Sample records for normal incidence multifilter

  1. ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary

    The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

  2. Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers Mentor Report and Baseline Surface Radiation Network Submission Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, G.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently twenty-four Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) operating within Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM). Eighteen are located within the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region, there is one at each of the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, and one is part of the instrumentation of the ARM Mobile Facility. At this time there are four sites, all extended facilities within the SGP, that are equipped for a MFRSR but do not have one due to instrument failure and a lack of spare instruments. In addition to the MFRSRs, there are three other MFRSR derived instruments that ARM operates. They are the Multi-Filter Radiometer (MFR), the Normal Incidence Multi-Filter Radiometer (NIMFR) and the Narrow Field of View (NFOV) radiometer. All are essentially just the head of a MFRSR used in innovative ways. The MFR is mounted on a tower and pointed at the surface. At the SGP Central Facility there is one at ten meters and one at twenty-five meters. The NSA has a MFR at each station, both at the ten meter level. ARM operates three NIMFRs; one is at the SGP Central Facility and one at each of the NSA stations. There are two NFOVs, both at the SGP Central Facility. One is a single channel (870) and the other utilizes two channels (673 and 870).

  3. Synchrotron radiation damage observations in normal incidence copper mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z.; Melendez, J.; Colbert, J.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-cooled copper mirrors used at near-normal incidence on two beam lines at the NSLS are observed to undergo severe degradation upon exposure to the direct SR beam. These mirrors are used on beam lines designed to utilize radiation in the wavelength regions longer than 100 nm and are coated with a uv reflection-enhancing coating, consisting of one or more bilayers of aluminum with a MgF/sub 2/ overcoat. Beamline performance degrades very rapidly following installation of a new set of mirrors. Analysis of the mirror surfaces by various non-destructive techniques indicates severe degradation of the coating and surface along the central strip where most of the x-ray power is absorbed from the beam. In one case where the mirror had three bilayer coatings, the outer coating layer has disappeared along the central strip. Rutherford backscatter measurements indicate compositional changes between layers and confirm the existence of a carbon deposit on the surface. Thermal modeling suggests that most of the damage is caused by direct photon interaction, since the temperature rise in the energy deposition region is small.

  4. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, GB; Michalsky, JJ

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using the diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  5. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  6. Improved Methodology to Measure Normal Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar, J.C.; Sun, Y.; Haberl, J.

    ESL-PA-13-11-02 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Improved Methodology to Measure Normal... Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array Juan-Carlos Baltazar*, Yifu Sun, Jeff Haberl Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station, The Texas A&M University System College Station, TX 77845, U.S.A. Abstract...

  7. Improved Methodology to Measure Normal Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar, J.C.; Sun, Y.; Haberl, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at different tilt and azimuth angles, and that can be used to estimate the normal incident component without the tracking devices that require more detailed installation and maintenance.. The array’s sensors are of the photovoltaic type, which require both... for photovoltaic-type solar sensor, and using similar approach, a number of solutions for switching schemes was presented by Miloslaw [7]. However, those methods still cannot provide high accuracy for the whole estimation period and the methods still present...

  8. In situ growth rate measurements by normal-incidence reflectance during MOVPE growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, H.Q.; Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Chui, H.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an in situ technique for monitoring metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy growth by normal-incidence reflectance. This technique is used to calibrate the growth rate periodically and to monitor the growth process routinely. It is not only a precise tool to measure the growth rate, but also very useful in identifying unusal problems during a growth run, such as depletion of source material, deterioration of surface morphology, and problems associated with an improper growht procedure. We will also present an excellent reproducibility ({+-}0.3% over a course of more than 100 runs) of the cavity wavelength of vertical-cavity surface emitting laser structures with periodic calibration by this in situ technique.

  9. Light trapping for emission from a photovoltaic cell under normally incident monochromatic illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko, E-mail: takeda@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Iizuka, Hideo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kajino, Tsutomu [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Ichiki, Akihisa; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have theoretically demonstrated a new light-trapping mechanism to reduce emission from a photovoltaic (PV) cell used for a monochromatic light source, which improves limiting conversion efficiency determined by the detailed balance. A multilayered bandpass filter formed on the surface of a PV cell has been found to prevent the light generated inside by radiative recombination from escaping the cell, resulting in a remarkable decrease of the effective solid angle for the emission. We have clarified a guide to design a suitable configuration of the bandpass filter and achieved significant reduction of the emission. The resultant gain in monochromatic conversion efficiency in the radiative limit due to the optimally designed 18-layerd bandpass filters is as high as 6% under normally incident 1064?nm illumination of 10 mW/cm{sup 2?}??1?kW/cm{sup 2}, compared with the efficiency for the perfect anti-reflection treatment to the surface of a conventional solar cell.

  10. Energetic deposition of metal ions: Observation of self-sputtering and limited sticking for off-normal angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hongchen; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The deposition of films under normal and off-normal angle of incidence has been investigated to show the relevance of non-sticking of and self-sputtering by energetic ions, leading to the formation of neutral atoms. The flow of energetic ions was obtained using a filtered cathodic arc system in high vacuum and therefore the ion flux had a broad energy distribution of typically 50-100 eV per ion. The range of materials included Cu, Ag, Au, Ti, and Ni. Consistent with molecular dynamics simulations published in the literature, the experiments show, for all materials, that the combined effects of non-sticking and self-sputtering are very significant, especially for large off-normal angles. Modest heating and intentional introduction of oxygen background affect the results.

  11. Evolution Of Surface Topography On GaAs(100) And GaAs(111) At Normal And Oblique Incidence Of Ar{sup +}-Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venugopal, V.; Basu, T.; Garg, S.; Majumder, S.; Sarangi, S. N.; Som, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Das, P.; Bhattacharyya, S. R.; Chini, T. K. [Surface Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale surface structures emerging from medium energy (50-60 keV)Ar{sup +}-ion sputtering of p-type GaAs(100) and semi-insulating GaAs(111) substrates have been investigated. For normally incident 50 keV Ar{sup +}-ions of fluence 1x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} on GaAs(100) and GaAs(111) features in the form of nanoscale pits/holes without short range ordering are observed with densities 5.2x10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2} and 5.9x10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2}, respectively along with irregularly shaped patches of islands. For GaAs(111) on increasing the influence to 5x10{sup 17} /cm{sup 2} the pit density increases marginally to 6.2x10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2}. For 60 deg. off-normal incidence of 60 keV Ar.{sup +}-ions of fluence 2x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} on GaAs(100) microscale wavelike surface topography is observed. In all cases well-defined nanodots are absent on the surface.

  12. Toward a self-consistent model of the interaction between an ultra-intense, normally incident laser pulse with an overdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debayle, A. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France) [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Sanz, J. [ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)] [ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Gremillet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Mima, K. [School for the Creation of Photonic Industries, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)] [School for the Creation of Photonic Industries, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a recent work by Sanz et al. [Phys. Rev. E 85, 046411 (2012)], we elaborate upon a one-dimensional model describing the interaction between an ultra-intense, normally incident laser pulse and an overdense plasma. The analytical solutions of the reflected laser field, the electrostatic field, and the plasma surface oscillation are obtained within the cold-fluid approximation. The high-order harmonic spectrum is calculated from the exact solution of the plasma surface oscillations. In agreement with particle-in-cell simulations, two regimes of harmonic generation are predicted: for moderately relativistic laser intensities, or high plasma densities, the harmonic spectrum is determined by the discontinuity in the derivative of the reflected field when the electron plasma boundary oscillates across the fixed ion boundary. For higher intensities, the electron plasma boundary is confined inside the ion region and oscillates at relativistic velocities, giving rise to a train of reflected attosecond pulses. In both cases, the harmonic spectrum obeys an asymptotic ?{sup ?4} scaling. The acceleration of electrons and the related laser absorption efficiency are computed by a test particle method. The model self-consistently reproduces the transition between the “anomalous skin effect” and the “J × B” heating predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. Analytical estimates of the different scalings are presented.

  13. The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) - precision infrared radiometer (PIR) platform in Fairbanks: Scientific objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stamnes, K.; Leontieva, E. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and precision infrared radiometer (PIR) have been employed at the Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks to check their performance under arctic conditions. Drawing on the experience of the previous measurements in the Arctic, the PIR was equipped with a ventilator to prevent frost and moisture build-up. We adopted the Solar Infrared Observing Sytem (SIROS) concept from the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) to allow implementation of the same data processing software for a set of radiation and meteorological instruments. To validate the level of performance of the whole SIROS prior to its incorporation into the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site instrumental suite for flux radiatin measurements, the comparison between measurements and model predictions will be undertaken to assess the MFRSR-PIR Arctic data quality.

  14. Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    NORMAL DlSTRlBUTION TABLE. Entries represent the area under the standardized normal distribution from -w to z, Pr(Z

  15. Incidents of Security Concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

  16. Evaluating calibrations of normal incident pyrheliometers Frank Vignola Fuding Lin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Cavity Radiometer HF 31104. Plot uses original calibration value. NIP values are about 0.3% too high in Oregon with high quality instruments for solar energy research and to build the Support Network Absolute Cavity Radiometer, the instrument systematically deviates from the absolute cavity readings

  17. Incidents of Security Concern

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Sets forth requirements for the DOE Incidents of Security Concern Program, including timely identification and notification of, response to, inquiry into, reporting of, and closure actions for incidents of security concern. Cancels Chapter VII of DOE O 470.1; DOE N 471.3; and Chapter IV of DOE M 471.2-1B (Note: Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Chapter III remain in effect.) Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

  18. Enterprise Incidents Issue 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Sheila

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    isn't possibl ... " Two .. nxious hours later thelo' moved into sensor range of the derellct, and discovered that he was wrong. "Can lo'ou r .. ise them yet, Lieutenant?" Kirk asked. Art .. r "Nor sir. There's just the automatic s.o.s. still beine...ScoTpress q ENTERPR.,ISE C I D E N T Stories by 8 Sheila Clark A STAR TREK FANZINE ENTERPRISE INCIDENTS 8 stories by Sheila Clark Abduction The Falcon Incident Tor'uaa Strancer. at the Gate Philanthrop), It l Foraet You Journe...

  19. Incident at the Rock Pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birgfeld, Doug

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the off limit rock pile At a Portland school Where theDoug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/Doug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/

  20. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  1. ccsd00003444, Jordan Normal and Rational Normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the characteristic polynomial can be fully factorized (see e.g. Fortuna-Gianni for rational normal forms

  2. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. No cancellations.

  3. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. No cancellations. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09.

  4. Reporting Incidents Of Security Concern

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To enhance the Department of Energy (DOE) Incidents of Security Concern Reporting Program through more consistent reporting, better information tracking, and interactive coordination. DOE N 251.54, dated 07/08/03, extends this directive until 07/08/04. Cancels Deputy Secretary Glauthier memorandum, subject: Reporting Security Incidents, dated 9-7-99.

  5. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09; Admin Chg 2 dated 12-22-09. Canceled by DOE O 205.1B.

  6. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

  7. MIDAS : minor incident decision analysis software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horng, Tze-Chieh, 1964-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MIDAS is the minor incident decision analysis software that acts as an advisory tool for plant decision makers and operators to analyze the available decision alternatives for resolving minor incidents. The minor incidents ...

  8. Employee Accident / Incident Investigation Report Employee Name _________________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Nicholas

    Employee Accident / Incident Investigation Report Employee Name's Title _________________________________________________________________ Date and Time of Accident accident occurred

  9. Incidence algebra of a presentation Eric Reynaud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Incidence algebra of a presentation Eric Reynaud D´epartement de Math´ematiques, Universit´e de an incidence algebra of a poset associated to a presentation by a quiver and relations of a finite dimensional algebra. We provide an exact sequence relying the fundamental groups of the incidence algebra

  10. Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance -A Closure Experiment, Halthore et al. 1 Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    ). This is the energy in the solar spectrum falling per unit time on a unit area of a surface oriented normal to the Sun Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the extinction - whether absorption or scattering

  11. Novel applications of data mining methodologies to incident databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Sumit

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    10. Management of Change 11. Incident Investigation 12. Emergency Planning and Response 13. Audits 14. Trade Secrets 5 1.4. Incident Investigation Incident investigation is one of the elements in PSM. Incident investigation follows...

  12. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  13. Normalization of Process Safety Metrics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Mengtian

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , for this research, the number of process safety incidents is not available; since all the companies just started recording process safety incidents after API RP 745 was issued. Therefore, the most similar reported indicator-operational oil spills is used... for lagging metrics testing as a proper substitute. The major related data was obtained for this section as follows: • Process and environmental incidents (operational oil spills) • Total oil production volume • Total natural gas production volume • Total...

  14. Resonant normal-incidence separate-absorption-charge-multiplication Ge/Si avalanche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    are extracted by fitting the measured S22 with the genetic algorithm optimization. Due to a resonance. E. Bowers, A. Beling, D. C. McIntosh, X. Zheng, and J. C. Campbell, "Monolithic Ge/Si Avalanche

  15. Incident Prevention, Warning, and Response (IPWAR) Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual defines a structured, cohesive, and consistent process for performing incident prevention, warning, and response for DOE's Federal information systems and is consistent with the requirements of Federal laws, Executive orders, national security directives, and other regulations. The Manual also provides requirements and implementation instructions for the Department's Incident Prevention, Warning and Response process, and supplements DOE O 205.1, Department of Energy Cyber Security Management Program, dated 3-21-03. DOE N 205.17 cancels this manual. This manual cancels DOE N 205.4, Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents, dated 3/18/2002.

  16. Second harmonic generation by propagation of a p-polarized obliquely incident laser beam in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Pallavi; Agrawal, Ekta [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical study of second harmonic generation due to interaction an intense, p-polarized laser beam propagating obliquely in homogeneous underdense plasma, in the mildly relativistic regime, has been presented. The efficiency of the second harmonic radiation as well as its detuning length has been obtained and their variation with the angle of incidence is analyzed. It is shown that, for a given plasma electron density, the second harmonic efficiency increases with the angle of incidence while the detuning length decreases. The second harmonic amplitude vanishes at normal incidence of the laser beam.

  17. Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Techniques (Presentation) Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray...

  18. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals, accidentally spilled, or released. In addition to laboratory chemicals, hazardous materials may include common not involve highly toxic or noxious hazardous materials, a fire, or an injury requiring medical attention

  19. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up, or there is a small spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  20. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  1. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit is not available? Call 561

  2. Injury / Incident Report INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    OF INJURY NONE EMPLOYER PHYSICIAN EMERGENCY FAMILY PHYSICIAN OTHER PHYSICIAN / SPECIALIST TO YOUR. _________________________________________ Room #___________________ STATE EXACTLY - THE SEQUENCE OF EVENTS LEADING UP TO THE INCIDENT, WHERE TO USE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE DEVICES 8 NOT GUARDED OR IMPROPERLY GUARDED 9 INADEQUATE ILLUMINATION 10

  3. On Normal Numbers Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueira, Santiago

    ends with all zeros; hence, q is not simply normal to base b. 3/23 #12;The problem is still open Theorem (Borel 1909) Almost all real numbers are absolutely normal. Problem (Borel 1909) Give an example transducers. Huffman 1959 calls them lossless compressors. A direct proof of the above theorem Becher

  4. Normal matter storage of antiprotons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

  5. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  6. Incident Data Analysis Using Data Mining Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veltman, Lisa M.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and findings that are currently available will greatly aid in this effort. 7 3. HSEES DATA The Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) data includes information on events where: ? There was an uncontrolled/illegal release... = Equipment failure, 3 = Operator Error, 8 = Other, G = Intentional, H = Bad weather condition, S = Illegal act SEC_FACT Secondary factor contributing to incident 1=Improper mixing, 2=Equipment failure, 3=Human error, 4=Improper filling, loading, or packing...

  7. A common language for computer security incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Howard; Thomas A Longstaff

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the computer security information regularly gathered and disseminated by individuals and organizations cannot currently be combined or compared because a common language has yet to emerge in the field of computer security. A common language consists of terms and taxonomies (principles of classification) which enable the gathering, exchange and comparison of information. This paper presents the results of a project to develop such a common language for computer security incidents. This project results from cooperation between the Security and Networking Research Group at the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, and the CERT{reg_sign} Coordination Center at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA. This Common Language Project was not an effort to develop a comprehensive dictionary of terms used in the field of computer security. Instead, the authors developed a minimum set of high-level terms, along with a structure indicating their relationship (a taxonomy), which can be used to classify and understand computer security incident information. They hope these high-level terms and their structure will gain wide acceptance, be useful, and most importantly, enable the exchange and comparison of computer security incident information. They anticipate, however, that individuals and organizations will continue to use their own terms, which may be more specific both in meaning and use. They designed the common language to enable these lower-level terms to be classified within the common language structure.

  8. Asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smither, R. K.; Fernandez, P. B.; Mills, D. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Graber, T. J. [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator was constructed and tested in 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The monochromator was originally designed as a high heat load monochromator capable of handling 5-10 kW beams from a wiggler source. This was accomplished by spreading the x-ray beam out on the surface an asymmetric-cut crystal and by using liquid metal cooling of the first crystal. The monochromator turned out to be a highly versatile monochromator that could perform many different types of experiments. The monochromator consisted of two 18 deg. asymmetrically cut Si crystals that could be rotated about 3 independent axes. The first stage ({Phi}) rotates the crystal around an axis perpendicular to the diffraction plane. This rotation changes the angle of the incident beam with the surface of the crystal without changing the Bragg angle. The second rotation ({Psi}) is perpendicular to the first and is used to control the shape of the beam footprint on the crystal. The third rotation ({Theta}) controls the Bragg angle. Besides the high heat load application, the use of asymmetrically cut crystals allows one to increase or decrease the acceptance angle for crystal diffraction of a monochromatic x-ray beam and allows one to increase or decrease the wavelength bandwidth of the diffraction of a continuum source like a bending-magnet beam or a normal x-ray-tube source. When the monochromator is used in the doubly expanding mode, it is possible to expand the vertical size of the double-diffracted beam by a factor of 10-15. When this was combined with a bending magnet source, it was possible to generate an 8 keV area beam, 16 mm wide by 26 mm high with a uniform intensity and parallel to 1.2 arc sec that could be applied in imaging experiments.

  9. An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

  10. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  11. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  12. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  13. Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Security incidents on the Internet, 1989--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an analysis of trends in Internet security based on an investigation of 4,299 Internet security-related incidents reported to the CERT{reg_sign} Coordination Center (CERT{reg_sign}/CC) from 1989 through 1995. Prior to this research, knowledge of actual Internet security incidents was limited and primarily anecdotal. This research: (1) developed a taxonomy to classify Internet attacks and incidents, (2) organized, classified, and analyzed CERT{reg_sign}/CC incident records, (3) summarized the relative frequency of the use of tools and vulnerabilities, success in achieving access, and results of attacks, (4) estimated total Internet incident activity, (5) developed recommendations for Internet users and suppliers, and (6) developed recommendations for future research. With the exception of denial-of-service attacks, security incidents were found to be increasing at a rate less than Internet growth. Estimates showed that most, if not all, severe incidents were reported to the CERT{reg_sign}/CC, and that more than one out of three above average incidents (in terms of duration and number of sites) were reported. Estimates also indicated that a typical Internet site was involved in, at most, around one incident (of any kind) per year, and a typical Internet host in, at most, around one incident in 45 years. The probability of unauthorized privileged access was around an order of magnitude less likely. As a result, simple and reasonable security precautions should be sufficient for most Internet users.

  15. Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Equivalence Class Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Equivalence Class Testing: Equivalence Class Testing #12;Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Outline Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Mousavi: Equivalence Class Testing #12

  16. Analysis of the HSEES Chemical Incident Database Using Data and Text Mining Methodologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdiyati, -

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    incidents from both the causal and consequence elements of the incidents. A subset of incidents data reported to the Hazardous Substance Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) chemical incident database from 2002-2006 was analyzed using data mining...

  17. Long range heliostat target using array of normal incidence pyranometers to evaluate a beam of solar radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghanbari, Cheryl M; Ho, Clifford K; Kolb, Gregory J

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Various technologies described herein pertain to evaluating a beam reflected by a heliostat. A portable target that has an array of sensors mounted thereupon is configured to capture the beam reflected by the heliostat. The sensors in the array output measured values indicative of a characteristic of the beam reflected by the heliostat. Moreover, a computing device can generate and output data corresponding to the beam reflected by the heliostat based on the measured values indicative of the characteristic of the beam received from the sensors in the array.

  18. Energetic deposition of metal ions: Observation of self-sputtering and limited sticking for off-normal angles of incidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hongchen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    step, the experiment was repeated but with the deposition probes slightly heated using the radiative heater.

  19. Countries with Estimated or Reported Tuberculosis Incidence, 2009 "High Incidence" areas are defined as areas with reported or estimated incidence of 20 cases per 100,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    are defined as areas with reported or estimated incidence of 20 cases per 100,000 population Afghanistan Cook China India Namibia Sri Lanka Colombia Indonesia Nepal Sudan Comoros Iraq Nicaragua Suriname Congo Japan

  20. The Fueling of Nuclear Activity: II. The Bar Properties of Seyfert and Normal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John S. Mulchaey; Michael W. Regan

    1997-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a recent near-infrared imaging survey of samples of Seyfert and normal galaxies to study the role of bars in the fueling of nuclear activity. The active galaxy sample includes Seyfert galaxies in the Revised Shapely-Ames (RSA) and Sandage & Tammann's (1987) extension to this catalog. The normal galaxies were selected to match the Seyfert sample in Hubble type, redshift, inclination and blue luminosity. All the galaxies in both samples classified as barred in the RSA catalog are also barred in the near-infrared. In addition, ~55% of the galaxies classified as non-barred in the RSA show evidence for bars at 2.1 microns. Overall, ~70% of the galaxies observed show evidence for bar structures. The incidence of bars in the Seyfert and normal galaxies is similar, suggesting Seyfert nuclei do not occur preferentially in barred systems. Furthermore, a slightly higher percentage of normal galaxies have multiple-bar structures.

  1. Thermal analysis of the horizontal shipping container for normal conditions of transport with solar insolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stumpfl, E.; Feldman, M.R.; Anderson, J.C.

