-horizon, and even three-horizon spacetimes can be obtained through either semi-analytic or monodromy techniques. While many technical details differ, both between the semi-analytic and monodromy approaches, and quite often among various authors seeking to apply the monodromy technique, there is nevertheless widespread agreement regarding the the general form of the QNF master equations. Within this class of generic master equations we can establish some rather general results, relating the existence of "families" of QNFs of the form omega_{a,n} = (offset)_a + i n (gap) to the question of whether or not certain ratios of parameters are rational or irrational.

  13. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-raymore »fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.« less

  14. Crossover from anomalous to normal diffusion in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. D. A. Aarao Reis; Dung di Caprio

    2015-06-16

    Random walks (RW) of particles adsorbed in the internal walls of porous deposits produced by ballistic-type growth models are studied. The particles start at the external surface of the deposits and enter their pores, in order to simulate an external flux of a species towards a porous solid. For short times, the walker concentration decays as a stretched exponential of the depth z, but a crossover to long time normal diffusion is observed in most samples. The anomalous concentration profile remains at long times in very porous solids if the walker steps are restricted to nearest neighbors and is accompanied with subdiffusion features. These findings are correlated with a decay of the explored area with z. The study of RW of tracer particles left at the internal part of the solid rules out an interpretation by diffusion equations with position-dependent coefficients. A model of RW in a tube of decreasing cross section explains those results by showing long crossovers from an effective subdiffusion regime to an asymptotic normal diffusion. The crossover position and density are analytically calculated for a tube with area decreasing exponentially with z and show good agreement with numerical data. The anomalous decay of the concentration profile is interpreted as a templating effect of the tube shape on the total number of diffusing particles at each depth, while the volumetric concentration in the actually explored porous region may not have significant decay. These results may explain the anomalous diffusion of metal atoms in porous deposits observed in recent works. They also confirm the difficulty in interpreting experimental or computational data on anomalous transport reported in recent works, particularly if only the concentration profiles are measured.

  15. Statistics of particle time-temperature histories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewson, John C.; Lignell, David O.; Sun, Guangyuan

    2014-10-01

    Particles in non - isothermal turbulent flow are subject to a stochastic environment tha t produces a distribution of particle time - temperature histories. This distribution is a function of the dispersion of the non - isothermal (continuous) gas phase and the distribution of particles relative to that gas phase. In this work we extend the one - dimensional turbulence (ODT) model to predict the joint dispersion of a dispersed particle phase and a continuous phase. The ODT model predicts the turbulent evolution of continuous scalar fields with a model for the cascade of fluctuations to smaller sc ales (the 'triplet map') at a rate that is a function of the fully resolved one - dimens ional velocity field . Stochastic triplet maps also drive Lagrangian particle dispersion with finite Stokes number s including inertial and eddy trajectory - crossing effect s included. Two distinct approaches to this coupling between triplet maps and particle dispersion are developed and implemented along with a hybrid approach. An 'instantaneous' particle displacement model matches the tracer particle limit and provide s an accurate description of particle dispersion. A 'continuous' particle displacement m odel translates triplet maps into a continuous velocity field to which particles respond. Particles can alter the turbulence, and modifications to the stochastic rate expr ession are developed for two - way coupling between particles and the continuous phase. Each aspect of model development is evaluated in canonical flows (homogeneous turbulence, free - shear flows and wall - bounded flows) for which quality measurements are ava ilable. ODT simulations of non - isothermal flows provide statistics for particle heating. These simulations show the significance of accurately predicting the joint statistics of particle and fluid dispersion . Inhomogeneous turbulence coupled with the in fluence of the mean flow fields on particles of varying properties alter s particle dispersion. The joint particle - temperature dispersion leads to a distribution of temperature histories predicted by the ODT . Predictions are shown for the lower moments an d the full distributions of the particle positions, particle - observed gas temperatures and particle temperatures. An analysis of the time scales affecting particle - temperature interactions covers Lagrangian integral time scales based on temperature autoco rrelations, rates of temperature change associated with particle motion relative to the temperature field and rates of diffusional change of temperatures. These latter two time scales have not been investigated previously; they are shown to be strongly in termittent having peaked distributions with long tails. The logarithm of the absolute value of these time scales exhibits a distribution closer to normal. A cknowledgements This work is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) under their Counter - Weapons of Mass Destruction Basic Research Program in the area of Chemical and Biological Agent Defeat under award number HDTRA1 - 11 - 4503I to Sandia National Laboratories. The authors would like to express their appreciation for the guidance provi ded by Dr. Suhithi Peiris to this project and to the Science to Defeat Weapons of Mass Destruction program.

  16. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  17. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  18. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  19. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Imaging Studies of In Vitro Carcinoma and Normal Cells Utilizing a Mitochondrial Specific Dye

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Joseph Walsh

    2002-08-01

    Low temperature Nonphotochemical Hole Burning (NPHB) Spectroscopy of the dye rhodamine 800 (MF680) was applied for the purpose of discerning differences between cultured normal and carcinoma ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. Both the cell lines were developed and characterized at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN), with the normal cell line having been transfected with a strain of temperature sensitive Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen (SV40) for the purpose of extending the life of the cell culture without inducing permanent changes in the characteristics of the cell line. The cationic lipophilic fluorophore rhodamine 800 preferentially locates in in situ mitochondria due to the high lipid composition of mitochondria and the generation of a large negative membrane potential (relative to the cellular cytoplasm) for oxidative phosphorylation. Results presented for NPHB of MF680 located in the cells show significant differences between the two cell lines. The results are interpreted on the basis of the NPHB mechanism and characteristic interactions between the host (cellular mitochondrial) and the guest (MF680) in the burning of spectral holes, thus providing an image of the cellular ultrastructure. Hole growth kinetics (HGK) were found to differ markedly between the two cell lines, with the carcinoma cell line burning at a faster average rate for the same exposure fluence. Theoretical fits to the data suggest a lower degree of structural heterogeneity in the carcinoma cell line relative to the normal cell line. Measurement of changes in the permanent dipole moment (f{Delta}{mu})were accomplished by measurement of changes in hole width in response to the application of an external electric field (the Stark effect), and found that {Delta}{mu} values for the carcinoma line were 1.5x greater than those of the SV40 antigen-free normal analogs. These findings are interpreted in terms of effects from the mitochondrial membrane potential. Results for HGK on the scale of single cells is also presented. Trends observed for large populations of cells (5 x 10{sup 5} to 2 x 10{sup 6}) were concurrently observed for individual cells, with the carcinoma cell line burning at a faster average rate relative to the normal cell line.

