Sample records for normal increasing household

  1. Demographic Patterns and Household Saving in China Chadwick C. Curtis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    Demographic Patterns and Household Saving in China Chadwick C. Curtis University of Richmond the aggregate household saving rate. We focus on China because it is experiencing an historic demographic transition and has had a massive increase in household saving. We conduct a quantitative investigation using

  2. INCREASE

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interdisciplinary Consortium for Research and Educational Access in Science and Engineering (INCREASE), assists minority-serving institutions in gaining access to world-class research facilities.

  3. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  4. Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    increased by 47%. The number of workers per household has changed the least of the statistics shown here. There has been a decline in the number of persons per household from...

  5. Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    over a larger area and releases them into the air. Pouring hazardous liquids on the ground can poisonHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion should be considered hazardous. You cannot treat hazardous wastes like other kinds of garbage

  6. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1...

  7. The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HOW MANY HYBRID HOUSEHOLDS IN THE CALIFORNIA NEW CAR MARKET?average 2.43 cars per household, then the hybrid householdnumber of multi-car households that fit our hybrid household

  8. Essays on microeconomics of the household

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahhaj, Zaki

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These essays are concerned with the problem of cooperation among individuals in a household and among households in a community under lack of commitment. The first chapter provides a theoretical investigation of consumption ...

  9. A Glance at China’s Household Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Known for its scale, China is the most populous country with the world’s third largest economy. In the context of rising living standards, a relatively lower share of household consumption in its GDP, a strong domestic market and globalization, China is witnessing an unavoidable increase in household consumption, related energy consumption and carbon emissions. Chinese policy decision makers and researchers are well aware of these challenges and keen to promote green lifestyles. China has developed a series of energy policies and programs, and launched a wide?range social marketing activities to promote energy conservation.

  10. New York Household Travel Patterns: A Comparison Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1969, the U. S. Department of Transportation began collecting detailed data on personal travel to address various transportation planning issues. These issues range from assessing transportation investment programs to developing new technologies to alleviate congestion. This 1969 survey was the birth of the Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. Longer-distance travel was collected in 1977 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed to the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and collected both daily and longer-distance trips in one survey. In addition to the number of sample households that the national NPTS/NHTS survey allotted to New York State (NYS), the state procured an additional sample of households in both the 1995 and 2001 surveys. In the 1995 survey, NYS procured an addition sample of more than 9,000 households, increasing the final NY NPTS sample size to a total of 11,004 households. Again in 2001, NYS procured 12,000 additional sample households, increasing the final New York NHTS sample size to a total of 13,423 households with usable data. These additional sample households allowed NYS to address transportation planning issues pertinent to geographic areas significantly smaller than for what the national NPTS and NHTS data are intended. Specifically, these larger sample sizes enable detailed analysis of twelve individual Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). Furthermore, they allowed NYS to address trends in travel behavior over time. In this report, travel data for the entire NYS were compared to those of the rest of the country with respect to personal travel behavior and key travel determinants. The influence of New York City (NYC) data on the comparisons of the state of New York to the rest of the country was also examined. Moreover, the analysis examined the relationship between population density and travel patterns, and the similarities and differences among New York MPOs. The 1995 and 2001 survey data make it possible to examine and identify travel trends over time. This report does not address, however, the causes of the differences and/or trends.

  11. Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Garcia, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Families in early Ptolemaic Egypt. In The Hellenistic world:granary models, and domestic economy in ancient Egypt. InThe archaeology and art of ancient Egypt: Essays in Honor of

  12. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a. Household

  13. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a. Household6a.

  14. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a.8a. Household

  15. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a.8a. Household9a.

  16. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001

  17. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 20012a.

  18. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households,

  19. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households,4a.

  20. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households,4a.5a.

  1. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a. Household

  2. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a. Household1a.

  3. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a.a. Household

  4. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a. Household

  5. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a. Household9a.

  6. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  American household carbon footprint. ” Ecological and  limitations) of carbon footprint estimates toward of the art in carbon footprint analyses for California, 

  7. Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    NORMAL DlSTRlBUTION TABLE. Entries represent the area under the standardized normal distribution from -w to z, Pr(Z

  8. Evolving Patterns of Household Computer Use: 1999-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatesh, Alladi; Dunkle, Debora E.; Wortman, Amanda

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 14. Education/Learning: household type, education, andeducation/learning activities: household type, education,related work and learning are specific to certain types of

  9. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

  10. The World Distribution of Household Wealth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DAVIES, JAMES B; Shorrocks, Anthony; Sandstrom, Susanna; WOLFF, EDWARD N

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. B. (1993). ‘The Distribution of Wealth in Canada’.Estimating the World Distribution of Household Wealth’.Tide: Changes in the Distribution of Wealth in the US, 1989-

  11. Household gasoline demand in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalensee, Richard

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuing rapid growth in U.S. gasoline consumption threatens to exacerbate environmental and congestion problems. We use flexible semiparametric and nonparametric methods to guide analysis of household gasoline consumption, ...

  12. Household batteries: Evaluation of collection methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeberger, D.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While it is difficult to prove that a specific material is causing contamination in a landfill, tests have been conducted at waste-to-energy facilities that indicate that household batteries contribute significant amounts of heavy metals to both air emissions and ash residue. Hennepin County, MN, used a dual approach for developing and implementing a special household battery collection. Alternative collection methods were examined; test collections were conducted. The second phase examined operating and disposal policy issues. This report describes the results of the grant project, moving from a broad examination of the construction and content of batteries, to a description of the pilot collection programs, and ending with a discussion of variables affecting the cost and operation of a comprehensive battery collection program. Three out-of-state companies (PA, NY) were found that accept spent batteries; difficulties in reclaiming household batteries are discussed.

  13. Household batteries: Evaluation of collection methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeberger, D.A.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    While it is difficult to prove that a specific material is causing contamination in a landfill, tests have been conducted at waste-to-energy facilities that indicate that household batteries contribute significant amounts of heavy metals to both air emissions and ash residue. Hennepin County, MN, used a dual approach for developing and implementing a special household battery collection. Alternative collection methods were examined; test collections were conducted. The second phase examined operating and disposal policy issues. This report describes the results of the grant project, moving from a broad examination of the construction and content of batteries, to a description of the pilot collection programs, and ending with a discussion of variables affecting the cost and operation of a comprehensive battery collection program. Three out-of-state companies (PA, NY) were found that accept spent batteries; difficulties in reclaiming household batteries are discussed.

  14. Traits Affecting Household Livestock Marketing Decisions in Rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traits Affecting Household Livestock Marketing Decisions in Rural Kenya Katherine L. Baldwin community of Central Kenya, we regressed household offtake rate of both cattle and smallstock against in Kenya. Because pastoralist economies depend almost exclusively upon livestock production, most recent

  15. Essays on household decision making in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, James W. (James Wesley)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation contains three essays on household decision making in the areas of education and health in developing countries. The first chapter explores intra-household decision making in the context of conditional ...

  16. Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension impurities can be corrected if they are a nuisance. Before beginning any treatment plan, have water tested select the most effective and economical treatment method. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications

  17. The changing character of household waste in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 as a function of home heating methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doležalová, Markéta, E-mail: mdolezalova@email.cz [Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Benatska 2, 128 01 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Benešová, Libuše [Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Benatska 2, 128 01 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Závodská, Anita [School of Adult and Continuing Education, Barry University, 8001 SW 36th Street, Suite #1, Davie, FL 33328 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The character of household waste in the three different types of households were assesed. • The quantity, density and composition of household waste were determined. • The physicochemical characteristics were determined. • The changing character of household waste during past 10 years was described. • The potential of energy recovery of household waste in Czech republic was assesed. - Abstract: The authors of this paper report on the changing character of household waste, in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 in households differentiated by their heating methods. The data presented are the result of two projects, financed by the Czech Ministry of Environment, which were undertaken during this time period with the aim of focusing on the waste characterisation and complete analysis of the physicochemical properties of the household waste. In the Czech Republic, the composition of household waste varies significantly between different types of households based on the methods of home heating employed. For the purposes of these studies, the types of homes were divided into three categories – urban, mixed and rural. Some of the biggest differences were found in the quantities of certain subsample categories, especially fine residue (matter smaller than 20 mm), between urban households with central heating and rural households that primarily employ solid fuel such coal or wood. The use of these solid fuels increases the fraction of the finer categories because of the higher presence of ash. Heating values of the residual household waste from the three categories varied very significantly, ranging from 6.8 MJ/kg to 14.2 MJ/kg in 1999 and from 6.8 MJ/kg to 10.5 MJ/kg in 2009 depending on the type of household and season. The same factors affect moisture of residual household waste which varied from 23.2% to 33.3%. The chemical parameters also varied significantly, especially in the quantities of Tl, As, Cr, Zn, Fe and Mn, which were higher in rural households. Because knowledge about the properties of household waste, as well as its physicochemical characteristics, is very important not only for future waste management, but also for the prediction of the behaviour and influence of the waste on the environment as the country continues to streamline its legislation to the European Union’s solid waste mandates, the results of these studies were employed by the Czech Ministry of Environment to optimise the national waste management strategy.

  18. Design and Control of Household CHP Fuel Cell System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Design and Control of Household CHP Fuel Cell System PhD. project Dissertation Anders Risum and Control of Household CHP Fuel Cell System" Anders R. Korsgaard, M.Sc. Mechanical Engineering, e-mail: ark for micro combined heat and power (CHP) systems for local households. Several components in the PEM fuel

  19. Poverty and Productivity in Female-Headed Households in Zimbabwe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horrell, Sara; Krishnan, Pramila

    A household survey conducted in rural Zimbabwe in 2001 is used to compare the position of de facto and de jure female-headed households to those with a male head. These households are characterised by different forms of poverty that impinge...

  20. THE DESIRE TO ACQUIRE: FORECASTING THE EVOLUTION OF HOUSEHOLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy-using devices in the average U.S. household that used over 4,700 kWh of electricity, natural gas-using devices to energy price, household income, and the cost of these devices. This analysis findsTHE DESIRE TO ACQUIRE: FORECASTING THE EVOLUTION OF HOUSEHOLD ENERGY SERVICES by Steven Groves BASc

  1. A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Borg, Edwards, Kimpel A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    's goal is to investigate the weekly per capita indoor water use of three households in Davis, CaliforniaA Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Borg, Edwards, Kimpel A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Maisie Borg, Orion Edwards & Sarah Kimpel Abstract Over the past several decades

  2. The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by electric and hybrid vehicles", SAE Technical Papers No.household response to hybrid vehicles. Finally, we suggestas electric or hybrid vehicles. Transitions in choices of

  3. A Multi Agent-Based Framework for Simulating Household PHEV Distribution and Electric Distribution Network Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL] [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Hoe Kyoung [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation of household attributes such as income, travel distance, age, household member, and education for different residential areas may generate different market penetration rates for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). Residential areas with higher PHEV ownership could increase peak electric demand locally and require utilities to upgrade the electric distribution infrastructure even though the capacity of the regional power grid is under-utilized. Estimating the future PHEV ownership distribution at the residential household level can help us understand the impact of PHEV fleet on power line congestion, transformer overload and other unforeseen problems at the local residential distribution network level. It can also help utilities manage the timing of recharging demand to maximize load factors and utilization of existing distribution resources. This paper presents a multi agent-based simulation framework for 1) modeling spatial distribution of PHEV ownership at local residential household level, 2) discovering PHEV hot zones where PHEV ownership may quickly increase in the near future, and 3) estimating the impacts of the increasing PHEV ownership on the local electric distribution network with different charging strategies. In this paper, we use Knox County, TN as a case study to show the simulation results of the agent-based model (ABM) framework. However, the framework can be easily applied to other local areas in the US.

  4. Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households, March 13, 2014. Call Slides and Discussion Summary More...

  5. California Household Transportation Survey - Datasets - OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from more than 42,500 households via multiple data-collection methods, including computer-assisted telephone interviewing, online and mail surveys, wearable and in-vehicle...

  6. Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimring, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neighborhood Program GETS – Green Energy Training ServicesGJGEI – Green Jobs, Green Energy Initiative CEWO – Cleanincome households. The Green Energy Training Services (GETS)

  7. Residential Network Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households Photo of a row of townhomes. Eligible Better Buildings Residential Network members reported completing 27,563 home energy upgrades...

  8. assessing household solid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: Water End?Use Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy Technologies Transportation Assessment of Household Carbon Footprint...

  9. Regional patterns of U.S. household carbon emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pizer, William; Sanchirico, James N.; Batz, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA), Residential Energy Consumption Survey (http://gasoline is EIA Household vehicle energy use survey (http://survey is 1994 not 1993 (labeled with an *). The EIA

  10. Putting People's Common Sense into Knowledge Bases of Household Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    , and Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous Systems Group Department of Informatics Technische Universität München {kunzel,tenorth,beetz}@in.tum.de Abstract. Unlike people, household robots cannot rely

  11. Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

  12. achieve household waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system will help keep your water safe. For more information, visit the Virginia Household Water Quality Program website www.wellwater.bse.vt.edu. unknown authors 30 The...

  13. ccsd00003444, Jordan Normal and Rational Normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the characteristic polynomial can be fully factorized (see e.g. Fortuna-Gianni for rational normal forms

  14. On future household structure Department of Computer Science and Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Løw, Erik

    of the population, such as household size, health or disability status, region of residence, labour market status household forecast helps policy makers, planners, and other forecast users in the fields of housing, energy size. A similar method could be applied to obtain probabilistic forecasts for other divisions

  15. Women, Work and Household Electrification in Rural India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    v Women, Work and Household Electrification in Rural India We must not believe, certainly electrification in rural India, the answer, it seems, would clearly point in a particular direction. On the one, that in the event of full electrification at the household level, rural women stand to be most affected in terms

  16. Modelling the Energy Demand of Households in a Combined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steininger, Karl W.

    . Emissions from passenger transport, households'electricity and heat consumption are growing rapidly despite demand analysis for electricity (e.g. Larsen and Nesbakken, 2004; Holtedahl and Joutz, 2004Modelling the Energy Demand of Households in a Combined Top Down/Bottom Up Approach Kurt Kratena

  17. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiencyof Household Appliances in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    China is already the second's largest energy consumer in the world after the United States, and its demand for energy is expected to continue to grow rapidly in the foreseeable future, due to its fast economic growth and its low level of energy use per capita. From 2001 to 2005, the growth rate of energy consumption in China has exceeded the growth rate of its economy (NBS, 2006), raising serious concerns about the consequences of such energy use on local environment and global climate. It is widely expected that China is likely to overtake the US in energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the first half of the 21st century. Therefore, there is considerable interest in the international community in searching for options that may help China slow down its growth in energy consumption and GHG emissions through improving energy efficiency and adopting more environmentally friendly fuel supplies such as renewable energy. This study examines the energy saving potential of three major residential energy end uses: household refrigeration, air-conditioning, and water heating. China is already the largest consumer market in the world for household appliances, and increasingly the global production base for consumer appliances. Sales of household refrigerators, room air-conditioners, and water heaters are growing rapidly due to rising incomes and booming housing market. At the same time, the energy use of Chinese appliances is relatively inefficient compared to similar products in the developed economies. Therefore, the potential for energy savings through improving appliance efficiency is substantial. This study focuses particularly on the impact of more stringent energy efficiency standards for household appliances, given that such policies are found to be very effective in improving the efficiency of household appliances, and are well established both in China and around world (CLASP, 2006).

  18. Deep cuts in household greenhouse gas emissions Andrew Blakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep cuts in household greenhouse gas emissions Andrew Blakers Director, Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Australian National University Ph 61 2 6125 5905 Andrew.blakers@anu.edu.au Web: http

  19. Householder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 1721, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higham, Nicholas J.

    for discussions. This year's symposium is held at Peebles Hotel Hydro in the small town of Peebles (populationHouseholder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 17­21, 2002 Peebles Hotel Hydro, Scotland

  20. Who counts? how the state (re)creates households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walther, Carol Sue

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    different data sources, I produce five different indices to determine settlement patterns of same-sex households in various geographic areas. Secondly, drawing on variables operationalized as cultural schema and resources, I identify characteristics...

  1. acute household accidental: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system will help keep your water safe. For more information, visit the Virginia Household Water Quality Program website at www.wellwater.bse. vt.edu. unknown authors 27...

  2. aa household alkaline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system will help keep your water safe. For more information, visit the Virginia Household Water Quality Program website at www.wellwater.bse. vt.edu. unknown authors 26...

  3. Smoothing consumption across households and time : essays in development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnan, Cynthia Georgia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies two strategies that households may use to keep their consumption smooth in the face of fluctuations in income and expenses: credit (borrowing and savings) and insurance (state contingent transfers between ...

  4. Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

  5. Do Disaster Expectations Explain Household Portfolios?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan, Sule

    durable ex- penditure information; and ?nally, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1983-1994) that allows me to calibrate group speci?c income process parameters. Limited het- 3 erogeneity in all parameters is allowed for by estimating the structural... innovations to excess return to be correlated with innovations to per- manent or transitory income in normal market times. Allowing for such a correlation is straightforward and would reduce the ex-ante disaster probability and disaster size needed to match...

  6. Overview of CFC replacement issues for household refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vineyard, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Roke, L. [Fisher and Paykel, Auckland (New Zealand); Hallett, F. [Frigidaire, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1974, the famous ozone depletion theory of Rowland and Molina claimed that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) diffuse into the stratosphere where they are broken down by photolysis to release chlorine atoms that catalytically destroy ozone. Although the understanding of the science is still imperfect, there is little doubt that CFCs play a major role in the Antarctic ozone hole phenomenon and the decline in ozone observed in the rest of the world. Another issue that has become increasingly important is the potential of CFCs to change the earth`s temperature and to modify the climate. While the main impact in global warming is made by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide, CFCs and other trace gases also contribute to this effect. In an effort to respond to the global environmental threat, a CFC protocol was adopted during a diplomatic conference in Montreal. This document, known as the Montreal Protocol, was ratified in 1988 and put into effect on January 1, 1989. In accordance with Article 6 of the Montreal Protocol, the countries that signed the agreement shall periodically assess the control measures provided for in the Protocol. As part of that assessment process, household refrigeration was investigated to determine the status of CFC-12 replacements. The conclusion was that much progress has been made towards finding a suitable replacement. Compressors designed for HFC-134a have efficiencies comparable to those for CFC-12 and acceptable reliability tests have been obtained with ester lubricants. In addition, other replacements such as R-152a and refrigerant mixtures exist, but will require more study. Cycle options, such as the Stirling cycle, may be viable, but are further out in the future. The impact of new refrigerants is expected to result in elimination of CFC-12 consumption in developed countries by 1997 and in developing countries by 2005.

  7. Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

  8. Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

  9. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual households. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies.

  10. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, J.D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, J.E. [and others

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual household. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies. 21 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. CommunityOrganizedHouseholdWaterIncreasesNot Only Rural incomes, but AlsoMen’sWork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corw, Ben; Swallow, Brent; Asamba, Isabella

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    average incomes in this group of seven springs. Kipsotet, as1. Characteristics of the seven spring groups Spring Group

  12. CommunityOrganizedHouseholdWaterIncreasesNot Only Rural incomes, but AlsoMen’sWork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corw, Ben; Swallow, Brent; Asamba, Isabella

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    worldwide lack access to safe drinking water. In rurallack of access to basic infrastructure services such as water

  13. Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisk, Cheree L.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting multiple household food inventories over the course of 30 days to examine weekly food variability. Household food availability influences the foods individuals choose...

  14. Rebound Effect in Energy Efficient Appliance Adopting Households 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Jacob Matthew

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uses data from smart meter technology to estimate the occurrence of energy rebound, a “substitution” and “income’ effect where the price-per-use of an appliance falls relative to its energy efficiency. This causes households to have more...

  15. Household scale slow sand filtration in the Dominican Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donison, Kori S. (Kori Shay), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow sand filtration is a method of water treatment that has been used for hundreds of years. In the past two decades, there has been resurgence in interest in slow sand filtration, particularly as a low-cost, household-scale ...

  16. Microcredit Program Participation and Household Food Security in Rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    and per capita calorie consumption, reduces the incidence of food poverty and the prevalence the impact of participation status on different measures of food insecurity -- household calorie consumption and consumption (Dercon and Krishnan, 2000; Dostie et al., 2002; Khandker et al., 2012). Income from non

  17. Effects of household dynamics on resource consumption and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrlich, Paul R.

    influence per capita consumption7,8 and thus biodiversity through, for example, consumption of wood for fuel, and resultant higher per capita resource con- sumption in smaller households15­19 pose serious challenges on resource consumption and biodiversity Jianguo Liu*, Gretchen C. Daily, Paul R. Ehrlich & Gary W. Luck

  18. The residential landscape: fluxes of elements and the role of household decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    The residential landscape: fluxes of elements and the role of household decisions Cinzia Fissore biogeochemical cycling of elements through residential household landscapes to evaluate the importance of annual 55108, USA #12;Introduction The household landscape represents a key feature in the residential areas

  19. An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Kimberly; Dale, Larry; Fujita, K. Sydny

    2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes our study of the price elasticity of demand for home appliances, including refrigerators, clothes washers, and dishwashers. In the context of increasingly stringent appliance standards, we are interested in what kind of impact the increased manufacturing costs caused by higher efficiency requirements will have on appliance sales. We begin with a review of existing economics literature describing the impact of economic variables on the sale of durable goods.We then describe the market for home appliances and changes in this market over the past 20 years, performing regression analysis on the shipments of home appliances and relevant economic variables including changes to operating cost and household income. Based on our analysis, we conclude that the demand for home appliances is price inelastic.