    1993-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal analysis of the horizontal shipping container (HSC) was performed to determine the temperatures at the outer surface of the inner container during normal conditions of transport with incident solar radiation. There are two methods by which this analysis can be performed: (1) it can be run as a steady-state problem where it is assumed that the incident solar radiation is applied to the package 24 hours per day, or (2) it can be run as a cyclic transient problem where the incident solar radiation is applied for 12 hours per day and the other 12 hours there is assumed to be no incident solar radiation. The steady-state method was initially attempted, but the temperatures determined from this analysis were judged to be significantly higher than one would find in the cyclic case. Thus, it was deemed necessary to perform a transient analysis to determine a more realistic temperature distribution within the HSC during normal conditions of transport. The heat transfer code HEATING 7.1 was used to perform these calculations. HEATING 7.1 is a heat conduction code capable of handling radiation, convection (forced and natural), and heat flux boundary conditions. Heat generation within a material is also possible with HEATING 7.1 but was not used in any of the models presented here. The models used here are one-dimensional in the radial direction.

  2. Version0109 THIS INJURY AND ILLNESS INCIDENT REPORT IS ONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Version0109 THIS INJURY AND ILLNESS INCIDENT REPORT IS ONE OF THE FIRST FORMS THAT MUST BE FILLED's Form 301 ­ Injury and Illness Incident Report, should be completed as soon as possible after? ______________________ 10. Date of Accident __________________________ DESCRIPTIONOFTHEINJURY: 1. State name of machine

  3. TIPS ON ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING Accident Reporting Why?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    TIPS ON ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING Accident Reporting ­ Why? Obligation to report Health Care of the accident ­ if not, the organization (i.e. the department) can be fined Obligation under Section 51, 52 happened? When did it happen? (Date, Time and Place) When was the accident/incident reported? Any

  4. Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006 chest pain headaches elevated bp rapid heart rate muscle tremors shock symptoms grinding of teeth visual Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress

  5. Turing's normal numbers: towards randomness Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presumably in 1938 Alan Turing gave an algorithm that produces real numbers normal to every integer base- putable normal numbers, and this result should be attributed to Alan Turing. His manuscript entitled "A

  6. Bloggers as Citizen Journalists: The 2012 Pink Slime Incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pannone, Anthony

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and added to ground beef to make lean affordable beef blends. News reports questioning the safety and quality of LFTB began in March 2012. A qualitative content analysis was performed on 44 blogs that mentioned the pink slime incident between...

  7. Active and Knowledge-based Process Safety Incident Retrieval System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Sara Shammni

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The sustainability and continued development of the chemical industry is to a large extent dependent on learning from past incidents. The failure to learn from past mistakes is rather not deliberate but due to unawareness ...

  8. ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS)...

  9. Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Solbrig

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

  10. Lambda hyperonic effect on the normal driplines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Samanta; P. Roy Chowdhury; D. N. Basu

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized mass formula is used to calculate the neutron and proton drip lines of normal and lambda hypernuclei treating non-strange and strange nuclei on the same footing. Calculations suggest existence of several bound hypernuclei whose normal cores are unbound. Addition of Lambda or, Lambda-Lambda hyperon(s) to a normal nucleus is found to cause shifts of the neutron and proton driplines from their conventional limits.

  11. Estimation of the Parameters of Skew Normal Distribution by Approximating the Ratio of the Normal Density and Distribution Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dey, Debarshi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 1.2 Normal Distribution and Simple Linear5 1.3 Skew Normal Distribution andthe Standard Normal Density and Distribution Functions 3.1

  12. Correlation between Incident and Emission Polarization in Nanowire Surface Plasmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Correlation between Incident and Emission Polarization in Nanowire Surface Plasmon Waveguides Nanowire plasmons can be launched by illumination at one terminus of the nanowire and emission can waveguide, or as a polarization-rotating, nanoscale half-wave plate. The understanding of how plasmonic

  13. Violation of Laws, Losses, and Incidents of Security Concerns

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To set forth Department of Energy (DOE) procedures to assure timely and effective action relating to violations of criminal, laws, loses, and incidents of security concern to DOE. Cancels DOE O 5631.5. Canceled by DOE O 470.1 of 9-28-1995.

  14. Mapping incident photosynthetically active radiation from MODIS data over China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    of incident photosynthetically active radiation from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer data. Journal, nitrogen and energy in different natural systems. Since photosynthesis is the core process for energy as an input for modeling photosynthesis from single plant leaves to complex plant communities. For example

  15. Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

  16. A categorical model for traffic incident likelihood estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchangi, Shamanth

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis an incident prediction model is formulated and calibrated. The primary idea of the model developed is to correlate the expected number of crashes on any section of a freeway to a set of traffic stream characteristics, so that a...

  17. AT&TConsulting Incident Management Program Security Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    and best practices. The AT&T Incident Management Program service provides expert resources to assess overhaul. AT&T Consulting will create custom solutions that are practical, efficient and help address response to a proactive, preventative approach. Although new technology solutions, such as Intrusion

  18. Formal Analysis of Aviation Incidents Tibor Bosse1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosse, Tibor

    of the plane back despite stall warnings [10]. For the analysis of accidents and incidents in aviation, roughly two streams can be distinguished in the literature, namely accident analysis and risk analysis. Whilst purposes, a main difference is that accident analysis attempts to identify one specific combination

  19. University of Bristol Incident & Crisis Management Framework Appendix L.2012 Appendix L Estates Incident Management Team: Roles & Responsibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    ) Or the out of hours on call Maintenance Manager Manage shift resources and act as the first line technical the incident is over and water and power are restored ­ limiting the extent of re-commissioning so far Responsibilities / Actions Security Services Security Services staff as on duty Manage shift resources and act

  20. Studying Aviation Incidents by Agent-Based Simulation and Analysis A Case Study on a Runway Incursion Incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosse, Tibor

    in the analysis of accidents and incidents in aviation: even if detailed flight data from the `black box this approach mainly focuses on the analysis of existing accidents (also called accident analysis), the current paper also addresses analysis of potential future accidents (called risk analysis). This is done

  1. Differentiated state of normal and malignant cells or how to define a normal cell in culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, M.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are cytological techniques to differentiate malignant and normal cells in culture. Emphasis is placed upon cell function and gene expression for determinative procedures. (DLS)

  2. Incident Energy Dependence of pt Correlations at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson,B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski,J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar,A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de laBarca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi,R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak,Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti,M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez,J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes,E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov,E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, ({Delta}p{sub t,i}{Delta}p{sub t,j}), as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, jet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  3. Computing Instantaneous Frequency by normalizing Hilbert Transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Norden E.

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention presents Normalized Amplitude Hilbert Transform (NAHT) and Normalized Hilbert Transform(NHT), both of which are new methods for computing Instantaneous Frequency. This method is designed specifically to circumvent the limitation set by the Bedorsian and Nuttal Theorems, and to provide a sharp local measure of error when the quadrature and the Hilbert Transform do not agree. Motivation for this method is that straightforward application of the Hilbert Transform followed by taking the derivative of the phase-angle as the Instantaneous Frequency (IF) leads to a common mistake made up to this date. In order to make the Hilbert Transform method work, the data has to obey certain restrictions.

  4. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamada, Tomomi [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Translational Medicine (Japan); Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  5. A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by2 Homogenized Monthly Temperature Normals3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1 A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by2 Homogenized a constrained harmonic technique that forces the daily30 temperature normals to be consistent with the monthly, or harmonic even though the annual march of temperatures for some locations can be highly asymmetric. Here, we

  6. Normality: A Consistency Condition for Concurrent Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Normality: A Consistency Condition for Concurrent Objects Vijay K. GARG \\Lambda Michel RAYNAL ECE for concurrent objects (objects shared by con­ current processes) that exploits the semantics of abstract data types. It provides the illusion that each operation applied by concurrent processes takes effect

  7. Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools for the analysis of incident and accident reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools for the analysis of incident and accident reports, Analysis of accidents/incidents, Categorization, Textual similarity INTRODUCTION Learning valuable lessons, (ii) the analysis of reports regardless of the categorization in order to expand the analysis

  8. Socioeconomic status and prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates among the diverse population of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MN, Smith E, Siadaty M, Hauck FR, Pickle LW (2006) Spatial analysis of prostate cancer incidence and race in Virginia,

  9. Do You Plan to Have Children? The Incidence of Potentially Illegal Questions during Resident Interviews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hern, Jr., H. Gene; Alter, Harrison J.; Wills, Charlotte P.; Snoey, Eric R.; Simon, Barry C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incidence of Potentially Illegal Questions During Residentor sexual preferences are potentially illegal. Littlethe prevalence of potentially illegal questions based on

  10. ORISE: Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 FederalTransformers1Thomas LiuYashema MackIncident

  11. Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, J. P.

    1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor.

  12. Prospective Study of Social and Other Risk Factors for Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Lucy L.

    Prospective Study of Social and Other Risk Factors for Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the relation of health behaviors and psy- chosocial factors to the incidence of type 2 diabetes are not well established. Methods: Prospective occupational cohort study

  13. SCENARIOS OF FUTURE LUNG CANCER INCIDENCE BY EDUCATIONAL LEVEL: MODELLING STUDY IN DENMARK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 SCENARIOS OF FUTURE LUNG CANCER INCIDENCE BY EDUCATIONAL LEVEL: MODELLING STUDY IN DENMARK Gwenn : 10.1016/j.ejca.2010.07.027 #12;2 Abstract Objective: To model future trends in lung cancer incidence in Denmark by education under different scenarios for cigarette smoking. Methods: Lung cancer incidence until

  14. Control of normal chirality at hexagonal interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haraldsen, Jason T [ORNL; Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the net chirality created by the Dzyaloshinkii-Moriya interaction (DMI) at the boundary between hexagonal layers of magnetic and non-magnetic materials. It is shown that another mechanism besides elastic torsion is required to understand the change in chirality observed in Dy/Y multilayers during field-cooling. The paper shows that due to the overlap between magnetic and non-magnetic atoms, interfacial steps may produce a DMI normal to the interface in magnetic heterostructures.

  15. HOW TO REPORT AN ACCIDENT, INCIDENT OR NEAR MISS 1. Notify your supervisor or lab manager as soon as possible of your accident, incident, or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    HOW TO REPORT AN ACCIDENT, INCIDENT OR NEAR MISS 1. Notify your supervisor or lab manager as soon as possible of your accident, incident, or near miss. 2. Fill out the online accident report (OARS) form://www.ehs.washington.edu/ohsoars/index.shtm. The supervisor, lab manager, or person who had the accident can fill out the form. 3. For any serious accidents

  16. Traffic Incident Analysis on Urban Arterials Using Extended Spectral Envelope Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhen-zhen; Gao, Zi-you; Sun, Ya-fu; Guo, Sheng-min

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A traffic incident analysis method based on extended spectral envelope (ESE) method is presented to detect the key incident time. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (the length of time window, the length of sliding window and the study period) are discussed on four real traffic incidents in Beijing. The results show that: (1) Moderate length of time window got the best accurate in detection. (2) The shorter the sliding window is, the more accurate the key incident time are detected. (3) If the study period is too short, the end time of an incident cannot be detected. Empirical studies show that the proposed method can effectively discover the key incident time, which can provide a theoretic basis for traffic incident management.

  17. NORMALITY VERSUS COUNTABLE PARACOMPACTNESS IN PERFECT SPACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, M. L.; Fleissner, William G.; Reed, G. M.

    1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    spaces, Proc. Topology Conf. (Memphis State Univ., 1975) (to appear). 3. H. Cook, Cartesian products and continuous semi-metrics, Proc. Conf. on Topology (1967), Arizona State Univ., Tempe, Ariz., 1968, pp. 5 8 - 6 3 . MR 38 #5152. 4. C. H. Dowker.... Pittsburgh Internat. Conf., 1972), Lecture Notes in Math., vol. 378, Springer-Verlag, Berlin and New York, 1974, pp. 243-247. MR 49 #1457. 9. A. J. Ostaszewski, On countably compact, perfectly normal spaces, J. London Math. Soc. (to appear). 10. C. W...

  18. Normal, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:NeppelsourceNormal, Illinois: Energy Resources

  19. Local asymptotic normality in quantum statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madalin Guta; Anna Jencova

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of local asymptotic normality for quantum statistical experiments is developed in the spirit of the classical result from mathematical statistics due to Le Cam. Roughly speaking, local asymptotic normality means that the family varphi_{\\theta_{0}+ u/\\sqrt{n}}^{n} consisting of joint states of n identically prepared quantum systems approaches in a statistical sense a family of Gaussian state phi_{u} of an algebra of canonical commutation relations. The convergence holds for all "local parameters" u\\in R^{m} such that theta=theta_{0}+ u/sqrt{n} parametrizes a neighborhood of a fixed point theta_{0}\\in Theta\\subset R^{m}. In order to prove the result we define weak and strong convergence of quantum statistical experiments which extend to the asymptotic framework the notion of quantum sufficiency introduces by Petz. Along the way we introduce the concept of canonical state of a statistical experiment, and investigate the relation between the two notions of convergence. For reader's convenience and completeness we review the relevant results of the classical as well as the quantum theory.

  20. Resonant normal form and asymptotic normal form behavior in magnetic bottle Hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Efthymiopoulos; M. Harsoula; G. Contopoulos

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider normal forms in `magnetic bottle' type Hamiltonians of the form $H=\\frac{1}{2}(\\rho^2_\\rho+\\omega^2_1\\rho^2) +\\frac{1}{2}p^2_z+hot$ (second frequency $\\omega_2$ equal to zero in the lowest order). Our main results are: i) a novel method to construct the normal form in cases of resonance, and ii) a study of the asymptotic behavior of both the non-resonant and the resonant series. We find that, if we truncate the normal form series at order $r$, the series remainder in both constructions decreases with increasing $r$ down to a minimum, and then it increases with $r$. The computed minimum remainder turns to be exponentially small in $\\frac{1}{\\Delta E}$, where $\\Delta E$ is the mirror oscillation energy, while the optimal order scales as an inverse power of $\\Delta E$. We estimate numerically the exponents associated with the optimal order and the remainder's exponential asymptotic behavior. In the resonant case, our novel method allows to compute a `quasi-integral' (i.e. truncated formal integral) valid both for each particular resonance as well as away from all resonances. We applied these results to a specific magnetic bottle Hamiltonian. The non resonant normal form yields theorerical invariant curves on a surface of section which fit well the empirical curves away from resonances. On the other hand the resonant normal form fits very well both the invariant curves inside the islands of a particular resonance as well as the non-resonant invariant curves. Finally, we discuss how normal forms allow to compute a critical threshold for the onset of global chaos in the magnetic bottle.

  1. The Normal/Bloomington Amtrak passenger station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, C.E. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Normal/Bloomington, Illinois Amtrak railroad passenger station was completed in 1990. A number of energy conservation technologies have been combined to provide for efficient railroad operations, passenger comfort, and a pleasing atmosphere. Passive solar heating, shading, and the building`s thermal efficiency have substantially reduced the amount of energy required for space conditions. The use of daylighting high efficiency fluorescent and high pressure sodium lighting as well as electronic load management have reduced energy requirements for lighting more than 70%. A stand-alone PV system provides energy for a portion of the building`s electrical requirement. An average monthly output of 147 kWh accounts for approximately 7.5% of the total electrical load. Overall, this station requires less than 25% of the energy required by a recently built `typical` station of similar size in a similar climate.

  2. Overview Report: Normal and Emergency Operation Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an overview report to document and illustrate methods used in a project entitled “Normal and Emergency Operations Visualization” for a utility company, conducted in 2009-2010 timeframe with funding from the utility company and the U.S. Department of Energy. The original final report (about 180 pages) for the project is not available for distribution because it alludes to findings that assessed the design of an operational system that contained proprietary information; this abridged version contains descriptions of methods and some findings to illustrate the approach used, while avoiding discussion of sensitive or proprietary information. The client has approved this abridged version of the report for unlimited distribution to give researchers and collaborators the benefit of reviewing the research concepts and methods that were applied in this study.

  3. A particle-in-cell plus Monte Carlo study of plasma-induced damage of normal incidence collector optics used in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zegeling, Paul

    ,6 In this paper, we present a study of plasma-induced sput- tering damage to the collector, using a spherical 3d3v at which the ions are created and their final energy is studied, revealing how the evolution In semiconductor industries there is a continuous de- mand for printing smaller structures on silicon wafers

  4. Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan,T.

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48 hours +). A few weeks later, a one day full-scale exercise was conducted for the late phase (recovery) response to an RDD event. The lessons learned from this study are not available as of June 30, 2009. The objective of this report is to review and summarize anticipated Federal and State response actions and the roles and responsibilities of various agencies (DHS, EPA, DOE, NY-DEP, NY-DEC) with respect to decontamination issues that would arise from a radiological dispersion device (RDD), e.g., dirty bomb attack. These issues arise in the late phase of the response (48 hours and beyond) after the area has been stabilized and forensic information has been obtained. Much of the information provided in this report is taken directly from published guidance that is readily available.

  5. Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

  6. Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange Call Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange Call February 26, 2015 3:00PM to 4:3...

  7. Use of incident databases for cause and consequence analysis and national estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obidullah, A.S.M.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    -Startup Safety Review ? Mechanical Integrity ? Hot Work Permit ? Management of Change ? Incident Investigations ? Emergency Response & Planning ? Compliance Audits ? Trade Secrets 5 Detailed description of the PSM regulation...

  8. Changes in vigorous physical activity and incident diabetes inmale runners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined the dose-response relationship between changes in reported vigorous exercise (running distance, {Delta}km/wk) and self-reported physician diagnosed diabetes in 25,988 men followed prospectively for (mean {+-} SD) 7.8 {+-} 1.8 years. Logistic regression analyses showed that the log odds for diabetes declined significantly in relation to men's {Delta}km/wk (coefficient {+-} SE: -0.012 {+-} 0.004, P < 0.01), which remained significant when adjusted for BMI (-0.018 {+-} 0.003, P < 0.0001). The decline in the log odds for diabetes was related to the distance run at the end of follow-up when adjusted for baseline distance, with (-0.024 {+-} 0.005, P < 0.0001) or without (-0.027 {+-} 0.005, P < 0.0001) adjustment for BMI. Baseline distance was unrelated to diabetes incidence when adjusted for the distance at the end of follow-up. Compared to men who ran <8 km/wk at the end of follow-up, incidence rates in those who ran {ge} 8 km/wk were 95% lower between 35-44 yrs old (P < 0.0001), 92% lower between 45-54 yrs old (P < 0.0001), 87% lower between 55 and 64 years old (P < 0.0001), and 46% lower between 65-75 yrs old (P = 0.30). For the subset of 6,208 men who maintained the same running distance during follow-up ({+-}5 km/wk), the log odds for diabetes declined with weekly distance run (-0.024 {+-} 0.010, P = 0.02) but not when adjusted for BMI (-0.005 {+-} 0.010, P = 0.65). Conclusion: Vigorous exercise significantly reduces diabetes incidence, due in part to the prevention of age-related weight gain and in part to other exercise effects. Physical activity decreases the risk of type 2 diabetes [1-10]. Moderate and vigorous exercise are purported to produce comparable reductions in diabetes risk if the energy expenditure is the same [3,10]. The optimal physical activity dose remains unclear, however, with some [4-7] but not all studies [1,8,9] showing continued reduction in diabetes for high versus intermediate energy expenditures. The National Runners Health Study [11-19] is unique among population cohorts in its focus on the health impact of higher doses of vigorously intense physical activity (i.e., {ge} 6-fold metabolic rate). The study was specifically designed to evaluate the dose-response relationship between vigorous physical activity and health for intensities and durations that exceed current physical activity recommendations [20-22]. One specific hypothesis is whether changes in vigorous physical activity affect the risk for becoming diabetic. Although women were surveyed and followed-up, only 23 developed diabetes so there is limited statistical power to establish their significance. Our analyses of diabetes and vigorous exercise are therefore restricted to men. This paper relates running distance at baseline and at the end of follow-up to self-reported, physician diagnosed diabetes in vigorously active men who were generally lean and ostensibly at low diabetic risk The benefits of greater doses of more vigorous exercise are relevant to the 27% of U.S. women and 34% of U.S. men meet or exceed the more general exercise recommendations for health benefits [23]. Specific issues to be addressed are: (1) whether maintenance of the same level of vigorous exercise over time reduces the risk of incident diabetes in relation to the exercise dose; (2) whether men who decrease their activity increase their risk for becoming diabetic; and (3) whether end of follow-up running distances are more predictive of diabetes than baseline distances, suggesting a causal, acute effect. Elsewhere we have shown that greater body weight is related to a lack of vigorous exercise [12-14] and increases the risk for diabetes even among generally lean vigorously active men [11]. In runners, leanness may be due to the exercise or due to initially lean men choosing to run further [17]. Therefore we also test whether body weight mediates the effects of vigorous exercise on diabetes, and whether this may be due to self-selection.

  9. Development of metrology instruments for grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Army Research and Development Command, Dover, NJ (USA)); Qian, Shi-nan (China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH (China). Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Liu, Wuming (Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics)

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective utilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) from high-brightness sources requires the use of optical components with very smooth surfaces and extremely precise shapes. Most manufacturers are not capable of measuring the figure and finish quality of the aspheric optics required for use in grazing incidence beam lines. Over the past several years we have developed measurement techniques and metrology instrumentation that have allowed us to measure the surface profile and roughness of large cylinder optics, up to one meter in length. Based on our measurements and feedback, manufacturers have been able to advance the state-of-the-art in mirror fabrication and are now able to produce acceptable components. Our analysis techniques enable designers to write meaningful specifications and predict the performance of real surfaces in their particular beamline configurations. Commercial instruments are now available for measuring surface microroughness with spatial periods smaller than about one millimeter. No commercial instruments are available for measuring the surface figure on cylindrical aspheres over long spatial periods, from one millimeter up to one meter. For that reason we developed a Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that measures surface profile over the long period range in a non-contact manner to extremely high accuracy. Examples of measured surfaces and data analysis techniques will be discussed, and limitations on the quality of optical surfaces related to intrinsic material properties will also be discussed. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storjohann, Arne

    Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices; Abstract We study the problem of computing Hermite and Smith normal forms of ma- trices over. One first result is a fast Las Vegas probabilistic algorithm to compute the * *Smith normal form

  11. Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storjohann, Arne

    Computation of Hermite and Smith Normal Forms of Matrices by Arne Storjohann A thesis presented the problem of computing Hermite and Smith normal forms of ma­ trices over principal ideal domains. The main probabilistic algorithm to compute the Smith normal form of a polynomial matrix for those cases where pre

  12. EIGENVALUES AND THE SMITH NORMAL FORM Joseph J. Rushanan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushanan, Joe J.