  20. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Imaging Studies of in vitro Carcinoma and Normal Cells Utilizing a Mitochondrial Specific Dye

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Joseph Walsh

    2002-06-27

    Low temperature Nonphotochemical Hole Burning (NPHB) Spectroscopy of the dye rhodamine 800 (MF680) was applied for the purpose of discerning differences between cultured normal and carcinoma ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. Both the cell lines were developed and characterized at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN), with the normal cell line having been transfected with a strain of temperature sensitive Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen (SV40) for the purpose of extending the life of the cell culture without inducing permanent changes in the characteristics of the cell line. The cationic lipophilic fluorophore rhodamine 800 preferentially locates in in situ mitochondria due to the high lipid composition of mitochondria and the generation of a large negative membrane potential (relative to the cellular cytoplasm) for oxidative phosphorylation. Results presented for NPHB of MF680 located in the cells show significant differences between the two cell lines. The results are interpreted on the basis of the NPHB mechanism and characteristic interactions between the host (cellular mitochondrial) and the guest (MF680) in the burning of spectral holes, thus providing an image of the cellular ultrastructure. Hole growth kinetics (HGK) were found to differ markedly between the two cell lines, with the carcinoma cell line burning at a faster average rate for the same exposure fluence. Theoretical fits to the data suggest a lower degree of structural heterogeneity in the carcinoma cell line relative to the normal cell line. Measurement of changes in the permanent dipole moment (f{Delta}{mu}) were accomplished by measurement of changes in hole width in response to the application of an external electric field (the Stark effect), and found that {Delta}{mu} values for the carcinoma line were 1.5x greater than those of the SV40 antigen-free normal analogs. These findings are interpreted in terms of effects from the mitochondrial membrane potential. Results for HGK on the scale of single cells is also presented. Trends observed for large populations of cells (5 x 10{sup 5} to 2 x 10{sup 6}) were concurrently observed for individual cells, with the carcinoma cell line burning at a faster average rate relative to the normal cell line.

  1. Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansure, A.J.; Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.

    1998-10-27

    Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated. 5 figs.

  2. Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM); Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated.

  3. Concentration-Temperature Superposition of Helix Folding Rates in Gelatin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Gornall; E. M. Terentjev

    2006-03-05

    We study the kinetics of helix-coil transition in water solutions of gelatin (collagen protein) by optical rotation techniques combined with thermal characterization. By examining the rates of secondary helix folding, and covering a very wide range of solution concentrations, we are able to identify a universal exponential dependence of folding rate on concentration and quench temperature. We demonstrate a new concentration-temperature superposition of data at all temperatures and concentrations, and build the corresponding master curve. The results support the concept of a diffuse helix-coil transition. We find no concentration dependance of the normalized rate constant, suggesting first order (single) kinetics of secondary helix folding dominate in the early stages of renaturation.

  4. Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liqiang Wei

    2006-05-23

    In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

  5. Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minor, J.E.

    1981-05-01

    The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

  6. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  7. Factor Analysis for Skewed Data and Skew-Normal Maximum Likelihood Factor Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaucher, Beverly Jane

    2013-04-04

    This research explores factor analysis applied to data from skewed distributions for the general skew model, the selection-elliptical model, the selection-normal model, the skew-elliptical model and the skew-normal model ...

  8. Normal form approach for dispersive equations with low-regularity data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Seungly

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, we examine applications of the normal form technique to nonlinear dispersive equations with rough initial data. Working within the framework of Bourgain spaces, the normal form method often produces ...

  9. Interactive crop management in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1): Seasonal influences on land-atmosphere fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levis, S.

    2014-01-01

    will likely improve earth system model simulations withABSTRACT The Community Earth System Model, version 1 (CESM1)in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1): Seasonal

  10. Intercomparison of the seasonal cycle in 200 hPa kinetic energy in AMIP GCM simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    The 200 hPa kinetic energy is represented by means of the spherical harmonic components for the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations, the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast Reanalysis (ERA). The data used are the monthly mean wind fields from 1979 to 1988. The kinetic energy is decomposed into the divergent (DKE) and rotational (RKE) components and emphasis is placed on examining the former. The two reanalysis data sets show reasonable agreement that is best for the rotational kinetic energy. The largest difference in the divergent kinetic energy occurs during the northern summer. As might be expected, the two analyses are closet in regions where there are sufficient observations such that the effect of the model used in the assimilation cycle are minimized. The observed RKE show only a slight seasonal cycle with a maximum occuring during the northern winter. The DKE, on the other hand, has a very pronounced seasonal cycle with maxima at the solsticial seasons and minima during the equinoctial seasons. The model results show a very large spread in the magnitudes of the RKE and DKE although the models all evince a seasonal variation in phase with that observed. The median values of the seasonal cycle of RKE and DKE for the models are usually superior to those of any individual model. Results are also presented for simulation following the AMIP protocol but using updated versions of the original AMIP entries. In most cases these new integrations show better agreement with the observations.

  11. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  12. A New Class of Easily Activated Palladium Precatalysts for Facile C?N Cross-Coupling Reactions and the Low Temperature Oxidative Addition of Aryl Chlorides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biscoe, Mark R.

    A new class of one-component Pd precatalysts bearing biarylphosphine ligands is described. These precatalysts are air- and thermally stable, are easily activated under normal reaction conditions at or below room temperature, ...

  13. TRENDS IN DIRECT NORMAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE IN OREGON FROM 1979-2003 Laura Riihimaki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    TRENDS IN DIRECT NORMAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE IN OREGON FROM 1979-2003 Laura Riihimaki Frank Vignola of trends in direct normal irradiance from three sites around Oregon over a period of 25 years. An overall. This article studies the trends in direct normal beam irradiance at three locations in Oregon. These sites have

  14. Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jin

    Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal of the normal distribution for modeling of daily changes in market variables with fatter-than-normal tails is to transform (linearly) a multivariate normalwith an input covariance matrix into the desired multivariate

  15. Sampling Plan for Assaying Plates Containing Depleted or Normal Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan R. Thomas

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the rationale behind the proposed method for selecting a 'representative' sample of uranium metal plates, portions of which will be destructively assayed at the Y-12 Security Complex. The total inventory of plates is segregated into two populations, one for Material Type 10 (depleted uranium (DU)) and one for Material Type 81 (normal [or natural] uranium (NU)). The plates within each population are further stratified by common dimensions. A spreadsheet gives the collective mass of uranium element (and isotope for DU) and the piece count of all plates within each stratum. These data are summarized in Table 1. All plates are 100% uranium metal, and all but approximately 60% of the NU plates have Kel-F{reg_sign} coating. The book inventory gives an overall U-235 isotopic percentage of 0.22% for the DU plates, ranging from 0.19% to 0.22%. The U-235 ratio of the NU plates is assumed to be 0.71%. As shown in Table 1, the vast majority of the plates are comprised of depleted uranium, so most of the plates will be sampled from the DU population.