  20. Experience with improved charcoal and wood stoves for households and institutions in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyman, E.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts at promoting more fuel-efficient charcoal stoves to replace traditional charcoal stoves in Kenya offer some lessons for the dissemination of appropriate technologies. This paper looks at the market-based approach which has made the Kenyan charcoal stoves project a success. Trends in woodfuels (wood and charcoal) consumption in Kenya are identified; the traditional technology for charcoal combustion and the upgraded traditional technologies are described; production achievement and the dissemination and promotion strategy used are examined; and a financial and economic analysis is performed with social, health and environmental effects assessed. Other ways to achieve a more favourable balance between woodfuels consumption and supply are then discussed looking at more efficient charcoal kilns and household woodstoves, improved institutional stoves and increased wood production. The replication potential of the Kenya experiment in other countries is also explored. The lessons learnt from the the Kenya experience concern the relationship between technology, choice and delivery systems as they interact with, economic, institutional, and policy factors. In this case, the design work accepted the traditional technology as a starting point which helped ensure widespread acceptance by households. The potential desirability of relying on local artisans to manufacture consumer durables using existing private sector channels to market these goods is also shown. It also highlights the importance of going beyond a laissez-faire approach and supporting training, demonstration, and publicity to faciliate the workings of the private sector. In the Kenyan case, technology choice was relatively unsubsidized and left ot the preferences of consumers.

  1. Measuring Pb bioavailability from household dusts using an in vitro model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, D.P.; McLaughlin, M.J.; Naidu, R.; Smith, L.H.; Maynard, E.J.; Calder, I.C.

    1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite an extensive cleanup program in the Port Pirie region, South Australia, the levels of lead (Pb) in blood of children have been found to exceed the level of concern (10 {micro}g/dL). The ingestion of household dust is a major pathway for elevated blood lead by children in the community. Significant differences in levels of Pb in blood in children were observed in various localities around the smelter. In this study an in vitro test was assessed as one method for determining the bioavailability of Pb in household dust and for predicting levels of Pb in blood of children. The solubility of Pb in the dust decreased significantly as pH of the in vitro mixture increased. Correlation studies with average blood Pb levels of children in the corresponding area and in vitro measures of Pb bioavailability found that the best relationship was with total dust Pb. A significant positive relationship was also found with Pb concentrations determined in the in vitro test at pH 3.0. This suggested that for these dust samples, which all had a similar environmental matrix, the use of the in vitro test was not a better indicator of blood Pb levels in children compared with a total Pb analysis.

  2. The Effect of Marketing Messages, Liquidity Constraints, and Household Bargaining on Willingness to Pay for a Nontraditional Cook-stove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltramo, Theresa; Levine, David I; Blalock, Garrick

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rural households are on average poorer than urban counterparts and have low rates of electrification-

  3. Model development for household waste prevention behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortoleto, Ana Paula, E-mail: a.bortoleto@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kurisu, Kiyo H.; Hanaki, Keisuke [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model waste prevention behaviour using structure equation modelling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We merge attitude-behaviour theories with wider models from environmental psychology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main behaviour predictors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental concern, moral obligation and inconvenience are the main influence on the behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste prevention and recycling are different dimensions of waste management behaviour. - Abstract: Understanding waste prevention behaviour (WPB) could enable local governments and decision makers to design more-effective policies for reducing the amount of waste that is generated. By merging well-known attitude-behaviour theories with elements from wider models from environmental psychology, an extensive cognitive framework that provides new and valuable insights is developed for understanding the involvement of individuals in waste prevention. The results confirm the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour and of Schwartz's altruistic behaviour model as bases for modelling participation in waste prevention. A more elaborate integrated model of prevention was shown to be necessary for the complete analysis of attitudinal aspects associated with waste prevention. A postal survey of 158 respondents provided empirical support for eight of 12 hypotheses. The proposed structural equation indicates that personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main predictors and that, unlike the case of recycling, subjective norms have a weak influence on WPB. It also suggests that, since social norms have not presented a direct influence, WPB is likely to be influenced by a concern for the environment and the community as well by perceptions of moral obligation and inconvenience. Results also proved that recycling and waste prevention represent different dimensions of waste management behaviour requiring particular approaches to increase individuals' engagement in future policies.

  4. Pollak and Wachter on the Household Production Function Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, William A.

    1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the ith commodity. As Pollak and Wachter have observed, much of the appeal of the commodity shadow-price approach lies in its ability to use functions having known neoclassical properties. However, Pollak and Wachter maintain that, if the constraint 7r(P...). But the commodity shadow prices 7r(P, Z) do depend upon Z whenever house- hold production exhibits jointness, which Pollak and Wachter maintain is inherently characteristic of household production processes. Hence 1 Pollack and Wachter have considered...

  5. Essays on Price Dynamics, Welfare Analysis, Household Food Insecurity in Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magana Lemus, David

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher and more volatile food prices, as reported in recent years, have consequences on household welfare and potentially on public policy. Analysis of agricultural commodities price dynamics, welfare ...

  6. Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    household GDP is corrected for Purchase Power Parity (PPP).The PPP factor adjusts currency market exchange rates (MER)20% for countries with average PPP adjusted incomes below $

  7. Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to a hybrid vehicle whichcombines multipleor 180 mile hybrid electric vehicle. Natural gas vehicles (1994) "Demand Electric Vehicles in Hybrid for Households:

  8. Effect of Income on Appliances in U.S. Households, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entails how people live, the factors that cause the most differences in home lifestyle, including energy use in geographic location, socioeconomics and household income.

  9. "Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than...

  10. "Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than...

  11. Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael, S; Berube, A; Deakin, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in 10 Household Automobile Ownership Rates:hauseltoldr lacking automobiles were mmit like! ) to be leftWithout 3 Access to an Automobile. Top Ten Metropolitan

  12. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gent, Janneane F., E-mail: janneane.gent@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Kezik, Julie M., E-mail: julie.colburn@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Hill, Melissa E., E-mail: melissa.hill@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tsai, Eling, E-mail: tsai.umiami@gmail.com [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)] [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Li, De-Wei, E-mail: DeWei.Li@ct.gov [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory, 153 Cook Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)] [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory, 153 Cook Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States); Leaderer, Brian P., E-mail: brian.leaderer@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g and Can f 1>1.2 {mu}g/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 {mu}g/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes were sampled for these allergens and asthma morbidity monitored during the subsequent month. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children exposed and sensitized to Penicillium, Der p, Fel d, Can f risk increased asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These children might benefit from targeted intervention strategies.

  13. Improving Device-level Electricity Consumption Breakdowns in Private Households Using ON/OFF Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recommen- dations on how to reduce the overall energy consumption of the household. In this paper, we build Descriptors H.4 [Information Systems Applications]: Miscellaneous 1. INTRODUCTION The energy sectorImproving Device-level Electricity Consumption Breakdowns in Private Households Using ON/OFF Events

  14. Changing household behaviors to curb climate change: How hard can it be? Shahzeen Z. Attaria,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    efforts to reduce household energy consumption. As part of a recent national survey on public perceptions: E-mail: shahzeen.attari@gmail.com #12;The residential sector contributes over 20% of energy reduce household energy consumption by nearly 30%. Examples include tuning up the car twice a year

  15. Dimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be made from any carbonaceous feedstock, including natural gas, coal, or biomass, using establishedDimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China Eric D. Larson Princeton gas (LPG) as a household cooking fuel. As such, DME is an attractive fuel for clean cooking. DME can

  16. UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diallo, Ibrahima

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE By © 2013 IBRAHIMA DIALLO Submitted to the graduate degree program in Economics and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas... version of the following dissertation: UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE ________________________________ (Chairperson) William A. Barnett Date...

  17. Frequency and longitudinal trends of household care product use Rebecca E. Moran a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    SUPERB Indoor environment d-limonene a b s t r a c t The use of household cleaning products and air infiltrating to the indoor environment to form potentially toxic secondary pollutants. Although realistic, frequencies of use of eight types of household cleaning products and air fresheners and the performance

  18. Deforestation and Cattle Ranching in the Brazilian Amazon: External Capital and Household Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Robert T.

    Deforestation and Cattle Ranching in the Brazilian Amazon: External Capital and Household Processes decomposes recent deforestation in four study areas in the Brazilian Amazon into components associated deforestation with respect to the proximate causes of their farming systems, and the household drivers

  19. Logistic regression models for predicting trip reporting accuracy in GPS-enhanced household travel surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Timothy Lee

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ...................................................................................................... 47 7 Significance Levels of Variables in Each Model......................................... 49 A-1 Example of Household Data File Format (Laredo) ..................................... 60 A...-2 Example of Household Data File Format Codes (Laredo) .......................... 62 A-3 Example of Person Data File Format (Laredo)............................................ 63 A-4 Example...

  20. Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , occupancy prediction, smart heating, energy management, smart home, energy efficiency Corresponding author.e. the household having too low a temperature when the residents come back home ­ triggering the heatingPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

  1. Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use DEBORAH H. BENNETTa, cleaning products, passive sampling, SUPERB, longitudinal. Introduction Personal care and household care products, such as cleaning products and pesticides, are frequently used in most house- holds although

  2. Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation's aftermath concerned the size and composition of the area's populations that lacked access to an automobile for all U.S. metropolitan areas that reside in a household without access to an automobile. Finally, we

  3. Household- and Market-Level Perspectives on the Peter Pan Peanut Butter Recall Using Nielsen Homescan Panel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhtavoryan, Rafael

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using household level scanner data for 2006, 2007, and 2008, this dissertation consists of four studies, which present household- and market-level analyses of food safety issues concerning the 2007 Peter Pan recall on the demand for peanut butter...

  4. "Certainly the Proper Business of Woman": Household and Estate Management Techniques of Eighteenth-Century French Noblewomen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utech, Sally

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project explores the legal, economic, and social aspects of household and estate management in eighteenth-century France. It investigates two paradoxes surrounding noblewomen and household management. The first involves ...

  5. Modeling household adoption of earthquake hazard adjustments: a longitudinal panel study of Southern California and Western Washington residents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arlikatti, Sudha S

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research, aimed at advancing the theory of environmental hazard adjustment processes by contrasting households from three cities in a high seismic hazard area with households from three other cities in a moderate ...

  6. Load Component Database of Household Appliances and Small Office Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Xie, YuLong; Huang, Zhenyu; Puyleart, Francis; Yang, Steve

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the development of a load component database for household appliances and office equipment. To develop more accurate load models at both transmission and distribution level, a better understanding on the individual behaviors of home appliances and office equipment under power system voltage and frequency variations becomes more and more critical. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has begun a series of voltage and frequency tests against home appliances and office equipments since 2005. Since 2006, Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has collaborated with BPA personnel and developed a load component database based on these appliance testing results to facilitate the load model validation work for the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In this paper, the testing procedure and testing results are first presented. The load model parameters are then derived and grouped. Recommendations are given for aggregating the individual appliance models to feeder level, the models of which are used for distribution and transmission level studies.

  7. Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Beverly; Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting behavior similar to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10 to 400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1 to 2.0 ?m) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM1.1) ranged from 10 to> 300 mu g m-3 and yields ranged from 5percent to 37percent. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were on the order of 10 cm-3 s-1 and 10 mu g m-3 min-1, respectively.

  8. Spatial Distribution of U.S. Household Carbon Footprints Reveals Suburbanization Undermines Greenhouse Gas Benefits of Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    with predominantly coal-fired electricity.10 Income, household size, and social factors have been shown to affect

  9. Patterns of Stove Usage after Introduction of an Advanced Cookstove: The Long-Term Application of Household Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT: Household air pollution generated from solid fuel use for cooking is one of the leading risk% of households rely on solid fuelsincluding wood, dung, grass, coal, and crop residues for cooking.1 The 2010 of Household Sensors Ajay Pillarisetti,*, Mayur Vaswani, Darby Jack,§ Kalpana Balakrishnan, Michael N. Bates

  10. On Normal Numbers Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueira, Santiago

    ends with all zeros; hence, q is not simply normal to base b. 3/23 #12;The problem is still open Theorem (Borel 1909) Almost all real numbers are absolutely normal. Problem (Borel 1909) Give an example transducers. Huffman 1959 calls them lossless compressors. A direct proof of the above theorem Becher

  11. Normal matter storage of antiprotons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

  12. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  13. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the next 20-30 years as China builds large quantity ofof power generation in China from 0.230 in 2003 to 0.164 kgHousehold Appliances in China Jiang Lin Environmental Energy

  14. 34 Pauline Kristiansen – life in the household, growing up in north-west Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 34 Length of track 1 hour 12 minutes Title of track Pauline Kristiansen – life in the household...

  15. Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with three or more vehicles grew from 2% in 1960 to nearly 20% in 2010. Before 1990, the most common number of vehicles per household was one, but since 1990, the most...

  16. Monitoring effective use of household water treatment and safe storage technologies in Ethiopia and Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Matthew M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Household water treatment and storage (HWTS) technologies dissemination is beginning to scale-up to reach the almost 900 million people without access to an improved water supply (WHO/UNICEF/JMP, 2008). Without well-informed ...

  17. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Household wastewater treatment systems (septic systems) can contaminate ground water unless they are properly designed, constructed and maintained. This publication describes various kinds of systems and guides the homeowner in assessing...

  18. Distributional Impacts of Carbon Pricing: A General Equilibrium Approach with Micro-Data for Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausch, Sebastian

    Many policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions have at their core efforts to put a price on carbon emissions. Carbon pricing impacts households both by raising the cost of carbon intensive products and by changing factor ...

  19. Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

  20. MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) of the causative parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida bitten by infected insect vectors. There are 130 species in the subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera

  1. Reconstituting Lives: Somali Women's Efforts to Reformulate Household and Community Values in Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippi-Franz, Melissa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research addresses what Somali women living in Kansas City, Missouri do to assist their households and communities to come to terms with the consequences of forced migration. Women's contributions to wellbeing are found ...

  2. Towards Practical and Grounded Knowledge Representation Systems for Autonomous Household Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Moritz Tenorth, Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous Systems, Technische Universit¨at M¨unchen {tenorth, beetz}@cs.tum.edu Abstract-- Mobile household robots need much knowledge about objects, places

  3. Estimating the impact of the 'digital switchover' on disposal of WEEE at household waste recycling centres in England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ongondo, F.O. [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Lanchester Building, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Williams, I.D., E-mail: idw@soton.ac.uk [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Lanchester Building, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Keynes, S. [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Lanchester Building, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Hampshire County Council (HCC) as a case study, this paper evaluates and discusses the estimated impacts of the so-called digital switchover (DSO) (scheduled for 2012 in Hampshire) on Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs) in England and the UK. Two public surveys of Hampshire residents were used to collect data on their preparedness for and awareness of the switchover and its implications. The survey also sought to establish the quantities of televisions (TVs) and TV related devices that are ready for the DSO. The quantities of TV and related devices that are likely to be disposed via HCC's collection network have been established and compared to the County's current handling capacities for waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE). Best and worst case potential net disposal scenarios have been established and the latter compared to Government projections. In addition, the potential environmental, logistical, financial and legal impacts of the WEEE arising as a consequence of the switchover have been identified and discussed. The results indicate that the majority of TVs both in Hampshire and the UK are digital ready and that awareness of the switchover is high. In contrast, most recording devices in Hampshire are not ready for the DSO. Awareness of the timeframe of the event remains modest however and about half of Hampshire households were not aware that TV recording devices will be affected by the switchover. A significant proportion of waste TVs and related equipment would be taken to HWRCs in contrast to smaller items such as remote controls that would more likely be disposed with normal household waste. Projected figures for the DSO year show that if Hampshire maintained its current collection capacity for WEEE it would experience a handling shortfall of around {approx}100 K for TVs and recording devices, respectively. The most important finding of the study is that the UK Government may have substantially underestimated the quantities of TV and related devices that will be disposed during the switchover. The potential impacts for local and national WEEE management have been discussed. The paper concludes by making recommendations to address identified issues.

  4. The effects of cash cropping on household expediture patterns in rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Fred Ken

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the hypotheses tested from the general problem statement is in order. The first hypothesis tested was that the average total expenditure for both commercial and send. -subsistence households are the same. Given that total expenditures are regarded as a proxy.... , University of Zambia at Lusaka Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Carl E. Shafer The aims of the study are to determine significant differences in the patterns and levels of expenditure by semi-subsistence and commercial farm households in rural Kenya...

  5. The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez Cabrera, Jesus Antonio 1977-

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of a death of household head. Death changes the economic and social face of a family, but the effect is usually less widespread than natural disasters. Juarez Torres (2010) examines the household capacity to recovery from shocks based... DEDICATION To my Lord, for showing me patience and love. To my wife, Miriam Juarez Torres, because your amazing love enlighten my road. Thank you for each prayer and words you gave me. To my kids, Emilio Lopez Juarez and Lilian Helena Lopez Juarez...

  6. Household income pooling and the demand for food: does family financial structure matter?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perusquia Corres, Ernesto

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    HOUSEHOLD INCOME POOLING AND THE DEMAND FOR FOOD: DOES FAMILY FINANCIAL STRUCTURE MATTER? A Dissertation by ERNESTO PERUSQUIA CORRES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2006 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics HOUSEHOLD INCOME POOLING AND THE DEMAND FOR FOOD: DOES FAMILY FINANCIAL STRUCTURE MATTER? A Dissertation by ERNESTO PERUSQUIA CORRES Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  7. LCA for household waste management when planning a new urban settlement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagstad, Helene, E-mail: helene.slagstad@ntnu.no [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Brattebo, Helge [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Household waste management of a new carbon neutral settlement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EASEWASTE as a LCA tool to compare different centralised and decentralised solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental benefit or close to zero impact in most of the categories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper and metal recycling important for the outcome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the challenges of waste prevention planning. - Abstract: When planning for a new urban settlement, industrial ecology tools like scenario building and life cycle assessment can be used to assess the environmental quality of different infrastructure solutions. In Trondheim, a new greenfield settlement with carbon-neutral ambitions is being planned and five different scenarios for the waste management system of the new settlement have been compared. The results show small differences among the scenarios, however, some benefits from increased source separation of paper and metal could be found. The settlement should connect to the existing waste management system of the city, and not resort to decentralised waste treatment or recovery methods. However, as this is an urban development project with ambitious goals for lifestyle changes, effort should be put into research and initiatives for proactive waste prevention and reuse issues.

  8. Resonant normal form and asymptotic normal form behavior in magnetic bottle Hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Efthymiopoulos; M. Harsoula; G. Contopoulos

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider normal forms in `magnetic bottle' type Hamiltonians of the form $H=\\frac{1}{2}(\\rho^2_\\rho+\\omega^2_1\\rho^2) +\\frac{1}{2}p^2_z+hot$ (second frequency $\\omega_2$ equal to zero in the lowest order). Our main results are: i) a novel method to construct the normal form in cases of resonance, and ii) a study of the asymptotic behavior of both the non-resonant and the resonant series. We find that, if we truncate the normal form series at order $r$, the series remainder in both constructions decreases with increasing $r$ down to a minimum, and then it increases with $r$. The computed minimum remainder turns to be exponentially small in $\\frac{1}{\\Delta E}$, where $\\Delta E$ is the mirror oscillation energy, while the optimal order scales as an inverse power of $\\Delta E$. We estimate numerically the exponents associated with the optimal order and the remainder's exponential asymptotic behavior. In the resonant case, our novel method allows to compute a `quasi-integral' (i.e. truncated formal integral) valid both for each particular resonance as well as away from all resonances. We applied these results to a specific magnetic bottle Hamiltonian. The non resonant normal form yields theorerical invariant curves on a surface of section which fit well the empirical curves away from resonances. On the other hand the resonant normal form fits very well both the invariant curves inside the islands of a particular resonance as well as the non-resonant invariant curves. Finally, we discuss how normal forms allow to compute a critical threshold for the onset of global chaos in the magnetic bottle.

  9. Housing deficits as a frame for housing policy: Demographic change, economic crisis and household formation in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    states passion for social housing. Vanguard Nigeria. Asianto help expand access to housing in Indonesia. Manila: PressThe transformation of housing and household structures in

  10. Household energy use in urban Venezuela: Implications from surveys in Maracaibo, Valencia, Merida, and Barcelona-Puerto La Cruz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Sathaye, J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies the most important results of a comparative analysis of household commercial energy use in Venezuelan urban cities. The use of modern fuels is widespread among all cities. Cooking consumes the largest share of urban household energy use. The survey documents no use of biomass and a negligible use of kerosene for cooking. LPG, natural gas, and kerosene are the main fuels available. LPG is the fuel choice of low-income households in all cities except Maracaibo, where 40% of all households use natural gas. Electricity consumption in Venezuela`s urban households is remarkably high compared with the levels used in households in comparable Latin American countries and in households of industrialized nations which confront harsher climatic conditions and, therefore, use electricity for water and space heating. The penetration of appliances in Venezuela`s urban households is very high. The appliances available on the market are inefficient, and there are inefficient patterns of energy use among the population. Climate conditions and the urban built form all play important roles in determining the high level of energy consumption in Venezuelan urban households. It is important to acknowledge the opportunities for introducing energy efficiency and conservation in Venezuela`s residential sector, particularly given current economic and financial constraints, which may hamper the future provision of energy services.

  11. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  12. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  13. Development of the household sample for furnace and boilerlife-cycle cost analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, Jim

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated. The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

  14. NYSERDA's Green Jobs-Green New York Program: Extending Energy Efficiency Financing To Underserved Households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimring, Mark; Fuller, Merrian

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The New York legislature passed the Green Jobs-Green New York (GJGNY) Act in 2009. Administered by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), GJGNY programs provide New Yorkers with access to free or low-cost energy assessments,1 energy upgrade services,2 low-cost financing, and training for various 'green-collar' careers. Launched in November 2010, GJGNY's residential initiative is notable for its use of novel underwriting criteria to expand access to energy efficiency financing for households seeking to participate in New York's Home Performance with Energy Star (HPwES) program.3 The GJGNY financing program is a valuable test of whether alternatives to credit scores can be used to responsibly expand credit opportunities for households that do not qualify for traditional lending products and, in doing so, enable more households to make energy efficiency upgrades.

  15. Long Term Dynamics of Inequalities between French Households concerning Automobile COLLET, Roger; BOUCQ, Elise; MADRE, Jean-Loup; HIVERT, Laurent.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Long Term Dynamics of Inequalities between French Households concerning Automobile COLLET, Roger TERM DYNAMICS OF INEQUALITIES BETWEEN FRENCH HOUSEHOLDS CONCERNING AUTOMOBILE Roger Collet, INRETS of automobile. As the curves representing car ownership (number of cars per adult) and car use (annual mileage

  16. Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Equivalence Class Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Equivalence Class Testing: Equivalence Class Testing #12;Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Outline Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Mousavi: Equivalence Class Testing #12

  17. Polymers with increased order

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawan, Samuel P. (Tyngsborough, MA); Talhi, Abdelhafid (Rochester, MI); Taylor, Craig M. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention features polymers with increased order, and methods of making them featuring a dense gas.