    EIGENVALUES AND THE SMITH NORMAL FORM Joseph J. Rushanan The MITRE Corporation, M/S E025, Bedford, MA 01730 Abstract. Results are shown that compare the Smith Normal Form (SNF) over the integers and its Smith Normal Form (SNF) over the integers. Our goals are more general than those results

  13. Lyapunov Exponents and Uniform Weak Normally Repelling Invariant Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hal

    Lyapunov Exponents and Uniform Weak Normally Repelling Invariant Sets Paul Leonard Salceanu and Hal repelling in directions normal to the boundary in which M resides provided all normal Lyapunov exponents that Lyapunov exponents can be used to establish the requisite repelling properties for both discrete

  14. Fractal Fluctuations and Statistical Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical systems in nature exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations and the corresponding power spectra follow inverse power law form signifying long-range space-time correlations identified as self-organized criticality. The physics of self-organized criticality is not yet identified. The Gaussian probability distribution used widely for analysis and description of large data sets underestimates the probabilities of occurrence of extreme events such as stock market crashes, earthquakes, heavy rainfall, etc. The assumptions underlying the normal distribution such as fixed mean and standard deviation, independence of data, are not valid for real world fractal data sets exhibiting a scale-free power law distribution with fat tails. A general systems theory for fractals visualizes the emergence of successively larger scale fluctuations to result from the space-time integration of enclosed smaller scale fluctuations. The model predicts a universal inverse power law incorporating the golden mean for fractal fluctuations and for the corresponding power spectra, i.e., the variance spectrum represents the probabilities, a signature of quantum systems. Fractal fluctuations therefore exhibit quantum-like chaos. The model predicted inverse power law is very close to the Gaussian distribution for small-scale fluctuations, but exhibits a fat long tail for large-scale fluctuations. Extensive data sets of Dow Jones index, Human DNA, Takifugu rubripes (Puffer fish) DNA are analysed to show that the space/time data sets are close to the model predicted power law distribution.

  15. Spatial analysis of air pollution and cancer incidence rates in Haifa Bay, Israel Ori Eitan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial analysis of air pollution and cancer incidence rates in Haifa Bay, Israel Ori Eitan with historically high air pollution levels. This work tests whether persistent spatial patterns of metrics of chronic exposure to air pollutants are associated with the observed patterns of cancer incidence rates

  16. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Aug 12 -Aug 18, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-001248 THOMPSON ROAD Gas leak Security , Toronto Fire, Toronto Police, and Occupational Health and Safety responded to a report of a natural gas leak in the area of the Life Science BuildingWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Aug 12 - Aug 18, 2013 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  17. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Feb 6 -Feb 12, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gas leak Security and Toronto Fire responded to a report of a natural gas odour in B-wing. TorontoWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Feb 6 - Feb 12, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building\\Const. Security, York Fire Prevention and Toronto Fire responded to a fire alarm. The cause of the alarm

  18. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Jul 9 -Jul 15, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Safety responded to a report of a natural gas odour in the building. The building was checked and no natural gas was found. Toronto Fire determined that all was in order. 7/12/2012 07:31 AM HazardousWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Jul 9 - Jul 15, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  19. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Apr 29 -May 5, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-000845 YORK LANES RETAIL Gas leak Security, Toronto Fire and Enbridge Gas responded to a report of a natural gas odour in the building. The source of the odour was located in a restaurant kitchen. EnbridgeWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Apr 29 - May 5, 2013 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  20. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of May 14 -May 20, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weekly Security Incident Log Period of May 14 - May 20, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building-000955 PARKING GARAGE - ARBORETUM LANE (PS2) Mech\\Electrical Security responded to a report that an automotive York Security responded to a report of an unknown male causing a disturbance in the food court

  1. Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants D Laurier 1 living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Germany. We present herein results about the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in France for the same age range. These results

  2. Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and geographic We have previously shown that geographic differences in cancer mortalities in Europe are related of 45 male and 47 female cancers. Differences in cancer incidences are correlated moder- ately, first

  3. Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer survival: Lessons from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Page /1 5 Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer ( ). With regards to cancer risk, a first comprehensive review of socioeconomic inequalities was1 published by IARC in 1997 ( ). This review covered inequalities in cancer mortality, incidence and survival and discussed

  4. Biohazardous Laboratory Incidence/Accident Response and Reporting Protocol UGA Office of Biosafety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Biohazardous Laboratory Incidence/Accident Response and Reporting Protocol UGA Office of Biosafety Biohazardous laboratory incident or accident involves the following: 1. Any potential or known exposure-related accidents or illnesses involving work described under the NIH Guidelines for Recombinant DNA Research (NIH

  5. Monthly Theme OARS January 2009 Report an Accident / Incident / Near Miss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Monthly Theme ­ OARS ­ January 2009 Report an Accident / Incident / Near Miss Online Accident Reporting System (OARS) debuts January 2009 EH&S has a NEW online system to report any accident or incident that happens at the University. The web- based reporting system is called OARS -- Online Accident Reporting

  6. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating the shortest wavelength laboratory x-ray laser, below 4.5 nm and operating in the water window, by using the high-energy capability of the Titan laser.

  7. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

  8. allowing normal bone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assays. Correlations of fluoride levels between normal bone near the Nancy Medina; Chester W. Douglass; Gary M. Whitford; Robert N. Hoover; Thomas R. Fears 6 Differential...

  9. Data Collection and Normalization for the Development of Cost...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This chapter discusses considerations for data collection and normalization. g4301-1chp19.pdf -- PDF Document, 21 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

  10. asymptotical normalization coefficients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    zeilbergtokhniotSameSexMarriages Zeilberger, Doron 114 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

  11. asymptotically normal estimators: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    first order inclusion probabilities, H Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 160 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

  12. asymptotic normalization coefficients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    zeilbergtokhniotSameSexMarriages Zeilberger, Doron 114 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

  13. astrophysics asymptotic normalization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    www.math.rutgers.eduzeilbergtokhniotSameSexMarriages Zeilberger, Doron 74 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

  14. asymptotic normalization coefficient: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    zeilbergtokhniotSameSexMarriages Zeilberger, Doron 114 Journal of Multivariate Analysis 74, 49 68 (2000) Asymptotic Normality of Posterior Distributions for...

  15. SciTech Connect: Effect of radiation on normal hematopoiesis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of radiation on normal hematopoiesis and on viral induced cancer of the hematopoietic system. Technical progress report, August 1, 1973--July 31, 1974 Citation Details...

  16. B-2 Bomber During In-flight Refueling Normal Heart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Bomber During In-flight Refueling Normal Heart Image Technology to Detect Concealed Nuclear Material in Trucks and Cargo Containers Single Abnormality Possible Heart Attack Disc...

  17. Log-normal distribution for correlators in lattice QCD?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas DeGrand

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many hadronic correlators used in spectroscopy calculations in lattice QCD simulations appear to show a log-normal distribution at intermediate time separations.

  18. adjacent normal skin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tangential mechanics SAI mechanoreceptor depth actuator strain energy density James Biggs; Mandayam A. Srinivasan 5 Expression and function of small RNAs in normal and...

  19. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization Used...

  20. Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, W.S.; Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Stoddard, D.H.

    1982-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety Technology Group is developing methodology that can be used to assess the risk of operating a plant to reprocess spent nuclear fuel. As an early step in the methodology, a preliminary hazards analysis identifies safety-related incidents. In the absence of appropriate safety features, these incidents could lead to significant consequences and risk to onsite personnel or to the public. This report is a compilation of potential safety-related incidents that have been identified in studies at SRL and in safety analyses of various commercially designed reprocessing plants. It is an expanded revision of the version originally published as DP-1558, Published December 1980.

  1. A preliminary evaluation of the economic risk for cleanup of nuclear material licensee contamination incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostmeyer, R.M.; Skinner, D.J.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents an analysis of the economic risks from nuclear material licensee contamination incidents. The results of the analyses are intended to provide a technical basis for an NRC rulemaking which would require nuclear material licensees to demonstrate adequate financial means to cover the cleanup costs for accidental or inadvertant release of radioactive materials. The important products of this effort include (1) a method for categorizing licensees according to the potential cost and frequency of contamination incidents, (2) a model for ranking the categories of licensees according to potential incident costs, and (3) estimates of contamination risk for the licensee categories.

  2. Asymptotic normalization coefficients for B-10->Be-9+p

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Clark, HL; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Lui, YW; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Xu, HM; Zhou, XG; Burjan, V.; Cejpek, J.; Kroha, V.; Carstoiu, F.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The differential cross sections for the reactions Be-9(B-10, B-10)Be-9 and Be-9(B-10,Be-9)B-10 have been measured at an incident energy of 100 MeV. The elastic scattering data have been used to determine the optical model parameters for the Be-9+B...

  3. Asymptotic normalization coefficients for C-13+p -> N-14 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trache, L.; Azhari, A.; Clark, HL; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Lui, YW; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Tribble, Robert E.; Carstoiu, F.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The C-13(N-14,C-13)N-14 proton exchange reaction has been measured at an incident energy of 162 MeV. Angular distributions were obtained for proton transfer to the ground and low-lying excited states in N-14. Elastic ...

  4. Explicit Expressions for Moments of Log Normal Order Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    Explicit Expressions for Moments of Log Normal Order Statistics Saralees Nadarajah First version: 31 December 2006 Research Report No. 23, 2006, Probability and Statistics Group School of Mathematics, The University of Manchester #12;Explicit Expressions for Moments of Log Normal Order Statistics by Saralees

  5. Numerical algorithms for the computation of the Smith normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seberry, Jennifer

    Numerical algorithms for the computation of the Smith normal form of integral matrices C of the Smith normal form of integral matrices are described. More specifically, the com­ pound matrix method of the algorithms. AMS Subject Classification: Primary 65F30, Secondary 15A21, 15A36. Key words and phrases: Smith

  6. Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Dudley

    Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen;Abstract The normal curve has been used to fit the rate of both world and U.S.A. oil production sizes are lognormally distributed, and the starting time of the production of a field is approximately

  7. Normalized k-means clustering of hyper-rectangles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Normalized k-means clustering of hyper-rectangles Marie Chavent Math´ematiques Appliqu´ees de-rectangles and their use in two normalized k-means clustering algorithms. Keywords: Interval data, Standardization [Diday, 1988], [Bock and Diday, 2000]. Several works on k-means clustering of interval data sets have

  8. New Equipartition Results for Normal Mode Energies of Anharmonic Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Bruce Ian

    New Equipartition Results for Normal Mode Energies of Anharmonic Chains B.I. Henry 1 and T. Szeredi 2;3 Date: 26 September 1995 The canonical and micro­canonical distribution of energy among. If the inter­particle potential is an even function then energy is distributed uniformly among the normal modes

  9. An account of scientific transfer to the industry: the co-development of an incident analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    about their need of an incident analysis method. The company wanted a tool that would help them better

  10. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and testing of an oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry (OIDRS) system for in-vivo and noninvasive detection of epithelial cancer. Two probes were fabricated using micromachining...

  11. Climate and Landscape Factors Associated with Buruli Ulcer Incidence in Victoria, Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Ravensway, Jenni; Benbow, Mark Eric; Tsonis, Anastasios A.; Pierce, Steven J.; Campbell, Lindsay P.; Fyfe, Janet A. M.; Hayman, John A.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Wallace, John R.; Qi, Jiaguo

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans), is a necrotizing skin disease found in more than 30 countries worldwide. BU incidence is highest in West Africa; however, cases have substantially increased in coastal...

  12. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and testing of an oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry (OIDRS) system for in-vivo and noninvasive detection of epithelial cancer. Two probes were fabricated using micromachining...

  13. Root cause analysis of solder flux residue incidence in the manufacture of electronic power modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Pranav

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates the root causes of the incidence of solder flux residue underneath electronic components in the manufacture of power modules. The existing deionized water-based centrifugal cleaning process was ...

  14. UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES RELEVANT SECTIONS: _______________________________________ NAME OF SUPERVISOR TO WHOM ACCIDENT WAS REPORTED: _________________________________ TELEPHONE: _____________________ IF THERE WAS A DELAY IN REPORTING THIS ACCIDENT, LIST REASON

  15. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  16. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  17. Accident/Incident Reporting Form & Investigation Report FAX COMPLETED FORM (Within 24 hours) TO: 519-661-2079 (82079)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Accident/Incident Reporting Form & Investigation Report FAX COMPLETED FORM (Within 24 hours) TO ­ Accident/Incident Reporting Form PART A Name of Employee: ______________________________________ Employee: Report Only Accident Incident No Injury/Hazard First Aid Lost Time Non-Lost Time (If Report Only

  18. A study of the relationship between emotional history and the incidence of cancer in human subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian, Henry Andrew

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    report a more severe emotional history than the non-cancer group. Eighty-eight male subjects were selected from the Veterans Administration Hospital in Temple, Texas to be interviewed according to a patterned interview guide. Results... SUBJECTS' CRITICAL INCIDENTS 55 APPENDIX D - SUMMARIES OF NON-CANCER 72 SUBJECTS' CRITICAL INCIDENTS APPENDIX E - RELEASE FORM 87 VITA 89 LIST OF TABLES Table Page B iographical Data of Sub j ects in Sample 10 Statistical Analysis of Data 22...

  19. A study of the incidence and histology of accessory corpora lutea in swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, Lewis Russell

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF THE INCIDENCE AND HISTOLOGY OF ACCESSORY CORPORA LUTEA IN SWINE A Thesis by LEWIS R. SCHULTZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1969 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction A STUDY OF THE INCIDENCE AND HISTOLOGY OF ACCESSORY CORPORA LUTEA IN SWINE A Thesis by LEWIS R. SCHULTZ Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (M...

  20. The incidence and significance of anaerobic bacteria in the equine uterus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Dean Roger

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INCIDENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE EQUINE UTERUS A Thesis by DEAN ROGER BOLINGER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCF.... December I 987 Major Subject: Veterinary Medical Sciences THE INCIDENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE EQUINE UTERUS A Thesis by DEAN ROGER BOLINGER Approved as to style and content by: Ronnie G. Elmore (Chairman of Committee...

  1. A climate-soil-crop model to evaluate drought incidence and severity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puvirajasinghe, Patrick

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CLINATE-SOIL-CROP MODEL TO EVALUATE DROUGHT INCIDENCE AND SEVERITY A Thesis by PATRICK PUVIRAJASINGHE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1982 Major Subject: Agronomy A CLIMATE-SOIL-CROP MODEL TO EVALUATE DROUGHT INCIDENCE AND SEVERITY A Thesis by PATRICK PUVIRAJASINGHE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) 5' 9 (Member) (Me r) (Member ead of e...

  2. Summary of canister overheating incident at the Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driggers, S.A.

    1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The granular activated carbon (GAC)-filled canister that overheated was being used to adsorb carbon tetrachloride vapors drawn from a well near the 216-Z-9 Trench, a subsurface disposal site in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The overheating incident resulted in a band of discolored paint on the exterior surface of the canister. Although there was no other known damage to equipment, no injuries to operating personnel, and no releases of hazardous materials, the incident is of concern because it was not anticipated. It also poses the possibility of release of carbon tetrachloride and other hazardous vapors if the incident were to recur. All soil vapor extraction system (VES) operations were halted until a better understanding of the cause of the incident could be determined and controls implemented to reduce the possibility of a recurrence. The focus of this report and the intent of all the activities associated with understanding the overheating incident has been to provide information that will allow safe restart of the VES operations, develop operational limits and controls to prevent recurrence of an overheating incident, and safely optimize recovery of carbon tetrachloride from the ground.

  3. NORMALITY OF NILPOTENT VARIETIES IN E6 ERIC SOMMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommers, Eric

    NORMALITY OF NILPOTENT VARIETIES IN E6 ERIC SOMMERS ABSTRACT. We determine which nilpotent orbits for a careful reading of the paper leading to its improvement. 1 #12;2 ERIC SOMMERS Our proof is direct

  4. Paducah and Portsmouth Off-Specification Enriched and Normal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enriched and Normal UF 6 Inventory 1 3B refers to a 30B cylinder size and 4A refers to a 48A size cylinder. Table 1 PORTS Enriched Inventory Container ID Sample Transfer Gross lbs...

  5. Stone-Cech remainder which make continuous images normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleissner, William G.; Levy, Ronnie

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , it is not necessary that every intermediate space Z be normal; it is enough to require that countably compact intermediate spaces be normal. 2. Proposition. If ßX\\X is sequential and Y is Tychonov, then P\\X is closed in ßX\\X. Hence, Y is normal. Proof. Suppose that q... , Clßx,x(Bn) is not compact. Since Clßx(Bn) is compact, we may choose distinct xn e Clßx(Bn) n X. Then {xln : n e to} and {x2n+x : n e to} axe disjoint closed subsets of X, both of whose closures in ßX contain p . This contradicts the normality of X. o...

  6. Characteristics of Wind Turbines Under Normal and Fault Conditions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Parsons, B.; Ellis, A.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the characteristics of a variable-speed wind turbine connected to a stiff or weak grid under normal and fault conditions and the role of reactive power compensation.

  7. Normality of Monte Carlo criticality eigenfunction decomposition coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, B. E.; Martin, W. R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Griesheimer, D. P. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., P.O. Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proof is presented, which shows that after a single Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport power method iteration without normalization, the coefficients of an eigenfunction decomposition of the fission source density are normally distributed when using analog or implicit capture MC. Using a Pearson correlation coefficient test, the proof is corroborated by results from a uniform slab reactor problem, and those results also suggest that the coefficients are normally distributed with normalization. The proof and numerical test results support the application of earlier work on the convergence of eigenfunctions under stochastic operators. Knowledge of the Gaussian shape of decomposition coefficients allows researchers to determine an appropriate level of confidence in the distribution of fission sites taken from a MC simulation. This knowledge of the shape of the probability distributions of decomposition coefficients encourages the creation of new predictive convergence diagnostics. (authors)

  8. Proving Termination of Normalization Functions for Conditional Expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Boyer and Moore have discussed a recursive function that puts con- ditional expressions software correctness) Keywords: Boyer/Moore Theorem Prover, LCF, total correctness, well 12 1 #12; 1 A normalization function Boyer

  9. Stirling numbers of graphs, and the normal ordering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Stirling numbers of graphs, and the normal ordering problem Galvin earned his PhD in mathematics correlations in discrete random structures. The Stirling number of the second kind ${n \\brace k}$ counts

  10. Use of Normalized Radial Basis Function in Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotar, Anton; Brilly, Mitja [Chair of Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Jamova 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we will present a use of normalized radial basis function in hydrology for prediction of missing river Reka runoff data. The method is based on multidimensional normal distribution, where standard deviation is first optimized and later the whole prediction process is learned on existing data [5]. We can conclude, that the method works very well for middle ranges of data, but not so well for extremes because of its interpolating nature.

  11. A grazing incidence x-ray streak camera for ultrafast, single-shot measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Jun; Engelhorn, K.; Cho, B.I.; Lee, H.J.; Greaves, M.; Weber, C.P.; Falcone, R.W.; Padmore, H. A.; Heimann, P.A.

    2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast x-ray streak camera has been realized using a grazing incidence reflection photocathode. X-rays are incident on a gold photocathode at a grazing angle of 20 degree and photoemitted electrons are focused by a large aperture magnetic solenoid lens. The streak camera has high quantum efficiency, 600fs temporal resolution, and 6mm imaging length in the spectral direction. Its single shot capability eliminates temporal smearing due to sweep jitter, and allows recording of the ultrafast dynamics of samples that undergo non-reversible changes.

  12. Incident-Energy Dependent Quenching of the Analyzing Power in Pre-Equilibrium Composite Particle Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowley, A. A. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dimitrova, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton-induced pre-equilibrium process in the energy range of 100 to 160 MeV, which leads to emission of composite ejectiles such as {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles, is discussed. New cross section and analyzing power measurements for the (p,{sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 93}Nb at an incident energy of 160 MeV are presented, and these are found to be in agreement with the prediction of a statistical multistep theoretical formulation. The observed quenching of the analyzing power is also reproduced well by the theory. The results are consistent with earlier work at lower incident energies and other nuclear species.

  13. EP&R Standards Project Report: Technical Review of National Incident Management Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance and necessity for a fully developed and implemented National Incident Management System (NIMS) has been demonstrated in recent years by the impact of national events such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Throughout the history of emergency response to major disasters, especially when multiple response organizations are involved, there have been systemic problems in the consistency and uniformity of response operations. Identifying national standards that support the development and implementation of NIMS is key to helping solve these systemic problems. The NIMS seeks to provide uniformity and consistency for incident management by using common terminology and protocols that will enable responders to coordinate their efforts to ensure an efficient response.

  14. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries. 19 figs.

  15. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries.

  16. Defining the normal turbine inflow within a wind park environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief paper discusses factors that must be considered when defining the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} (as opposed to {open_quotes}extreme{close_quotes}) loading conditions seen in wind turbines operating within a wind park environment. The author defines the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} conditions to include fatigue damage accumulation as a result of: (1) start/stop cycles, (2) emergency shutdowns, and (3) the turbulence environment associated with site and turbine location. He also interprets {open_quotes}extreme{close_quotes} loading conditions to include those events that can challenge the survivability of the turbine.

  17. Defining the normal turbine inflow within a wind park environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief paper discusses factors that must be considered when defining the [open quotes]normal[close quotes] (as opposed to [open quotes]extreme[close quotes]) loading conditions seen in wind turbines operating within a wind park environment. The author defines the [open quotes]normal[close quotes] conditions to include fatigue damage accumulation as a result of: (1) start/stop cycles, (2) emergency shutdowns, and (3) the turbulence environment associated with site and turbine location. He also interprets [open quotes]extreme[close quotes] loading conditions to include those events that can challenge the survivability of the turbine.

  18. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  19. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form. The method comprises: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  20. Household catastrophic payments for tuberculosis care in Nigeria: incidence, determinants, and policy implications for universal health coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ukwaja, Kingsley; Alobu, Isaac; Abimbola, Seye; Hopewell, Philip

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for tuberculosis care in Nigeria: incidence, determinants,Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. 2 National TuberculosisAbakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. 3 National Primary Health

  1. forthcoming in Economic Letters Incidence of Federal and State Gasoline Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    concerns over high gasoline prices. As recently as April 2003, Congress argued over the merits of includingforthcoming in Economic Letters Incidence of Federal and State Gasoline Taxes Hayley Chouinarda, Berkeley, and member of the Giannini Foundation. Abstract The federal specific gasoline tax falls equally

  2. Using Violation and Vulnerability Analysis to Understand the Root-Causes of Complex Security Incidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    Incidents C.W. Johnson Dept. of Computing Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. http Department of Energy has also established the Information Security Resource Center to coordinate the `root is appropriate because it included failures in the underlying audit and control mechanisms. It also stemmed from

  3. Biomedical nuclear and X-ray imager using high-energy grazing incidence mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Craig, William W.; Hasegawa, Bruce; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging of radiation sources located in a subject is explored for medical applications. The approach involves using grazing-incidence optics to form images of the location of radiopharmaceuticals administered to a subject. The optics are "true focusing" optics, meaning that they project a real and inverted image of the radiation source onto a detector possessing spatial and energy resolution.