  16. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2013-09-11

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  17. Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2004-12-19

    Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: (1) fluorescence excitation spectra of MF680 and confocal microscopy images of thin sliced tissues incubated with MF680 confirm the site-specificity of the probe molecules in the cellular systems. (2) Tunneling parameters, {lambda}{sub 0} and {sigma}{sub {lambda}}, as well as the standard hole burning parameters (namely, {gamma} and S), have been determined for the tissue samples by hole growth kinetics (HGK) analyses. Unlike the preliminary cultured cell studies, these parameters have not shown the ability to distinguish tissue cellular matrices surrounding the chromophores. (3) Effects of an external electric (Stark) field on the nonphotochemical holes have been used to determine the changes in permanent dipole moment (f{Delta}{mu}) for MF680 in tissue samples when burn laser polarization is parallel to the Stark field. Differences are detected between f{Delta}{mu}s in the two tissue samples, with the cancerous tissue exhibiting a more pronounced change (1.35-fold increase) in permanent dipole moment change relative to the normal analogs. It is speculated that the difference may be related to differences in mitochondrial membrane potentials in these tissue samples. (4) In the HGK mode, hole burning imaging (HBI) of cells adhered to coverslips and cooled to liquid helium temperatures in the complete absence of cryopreservatives, shows the ability to distinguish between carcinoma and analogous normal cells on the single-cell level. In future applications, this system has the potential to be used with smears of tissue samples for single-layer HBI analysis. These conclusions demonstrate that HBI has the potential of providing detailed information about localized intracellular environments and for detecting changes in the physical characteristics (e.g., electrical properties) of cells which constitute the in vitro tissue samples. For the latter, the long-term goal will be to develop NPHB into a diagnostic technique for the early detection of cancer by exploiting the physical differences between normal and cancerous cells and tissues. Moreover, because of the aforementioned HBI's capability to detect cellular anomalies, it has the potential of being used in conjunction with studies involving photodynamic therapy, assuming the chromophore is carefully selected.

  18. Quantum Chaos at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Caron; H. Jirari; H. Kröger; X. Q. Luo; G. Melkonyan; K. J. M. Moriarty

    2001-06-23

    We use the quantum action to study quantum chaos at finite temperature. We present a numerical study of a classically chaotic 2-D Hamiltonian system - harmonic oscillators with anharmonic coupling. We construct the quantum action non-perturbatively and find temperature dependent quantum corrections in the action parameters. We compare Poincar\\'{e} sections of the quantum action at finite temperature with those of the classical action.

  19. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  20. Superconducting and normal-state properties of novel materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crespi, V.H.

    1994-09-01

    Interest in solid state physics naturally gravitates towards novel systems such as the copper oxide superconductors or the alkali-doped fullerenes. This paper tackles high temperature superconductivity by extension of the BCS theory for ordinary superconductors, in particular, incorporation of anharmonicity in phonon dynamics and anisotropy in electron-phonon coupling. These refinements can account for many anomalous properties of the cuprates. Phonon anharmonicity is consistent with a small isotope effect at optimal doping and a larger isotope effect in suboptimal systems. Anisotropy in the interaction, a plausible consequence of certain anharmonic models, can circumvent objections to electron-phonon coupling based on transport measurements. Such anisotropy is consistent with gap anisotropy and strong temperature dependence of Hall coefficient. In contrast to cuprates, the doped fullerenes appear understandable within the standard model of single electron band theory and BCS theory. Microscopic parameters derivable from transport and critical field measurements yield a self-consistent picture of a disordered Type-2 BCS superconductor. Isotope effects imply that superconductivity is mediated by carbon phonons opposed to alkali atom vibrations. The novel properties of the fullerenes are generally traceable to their microscopic heterogeneity, being a collection of tightly bound but weakly overlapping molecules. Separation of electronic regimes into weak intermolecular overlap and strong carbon-carbon on-ball bonds yields a superconductor with both a large density of states and a high phonon frequency, properties consistent with a relatively high {Tc}. Disordered nature of intermolecular overlap produces a large residual resistivity and a universal dependence to the Hall coefficient. This disorder is also consistent with the anomalously large carbon isotope effect for heterogeneous isotopic substitution.

  1. RECHARGEABLE HIGH-TEMPERATURE BATTERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2014-01-01

    F. Eshman, High-Performance Batteries for Electric-VehicleS. Sudar, High Performance Batteries for Electric-VehicleHIGH-TEMPERATURE BATTERIES Elton J. Cairns January 1981 TWO-

  2. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  3. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  4. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  5. Microlaminated high temperature intermetallic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, R.G.; Skelly, D.W.; Larsen, M. (GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)); Heathcote, J.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.)

    1994-12-01

    The thrust to weight ratio of aircraft engines is limited by the density and elevated temperature capability of high temperature turbine materials. Single crystal superalloys, which are the current state-of-the-art in high temperature turbine blade materials, have limited potential for further increases in temperature capability. High temperature intermetallics offer the advantage of higher specific strength and higher temperature capability, but lack ductility and fracture toughness below 1,000 C. By compositing these very high temperature intermetallics with ductile metals, toughening may be improved to the point where the composites have applicability in aircraft engine turbine sections. Lamination of ductile metals with continuous intermetallic layers offers one means of producing such composites. Small lamellae thicknesses may have advantages related to intrinsic defect sizes and the effectiveness of ductile reinforcements in load-controlled applications where strength is important. Intermetallic composites will require a refractory metal for toughening because of the need for metal strength at temperatures above 1,100 C. Niobium-base alloys were selected as the toughening layer in this study because of experience with oxidation-resistant niobium alloys with low densities compared to superalloys and the existence of metal-intermetallic systems in equilibrium at high temperatures. Two microlaminated composite systems, Nb[sub 3]Al-Nb and Cr[sub 2]Nb(Cr) were chosen for microstructural and mechanical property evaluation. The choice of systems was partially based upon knowledge of phase relations between the metal and the intermetallic compositions.

  6. Room temperature 1.6 m electroluminescence from Ge light emitting diode on Si substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    Room temperature 1.6 µm electroluminescence from Ge light emitting diode on Si substrate Szu n+/p light emitting diode on a Si substrate. Unlike normal electrically pumped devices, this device.4670) Optical materials; (230.3670) Light-emitting diodes. References and links 1. L. C. Kimerling, "Silicon

  7. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. L. [Department of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Yuncheng University, 044000, Yuncheng, Shanxi (China); Wang, H. G., E-mail: hgwang.gz@gmail.com [Center for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, 510006, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = A?{sup ?} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, ? = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have ? < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ?? ? 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have ? > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  8. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  9. Normal and lateral Casimir forces between deformed plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emig, Thorsten; Hanke, Andreas; Golestanian, Ramin; Kardar, Mehran [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan 45195-159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2003-02-01

    The Casimir force between macroscopic bodies depends strongly on their shape and orientation. To study this geometry dependence in the case of two deformed metal plates, we use a path-integral quantization of the electromagnetic field which properly treats the many-body nature of the interaction, going beyond the commonly used pairwise summation (PWS) of van der Waals forces. For arbitrary deformations we provide an analytical result for the deformation induced change in the Casimir energy, which is exact to second order in the deformation amplitude. For the specific case of sinusoidally corrugated plates, we calculate both the normal and the lateral Casimir forces. The deformation induced change in the Casimir interaction of a flat and a corrugated plate shows an interesting crossover as a function of the ratio of the mean plate distance H to the corrugation length {lambda}: For {lambda}<>H. The amplitude of the lateral force between two corrugated plates which are out of registry is shown to have a maximum at an optimal wavelength of {lambda}{approx_equal}2.5 H. With increasing H/{lambda} > or approx. 0.3 the PWS approach becomes a progressively worse description of the lateral force due to many-body effects. These results may be of relevance for the design and operation of novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and other nanoscale devices.