  18. Performance Evaluation of A Household Refrigerator Using Cuo Nanoparticle Lubricant Mixture and Various Other Compressor Oils with Different Condenser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreejith. K

    Abstract:- The objective of this paper was to study the performance of household refrigerator having both air and water-cooled condenser, with 0.06 % mass fraction CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture and different types of compressor oils. The experiment was done using HFC134a as the refrigerant, CuO nanoparticles, Polyol-ester oil (POE) oil which is used as the conventional lubricant in the household refrigerator and SUNISO 3GS mineral oil as the lubricant alternatively. The result indicates that the refrigerator performance had improved while using CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture. The performance was also improved when HFC134a/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system was used instead of HFC134a/POE oil system and there was also an enhancement when water-cooled condenser was used instead of the conventional air-cooled condenser on all load conditions. The HFC134a/CuO/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system works normally and safely in the refrigerator. HFC134a/CuO/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system reduced the energy consumption between 12 % and 19 % when compared with the HFC134a/POE oil system and between 9 % and 14 % while working with water-cooled condenser on various load conditions. There was also an enhancement in coefficient of performance (COP) when CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture was used instead of POE oil as the lubricant. The water cooled heat exchanger was designed and the system was modified by retrofitting it, along with the conventional air-cooled condenser by making a bypass line and thus the system can be utilized as a waste heat recovery unit. Experimental result shows that about 200 litres of hot water at a temperature of about 58ºC over a day can be generated. Techno economic analysis shows that the installation cost and running cost of the waste heat recovery system for a day is much lower than that of a conventional

  19. Assessing the Interaction between Real Estate and Equity in Households Portfolio Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that households taking positions in one asset (home or stock) encounter a positive position in the other asset considering their stock market participation and home tenure choices. There is already a huge body of literature on housing status (own/rent) decisions and many contributions doc- umented the low stock market

  20. Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past years the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed an econometric model that predicts appliance ownership at the household level based on macroeconomic variables such as household income (corrected for purchase power parity), electrification, urbanization and climate variables. Hundreds of data points from around the world were collected in order to understand trends in acquisition of new appliances by households, especially in developing countries. The appliances covered by this model are refrigerators, lighting fixtures, air conditioners, washing machines and televisions. The approach followed allows the modeler to construct a bottom-up analysis based at the end use and the household level. It captures the appliance uptake and the saturation effect which will affect the energy demand growth in the residential sector. With this approach, the modeler can also account for stock changes in technology and efficiency as a function of time. This serves two important functions with regard to evaluation of the impact of energy efficiency policies. First, it provides insight into which end uses will be responsible for the largest share of demand growth, and therefore should be policy priorities. Second, it provides a characterization of the rate at which policies affecting new equipment penetrate the appliance stock. Over the past 3 years, this method has been used to support the development of energy demand forecasts at the country, region or global level.

  1. Finding the creatures of habit; Clustering households based on their flexibility in using electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    electricity Ian Dent, Uwe Aickelin and Tom Rodden School of Computer Science University of Nottingham, UK, AB15 8QH tony.craig@hutton.ac.uk ABSTRACT Changes in the UK electricity market, particularly to change households' electricity usage patterns for the benefit of the overall sys- tem. Users show

  2. Applications of demand analysis for the dairy industry using household scanner data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockton, Matthew C.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of the represented cities. 9 Table 2. Percent of Households by Region Region Percent East 20.3 West 20.0 South 34.3 Central 25.3 The scanner information was collected by date of purchase and included only those panelist that purchased...

  3. Rice inventory credit in Madagascar : diversity of rural household strategies around an hybrid financial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rice inventory credit in Madagascar : diversity of rural household strategies around an hybrid been offering an innovative individual rice inventory credit to its members since 1993. Starting from the acknowledgement that the inventory credit is a hybrid product, which involves a mix of in kind and in cash flows

  4. Journal: Ecological Applications1 Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus fluxes in household ecosystems in the3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    with several29 components of household activities including air and motor vehicle travel, food consumption,30 home energy use, landscape, pets, and paper and plastic use for 360 owner-occupied, stand-alone31 vehicle transportation, together with home energy use, accounted for 85% of total C33 consumption

  5. Energy Policy 30 (2002) 815826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policy 30 (2002) 815­826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy School of Public Policy and Energy and Resources Group (ERG), 310 Barrows Hall, University of California in disease from a range of interventions, including changes in energy technology (stove or fuel) and cooking

  6. DETERMINANTS OF HOUSEHOLD PARTICIPATION IN WATER SOURCE MANAGEMENT: ACHEFER, AMHARA REGION, ETHIOPIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    , ETHIOPIA A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University In Partial in Ethiopia are among the lowest in Sub-Saharan Africa. While governmental and non- governmental organizations out involving 16 water supply systems and 160 households within Achefer area, in Amhara, Ethiopia

  7. HOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the dynamic variation in wholesale energy costs. This can be accomplished by letting retail prices varyHOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS Ahmad Faruqui and Sanem Sergici1 November 13, 2008 Since the energy crisis disrupted markets

  8. Reforming Household Energy Markets: Some Welfare Effects in the United Catherine Waddams Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    final energy prices (though those of monopoly inputs such as transmission and distribution remainReforming Household Energy Markets: Some Welfare Effects in the United Kingdom by Catherine Waddams Price Centre for Competition and Regulation and School of Management University of East Anglia, UK

  9. Derived Willingness-to-Pay for Household Water Use with Price and Probabilistic Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    a greater frequency of shortages in exchange for reduced water bills Howe and Smith 1994 . Relatively little, investments in water supply reliability enhancement can alter the frequency of all shortage levels soDerived Willingness-to-Pay for Household Water Use with Price and Probabilistic Supply Roberto

  10. Household Vehicle Ownership by Vehicle Type: Application of a Multivariate Negative Binomial Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    related to household size, income, population density (of zone of residence), and vehicle prices 1970's and early 1980's. Continual improvements in computation power permit more rigorous statistical to new energy issues and a focus on global warming policies, renewed consideration should be given

  11. Are domestic load profiles stable over time? An attempt to identify target households for demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Are domestic load profiles stable over time? An attempt to identify target households for demand Bamberg, Germany Email: thorsten.staake@uni-bamberg.de Abstract--Elaborating demand side management future demand side will largely depend on an automatic control of larger loads, it is also widely agreed

  12. Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , energy management, smart home, energy efficiency, thermostat strategy, heating setback Corresponding, a heating control system may require some time to heat a home to a comfortable temperature after itsPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

  13. Towards a Plan Library for Household Robots Armin Muller and Michael Beetz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Towards a Plan Library for Household Robots Armin M¨uller and Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous {muellear,beetz}@cs.tum.edu Abstract This paper describes the structure for a plan library of a ser- vice (M¨uller, Kirsch, & Beetz 2007). This paper is about writing general, robust default plans

  14. THE HOUSEHOLD AS SECURITY: STRATEGIES OF RURAL-URBAN MIGRANTS IN CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    205 CHAPTER 11 THE HOUSEHOLD AS SECURITY: STRATEGIES OF RURAL-URBAN MIGRANTS IN CHINA C. Cindy Fan and lack of economic opportunities on their own. Agriculture faces an uncertain future, so do peasant work in urban industries and services, the sectors of the Chinese economy characterized by poorly paid

  15. EVOLUTION OF THE HOUSEHOLD VEHICLE FLEET: ANTICIPATING FLEET COMPOSITION, PHEV ADOPTION AND GHG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    EVOLUTION OF THE HOUSEHOLD VEHICLE FLEET: ANTICIPATING FLEET COMPOSITION, PHEV ADOPTION AND GHG evolution, vehicle ownership, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), climate change policy, stated preference, opinion survey, microsimulation ABSTRACT In todays world of volatile fuel prices and climate

  16. Evaluating the Long-term Impact of a Continuously Increasing Harmonic Load Demand on Feeder Level Voltage Distortion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    , fluorescent tube lighting, pc's and laptops have become more prominent in the residential household. With an expectation of higher penetrations of electric vehicle chargers and renewable energy devices the increased usage of nonlinear devices by type. The disadvantage to this approach is that it relies upon

  17. S U P P L E M E N T A R T I C L E Determinants of Household Costs Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheingans, Richard

    S U P P L E M E N T A R T I C L E Determinants of Household Costs Associated With Childhood households. We used survey data from sites in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan to estimate the costs borne by households due to childhood diarrhea, including direct medical costs, direct nonmedical costs

  18. The impact of forecasted energy price increases on low-income consumers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, Joel F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released its short term forecast for residential energy prices for the winter of 2005-2006. The forecast indicates significant increases in fuel costs, particularly for natural gas, propane, and home heating oil, for the year ahead. In the following analysis, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has integrated the EIA price projections with the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 in order to project the impact of these price increases on the nation’s low-income households by primary heating fuel type, nationally and by Census Region. The statistics are intended for the use of policymakers in the Department of Energy’s Weatherization Assistance Program and elsewhere who are trying to gauge the nature and severity of the problems that will be faced by eligible low-income households during the 2006 fiscal year.

  19. Turing's normal numbers: towards randomness Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presumably in 1938 Alan Turing gave an algorithm that produces real numbers normal to every integer base- putable normal numbers, and this result should be attributed to Alan Turing. His manuscript entitled "A

  20. Unmet Housing Rehabilitation and Household Goods Needs in Texas During Katrina-Rita, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley, Dayna

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    and household 7 goods. Differences in housing needs per confounding variables will be analyzed according to adjusted Census data by county for size. The data will be analyzed using SAS? and mapped using ARC GIS?. Hypothesis 1: Unmet housing renovation... of the variation in housing variables by geographical location overall and per disaster phase. The analyses were conducted using Excel and SAS. The mapping was done using ArcGIS and ArcInfo. 17 CHAPTER III RESULTS There were a...

  1. Development of program implementation, evaluation, and selection tools for household water treatment and safe storage systems in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baffrey, Robert Michael Nuval, 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past six years, the MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering's Master of Engineering program has undertaken various projects involved with the design and implementation of a wide range of household ...

  2. An estimated one of every six households (16.2 percent) in Texas lives in poverty. Research has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relevance An estimated one of every six households (16.2 percent) in Texas lives in poverty. Research has shown that individuals who live in poverty have dietary intakes that are not in agreement

  3. Increasing productivity: Another approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, F.J.

    1996-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering information (EI) and information technology (IT) organization that must improve its productivity should work to further its business goals. This paper explores a comprehensive model for increasing EI/IT productivity by supporting organizational objectives.

  4. Characterizing Walk Trips in communities by Using Data from 2009 National Household Travel Survey, American Community Survey, and Other Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [Macrosys] [Macrosys; Wilson, Daniel W [ORNL] [ORNL; Murakami, Elaine [FHWA USDOT] [FHWA USDOT

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-motorized travel (i.e. walking and bicycling) are of increasing interest to the transportation profession, especially in context with energy consumption, reducing vehicular congestion, urban development patterns, and promotion of healthier life styles. This research project aimed to identify factors impacting the amount of travel for both walk and bike trips at the Census block group or tract level, using several public and private data sources. The key survey of travel behavior is the 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) which had over 87,000 walk trips for persons 16 and over, and over 6000 bike trips for persons 16 and over. The NHTS, in conjunction with the Census Bureau s American Community Survey, street density measures using Census Bureau TIGER, WalkScore , Nielsen Claritas employment estimates, and several other sources were used for this study. Stepwise Logistic Regression modeling techniques as well as Discriminant Analysis were applied using the integrated data set. While the models performed reasonably well for walk trips, travel by bike was abandoned due to sparseness of data. This paper discusses data sources utilized and modeling processes conducted under this study. It also presents a summary of findings and addresses data challenges and lesson-learned from this research effort.

  5. Productivity increases in science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.E. [ed.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today`s scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

  6. Productivity increases in science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.E. (ed.); Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today's scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

  7. Lambda hyperonic effect on the normal driplines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Samanta; P. Roy Chowdhury; D. N. Basu

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized mass formula is used to calculate the neutron and proton drip lines of normal and lambda hypernuclei treating non-strange and strange nuclei on the same footing. Calculations suggest existence of several bound hypernuclei whose normal cores are unbound. Addition of Lambda or, Lambda-Lambda hyperon(s) to a normal nucleus is found to cause shifts of the neutron and proton driplines from their conventional limits.

  8. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Daniel F. (Friendswood, TX)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

  9. Household magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstitute / TexasA4. U.S. Vehicles

  10. The Impact of Carbon Control on Low-Income Household Electricity and Gasoline Expenditures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In July of 2007 The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its impact analysis of 'The Climate Stewardship And Innovation Act of 2007,' known as S.280. This legislation, cosponsored by Senators Joseph Lieberman and John McCain, was designed to significantly cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions over time through a 'cap-and-trade' system, briefly described below, that would gradually but extensively reduce such emissions over many decades. S.280 is one of several proposals that have emerged in recent years to come to grips with the nation's role in causing human-induced global climate change. EIA produced an analysis of this proposal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to generate price projections for electricity and gasoline under the proposed cap-and-trade system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated those price projections into a data base derived from the EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 and the EIA public use files from the National Household Transportation Survey (NHTS) for 2001 to develop a preliminary assessment of impact of these types of policies on low-income consumers. ORNL will analyze the impacts of other specific proposals as EIA makes its projections for them available. The EIA price projections for electricity and gasoline under the S.280 climate change proposal, integrated with RECS and NHTS for 2001, help identify the potential effects on household electric bills and gasoline expenditures, which represent S.280's two largest direct impacts on low-income household budgets in the proposed legislation. The analysis may prove useful in understanding the needs and remedies for the distributive impacts of such policies and how these may vary based on patterns of location, housing and vehicle stock, and energy usage.

  11. WEEE and portable batteries in residual household waste: Quantification and characterisation of misplaced waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigum, Marianne, E-mail: mkkb@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Claus, E-mail: claus_petersen@econet.dk [Econet A/S, Strandboulevarden 122, 5, 2100 København Ø (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • We analyse 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 Danish households. • We quantify and characterise misplaced WEEE and portable batteries. • We compare misplaced WEEE and batteries to collection through dedicated schemes. • Characterisation showed that primarily small WEEE and light sources are misplaced. • Significant amounts of misplaced batteries were discarded as built-in WEEE. - Abstract: A total of 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 households in 12 Danish municipalities was analysed and revealed that 89.6 kg of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), 11 kg of batteries, 2.2 kg of toners and 16 kg of cables had been wrongfully discarded. This corresponds to a Danish household discarding 29 g of WEEE (7 items per year), 4 g of batteries (9 batteries per year), 1 g of toners and 7 g of unidentifiable cables on average per week, constituting 0.34% (w/w), 0.04% (w/w), 0.01% (w/w) and 0.09% (w/w), respectively, of residual waste. The study also found that misplaced WEEE and batteries in the residual waste constituted 16% and 39%, respectively, of what is being collected properly through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. This shows that a large amount of batteries are being discarded with the residual waste, whereas WEEE seems to be collected relatively successfully through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. Characterisation of the misplaced batteries showed that 20% (w/w) of the discarded batteries were discarded as part of WEEE (built-in). Primarily alkaline batteries, carbon zinc batteries and alkaline button cell batteries were found to be discarded with the residual household waste. Characterisation of WEEE showed that primarily small WEEE (WEEE directive categories 2, 5a, 6, 7 and 9) and light sources (WEEE directive category 5b) were misplaced. Electric tooth brushes, watches, clocks, headphones, flashlights, bicycle lights, and cables were items most frequently found. It is recommended that these findings are taken into account when designing new or improving existing special waste collection schemes. Improving the collection of WEEE is also recommended as one way to also improve the collection of batteries due to the large fraction of batteries found as built-in. The findings in this study were comparable to other western European studies, suggesting that the recommendations made in this study could apply to other western European countries as well.

  12. Disk Quota Increase Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscovering How Muscles Really Work Disk Quota Increase

  13. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) -heating oil pricepropanepropane prices increase The

  14. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) -heating oil pricepropanepropane prices increase

  15. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomyDr.Energy University Managing Increased Charging

  16. Increasing Employee PEV Awareness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of theResponses to Public Increasing Employee

  17. Estimation of the Parameters of Skew Normal Distribution by Approximating the Ratio of the Normal Density and Distribution Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dey, Debarshi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 1.2 Normal Distribution and Simple Linear5 1.3 Skew Normal Distribution andthe Standard Normal Density and Distribution Functions 3.1

  18. A Method for Modeling Household Occupant Behavior to Simulate Residential Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Brandon J [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a statistical method for modeling the behavior of household occupants to estimate residential energy consumption. Using data gathered by the U.S. Census Bureau in the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), actions carried out by survey respondents are categorized into ten distinct activities. These activities are defined to correspond to the major energy consuming loads commonly found within the residential sector. Next, time varying minute resolution Markov chain based statistical models of different occupant types are developed. Using these behavioral models, individual occupants are simulated to show how an occupant interacts with the major residential energy consuming loads throughout the day. From these simulations, the minimum number of occupants, and consequently the minimum number of multiple occupant households, needing to be simulated to produce a statistically accurate representation of aggregate residential behavior can be determined. Finally, future work will involve the use of these occupant models along side residential load models to produce a high-resolution energy consumption profile and estimate the potential for demand response from residential loads.

  19. Recovery and separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karvelas, D.E.; Jody, B.J.; Poykala, J.A. Jr.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.; Arman, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.]|[Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research to develop a cost- effective and environmentally acceptable process for the separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances. The process under development has separated individual high purity (greater than 99.5%) acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and high- impact polystyrene (HIPS) from commingled plastics generated by appliance-shredding and metal-recovery operations. The process consists of size-reduction steps for the commingled plastics, followed by a series of gravity-separation techniques to separate plastic materials of different densities. Individual plastics of similar densities, such as ABS and HIPS, are further separated by using a chemical solution. By controlling the surface tension, the density, and the temperature of the chemical solution we are able to selectively float/separate plastics that have different surface energies. This separation technique has proven to be highly effective in recovering high-purity plastics materials from discarded household appliances. A conceptual design of a continuous process to recover high-value plastics from discarded appliances is also discussed. In addition to plastics separation research, Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research to develop cost-effective techniques for improving the mechanical properties of plastics recovered from appliances.

  20. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation ManagementMobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Managementtechnology-management, and strategic-marketing lenses to the problem of commercializing H 2 FCVs, other EDVs, and other Mobile

  1. Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part of the total energy consumed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    consumption and for about 50% of the total electricity consumption [1]. Therefore it is important to explore one of them. The interviewees preferred receiving electricity consumption feedback from a bill, a web1 Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part

  2. Changing Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages and Tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in energy consumption. Patterns of Consumption--Historic Trends Electricity & Gas We'll start with historicChanging Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages analysis of consumption patterns of different commodities in the U.S. shed light on the consumption

  3. Water availability at farm household level a case study in the Nyando district in South-Western Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water availability at farm household level ­ a case study in the Nyando district in South of Crop Production Ecology Uppsala 2011 Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences #12;2 Water: Women collecting water in a well, Onjiko, Kenya. Photo: Erika Näslund Keywords: Water availability

  4. The value of bushmeat and other wild foods to rural households living in extreme poverty in Democratic Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    The value of bushmeat and other wild foods to rural households living in extreme poverty between poverty and the use of wild foods, namely bushmeat, fish and wild plants, within a Congolese poverty (income below US$1 per capita per day). Our analyses indicate that wild foods play a small role

  5. Workshop on Demand Response, Ballerup, 7. February 2006 www.risoe.dk Curtailment of Household Equipments A Danish Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop on Demand Response, Ballerup, 7. February 2006 www.risoe.dk Curtailment of Household Frame · 189 Respondents · Power consumption: 5000 ­ 6000 kWh per year · No electrical heating · Products hours 3 hours 3 hours Question 9 Question 10 Question 13 Price(DKK/kWh) 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Response

  6. Residential energy use and conservation in Venezuela: Results and implications of a household survey in Caracas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Ketoff, A.; Masera, O.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the final report of a study of residential energy use in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. It contains the findings of a household energy-use survey held in Caracas in 1988 and examines options for introducing energy conservation measures in the Venezuelan residential sector. Oil exports form the backbone of the Venezuelan economy. Improving energy efficiency in Venezuela will help free domestic oil resources that can be sold to the rest of the world. Energy conservation will also contribute to a faster recovery of the economy by reducing the need for major investments in new energy facilities, allowing the Venezuelan government to direct its financial investments towards other areas of development. Local environmental benefits will constitute an important additional by-product of implementing energy-efficiency policies in Venezuela. Caracas`s residential sector shows great potential for energy conservation. The sector is characterized by high saturation levels of major appliances, inefficiency of appliances available in the market, and by careless patterns of energy use. Household energy use per capita average 6.5 GJ/per year which is higher than most cities in developing countries; most of this energy is used for cooking. Electricity accounts for 41% of all energy use, while LPG and natural gas constitute the remainder. Specific options for inducing energy conservation and energy efficiency in Caracas`s residential sector include energy-pricing policies, fuel switching, particularly from electricity to gas, improving the energy performance of new appliances and customer information. To ensure the accomplishment of an energy-efficiency strategy, a concerted effort by energy users, manufacturers, utility companies, government agencies, and research institutions will be needed.

  7. Differentiated state of normal and malignant cells or how to define a normal cell in culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, M.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are cytological techniques to differentiate malignant and normal cells in culture. Emphasis is placed upon cell function and gene expression for determinative procedures. (DLS)

  8. Computing Instantaneous Frequency by normalizing Hilbert Transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Norden E.

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention presents Normalized Amplitude Hilbert Transform (NAHT) and Normalized Hilbert Transform(NHT), both of which are new methods for computing Instantaneous Frequency. This method is designed specifically to circumvent the limitation set by the Bedorsian and Nuttal Theorems, and to provide a sharp local measure of error when the quadrature and the Hilbert Transform do not agree. Motivation for this method is that straightforward application of the Hilbert Transform followed by taking the derivative of the phase-angle as the Instantaneous Frequency (IF) leads to a common mistake made up to this date. In order to make the Hilbert Transform method work, the data has to obey certain restrictions.