  4. Systme de rapports d'incidents conforme aux normes ITIL pour le

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    Système de rapports d'incidents conforme aux normes ITIL pour le réseau A.S.T.R.I.D Mémoire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Aper¸cu d'ITIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Objectifs de ce m´emoire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 ITIL 4 2.1 Introduction

  5. SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID 7.6 Kevin F the price of electricity in the PJM power grid. In this paper we examine one of the mechanisms by which space weather impacts the electricity market in the PJM power grid. The starting point of this paper

  6. A. Name: Information Systems Security Incident Response Policy B. Number: 20070103-secincidentresp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    Page 1 I. Title A. Name: Information Systems Security Incident Response Policy B. Number: 20070103-secincidentresp C. Author(s): David Millar (ISC Information Security) and Lauren Steinfeld (Chief Privacy OfficerNet) as well as the establishment of information security policies, guidelines, and standards. The Office

  7. DNA Identification of Mountain Lions Involved in Livestock Predation and Public Safety Incidents and Investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernest, Holly

    1 DNA Identification of Mountain Lions Involved in Livestock Predation and Public Safety Incidents concolor, bobcat, forensic, genetics, DNA techniques, noninvasive sampling, fecal DNA, prey swab DNA ABSTRACT Using three case studies, we demonstrated the utility of techniques to analyze DNA from trace

  8. Forecasting Spatiotemporal Impact of Traffic Incidents on Road Networks Bei Pan, Ugur Demiryurek, Cyrus Shahabi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    -fidelity spatiotemporal data on trans- portation networks of major cities. In this paper, using two real- world incidents, for example it can be used by city transportation agencies for providing evacuation plan to eliminate potential congested grid locks, for effective dispatching of emergency vehicles, or even for long

  9. Dynamically Predicting Corridor Travel Time Under Incident Conditions Using a Neural Network Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Xiaosi

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    into the ANN model development, despite that incident might be a major source of prediction degradations. Additionally, directly deriving corridor travel times in a one-step manner raises some intractable problems, such as pairing input-target data, which have...

  10. Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommaruga, Ruben

    Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models Key words: Lake Lucerne, Lake Cadagno, PAR, UV-A, UV-B, irradiance regime, radiative transfer models) at the field stations Kastanienbaum at Lake Lucerne (434 m a.s.l.) and Piora at Lake Cadagno (1923 m a

  11. Revised rail-stop exposure model for incident-free transport of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostmeyer, R.M.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a model for estimating railstop doses that occur during incident-free transport of nuclear waste by rail. The model, which has been incorporated into the RADTRAN III risk assessment code, can be applied to general freight and dedicated train shipments of waste.

  12. Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    -492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

  13. Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection of biochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection (OI-RD) microscope, a form of polarization-modulated imaging ellipsometer, for label on the polarizer­ compensator­sample­analyzer scheme and under the off-null condition, a polarization-modulated OI

  14. Variable ventilation induces endogenous surfactant release in normal guinea pigs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Variable ventilation induces endogenous surfactant release in normal guinea pigs Stephen P. Arold,1. Alencar, Kenneth R. Lutchen, and Edward P. Ingenito. Variable ventilation induces endogenous surfactant.00036.2003.--Variable or noisy ventilation, which includes random breath-to-breath variations in tidal

  15. PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutter, Jared

    PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance Huai-Xiang Hao*, Caleb M. Cardon*, Wojtek, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Edited by Steven L. McKnight, University in a cell-autonomous manner to maintain cellular energy homeostasis and is a potential therapeutic target

  16. Rigid Shape Interpolation Using Normal Equations William Baxter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Rigid Shape Interpolation Using Normal Equations William Baxter OLM Digital, Inc. Pascal Barla INRIA Bordeaux University Ken-ichi Anjyo OLM Digital, Inc. Figure 1: Rigid Morphing with large rotations works well and is a very practical way e-mail: baxter@olm.co.jp e-mail: pascal.barla@labri.fr e

  17. Auditory Responses in Normal-Hearing, Noise-Exposed Ears

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamper, Greta

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ....................................................................................... 29 Influence of ABR Recording Electrode ......................................................................................... 31 ABR Wave V Amplitude... membrane electrode (Ferguson and Ferraro, 1989; Schwartz et al., 1994; Hall, 2007b; Gaddam and Ferraro, 2008). Variability is commonly seen in ABR response amplitude, even in normal-hearing ears (Schwartz et al., 1994). In light of the recent animal data...

  18. RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES The secret are going to say. Many people with radios have a tendency to talk and/or repeat too much. Say what you need until it is second nature. Practicing proper day-to-day radio procedures will make emergency radio

  19. Determination of normalized magnetic eigenfields in microwave cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helsing, Johan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic field integral equation for axially symmetric cavities with perfectly conducting surfaces is discretized according to a high-order convergent Fourier--Nystr\\"om scheme. The resulting solver is used to determine eigenwavenumbers and normalized magnetic eigenfields to very high accuracy in the entire computational domain.

  20. Water-Energy Shortages in the West: The New Normal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    Water-Energy Shortages in the West: The New Normal? Tuesday, November 19, 2013 12:00 - 1:30 p, Kristen Averyt, director of the Western Water Assessment, a NOAA program based at CIRES, will discuss the connections between climate science and decision- making across the West , in particular, the water

  1. CONCENTRATED SOLID SOLUTIONS OF NORMAL METALS By H. JONES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    637. CONCENTRATED SOLID SOLUTIONS OF NORMAL METALS By H. JONES, Imperial College. Department and Heine [1] in the light of the new knowledge of the Fermi surface revealed by experi- ments alloys is reviewed in the light of modern work on the nature of the Fermi surfaces in the noble metals

  2. Proving Termination of Normalization Functions for Conditional Expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Computer Laboratory University of Cambridge 3 June 1985 Boyer and Moore have discussed a recursive function: Boyer/Moore Theorem Prover, LCF, total correctness, well-founded relations. #12;Contents 1 Conclusions 12 1 #12;1 A normalization function Boyer and Moore have published a machine-assisted proof

  3. Computational Model for Forced Expiration from Asymmetric Normal Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Computational Model for Forced Expiration from Asymmetric Normal Lungs ADAM G. POLAK 1 losses along the airway branches. Calculations done for succeeding lung volumes result in the semidynamic to the choke points, characteristic differences of lung regional pressures and volumes, and a shape

  4. 60. LUNG .13 NORMAL VARIANT .31 BENIGN NEOPI,J.SM, CYST, 6l. RIGHT .131 NORMAL VARIANT, OTHER NEOPLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [ ~;{(, (1) Lungs 60. LUNG .13 NORMAL VARIANT .31 BENIGN NEOPI,J.SM, CYST, 6l. RIGHT .131 IN LUNG BRONCHI .221 SARCOIDOSIS, 672. SUPERIOR ADENOPATHY MEDIASTINUN .222 SARCOIDOSIS, 673 68. MORE THAN 1 LUNG PLRA, MEDIAST. , LOCATION (GNRLIZED) 69. OTHER-(LUNG, PLRA, MEDIAST

  5. (BBA) is competent for investigations on incidents of poisoning honey bees due to the use of pesti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (BBA) is competent for investigations on incidents of poisoning honey bees due to the use of pesti in the case of honey-bee poisoning by pesticides' [Amtl Pfl Best (Berlin-Dahlem), NF 36/5, 179-182]. An overview of the poisoning incidents shows a clear decline in the last years. The most impor- tant

  6. 29.01.03.M1.09 Information Resources Incident Management Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    likelihood that security incidents could be propagated to other systems beyond departmental control, system, process, store, retrieve, display, and transmit information or data. SIRS ­ Security Incident Reporting follow System Regulation 10.02.01, Control of Fraud, Waste and Abuse. 2.6 If there is a substantial

  7. Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M. Berrill,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M 2007 The output energy dependence of high repetition rate grazing incidence pumped Ni-like Mo, Ni-like Ag, and Ne-like Ti transient collisional soft x-ray lasers on the duration of the pump pulse

  8. Residential Life Judicial Review Board Process An incident report is submitted and directed to the Coordinator of the specific residence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Residential Life Judicial Review Board Process · An incident report is submitted and directed of Residential Life. · Upon review, the Coordinator determines whether or not the incident requires a one. For additional information, you may contact the Residential Life office at 257-4917. #12;

  9. -Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load -751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 751-754, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCune, Bruce

    as predictors. Heat load was calculated as a 45 degree rotation of the PDIR response surface. Results- Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load - 751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18 regression (NPMR) improve estimates of potential direct incident radia- tion (PDIR) and heat load based

  10. The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    which facilitates analysis of the incidence of an economywide capandtrade system for carbon dioxide (CO2) at the state level. An understanding of the geographic incidence of climate change mitigation are geographically localized. The upshot is a classic collective action problem. The issue of distribution has long

  11. EOC Title: Documentation Unit General Description The Documentation Unit maintains accurate, up-to-date incident files

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Matthew P.

    PLANNING EOC Title: Documentation Unit General Description The Documentation Unit maintains, EOC Action Plan, and other documents, as required · Ensure an EOC sign-in sheet is available for each and Initial Action Incidents (3 hours) · IS-700 National Incident Management System (3 hours) · IS-800

  12. SciTech Connect: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

  13. Low-Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria. Low-Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria. Abstract: Microarray analysis indicated...

  14. Measurement of normal contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chongpu Zhai; Sébastien Bevand; Yixiang Gan; Dorian Hanaor; Gwénaëlle Proust; Bruno Guelorget; Delphine Retraint

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of roughness and fractality on the normal contact stiffness of rough surfaces. Samples of isotropically roughened aluminium surfaces are considered. The roughness and fractal dimension were altered through blasting using different sized particles. Subsequently, surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) was applied to the surfaces in order to modify the surface at the microscale. The surface topology was characterised by interferometry based profilometry. The normal contact stiffness was measured through nanoindentation with a flat tip utilising the partial unloading method. We focus on establishing the relationships between surface stiffness and roughness, combined with the effects of fractal dimension. The experimental results, for a wide range of surfaces, showed that the measured contact stiffness depended very closely on surfaces' root mean squared (RMS) slope and their fractal dimension, with correlation coefficients of around 90\\%, whilst a relatively weak correlation coefficient of 57\\% was found between the contact stiffness and RMS roughness.

  15. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonaldo, Maria DeFatima (New York, NY); Soares, Marcelo Bento (New York, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  16. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonaldo, M.D.; Soares, M.B.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 1 fig.

  17. HASCAL: A system for estimating contamination and doses from incidents at worldwide radiological facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjoreen, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sykes, R.I. [Titan/ARAP, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    HASCAL (Hazard Assessment System for Consequence Analysis), Version 0.1, is being developed to support analysis of radiological incidents anywhere in the world for Defense Nuclear Agency. HASCAL is a component of HPAC (Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability), a comprehensive nuclear, biological, and chemical hazard effects planning and forecasting modeling system. HASCAL estimates the amount of radioactivity released, its atmospheric transport, and the resulting radiological doses for a variety of radiological incident scenarios. HASCAL is based on RASCAL (Radiological assessment System Consquence Analysis), which was developed for US NRC for analysis of US power reactor accidents. HASCAL contains addtions of an atmospheric transport model (SCIPUFF) and of a database of all power reactors in the world. Enhancements to HASCAL are planned.

  18. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, A. F. H. [Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Lulea University of Technology, S-971 87 Lulea (Sweden)

    2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 {mu}m wavelength CO{sub 2}-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  19. Quasi-Degenerate Neutrino Masses with Normal and Inverted Hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Ng K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of CP-phases on the three absolute quasi-degenerate Majorana neutrino (QDN) masses are stud-ied with neutrino mass matrices obeying {\\mu} - {\\tau} symmetry for normal as well as inverted hierarchical mass patterns. We have made further investigations on 1) the prediction of solar mixing angle which lies below tri-bimaximal mixing value in consistent with neutrino oscillation observational data, 2) the prediction on absolute neutrino mass parameter (mee) in 0{\

  20. Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and responsibilities for reporting cyber security incidents involving classified and unclassified systems and responding to cyber security alerts and advisories; and to implement requirements of DOE N 205.1, Unclassified Cyber Security Program, and DOE M 471.2-2, Classified Information Systems Security Manual. DOE N 205.13, dated 7-6-04, extends this notice until 7-6-05. Cancels DOE M 471.2-2, Chapter III, section 8.

  1. Investigation of lane occupancy as a freeway control parameter for use during incident conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friebele, John Duncan

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    freeway safety warning device, using critical occupancy parameters, was developed and simulated in real-time. Evaluation of the simulated operation of the device revealed. that relia'cle detection of shock waves generated by freeway incidents... Detection of Shock Waves Page 38 Sensitivity of Occupancy Measurements 38 Occupancy Differential Concept Determination of' Occupancy D"' fzerence Parameters Det, ection of Shock Waves 41 RESULTS Critical Occupancy Concept Determination of Critical...

  2. Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

  3. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boe, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Lemieux, Paul [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hayes, Colin [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)] [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  4. A frequency-domain transient stability criterion for normal contingencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marceau, R.J.; Rizzi, J.C. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Mailhot, R. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous paper, a simple frequency-domain stability criterion was proposed for networks near the stability limit subjected to a 3-phase fault with no loss of line. The criterion can be summarized as follows: if a system is stable, the phase angle of the Fourier transform of a network`s transient voltage response exhibits a clockwise polar plot behavior at all buses (i.e. for increasing frequency); if the system is unstable, it exhibits a counterclockwise behavior in at least one location. Though these results are of interest, the criterion would be of greater practical use in mechanizing dynamic security analysis if it could be extended to the types of contingencies actually used in security analysis, namely normal contingencies. Normal contingencies are commonly defined as the loss of any element in a power system, either spontaneously or preceded by a fault, and such changes in topology impact post-contingency steady-state voltages in addition to their transient behavior. The present paper shows how such cases can be treated, thereby extending the applicable range of the criterion to normal contingencies.

  5. Surface tension with Normal Curvature in Curved Space-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himanshu kumar; Sharf Alam; Suhail Ahmad

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With an aim to include the contribution of surface tension in the action of the boundary, we define the tangential pressure in terms of surface tension and Normal curvature in a more naturally geometric way. First, we show that the negative tangential pressure is independent of the four-velocity of a very thin hyper-surface. Second, we relate the 3-pressure of a surface layer to the normal curvature and the surface tension. Third, we relate the surface tension to the energy of the surface layer. Four, we show that the delta like energy flows across the hyper-surface will be zero for such a representation of intrinsic 3-pressure. Five, for the weak field approximation and for static spherically symmetric configuration, we deduce the classical Kelvin's relation. Six, we write a modified action for the boundary having contributions both from surface tension and normal curvature of the surface layer. Also we propose a method to find the physical action assuming a reference background, where the background is not flat.

  6. Physics of collisionless scrape-off-layer plasma during normal and off-normal Tokamak operating conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of a collisionless scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma in tokamak reactors is being studied to define the electron distribution function and the corresponding sheath potential between the divertor plate and the edge plasma. The collisionless model is shown to be valid during the thermal phase of a plasma disruption, as well as during the newly desired low-recycling normal phase of operation with low-density, high-temperature, edge plasma conditions. An analytical solution is developed by solving the Fokker-Planck equation for electron distribution and balance in the SOL. The solution is in good agreement with numerical studies using Monte-Carlo methods. The analytical solutions provide an insight to the role of different physical and geometrical processes in a collisionless SOL during disruptions and during the enhanced phase of normal operation over a wide range of parameters.

  7. SRS reactor control rod cooling without normal forced convection cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.C. (SAIC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Easterling, T.C. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an analytical study of the coolability of the control rods in the Savannah River site (SRS) K production reactor under conditions of loss of normal forced convection cooling. The study was performed as part of the overall safety analysis of the reactor supporting its restart. The analysis addresses the buoyancy-driven boiling flow over the control rods that occurs when forced cooling is lost. The objective of the study was to demonstrate that the control rods will remain cooled (i.e., no melting) at powers representative of those anticipated for restart of the reactor.

  8. Fitting Parton Distribution Data with Multiplicative Normalization Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The NNPDF Collaboration; Richard D. Ball; Luigi Del Debbio; Stefano Forte; Alberto Guffanti; Jose I. Latorre; Juan Rojo; Maria Ubiali

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the generic problem of performing a global fit to many independent data sets each with a different overall multiplicative normalization uncertainty. We show that the methods in common use to treat multiplicative uncertainties lead to systematic biases. We develop a method which is unbiased, based on a self--consistent iterative procedure. We demonstrate the use of this method by applying it to the determination of parton distribution functions with the NNPDF methodology, which uses a Monte Carlo method for uncertainty estimation.

  9. The normal levels of immunoglobulins of the mare's uterus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergeron, Helene

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [IgG, IgA, IgG(T)) were prepared. The plates were kept at 4 C in a moist chamber for at least 24 hours before being used. 32 Table 3 ? Approximate final concentration of antisera against horse IgG, IgA and IgG(T) after dilution Antrserum (against...) Charle L. d (Head of Department) August 1984 The Normal Levels of Immunoglobulins of the Mare's Uterus (August, 1984) Helene Bergeron, D. M. V. , Universite de Montreal, Quebec, Canada Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John M. Bowen The levels...

  10. High-accuracy measurements of the normal specular reflectance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voarino, Philippe; Piombini, Herve; Sabary, Frederic; Marteau, Daniel; Dubard, Jimmy; Hameury, Jacques; Filtz, Jean Remy

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The French Laser Megajoule (LMJ) is designed and constructed by the French Commissariata l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Its amplifying section needs highly reflective multilayer mirrors for the flash lamps. To monitor and improve the coating process, the reflectors have to be characterized to high accuracy. The described spectrophotometer is designed to measure normal specular reflectance with high repeatability by using a small spot size of 100 {mu}m. Results are compared with ellipsometric measurements. The instrument can also perform spatial characterization to detect coating nonuniformity.

  11. Termination of a Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar JumpTennessee/Wind Resources < Tennessee Jump to:TensasNormal

  12. Apex or Salient of Normal Fault | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County, Michigan: EnergySalient of Normal Fault Jump to:

  13. Incidence and risk factors for lung cancer among women in the women’s interagency HIV study (WIHS) and men in the multicenter AIDS cohort study (MACS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incidence and risk factors for lung cancer among women inan increased incidence of lung can- cer among people withis due to HIV or to other lung cancer risk factors such as

  14. A new coral disease from the southern Arabian Gulf During an ecological survey of coral communities at Jebel Ali in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, a high incidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Jebel Ali in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, a high incidence of coral diseases was observed. Although

  15. Incidence of Leukoencephalopathy After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebi, Junko, E-mail: junkoe@fmu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Sato, Hisashi; Nakajima, Masaru; Shishido, Fumio [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of leukoencephalopathy after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 111 patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from April 2001 through March 2008 and had evaluable computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 1 month after completion of WBRT. We evaluated the leukoencephalopathy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The patients who had brain tumor recurrence after WBRT were censored at the last follow-up CT or MRI without recurrence. To evaluate the risk factors for leukoencephalopathy, bivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for follow-up time. Factors included in the analysis were age, gender, dose fractionation, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, cisplatin, and other chemotherapeutic agents. Results: The median age of the 111 patients was 60.0 years (range, 23-89 years). The median follow-up was 3.8 months (range, 1.0-38.1 months). Leukoencephalopathy developed in 23 of the 111 patients. Grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed in 8, 7, and 8 patients, respectively. The incidence was 34.4% (11 of 32), 42.9% (6 of 14), 66.7% (2 of 3), and 100% (2 of 2) of the patients who were followed up for ?6, ?12, ?24, and ?36 months, respectively. In the bivariate analysis, older age (?65 years) was significantly correlated with higher risk of leukoencephalopathy (odds ratio 3.31; 95% confidence interval 1.15-9.50; P=.03). Conclusions: The incidence of leukoencephalopathy after WBRT was 34.4% with ?6 months follow-up, and increased with longer follow-up. Older age was a significant risk factor. The schedule of WBRT for patients with brain metastases should be carefully determined, especially for favorable patients.

  16. Measurement of incident position of hypervelocity particles on piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takechi, Seiji; Onishi, Toshiyuki; Minami, Shigeyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Miyachi, Takashi; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nogami, Ken-ichi [Department of Physics, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Ohashi, Hideo [Faculty of Marine Science, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 108-8477 (Japan); Sasaki, Sho [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Iwate 023-0861 (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Iwai, Takeo [Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Gruen, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Okada, Nagaya [Honda Electronics Co., Ltd., Aichi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cosmic dust detector for use onboard a satellite is currently being developed by using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT). The characteristics of the PZT detector have been studied by bombarding it with hypervelocity iron (Fe) particles supplied by a Van de Graaff accelerator. One central electrode and four peripheral electrodes were placed on the front surface of the PZT detector to measure the impact positions of the incident Fe particles. It was demonstrated that the point of impact on the PZT detector could be identified by using information on the time at which the first peak of the output signal obtained from each electrode appeared.

  17. Systematics of threshold incident energy for deep sub-barrier fusion hindrance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takatoshi Ichikawa; Kouichi Hagino; Akira Iwamoto

    2007-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically evaluate the potential energy at the touching configuration for heavy-ion reactions using various potential models. We point out that the energy at the touching point, especially that estimated with the Krappe-Nix-Sierk (KNS) potential, strongly correlates with the threshold incident energy for steep fall-off of fusion cross sections observed recently for several systems at extremely low energies. This clearly indicates that the steep fall-off phenomenon can be attributed to the dynamics after the target and projectile touch with each other, e.g., the tunneling process and the nuclear saturation property in the overlap region.

  18. Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604° ShowCounty,Energy Information Incidence in

  19. METEOROLOGICAL INFLUENCES ON VAPOR INCIDENTS IN THE 200 EAST & 200 WEST TANK FARMS FROM CY1995 TO CY2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOCKING, M.J.