  10. Temperature standards, what and where: resources for effective temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, W.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Many standards have been published to describe devices, methods, and other topics. How they are developed and by whom are briefly described, and an attempt is made to extract most of those relating to temperature measurements. A directory of temperature standards and their sources is provided.

  11. Movements of Palearctic and Afrotropical bird species during the dry season (NovemberFebruary) within Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    ­February) within Nigeria WILL CRESSWELL1, MARK BOYD2 & MATT STEVENS1 1AP Leventis Ornithological Research Institute, Jos, Nigeria & School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. wrlc@st-and.ac.uk 2Afrotropical bird species during the dry season (November­February) within Nigeria. pp. 18­28. In: Harebottle, D

  12. Flood quantiles in a changing climate: Seasonal forecasts and causal relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    Flood quantiles in a changing climate: Seasonal forecasts and causal relations A maximum floods at a given location may change over time in response to interannual and longer climate fluctuations, we compare two approaches for the estimation of flood quantiles conditional on selected ``climate

  13. Assessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using Positive and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Assessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using July 15, 1999 #12;Abstract Much of the evidence for health e ects of particulate air pollution has come standards for ambient air pollutants to protect the public from adverse e ects. Much of the evidence for air

  14. Blue Oak Canopy Effect On Seasonal Forage Production and Quality1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blue Oak Canopy Effect On Seasonal Forage Production and Quality1 William E. Frost Neil K. Mc the canopy of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) and in open grassland at the San Joaquin Experimental Range blue oak compared to open grassland. At most sampling dates, the protein content was greater

  15. XI. DIFFUSEGLOBAL CORRELATIONS: SEASONAL VARIATIONS Estimating the performance of a solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    39 XI. DIFFUSE­GLOBAL CORRELATIONS: SEASONAL VARIATIONS Estimating the performance of a solar system requires an accurate assessment of incident solar radiation. Ordinarily, solar radiation-9]. In the previous section we presented a one- parameter correlation study using direct and global data from our

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE A seasonal cycle of terrestrial inputs in Lake Van, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    RESEARCH ARTICLE A seasonal cycle of terrestrial inputs in Lake Van, Turkey C. Huguet & S. Fietz Van in Turkey is the world's largest soda lake (607 km3 ). The lake's catchment area is estimated the environmental status of a lake today and in the recent history. Lake Van in Eastern Anatolia (Turkey

  17. Seasonal subsidence and rebound in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, observed by synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    Seasonal subsidence and rebound in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, observed by synthetic aperture radar in the subsidence and rebound occurring over stressed aquifer systems, in conjunction with measurements, generally permanent aquifer system compaction and land subsidence at yearly and longer timescales, caused

  18. Vocal Control Region Sizes of an Adult Female Songbird Change Seasonally in the Absence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deviche, Pierre

    ­211, 2000 Keywords: junco; androgen; HVc; sexual dimorphism; plasticity In oscine birds, song is a learned birds, brain areas [vocal control regions (VCRs)] that control vocal behavior learning and expression. In behaviorally dimorphic species, VCRs are larger in males than females and change seasonally also in females

  19. Reproductive Seasonality in Female Capuchins (Cebus capucinus) in Santa Rosa (Area de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedigan, Linda M.

    The income-capital breeding model was developed to explain birth seasonality and reproductive strategies in female animals in relation to the abundance of food energy in the environment. An income breeder uses currently available energy and acts so as to maximize either maternal survival or weanling survival

  20. Seasonal Changes in Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression Patterns across Salinity Gradients in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their metabolic activities, microbial populations mediate the impact of high gradient regions on ecologicalSeasonal Changes in Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression Patterns across Salinity Gradients in nitrogen and carbon metabolism in the CRCM. Initial experiments with the environmental microarrays were

  1. Simulating cold season snowpack: Impacts of snow albedo and multi-layer snow physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    Simulating cold season snowpack: Impacts of snow albedo and multi-layer snow physics D. Waliser & J of the alterations of snow albedo due to anthropogenic aerosol deposition on snowpack and the treatment of snow physics using a multi-layer snow model. The snow albedo component considered qualitatively future changes

  2. Wind stress forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 1999 upwelling season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    Wind stress forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 1999 upwelling season R. Samelson, P November 2001; published 1 May 2002. [1] The wind stress forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during June hypothesis that systematic variations in local wind stress may contribute to the observed offshore

  3. Biogeography and phenology of satellite-measured phytoplankton seasonality in the California current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    to be influenced by changes in the seasonality of the wind mixing power offshore, coastal upwelling in the near of the ocean offshore, upwelling cold, nutrient-rich, subsurface water near the coast (Hill et al., 1998 the northern and southern coastal upwelling zones, one with a summer minimum offshore in mid

  4. Atmospheric forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 2001 upwelling season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    by nonlinear internal ocean tides. The diurnal cycle of wind stress was similar for both southwardAtmospheric forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 2001 upwelling season J. M. Bane,1 M. D. Southward wind stresses of 0.05À0.1 N mÀ2 occurred roughly 75% of the time, with a sustained period

  5. Local time, substorm, and seasonal dependence of electron precipitation at Lapprox. =4 inferred from riometer measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, T.J.; Dudeney, J.R.

    1986-11-01

    We have examined the variations of electron precipitation at Lapprox. =4 as inferred from riometer measurements of cosmic radio noise absorption made during 1975 at Siple Station and Halley Bay, Antarctica. The results are presented in the form of annual and seasonal averages of 1/2-hourly values for two geomagnetic activity subsets, AE>140 nT (disturbed) and AEless than or equal to 140 nT (quiet). Monthly quiet day curves were used to remove the diurnal and seasonal variations in the background noise levels. Generally, the local time characteristics of the absorption were the same at both stations; the highest absorption occurred in the 0400--1600 MLT sector during disturbed conditions and in the 1200--2000 MLT sector during quiet conditions. For high AE, the highest correlation was obtained at a lag equal to the magnetic local time difference (1.5 hours) between the two stations. On the other hand, for low AE, the highest correlation occurred for a lag of 3.0 hours, nearer the local solar time difference (3.8 hours). Consistently higher absorption was measured at Halley on the average during both levels of magnetic disturbance and in all seasons. At both locations, and for both geomagnetic activity subsets, more absorption was observed in summer and equinox than in winter. This is in contrast to earlier studies for Lgreater than or equal to6, and suggests that a meridional reversal of seasonal behavior occurs between L = 4 and L = 6.