  9. Increased

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News Community Connections:HAZARD ANALYSES OF GLINT

  10. A frequency-domain transient stability criterion for normal contingencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marceau, R.J.; Rizzi, J.C. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Mailhot, R. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous paper, a simple frequency-domain stability criterion was proposed for networks near the stability limit subjected to a 3-phase fault with no loss of line. The criterion can be summarized as follows: if a system is stable, the phase angle of the Fourier transform of a network`s transient voltage response exhibits a clockwise polar plot behavior at all buses (i.e. for increasing frequency); if the system is unstable, it exhibits a counterclockwise behavior in at least one location. Though these results are of interest, the criterion would be of greater practical use in mechanizing dynamic security analysis if it could be extended to the types of contingencies actually used in security analysis, namely normal contingencies. Normal contingencies are commonly defined as the loss of any element in a power system, either spontaneously or preceded by a fault, and such changes in topology impact post-contingency steady-state voltages in addition to their transient behavior. The present paper shows how such cases can be treated, thereby extending the applicable range of the criterion to normal contingencies.

  11. A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by2 Homogenized Monthly Temperature Normals3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1 A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by2 Homogenized a constrained harmonic technique that forces the daily30 temperature normals to be consistent with the monthly, or harmonic even though the annual march of temperatures for some locations can be highly asymmetric. Here, we

  12. Normality: A Consistency Condition for Concurrent Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Normality: A Consistency Condition for Concurrent Objects Vijay K. GARG \\Lambda Michel RAYNAL ECE for concurrent objects (objects shared by con­ current processes) that exploits the semantics of abstract data types. It provides the illusion that each operation applied by concurrent processes takes effect

  13. Control of normal chirality at hexagonal interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haraldsen, Jason T [ORNL; Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the net chirality created by the Dzyaloshinkii-Moriya interaction (DMI) at the boundary between hexagonal layers of magnetic and non-magnetic materials. It is shown that another mechanism besides elastic torsion is required to understand the change in chirality observed in Dy/Y multilayers during field-cooling. The paper shows that due to the overlap between magnetic and non-magnetic atoms, interfacial steps may produce a DMI normal to the interface in magnetic heterostructures.

  14. Status of not-in-kind refrigeration technologies for household space conditioning, water heating and food refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, Pradeep [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of the next generation not-in-kind technologies to replace conventional vapor compression refrigeration technology for household applications. Such technologies are sought to provide energy savings or other environmental benefits for space conditioning, water heating and refrigeration for domestic use. These alternative technologies include: thermoacoustic refrigeration, thermoelectric refrigeration, thermotunneling, magnetic refrigeration, Stirling cycle refrigeration, pulse tube refrigeration, Malone cycle refrigeration, absorption refrigeration, adsorption refrigeration, and compressor driven metal hydride heat pumps. Furthermore, heat pump water heating and integrated heat pump systems are also discussed due to their significant energy saving potential for water heating and space conditioning in households. The paper provides a snapshot of the future R&D needs for each of the technologies along with the associated barriers. Both thermoelectric and magnetic technologies look relatively attractive due to recent developments in the materials and prototypes being manufactured.

  15. The evolving price of household LED lamps: Recent trends and historical comparisons for the US market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Brian F.; Ngo, Allison T.; Alstone, Andrea L.; Fisseha, Kibret S.

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, household LED light bulbs (LED A lamps) have undergone a dramatic price decline. Since late 2011, we have been collecting data, on a weekly basis, for retail offerings of LED A lamps on the Internet. The resulting data set allows us to track the recent price decline in detail. LED A lamp prices declined roughly exponentially with time in 2011-2014, with decline rates of 28percent to 44percent per year depending on lumen output, and with higher-lumen lamps exhibiting more rapid price declines. By combining the Internet price data with publicly available lamp shipments indices for the US market, it is also possible to correlate LED A lamp prices against cumulative production, yielding an experience curve for LED A lamps. In 2012-2013, LED A lamp prices declined by 20-25percent for each doubling in cumulative shipments. Similar analysis of historical data for other lighting technologies reveals that LED prices have fallen significantly more rapidly with cumulative production than did their technological predecessors, which exhibited a historical decline of 14-15percent per doubling of production.

  16. Influence of assumptions about household waste composition in waste management LCAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagstad, Helene, E-mail: helene.slagstad@ntnu.no [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Brattebo, Helge [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainty in waste composition of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systematically changed waste composition in a constructed waste management system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste composition important for the results of accounting LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust results for comparative LCA. - Abstract: This article takes a detailed look at an uncertainty factor in waste management LCA that has not been widely discussed previously, namely the uncertainty in waste composition. Waste composition is influenced by many factors; it can vary from year to year, seasonally, and with location, for example. The data publicly available at a municipal level can be highly aggregated and sometimes incomplete, and performing composition analysis is technically challenging. Uncertainty is therefore always present in waste composition. This article performs uncertainty analysis on a systematically modified waste composition using a constructed waste management system. In addition the environmental impacts of several waste management strategies are compared when applied to five different cities. We thus discuss the effect of uncertainty in both accounting LCA and comparative LCA. We found the waste composition to be important for the total environmental impact of the system, especially for the global warming, nutrient enrichment and human toxicity via water impact categories.

  17. Cost comparison between private and public collection of residual household waste: Multiple case studies in the Flemish region of Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, R., E-mail: ray.jacobsen@ugent.be [Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Buysse, J., E-mail: j.buysse@ugent.be [Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Gellynck, X., E-mail: xavier.gellynck@ugent.be [Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The goal is to compare collection costs for residual household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have clustered all municipalities in order to find mutual comparable pairs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each pair consists of one private and one public operating waste collection program. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All cases show that private service has lower costs than public service. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipalities were contacted to identify the deeper causes for the waste management program. - Abstract: The rising pressure in terms of cost efficiency on public services pushes governments to transfer part of those services to the private sector. A trend towards more privatizing can be noticed in the collection of municipal household waste. This paper reports the findings of a research project aiming to compare the cost between the service of private and public collection of residual household waste. Multiple case studies of municipalities about the Flemish region of Belgium were conducted. Data concerning the year 2009 were gathered through in-depth interviews in 2010. In total 12 municipalities were investigated, divided into three mutual comparable pairs with a weekly and three mutual comparable pairs with a fortnightly residual waste collection. The results give a rough indication that in all cases the cost of private service is lower than public service in the collection of household waste. Albeit that there is an interest in establishing whether there are differences in the costs and service levels between public and private waste collection services, there are clear difficulties in establishing comparisons that can be made without having to rely on a large number of assumptions and corrections. However, given the cost difference, it remains the responsibility of the municipalities to decide upon the service they offer their citizens, regardless the cost efficiency: public or private.

  18. The economics of US greenhouse gas emissions reduction policy : assessing distributional effects across households and the 50 United States using a recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Look, Wesley Allen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The political economy of US climate policy has revolved around state- and district- level distributional economics, and to a lesser extent household-level distribution questions. Many politicians and analysts have suggested ...

  19. Collection and representation of GIS data to aid household water treatment and safe storage technology implementation in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanCalcar, Jenny E. (Jenny Elizabeth)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, a start-up social business called Pure Home Water (PHW) was begun in Ghana to promote and sell household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) technologies. The original aim of the company was to offer a variety ...

  20. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Managementtechnology-management, and strategic-marketing lenses to the problem of commercializing H 2 FCVs, other EDVs, and other Mobile

  1. Simulation of household in-home and transportation energy use : an integrated behavioral model for estimating energy consumption at the neighborhood scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Feifei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Household in-home activities and out-of-home transportation are two major sources of urban energy consumption. In light of China's rapid urbanization and income growth, changing lifestyles and consumer patterns - evident ...

  2. OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF NORMAL AND GREEN OYSTERS 1 PAUL S. GALTSOFF, Ph. D., In Charge, Oyster Fishery Investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF NORMAL AND GREEN OYSTERS 1 $ By PAUL S. GALTSOFF, Ph. D., In Charge, Oyster _ ~ethod _ Oxygen consumption of normal oyster _ Effect of oxygen tension on oxygen con- sumption _ Page 489 Increased rate of metabolism _ 490 Experiments with green oysters _ 493 Oxygen consumption

  3. The Impact of Rising Food Prices on Household Welfare in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Janvry, Alain; Sadoulet, Eliisabeth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that these cereal and oil price increases of 28 to 52% wouldthe large increase in oil prices, leaving them with only aprices and 2.2% from the oil price increase. Poor people

  4. A life cycle approach to the management of household food waste - A Swedish full-scale case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A., E-mail: anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Department of Chemical Engineering, Box 124, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Lund University, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Department of Chemical Engineering, Box 124, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Lund University, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Highlights: > The comparison of three different methods for management of household food waste show that anaerobic digestion provides greater environmental benefits in relation to global warming potential, acidification and ozone depilation compared to incineration and composting of food waste. Use of produced biogas as car fuel provides larger environmental benefits compared to a use of biogas for heat and power production. > The use of produced digestate from the anaerobic digestion as substitution for chemical fertilizer on farmland provides avoidance of environmental burdens in the same ratio as the substitution of fossil fuels with produced biogas. > Sensitivity analyses show that results are highly sensitive to assumptions regarding the environmental burdens connected to heat and energy supposedly substituted by the waste treatment. - Abstract: Environmental impacts from incineration, decentralised composting and centralised anaerobic digestion of solid organic household waste are compared using the EASEWASTE LCA-tool. The comparison is based on a full scale case study in southern Sweden and used input-data related to aspects such as source-separation behaviour, transport distances, etc. are site-specific. Results show that biological treatment methods - both anaerobic and aerobic, result in net avoidance of GHG-emissions, but give a larger contribution both to nutrient enrichment and acidification when compared to incineration. Results are to a high degree dependent on energy substitution and emissions during biological processes. It was seen that if it is assumed that produced biogas substitute electricity based on Danish coal power, this is preferable before use of biogas as car fuel. Use of biogas for Danish electricity substitution was also determined to be more beneficial compared to incineration of organic household waste. This is a result mainly of the use of plastic bags in the incineration alternative (compared to paper bags in the anaerobic) and the use of biofertiliser (digestate) from anaerobic treatment as substitution of chemical fertilisers used in an incineration alternative. Net impact related to GWP from the management chain varies from a contribution of 2.6 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/household and year if incineration is utilised, to an avoidance of 5.6 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/household and year if choosing anaerobic digestion and using produced biogas as car fuel. Impacts are often dependent on processes allocated far from the control of local decision-makers, indicating the importance of a holistic approach and extended collaboration between agents in the waste management chain.

  5. NORMALITY VERSUS COUNTABLE PARACOMPACTNESS IN PERFECT SPACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, M. L.; Fleissner, William G.; Reed, G. M.

    1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    spaces, Proc. Topology Conf. (Memphis State Univ., 1975) (to appear). 3. H. Cook, Cartesian products and continuous semi-metrics, Proc. Conf. on Topology (1967), Arizona State Univ., Tempe, Ariz., 1968, pp. 5 8 - 6 3 . MR 38 #5152. 4. C. H. Dowker.... Pittsburgh Internat. Conf., 1972), Lecture Notes in Math., vol. 378, Springer-Verlag, Berlin and New York, 1974, pp. 243-247. MR 49 #1457. 9. A. J. Ostaszewski, On countably compact, perfectly normal spaces, J. London Math. Soc. (to appear). 10. C. W...

  6. Normal, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:NeppelsourceNormal, Illinois: Energy Resources

  7. South African Hake Sales Increase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South African Hake Sales Increase The Capeto\\\\ n Traw ler Com pan) Inin and J ohn~on. i e\\port1l1g

  8. Local asymptotic normality in quantum statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madalin Guta; Anna Jencova

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of local asymptotic normality for quantum statistical experiments is developed in the spirit of the classical result from mathematical statistics due to Le Cam. Roughly speaking, local asymptotic normality means that the family varphi_{\\theta_{0}+ u/\\sqrt{n}}^{n} consisting of joint states of n identically prepared quantum systems approaches in a statistical sense a family of Gaussian state phi_{u} of an algebra of canonical commutation relations. The convergence holds for all "local parameters" u\\in R^{m} such that theta=theta_{0}+ u/sqrt{n} parametrizes a neighborhood of a fixed point theta_{0}\\in Theta\\subset R^{m}. In order to prove the result we define weak and strong convergence of quantum statistical experiments which extend to the asymptotic framework the notion of quantum sufficiency introduces by Petz. Along the way we introduce the concept of canonical state of a statistical experiment, and investigate the relation between the two notions of convergence. For reader's convenience and completeness we review the relevant results of the classical as well as the quantum theory.

  9. The Normal/Bloomington Amtrak passenger station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, C.E. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Normal/Bloomington, Illinois Amtrak railroad passenger station was completed in 1990. A number of energy conservation technologies have been combined to provide for efficient railroad operations, passenger comfort, and a pleasing atmosphere. Passive solar heating, shading, and the building`s thermal efficiency have substantially reduced the amount of energy required for space conditions. The use of daylighting high efficiency fluorescent and high pressure sodium lighting as well as electronic load management have reduced energy requirements for lighting more than 70%. A stand-alone PV system provides energy for a portion of the building`s electrical requirement. An average monthly output of 147 kWh accounts for approximately 7.5% of the total electrical load. Overall, this station requires less than 25% of the energy required by a recently built `typical` station of similar size in a similar climate.

  10. Overview Report: Normal and Emergency Operation Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an overview report to document and illustrate methods used in a project entitled “Normal and Emergency Operations Visualization” for a utility company, conducted in 2009-2010 timeframe with funding from the utility company and the U.S. Department of Energy. The original final report (about 180 pages) for the project is not available for distribution because it alludes to findings that assessed the design of an operational system that contained proprietary information; this abridged version contains descriptions of methods and some findings to illustrate the approach used, while avoiding discussion of sensitive or proprietary information. The client has approved this abridged version of the report for unlimited distribution to give researchers and collaborators the benefit of reviewing the research concepts and methods that were applied in this study.

  11. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  12. Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange Call Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange Call February 26, 2015 3:00PM to 4:3...

  13. Controlling the number of graphene sheets exfoliated from graphite by designed normal loading and frictional motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei, E-mail: weilu@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We use molecular dynamics to study the exfoliation of patterned nanometer-sized graphite under various normal loading conditions for friction-induced exfoliation. Using highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) as well as both amorphous and crystalline SiO{sub 2} substrate as example systems, we show that the exfoliation process is attributed to the corrugation of the HOPG surface and the atomistic roughness of the substrate when they contact under normal loading. The critical normal strain, at which the exfoliation occurs, is higher on a crystalline substrate than on an amorphous substrate. This effect is related to the atomistic flatness and stiffness of the crystalline surface. We observe that an increase of the van der Waals interaction between the graphite and the substrate results in a decrease of the critical normal strain for exfoliation. We find that the magnitude of the normal strain can effectively control the number of exfoliated graphene layers. This mechanism suggests a promising approach of applying designed normal loading while sliding to pattern controlled number of graphene layers or other two-dimensional materials on a substrate surface.

  14. Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storjohann, Arne

    Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices; Abstract We study the problem of computing Hermite and Smith normal forms of ma- trices over. One first result is a fast Las Vegas probabilistic algorithm to compute the * *Smith normal form

  15. Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storjohann, Arne

    Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices by Arne Storjohann A thesis presented the problem of computing Hermite and Smith normal forms of ma­ trices over principal ideal domains. The main probabilistic algorithm to compute the Smith normal form of a polynomial matrix for those cases where pre

  16. EIGENVALUES AND THE SMITH NORMAL FORM Joseph J. Rushanan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushanan, Joe J.

    EIGENVALUES AND THE SMITH NORMAL FORM Joseph J. Rushanan The MITRE Corporation, M/S E025, Bedford, MA 01730 Abstract. Results are shown that compare the Smith Normal Form (SNF) over the integers and its Smith Normal Form (SNF) over the integers. Our goals are more general than those results

  17. Lyapunov Exponents and Uniform Weak Normally Repelling Invariant Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hal

    Lyapunov Exponents and Uniform Weak Normally Repelling Invariant Sets Paul Leonard Salceanu and Hal repelling in directions normal to the boundary in which M resides provided all normal Lyapunov exponents that Lyapunov exponents can be used to establish the requisite repelling properties for both discrete

  18. Fractal Fluctuations and Statistical Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical systems in nature exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations and the corresponding power spectra follow inverse power law form signifying long-range space-time correlations identified as self-organized criticality. The physics of self-organized criticality is not yet identified. The Gaussian probability distribution used widely for analysis and description of large data sets underestimates the probabilities of occurrence of extreme events such as stock market crashes, earthquakes, heavy rainfall, etc. The assumptions underlying the normal distribution such as fixed mean and standard deviation, independence of data, are not valid for real world fractal data sets exhibiting a scale-free power law distribution with fat tails. A general systems theory for fractals visualizes the emergence of successively larger scale fluctuations to result from the space-time integration of enclosed smaller scale fluctuations. The model predicts a universal inverse power law incorporating the golden mean for fractal fluctuations and for the corresponding power spectra, i.e., the variance spectrum represents the probabilities, a signature of quantum systems. Fractal fluctuations therefore exhibit quantum-like chaos. The model predicted inverse power law is very close to the Gaussian distribution for small-scale fluctuations, but exhibits a fat long tail for large-scale fluctuations. Extensive data sets of Dow Jones index, Human DNA, Takifugu rubripes (Puffer fish) DNA are analysed to show that the space/time data sets are close to the model predicted power law distribution.

  19. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  20. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel prices continue to increase The U.S.

  1. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel prices continue to increase The

  2. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel prices continue to increase TheDiesel

  3. Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| Department ofGeneralWind »Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance

  4. A REVIEW OF ASSUMPTIONS AND ANALYSIS IN EPRI EA-3409, "HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPS BEHAVIORAL MODELS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only logit estimate variable name normalized capital costcost estimates by using construction handbooks (for capitalcapital cost coefficient to operating cost coefficient gives an estimate

  5. Linking Household Food Inventories with Dietary Recalls to Examine the Association between Nutrient Availability and Dietary Intake among Mexican-origin Children who Reside in Texas Border Region Colonias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Jennifer Becker

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between household food inventories (HFI) and dietary recalls among Mexican-origin children (ages 6-11 years old) who reside in Texas border region colonias. Household food availability is a...

  6. Factors associated with mosquito net use by individuals in households owning nets in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Patricia M; Ngondi, Jeremiah M; Hwang, Jimee; Getachew, Asefaw; Gebre, Teshome; Mosher, Aryc W; Patterson, Amy E; Shargie, Estifanos B; Tadesse, Zerihun; Wolkon, Adam; Reithinger, Richard; Emerson, Paul M; Richards, Frank O Jr

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Background Ownership of insecticidal mosquito nets has dramatically increased in Ethiopia since 2006, but the proportion of persons with access to such nets who use them has declined. It is important to understand individual level net use...

  7. Separate collection of household food waste for anaerobic degradation - Comparison of different techniques from a systems perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A., E-mail: Anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four modern and innovative systems for household food waste collection are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct emissions and resource use were based on full-scale data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conservation of nutrients/energy content over the system was considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systems with high energy/nutrient recovery are most environmentally beneficial. - Abstract: Four systems for household food waste collection are compared in relation the environmental impact categories eutrophication potential, acidification potential, global warming potential as well as energy use. Also, a hotspot analysis is performed in order to suggest improvements in each of the compared collection systems. Separate collection of household food waste in paper bags (with and without drying prior to collection) with use of kitchen grinders and with use of vacuum system in kitchen sinks were compared. In all cases, food waste was used for anaerobic digestion with energy and nutrient recovery in all cases. Compared systems all resulted in net avoidance of assessed environmental impact categories; eutrophication potential (-0.1 to -2.4 kg NO{sub 3}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), acidification potential (-0.4 to -1.0 kg SO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), global warming potential (-790 to -960 kg CO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste) and primary energy use (-1.7 to -3.6 GJ/ton food waste). Collection with vacuum system results in the largest net avoidance of primary energy use, while disposal of food waste in paper bags for decentralized drying before collection result in a larger net avoidance of global warming, eutrophication and acidification. However, both these systems not have been taken into use in large scale systems yet and further investigations are needed in order to confirm the outcomes from the comparison. Ranking of scenarios differ largely if considering only emissions in the foreground system, indicating the importance of taking also downstream emissions into consideration when comparing different collection systems. The hot spot identification shows that losses of organic matter in mechanical pretreatment as well as tank connected food waste disposal systems and energy in drying and vacuum systems reply to the largest impact on the results in each system respectively.

  8. ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ANALYSIS OF INCREASING COSTS IN THE GULF SHRIMP FLEETI,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of construction, length ofkeel, and index ofeffort. In 1973, class II vessels were the only vessels ableECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ANALYSIS OF INCREASING COSTS IN THE GULF SHRIMP FLEETI,2 WADE L. GRi flow for 1974. Increasing input cost another 10% above the 1974 level, and assuming normal production

  9. allowing normal bone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assays. Correlations of fluoride levels between normal bone near the Nancy Medina; Chester W. Douglass; Gary M. Whitford; Robert N. Hoover; Thomas R. Fears 6 Differential...

  10. Data Collection and Normalization for the Development of Cost...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This chapter discusses considerations for data collection and normalization. g4301-1chp19.pdf -- PDF Document, 21 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

  11. asymptotical normalization coefficients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    zeilbergtokhniotSameSexMarriages Zeilberger, Doron 114 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

  12. asymptotically normal estimators: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    first order inclusion probabilities, H Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 160 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

  13. asymptotic normalization coefficients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    zeilbergtokhniotSameSexMarriages Zeilberger, Doron 114 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

  14. astrophysics asymptotic normalization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    www.math.rutgers.eduzeilbergtokhniotSameSexMarriages Zeilberger, Doron 74 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

  15. asymptotic normalization coefficient: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    zeilbergtokhniotSameSexMarriages Zeilberger, Doron 114 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

  16. SciTech Connect: Effect of radiation on normal hematopoiesis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of radiation on normal hematopoiesis and on viral induced cancer of the hematopoietic system. Technical progress report, August 1, 1973--July 31, 1974 Citation Details...