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Revised for a more comprehensive overview of vapor incidents reported at the Hanford Tank Farms. Investigation into the meteorological influences on vapor incidents in the tank farm to determine what, if any, meteorological influences contribute to the reporting of odors, smells, vapors, and other gases. Weather phenomena, specifically barometric pressure, and wind velocity and direction can potentially cause or exacerbate a vapor release within the farm systems. The purpose of this document is to gather and evaluate the meteorological and weather information for the Tank Farms Shift Log Vapor Incident entries and determine what, if any, meteorological influences contribute to the reporting of odors, smells, vapors, and other gases such as propane. A part of the evaluation will be determining which of the incidents are related to actual ''intrusive'' work, and which are ''transient.'' Transient vapor incidents are herein defined as those vapors encountered during walkdowns, surveys, or other activities that did not require working directly with the tanks, pits, transfer lines, etc. Another part of the investigation will involve determining if there are barometric pressures or other weather related phenomena that might cause or contribute vapors being released when there are no ''intrusive'' activities. A final purpose is to evaluate whether there is any correlation between the 242-A Evaporator operations and Vapor Incidents entered on the Shift Log.

  20. Statistical Inference for Models with Intractable Normalizing Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Ick Hoon

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    be calculated by S1(y) = X 1?inormalizing constant ratio R(?t, ?) = ?(?)/?(?t) by bRm(?t,yt, ?) = 1 m mX i=1 g(y(t)i , ?) g(y(t)i , ?t) . 4. Calculate the Monte Carlo MH ratio r...

  1. Hard Sphere Dynamics for Normal and Granular Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James W. Dufty; Aparna Baskaran

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid of N smooth, hard spheres is considered as a model for normal (elastic collisions) and granular (inelastic collisions) fluids. The potential energy is discontinuous for hard spheres so the pairwise forces are singular and the usual forms of Newtonian and Hamiltonian mechanics do not apply. Nevertheless, particle trajectories in the N particle phase space are well defined and the generators for these trajectories can be identified. The first part of this presentation is a review of the generators for the dynamics of observables and probability densities. The new results presented in the second part refer to applications of these generators to the Liouville dynamics for granular fluids. A set of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the generator for this Liouville dynamics is identified in a special "stationary representation". This provides a class of exact solutions to the Liouville equation that are closely related to hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

  2. The Properties of Normal Conducting Cathodes in FZD Superconducting Gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF photoinjector) is one of the latest applications of SC technology in the accelerator field. Since superconducting cathodes with high QE are not available up to now, normal conducting cathode material is the main choice for the SRF photoinjectors. However, the compatibility between the cathode and the cavity is one of the challenges for this concept. The SRF gun with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated under the collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. In this paper, some experience gained in the gun commissioning will be concluded. The results of the properties of Cs2Te photocathode in the cavity will be presented, such as the Q.E., the life time, the dark current and the thermal emittance.

  3. Tunneling from super- to normal-deformed minima in nuclei.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khoo, T. L.

    1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An excited minimum, or false vacuum, gives rise to a highly elongated superdeformed (SD) nucleus. A brief review of superdeformation is given, with emphasis on the tunneling from the false to the true vacuum, which occurs in the feeding and decay of SD bands. During the feeding process the tunneling is between hot states, while in the decay it is from a cold to a hot state. The {gamma} spectra connecting SD and normal-deformed (ND) states provide information on several physics issues: the decay mechanism; the spin/parity quantum numbers, energies and microscopic structures of SD bands; the origin of identical SD bands; the quenching of pairing with excitation energy; and the chaoticity of excited ND states at 2.5-5 MeV. Other examples of tunneling in nuclei, which are briefly described, include the possible role of tunneling in {Delta}I = 4 bifurcation in SD bands, sub-barrier fusion and proton emitters.

  4. Phenomenology of electrostatically charged droplet combustion in normal gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Eric K.; Koch, Jeremy A.; Kyritsis, Dimitrios C. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental findings are provided on the effect of electrostatically charging a fuel on single-burning droplet combustion in normal gravity. It was established that significant modification of the flame morphology and the droplet burning time could be achieved, solely by the droplet charge, without the application of external electric fields. Negative charging of the droplets of mixtures of isooctane with either ethanol or a commercially available anti-static additive generated intense motion of the flame and abbreviated the droplet burning time by as much as 40% for certain blend compositions. Positive charging of the droplets generated almost spherical flames, because electrostatic attraction toward the droplets countered the effect of buoyancy. By comparing combustion of droplets of the same conductivity but different compositions, coupling of electrostatics with combustion chemistry was established. (author)

  5. Normal modes analysis of the microscopic dynamics in hard discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina Brito; Matthieu Wyart

    2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate numerically the normal modes of the free energy in a glass of hard discs. We observe that, near the glass transition or after a rapid quench deep in the glass phase, the density of states (i) is characteristic of a marginally stable structure, in particular it di splays a frequency scale $\\omega^*\\sim p^{1/2}$, where $p$ is the pressure and (ii) gives a faithful representation of the short-time dyn amics. This brings further evidences that the boson peak near the glass transition corresponds to the relaxation of marginal modes of a we akly-coordinated structure, and implies that the mean square displacement in the glass phase is anomalously large and goes as $ \\sim p^{-3/2}$, a prediction that we check numerically.

  6. Fermi Normal Coordinates and Fermion Curvature Couplings in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anshuman Dey; Abhisek Samanta; Tapobrata Sarkar

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study gravitational curvature effects in circular and radial geodesics in static, spherically symmetric space-times, using Fermi normal coordinates. We first set up these coordinates in the general case, and then use this to study effective magnetic fields due to gravitational curvature in the exterior and interior Schwarzschild, Janis-Newman-Winicour, and Bertrand space-times. We show that these fields can be large for specific parameter values in the theories, and thus might have observational significance. We discuss the qualitative differences of the magnetic field for vacuum space-times and for those seeded by matter. We estimate the magnitude of these fields in realistic galactic scenarios and discuss their possible experimental relevance. Gravitational curvature corrections to the Hydrogen atom spectrum for these space-times are also discussed briefly.

  7. Insolation data manual and direct normal solar radiation data manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24--25 years of data, generally from 1952--1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/m{sup 2} per day, Btu/ft{sup 2} per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global {bar K}{sub T} (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global {bar K}{sub T} is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

  8. Technical Review of Law Enforcement Standards and Guides Relative to Incident Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Salter, R.; Stanton, J. R.; Fisher, D.

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to locate potential law enforcement-related standards that support incident management, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contacted representatives from the National Institute of Standards-Office of Law Enforcement Standards (NIST-OLES), National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Secret Service, ASTM International committees that have a law enforcement focus, and a variety of individuals from local and regional law enforcement organizations. Discussions were held with various state and local law enforcement organizations. The NIJ has published several specific equipment-related law enforcement standards that were included in the review, but it appears that law enforcement program and process-type standards are developed principally by organizations that operate at the state and local level. Input is provided from state regulations and codes and from external non-government organizations (NGOs) that provide national standards. The standards that are adopted from external organizations or developed independently by state authorities are available for use by local law enforcement agencies on a voluntary basis. The extent to which they are used depends on the respective jurisdictions involved. In some instances, use of state and local disseminated standards is mandatory, but in most cases, use is voluntary. Usually, the extent to which these standards are used appears to depend on whether or not jurisdictions receive certification from a “governing” entity due to their use and compliance with the standards. In some cases, these certification-based standards are used in principal but without certification or other compliance monitoring. In general, these standards appear to be routinely used for qualification, selection for employment, and training. In these standards, the term “Peace Officer” is frequently used to refer to law enforcement personnel. This technical review of national law enforcement standards and guides identified the following four guides as having content that supports incident management: • TE-02-02 Guide to Radio Communications Interoperability Strategies and Products • OSHA 335-10N Preparing and Protecting Security Personnel in Emergencies • NIJ 181584 Fire and Arson Scene Evidence: A Guide for Public Safety Personnel • NIJ 181869 A Guide for Explosion and Bombing Scene Investigation In conversations with various state and local law enforcement officials, it was determined that the following National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) standards are generally recognized and tend to be universally used by law enforcement organizations across the country: • NFPA 1600 Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs • NFPA 1561 Standard on Fire Department Incident Management Systems • NFPA 472 Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition) • NFPA 473 Standard for Competencies for EMS Personnel Responding to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition)

  9. Cubic AlGaN/GaN Hetero-Junction Field-Effect Transistors with Normally-on and Normally-off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    Cubic AlGaN/GaN Hetero-Junction Field-Effect Transistors with Normally-on and Normally-effect transistors (HFETs) in GaN technology. HFET structures were fabricated of non-polar cubic AlGaN/GaN hetero insulation of 3C-SiC was realized by Ar+ implantation before c-AlGaN/GaN growth. HFETs with normally

  10. SPEECH-CODING AND TRAINING-INDUCED PLASTICITY IN AUDITORY CORTEX OF NORMAL AND DYSLEXIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilgard, Michael P.

    SPEECH-CODING AND TRAINING-INDUCED PLASTICITY IN AUDITORY CORTEX OF NORMAL AND DYSLEXIA MODEL RATS anymore... #12;SPEECH-CODING AND TRAINING-INDUCED PLASTICITY IN AUDITORY CORTEX OF NORMAL AND DYSLEXIA

  11. Imaging of normal and pathologic joint synovium using nonlinear optical microscopy as a potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    , and gout at 3.0 million. Arthritis can result in irreversible destruction and loss of normal articular

  12. Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jin

    Distributions Jin Wang Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Valdosta State University Valdosta, GA 31698-0040 January 28, 2000 Abstract The mixture of normal distributions provides a useful extension of the normal distribution for modeling of daily changes in market variables with fatter-than-normal tails

  13. bridge. The bridge consists of a polarization beamsplitter oriented at 458 to the incident laser polarization, and vF is measured via the normalized intensity difference between the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roukes, Michael L.

    . Metrologia 33, 325­335 (1996). 3. Itano, W. M. et al. Quantum projection noise: Population fluctuations

  14. The effective beta sensitivity to the incident neutron energy dependence of the absolute delayed neutron yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Angelo, A. (ENEA, Casaccia (Italy)); Filip, A. (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty of the [sup 235]U, [sup 239]Pu, and [sup 238]U absolute delayed neutron yields v[sub d] is one of the principal sources of uncertainty in predicting the fission reactor reactivity scale [beta][sub eff]. The current uncertainties in the dependence of v[sub d] on incident neutron energy is investigated for significance in the evaluation of [beta][sub eff]. The uncertainty effects on the GODIVA, JEZEBEL, Zero Power Reactor, SNEAK, and Masurca benchmark facility calculations are analyzed using ENDF/B and JEF basic data. Different assumptions about the energy dependence result in variations of up to 5% in the reactor spectrum averaged values of v[sub d], and these would result in variations of up to [approximately] 2% in the value of [beta][sub eff] for a typical liquid-metal fast breeder reactor.

  15. Risk Insights Associated with Incident-Free Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel To Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Supko, E.M. [Energy Resources International, Inc., 101518 St., NW, Suite 650, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Kessler, J.H. [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West W.T. Harris Blvd., Charlotte NC 28262 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Final Environmental Impact Statement (YM EIS)[1] included an analysis of the environmental impacts associated with the transport of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from multiple locations across the US to Yucca Mountain for incident-free and accident conditions. While the radiological risks contained in the YM EIS were calculated to be small, it is important to recognize the many conservatisms that were utilized to calculate these risks. This paper identifies conservative assumptions associated with the YM EIS calculation of incident free transportation risk, and provides an estimate of incident free transportation risk using more realistic assumptions. While it is important to use conservative assumptions in the evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with the proposed repository, it is equally important that the public and decision makers understand the conservative nature of the results presented. This paper will provide that perspective regarding the incident free transportation impacts and summarizes the results of a more detailed EPRI report on this subject, 'Assessment of Incident Free Transport Risk for Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel to Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5'. [2] (authors)

  16. Effects of grazing incidence conditions on the x-ray diffuse scattering from self-assembled nanoscale islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidbauer, M.; Grigoriev, D.; Hanke, M.; Schaefer, P.; Wiebach, T.; Koehler, R. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction from SiGe nanoscale islands grown on Si(001) substrate were investigated. Experiments and corresponding theoretical simulations based on the distorted-wave Born approximation were carried out. The strain field inside and in the vicinity of the SiGe islands was calculated in the framework of linear elasticity theory using the numerical finite element method. The diffuse intensity pattern in reciprocal space reveals a well-resolved fine structure with prominent maxima and a complicated fringe pattern. The distribution of diffuse intensity in reciprocal space strongly depends on the angle of incidence with respect to the sample surface. The results obtained substantiate the important role of basically five (grazing incidence small-angle x-ray) and nine (grazing incidence diffraction) scattering channels that have to be considered for a complete understanding of the scattering scenario. A refined island model concerning shape, size, and Ge composition was elaborated.

  17. Incidence of primary liver cancer and aetiological aspects: a study of a defined population from a low-endemicity area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J Kaczynski; G Hansson; S Wallerstedt

    Summary The prevalence of primary liver cancer (PLC) varies throughout the world. It has been attributed to variations in incidence of the predominant histological type, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The incidence of PLC types other than HCC such as cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) is far less known, especially in low-incidence areas. The aetiology of HCC and other PLC types is obscure, with the exception of the association between HCC and cirrhosis as well as chronic viral hepatitis. The present retrospective incidence and aetiology study concerns a well-defined population from a period with a high autopsy frequency. Preserved biopsy specimens were re-evaluated histopathologically and patient records were studied. Among 590 histologically verified cases of PLC, HCC constituted 90%, CCC 8 % and a mixed form of these types 1%. At the end of the study period the annual age-standardised incidence rate of HCC was 3.6 cases per 100 000 inhabitants. Other PLC types were hepatoblastoma (n = 3), fibrolamellar carcinoma (n = 2), angiosarcoma (n = 1) and infantile haemangioendothelioma (n = 1), each constituting less than I % of the PLC cases. Comparing HCC with CCC we found that cirrhosis (70%) and alcoholism (21%) was significantly more frequent in HCC, and cholelithiasis was significantly more common (60%) in patients with CCC. In the majority of the PLC cases with liver cirrhosis this disorder was unknown before diagnosis of the tumour.

  18. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  19. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Christine S., E-mail: chungc1@sutterhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley, California (United States); Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nelson, Kerrie [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Xu, Yang [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keating, Nancy L. [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Office of the Executive Dean, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study, these results should be viewed as hypothesis generating.

  20. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Han Jo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Boland, Patrick J. [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Meredith, Dennis S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States)] [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  1. The dust mass in z > 6 normal star forming galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, Mattia; Graziani, Luca; Valiante, Rosa; Dayal, Pratika; Maio, Umberto; Ciardi, Benedetta; Hunt, Leslie K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We interpret recent ALMA observations of z > 6 normal star forming galaxies by means of a semi-numerical method, which couples the output of a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation with a chemical evolution model which accounts for the contribution to dust enrichment from supernovae, asymptotic giant branch stars and grain growth in the interstellar medium. We find that while stellar sources dominate the dust mass of small galaxies, the higher level of metal enrichment experienced by galaxies with Mstar > 10^9 Msun allows efficient grain growth, which provides the dominant contribution to the dust mass. Even assuming maximally efficient supernova dust production, the observed dust mass of the z = 7.5 galaxy A1689-zD1 requires very efficient grain growth. This, in turn, implies that in this galaxy the average density of the cold and dense gas, where grain growth occurs, is comparable to that inferred from observations of QSO host galaxies at similar redshifts. Although plausible, the upper limits on the dust ...

  2. Rap G protein signal in normal and disordered lymphohematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minato, Nagahiro, E-mail: minato@imm.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Rap proteins (Rap1, Rap2a, b, c) are small molecular weight GTPases of the Ras family. Rap G proteins mediate diverse cellular events such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and gene activation through various signaling pathways. Activation of Rap signal is regulated tightly by several specific regulatory proteins including guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins. Beyond cell biological studies, increasing attempts have been made in the past decade to define the roles of Rap signal in specific functions of normal tissue systems as well as in cancer. In the immune and hematopoietic systems, Rap signal plays crucial roles in the development and function of essentially all lineages of lymphocytes and hematopoietic cells, and importantly, deregulated Rap signal may lead to unique pathological conditions depending on the affected cell types, including various types of leukemia and autoimmunity. The phenotypical studies have unveiled novel, even unexpected functional aspects of Rap signal in cells from a variety of tissues, providing potentially important clues for controlling human diseases, including malignancy.

  3. A Computational Model Incorporating Neural Stem Cell Dynamics Reproduces Glioma Incidence across the Lifespan in the Human Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Roman; Stoll, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert...

  4. Normal and lateral Casimir forces between deformed plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emig, Thorsten; Hanke, Andreas; Golestanian, Ramin; Kardar, Mehran [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan 45195-159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Casimir force between macroscopic bodies depends strongly on their shape and orientation. To study this geometry dependence in the case of two deformed metal plates, we use a path-integral quantization of the electromagnetic field which properly treats the many-body nature of the interaction, going beyond the commonly used pairwise summation (PWS) of van der Waals forces. For arbitrary deformations we provide an analytical result for the deformation induced change in the Casimir energy, which is exact to second order in the deformation amplitude. For the specific case of sinusoidally corrugated plates, we calculate both the normal and the lateral Casimir forces. The deformation induced change in the Casimir interaction of a flat and a corrugated plate shows an interesting crossover as a function of the ratio of the mean plate distance H to the corrugation length {lambda}: For {lambda}<>H. The amplitude of the lateral force between two corrugated plates which are out of registry is shown to have a maximum at an optimal wavelength of {lambda}{approx_equal}2.5 H. With increasing H/{lambda} > or approx. 0.3 the PWS approach becomes a progressively worse description of the lateral force due to many-body effects. These results may be of relevance for the design and operation of novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and other nanoscale devices.

  5. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  6. The influence of iodinated casein and high fat diets on the performance and incidence of fatty livers in laying hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Louis Lee

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INl'LUENCE OF IODINATED CASEIN AND HIGH FAT DIETS ON THE PEBFORMANC' AND INCIDENCE OF FATTY LIVERS IN LAYING H"NS A Thesis Loui" Lee Young Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&II Univer -ity in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject oultry Science THE INPLUENCE OP IODINA'I "D CAS IN AND HIGH FAT DIETS ON THE P, HFOHMAI'JCE AND INCIDENCE OP PATTY LIVENS IN LAYING HENS A Thesis Louis Lee Young Approved...

  7. Verification of TG-61 dose for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams using fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L. II; Ham, Kyungmin [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Ion chamber dosimetry is being used to calibrate dose for cell irradiations designed to investigate photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. This study performed a dosimetry intercomparison for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams at 25 and 35 keV. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom were compared with the product of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations of dose per fluence and measured incident fluence. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25 and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. A cylindrical, air-equivalent ion chamber was used to measure the ionization created in a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 Multiplication-Sign 10-cm{sup 3} PMMA phantom for depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Photon fluence was determined using a NaI detector to make scattering measurements of the beam from a thin polyethylene target at angles 30 Degree-Sign -60 Degree-Sign . Differential Compton and Rayleigh scattering cross sections obtained from xraylib, an ANSI C library for x-ray-matter interactions, were applied to derive the incident fluence. MCNP5 simulations of the irradiation geometry provided the dose deposition per photon fluence as a function of depth in the phantom. Results: At 25 keV the fluence-normalized MCNP5 dose overestimated the ion-chamber measured dose by an average of 7.2 {+-} 3.0%-2.1 {+-} 3.0% for PMMA depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm, respectively. At 35 keV the fluence-normalized MCNP5 dose underestimated the ion-chamber measured dose by an average of 1.0 {+-} 3.4%-2.5 {+-} 3.4%, respectively. Conclusions: These results showed that TG-61 ion chamber dosimetry, used to calibrate dose output for cell irradiations, agreed with fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations to within approximately 7% and 3% at 25 and 35 keV, respectively.

  8. National Incident Management System (NIMS) Standards Review Panel Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Kirk, Jennifer L.; Stanton, James R.; Shebell, Peter; Schwartz, Deborah S.; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gelston, Gariann M.

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance and need for full compliant implementation of NIMS nationwide was clearly demonstrated during the Hurricane Katrina event, which was clearly expressed in Secretary Chertoff's October 4, 2005 letter addressed to the State's governors. It states, ''Hurricane Katrina was a stark reminder of how critical it is for our nation to approach incident management in a coordinated, consistent, and efficient manner. We must be able to come together, at all levels of government, to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from any emergency or disaster. Our operations must be seamless and based on common incident management doctrine, because the challenges we face as a nation are far greater than capabilities of any one jurisdiction.'' The NIMS is a system/architecture for organizing response on a ''national'' level. It incorporations ICS as a main component of that structure (i.e., it institutionalizes ICS in NIMS). In a paper published on the NIMS Website, the following statements were made: ''NIMS represents a core set of doctrine, principles, terminology, and organizational processes to enable effective, efficient and collaborative incident management at all levels. To provide the framework for interoperability and compatibility, the NIMS is based on a balance between flexibility and standardization.'' Thus the NIC is challenged with the need to adopt quality SDO generated standards to support NIMS compliance, but in doing so maintain the flexibility necessary so that response operations can be tailored for the specific jurisdictional and geographical needs across the nation. In support of this large and complex challenge facing the NIC, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked to provide technical support to the NIC, through their DHS Science and Technology ? Standards Portfolio Contract, to help identify, review, and develop key standards for NIMS compliance. Upon examining the challenge, the following general process appears to be a reasonable approach for identifying and establishing existing standards that would be applicable to NIMS compliance. The suggested generalized steps to establishing existing SDO generated standards for NIMS compliance are: (1) establish search criteria from the NIMS and its support documents, (2) search SDO databases to identify key existing nationally and/or internationally recognized standards that have potential application to NIMS compliance needs, (3) review the identified standards against the specific component needs of the NIMS, (4) identify the pertinent aspects/components of those identified standards that clearly address specific NIMS compliance needs, (5) establish a process to adopt the pertinent standards, which includes the generation of formalized FEMA Guidance that identifies the specific NIMS component compliance needs addressed in the respective standard, (6) develop performance criteria for which to measure compliance with the identified NIMS components addressed by the respective adopted standard, and (7) adopt the standard, publish the guidance and performance criteria, and incorporate it into routine FEMA/NIC NIMS management operations. This review process will also help identify real gaps in standards for which new NIMS specific standards should be developed. To jump start this process and hopefully identify some key ''low hanging fruit'' standards the NIC could use to begin such a process, a panel of first-responder experts (familiar with the current standards of common use in the first-responder community) from various response disciplines was formed and a workshop held. The workshop included a pre-workshop information gathering process. This report discusses the workshop and its findings in detail.