  6. Seasonal Maize Forecasting for South Africa and Zimbabwe Derived from an Agroclimatological Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    ) and sea level pressure (SLP) readings to anticipate water-stress six months prior to harvest-economic variability. Explored within is a new approach to seasonal crop forecasting, one derived from crop water, and other climatic factors over the period 1961-1994 are compared with calculated available water from

  7. Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    further demonstrates that existing precautionary allowances for climate change used for flood managementClick Here for Full Article Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood risk H. J. Fowler1 and R. L. Wilby2

  8. Seasonal Prevalence of Hematodinium sp. Infections of Blue Crabs in Three South Carolina (USA) Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Michael J.

    Seasonal Prevalence of Hematodinium sp. Infections of Blue Crabs in Three South Carolina (USA at an alarming rate. In South Carolina, these declines are significantly correlated with years of decreased (Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission 2004). In South Carolina, annual fishery landings of blue crabs

  9. FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    Hurricanes (MH) (2.0) 4 4 0 3 3 Major Hurricane Days (MHD) (3.9) 9 9 0 7 7 Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE Coast Including Peninsula Florida - 40% (full-season average for last century is 31%) 3) Gulf Coast from%) New Jersey 2% (1%) New York 10% (8%) 4% (3%) Connecticut 10% (7%) 3% (2%) Rhode

  10. Variable ecological effects of hurricanes: The importance of seasonal timing for survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losos, Jonathan B.

    Variable ecological effects of hurricanes: The importance of seasonal timing for survival University, St. Louis, MO 63130 Contributed by Thomas W. Schoener, October 24, 2003 Two recent hurricanes populations inhabiting exactly the same islands. The hurricanes differed in two ways: one struck during

  11. Phytologia (April 2012) 94(1) 91 SEASONAL VARIATION IN THE LEAF ESSENTIAL OIL OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Robert P.

    Phytologia (April 2012) 94(1) 91 SEASONAL VARIATION IN THE LEAF ESSENTIAL OIL OF TAXODIUM DISTICHUM Robert_Adams@baylor.edu ABSTRACT The leaf essential oil of Taxodium distichum is dominated by -pinene (63-69%) with moderate amounts of limonene, - phellandrene, myrcene and -pinene. Oil yield increased from April (3.45 mg

  12. Seasonal Variations of Yellow Sea Fog: Observations and Mechanisms* SU-PING ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Seasonal Variations of Yellow Sea Fog: Observations and Mechanisms* SU-PING ZHANG Physical of China, Qingdao, China (Manuscript received 27 August 2008, in final form 26 April 2009) ABSTRACT Sea fog is frequently observed over the Yellow Sea, with an average of 50 fog days on the Chinese coast during April

  13. Projected Future Seasonal Changes in Tropical Summer Climate ADAM H. SOBEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    is marked by relative warming in the Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern Hemisphere, the seasonal that are robust, meaning that most or all models simulate them (albeit with differ- ences in detail) when a common in response to increased green- house gases, it is sufficient reason to study that change carefully. Our

  14. Seasonal mass-balance gradients in Norway L.A. RASMUSSEN,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, L.A.

    Seasonal mass-balance gradients in Norway L.A. RASMUSSEN,1 L.M. ANDREASSEN2,3 1 Department of Earth, Norway 3 Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway ABSTRACT. Previously discovered regularity in vertical profiles of net balance, bnðzÞ, on ten glaciers in Norway also

  15. European Finance Review, 6,3, 291-319. 1 Seasoned Equity Issues in a Closely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    European Finance Review, 6,3, 291-319. 1 Seasoned Equity Issues in a Closely Held Market: Evidence of the European Financal Management Association in Lisbon, at the 1998 conference of the French Finance Association in Lille, at the 1998 conference of the Northern Finance Association in Toronto and at the 1998

  16. Seasonal and interannual changes in particulate organic carbon export and deposition in the Chukchi Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    Seasonal and interannual changes in particulate organic carbon export and deposition in the Chukchi) export fluxes were estimated in the shelf-slope region of the Chukchi Sea using measurements of 234 ThÀ238 U disequilibria and the POC/234 Th ratio in large (>53-mm) particles. These export fluxes were

  17. Seasonal Export of South Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic Bight Shelf Waters at Cape Hatteras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savidge, Dana

    Seasonal Export of South Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic Bight Shelf Waters at Cape Hatteras Dana K 31411 Abstract Studies of Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf water export to the open ocean at Cape SAB shelf water to the Cape Hatteras, which must also be exported to the open ocean. In the following

  18. Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

  19. SEASONAL AND INSHORE-OFFSHORE VARIATIONS IN THE STANDING STOCKS OF MICRONEKTON AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEASONAL AND INSHORE-OFFSHORE VARIATIONS IN THE STANDING STOCKS OF MICRONEKTON AND MACROZOOPLANKTON OFF OREGON WILLIAM G. PEARCyl ABSTRACT Dry weights of pelagic animals captured along an inshore-offshore, shrimps, and squids) were largest inshore (28 and 46 km offshore) in the winter (November

  20. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Climatic-driven seasonality of emerging dengue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choisy, Marc

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Climatic-driven seasonality of emerging dengue fever in Hanoi, Vietnam Background: Dengue fever (DF) has been emerging in Hanoi over the last decade. Both DF epidemiology serotypes interactions, knowledge of prime importance for vaccine development. Keywords: Dengue fever

  1. 20th century seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asian montane forests from tree cellulose 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stott, Lowell

    20th century seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asian montane forests from tree cellulose 18 O composition (18 O) of sub- annual tree cellulose samples of Pinus kesiya growing at 1,500 m elevation on Doi Chiang Dao in northern Thailand. The cellulose 18 O values exhibit a distinctive annual cycle

  2. Non-stationarity of the signal and noise characteristics of seasonal precipitation anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    seasonal SST variability (r S,PCi ) are shown in Fig. 5, andand magnitudes of PCs (r N,PCi ) are shown in Fig. 6. Valuesthe a = 0.05 level (H o : r h,PCi B P 95 {r h,PCiMC }, for r

  3. Seasonality in Community Water Demand Ronald C. Griffin and Chan Chang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Ronald

    in residential water demand stems fundamentally from the potential ofprice as a rationing mechanism and the use demand is impor- tant in two respects. First, available evidence that summer residential water demandsSeasonality in Community Water Demand Ronald C. Griffin and Chan Chang Secondary data and survey

  4. Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 26982714 Mechanisms regulating large-scale seasonal fluctuations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    2005-01-01

    Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 2698­2714 Mechanisms regulating large-scale seasonal fluctuations Hole, MA 02543, USA b Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA c School by ocean currents. Third, the organism is capable of directed motion through the water by virtue of its

  5. Seasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    of indoor air pollution sources. Concurrently, great efforts are made to make buildings energy efficient 1970s, while less attention has been paid to IAQ. Insufficient venting of indoor air pollutantsSeasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements Marie

  6. Seasonal Variation in Volatile Compound Profiles of Preen Gland Secretions of the Dark-eyed Junco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketterson, Ellen D.