  17. B-2 Bomber During In-flight Refueling Normal Heart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Bomber During In-flight Refueling Normal Heart Image Technology to Detect Concealed Nuclear Material in Trucks and Cargo Containers Single Abnormality Possible Heart Attack Disc...

  18. Log-normal distribution for correlators in lattice QCD?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas DeGrand

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many hadronic correlators used in spectroscopy calculations in lattice QCD simulations appear to show a log-normal distribution at intermediate time separations.

  19. adjacent normal skin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tangential mechanics SAI mechanoreceptor depth actuator strain energy density James Biggs; Mandayam A. Srinivasan 5 Expression and function of small RNAs in normal and...

  20. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization Used...

  1. Rap G protein signal in normal and disordered lymphohematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minato, Nagahiro, E-mail: minato@imm.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Rap proteins (Rap1, Rap2a, b, c) are small molecular weight GTPases of the Ras family. Rap G proteins mediate diverse cellular events such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and gene activation through various signaling pathways. Activation of Rap signal is regulated tightly by several specific regulatory proteins including guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins. Beyond cell biological studies, increasing attempts have been made in the past decade to define the roles of Rap signal in specific functions of normal tissue systems as well as in cancer. In the immune and hematopoietic systems, Rap signal plays crucial roles in the development and function of essentially all lineages of lymphocytes and hematopoietic cells, and importantly, deregulated Rap signal may lead to unique pathological conditions depending on the affected cell types, including various types of leukemia and autoimmunity. The phenotypical studies have unveiled novel, even unexpected functional aspects of Rap signal in cells from a variety of tissues, providing potentially important clues for controlling human diseases, including malignancy.

  2. Security enhanced with increased vehicle inspections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security enhanced with increased vehicle inspections Security measures increase as of March: vehicle inspections won't delay traffic New increased security procedures meet LANL's...

  3. First waste-to-energy power station put into operation in Vietnam has successfully produced electricity from household and industrial waste as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    electricity from household and industrial waste as a newly-generated power supply has come online, its average cost per watt would be about half the price of electricity produced by other plants with the national electricity grid. On Wednesday, August 3, the Ho Chi Minh City Urban Environment Management

  4. Simulating the Household Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Distribution and its Electric Distribution Network Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Hoe Kyoung [ORNL] [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a multi agent-based simulation framework for modeling spatial distribution of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle ownership at local residential level, discovering plug-in hybrid electric vehicle hot zones where ownership may quickly increase in the near future, and estimating the impacts of the increasing plug-in hybrid electric vehicle ownership on the local electric distribution network with different charging strategies. We use Knox County, Tennessee as a case study to highlight the simulation results of the agent-based simulation framework.

  5. Explicit Expressions for Moments of Log Normal Order Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    Explicit Expressions for Moments of Log Normal Order Statistics Saralees Nadarajah First version: 31 December 2006 Research Report No. 23, 2006, Probability and Statistics Group School of Mathematics, The University of Manchester #12;Explicit Expressions for Moments of Log Normal Order Statistics by Saralees

  6. Numerical algorithms for the computation of the Smith normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seberry, Jennifer

    Numerical algorithms for the computation of the Smith normal form of integral matrices C of the Smith normal form of integral matrices are described. More specifically, the com­ pound matrix method of the algorithms. AMS Subject Classification: Primary 65F30, Secondary 15A21, 15A36. Key words and phrases: Smith

  7. Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Dudley

    Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen;Abstract The normal curve has been used to fit the rate of both world and U.S.A. oil production sizes are lognormally distributed, and the starting time of the production of a field is approximately

  8. Normalized k-means clustering of hyper-rectangles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Normalized k-means clustering of hyper-rectangles Marie Chavent Math´ematiques Appliqu´ees de-rectangles and their use in two normalized k-means clustering algorithms. Keywords: Interval data, Standardization [Diday, 1988], [Bock and Diday, 2000]. Several works on k-means clustering of interval data sets have

  9. New Equipartition Results for Normal Mode Energies of Anharmonic Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Bruce Ian

    New Equipartition Results for Normal Mode Energies of Anharmonic Chains B.I. Henry 1 and T. Szeredi 2;3 Date: 26 September 1995 The canonical and micro­canonical distribution of energy among. If the inter­particle potential is an even function then energy is distributed uniformly among the normal modes

  10. Stranded Vehicles: How Gasoline Taxes Change the Value of Households' Vehicle Assets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel

    of increases in gasoline prices varies across income, geography, and political affiliation. One standard that changes in gasoline prices can have sizable effects on the market value of vehicles. In this paper in gasoline prices affect the value of the vehicles that people own and how this varies across demographic

  11. Development of Advanced Combustion Technologies for Increased...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Technologies for Increased Thermal Efficiency Development of Advanced Combustion Technologies for Increased Thermal Efficiency Investigation of fuel effects on...

  12. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  13. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  14. Houses and households in early Icelandic society: geoarchaeology and the interpretation of social space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milek, Karen Beatrice

    2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    a matter of dispute, as does the control wielded by early Icelandic chieftains over access to farmland and such basic resources as woodland, driftwood, peat, bog iron, and maritime resources (DulTenberger 1992). The situation is much clearer... and there was increasing tension over the unequal distribution of land and natural resources. = PREFACE This dissertation is the result of my own work and includes nothing which is the outcome of work done in collaboration except where specifically indicated...

  15. EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127byFormsConsumption 1994 4

  16. Normal and lateral Casimir forces between deformed plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emig, Thorsten; Hanke, Andreas; Golestanian, Ramin; Kardar, Mehran [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan 45195-159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Casimir force between macroscopic bodies depends strongly on their shape and orientation. To study this geometry dependence in the case of two deformed metal plates, we use a path-integral quantization of the electromagnetic field which properly treats the many-body nature of the interaction, going beyond the commonly used pairwise summation (PWS) of van der Waals forces. For arbitrary deformations we provide an analytical result for the deformation induced change in the Casimir energy, which is exact to second order in the deformation amplitude. For the specific case of sinusoidally corrugated plates, we calculate both the normal and the lateral Casimir forces. The deformation induced change in the Casimir interaction of a flat and a corrugated plate shows an interesting crossover as a function of the ratio of the mean plate distance H to the corrugation length {lambda}: For {lambda}<>H. The amplitude of the lateral force between two corrugated plates which are out of registry is shown to have a maximum at an optimal wavelength of {lambda}{approx_equal}2.5 H. With increasing H/{lambda} > or approx. 0.3 the PWS approach becomes a progressively worse description of the lateral force due to many-body effects. These results may be of relevance for the design and operation of novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and other nanoscale devices.

  17. Short and Long-Term Perspectives: The Impact on Low-Income Consumers of Forecasted Energy Price Increases in 2008 and A Cap & Trade Carbon Policy in 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released its short-term forecast for residential energy prices for the winter of 2007-2008. The forecast indicates increases in costs for low-income consumers in the year ahead, particularly for those using fuel oil to heat their homes. In the following analysis, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has integrated the EIA price projections with the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 in order to project the impact of these price increases on the nation's low-income households by primary heating fuel type, nationally and by Census Region. The report provides an update of bill estimates provided in a previous study, "The Impact Of Forecasted Energy Price Increases On Low-Income Consumers" (Eisenberg, 2005). The statistics are intended for use by policymakers in the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program and elsewhere who are trying to gauge the nature and severity of the problems that will be faced by eligible low-income households during the 2008 fiscal year. In addition to providing expenditure forecasts for the year immediately ahead, this analysis uses a similar methodology to give policy makers some insight into one of the major policy debates that will impact low-income energy expenditures well into the middle decades of this century and beyond. There is now considerable discussion of employing a cap-and-trade mechanism to first limit and then reduce U.S. emissions of carbon into the atmosphere in order to combat the long-range threat of human-induced climate change. The Energy Information Administration has provided an analysis of projected energy prices in the years 2020 and 2030 for one such cap-and-trade carbon reduction proposal that, when integrated with the RECS 2001 database, provides estimates of how low-income households will be impacted over the long term by such a carbon reduction policy.

  18. NORMALITY OF NILPOTENT VARIETIES IN E6 ERIC SOMMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommers, Eric

    NORMALITY OF NILPOTENT VARIETIES IN E6 ERIC SOMMERS ABSTRACT. We determine which nilpotent orbits for a careful reading of the paper leading to its improvement. 1 #12;2 ERIC SOMMERS Our proof is direct

  19. Paducah and Portsmouth Off-Specification Enriched and Normal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enriched and Normal UF 6 Inventory 1 3B refers to a 30B cylinder size and 4A refers to a 48A size cylinder. Table 1 PORTS Enriched Inventory Container ID Sample Transfer Gross lbs...

  20. Stone-Cech remainder which make continuous images normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleissner, William G.; Levy, Ronnie

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , it is not necessary that every intermediate space Z be normal; it is enough to require that countably compact intermediate spaces be normal. 2. Proposition. If ßX\\X is sequential and Y is Tychonov, then P\\X is closed in ßX\\X. Hence, Y is normal. Proof. Suppose that q... , Clßx,x(Bn) is not compact. Since Clßx(Bn) is compact, we may choose distinct xn e Clßx(Bn) n X. Then {xln : n e to} and {x2n+x : n e to} axe disjoint closed subsets of X, both of whose closures in ßX contain p . This contradicts the normality of X. o...

  1. Characteristics of Wind Turbines Under Normal and Fault Conditions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Parsons, B.; Ellis, A.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the characteristics of a variable-speed wind turbine connected to a stiff or weak grid under normal and fault conditions and the role of reactive power compensation.

  2. Normality of Monte Carlo criticality eigenfunction decomposition coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, B. E.; Martin, W. R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Griesheimer, D. P. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., P.O. Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proof is presented, which shows that after a single Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport power method iteration without normalization, the coefficients of an eigenfunction decomposition of the fission source density are normally distributed when using analog or implicit capture MC. Using a Pearson correlation coefficient test, the proof is corroborated by results from a uniform slab reactor problem, and those results also suggest that the coefficients are normally distributed with normalization. The proof and numerical test results support the application of earlier work on the convergence of eigenfunctions under stochastic operators. Knowledge of the Gaussian shape of decomposition coefficients allows researchers to determine an appropriate level of confidence in the distribution of fission sites taken from a MC simulation. This knowledge of the shape of the probability distributions of decomposition coefficients encourages the creation of new predictive convergence diagnostics. (authors)

  3. Proving Termination of Normalization Functions for Conditional Expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Boyer and Moore have discussed a recursive function that puts con- ditional expressions software correctness) Keywords: Boyer/Moore Theorem Prover, LCF, total correctness, well 12 1 #12; 1 A normalization function Boyer

  4. Stirling numbers of graphs, and the normal ordering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Stirling numbers of graphs, and the normal ordering problem Galvin earned his PhD in mathematics correlations in discrete random structures. The Stirling number of the second kind ${n \\brace k}$ counts

  5. Use of Normalized Radial Basis Function in Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotar, Anton; Brilly, Mitja [Chair of Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Jamova 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we will present a use of normalized radial basis function in hydrology for prediction of missing river Reka runoff data. The method is based on multidimensional normal distribution, where standard deviation is first optimized and later the whole prediction process is learned on existing data [5]. We can conclude, that the method works very well for middle ranges of data, but not so well for extremes because of its interpolating nature.

  6. Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams This report describes...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: increased photovoltaic efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    increased photovoltaic efficiency Combining 'Tinkertoy' Materials with Solar Cells for Increased Photovoltaic Efficiency On December 4, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News,...

  8. Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity July 20, 2011 | Tags: HPSS, NERSC Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 2402 HPSS...

  9. Elastin-insufficient mice show normal cardiovascular remodeling in 2K1C hypertension despite higher baseline pressure and unique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Robert

    Elastin-insufficient mice show normal cardiovascular remodeling in 2K1C hypertension despite higher that would be expected in an animal demonstrat- ing hypertensive remodeling. To determine whether this is due-clip Goldblatt model of hypertension. Successfully clipped mice have a systolic pressure increase of at least 15

  10. Childhood lead poisoning near abandoned lead mining and smelting areas: A case study of two affected households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moehr, A.D. (Jasper County Health Dept., Webb City, MO (United States)); Roberts, D.W.; Phillips, P.E.; Evans, R.G.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October, 1990 the Missouri Dept. of Health entered a contract with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to conduct an exposure study at the Jasper County, Missouri Superfund Site. The primary concern was exposure to elevated levels of lead and cadmium resulting from previous mining of lead and zinc in the area. Several individuals were found to have elevated lead levels and this article is a case study of two households where children with elevated levels resided. Due to the lowering of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) standard for a level of concern in childhood lead poisoning from 25 [mu]g/dl to 10 [mu]g/dl, many environmental heath personnel may be requested to evaluate exposure routes and give advice regarding risk reduction to families who reside in areas not previously thought to be problematic. Accomplishing this risk reduction may require passage of local ordinances requiring lead abatement, additional training of field personnel, and cooperative work with other public and governmental entities.

  11. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  12. Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reimers-Arias, Carlos Alberto

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border. (August 2009) Carlos Alberto Reimers-Arias, B.Arch., Universidad Sim?n Bol?var; M.Arch., Mc... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Andrew D. Seidel Robin F. Abrams Committee Members, Marlynn L. May Robert B. Warden Head of Department, Glen T. Mills August 2009 Major Subject: Architecture iii ABSTRACT...

  13. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries. 19 figs.

  14. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries.

  15. Defining the normal turbine inflow within a wind park environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief paper discusses factors that must be considered when defining the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} (as opposed to {open_quotes}extreme{close_quotes}) loading conditions seen in wind turbines operating within a wind park environment. The author defines the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} conditions to include fatigue damage accumulation as a result of: (1) start/stop cycles, (2) emergency shutdowns, and (3) the turbulence environment associated with site and turbine location. He also interprets {open_quotes}extreme{close_quotes} loading conditions to include those events that can challenge the survivability of the turbine.

  16. Defining the normal turbine inflow within a wind park environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief paper discusses factors that must be considered when defining the [open quotes]normal[close quotes] (as opposed to [open quotes]extreme[close quotes]) loading conditions seen in wind turbines operating within a wind park environment. The author defines the [open quotes]normal[close quotes] conditions to include fatigue damage accumulation as a result of: (1) start/stop cycles, (2) emergency shutdowns, and (3) the turbulence environment associated with site and turbine location. He also interprets [open quotes]extreme[close quotes] loading conditions to include those events that can challenge the survivability of the turbine.

  17. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  18. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form. The method comprises: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  19. HOTSPOTS OF CLIMATEDRIVEN INCREASES IN RESIDENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This paper provides reduced form estimates of changes in electricity consumption due to increased use to higher projections of electricity consumption. These increases in projected electricity consumption were: climate change, vulnerability, electricity consumption, heating, cooling Please use the following citation

  20. Bioenergy Research at BNL: Increasing Productivity Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Bioenergy Research at BNL: Increasing Productivity Using Biological Interactions Lee Newman With D consequences: ­ Price of corn has doubled ­ Farmers are planting more corn for ethanol · Increase alternative

  1. The Infrared Spectral Energy Distribution of Normal Star-Forming Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel A. Dale; George Helou; Alessandra Contursi; Nancy A. Silbermann; Sonali Kolhatkar

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new phenomenological model for the spectral energy distribution of normal star-forming galaxies between 3 and 1100 microns. A sequence of realistic galaxy spectra are constructed from a family of dust emission curves assuming a power law distribution of dust mass over a wide range of interstellar radiation fields. For each interstellar radiation field heating intensity we combine emission curves for large and very small grains and aromatic feature carriers. The model is constrained by IRAS and ISOCAM broadband photometric and ISOPHOT spectrophotometric observations for our sample of 69 normal galaxies; the model reproduces well the empirical spectra and infrared color trends. These model spectra allow us to determine the infrared energy budget for normal galaxies, and in particular to translate far-infrared fluxes into total (bolometric) infrared fluxes. The 20 to 42 micron range appears to show the most significant growth in relative terms as the activity level increases, suggesting that the 20-42 micron continuum may be the best dust emission tracer of current star formation in galaxies. The redshift dependence of infrared color-color diagrams and the far-infrared to radio correlation for galaxies are also explored.

  2. Variable ventilation induces endogenous surfactant release in normal guinea pigs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Variable ventilation induces endogenous surfactant release in normal guinea pigs Stephen P. Arold,1. Alencar, Kenneth R. Lutchen, and Edward P. Ingenito. Variable ventilation induces endogenous surfactant.00036.2003.--Variable or noisy ventilation, which includes random breath-to-breath variations in tidal

  3. PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutter, Jared

    PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance Huai-Xiang Hao*, Caleb M. Cardon*, Wojtek, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Edited by Steven L. McKnight, University in a cell-autonomous manner to maintain cellular energy homeostasis and is a potential therapeutic target

  4. Rigid Shape Interpolation Using Normal Equations William Baxter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Rigid Shape Interpolation Using Normal Equations William Baxter OLM Digital, Inc. Pascal Barla INRIA Bordeaux University Ken-ichi Anjyo OLM Digital, Inc. Figure 1: Rigid Morphing with large rotations works well and is a very practical way e-mail: baxter@olm.co.jp e-mail: pascal.barla@labri.fr e

  5. Auditory Responses in Normal-Hearing, Noise-Exposed Ears

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamper, Greta

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ....................................................................................... 29 Influence of ABR Recording Electrode ......................................................................................... 31 ABR Wave V Amplitude... membrane electrode (Ferguson and Ferraro, 1989; Schwartz et al., 1994; Hall, 2007b; Gaddam and Ferraro, 2008). Variability is commonly seen in ABR response amplitude, even in normal-hearing ears (Schwartz et al., 1994). In light of the recent animal data...

  6. RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES The secret are going to say. Many people with radios have a tendency to talk and/or repeat too much. Say what you need until it is second nature. Practicing proper day-to-day radio procedures will make emergency radio

  7. Determination of normalized magnetic eigenfields in microwave cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helsing, Johan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic field integral equation for axially symmetric cavities with perfectly conducting surfaces is discretized according to a high-order convergent Fourier--Nystr\\"om scheme. The resulting solver is used to determine eigenwavenumbers and normalized magnetic eigenfields to very high accuracy in the entire computational domain.

  8. Water-Energy Shortages in the West: The New Normal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    Water-Energy Shortages in the West: The New Normal? Tuesday, November 19, 2013 12:00 - 1:30 p, Kristen Averyt, director of the Western Water Assessment, a NOAA program based at CIRES, will discuss the connections between climate science and decision- making across the West , in particular, the water

  9. CONCENTRATED SOLID SOLUTIONS OF NORMAL METALS By H. JONES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    637. CONCENTRATED SOLID SOLUTIONS OF NORMAL METALS By H. JONES, Imperial College. Department and Heine [1] in the light of the new knowledge of the Fermi surface revealed by experi- ments alloys is reviewed in the light of modern work on the nature of the Fermi surfaces in the noble metals

  10. Proving Termination of Normalization Functions for Conditional Expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Computer Laboratory University of Cambridge 3 June 1985 Boyer and Moore have discussed a recursive function: Boyer/Moore Theorem Prover, LCF, total correctness, well-founded relations. #12;Contents 1 Conclusions 12 1 #12;1 A normalization function Boyer and Moore have published a machine-assisted proof

  11. Computational Model for Forced Expiration from Asymmetric Normal Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Computational Model for Forced Expiration from Asymmetric Normal Lungs ADAM G. POLAK 1 losses along the airway branches. Calculations done for succeeding lung volumes result in the semidynamic to the choke points, characteristic differences of lung regional pressures and volumes, and a shape

  12. Assessment of Summer 1997 motor gasoline price increase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasoline markets in 1996 and 1997 provided several spectacular examples of petroleum market dynamics. The first occurred in spring 1996, when tight markets, following a long winter of high demand, resulted in rising crude oil prices just when gasoline prices exhibit their normal spring rise ahead of the summer driving season. Rising crude oil prices again pushed gasoline prices up at the end of 1996, but a warm winter and growing supplies weakened world crude oil markets, pushing down crude oil and gasoline prices during spring 1997. The 1996 and 1997 spring markets provided good examples of how crude oil prices can move gasoline prices both up and down, regardless of the state of the gasoline market in the United States. Both of these spring events were covered in prior Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports. As the summer of 1997 was coming to a close, consumers experienced yet another surge in gasoline prices. Unlike the previous increase in spring 1996, crude oil was not a factor. The late summer 1997 price increase was brought about by the supply/demand fundamentals in the gasoline markets, rather than the crude oil markets. The nature of the summer 1997 gasoline price increase raised questions regarding production and imports. Given very strong demand in July and August, the seemingly limited supply response required examination. In addition, the price increase that occurred on the West Coast during late summer exhibited behavior different than the increase east of the Rocky Mountains. Thus, the Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) 5 region needed additional analysis (Appendix A). This report is a study of this late summer gasoline market and some of the important issues surrounding that event.

  13. 60. LUNG .13 NORMAL VARIANT .31 BENIGN NEOPI,J.SM, CYST, 6l. RIGHT .131 NORMAL VARIANT, OTHER NEOPLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [ ~;{(, (1) Lungs 60. LUNG .13 NORMAL VARIANT .31 BENIGN NEOPI,J.SM, CYST, 6l. RIGHT .131 IN LUNG BRONCHI .221 SARCOIDOSIS, 672. SUPERIOR ADENOPATHY MEDIASTINUN .222 SARCOIDOSIS, 673 68. MORE THAN 1 LUNG PLRA, MEDIAST. , LOCATION (GNRLIZED) 69. OTHER-(LUNG, PLRA, MEDIAST

  14. Strong Evidence of Normal Heat Conduction in a one-Dimensional Quantum System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiji Saito

    2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate how the normal energy transport is realized in one-dimensional quantum systems using a quantum spin system. The direct investigation of local energy distribution under thermal gradient is made using the quantum master equation, and the mixing properties and the convergence of the Green-Kubo formula are investigated when the number of spin increases. We find that the autocorrelation function in the Green-Kubo formula decays as $\\sim t^{-1.5}$ to a finite value which vanishes rapidly with the increase of the system size. As a result, the Green-Kubo formula converges to a finite value in the thermodynamic limit. These facts strongly support the realization of Fourier heat law in a quantum system.