  9. Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy that has rapidly increased in global incidence in recent dec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    in recent dec- ades1,2 . In the United States, the average annual increase in thyroid cancer incidence of 6.6% between 2000 and 2009 is the highest among all cancers2 . Although the death rate of thyroid cancer is relatively low, the rate of disease recurrence or persistence is high, which is asso- ciated with increased

  10. Learning of the rootfactors of incidents potentially impacting the biofuel supply chains from some 100 significant cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Learning of the rootfactors of incidents potentially impacting the biofuel supply chains from some.riviere(cb.ineris.fr guy.marlair@iineris.fr alexis. vignestcbjneris.fr Abstract A biofuel is most often defined as a liquid. There are numerous potential supply chains for the production of biofuels, depending on feedstock, conventional

  11. Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser inertial fusion energy power plants*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    1 Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser final optics in a laser inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The amount of laser light the GILMM substrate, adaptive (deformable) optics, surface tension and low Reynolds number, laminar flow in the film

  12. A new parameterization of canopy spectral response to incident solar radiation: case study with hyperspectral data from pine dominant forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    A new parameterization of canopy spectral response to incident solar radiation: case study, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland c Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki Research Station, FIN-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland d VTT Automation, Remote Sensing Group, FIN-02044 VTT, Finland Received 27

  13. A Spatio-Temporal exploratory analysis of pipe-failure incidents in the Water Distribution Network of Limassol, Cyprus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagatsis, Anastasios

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    in the degradation of the WDN of Limassol. The distribution of pipe-failure incidents was studied at the level of District Metered Areas (DMA) boundary classifications and at the location level using point-pattern analysis methodologies. A modified version...

  14. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 014607 (2010) Fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    , and Nuclear Engineering, NES 1-25, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180, USA 2 Los Alamos National Lab, Los; published 19 January 2010) A new method of measuring fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy are necessary for accurate, detailed neutronics calculations for new

  15. Geophys. J. Int. (2002) 151, 501510 On the duration of seismic motion incident onto the Valley of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Kim Bak

    of Mexico for subduction zone earthquakes Nikolai M. Shapiro,1, Kim B. Olsen2 and Shri K. Singh1 1Deportamento de Sismolog´ia y Vulcanolog´ia, Instituto de Geof´isica, UNAM, CP 04510, M´exico, DF, M´exico 2 motion incident onto the Valley of Mexico for subduc- tion zone earthquakes. Our simulations suggest

  16. Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C N

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with the Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streetlight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streetlight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltages were at the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some of the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory's environmental surveillance and radiological emergency vehicle and the Co-60 incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Etten, D.M.; Ahlquist, A.J.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4-wheel drive van has been outfitted at Los Alamos for environmental surveillance and radiological emergencies. The van's capabilities were described at this conference in 1982. The rapid gamma search and spectral analysis capabilities were utilized in conjunction with the cobalt-60 (/sup 60/Co) teletherapy source incident in Juarez, Mexico. Assistance was requested by the State of New Mexico (through DOE/Albuquerque Area Office) in January 1984 to perform initial in-situ isotopic identification of the contaminated steel that was first discovered in the United States by Los Alamos. The van's capabilities were again called upon in March 1984 to survey the New Mexico highways using the highly sensitive delta count rate monitoring system for /sup 60/Co pellets that may have been tracked into the state. This paper provides (1) setup and results of the surveys conducted with the van, (2) interactions with the press, and (3) an evaluation of the van's usefulness in such an emergency response. 2 references, 5 figures.

  19. Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streelight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streelight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltage were beyond the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some do the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents & Accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheatley, Spencer; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide, and perform a risk theoretic statistical analysis of, a dataset that is 75 percent larger than the previous best dataset on nuclear incidents and accidents, comparing three measures of severity: INES (International Nuclear Event Scale), radiation released, and damage dollar losses. The annual rate of nuclear accidents, with size above 20 Million US$, per plant, decreased from the 1950s until dropping significantly after Chernobyl (April, 1986). The rate is now roughly stable at 0.002 to 0.003, i.e., around 1 event per year across the current fleet. The distribution of damage values changed after Three Mile Island (TMI; March, 1979), where moderate damages were suppressed but the tail became very heavy, being described by a Pareto distribution with tail index 0.55. Further, there is a runaway disaster regime, associated with the "dragon-king" phenomenon, amplifying the risk of extreme damage. In fact, the damage of the largest event (Fukushima; March, 2011) is equal to 60 percent of the total damag...

  1. Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krim, Jacqueline

    Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding degradation of the contact interface of a fluorocarbon monolayer-coated polycrystalline silicon microdevice

  2. Pentose fermentation of normally toxic lignocellulose prehydrolysate with strain of Pichia stipitis yeast using air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Jr., Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis NPw9 (ATCC PTA-3717) useful for the production of ethanol using oxygen for growth while fermenting normally toxic lignocellulosic prehydrolysates.

  3. Optimizing Normal Tissue Sparing in Ion Therapy Using Calculated Isoeffective Dose for Ion Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remmes, Nicholas B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Herman, Michael G., E-mail: Herman.Michael@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Kruse, Jon J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate how the selection of ion type affects the calculated isoeffective dose to the surrounding normal tissue as a function of both normal tissue and target tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratios. Methods and Materials: A microdosimetric biologic dose model was incorporated into a Geant4 simulation of parallel opposed beams of protons, helium, lithium, beryllium, carbon, and neon ions. The beams were constructed to give a homogeneous isoeffective dose to a volume in the center of a water phantom for target tissues covering a range of cobalt equivalent {alpha}/{beta} ratios of 1-20 Gy. Concomitant normal tissue isoeffective doses in the plateau of the ion beam were then compared for different ions across the range of normal tissue and target tissue radiosensitivities for a fixed isoeffective dose to the target tissue. Results: The ion type yielding the optimal normal tissue sparing was highly dependent on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of both the normal and the target tissue. For carbon ions, the calculated isoeffective dose to normal tissue at a 5-cm depth varied by almost a factor of 5, depending on the {alpha}/{beta} ratios of the normal and target tissue. This ranges from a factor of 2 less than the isoeffective dose of a similar proton treatment to a factor of 2 greater. Conclusions: No single ion is optimal for all treatment scenarios. The heavier ions are superior in cases in which the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of the target tissue is low and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of normal tissue is high, and protons are superior in the opposite circumstances. Lithium and beryllium appear to offer dose advantages similar to carbon, with a considerably lower normal tissue dose when the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the target tissue is high and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the normal tissue is low.

  4. Meteorological Integration for the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System: General Guidance for BWIC Cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, William J.; Wang, Weiguo; Rutz, Frederick C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Xie, YuLong; Seiple, Timothy E.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for developing systems to detect the release of aerosolized bioagents in urban environments. The system that accomplishes this, known as BioWatch, is a robust first-generation monitoring system. In conjunction with the BioWatch detection network, DHS has also developed a software tool for cities to use to assist in their response when a bioagent is detected. This tool, the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System, will eventually be deployed to all BioWatch cities to aid in the interpretation of the public health significance of indicators from the BioWatch networks. BWIC consists of a set of integrated modules, including meteorological models, that estimate the effect of a biological agent on a city’s population once it has been detected. For the meteorological models in BWIC to successfully calculate the distribution of biological material, they must have as input accurate meteorological data, and wind fields in particular. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for cities to use in identifying sources of good-quality local meteorological data that BWIC needs to function properly. This process of finding sources of local meteorological data, evaluating the data quality and gaps in coverage, and getting the data into BWIC, referred to as meteorological integration, is described. The good news for many cities is that meteorological measurement networks are becoming increasingly common. Most of these networks allow their data to be distributed in real time via the internet. Thus, cities will often only need to evaluate the quality of available measurements and perhaps add a modest number of stations where coverage is poor.

  5. Poisoning Incidence in Wisconsin: Does Age Ma2er? Thomas Leschke, BA; Clare Guse, MS; Amy Schlo2hauer, MPH; Peter Layde, MD, MSc IntroducEon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poisoning Incidence in Wisconsin: Does Age Ma2er? Thomas Leschke, BA; Clare groups for both intenEonal opioid and non-opioid poisonings Opioid range: 6 and ICD -10 codes were used to divide poisoning incidents by agent (opioid vs

  6. CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes and probe, to produce a fourth, the anti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes diagram for the production of a CARS signal. The three incident waves pump, probe (both of frequency p) and Stokes (S) combine to produce an anti-Stokes signal, frequency as. Figure 2. Schematic of the CARS system

  7. DTERMINATION GRAPHIQUE DES COEFFICIENTS DE FRESNEL EN INCIDENCE OBLIQUE A LA SURFACE DE SPARATION D'UN MILIEU TRANSPARENT ET D'UN MILIEU ABSORBANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    294. DÉTERMINATION GRAPHIQUE DES COEFFICIENTS DE FRESNEL EN INCIDENCE OBLIQUE A LA SURFACE DE coefficients de Fresnel ainsi obtenus, on a également déterminé pour diverses incidences le facteur de. Cette précision atteint I/I000 en valeur relative pour les coefficients de Fresnel et quelques millièmes

  8. ANALYTIC EQUIVALENCE OF NORMAL CROSSING FUNCTIONS ON A REAL ANALYTIC MANIFOLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ANALYTIC EQUIVALENCE OF NORMAL CROSSING FUNCTIONS ON A REAL ANALYTIC MANIFOLD Goulwen Fichou crossing singularities after a modification. We focus on the analytic equivalence of such functions with only normal crossing singularities. We prove that for such functions C right equivalence implies

  9. A Filtering Mechanism for Normal Fish Trajectories Cigdem Beyan, Robert B. Fisher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    A Filtering Mechanism for Normal Fish Trajectories Cigdem Beyan, Robert B. Fisher IPAB, School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, UK C.Beyan@sms.ed.ac.uk, rbf@inf.ed.ac.uk Abstract Understanding fish surveillance, etc. However, the literature is very limited in terms of normal/abnormal fish behavior

  10. Quantum Cavitation: a comparison between superfluid helium-4 and normal liquid helium-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caupin, Frédéric

    Quantum Cavitation: a comparison between superfluid helium-4 and normal liquid helium-3 S. Balibar in superfluid helium-4 and in normal liquid helium-3, both theoretically and experimentally. We compare the two by tunneling, to classical cavitation where their nu- cleation is thermally activated. In helium-3, where

  11. All proper normal extensions of S5{square have the polynomial size model property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amsterdam, University of

    All proper normal extensions of S5{square have the polynomial size model property Nick extensions of the bi-modal system S5 2 have the poly-size model property. In fact, every normal proper extension L of S5 2 is complete with respect to a class of #12;nite frames FL . To each such class

  12. Assessing Non-Normal Effects in Thermoacoustic Systems with Mean Flow. K. Wieczorek,1, a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    Assessing Non-Normal Effects in Thermoacoustic Systems with Mean Flow. K. Wieczorek,1, a) C this paper, non-normal interactions in a thermoacoustic system are studied, using a low-order expansion. INTRODUCTION Over the last decades, thermoacoustic instabilities have been the subject of intense re- search

  13. Assessing Non-Normal Effects in Thermoacoustic Systems with Mean Flow. K. Wieczorek,1, a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Assessing Non-Normal Effects in Thermoacoustic Systems with Mean Flow. K. Wieczorek,1, a) C.1063/1.3650418 #12;In this paper, non-normal interactions in a thermoacoustic system are studied, using a low,version1-19Mar2013 #12;I. INTRODUCTION Over the last decades, thermoacoustic instabilities have been

  14. Asymptotic normality of urn models for clinical trials with delayed response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Li-Xin

    normality of Yn in the GFU model. Typically, clinical trials do not result in immediate outcomes ­ that isAsymptotic normality of urn models for clinical trials with delayed response F E I FA N G H U 1, Zhejiang, Hangzhou 310028, P. R. China. E-mail: lxzhang@mail.hz.zj.cn For response-adaptive clinical trials

  15. Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    is known as Normalized Differ- ence Water Index (NDWI) [12]. It is calculated using reflectance in two near infrared (NIR) channels. Similar indices have been proposed that use reflectance at other NIR wavelengthsNormalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks Kristine

  16. Projective re-normalization for improving the behavior of a homogeneous conic linear system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belloni, Alexandre

    In this paper we study the homogeneous conic system F : Ax = 0, x ? C \\ {0}. We choose a point ¯s ? intC? that serves as a normalizer and consider computational properties of the normalized system F¯s : Ax = 0, ¯sT x = 1, ...

  17. Interpolating wind speed normals from the sparse Dutch network to a high resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    , we had potential wind speed time series with 30 years of data (with at least 20 yearly and monthly by Verkaik (Verkaik, 2001). The method is a five-step procedure: 1 Use series of (potential) wind to calculate (potential) normals at measuring sites 2 Calculate wind speed normals at the top of the surface

  18. Elastin protein levels are a vital modifier affecting normal lung development and susceptibility to emphysema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Robert

    Elastin protein levels are a vital modifier affecting normal lung development and susceptibility modifier affecting normal lung development and susceptibility to emphysema. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol-induced emphysema is highly variable, and numerous genetic and environmental factors are thought to mitigate lung

  19. An approach to the problem of network synthesis utilizing normal coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Jack Anthony

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN APPROACH TO THE PROBLEM OF NETWORK SYNTHESIS UTILIZING NORMAL COORDINATES A NPRROCHTHPEB LM FTWK ABHSEBM LTPCY Approved as to style and content by: A N P u __________IUSTPCZBTB of Commit teNETWORK SYNTHESIS UTILIZING NORMAL COORDINATES LM Jack Anthony Baird u * A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas In partial fulfillment...

  20. Computer Graphics International 2004 (CGI), June 1619, Crete, Greece. IEEE Computer Society Press. Consistent Normal Orientation for Polygonal Meshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    . Consistent Normal Orientation for Polygonal Meshes Pavel Borodin Gabriel Zachmann Reinhard Klein Institute

  1. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a Cu(100) projected band-gap surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbard, J A; Kohlhoff, M; Rennick, C J; So, E; Ford, M; Softley, T P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charge transfer (ionization) of hydrogen Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number $n=25-34$) incident at a Cu(100) surface is investigated. Unlike fully metallic surfaces, where the Rydberg electron energy is degenerate with the conduction band of the metal, the Cu(100) surface has a projected bandgap at these energies, and only discrete image states are available through which charge transfer can take place. Resonant enhancement of charge transfer is observed at hydrogen principal quantum numbers for which the Rydberg energy matches the energy of one of the image states. The integrated surface ionization signals show clear periodicity as the energies of states with increasing $n$ come in and out of resonance with the image states. The velocity dependence of the surface ionization dynamics is also investigated. Decreased velocity of the incident H atom leads to a greater mean distance of ionization and a lower field required to extract the ion. The surface-ionization profiles (signal versus applied field) ...

  2. The incidence of burnout or compassion fatigue in medical dosimetrists as a function of various stress and psychologic factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Michelle, E-mail: Mhoward24601@yahoo.com [University of Wisconsin—La Crosse, WI 54601 (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: Burnout and compassion fatigue (CF) adversely affect medical professionals, including those employed in radiation oncology. Previously conducted research acknowledged the presence of burnout in populations of radiation therapists, radiation oncologists, and oncology nursing staff. The aim of the following research was to measure the incidence of burnout or CF in the specific population of medical dosimetrists surveyed. As professional members of the radiation oncology team, this group had not been included in published research data to date. The hypothesis of the subsequent study stated that a comparable incidence of burnout would be observed among medical dosimetrists as had been reported by earlier researchers for a population of radiation therapists. A survey tool based on the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and distributed to full members of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists (AAMD) was utilized as the research measurement method. Results obtained indicated an incidence rates of burnout or CF for medical dosimetrists were less than the rates previously measured for radiation therapists (53% vs 11% for emotional exhaustion [EE] and 45% vs 27% for depersonalization [DP]). The incidence of burnout was based on the Burnout Inventory (BI) developed for the research project. Each of the subscales, EE, DP, and decreased personal accomplishment (PA), was considered and analyzed independently. Although not as prevalent among medical dosimetrists as a variety of additional radiation oncology professionals, a significant portion of the population demonstrated signs of burnout or CF. Future concerns abound for the population of medical dosimetrists as a large number of members scored positive for intermediate risk of burnout and CF. Additionally, a large portion of the population was found to be rapidly approaching retirement.

  3. Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents--The RESRAD-RDD&IND

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents--The RESRAD-RDD&IND Abstract: The RESRAD-RDD code was developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT) to assist decision makers, emergency responders, and emergency preparedness planners for response to radiological dispersal device incidents (RDD). The RESRAD-RDD code was released as a companion software tool in 2009 to support the OGT Manual—Preliminary Report on Operational Guidelines Developed for Use in Emergency Preparedness and Response to a Radiological Dispersal Device Incident (DOE/HS-0001). The original RESRAD-RDD code was Microsoft Excel based software with the user interface written in Visual Basic. This version of RESRAD-RDD is being converted to a database driven software that runs on Windows 7 operating system in the .NET environment. The new RESRAD-RDD code is being tested to make sure it reproduces old code results. The new code runs faster than the old spreadsheets code by a factor of 10 or so, fewer clicks are required for the same calculations, operational guidelines can be easily located, and the reports can be written to PDFs instead of HTML. Additional radionuclides are also being added to the new RESRAD-RDD code. An Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) scenario is also being added to the code and about 44 - 60 radionuclides will be added to handle IND incident. A new OGT Task Group is in the process of updating the OGT Manual and providing guidance on the development of the IND scenario and methodology. The new code, RESRAD-RDD&IND is expected to be released in early 2015. Charley Yu*, Argonne National Laboratory ; Carlos Corredor, U.S. Department of Energy; Jing-Jy Cheng, Argonne National Laboratory; Sunita Kamboj, Argonne National Laboratory; David LePoire, Argonne National Laboratory; Paul Flood, Argonne National Laboratory

  4. Survey of historical incidences with Controls-Structures Interaction and recommended technology improvements needed to put hardware in space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketner, G.L.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a survey for the Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center. The purpose of the survey was to collect information documenting past incidences of problems with CSI during design, analysis, ground development, test and/or flight operation of space systems in industry. The survey was conducted to also compile recommended improvements in technology to support future needs for putting hardware into space. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Decontamination and Management of Human Remains Following Incidents of Hazardous Chemical Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Bock, Robert Eldon [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Objective: To provide specific procedural guidance and resources for identification, assessment, control, and mitigation of compounds that may contaminate human remains resulting from chemical attack or release. Design: A detailed technical, policy, and regulatory review is summarized. Setting: Guidance is suitable for civilian or military settings where human remains potentially contaminated with hazardous chemicals may be present. Settings would include sites of transportation accidents, natural disasters, terrorist or military operations, mortuary affairs or medical examiner processing and decontamination points, and similar. Patients, Participants: While recommended procedures have not been validated with actual human remains, guidance has been developed from data characterizing controlled experiments with fabrics, materiel, and laboratory animals. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presentation of logic and specific procedures for remains management, protection and decontamination of mortuary affairs personnel, as well as decision criteria for determining when remains are sufficiently decontaminated so as to pose no chemical health hazard. Results: Established procedures and existing equipment/materiel available for decontamination and verification provide appropriate and reasonable means to mitigate chemical hazards from remains. Extensive characterization of issues related to remains decontamination indicates that supra-lethal concentrations of liquid chemical warfare agent VX may prove difficult to decontaminate and verify in a timely fashion. Specialized personnel can and should be called upon to assist with monitoring necessary to clear decontaminated remains for transport and processing. Conclusions: Once appropriate decontamination and verification have been accomplished, normal procedures for remains processing and transport to the decedent s family and the continental United States can be followed.

  6. Simulation of coastal flow fields when the incident solar radiation is obscured

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molenkamp, C.R.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the aftermath of a large scale nuclear exchange, smoke from fires started by the explosions would be lofted into the troposphere and lower stratosphere. If sufficient amounts are injected, this smoke would be so thick that very little solar radiation would penetrate to the ground. The ground surface, obscured from insolation by the smoke, would cool rapidly leading to temperature decreases of 10 to 25/sup 0/C in the lower atmosphere. Among the many possible effects accompanying this cooling, a suggestion has been made that regions of enhanced and persistent precipitation could occur along continental coastlines due to the response of the flow fields to the more rapid cooling of air over land than over the oceans. This paper describes a simulation intended to investigate this super land breeze hypothesis using a mesoscale model that has been used to simulate normal land and sea breeze flows. The simulation shows that fog and clouds form over both land and sea with the net result that there is no dramatic temperature difference at the continental coastline and no significant induced flow or vertical motion. This simulation again contravenes the super land breeze precipitation hypothesis. In addition, it points out the moderating effect cloud and fog formation would have on the rate of cooling over the continents.

  7. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mak, Kimberley S. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Leslie K. [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Mak, Raymond H. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Shuang [Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Pile-Spellman, John [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Abrahm, Janet L. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Prigerson, Holly G. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Psycho-oncology and Palliative Care Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Balboni, Tracy A., E-mail: tbalboni@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Psycho-oncology and Palliative Care Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC outcomes and strategies for reducing MSCC-related costs.

  8. Normalizer circuits and a Gottesman-Knill theorem for infinite-dimensional systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Bermejo-Vega; Cedric Yen-Yu Lin; Maarten Van den Nest

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\textit{Normalizer circuits}$ [1,2] are generalized Clifford circuits that act on arbitrary finite-dimensional systems $\\mathcal{H}_{d_1}\\otimes ... \\otimes \\mathcal{H}_{d_n}$ with a standard basis labeled by the elements of a finite Abelian group $G=\\mathbb{Z}_{d_1}\\times... \\times \\mathbb{Z}_{d_n}$. Normalizer gates implement operations associated with the group $G$ and can be of three types: quantum Fourier transforms, group automorphism gates and quadratic phase gates. In this work, we extend the normalizer formalism [1,2] to infinite dimensions, by allowing normalizer gates to act on systems of the form $\\mathcal{H}_\\mathbb{Z}^{\\otimes a}$: each factor $\\mathcal{H}_\\mathbb{Z}$ has a standard basis labeled by $\\textit{integers}$ $\\mathbb{Z}$, and a Fourier basis labeled by $\\textit{angles}$, elements of the circle group $\\mathbb{T}$. Normalizer circuits become hybrid quantum circuits acting both on continuous- and discrete-variable systems. We show that infinite-dimensional normalizer circuits can be efficiently simulated classically with a generalized $\\textit{stabilizer formalism}$ for Hilbert spaces associated with groups of the form $\\mathbb{Z}^a\\times \\mathbb{T}^b \\times \\mathbb{Z}_{d_1}\\times...\\times \\mathbb{Z}_{d_n}$. We develop new techniques to track stabilizer-groups based on normal forms for group automorphisms and quadratic functions. We use our normal forms to reduce the problem of simulating normalizer circuits to that of finding general solutions of systems of mixed real-integer linear equations [3] and exploit this fact to devise a robust simulation algorithm: the latter remains efficient even in pathological cases where stabilizer groups become infinite, uncountable and non-compact. The techniques developed in this paper might find applications in the study of fault-tolerant quantum computation with superconducting qubits [4,5].