    (Junco hyemalis) Helena A. Soini & Sara E. Schrock & Kevin E. Bruce & Donald Wiesler & Ellen D. Ketterson (AED) were utilized to analyze seasonal changes in volatile components of preen oil secretions in Junco . Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry J Chem Ecol DOI 10.1007/s10886-006-9210-0 H. A. Soini :K. E

  7. Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa related to monsoon of aerosol emissions from the wet surface. 1. Introduction The main aerosol types occurring over Africa Africa can be characterized using Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) data from Global Ozone Monitoring

  8. Seasonal Distribution of the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) in Southwestern Alberta Douglas M. Collister1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seasonal Distribution of the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) in Southwestern Alberta Douglas M in the foothills of Alberta from 1986 to 1996. Thirty-six adult owls have been banded: 16 males, 16 females and 4. The Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) breeds in northern and western Alberta south to Waterton Lakes National

  9. Exchange of groundwater and surfacewater mediated by permafrost response to seasonal and long term air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Exchange of groundwater and surfacewater mediated by permafrost response to seasonal and long term impact hydrologic cycle processes by promoting or impeding groundwater and surface water exchange. Under between groundwater and surface water. A coupled heat transport and groundwater flow model, SUTRA

  10. Carbon limitation of soil respiration under winter snowpacks: potential feedbacks between growing season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon limitation of soil respiration under winter snowpacks: potential feedbacks between growing season and winter carbon fluxes PA U L D . B R O O K S *, D I A N E M C K N I G H T w and K E L LY E L D- latitude and high-elevation ecosystems may increase soil carbon availability both through increased litter

  11. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterhalter, Wade

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  12. Remote sensing of seasonal stratification dynamics in the southern Irish Sea Claire Neil a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polton, Jeff

    Remote sensing of seasonal stratification dynamics in the southern Irish Sea Claire Neil a , Alex Sea mixing Tidal front Optical remote sensing In early summer, a well-defined front forms resolution achievable by remote sensing in a single year was limited by the high incidence of cloud cover

  13. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic ...

  14. Seasonal patterns and environmental control of carbon dioxide and water vapour exchange in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the equivalent of up to 40% of fossil fuel carbon emissions (Tans et al. 1990; Conway et al. 1994; Ciais et al and of great potential concern as CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions continue to alter the climateSeasonal patterns and environmental control of carbon dioxide and water vapour exchange

  15. Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest Lucy R. Hutyra,1 controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J. Geophys. Res., 112, G03008 response to climate and weather. This study presents 4 years of eddy covariance data for CO2 and water

  16. Observations of atmospheric tides on Mars at the season and latitude of the Phoenix atmospheric entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Observations of atmospheric tides on Mars at the season and latitude of the Phoenix atmospheric atmospheric entry of NASA's Phoenix Mars probe using Phoenix Atmospheric Structure Experiment (ASE) data atmospheric entry, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L24204, doi:10.1029/2010GL045382. 1. Introduction [2] Phoenix

  17. HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):182194, Fall 2013 Vitals rates and seasonal movements of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 7(2):182­194, Fall 2013 Vitals rates and seasonal movements of two the factors affecting the vital rates in these isolated populations. Livestock grazing by domestic cattle higher for both populations in 2005 than 2006. We attributed these annual differences in vital rates

  18. Cloud frequency climatology at the Andes/Amazon transition: 1. Seasonal and diurnal cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Cloud frequency climatology at the Andes/Amazon transition: 1. Seasonal and diurnal cycles Kate-scale cloud patterns. We examine the cloud climatology of a tropical Andean montane region in the context Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) DX cloud product (1983­2008), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging

  19. Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Implications for terrestrial vegetation uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Implications of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) to interpret observations at a network of surface sites. We aim to identify, and D. J. Jacob (2008), Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

  20. SUMMARY OF 2013 ATLANTIC TROPICAL CYCLONE ACTIVITY AND VERIFICATION OF AUTHORS' SEASONAL AND TWO-WEEK FORECASTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    -WEEK FORECASTS The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season was much quieter than predicted in our seasonal outlooks. While as past forecasts and verifications are available via the World Wide Web at http Cyclone Energy (ACE) (92) 165 165 142 30 32% Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (103%) 175 175 150 43 42

  1. Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate model over the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System (NCEP CFS), winter season predictions over the contiguous in the study. CFS over-predicts the precipitation in eastern and western US by as much as 45 and 90

  2. Seasonal and interannual variability of primary and export production in the South China Sea: a three-dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiu, Peng

    Seasonal and interannual variability of primary and export production in the South China Sea. Seasonal and interannual variability of primary and export production in the South China Sea: a three­biogeochemical model has been developed and used to estimate the biological productivity and export flux in the SCS

  3. Sex-specific recruitment and brood sex ratios of Eurasian kestrels in a seasonally and annually fluctuating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Sex-specific recruitment and brood sex ratios of Eurasian kestrels in a seasonally and annually-ordinating editor: J. Tuomi Abstract. Timing of birth and food availability may select for biased offspring sex in brood sex ratio during the breeding season in a long-term data from 8 years. As far as we know

  4. An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2 D. J. Erickson III,1,2 R. T. Mills,1 J. Gregg,3 T. J. Blasing,4 F. M. Hoffman,1 R. J. Andres,4 of anthropogenic CO2 are presented. Approximating the seasonal CO2 emission cycle using a 2-harmonic Fourier series

  5. Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P; Charles, C D

    2008-04-23

    We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.

  6. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station. Interim report, 1992 cooling season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  7. Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid solutions of methanol and ethanol at temperatures near the glass transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthiesen, Jesper; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2011-03-17

    Do liquid mixtures, cooled to temperatures below their freezing point, behave as normal liquids? We address this question using nanoscale films of methanol and ethanol supercooled liquid solutions of varying composition (7 -93% methanol) at temperatures near their glass transition,Tg. The permeation of Kr through these films is used to determine the diffusivities of the supercooled liquid mixtures. We find that the temperature dependent diffusivities of the mixtures are well-fit by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation indicating that the mixtures exhibit fragile behavior at temperatures just above their Tg. Further, for a given temperature, the composition dependent diffusivity is well-fit by a Vignes-type equation, i.e. the diffusivity of any mixture can be predicted using an exponential weighting of the diffusion of the pure methanol and ethanol diffusivities. These results show that deeply supercooled liquid mixtures can be used to provide valuable insight into the properties of normal liquid mixtures.

  8. The radial temperature distribution of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrica,Traian

    The radial temperature distribution of a constricted oxygen arc in plasma arc cutting Sung Je Kim Gas supply, O2 RHF Starter 2 Components of cutting system Cutting torch components Plasma Arc Cutting High Temperature & Plasma Laboratory University of Minnesota #12;Rotating anode Torch body Power Supply

  9. New High-Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    -TEMPERATURE superconductors, materials that carry electricity without resistance at temperatures inexplicably far above one finds its target. Computa- tional biologists in Germany and the United States offered bold new plenty going for them. They're abundant and carbon-free, and their prices are dropping. But they're part

  10. Global Temperature November 3, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of instrumental temperature measurements occurred when the 1997-98 "El Nino of the century" occurred on the back of a strong two-decade warming trend; in addition, the global temperature impact of the El Nino, which typically lags the El Nino by a few months, coincided almost precisely with calendar year 1998. As a result

  11. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  12. Pion dynamics at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toublan, D.