  15. SciTech Connect: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

  16. Low-Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria. Low-Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria. Abstract: Microarray analysis indicated...

  17. Some Skepticism about Increasing Shareholder Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anabtawi, Iman

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005) (“[E]ffective corporate governance, which enhancesmetric for effective corporate governance. Id. at 892 (“Iwould improve corporate governance and increase shareholder

  18. Increasing water holding capacity for irrigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Increasing water holding capacity for irrigation Reseachers recommend solutions for sediment trapping in irrigation system LANL and SNL leveraged technical expertise to determine...

  19. New Sensor Network Technology Increases Manufacturing Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Increases Manufacturing Efficiency April 11, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE supported Eaton Corporation in the development and successful deployment of an electric motor...

  20. Keeping Household Records. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormack, Linda

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transactiwl or enable you to GtbgCk MI others' * prove your ownership of property e define your fegal and financial rights ease management of your home and financi fairs Many papers could and should be di Don't become a junk collector, but don't th... valuable papers either. Know what family r keep where and why. Papers to Keep in Your Home File Certain important papers and records need to refer to or update often are best kept Store them in a &%, convenient @ace. A home business center will help...

  1. Managing Household Ant Pests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, Bastiaan M.

    2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    can tolerate the stings, but some people are very sensitive to fire ant venom and must seek medical attention. Foraging workers may enter a house in search of food, moisture or nesting sites, particularly during hot, dry periods or during floods... System become queen ants in new colonies. They may choose indoor nesting sites if suitable ones are not available outdoors. When she ?nds a nesting site, the queen loses her wings and begins to lay eggs, which hatch into legless, grub-like larvae...

  2. Essays on household finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferman, Bruno

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of three essays. The first chapter studies whether credit demand is sensitive to interest rates, to the prominence of interest rate disclosure, and to nudges. Consumer credit regulations usually ...

  3. Keeping Household Records.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormack, Linda

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Keep these while you own the ve the vehicle is stolen, the title is evidence of ship. Church records Baptismal and confirmat tificates are acceptable evidence of your bi when obtaining a delayed birth certificate. may be kept in home files. re..., allergies, diseases and immunizations for 4 all family members. Also record place and date of birth, doctors, medications and blood type. Insurance pblicies Keep these at home for con- venient referral about your coverage. Tax returns Keep...

  4. Try This: Household Magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending:Schedule FYHousehold Magnets

  5. Measurement of normal contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chongpu Zhai; Sébastien Bevand; Yixiang Gan; Dorian Hanaor; Gwénaëlle Proust; Bruno Guelorget; Delphine Retraint

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of roughness and fractality on the normal contact stiffness of rough surfaces. Samples of isotropically roughened aluminium surfaces are considered. The roughness and fractal dimension were altered through blasting using different sized particles. Subsequently, surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) was applied to the surfaces in order to modify the surface at the microscale. The surface topology was characterised by interferometry based profilometry. The normal contact stiffness was measured through nanoindentation with a flat tip utilising the partial unloading method. We focus on establishing the relationships between surface stiffness and roughness, combined with the effects of fractal dimension. The experimental results, for a wide range of surfaces, showed that the measured contact stiffness depended very closely on surfaces' root mean squared (RMS) slope and their fractal dimension, with correlation coefficients of around 90\\%, whilst a relatively weak correlation coefficient of 57\\% was found between the contact stiffness and RMS roughness.

  6. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonaldo, Maria DeFatima (New York, NY); Soares, Marcelo Bento (New York, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  7. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonaldo, M.D.; Soares, M.B.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 1 fig.

  8. INCREASING RENDERING PERFORMANCE OF GRAPHICS HARDWARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    a compute-on-demand paradigm for the design of high-speed and energy-efficient graphics components. The goalINCREASING RENDERING PERFORMANCE OF GRAPHICS HARDWARE Justin Hensley A dissertation submitted RIGHTS RESERVED ii #12;ABSTRACT JUSTIN HENSLEY: Increasing Rendering Performance of Graphics Hardware

  9. PERCEIVED SPEED INCREASES AT LOW LUMINANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pashkam, Maryam Vaziri

    PERCEIVED SPEED INCREASES AT LOW LUMINANCE Maryam Vaziri-Pashkam, Patrick Cavanagh Vision Sciences Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Harvard University Discussion Does changing the mean luminance is increased as the mean luminance of the grating decreases. Conclusion First Experiment: Stimuli were radial

  10. Quasi-Degenerate Neutrino Masses with Normal and Inverted Hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Ng K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of CP-phases on the three absolute quasi-degenerate Majorana neutrino (QDN) masses are stud-ied with neutrino mass matrices obeying {\\mu} - {\\tau} symmetry for normal as well as inverted hierarchical mass patterns. We have made further investigations on 1) the prediction of solar mixing angle which lies below tri-bimaximal mixing value in consistent with neutrino oscillation observational data, 2) the prediction on absolute neutrino mass parameter (mee) in 0{\

  11. SES Performance-Based Pay Increase

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An agency may provide a pay increase to allow a senior executive to advance his or her relative position with the SES rate range only upon a determination by the authorized agency official that the executive’s individual performance and/or contribution to agency performance so warrant. A senior executive who receives an annual summary rating of Outstanding or equivalent may be considered for an annual pay increase. A senior executive who receives an annual summary rating of less than Fully Successful or equivalent may not receive an increase in pay for the current appraisal period. The expectation is that executives who are paid consistent with their current level of responsibilities and who receive an acceptable (“Fully Successful” or better) annual summary rating will be eligible to receive a discretionary performance-based pay increase. Pay increases that advance an executive's position in the SES rate range restart the clock under the 12-month rule.

  12. Surface tension with Normal Curvature in Curved Space-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himanshu kumar; Sharf Alam; Suhail Ahmad

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With an aim to include the contribution of surface tension in the action of the boundary, we define the tangential pressure in terms of surface tension and Normal curvature in a more naturally geometric way. First, we show that the negative tangential pressure is independent of the four-velocity of a very thin hyper-surface. Second, we relate the 3-pressure of a surface layer to the normal curvature and the surface tension. Third, we relate the surface tension to the energy of the surface layer. Four, we show that the delta like energy flows across the hyper-surface will be zero for such a representation of intrinsic 3-pressure. Five, for the weak field approximation and for static spherically symmetric configuration, we deduce the classical Kelvin's relation. Six, we write a modified action for the boundary having contributions both from surface tension and normal curvature of the surface layer. Also we propose a method to find the physical action assuming a reference background, where the background is not flat.

  13. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Response and Normal Tissue Regeneration After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinauer, Michelle A., E-mail: Michelle.Stinauer@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To characterize changes in standardized uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) scans and determine the pace of normal tissue regeneration after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solid tumor liver metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of patients with liver metastases treated with SBRT to {>=}40 Gy in 3-5 fractions. Evaluable patients had pretreatment PET and {>=}1 post-treatment PET. Each PET/CT scan was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) scan. The maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) for each lesion and the total liver volume were measured on each PET/CT scan. Maximum SUV levels before and after SBRT were recorded. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 35 treated liver lesions were studied. The median follow-up was 15.7 months (range, 1.5-38.4 mo), with 5 PET scans per patient (range, 2-14). Exponential decay curve fitting (r=0.97) showed that SUV{sub max} declined to a plateau of 3.1 for controlled lesions at 5 months after SBRT. The estimated SUV{sub max} decay half-time was 2.0 months. The SUV{sub max} in controlled lesions fluctuated up to 4.2 during follow-up and later declined; this level is close to 2 standard deviations above the mean normal liver SUV{sub max} (4.01). A failure cutoff of SUV{sub max} {>=}6 is twice the calculated plateau SUV{sub max} of controlled lesions. Parenchymal liver volume decreased by 20% at 3-6 months and regenerated to a new baseline level approximately 10% below the pretreatment level at 12 months. Conclusions: Maximum SUV decreases over the first months after SBRT to plateau at 3.1, similar to the median SUV{sub max} of normal livers. Transient moderate increases in SUV{sub max} may be observed after SBRT. We propose a cutoff SUV{sub max} {>=}6, twice the baseline normal liver SUV{sub max}, to score local failure by PET criteria. Post-SBRT values between 4 and 6 would be suspicious for local tumor persistence or recurrence. The volume of normal liver reached nadir 3-6 months after SBRT and regenerated within the next 6 months.

  14. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B. (Wayne State Univ. School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  15. Physics of collisionless scrape-off-layer plasma during normal and off-normal Tokamak operating conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of a collisionless scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma in tokamak reactors is being studied to define the electron distribution function and the corresponding sheath potential between the divertor plate and the edge plasma. The collisionless model is shown to be valid during the thermal phase of a plasma disruption, as well as during the newly desired low-recycling normal phase of operation with low-density, high-temperature, edge plasma conditions. An analytical solution is developed by solving the Fokker-Planck equation for electron distribution and balance in the SOL. The solution is in good agreement with numerical studies using Monte-Carlo methods. The analytical solutions provide an insight to the role of different physical and geometrical processes in a collisionless SOL during disruptions and during the enhanced phase of normal operation over a wide range of parameters.

  16. Both construction and operations continue to increase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Both construction and operations continue to increase As mentioned earlier, Building 9731 was the first building completed at Y-12, having been completed in just a few weeks in...

  17. Increasing TLB reach using TCAM cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anuj

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose dynamic aggregation of virtual tags in TLB to increase its coverage and improve the overall miss ratio during address translation. Dynamic aggregation exploits both the spatial and temporal locality inherent in ...

  18. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector More Documents & Publications Downeast LNG, Inc. - FE Dkt. No. 14-173-LNG Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP - FE Dkt. No 11-128-LNG...

  19. Increasing Global Renewable Energy Market Share

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Increasing Global Renewable Energy Market Share: Recent Trends and Perspectives Final Report Prepared for: Beijing International Renewable Energy Conference 2005 Prepared by: The Expert Group .............................................................. ix Message to the Beijing International Renewable Energy Conference from the Secretary General

  20. RESEARCH ARTICLE Lifespan Extension and Increased Pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gronostajski, Richard M.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Lifespan Extension and Increased Pumping Rate Accompany Pharyngeal Muscle in multiple behavioral defects; slower pharyngeal pumping rate, impaired egg laying, defective motility nfi-1 must be expressed to rescue the pharyngeal pumping defect. Expression of nfi-1 from

  1. Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater treatment Plant community changes and related nutrient retention within an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland How does plant community composition change in an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland and how do those

  2. SRS reactor control rod cooling without normal forced convection cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.C. (SAIC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Easterling, T.C. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an analytical study of the coolability of the control rods in the Savannah River site (SRS) K production reactor under conditions of loss of normal forced convection cooling. The study was performed as part of the overall safety analysis of the reactor supporting its restart. The analysis addresses the buoyancy-driven boiling flow over the control rods that occurs when forced cooling is lost. The objective of the study was to demonstrate that the control rods will remain cooled (i.e., no melting) at powers representative of those anticipated for restart of the reactor.

  3. Fitting Parton Distribution Data with Multiplicative Normalization Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The NNPDF Collaboration; Richard D. Ball; Luigi Del Debbio; Stefano Forte; Alberto Guffanti; Jose I. Latorre; Juan Rojo; Maria Ubiali

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the generic problem of performing a global fit to many independent data sets each with a different overall multiplicative normalization uncertainty. We show that the methods in common use to treat multiplicative uncertainties lead to systematic biases. We develop a method which is unbiased, based on a self--consistent iterative procedure. We demonstrate the use of this method by applying it to the determination of parton distribution functions with the NNPDF methodology, which uses a Monte Carlo method for uncertainty estimation.

  4. The normal levels of immunoglobulins of the mare's uterus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergeron, Helene

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [IgG, IgA, IgG(T)) were prepared. The plates were kept at 4 C in a moist chamber for at least 24 hours before being used. 32 Table 3 ? Approximate final concentration of antisera against horse IgG, IgA and IgG(T) after dilution Antrserum (against...) Charle L. d (Head of Department) August 1984 The Normal Levels of Immunoglobulins of the Mare's Uterus (August, 1984) Helene Bergeron, D. M. V. , Universite de Montreal, Quebec, Canada Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John M. Bowen The levels...

  5. High-accuracy measurements of the normal specular reflectance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voarino, Philippe; Piombini, Herve; Sabary, Frederic; Marteau, Daniel; Dubard, Jimmy; Hameury, Jacques; Filtz, Jean Remy

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The French Laser Megajoule (LMJ) is designed and constructed by the French Commissariata l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Its amplifying section needs highly reflective multilayer mirrors for the flash lamps. To monitor and improve the coating process, the reflectors have to be characterized to high accuracy. The described spectrophotometer is designed to measure normal specular reflectance with high repeatability by using a small spot size of 100 {mu}m. Results are compared with ellipsometric measurements. The instrument can also perform spatial characterization to detect coating nonuniformity.

  6. Termination of a Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar JumpTennessee/Wind Resources < Tennessee Jump to:TensasNormal

  7. Apex or Salient of Normal Fault | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County, Michigan: EnergySalient of Normal Fault Jump to:

  8. Increased Mercury Bioaccumulation Follows Water Quality Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogle, M.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic habitats made to reduce or eliminate ecological risks can sometimes have unforeseen consequences. Environmental management activities on the U.S. Dept. of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee,have succeeded in improving water quality in streams impacted by discharges fi-om industrial facilities and waste disposal sites. The diversity and abundance of pollution-sensitive components of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of three streams improved after new waste treatment systems or remedial actions reduced inputs of various toxic chemicals. Two of the streams were known to be mercury-contaminated from historical spills and waste disposal practices. Waterborne mercury concentrations in the third were typical of uncontaminated systems. In each case, concentrations of mercury in fish, or the apparent biological availability of mercury increased over the period during which ecological metrics indicated improved water quality. In the system where waterborne mercury concentrations were at background levels, increased mercury bioaccumulation was probably a result of reduced aqueous selenium concentrations; however, the mechanisms for increased mercury accumulation in the other two streams remain under investigation. In each of the three systems, reduced inputs of metals and inorganic anions was followed by improvements in the health of aquatic invertebrate communities. However, this reduction in risk to aquatic invertebrates was accompanied by increased risk to humans and piscivorous wildlife related to increased mercury concentrations in fish.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  10. Analysis of genomic Regions of IncreaseD Gene Expression (RIDGE)s in immune activation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansson, Lena

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A RIDGE (Region of IncreaseD Gene Expression), as defined by previous studies, is a consecutive set of active genes on a chromosome that span a region around 110 kbp long. This study investigated RIDGE formation by ...

  11. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Miften, Moyed, E-mail: Moyed.Miften@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  12. Comparison of several protocols for the increase in homologous recombination in normal porcine fetal fibroblasts and the application to an actual locus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaunbrecher, Gretchen Marie

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 protein complex. A DSB occurring at the beginning of S phase will be first recognized and the free DNA ends bound by the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer. This binding recruits DNA-PKcs which... attracts a cascade of proteins to the sight of the break. The protein complex of Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2, which possess helicase and endonuclease activity, will bind to the free DNA ends and make them more accessible for the proteins involved in aligning...

  13. Increasing security in inter-chip communication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nathan J; Hamlet, Jason; Bauer, Todd; Helinski, Ryan

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for increasing security in inter-chip communication includes a sending control module, a communication bus, and a receiving control module. The communication bus is coupled between the sending control module and the receiving control module. The sending control module operates to send data on the communication bus, disable the communication bus when threats are detected, or both.

  14. INCREASED LEAD ABSORPTION AND LEAD POISONING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INCREASED LEAD ABSORPTION AND LEAD POISONING IN YOUNG CHILDREN A STATDIE:"IT BY THE CEJde slnt:t! the Surgeon GenerJi's Statement. "~edicJI Aspects of Childhood Lead POisoning," was issued:ld absorption Jnd lead poisoning. Such JCtivities for children will continue to be necessary until sources

  15. DREAM tool increases space weather predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool DREAM comes into play. Radiation belt structure and dynamics revealed DREAM is a modeling tool

  16. Porous radiant burners having increased radiant output

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tong, Timothy W. (Tempe, AZ); Sathe, Sanjeev B. (Tempe, AZ); Peck, Robert E. (Tempe, AZ)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a porous radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.

  17. Closing Digital Divides, Increasing Digital Literacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    people s media ecology #12;2. MOBILE SHIFT #12;#12;THE MOBILE PARADOX #12;Are all digital media Closing Digital Divides, Increasing Digital Literacy S. Craig Watkins The University of Texas at Austin #12;4Shifts #12;1. Digital divides & Participation gaps (Jenkins 2006; Watkins 2012) #12;Young

  18. Statistical Inference for Models with Intractable Normalizing Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Ick Hoon

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    be calculated by S1(y) = X 1?inormalizing constant ratio R(?t, ?) = ?(?)/?(?t) by bRm(?t,yt, ?) = 1 m mX i=1 g(y(t)i , ?) g(y(t)i , ?t) . 4. Calculate the Monte Carlo MH ratio r...

  19. Hard Sphere Dynamics for Normal and Granular Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James W. Dufty; Aparna Baskaran

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid of N smooth, hard spheres is considered as a model for normal (elastic collisions) and granular (inelastic collisions) fluids. The potential energy is discontinuous for hard spheres so the pairwise forces are singular and the usual forms of Newtonian and Hamiltonian mechanics do not apply. Nevertheless, particle trajectories in the N particle phase space are well defined and the generators for these trajectories can be identified. The first part of this presentation is a review of the generators for the dynamics of observables and probability densities. The new results presented in the second part refer to applications of these generators to the Liouville dynamics for granular fluids. A set of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the generator for this Liouville dynamics is identified in a special "stationary representation". This provides a class of exact solutions to the Liouville equation that are closely related to hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

  20. The Properties of Normal Conducting Cathodes in FZD Superconducting Gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF photoinjector) is one of the latest applications of SC technology in the accelerator field. Since superconducting cathodes with high QE are not available up to now, normal conducting cathode material is the main choice for the SRF photoinjectors. However, the compatibility between the cathode and the cavity is one of the challenges for this concept. The SRF gun with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated under the collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. In this paper, some experience gained in the gun commissioning will be concluded. The results of the properties of Cs2Te photocathode in the cavity will be presented, such as the Q.E., the life time, the dark current and the thermal emittance.

  1. Tunneling from super- to normal-deformed minima in nuclei.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khoo, T. L.

    1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An excited minimum, or false vacuum, gives rise to a highly elongated superdeformed (SD) nucleus. A brief review of superdeformation is given, with emphasis on the tunneling from the false to the true vacuum, which occurs in the feeding and decay of SD bands. During the feeding process the tunneling is between hot states, while in the decay it is from a cold to a hot state. The {gamma} spectra connecting SD and normal-deformed (ND) states provide information on several physics issues: the decay mechanism; the spin/parity quantum numbers, energies and microscopic structures of SD bands; the origin of identical SD bands; the quenching of pairing with excitation energy; and the chaoticity of excited ND states at 2.5-5 MeV. Other examples of tunneling in nuclei, which are briefly described, include the possible role of tunneling in {Delta}I = 4 bifurcation in SD bands, sub-barrier fusion and proton emitters.

  2. Phenomenology of electrostatically charged droplet combustion in normal gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Eric K.; Koch, Jeremy A.; Kyritsis, Dimitrios C. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental findings are provided on the effect of electrostatically charging a fuel on single-burning droplet combustion in normal gravity. It was established that significant modification of the flame morphology and the droplet burning time could be achieved, solely by the droplet charge, without the application of external electric fields. Negative charging of the droplets of mixtures of isooctane with either ethanol or a commercially available anti-static additive generated intense motion of the flame and abbreviated the droplet burning time by as much as 40% for certain blend compositions. Positive charging of the droplets generated almost spherical flames, because electrostatic attraction toward the droplets countered the effect of buoyancy. By comparing combustion of droplets of the same conductivity but different compositions, coupling of electrostatics with combustion chemistry was established. (author)

  3. Normal modes analysis of the microscopic dynamics in hard discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina Brito; Matthieu Wyart

    2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate numerically the normal modes of the free energy in a glass of hard discs. We observe that, near the glass transition or after a rapid quench deep in the glass phase, the density of states (i) is characteristic of a marginally stable structure, in particular it di splays a frequency scale $\\omega^*\\sim p^{1/2}$, where $p$ is the pressure and (ii) gives a faithful representation of the short-time dyn amics. This brings further evidences that the boson peak near the glass transition corresponds to the relaxation of marginal modes of a we akly-coordinated structure, and implies that the mean square displacement in the glass phase is anomalously large and goes as $ \\sim p^{-3/2}$, a prediction that we check numerically.

  4. Fermi Normal Coordinates and Fermion Curvature Couplings in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anshuman Dey; Abhisek Samanta; Tapobrata Sarkar

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study gravitational curvature effects in circular and radial geodesics in static, spherically symmetric space-times, using Fermi normal coordinates. We first set up these coordinates in the general case, and then use this to study effective magnetic fields due to gravitational curvature in the exterior and interior Schwarzschild, Janis-Newman-Winicour, and Bertrand space-times. We show that these fields can be large for specific parameter values in the theories, and thus might have observational significance. We discuss the qualitative differences of the magnetic field for vacuum space-times and for those seeded by matter. We estimate the magnitude of these fields in realistic galactic scenarios and discuss their possible experimental relevance. Gravitational curvature corrections to the Hydrogen atom spectrum for these space-times are also discussed briefly.

  5. Insolation data manual and direct normal solar radiation data manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24--25 years of data, generally from 1952--1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/m{sup 2} per day, Btu/ft{sup 2} per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global {bar K}{sub T} (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global {bar K}{sub T} is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

  6. RUMINAL ADAPTATION TO INCREASING LEVELS OF CONCENTRATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .0 % citrus pulp, 1.0 % lard, 7.0 % sugarbeet pulp, 3.3 % oat husk meal, 2.0 % coconut expeller and 2-chromatography. The rate of lactate fermentation was measured by incubation of 10 ml rumen fluid (taken at 14.00 h) with 1. If adaptation occurs one should expect an increase of lactate and a higher rate of L- lactate fermentation

  7. New hydrocracking catalysts increase throughput, run length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huizinga, T. [Shell Internationale Petroleum Mij., The Hague (Netherlands); Theunissen, J.M.H. [Rayong Refinery Co. Ltd., Rayong (Thailand); Minderhoud, H.; Veen, R. van [Koninklijke/Shell-Lab., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved, second-stage hydrocracking catalyst has been developed by combining stabilized Y zeolites with amorphous silica alumina cracking components. A commercial application of this catalyst, along with a new, first-stage zeolitic hydrocracking catalyst, resulted in increased unit throughput and cycle length. The paper discusses the hydrocracking process, first-stage catalysts, second-stage catalysts, hydrogenation process, commercial results, and product properties.