  9. Fuel cell system logic for differentiating between rapid and normal shutdown commands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling the operation of a fuel cell system wherein each shutdown command for the system is subjected to decision logic which determines whether the command should be a normal shutdown command or rapid shutdown command. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a normal shutdown command, then the system is shutdown in a normal step-by-step process in which the hydrogen stream is consumed within the system. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a rapid shutdown command, the hydrogen stream is removed from the system either by dumping to atmosphere or routing to storage.

  10. Multi-phase decline curve analysis with normalized rate and time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraim, Michael Lee

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material Balance Equation. The purpose of the current work is to develop a normalized time and a normalized rate which can be applied to the Fetkovich type curve or any other decline type curve. From a Fetkovich type curve analysis, an engineer can...MULTI-PHASE DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS WITH NORMALIZED RATE AND TIME A Thesis by MICHAEL LEE FRAIM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University &n partial fulf 111ment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August...

  11. Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla and Alzheimer's disease based on high resolution MRI at 3 Tesla. T1-weighted images were acquired from 19

  12. Field measurements of a swell band, shore normal, flux divergence reversal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Link, Shmuel G

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout this thesis we will discuss the theoretical background and empirical observation of a swell band shore normal flux divergence reversal. Specifically, we will demonstrate the existence and persistence of the ...

  13. A Novel Approach to Determine Normal Variation in Gene Expression Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaki, Mohammed Javeed

    among identical mice, thus enabling a comprehensive database of normal variations in gene expression EIA-0103708 under-appreciated problem in microarray analysis is the in- cidence of microarrays

  14. Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan Ecole Doctorale Sciences Pratiques Etude mathematique et numerique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Professeur, ´Ecole Normale Sup´erieure de Cachan Marcel FILOCHE Directeur de recherche CNRS, ´Ecole en premier lieu à remercier mes deux directeurs de thèse : Laurent Desvillettes et Marcel Filoche

  15. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  16. On reconciling ground-based with spaceborne normalized radar cross section measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumgartner, F.; Munk, J.; Jezek, K. C.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines differences in the normalized radar cross section, derived from ground-based versus spaceborne radar data. A simple homogeneous half-space model, indicates that agreement between the two improves as 1) ...

  17. CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triplett, B.B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN B. B. Triplett, N. E.State Heat Capacity of Tungsten* B. n. Triplett,t N. E.I. ;\\feasurement Properties of tungsten sa~ples. ~feasured

  18. regulation. Buoys and ship-based sensors are normally used to measure the amount of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    regulation. Buoys and ship-based sensors are normally used to measure the amount of water of many neurons at once. But researchers based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, have painstakingly mapped

  19. Yield and leaf blade area comparisons of extra leafy to normal leafed maize (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushing, Ronald Wayne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relationships between extra leaf production and rain yield of the leafy 9 hybrids. Fourteen hybrids were compared, including, eight Lfy and six normal-leafed industry standard hybrids. The fourteen hybrids were replicated four times in a randomized block design...

  20. Effects of burial history, rock ductility and recovery magnitude on inversion of normal faulted strata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhle, Nathan John

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inversion of normal faults at different burial depths is studied using physical models constructed with rock and deformed at confining pressure. Models consist of a 1 cm thick limestone layer above a fault dipping 70° in a rigid medium...

  1. Electrocochleographic Recordings from the Eardrum: Variations and Effects of Electrode Location in Normal Subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alhanada, Mohammad Rfifan

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives: The primary goals of this study are to observe the degree of variation of the tymptrode position on the TM and the marker's area size among a population of adult subjects with normal hearing, and to investigate the effects...

  2. FOURIER-TRANSFORM ANALYSIS OF NORMAL PHOTOELECTRON DIFFRACTION DATA FOR SURFACE-STRUCTURE DETERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Z.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical Review Letters FOURIER-TRANSFORM ANALYSIS OF NORMAL0 eV. (b) Magnitude of the Fourier transform IF(r)l accord·3. l.94A and V 5 eV. Fourier-transform derived distances ZF

  3. FOURIER-TRANSFORM ANALYSIS OF NORMAL PHOTOELECTRON DIFFRACTION DATA FOR SURFACE-STRUCTURE DETERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Z.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Academy of Sciences USA FOURIER-TRANSFORM ANALYSIS OF NORMALeV. (b) Magnitude of the Fourier transform IF(r)l accordingV 0 = 5 eV. Figure 3. Fourier-transform derived distances ZF

  4. Yield and leaf blade area comparisons of extra leafy to normal leafed maize (Zea mays L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushing, Ronald Wayne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relationships between extra leaf production and rain yield of the leafy 9 hybrids. Fourteen hybrids were compared, including, eight Lfy and six normal-leafed industry standard hybrids. The fourteen hybrids were replicated four times in a randomized block design...

  5. Compressible gas properties of UF/sub 6/ for isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harloff, G.J.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock tables are given for the real gas UF/sub 6/ for Mach numbers up to 22. An evaluation of the real gas effects is given. A computer program listing is included.

  6. The effect of firming agents on quality of parthenocarpic and normal fresh-pack pickles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longan, Bobby Jeff

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of calcium salts as firming agents is widespread in the food industry; however, alum has traditionally been used for this purpose in pickles. The parthenocarpic cucumber, which holds great promise because of improved machine harvesting... characteris- tics, was found to be softer than normal pickles when processed by the usual commercial method. Calcium chloride, calcium lactate, and alum were evaluated as firming agents at five levels each in both parthenocarpic and normal pickles...

  7. Normalization and missing value imputation for label-free LC-MS analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpievitch, Yuliya; Dabney, Alan R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Shotgun proteomic data are affected by a variety of known and unknown systematic biases as well as high proportions of missing values. Typically, normalization is performed in an attempt to remove systematic biases from the data before statistical inference, sometimes followed by missing value imputation to obtain a complete matrix of intensities. Here we discuss several approaches to normalization and dealing with missing values, some initially developed for microarray data and some developed specifically for mass spectrometry-based data.

  8. May 28-29, 2008/ARR Thermal Effect of Off-Normal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    for Power Plant with Bare FS FW · Disruption simulation: q''=1.667 x 109 W/m2 over 3 ms (~5 MJ/m2) · 4+1 mm #12;May 28-29, 2008/ARR 2 Power Plant FW Under Energy Deposition from Off- Normal Conditions · Thermal impact of off-normal events on power plant FW presented before for SiC and W · Questions arise

  9. Peer relations and depressed mood in normal children: a prospective study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoye, Wayne Edgar

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PEER RELATIONS AND DEPRESSED MOOD IN NORMAL CHILDREN: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY A Thesis by WAYNE EDGAR HOYE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 19S5 Major Subject: Psychology PEER RELATIONS AND DEPRESSED MOOD IN NORMAL CHILDREN: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY A Thesis by WAYNE EDGAR HOYE Approved as to style and content by: William S. Rholes (Chairman of Committee) Charlene Mu hlenhard...

  10. Indirect methods of determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients and their application for nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarmukhamedov, R. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan, 100214 Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic methods of the determination of asymptotic normalization coefficient for A+a?B of astrophysical interest are briefly presented. The results of the application of the specific asymptotic normalization coefficients derived within these methods for the extrapolation of the astrophysical S factors to experimentally inaccessible energy regions (E ? 25 keV) for the some specific radiative capture A(a,?)B reactions of the pp-chain and the CNO cycle are presented.

  11. Reactive-coupling-induced normal mode splittings in microdisk resonators coupled to waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Sumei; Agarwal, G. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the optomechanical design introduced by M. Li et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 223901 (2009)], which is very effective for investigation of the effects of reactive coupling. We show the normal mode splitting that is due solely to reactive coupling rather than due to dispersive coupling. We suggest feeding the waveguide with a pump field along with a probe field and scanning the output probe for evidence of reactive-coupling-induced normal mode splitting.

  12. Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedron, P; Schlemmer, J; Klassen, M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rotating shawdowband spectroradiometer (RSS) implements the same automated shadowbanding technique used by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), and so it too provides spectrally-resolved, direct-normal, diffuse-horizontal, and total-horizontal irradiances, and can be calibrated in situ via Langley regression. The irradiance spectra are measured simultaneously at all spectral elements (pixels) in 360-nm to 1050-nm range.

  13. Controlling the number of graphene sheets exfoliated from graphite by designed normal loading and frictional motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei, E-mail: weilu@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We use molecular dynamics to study the exfoliation of patterned nanometer-sized graphite under various normal loading conditions for friction-induced exfoliation. Using highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) as well as both amorphous and crystalline SiO{sub 2} substrate as example systems, we show that the exfoliation process is attributed to the corrugation of the HOPG surface and the atomistic roughness of the substrate when they contact under normal loading. The critical normal strain, at which the exfoliation occurs, is higher on a crystalline substrate than on an amorphous substrate. This effect is related to the atomistic flatness and stiffness of the crystalline surface. We observe that an increase of the van der Waals interaction between the graphite and the substrate results in a decrease of the critical normal strain for exfoliation. We find that the magnitude of the normal strain can effectively control the number of exfoliated graphene layers. This mechanism suggests a promising approach of applying designed normal loading while sliding to pattern controlled number of graphene layers or other two-dimensional materials on a substrate surface.

  14. Influence of Transcontinental arch on Cretaceous listric-normal faulting, west flank, Denver basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, T.L.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic studies along the west flank of the Denver basin near Boulder and Greeley, Colorado illustrate the interrelationship between shallow listric-normal faulting in the Cretaceous and deeper basement-controlled faulting. Deeper fault systems, primarily associated with the Transcontinental arch, control the styles and causative mechanisms of listric-normal faulting that developed in the Cretaceous. Three major stratigraphic levels of listric-normal faulting occur in the Boulder-Greeley area. These tectonic sensitive intervals are present in the following Cretaceous formations: Laramie-Fox Hills-upper Pierre, middle Pierre Hygiene zone, and the Niobrara-Carlile-Greenhorn. Documentation of the listric-normal fault style reveals a Wattenberg high, a horst block or positive feature of the greater Transcontinental arch, was active in the east Boulder-Greeley area during Cretaceous time. Paleotectonic events associated with the Wattenberg high are traced through analysis of the listric-normal fault systems that occur in the area. These styles are important to recognize because of their stratigraphic and structural influence on Cretaceous petroleum reservoir systems in the Denver basin. Similar styles of listric-normal faulting occur in the Cretaceous in many Rocky Mountain foreland basins.

  15. AN INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT OF THE INCIDENCE OF Mg II ABSORBERS ALONG GAMMA-RAY BURST SIGHT LINES: THE END OF THE MYSTERY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucchiara, A.

    In 2006, Prochter et al. reported a statistically significant enhancement of very strong Mg II absorption systems intervening the sight lines to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) relative to the incidence of such absorption along ...

  16. Incident Case Study Friday, December Incident description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Gregory

    nitric acid into the waste container, capped the container, closed the fume hood glass, and walked away of the fume hood glass were severely damaged, glass shards were scattered throughout the hood the waste bottle container while it was reacting. The volumes of both liquids were relatively small compared

  17. Compensation of Variable Skew- and Normal quadrupole Focusing Effects of APPLE-II Undulators with Computer-aided Shimming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chubar, O V; Couprie, M E; Filhol, J M; Leroy, E; Marteau, F; Paulin, F; Rudenko, O

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compensation of Variable Skew- and Normal quadrupole Focusing Effects of APPLE-II Undulators with Computer-aided Shimming

  18. Work report Implementation of true area normalization in OASIS3 CERFACS Working Notes WN-CMGC-12-48

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Work report ­ Implementation of true area normalization in OASIS3 CERFACS Working Notes formula (5), (6), (7), true area normalization has been implemented in OASIS3. It should be noted that in OASIS3, there were previously 3 normalization options, DESTAREA, FRACAREA

  19. Incident IR Bandwidth Effects on Efficiency and Shaping for Third Harmonic Generation of Quasi-Rectangular UV Longitudinal Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The photocathode of the proposed LCLS RF Photoinjector will be irradiated by uv laser light which is generated as the third harmonic of incident fundamental ir laser light. We have investigated quantitatively the effect of input ir spectral bandwidth on the exiting longitudinal intensity profiles, energy conversion efficiencies and spectral bandwidths that characterize the third harmonic generation (THG) process with a pair of crystals. These profiles, efficiencies and bandwidths include the residual fundamental and residual second harmonic light exiting the second crystal. The intrinsic acceptance bandwidth for THG is determined by crystal material and thickness as well as the type of phase matching that is used. For our case of BBO material with type I phase matching these bandwidths are approximately 0.9 nm*cm and 0.1 nm*cm for second and third harmonic generation respectively. Consequently for fixed crystal thicknesses and a fixed input ir longitudinal profile, the specified input ir bandwidth will determine the profiles, efficiencies and bandwidths exiting the second crystal. The results reported here are predictions of the SNLO code that is available as 'freeware' from the Sandia National Laboratories. It has been modified for this work. It is critical to note that this modification has enabled us to generate SNLO predictions of the 'coupled' case in which the output of the first crystal is used as input to the second crystal. Our focus is the dependence of uv longitudinal intensity profile and THG efficiency on the input ir bandwidth and crystal thicknesses. We include here cases that best illustrate input bandwidth effects. The criteria for selection of reported cases are highest efficiency generation of quasi-rectangular uv profiles with proportional intensity ripple less than 5% rms on the plateau of the pulse. Maximizing THG efficiency typically amounts to maximizing the crystal thicknesses with the longitudinal profile constraint. The specified incident ir longitudinal profile is quasi-rectangular (i.e. nonzero risetime and falltime with small intensity variation on the plateau) with a 10 psec pulse duration (FWHM). By assumption, this profile has been established upstream of the crystals at the fundamental ir wavelength. The simplest possible optical configuration is used in this work as shown in figure 1. The first crystal is the site of second harmonic generation (SHG) driven by the incident ir irradiation of central wavelength, 800nm. Downstream of the first crystal, the second crystal is the site of third harmonic generation (THG) which occurs by sum frequency mixing. Inter-crystal optics (such as a half waveplate) are assumed to be lossless at the fundamental and second harmonic wavelengths. As shown in figure 1, a portion of the incident ir irradiation is not sequestered from the first crystal for subsequent THG in the second crystal. Also, quasi-phase matching configurations and other complex compensation schemes have not been investigated at this point. The simplistic geometry better elucidates the intrinsic acceptance bandwidth limitations imposed by the crystals. Our goal in this endeavor has been to conduct a quantitative assessment of incident ir bandwidth effects on the THG process for BBO material of varied thicknesses and not, at this stage, to comply with all uv pulse specifications for the LCLS RF Photoinjector. Nonetheless, our results can be compared with LCLS photoinjector uv pulse requirements which call for a nominal 10 psec FWHM with 1 psec risetime and falltime and a nominally flat plateau (allowing for slope adjustments) with no more than a 5% rms proportional intensity variation. Furthermore, the results of this work can be used to suggest crystal thicknesses that would likely comply with all uv pulse requirements given the appropriate longitudinal profile and bandwidth for an input ir pulse.

  20. Heterogeneity of SPECT bull`s-eyes in normal dogs: Comparison of attenuation compensation algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBella, E.V.R.; Eisner, R.L.; Schmarkey, L.S.; Barclay, A.B.; Patterson, R.E.; Nowak, D.J.; Lalush, D.S.; Tsui, B.M.W. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Crawford Long Hospital; [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In normal dogs, SPECT {sup 99m}Tc Sestamibi (MIBI) and {sup 201}Tl myocardial perfusion images reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) show a large decrease of counts in the septal wall (S) compared to the lateral wall (L). The authors evaluated the iterative method of Chang at 0 and 1 iterations (Chang0 and Chang1), and the Maximum Likelihood-Expectation Maximization with attenuation compensation (ML-EM-ATN) algorithm on data acquired from 5 normal dogs and from simulated projection data using a homogeneous count-density model of a normal canine myocardium in the attenuation field measured in one dog. Mean counts in the S and L regions were calculated from maximum-count circumferential profile arrays. Their results demonstrate that ML-EM-ATN and Chang1 result in improved uniformity, as measured by the S/L ratio.

  1. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Eun Young, E-mail: eyhan@uams.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Zhang Xin; Yan Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Moros, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Corry, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  2. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  3. Note: A novel normalization scheme for laser-based plasma x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, B. B.; Sun, D. R.; Tao, Y., E-mail: taoy@ihep.ac.cn [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, S. S. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100090 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A kHz repetition rate laser pump-X-ray probe system for ultrafast X-ray diffraction is set up based on a laser-driven plasma X-ray source. A simple and reliable normalization approach has been developed to minimize the impact of large X-ray pulse intensity fluctuation on data quality. It utilizes one single X-ray area detector to record both sample and reference signals simultaneously. Performance of this novel normalization method is demonstrated in reflectivity oscillation measurement of a superlattice sample at sub-ps resolution.

  4. Fermion Quasi-normal modes of the Kerr Black-Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Carlson; A. S. Cornell; B. Jordan

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the fermion quasi-normal modes of a 4-dimensional rotating black-hole using the WKB(J) (to third and sixth order) and the AIM semi-analytic methods in the massless Dirac fermion sector. These semi-analytic approximations are computed in a pedagogical manner with comparisons made to the numerical values of the quasi-normal mode frequencies presented in the literature. It was found that The WKB(J) method and AIM show good agreement with direct numerical solutions for low values of the overtone number $n$ and angular quantum number l.

  5. Acoustic wave propagation through a supercooled liquid: A normal mode analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Matsuoka; Hideyuki Mizuno; Ryoichi Yamamoto

    2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism of acoustic wave propagation in supercooled liquids is not yet fully understood since the vibrational dynamics of supercooled liquids are strongly affected by their amorphous inherent structures. In this paper, the acoustic wave propagation in a supercooled model liquid is studied by using normal mode analysis. Due to the highly disordered inherent structure, a single acoustic wave is decomposed into many normal modes in broad frequency range. This causes the rapid decay of the acoustic wave and results in anomalous wavenumber dependency of the dispersion relation and the rate of attenuation.

  6. Ultrasonic absorption associated with tertiary butanol complex formation in normal-hexane solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucaram, Salim Michel

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Concentration Dependence of the Residue Formation in Mixtures of Tertiary Butanol in Normal-Hexane and Cyclohexane . 44 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Relaxation Data 34 2. Results of 11. 2 C. 37 3. Results of 0 C Analysis . . 0 4. Properties of Normal... Timmermans 5 Musa fromy= 1+MTQ c /Cp 2 2 Guggenheim13 12 Ttmmermans 40 TABLE 5 5 Results of Analysisof Tertiary Butanol in Cyclohexane. Data by Musa N 0 mole fraction * 3 N x 10 mole fraction * 3 N x10 mole fraction N x10 3 mole fra ct...

  7. Graphs whose normalized Laplacian matrices are separable as density matrices in quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chai Wah Wu

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently normalized Laplacian matrices of graphs are studied as density matrices in quantum mechanics. Separability and entanglement of density matrices are important properties as they determine the nonclassical behavior in quantum systems. In this note we look at the graphs whose normalized Laplacian matrices are separable or entangled. In particular, we show that the number of such graphs is related to the number of 0-1 matrices that are line sum symmetric and to the number of graphs with at least one vertex of degree 1.

  8. Self-similar pulse evolution in an all-normal-dispersion laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renninger, William H.; Chong, Andy; Wise, Frank W. [Department of Applied Physics, Cornell University, 212 Clark Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Parabolic amplifier similaritons are observed inside a normal-dispersion laser. The self-similar pulse is a local nonlinear attractor in the gain segment of the oscillator. The evolution in the laser exhibits large (20 times) spectral breathing, and the pulse chirp is less than the group-velocity dispersion of the cavity. All of these features are consistent with numerical simulations. The amplifier similariton evolution also yields practical features such as parabolic output pulses with high energies, and the shortest pulses to date from a normal-dispersion laser.

  9. Combinatorial approach to generalized Bell and Stirling numbers and boson normal ordering problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M A Mendez; P Blasiak; K A Penson

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the numbers arising in the problem of normal ordering of expressions in canonical boson creation and annihilation operators. We treat a general form of a boson string which is shown to be associated with generalizations of Stirling and Bell numbers. The recurrence relations and closed-form expressions (Dobiski-type formulas) are obtained for these quantities by both algebraic and combinatorial methods. By extensive use of methods of combinatorial analysis we prove the equivalence of the aforementioned problem to the enumeration of special families of graphs. This link provides a combinatorial interpretation of the numbers arising in this normal ordering problem.

  10. Learned helplessness in mentally retarded and learning disabled versus normal subjects: an attributional approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Veronica Ladell

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this project, he/she is free to do so. Upon completion of the project, a copy of the results will be mailed to you. 31 APPENDIX A (CONT. ) We feel that this study is important because it will help us to better understand motivation in children. We would... students and eighty normal subjects partic1pated 1n the study. Normal children were found to be signficantly more persistent than nonretarded children. Older retarded ch11dren showed signf1cantly more helplessness than e1ther of the other two retarded...