    1997-11-01

    The pion decay constant and mass are computed at low temperature within chiral perturbation theory to two loops. The effects of the breaking of Lorentz symmetry by the thermal equilibrium state are discussed. The validity of the Gell-Mann{endash}Oakes{endash}Renner relation at finite temperature is examined. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine Stanley L. Krugman U. S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage knobcone pine conelets. Berkeley, Calif.. Pacific pine, conelets, freezing temperature) Krugman, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage

  14. Method of low temperature operation of an electrochemical cell array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Bratton, R.J.

    1994-04-26

    A method is described for operating an electrochemical cell generator apparatus containing a generator chamber containing an array of cells having interior and exterior electrodes with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where a hot gas contacts the outside of the cells and the generating chamber normally operates at over 850 C, where N[sub 2] gas is fed to contact the interior electrode of the cells in any case when the generating chamber temperature drops for whatever reason to within the range of from 550 C to 800 C, to eliminate cracking within the cells. 2 figures.

  15. Method of low temperature operation of an electrochemical cell array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, PA); Bratton, Raymond J. (Delmont, PA)

    1994-01-01

    In the method of operating an electrochemical cell generator apparatus containing a generator chamber (20) containing an array of cells (12) having interior and exterior electrodes with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where a hot gas (F) contacts the outside of the cells (12) and the generating chamber normally operates at over 850.degree. C., where N.sub.2 gas is fed to contact the interior electrode of the cells (12) in any case when the generating chamber (20) temperature drops for whatever reason to within the range of from 550.degree. C. to 800.degree. C., to eliminate cracking within the cells (12).

  16. Black hole temperature: Minimal coupling vs conformal coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fazel, Mohamadreza; Mirza, Behrouz; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2014-05-15

    In this article, we discuss the propagation of scalar fields in conformally transformed spacetimes with either minimal or conformal coupling. The conformally coupled equation of motion is transformed into a one-dimensional Schrödinger-like equation with an invariant potential under conformal transformation. In a second stage, we argue that calculations based on conformal coupling yield the same Hawking temperature as those based on minimal coupling. Finally, it is conjectured that the quasi normal modes of black holes are invariant under conformal transformation.

  17. Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

  18. Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal Electrical Power Generation Systems Using Oilfield Fluids Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature...

  19. Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules Presents concept for hermetic encapsulation of TE modules...

  20. The Application and Verification of ASHRAE 152-2004 (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) to DOE-2-1e Simulation Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

    2008-01-01

    A&M University System 6 The heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system consists of a 10.5 SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) air-conditioning unit (2.5 tons), a furnace with 80% AFUE (Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency), and a 0.... This caused the CV(RMSE) and MBE for the attic temperature to be reduced from 14.5 % to 8.0 % and 6.9 % to 2.0 %. These results showed that using layered materials with DOE-2?s custom weighting factors predicted more accurately than using overall U...

  1. A Seasonal Perspective on Regional Air Quality in CentralCalifornia - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.; Tonse, Shaheen R.; Jin, Ling

    2006-12-01

    Central California spans a wide variety of urban, agricultural, and natural terrain, including the San Francisco Bay area, the Central Valley, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Population within this region is growing rapidly, and there are persistent, serious air pollution problems including fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and ozone. Summertime photochemical air pollution is the focus of the present study, which represents a first phase in the development and application of a modeling capability to assess formation and transport of ozone and its precursors within Central California over an entire summer season. This contrasts with past studies that have examined pollutant dynamics for a few selected high-ozone episodes each lasting 3-5 days. The Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) has been applied to predict air pollutant formation and transport in Central California for a 15-day period beginning on July 24, 2000. This period includes a 5-day intensive operating period (July 29 to August 2) from the Central California Ozone Study (CCOS). Day-specific meteorological conditions were modeled by research collaborators at NOAA using a mesoscale meteorological model (MM5). Pollutant emissions within the study domain were based on CARB emission inventory estimates, with additional efforts conducted as part of this research to capture relevant emissions variability including (1) temperature and sunlight-driven changes in biogenic VOC, (2) weekday/weekend and diurnal differences in light-duty (LD) and heavy-duty (HD) motor vehicle emissions, (3) effects of day-specific meteorological conditions on plume rise from point sources such as power plants. We also studied the effects of using cleaner pollutant inflow boundary conditions, lower than indicated during CCOS aircraft flights over the Pacific Ocean, but supported by other surface, ship-based, balloon and aircraft sampling studies along the west coast. Model predictions were compared with measured concentrations for O{sub 3}, NO{sub x}, NO{sub y}, and CO at about 100 ground observation stations within the CCOS domain. Comparisons were made both for time series and for statistically aggregated metrics, to assess model performance over the whole modeling domain and for the individual air basins within the domain. The model tends to over-predict ozone levels along the coast where observed levels are generally low. Inland performance in the San Joaquin Valley is generally better. Model-measurement agreement for night-time ozone is improved by evaluating the sum of predicted O{sub 3} + NO{sub 2} against observations; this removes from the comparison the effect of any ozone titration that may occur. A variety of diagnostic simulations were conducted to investigate the causes for differences between predictions and observations. These included (1) enhanced deposition of O{sub 3} to the ocean, (2) reduced vertical mixing over the ocean, (3) attenuation of sunlight by coastal stratus, (4) the influence of surface albedo on photochemistry, and (5) the effects of observation nudging on wind fields. Use of advanced model probing tools such as process analysis and sensitivity analysis is demonstrated by diagnosing model sensitivity to boundary conditions and to weekday-weekend emission changes.

  2. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivities of coupled rotator lattice and the momentum diffusion in standard map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunyun Li; Nianbei Li; Baowen Li

    2015-01-29

    In contrary to other 1D momentum-conserving lattices such as the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam $\\beta$ (FPU-$\\beta$) lattice, the 1D coupled rotator lattice is a notable exception which conserves total momentum while exhibits normal heat conduction behavior. The temperature behavior of the thermal conductivities of 1D coupled rotator lattice had been studied in previous works trying to reveal the underlying physical mechanism for normal heat conduction. However, two different temperature behaviors of thermal conductivities have been claimed for the same coupled rotator lattice. These different temperature behaviors also intrigue the debate whether there is a phase transition of thermal conductivities as the function of temperature. In this work, we will revisit the temperature dependent thermal conductivities for the 1D coupled rotator lattice. We find that the temperature dependence follows a power law behavior which is different with the previously found temperature behaviors. Our results also support the claim that there is no phase transition for 1D coupled rotator lattice. We also give some discussion about the similarity of diffusion behaviors between the 1D coupled rotator lattice and the single kicked rotator also called the Chirikov standard map.