  8. Cubic AlGaN/GaN Hetero-Junction Field-Effect Transistors with Normally-on and Normally-off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    Cubic AlGaN/GaN Hetero-Junction Field-Effect Transistors with Normally-on and Normally-effect transistors (HFETs) in GaN technology. HFET structures were fabricated of non-polar cubic AlGaN/GaN hetero insulation of 3C-SiC was realized by Ar+ implantation before c-AlGaN/GaN growth. HFETs with normally

  9. As you know, water costs continue to rise, but you can do something to help yourself. Households can check their plumbing fixtures and irrigation systems for leaks. This checklist will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Households can check their plumbing fixtures and irrigation systems for leaks. This checklist will help you a certification program focused on water efficiency to ensure that your in-ground irrigation system is not leaking tape and a wrench. 8. Consult with an irrigation installer (WaterSense partner) who has passed

  10. Source and thermal maturity of bitumen in Precambrian Nonesuch Formation inferred from isotopic compositions of individual normal alkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hieshima, G.B. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a continuing study of organic geochemistry of the 1.05 Ga Nonesuch Formation in the North American Mid-Continents rift, isotopic compositions of individual normal alkanes were measured using compound-specific isotopic analysis. This is a relatively new technique that can be used in conjunction with traditional biomarker analysis in interpretation of thermal maturity, oil-source rock correlation, and paleoecologic reconstruction. Carbon-isotopic compositions of individual normal alkanes from C{sub 15} to C{sub 25} in five bitumens and one oil from Nonesuch strata vary from {minus}28.8 to {minus}34.5{per thousand} (versus PDB). Within a given sample, isotopic compositions of n-alkanes span a range of 2 to 4 {per thousand}%. Homologues from C{sub 15} to C{sub 19} are isotopically light (depleted) by approximately 0.5{per thousand} relative to higher homologues from C{sub 20} to C{sub 25}. Two sources of normal alkanes are interpreted from the distribution of isotopic compositions. Based on chain length, the series from C{sub 15} to C{sub 19} may have been derived from algal components. Isotopically heavy, higher homologues are suspected to have been derived from bacterial sources. The pattern of isotopic compositions of bitumens is similar to that of the oil, demonstrating an oil-source rock relationship. Superimposed upon this primary, bimodal distribution of normal alkanes is the influence of thermal maturity on isotopic composition. Normal alkanes in samples of higher thermal maturity are enriched isotopically by 0.25 to 2{per thousand} relative to those of lower thermal maturity. Isotopic enrichment with increasing thermal maturity is interpreted to be the result of either addition of isotopically heavy components derived from kerogen and/or preferential loss through cracking of isotopically light components in bitumen.

  11. SPEECH-CODING AND TRAINING-INDUCED PLASTICITY IN AUDITORY CORTEX OF NORMAL AND DYSLEXIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilgard, Michael P.

    SPEECH-CODING AND TRAINING-INDUCED PLASTICITY IN AUDITORY CORTEX OF NORMAL AND DYSLEXIA MODEL RATS anymore... #12;SPEECH-CODING AND TRAINING-INDUCED PLASTICITY IN AUDITORY CORTEX OF NORMAL AND DYSLEXIA

  12. Imaging of normal and pathologic joint synovium using nonlinear optical microscopy as a potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    , and gout at 3.0 million. Arthritis can result in irreversible destruction and loss of normal articular

  13. Increasing the Efficiency of Energy Scavengers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahram M. Shahruz

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a methodology for designing efficient energy scavengers is proposed. The scavenger consists of a cantilever beam on which piezoelectric films and a mass are mounted. The mass at the tip of the beam is known as the proof mass and the device is called either an energy scavenger or a beam-mass system. The proof mass is a permanent magnet, where in its vicinity attracting permanent magnets are placed. It is shown that when the magnets have appropriate strengths and are placed appropriately, the vibration of the beam-mass system can be amplified, thereby the scavenged energy is increased. Examples are given throughout the paper.

  14. Increasing thermoelectric efficiency towards the Carnot limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulio Casati; Carlos Mejia-Monasterio; Tomaz Prosen

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of thermoelectricity and propose a simple microscopic mechanism for the increase of thermoelectric efficiency. We consider the cross transport of particles and energy in open classical ergodic billiards. We show that, in the linear response regime, where we find exact expressions for all transport coefficients, the thermoelectric efficiency of ideal ergodic gases can approach Carnot efficiency for sufficiently complex charge carrier molecules. Our results are clearly demonstrated with a simple numerical simulation of a Lorentz gas of particles with internal rotational degrees of freedom.

  15. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Wheatridge, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  16. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, R.B.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 11 figs.

  17. Increasing water holding capacity for irrigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » ImportantOfficeofofIncreasing water holding

  18. Increasing the Capacity of Existing Power Lines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of Energy IRSJulyIncandescentIncreasing Solar

  19. Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jin

    Distributions Jin Wang Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Valdosta State University Valdosta, GA 31698-0040 January 28, 2000 Abstract The mixture of normal distributions provides a useful extension of the normal distribution for modeling of daily changes in market variables with fatter-than-normal tails

  20. Value of storage with increased renewable penetration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, James Robert; Roach, Jesse Dillon

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem statement for this project is: (1) Renewable energy portfolio standards - (a) high penetration of intermittent and variable renewable generation on the grid, (b) utilities constrained by NERC Control Performance Standards, (c) requires additional resources to match generation with load; and (2) mitigation of impacts with energy storage - at what level of renewable penetration does energy storage become an attractive value proposition. Use a simplified, yet robust dispatch model that: (a) incorporates New Mexico Balance Area load and wind generation data, (b) distributes the load among a suite of generators, (c) quantifies increased generation costs with increased penetration of intermittent and variable renewable generation - fuel, startup, shut down, ramping, standby, etc., (d) tracks and quantifies NERC pentalties and violations, and (e) quantifies storage costs. Dispatch model has been constructed and it: (a) accurately distributes a load among a suite of generators, (b) quantifies duty cycle metrics for each of the generators - cumulative energy production, ramping and non ramping duration, spinning reserves, number of start-ups, and shut down durations, etc., (c) quantifies energy exchanges - cumulative exchanges, duration, and number of exchanges, (d) tracks ACE violations.

  1. Cloud cover increase with increasing aerosol absorptivity: A counterexample to the conventional semidirect aerosol effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    humidity. The net effect is more low cloud cover with increasing aerosol absorption. The higher specific by dust radiative heating. Although in some areas our model exhibits a reduction of low cloud cover due are expected to have a similar effect. Citation: Perlwitz, J., and R. L. Miller (2010), Cloud cover increase

  2. Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance -A Closure Experiment, Halthore et al. 1 Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    ). This is the energy in the solar spectrum falling per unit time on a unit area of a surface oriented normal to the Sun Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the extinction - whether absorption or scattering

  3. The dust mass in z > 6 normal star forming galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, Mattia; Graziani, Luca; Valiante, Rosa; Dayal, Pratika; Maio, Umberto; Ciardi, Benedetta; Hunt, Leslie K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We interpret recent ALMA observations of z > 6 normal star forming galaxies by means of a semi-numerical method, which couples the output of a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation with a chemical evolution model which accounts for the contribution to dust enrichment from supernovae, asymptotic giant branch stars and grain growth in the interstellar medium. We find that while stellar sources dominate the dust mass of small galaxies, the higher level of metal enrichment experienced by galaxies with Mstar > 10^9 Msun allows efficient grain growth, which provides the dominant contribution to the dust mass. Even assuming maximally efficient supernova dust production, the observed dust mass of the z = 7.5 galaxy A1689-zD1 requires very efficient grain growth. This, in turn, implies that in this galaxy the average density of the cold and dense gas, where grain growth occurs, is comparable to that inferred from observations of QSO host galaxies at similar redshifts. Although plausible, the upper limits on the dust ...

  4. Synchrotron radiation damage observations in normal incidence copper mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z.; Melendez, J.; Colbert, J.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-cooled copper mirrors used at near-normal incidence on two beam lines at the NSLS are observed to undergo severe degradation upon exposure to the direct SR beam. These mirrors are used on beam lines designed to utilize radiation in the wavelength regions longer than 100 nm and are coated with a uv reflection-enhancing coating, consisting of one or more bilayers of aluminum with a MgF/sub 2/ overcoat. Beamline performance degrades very rapidly following installation of a new set of mirrors. Analysis of the mirror surfaces by various non-destructive techniques indicates severe degradation of the coating and surface along the central strip where most of the x-ray power is absorbed from the beam. In one case where the mirror had three bilayer coatings, the outer coating layer has disappeared along the central strip. Rutherford backscatter measurements indicate compositional changes between layers and confirm the existence of a carbon deposit on the surface. Thermal modeling suggests that most of the damage is caused by direct photon interaction, since the temperature rise in the energy deposition region is small.

  5. HP replacement program increases efficiency, protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than 50 years, compression equipment along the 2,000-mile Tennessee Gas Pipeline has been helping to supply natural gas needs for the Northeast. But increasing demand and a need for more environmentally safe equipment mean a major replacement program for the compressor stations that make the natural gas transmission possible. Today it is one of the longest gas pipelines in the world, carrying more than 1 Bcf/d of natural gas. New compression equipment is being installed to boost efficiency and meet more stringent environmental standards. In 1993, Tenneco Energy, purchased by El Paso Energy in December 1996, initiated a Horsepower Replacement Program intended to replace older, inefficient technology with more advanced equipment. A major objective was to improve operational effectiveness and to reduce harmful nitrogen oxide and carbon monoxide emissions by converting much of the machinery to electric-driven compression equipment.

  6. Uptake of radiolabeled ions in normal and ischemia-damaged brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dienel, G.A.; Pulsinelli, W.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regional concentrations of nine radiochemicals were measured in rat brain after induction of cerebral ischemia to identify tracers concentrated by brain undergoing selective neuronal necrosis. Transient (30 minute) forebrain ischemia was produced in the rat; 24 hours after cerebral recirculation the radiochemicals were injected intravenously and allowed to circulate for 5 hours. The brain concentrations of the radiochemicals in dissected regions were determined by scintillation counting. Forebrain ischemia of this nature will produce extensive injury to striatal neurons but will spare the great majority of neocortical neurons at 24 hours. The regional concentrations of these radiochemicals varied considerably in both control and ischemic animals. In postischemic animals, 4 radionuclides (/sup 63/Ni, /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, /sup 22/Na, and (/sup 3/H)tetracycline) were concentrated in the irreversibly damaged striatum in amounts ranging from 1.4 to 2.4 times greater than in normal tissue. The concentrations of /sup 65/Zn, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, and /sup 147/Pm in postischemic brain were similar to or less than those in normal brain. The concentration of (14C)EDTA was increased in injured and uninjured brain of postischemic rats. Autoradiographic analysis of the distribution patterns of some of these ions in normal animals showed that /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, /sup 22/Na, /sup 65/Zn, and /sup 59/Fe were distributed more uniformly throughout the brain than were /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, /sup 63/Ni, and /sup 147/Pm. At 24 or 48 hours after ischemia, /sup 63/Ni, /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, and /sup 22/Na were preferentially concentrated in the damaged striatum and hippocampus, whereas /sup 65/Zn, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, and /sup 147/Pm did not accumulate in irreversibly injured tissue. Of the radiochemicals tested to date, Ni, TcO/sub 4/, and tetracycline may be useful for diagnosing ischemic brain injury in humans, using positron emission tomography.

  7. Do PV Systems Increase Residential Selling Prices If So, How Can Practitioners Estimate This Increase?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Do PV Systems Increase Residentialimpacts of photovoltaic (PV) energy systems on home salesthat existing homes with PV systems sold for a premium over

  8. Multivariable controller increased MTBE complex capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, D.; Peterson, T.J.; O`Connor, D. [DMC Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Payne, D.; Adams, V. [Valero Refining Co., Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capacity increased by more than 4.6% when one dynamic matrix multivariable controller began operating in Valero Refining Company`s MTBE production complex in Corpus Christi, Texas. This was on a plant that was already running well above design capacity due to previously made process changes. A single controller was developed to cover an isobutane dehydrogenation (ID) unit and an MTBE reaction and fractionation plant with the intermediate isobutylene surge drum. The overall benefit is realized by a comprehensive constrained multivariable predictive controller that properly handles all sets of limits experienced by the complex, whether limited by the front-end ID or back-end MTBE units. The controller has 20 manipulated, 6 disturbance and 44 controlled variables, and covers widely varying dynamics with settling times ranging from twenty minutes to six hours. The controller executes each minute with a six hour time horizon. A unique achievement is intelligent surge drum level handling by the controller for higher average daily complex capacity as a whole. The ID unit often operates at simultaneous limits on reactor effluent compressor capacity, cold box temperature and hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio, and the MTBE unit at impurity in butene column overhead as well as impurity in MTBE product. The paper discusses ether production, isobutane dehydrogenation, maximizing production, controller design, and controller performance.

  9. angiotensin ii increases: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the rat brain in response to dietary sodium manipulation and angiotensin (Ang)II infusion. Male Wistar Kyoto rats (n ? 6) were fed normal, high, or low sodium diets for 12 d...

  10. acids increase hepatitis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was delayed at both concentrations. Root initiation was also stimulated by gibberellic acid (0-1-45 tM) at an auxin-to-kinin ratio 10 times that normally optimal for cell...

  11. Increased use of Renewable Energy in Africa through a Program of Energy Enterprise Development and Investment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christine Eibs Singer

    2005-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    To provide training in enterprise development and technical applications, local partner capacity building, individualized enterprise development services and seed capital investment to catalyze the creation of sustainable renewable energy enterprises that deliver clean energy services to households and businesses in South Africa, Ethiopia and Tanzania.

  12. Increased phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) receptor function associated with sickle red cell membrane ghosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramachandran, M.; Nair, C.N.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological receptor for tumor-promoting phorbol esters has been identified as the CaS /phospholipid dependent enzyme, protein kinase C. In the red cell, this enzyme is mainly cytosolic but becomes translocated to the membrane if the cellular CaS is allowed to rise. Since cellular CaS in sickle red cells is high, it was reasoned that this enzyme may become more membrane-bound. In fact, the authors noticed a four-fold increase in the binding of TH-PDBu by membrane ghosts isolated from sickle red cells compared to normal red cells (pmoles PDBu bound/mg protein; normal = 0.3 vs sickle cell = 1.4). Attempts to assay the enzyme directly as phospholipid-activated TSP incorporation into the acid-precipitable membrane proteins also indicated a two-fold increase in the radiolabelling of sickle cell membrane ghosts. Autophosphorylation of membrane proteins and analysis of the phosphorylation profile by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography revealed phosphorylation predominantly of bands 3, 4.1 and 4.9 which are known protein kinase C substrates for the red cell enzyme. The increased membrane-associated protein kinase C in sickle red cells may have a bearing on the altered membrane properties reported in this condition.

  13. The normal state properties of nano-sized CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} added Bi-based superconductors in bipolaron model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Salem, M. K.; Slimani, Y.; Hannachi, E.; Hamrita, A.; Ben Azzouz, F.; Ben Salem, M. [L3M, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, University of Carthage, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of nano-sized CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles (10 nm in diameter) addition on the structure and the normal state transport properties of polycrystalline Bi-based superconductors were systematically studied. The additional amount, x wt.%, of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} in this case varied from 0.0 to 1 wt.% of the total mass of the sample. Phase analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electrical resistance as a function of temperature, ?(T) were carried out. Nano-sized particles addition modifies the electrical behavior of the normal state with increasing the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} concentration. The bipolaron model can explain properly the normal state resistivity of the samples.

  14. Depth-resolved monitoring of diffusion of hyperosmotic agents in normal and malignant human esophagus tissues using optical coherence tomography in-vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Qingliang; Guo Zhouyi; Wei Huajiang; Yang Hongqin; Xie Shusen

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Depth-resolved monitoring with differentiation and quantification of glucose diffusion in healthy and abnormal esophagus tissues has been studied in vitro. Experiments have been performed using human normal esophagus and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues by the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The images have been continuously acquired for 120 min in the experiments, and the depth-resolved and average permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution have been calculated by the OCT amplitude (OCTA) method. We demonstrate the capability of the OCT technique for depth-resolved monitoring, differentiation, and quantifying of glucose diffusion in normal esophagus and ESCC tissues. It is found that the permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution are not uniform throughout the normal esophagus and ESCC tissues and increase from (3.30 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and (1.57 {+-} 0.05) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the mucous membrane of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues to (1.82 {+-} 0.04) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} and (3.53 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the submucous layer approximately 742 {mu}m away from the epithelial surface of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues, respectively. (optical coherence tomography)

  15. Hydromechanical modeling of pulse tests that measure both fluidpressure and fracture-normal displacement of the Coaraze Laboratory site,France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappa, F.; Guglielmi, Y.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.; Thoraval, A.

    2006-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ fracture mechanical deformation and fluid flowinteractions are investigated through a series of hydraulic pulseinjection tests, using specialized borehole equipment that cansimultaneously measure fluid pressure and fracture displacements. Thetests were conducted in two horizontal boreholes spaced one meter apartvertically and intersecting a near-vertical highly permeable faultlocated within a shallow fractured carbonate rock. The field data wereevaluated by conducting a series of coupled hydromechanical numericalanalyses, using both distinct-element and finite-element modelingtechniques and both two- and three-dimensional model representations thatcan incorporate various complexities in fracture network geometry. Oneunique feature of these pulse injection experiments is that the entiretest cycle, both the initial pressure increase and subsequent pressurefall-off, is carefully monitored and used for the evaluation of the insitu hydromechanical behavior. Field test data are evaluated by plottingfracture normal displacement as a function of fluid pressure, measured atthe same borehole. The resulting normal displacement-versus-pressurecurves show a characteristic loop, in which the paths for loading(pressure increase) and unloading (pressure decrease) are different. Bymatching this characteristic loop behavior, the fracture normal stiffnessand an equivalent stiffness (Young's modulus) of the surrounding rockmass can be back-calculated. Evaluation of the field tests by couplednumerical hydromechanical modeling shows that initial fracture hydraulicaperture and normal stiffness vary by a factor of 2 to 3 for the twomonitoring points within the same fracture plane. Moreover, the analysesshow that hydraulic aperture and the normal stiffness of the pulse-testedfracture, the stiffness of surrounding rock matrix, and the propertiesand geometry of the surrounding fracture network significantly affectcoupled hydromechanical responses during the pulse injection test. Morespecifically, the pressure-increase path of the normaldisplacement-versus-pressure curve is highly dependent on thehydromechanical parameters of the tested fracture and the stiffness ofthe matrix near the injection point, whereas the pressure-decrease pathis highly influenced by mechanical processes within a larger portion ofthe surrounding fractured rock.

  16. Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krim, Jacqueline

    Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding degradation of the contact interface of a fluorocarbon monolayer-coated polycrystalline silicon microdevice

  17. Pentose fermentation of normally toxic lignocellulose prehydrolysate with strain of Pichia stipitis yeast using air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Jr., Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis NPw9 (ATCC PTA-3717) useful for the production of ethanol using oxygen for growth while fermenting normally toxic lignocellulosic prehydrolysates.

  18. Non-CFC vacuum alternatives for the energy-efficient insulation of household refrigerators: Design and use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, T.F.; Benson, D.K.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency, environmental issues, and market incentives all encourage government and industry to continue work on thin-profile vacuum insulations for domestic refrigerators and freezers (R/Fs). Vacuum insulations promise significant improvement in thermal savings over current insulations; the technical objective of one design is an R-value of better than 10 (hr-ft{sup 2}-F/Btu) in 0.1 in. thickness. If performance is improved by a factor of 10 over that of CFC-blown insulating foams, the new insulations (made without CFCs or other potentially troublesome fill gases) will change the design and improve the efficiency of refrigerators. Such changes will meet the conservation, regulatory, and market drivers now strong in developed countries and likely to increase in developing countries. Prototypes of various designs have been tested in the laboratory and in factories, and results to date confirm the good thermal performance of these thin-profile alternatives. The next step is to resolve issues of reliability and cost effectiveness. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Neutronics and Fuel Performance Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Fuel under Normal Operation Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Wu; Piyush Sabharwall; Jason Hales

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the analysis of neutronics and fuel performance analysis for enhanced accident tolerance fuel, with Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent and INL’s fuel performance code BISON, respectively. The purpose is to evaluate two of the most promising candidate materials, FeCrAl and Silicon Carbide (SiC), as the fuel cladding under normal operating conditions. Substantial neutron penalty is identified when FeCrAl is used as monolithic cladding for current oxide fuel. From the reactor physics standpoint, application of the FeCrAl alloy as coating layer on surface of zircaloy cladding is possible without increasing fuel enrichment. Meanwhile, SiC brings extra reactivity and the neutron penalty is of no concern. Application of either FeCrAl or SiC could be favorable from the fuel performance standpoint. Detailed comparison between monolithic cladding and hybrid cladding (cladding + coating) is discussed. Hybrid cladding is more practical based on the economics evaluation during the transition from current UO2/zircaloy to Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) system. However, a few issues remain to be resolved, such as the creep behavior of FeCrAl, coating spallation, inter diffusion with zirconium, etc. For SiC, its high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, low thermal neutron absorption cross section, irradiation stability (minimal swelling) make it an excellent candidate materials for future nuclear fuel/cladding system.