  3. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

  4. Control of Dry Season Evapotranspiration over the Amazonian Forest as Inferred from Observations at a Southern Amazon Forest Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juárez, RIN; Hodnett, MG; Fu, R; Goulden, ML; von Randow, C

    2007-01-01

    Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia, 1992: Climate Normals (Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia 1992) over the Brazilian

  5. Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean color and composition of phytoplankton communities in the North Atlantic, Equatorial Pacific and South Pacific.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean color and composition of phytoplankton communities in the North Atlantic, Equatorial Pacific and South Pacific. By : Yves Dandonneaua , Pierre-Yves Deschampsb ­ Picoplankton ­ Seasonal variations ­ Variability ­ Oceanic provinces ) Contact : Yves DANDONNEAU LODYC

  6. Room temperature water Leidenfrost droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck Celestini; Thomas Frisch; Yves Pomeau

    2013-08-05

    We experimentally investigate the Leidenfrost effect at pressures ranging from 1 to 0.05 atmospheric pressure. As a direct consequence of the Clausius-Clapeyron phase diagram of water, the droplet temperature can be at ambient temperature in a non-sophisticated lab environment. Furthermore, the lifetime of the Leidenfrost droplet is significantly increased in this low pressure environment. The temperature and pressure dependance of the evaporation rate are successfully tested against a recently proposed model. These results may pave a way to reach efficient Leidenfrost micro-fluidic and milli-fluidic applications.

  7. Method for measuring surface temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  8. Comparative Study of Optical and Magneto-Optical Properties of Normal, Disordered and Inverse Spinel Type Oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zviagin, Vitaly; Böntgen, Tammo; Lorenz, Michael; Ziese, Michael; Zahn, Dietrich R T; Salvan, Georgeta; Grundmann, Marius; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    $Co_3O_4$, $ZnFe_2O_4$, $CoFe_2O_4$, $ZnCo_2O_4$, and $Fe_3O_4$ thin films were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition at high and low temperatures resulting in crystalline single-phase normal, inverse, as well as disordered spinel oxide thin films with smooth surface morphology. The dielectric function, determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry in a wide spectral range from 0.5 eV to 8.5 eV, is compared with the magneto-optical response of the dielectric tensor, investigated by magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy in the range of 1.7 eV to 5.5 eV with an applied magnetic field of 1.7 T. Crystal field, inter-valence and inter-sublattice charge transfer transitions, and transitions from $O_{2p}$ to metal cation 3d or 4s bands are identified in both the principal diagonal elements and the magneto-optically active off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor. Depending on the degree of cation disorder, resulting in local symmetry distortion, due to mixtures of normal and inverse spinel structures, the...

  9. THERMOELECTRIC GENERATION OF CHARGE IMBALANCE AT A SUPERCONDUCTOR-NORMAL METAL INTERFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Harlingen, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    in Non-equilibrium Superconductivity, Phonons, and KapitzaD. Bedard, in SQUID: Superconducting Quantum Inter- ference1 (a) At a normal metal-superconductor interface, an applied

  10. Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queener, Benjamin Daniel

    2012-01-01

    16 3.2 Push Programming Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Genetic Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 3.1.3normalized data, Genetic Programming would become a powerful

  11. Pentose fermentation of normally toxic lignocellulose prehydrolysate with strain of Pichia stipitis yeast using air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Jr., Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO)

    2002-01-01

    Strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis NPw9 (ATCC PTA-3717) useful for the production of ethanol using oxygen for growth while fermenting normally toxic lignocellulosic prehydrolysates.

  12. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  13. Interannual Changes in Seasonal Ground Freezing and Near-surface Heat Flow Beneath Bottom-fast Ice in the Near-shore Zone, Mackenzie Delta, NWT, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorman, Brian

    Interannual Changes in Seasonal Ground Freezing and Near-surface Heat Flow Beneath Bottom-fast Ice Resources Canada, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada ABSTRACT Interannual changes in seasonal ground freezing. KEY WORDS: seasonal ground freezing; permafrost; bottom-fast ice; Mackenzie Delta INTRODUCTION Arctic

  14. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, J. Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hau-Riege, Stefan (Fremont, CA); Walton, Chris (Oakland, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-01-11

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  15. High-Tc superconductivity originated from strong spin-charge correlation: indication from linear temperature dependence of resistivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2009-05-05

    Both the highest- and the linear temperature dependence of the resistivity in wide temperature range appear at the optimally doped regions of Cu-based superconductors1,2,3,4,5, and the highest- of Fe-based superconductors6,7 are also associated with the linear temperature dependence of the resistivity in normal states near superconducting states. This means that the high temperature superconductivity and the linear temperature dependence of the resistivity should be dominated by the same mechanism. This letter on theoretic calculation clearly shows that strong spin-charge correlation dominated resistivity behaves the linear temperature dependence, thus high-temperature superconductivity should be induced by strong spin-charge correlation.

  16. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.(y), wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  17. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1998-03-24

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub (x)},Eu{sub (y)}, wherein: 0.1 wt %{<=}x{<=}20 wt % and 0.1 wt %{<=}y{<=}20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  18. Modified normal-phase ion-pair chromatographic methods for the facile separation and purification of imidazolium-based ionic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, ND; Schenkel, MR; Robertson, LA; Noble, RD; Gin, DL

    2012-07-04

    lmidazolium- and oligo(imidazolium)-based ionic organic compounds are important in the design of room-temperature ionic liquid materials; however, the chromatographic analysis and separation of such compounds are often difficult. A convenient and inexpensive method for effective thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis and column chromatography separation of imidazolium-based ionic compounds is presented. Normal-phase ion-pair TLC is used to effectively analyze homologous mixtures of these ionic compounds. Subsequent separation of the mixtures is performed using ion-pair flash chromatography on normal-phase silica gel, yielding high levels of recovery. This method also results in a complete exchange of the counter anion on the imidazolium compounds to the anion of the ion-pair reagent. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Apparatus and method for high temperature viscosity and temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balasubramaniam, Krishnan (Mississippi State, MS); Shah, Vimal (Houston, TX); Costley, R. Daniel (Mississippi State, MS); Singh, Jagdish P. (Mississippi State, MS)

    2001-01-01

    A probe for measuring the viscosity and/or temperature of high temperature liquids, such as molten metals, glass and similar materials comprises a rod which is an acoustical waveguide through which a transducer emits an ultrasonic signal through one end of the probe, and which is reflected from (a) a notch or slit or an interface between two materials of the probe and (b) from the other end of the probe which is in contact with the hot liquid or hot melt, and is detected by the same transducer at the signal emission end. To avoid the harmful effects of introducing a thermally conductive heat sink into the melt, the probe is made of relatively thermally insulative (non-heat-conductive) refractory material. The time between signal emission and reflection, and the amplitude of reflections, are compared against calibration curves to obtain temperature and viscosity values.

  20. Facial Expression Invariant Head Pose Normalization using Gaussian Process Ognjen Rudovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    into a head-pose space defined by a low dimensional manifold attained by means of multi-class LDA. ThenFacial Expression Invariant Head Pose Normalization using Gaussian Process Regression Ognjen for facial- expression-invariant head pose normalization. We address the problem by mapping the locations