  20. Optimizing Normal Tissue Sparing in Ion Therapy Using Calculated Isoeffective Dose for Ion Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remmes, Nicholas B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Herman, Michael G., E-mail: Herman.Michael@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Kruse, Jon J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate how the selection of ion type affects the calculated isoeffective dose to the surrounding normal tissue as a function of both normal tissue and target tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratios. Methods and Materials: A microdosimetric biologic dose model was incorporated into a Geant4 simulation of parallel opposed beams of protons, helium, lithium, beryllium, carbon, and neon ions. The beams were constructed to give a homogeneous isoeffective dose to a volume in the center of a water phantom for target tissues covering a range of cobalt equivalent {alpha}/{beta} ratios of 1-20 Gy. Concomitant normal tissue isoeffective doses in the plateau of the ion beam were then compared for different ions across the range of normal tissue and target tissue radiosensitivities for a fixed isoeffective dose to the target tissue. Results: The ion type yielding the optimal normal tissue sparing was highly dependent on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of both the normal and the target tissue. For carbon ions, the calculated isoeffective dose to normal tissue at a 5-cm depth varied by almost a factor of 5, depending on the {alpha}/{beta} ratios of the normal and target tissue. This ranges from a factor of 2 less than the isoeffective dose of a similar proton treatment to a factor of 2 greater. Conclusions: No single ion is optimal for all treatment scenarios. The heavier ions are superior in cases in which the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of the target tissue is low and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of normal tissue is high, and protons are superior in the opposite circumstances. Lithium and beryllium appear to offer dose advantages similar to carbon, with a considerably lower normal tissue dose when the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the target tissue is high and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the normal tissue is low.

  1. Radiation Increases Invasion of Gene-Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zielske, Steven P., E-mail: szielske@med.umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Livant, Donna L.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells in the bone marrow that have been found to migrate to tumors, suggesting a potential use for cancer gene therapy. MSCs migrate to sites of tissue damage, including normal tissues damaged by radiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of tumor radiotherapy on the localization of lentivirus-transduced MSCs to tumors. Methods and Materials: MSCs were labeled with a lipophilic dye to investigate their migration to colon cancer xenografts. Subsequently, the MSCs were transduced with a lentiviral vector to model gene therapy and mark the infused MSCs. LoVo tumor xenografts were treated with increasing radiation doses to assess the effect on MSC localization, which was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MSC invasion efficiency was determined in an invasion assay. Results: MSCs migrated to tumor xenografts of various origins, with few cells found in normal tissues. A lentiviral vector efficiently transduced MSCs in the presence, but not the absence, of hexadimethrine bromide (Polybrene). When LoVo tumors were treated with increasing radiation doses, more MSCs were found to migrate to them than to untreated tumors. Irradiation increased MSC localization in HT-29 and MDA-MB-231, but not UMSCC1, xenografts. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in tumors did not correlate with the basal levels of MSC infiltration; however, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was modestly elevated in irradiated tumors. Media from irradiated LoVo cells stimulated MSC invasion into basement membranes. Conclusion: These findings suggest that radiation-induced injury can be used to target MSCs to tumors, which might increase the effectiveness of MSC cancer gene therapy. The production of tumor-derived factors in response to radiation stimulates MSC invasion.

  2. Edinburgh Research Explorer Pulmonary diesel particulate increases susceptibility to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Pulmonary diesel particulate increases susceptibility to myocardial, MR & Gray, GA 2014, 'Pulmonary diesel particulate increases susceptibility to myocardial ischemia. Pulmonary diesel particulate increases susceptibility to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury via

  3. ANALYTIC EQUIVALENCE OF NORMAL CROSSING FUNCTIONS ON A REAL ANALYTIC MANIFOLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ANALYTIC EQUIVALENCE OF NORMAL CROSSING FUNCTIONS ON A REAL ANALYTIC MANIFOLD Goulwen Fichou crossing singularities after a modification. We focus on the analytic equivalence of such functions with only normal crossing singularities. We prove that for such functions C right equivalence implies

  4. A Filtering Mechanism for Normal Fish Trajectories Cigdem Beyan, Robert B. Fisher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    A Filtering Mechanism for Normal Fish Trajectories Cigdem Beyan, Robert B. Fisher IPAB, School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, UK C.Beyan@sms.ed.ac.uk, rbf@inf.ed.ac.uk Abstract Understanding fish surveillance, etc. However, the literature is very limited in terms of normal/abnormal fish behavior

  5. Quantum Cavitation: a comparison between superfluid helium-4 and normal liquid helium-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caupin, Frédéric

    Quantum Cavitation: a comparison between superfluid helium-4 and normal liquid helium-3 S. Balibar in superfluid helium-4 and in normal liquid helium-3, both theoretically and experimentally. We compare the two by tunneling, to classical cavitation where their nu- cleation is thermally activated. In helium-3, where

  6. All proper normal extensions of S5{square have the polynomial size model property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amsterdam, University of

    All proper normal extensions of S5{square have the polynomial size model property Nick extensions of the bi-modal system S5 2 have the poly-size model property. In fact, every normal proper extension L of S5 2 is complete with respect to a class of #12;nite frames FL . To each such class

  7. Assessing Non-Normal Effects in Thermoacoustic Systems with Mean Flow. K. Wieczorek,1, a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    Assessing Non-Normal Effects in Thermoacoustic Systems with Mean Flow. K. Wieczorek,1, a) C this paper, non-normal interactions in a thermoacoustic system are studied, using a low-order expansion. INTRODUCTION Over the last decades, thermoacoustic instabilities have been the subject of intense re- search

  8. Assessing Non-Normal Effects in Thermoacoustic Systems with Mean Flow. K. Wieczorek,1, a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Assessing Non-Normal Effects in Thermoacoustic Systems with Mean Flow. K. Wieczorek,1, a) C.1063/1.3650418 #12;In this paper, non-normal interactions in a thermoacoustic system are studied, using a low,version1-19Mar2013 #12;I. INTRODUCTION Over the last decades, thermoacoustic instabilities have been

  9. Asymptotic normality of urn models for clinical trials with delayed response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Li-Xin

    normality of Yn in the GFU model. Typically, clinical trials do not result in immediate outcomes ­ that isAsymptotic normality of urn models for clinical trials with delayed response F E I FA N G H U 1, Zhejiang, Hangzhou 310028, P. R. China. E-mail: lxzhang@mail.hz.zj.cn For response-adaptive clinical trials

  10. Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    is known as Normalized Differ- ence Water Index (NDWI) [12]. It is calculated using reflectance in two near infrared (NIR) channels. Similar indices have been proposed that use reflectance at other NIR wavelengthsNormalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks Kristine

  11. Projective re-normalization for improving the behavior of a homogeneous conic linear system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belloni, Alexandre

    In this paper we study the homogeneous conic system F : Ax = 0, x ? C \\ {0}. We choose a point ¯s ? intC? that serves as a normalizer and consider computational properties of the normalized system F¯s : Ax = 0, ¯sT x = 1, ...

  12. Interpolating wind speed normals from the sparse Dutch network to a high resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    , we had potential wind speed time series with 30 years of data (with at least 20 yearly and monthly by Verkaik (Verkaik, 2001). The method is a five-step procedure: 1 Use series of (potential) wind to calculate (potential) normals at measuring sites 2 Calculate wind speed normals at the top of the surface

  13. Elastin protein levels are a vital modifier affecting normal lung development and susceptibility to emphysema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Robert

    Elastin protein levels are a vital modifier affecting normal lung development and susceptibility modifier affecting normal lung development and susceptibility to emphysema. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol-induced emphysema is highly variable, and numerous genetic and environmental factors are thought to mitigate lung

  14. An approach to the problem of network synthesis utilizing normal coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Jack Anthony

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN APPROACH TO THE PROBLEM OF NETWORK SYNTHESIS UTILIZING NORMAL COORDINATES A NPRROCHTHPEB LM FTWK ABHSEBM LTPCY Approved as to style and content by: A N P u __________IUSTPCZBTB of Commit teNETWORK SYNTHESIS UTILIZING NORMAL COORDINATES LM Jack Anthony Baird u * A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas In partial fulfillment...

  15. Computer Graphics International 2004 (CGI), June 1619, Crete, Greece. IEEE Computer Society Press. Consistent Normal Orientation for Polygonal Meshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    . Consistent Normal Orientation for Polygonal Meshes Pavel Borodin Gabriel Zachmann Reinhard Klein Institute

  16. California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases Personal Comfort California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases Personal Comfort April 18, 2013 - 12:00am...

  17. Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies Download presentation...

  18. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    : Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary) 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply...

  19. Optimizing Blast Furnace Operation to Increase Efficiency and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimizing Blast Furnace Operation to Increase Efficiency and Lower Costs Optimizing Blast Furnace Operation to Increase Efficiency and Lower Costs cfdblastfurnace.pdf More...

  20. SciTech Connect: Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas Use for Transportation (Presentation) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural...

  1. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to Advance Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to...

  2. Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in...

  3. Mentoring and Educating to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mentoring and Educating to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math Mentoring and Educating to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math October...

  4. DOE Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy Efficiency Reporting Requirements DOE Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy Efficiency Reporting...

  5. Energy Department Invests $6 Million to Increase Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Million to Increase Energy Efficiency of Schools, Offices, Stores and other U.S. Buildings Energy Department Invests 6 Million to Increase Energy Efficiency of Schools, Offices,...

  6. Oregon Institute of Technology Recognized for Increasing its...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Institute of Technology Recognized for Increasing its Use of Geothermal and Solar Energy Oregon Institute of Technology Recognized for Increasing its Use of Geothermal and Solar...

  7. Energy Department Announces $9 Million to Lower Costs, Increase...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lower Costs, Increase Performance of Solar Energy Systems Energy Department Announces 9 Million to Lower Costs, Increase Performance of Solar Energy Systems December 2, 2014 -...

  8. Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal...

  9. Federal Strategies to Increase the Implementation of CHP in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Strategies to Increase the Implementation of CHP in the United States, June 1999 Federal Strategies to Increase the Implementation of CHP in the United States, June 1999...

  10. Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries This...

  11. Increasing Community Access to Solar: Designing and Developing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Increasing Community Access to Solar: Designing and Developing a Shared Solar Photovoltaic System (Fact Sheet), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Increasing Community Access to...

  12. Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces Clean Water Demands Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces Clean Water Demands June 30,...

  13. Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  14. DOE Issues Funding Opportunity for Innovations to Increase Cybersecuri...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Funding Opportunity for Innovations to Increase Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems DOE Issues Funding Opportunity for Innovations to Increase Cybersecurity for Energy...

  15. Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

  16. Measurement of pressure-displacement kinetics of hemoglobin in normal breast tissue with near-infrared spectral imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Laughney, Ashley M.; Kogel, Christine A.; Paulsen, Keith D

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying localized external displacement to the breast surface can change the interstitial fluid pressure such that regional transient microvascular changes occur in oxygenation and vascular volume. Imaging these dynamic responses over time, while different pressures are applied, could provide selective temporal contrast for cancer relative to the surrounding normal breast. In order to investigate this possibility in normal breast tissue, a near-infrared spectral tomography system was developed that can simultaneously acquire data at three wavelengths with a 15 s time resolution per scan. The system was tested first with heterogeneous blood phantoms. Changes in regional blood concentrations were found to be linearly related to recovered mean hemoglobin concentration (HbT) values (R{sup 2}=0.9). In a series of volunteer breast imaging exams, data from 17 asymptomatic subjects were acquired under increasing and decreasing breast compression. Calculations show that a 10 mm displacement applied to the breast results in surface pressures in the range of 0-55 kPa depending on breast density. The recovered human data indicate that HbT was reduced under compression and the normalized change was significantly correlated to the applied pressure with a p value of 0.005. The maximum HbT decreases in breast tissue were associated with body mass index (BMI), which is a surrogate indicator of breast density. No statistically valid correlations were found between the applied pressure and the changes in tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) or water percentage (H2O) across the range of BMI values studied.

  17. Individualized Radical Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Normal Tissue Dose Constraints: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baardwijk, Angela van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)], E-mail: angela.vanbaardwijk@maastro.nl; Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Wanders, Stofferinus; Dekker, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Maasland Hospital, Sittard (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Sint Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Simons, Jean [Department of Pulmonology, Sint Jans Gasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW Research Institute, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Local recurrence is a major problem after (chemo-)radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that for each individual patient, the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, delivered within 5 weeks. We report first results of a prospective feasibility trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with medically inoperable or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, World Health Organization performance score of 0-1, and reasonable lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 50%) were analyzed. All patients underwent irradiation using an individualized prescribed TTD based on normal tissue dose constraints (mean lung dose, 19 Gy; maximal spinal cord dose, 54 Gy) up to a maximal TTD of 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions twice daily. No concurrent chemoradiation was administered. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria. An {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed to evaluate (metabolic) response 3 months after treatment. Results: Mean delivered dose was 63.0 {+-} 9.8 Gy. The TTD was most often limited by the mean lung dose (32.1%) or spinal cord (28.6%). Acute toxicity generally was mild; only 1 patient experienced Grade 3 cough and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 dysphagia. One patient (3.6%) died of pneumonitis. For late toxicity, 2 patients (7.7%) had Grade 3 cough or dyspnea; none had severe dysphagia. Complete metabolic response was obtained in 44% (11 of 26 patients). With a median follow-up of 13 months, median overall survival was 19.6 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 57.1%. Conclusions: Individualized maximal tolerable dose irradiation based on normal tissue dose constraints is feasible, and initial results are promising.

  18. The refractive index and electronic gap of water and ice increase with increasing pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ding; Galli, Giulia

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the electronic and dielectric properties of water at high pressure and temperature is an essential prerequisite to understand the physical and chemical properties of aqueous environments under supercritical conditions, e.g. in the Earth interior. However optical measurements of compressed ice and water remain challenging and it has been common practice to assume that their band gap is inversely correlated to the measured refractive index, consistent with observations reported for hundreds of materials. Here we report ab initio molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations showing that both the refractive index and the electronic gap of water and ice increase with pressure, at least up to 30 GPa. Subtle electronic effects, related to the nature of interband transitions and band edge localization under pressure, are responsible for this apparently anomalous behavior.

  19. EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy Use:

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127byFormsConsumption 1994

  20. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Households with Children Households Without Children

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1. Introduction4.

  1. Normalizer circuits and a Gottesman-Knill theorem for infinite-dimensional systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Bermejo-Vega; Cedric Yen-Yu Lin; Maarten Van den Nest

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\textit{Normalizer circuits}$ [1,2] are generalized Clifford circuits that act on arbitrary finite-dimensional systems $\\mathcal{H}_{d_1}\\otimes ... \\otimes \\mathcal{H}_{d_n}$ with a standard basis labeled by the elements of a finite Abelian group $G=\\mathbb{Z}_{d_1}\\times... \\times \\mathbb{Z}_{d_n}$. Normalizer gates implement operations associated with the group $G$ and can be of three types: quantum Fourier transforms, group automorphism gates and quadratic phase gates. In this work, we extend the normalizer formalism [1,2] to infinite dimensions, by allowing normalizer gates to act on systems of the form $\\mathcal{H}_\\mathbb{Z}^{\\otimes a}$: each factor $\\mathcal{H}_\\mathbb{Z}$ has a standard basis labeled by $\\textit{integers}$ $\\mathbb{Z}$, and a Fourier basis labeled by $\\textit{angles}$, elements of the circle group $\\mathbb{T}$. Normalizer circuits become hybrid quantum circuits acting both on continuous- and discrete-variable systems. We show that infinite-dimensional normalizer circuits can be efficiently simulated classically with a generalized $\\textit{stabilizer formalism}$ for Hilbert spaces associated with groups of the form $\\mathbb{Z}^a\\times \\mathbb{T}^b \\times \\mathbb{Z}_{d_1}\\times...\\times \\mathbb{Z}_{d_n}$. We develop new techniques to track stabilizer-groups based on normal forms for group automorphisms and quadratic functions. We use our normal forms to reduce the problem of simulating normalizer circuits to that of finding general solutions of systems of mixed real-integer linear equations [3] and exploit this fact to devise a robust simulation algorithm: the latter remains efficient even in pathological cases where stabilizer groups become infinite, uncountable and non-compact. The techniques developed in this paper might find applications in the study of fault-tolerant quantum computation with superconducting qubits [4,5].

  2. Evolution of globular cluster systems in elliptical galaxies. I. Log-normal initial mass function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Vesperini

    2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of globular cluster systems (GCS) in elliptical galaxies and explore the dependence of their main properties on the mass and the size of the host galaxy.The dependence of the evolution of the GCS mass function (GCMF), of the fraction of surviving clusters and of the ratio of the final to initial mass in clusters on the structure of the host galaxy as well as their variation with the galactocentric distance inside individual host galaxies has been thoroughly investigated.After a survey over a large number of different host galaxies we have restricted our attention to a sample of galaxies with effective masses and radii equal to those observed for dwarf,normal and giant ellipticals. We show that, in spite of large differences in the fraction of surviving clusters, the final mean masses of the GCMF in massive galaxies are very similar to each other with a small galaxy-to-galaxy dispersion;low-mass compact galaxies tend to have smaller values of the final mean mass and a larger galaxy-to-galaxy dispersion. These findings are in agreement with those of recent observational analyses. The fraction of surviving clusters increases with the mass of the host galaxy. We show that a small difference between the initial and the final mean mass and dispersion of the GCMF and the lack of a significant radial dependence of the mean mass inside individual galaxies do not necessarily imply that evolutionary processes have been unimportant in the evolution of the initial population of clusters. For giant galaxies most disruption occurs within the effective radius while for low-mass galaxies a significant disruption of clusters takes place also at larger galactocentric distances. The dependence of the results obtained on the initial mean mass of the GCMF is investigated. (abridged)

  3. Fuel cell system logic for differentiating between rapid and normal shutdown commands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling the operation of a fuel cell system wherein each shutdown command for the system is subjected to decision logic which determines whether the command should be a normal shutdown command or rapid shutdown command. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a normal shutdown command, then the system is shutdown in a normal step-by-step process in which the hydrogen stream is consumed within the system. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a rapid shutdown command, the hydrogen stream is removed from the system either by dumping to atmosphere or routing to storage.

  4. Multi-phase decline curve analysis with normalized rate and time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraim, Michael Lee

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material Balance Equation. The purpose of the current work is to develop a normalized time and a normalized rate which can be applied to the Fetkovich type curve or any other decline type curve. From a Fetkovich type curve analysis, an engineer can...MULTI-PHASE DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS WITH NORMALIZED RATE AND TIME A Thesis by MICHAEL LEE FRAIM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University &n partial fulf 111ment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August...

  5. The prostaglandin E{sub 1} analog, misoprostol, a normal tissue protector, does not protect four murine tumors in vivo from radiation injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, W.R.; Zhen, W.; Geng, L. [Loyola Univ. Chicago and Hines Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Hines, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The clinical development of radioprotectors, such as misoprostol, to protect normal tissue during cancer treatment must proceed with the assurance that tumors are not protected similarly or significantly. To provide data on this critical question, radiation-induced growth delay with or without the presence of misoprostol was measured in four murine tumors grown in the flanks of mice: the Lewis lung carcinoma, M-5076 ovarian sarcoma, FSA and NFSA. The effect of misoprostol on the tumor control dose (TCD{sub 50}) of radiation was measured in FSA-bearing mice with or without prior treatment with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Misoprostol did not influence the in vivo growth of any of the four tumors, nor did it protect any of the tumors from radiation-induced growth delay. Likewise, there was no increase in the radiation TCD{sub 50} to treat the FSA in vivo in control or indomethacin-treated tumor-bearing mice. To measure any possible influence of tumor burden on the protective effect of miso-prostol on normal tissue in mice, the protective effect of misoprostol on the survival of intestinal clonogenic cells was measured in M-5076-bearing mice and found to be the same as in non-tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that misoprostol protects normal tissue in mice without protecting at least four experimental murine tumors. The data support the contention that misoprostol can achieve therapeutic gain by protecting normal tissues without protecting tumors. 44 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Electricity Prices for Households - EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (U.S. Dollars per Kilowatthour) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.023 NA NA Australia 0.091 0.092 0.094 0.098 NA NA NA NA NA...

  7. Setting Your Household in Order.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chenoweth, Lillian

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CERTIFICATE & FILING FOR BENEFITS Myaddress __________________________________________________________________ _ street city county state zip code Citizen of _____________ Race ____ Birthplace ________ Date of Birth ______ _ Social Security Number... employment began with this employer _____________________ _ If you own your own business: Business partner ____________________________ _ Homeaddress _____________________________ _ Partnership agreement? YES __ NO __ Filed _______________ _ Partnership...

  8. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic Feet)Historical1

  9. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic

  10. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic1. Introduction The

  11. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 d d XAir

  12. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 d d

  13. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 d d1a.

  14. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  15. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 da. Air

  16. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 da.

  17. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 da.3a.

  18. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0

  19. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 05a. Air

  20. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 05a.

  1. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 05a.2001

  2. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P

  3. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P9a. Air

  4. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P9a.

  5. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P9a.0a.

  6. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P9a.0a.1a.

  7. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  8. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3a. Appliances

  9. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  10. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  11. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  12. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  13. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  14. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 02001 Appliance

  15. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  16. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  17. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August 2001)

  18. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August 2001)0a.

  19. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August

  20. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August2a.

  1. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August2a.a.

  2. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August2a.a.2a.

  3. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August2a.a.2a.3a.

  4. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I

  5. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a.

  6. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980 Summary

  7. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980 Summary0a. Home

  8. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980 Summary0a.

  9. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980 Summary0a.2a.

  10. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980 Summary0a.2a.a.

  11. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980

  12. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights199803a. Home Office

  13. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights199803a. Home

  14. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights199803a. Home9a. Home

  15. housingunit_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights199803a. Home9a.

  16. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total per SquareQ2

  17. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total per SquareQ21a.

  18. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total per

  19. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera. Space

  20. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera. Space2a.

  1. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera. Space2a.3a.

  2. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.

  3. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.5a. Space

  4. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.5a. Space6a.

  5. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.5a.

  6. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.5a.8a. Space

  7. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.5a.8a.

  8. usage_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996September

  9. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3, 2001Air

  10. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3, 2001Air0a.

  11. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3, 2001Air0a.1a.

  12. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,

  13. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a. Air

  14. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a. Air2a. Air

  15. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a. Air2a.

  16. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a. Air2a.4a.

  17. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.

  18. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.6a. Air

  19. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.6a. Air2001

  20. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.6a.