  11. Retrieval of Optical And Size Parameters of Aerosols Utilizing a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer and Inter-Comparison with CIMEL Sun Photometer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiometer and Inter-Comparison with CIMEL Sun Photometer and MICROTOPS Sun Photometer Antonio Aguirre Radiometer (MFRSR) and comparing with data from a CIMEL Sun Photometer and a MICROTOPS Sun Photometer. Using the inverse cosine of the angle between the sun and the vertical. A Langley plot provides a linear regression

  12. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that contralateral breast doses and LAR were comparable to WBRT, despite their added complexity. The smaller irradiated volume of the ABPI plan contributed to a halving of LAR for contralateral breast compared with the other plan types. Daily image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for a left breast protocol using kilovoltage CBCT contributed <10% to LAR for the majority of organs, and did not exceed 22% of total organ dose. Conclusions: Phantom measurements and calculations of LAR from the BEIR VII models predict that complex breast radiotherapy techniques do not increase the theoretical risk of second cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

  13. Investigation of the spontaneous lateral modulation in short-period superlattices by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, Simon C. (University of Houston, Houston, TX); Holy, Vaclav (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic); Reno, John Louis; Krause, B. (ESRF, Grenoble, France); Norman, Andrew G. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Mikulik, P. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Caha, O. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Mascarenhas, Angelo (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of spontaneous lateral composition modulation in short-period InAs/AlAs superlattices has been investigated by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. We have developed a theoretical description of x-ray scattering from laterally modulated structures that makes it possible to determine the lateral composition modulation directly without assuming any structure model. From experimental intensity distributions in reciprocal space we have determined the amplitudes of the modulation and its degree of periodicity and their dependence on the number of superlattice periods. From the data it follows that the modulation process cannot be explained by bunching of monolayer steps and most likely, it is caused by stress-driven morphological instabilities of the growing surface.

  14. Finding clusters of similar events within clinical incident reports: a novel methodology combining case based reasoning and information retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsatsoulis, Costas; Amthauer, Heather A.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ....................... Correspondence to: Dr C Tsatsoulis, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA; tsatsoul@ittc.ku.edu ....................... O ne of the goals of incident reporting systems is to allow their users to discover trends, identify patterns of organizational... be retrieved even if it shares only a few terms. ii26 Tsatsoulis, Amthauer www.qshc.com on 14 February 2007 qshc.bmj.comDownloaded from K53K65K63K74K69K6FK6E K41K96K44K69K73K63K6FK76K65K72K79 K49K6EK66K6FK72K6DK61K74K69K6FK6E K31K2E K52K65K70K6FK72K74 K64K61K...

  15. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 ?m wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  16. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xian-Rong, E-mail: xiahuang@aps.anl.gov; Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Peng, Ru-Wen, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Siddons, D. P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  17. Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persinger, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

  18. Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Bowman, David R. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Remick, Alan [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSA’s role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

  19. Perturbative description of the fermionic projector: Normalization, causality, and Furry's theorem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finster, Felix, E-mail: finster@ur.de [Fakultät für Mathematik, Universität Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)] [Fakultät für Mathematik, Universität Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Tolksdorf, Jürgen, E-mail: Juergen.Tolksdorf@mis.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The causal perturbation expansion of the fermionic projector is performed with a contour integral method. Different normalization conditions are analyzed. It is shown that the corresponding light-cone expansions are causal in the sense that they only involve bounded line integrals. For the resulting loop diagrams we prove a generalized Furry theorem.

  20. NORMALITY OF VERY EVEN NILPOTENT VARIETIES IN D2l ERIC SOMMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommers, Eric

    NORMALITY OF VERY EVEN NILPOTENT VARIETIES IN D2l ERIC SOMMERS ABSTRACT. For the classical groups, 20G20. 1 #12;2 ERIC SOMMERS Then there is a G-module isomorphism Hi (G/B, V ) = Hi+1 (G/B, V -(m

  1. Comparison: Meningioma Classification using Wavelet Packets and Normal Texture based Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qureshi, Hammad

    Energy Based Classification Accuracy 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 F M P T Overall Meningiomas %Accuracy RawComparison: Meningioma Classification using Wavelet Packets and Normal Texture based Classification performed better were obtained from each · Classification using k-nn (leave one out). Introduction

  2. Fully Simplified Multivariate Normal Updates in Non-Conjugate Variational Message Passing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wand, Matt

    Fully Simplified Multivariate Normal Updates in Non-Conjugate Variational Message Passing BY M updates in non-conjugate vari- ational message passing approximate inference schemes are obtained factors in variational message passing approximate inference schemes. Dubbed non-conjugate variational

  3. Farm Risk Management Between Normal Business Risk and Climatic/Market Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Farm Risk Management Between Normal Business Risk and Climatic/Market Shocks by Jean Cordier by any means, provided that this copyright notice appears on all such copies #12;2 Farm Risk Management ABSTRACT Farm risk management for income stabilization is on-going issue. An applied work has been

  4. Recursive computation of the normalization constant of a multivariate Gaussian distribution truncated on a simplex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    truncated on a simplex Nicolas Dobigeon and Jean-Yves Tourneret E-mail: dobigeon@umich.edu TECHNICAL REPORT simplex: S = r 0, r = 1, . . . , R - 1, R-1 r=1 r 1 , (1) Let NS(A, B) denote the truncated multivariate normal distribution defined on the simplex S with mean vector A and covariance matrix B

  5. SPACE WEATHER, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Log-normal Kalman filter for assimilating1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghil, Michael

    data assimilation methods that are based on least-squares mini-14 mization of normally distributed-space density data in the radiation belts2 D. Kondrashov, 1 M. Ghil 1,3 and Y. Shprits, 1,3 D. Kondrashov Los Angeles, CA 90095-1565, U.S.A. (dkon- dras@atmos.ucla.edu) 1 Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic

  6. ANIMATION OF THE NORMAL ICE CYCLE OF THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES OF NORTH AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANIMATION OF THE NORMAL ICE CYCLE OF THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES OF NORTH AMERICA R.A. Assel and J describes an interactive menu- driven computer tutorial on the contemporary ice cover climatology information on ice cover data and analysis, and the second text module contains a generalized description

  7. Simultaneous Replacement in Normal Programs Annalisa Bossi 1 , Nicoletta Cocco 2 , Sandro Etalle 1;3 .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocco, Nicoletta

    Simultaneous Replacement in Normal Programs Annalisa Bossi 1 , Nicoletta Cocco 2 , Sandro Etalle 1@zenone.math.unipd.it, cocco@moo.dsi.unive.it, etalle@cwi.nl October 13, 1994 Abstract The simultaneous replacement results for Fitting's and Kunen's semantics. We also show how simultaneous replacement can mimic other

  8. Astrophysical S factor for C-13(p,gamma)N-14 and asymptotic normalization coefficients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Azhari, A.; Burjan, V.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Kroha, V.; Sattarov, A.; Tang, X.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reanalyze the C-13(p,gamma)N-14 radiative capture reaction within the R-matrix approach. The low-energy astrophysical S factor has important contributions from both resonant and onresonant captures. The normalization of the nonresonant component...

  9. PABS: A Computer Program to Normalize Emission Probabilities and Calculate Realistic Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caron, D. S.; Browne, E.; Norman, E. B.

    2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The program PABS normalizes relative particle emission probabilities to an absolute scale and calculates the relevant uncertainties on this scale. The program is written in Java using the JDK 1.6 library. For additional information about system requirements, the code itself, and compiling from source, see the README file distributed with this program. The mathematical procedures used are given below.

  10. Bionic anklefoot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    Bionic ankle­foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation Hugh M. Herr1 and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive- elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during

  11. Normal Aging and the Dissociable Prototype Learning Systems Brian D. Glass1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    that the learning of different types of classification tasks are mediated by functionally and neurally distinct Filoteo & Maddox, 2004). Another important type of classification learning is prototype learning (Homa1 Normal Aging and the Dissociable Prototype Learning Systems Brian D. Glass1 Tanya Chotibut2

  12. Kernel k-means, Spectral Clustering and Normalized Cuts Inderjit S. Dhillon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    Kernel k-means, Spectral Clustering and Normalized Cuts Inderjit S. Dhillon Dept. of Computer. of Computer Sciences University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712 kulis@cs.utexas.edu ABSTRACT Kernel k-means an ex- plicit theoretical connection between them. We show the generality of the weighted kernel k-means

  13. NORMAL FORMS NEAR A SADDLE-NODE AND APPLICATIONS TO FINITE CYCLICITY OF GRAPHICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rousseau, Christiane

    NORMAL FORMS NEAR A SADDLE-NODE AND APPLICATIONS TO FINITE CYCLICITY OF GRAPHICS F. Dumortier, Y and allows to prove the finite cyclicity of families of graphics ("ensembles") occuring inside analytic families of vector fields. It is used in [RZ1] to prove the finite cyclicity of graphics through

  14. Data Collection and Normalization for the Development of Cost Estimating Relationships

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost estimating relationships or parametric equations are mathematical statements that indicate that the cost is proportional to a physical commodity. Parametric estimating requires that the statistical analysis be performed on data points to correlate the cost drivers and other system parameters. This chapter discusses considerations for data collection and normalization.

  15. Inducing Letter-by-letter Dyslexia in Normal Readers Daniel Fiset1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosselin, Frédéric

    Inducing Letter-by-letter Dyslexia in Normal Readers Daniel Fiset1 , Fre´de´ric Gosselin1 , Caroline Blais1 , and Martin Arguin1,2 Abstract & Letter-by-letter (LBL) dyslexia is an acquired reading. Sequential and parallel letter processing in letter-by-letter dyslexia. Cogni- tive Neuropsychology, 19, 535

  16. Asymptotic normalization coefficients and the Be-7(p, gamma)B-8 astrophysical S factor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azhari, A.; Burjan, V.; Carstoiu, F.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Kroha, V.; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Nunes, FM; Tang, X.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the results of two proton transfer reactions, B-10(Be-7, B-8)Be-9 and N-14(Be-7, B-8)C-13, to obtain a weighted average of the measured asymptotic normalization coefficients for the virtual transition 7Be +pB-8. ...

  17. On Strong Normalization of the Calculus of Constructions with Type-Based Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On Strong Normalization of the Calculus of Constructions with Type-Based Termination Benjamin Gr.Gregoire,Jorge-Luis.Sacchini}@inria.fr Abstract. Termination of recursive functions is an important property in proof assistants based on dependent type theories; it implies con- sistency and decidability of type checking. Type-based termination

  18. A Gene Necessary for Normal Male Courtship, yellow, Acts Downstream of fruitless in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruber, Jonathan

    A Gene Necessary for Normal Male Courtship, yellow, Acts Downstream of fruitless in the Drosophila- ship behavior, genes acting downstream of fru have not yet been identified. Here we demonstrate that the yellow (y) gene is genetically downstream of fru in the 3rd -instar larval brain. Yellow protein

  19. Combined giant inverse and normal magnetocaloric effect for room-temperature magnetic cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zexian, Cao

    In the last two decades, magnetic refrigeration has been demonstrated as a very promising alternativeCombined giant inverse and normal magnetocaloric effect for room-temperature magnetic cooling Report, we report on the observation of a giant positive inverse magnetic entropy change about 28.6 J K-1

  20. High Speed Max-Log-MAP Turbo SISO Decoder Implementation Using Branch Metric Normalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Tughrul

    High Speed Max-Log-MAP Turbo SISO Decoder Implementation Using Branch Metric Normalization J. H.Erdogan@ee.ed.ac.uk, Tughrul.Arslan@ee.ed.ac.uk Abstract The authors present a turbo soft-in soft-out (SISO) decoder based. The turbo decoder with the proposed technique has been synthesized to evaluate its power consumption

  1. Normal Stresses and Interface Displacement: Influence of Viscoelasticity on Enhanced Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Normal Stresses and Interface Displacement: Influence of Viscoelasticity on Enhanced Oil Recovery assistée -- Une des méthodes de récupération assistée du pétrole (EOR - Enhanced Oil Recovery) consiste à Recovery Efficiency -- One of chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) methods consists in injecting aqueous

  2. Cavitation in normal liquid helium 3 F. Caupin, P. Roche, S. Marchand and S. Balibar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caupin, Frédéric

    Cavitation in normal liquid helium 3 F. Caupin, P. Roche, S. Marchand and S. Balibar Laboratoire de 24 rue Lhomond 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France We have studied cavitation, i.e. bubble nucleation, cavitation is found to be stochastic, with a cavitation probability 0.5 at a given value of the sound

  3. The Normal Modes of the Earth Lapo Boschi (lapo@erdw.ethz.ch)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschi, Lapo

    ) is given by Newton's law of gravitation, ¨u(r, t) = V r - r |r - r|3 G(r )d3 r , (1) with G denoting Newton, with associated eigenfrequencies: the normal modes (free oscillations) of the Earth. Self-Gravitation to the gravity field caused by the Earth's deformation u(r, t) itself ("self-gravitation"). Those terms, how

  4. Towards an Understanding of the Mid-Infrared Surface Brightness of Normal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel A. Dale; George Helou; Nancy A. Silbermann; Alessandra Contursi; Sangeeta Malhotra; Robert H. Rubin

    1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a mid-infrared color and surface brightness analysis of IC 10, NGC 1313, and NGC 6946, three of the nearby galaxies studied under the Infrared Space Observatory Key Project on Normal Galaxies. Images with < 9 arcsecond (170 pc) resolution of these nearly face-on, late-type galaxies were obtained using the LW2 (6.75 mu) and LW3 (15 mu) ISOCAM filters. Though their global I_nu(6.75 mu)/I_nu(15 mu) flux ratios are similar and typical of normal galaxies, they show distinct trends of this color ratio with mid-infrared surface brightness. We find that I_nu(6.75 mu)/I_nu(15 mu) ~< 1 only occurs for regions of intense heating activity where the continuum rises at 15 micron and where PAH destruction can play an important role. The shape of the color-surface brightness trend also appears to depend, to the second-order, on the hardness of the ionizing radiation. We discuss these findings in the context of a two-component model for the phases of the interstellar medium and suggest that star formation intensity is largely responsible for the mid-infrared surface brightness and colors within normal galaxies, whereas differences in dust column density are the primary drivers of variations in the mid-infrared surface brightness between the disks of normal galaxies.

  5. Diffusion Tensor Imaging in the Assessment of Normal-Appearing Brain Tissue Damage in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang,Tianzi

    (including medulla oblongata, cerebral peduncle, internal capsule and optic radiation), in corpus callosum Damage in Relapsing Neuromyelitis Optica C.S. Yu F.C. Lin K.C. Li T.Z. Jiang C.Z. Zhu W. Qin H. Sun P. Chan BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT) damage was established in multiple

  6. Normal and Shear Forces between a Polyelectrolyte Brush and a Solid Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Jacob

    -FRANC¸ OIS GOHY,2 ROBERT JE´RO^ ME,2 JACOB KLEIN1,3 1 Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann decade there have been many re- ports on normal and shear forces between sur- faces bearing polymeric--Division of Polymer Physics, Montreal, Canada Correspondence to: J. Klein (E-mail: jacob.klein@weizmann. ac

  7. DATA NORMALIZATION FOR FOUNDATION SHM OF AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE : A REAL-LIFE CASE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DATA NORMALIZATION FOR FOUNDATION SHM OF AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE : A REAL-LIFE CASE STUDY Wout the first results in the development of a SHM approach for the foun- dations of an offshore wind turbine the performance of the presented approach. KEYWORDS : Foundation Monitoring, Offshore Wind Turbine, Operational

  8. enoLOGOS: a versatile web tool for energy normalized sequence logos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    enoLOGOS: a versatile web tool for energy normalized sequence logos Christopher T. Workman*, Yutong, MO, USA Received February 14, 2005; Revised and Accepted March 28, 2005 ABSTRACT enoLOGOS is a web-based tool that generates sequence logos from various input sources. Sequence logos have become a popular way

  9. Non-normal parameter blowout bifurcation: an example in a truncated mean field dynamo model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eurico Covas; Peter Ashwin; Reza Tavakol

    1997-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine global dynamics and bifurcations occurring in a truncated model of a stellar mean field dynamo. This model has symmetry-forced invariant subspaces for the dynamics and we find examples of transient type I intermittency and blowout bifurcations to transient on-off intermittency, involving laminar phases in the invariant submanifold. In particular, our model provides examples of blowout bifurcations that occur on varying a non-normal parameter; that is, the parameter varies the dynamics within the invariant subspace at the same time as the dynamics normal to it. As a consequence of this we find that the Lyapunov exponents do not vary smoothly and the blowout bifurcation occurs over a range of parameter values rather than a point in the parameter space.

  10. Gamma Ray Bursts, The Principle of Relative Locality and Connection Normal Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. McCoy

    2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The launch of the Fermi telescope in 2008 opened up the possibility of measuring the energy dependence of the speed of light by considering the time delay in the arrival of gamma ray bursts emitted simultaneously from very distant sources.The expected time delay between the arrival of gamma rays of significantly different energies as predicted by the framework of relative locality has already been calculated in Riemann normal coordinates. In the following, we calculate the time delay in more generality and then specialize to the connection normal coordinate system as a check that the results are coordinate independent. We also show that this result does not depend on the presence of torsion.

  11. Non-normality in combustion-acoustic interaction in diffusion flames: a critical revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magri, Luca; Sujith, R I; Juniper, Matthew P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perturbations in a non-normal system can grow transiently even if the system is linearly stable. If this transient growth is sufficiently large, it can trigger self-sustained oscillations from small initial disturbances. This has important practical consequences for combustion-acoustic oscillations, which are a continual problem in rocket and aircraft engines. Balasubramanian and Sujith (Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2008, 594, 29-57) modelled an infinite-rate chemistry diffusion flame in an acoustic duct and found that the transient growth in this system can amplify the initial energy by a factor, $G_{max}$, of order $10^5$ to $10^7$. However, recent investigations by L. Magri & M. P. Juniper have brought to light certain errors in that paper. When the errors are corrected, $G_{max}$ is found to be of order 1 to 10, revealing that non-normality is not as influential as it was thought to be.

  12. Regulation of bcl-2 proto-oncogene expression during normal human lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, J.C.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Alpers, J.D.; Croce, C.M.; Nowell, P.C.

    1987-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The bcl-2 and c-myc proto-oncogenes are brought into juxtaposition with the immuno-globulin heavy chain locus in particular B-cell lymphomas, resulting in high levels of constitutive accumulation of their messenger RNAs. Precisely how the products of the bcl-2 and c-myc genes contribute to tumorigenesis is unknown, but observations that c-myc expression is rapidly induced in nonneoplastic lymphocytes upon stimulation of proliferation raise the possibility that this proto-oncogene is involved in the control of normal cellular growth. In addition to c-myc, the bcl-2 proto-oncogene also was expressed in normal human B and T lymphocytes after stimulation with appropriate mitogens. Comparison of the regulation of the expression of these proto-oncogenes demonstrated marked differences and provided evidence that, in contrast to c-myc, levels of bcl-2 messenger RNA are regulated primarily though transcriptional mechanisms. 10 references, 3 figures.

  13. Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

  14. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Jianyi [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, (United States); Xu, Dingguo [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, (United States) and Sichuan Univ. (China); Guo, Hua [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, (United States); Tyng, Vivian [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Kellman, Michael E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helps to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.

  15. Feedback cooling of the normal modes of a massive electromechanical system to submillikelvin temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vinante; M. Bignotto; M. Bonaldi; M. Cerdonio; L. Conti; P. Falferi; N. Liguori; S. Longo; R. Mezzena; A. Ortolan; G. A. Prodi; F. Salemi; L. Taffarello; G. Vedovato; S. Vitale; J. -P. Zendri

    2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply a feedback cooling technique to simultaneously cool the three electromechanical normal modes of the ton-scale resonant-bar gravitational wave detector AURIGA. The measuring system is based on a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) amplifier, and the feedback cooling is applied electronically to the input circuit of the SQUID. Starting from a bath temperature of 4.2 K, we achieve a minimum temperature of 0.17 mK for the coolest normal mode. The same technique, implemented in a dedicated experiment at subkelvin bath temperature and with a quantum limited SQUID, could allow to approach the quantum ground state of a kilogram-scale mechanical resonator.

  16. FORTRAN algorithm for correcting normal resistivity logs for borehold diameter and mud resistivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, J H

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FORTRAN algorithm described was developed for applying corrections to normal resistivity logs of any electrode spacing for the effects of drilling mud of known resistivity in boreholes of variable diameter. The corrections are based on Schlumberger departure curves that are applicable to normal logs made with a standard Schlumberger electric logging probe with an electrode diameter of 8.5 cm (3.35 in). The FORTRAN algorithm has been generalized to accommodate logs made with other probes with different electrode diameters. Two simplifying assumptions used by Schlumberger in developing the departure curves also apply to the algorithm: (1) bed thickness is assumed to be infinite (at least 10 times larger than the electrode spacing), and (2) invasion of drilling mud into the formation is assumed to be negligible.

  17. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E.

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helpsmore »to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.« less

  18. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B [San Diego State University, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  19. Accident and Off Normal Response and Recovery from Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Processing Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALDERMAN, C.A.

    2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In the process of removing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the K Basins through its subsequent packaging, drymg, transportation and storage steps, the SNF Project must be able to respond to all anticipated or foreseeable off-normal and accident events that may occur. Response procedures and recovery plans need to be in place, personnel training established and implemented to ensure the project will be capable of appropriate actions. To establish suitable project planning, these events must first be identified and analyzed for their expected impact to the project. This document assesses all off-normal and accident events for their potential cross-facility or Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) process reversal impact. Table 1 provides the methodology for establishing the event planning level and these events are provided in Table 2 along with the general response and recovery planning. Accidents and off-normal events of the SNF Project have been evaluated and are identified in the appropriate facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) or in the transportation Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). Hazards and accidents are summarized from these safety analyses and listed in separate tables for each facility and the transportation system in Appendix A, along with identified off-normal events. The tables identify the general response time required to ensure a stable state after the event, governing response documents, and the events with potential cross-facility or SNF process reversal impacts. The event closure is predicated on stable state response time, impact to operations and the mitigated annual occurrence frequency of the event as developed in the hazard analysis process.

  20. Correlation of ammonia clearance with classical liver function tests in normal and liver-damaged sheep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansson, Lucille Ann

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Veterinary Toxicology CORRELATION OF AMMONIA CLEARANCE WITH CLASSICAL LIVER FUNCTION TESTS IN NORMAL AND LIVER-DAMAGED SHEEP A Thesis LUCILLE ANN HANSSON Approved as to style and content by... together. The United States Department of Agriculture, Veterinary Toxicology and . Entomology Research Laboratory, Bryan, Texas for providing the research sheep, analysis of research samples, and the funding for this research project. TABLE OF CONTENTS...

  1. FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION MODELS OF THE MITRAL VALVE: FUNCTION IN NORMAL AND PATHOLOGIC STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunzelman, K. S.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Cochran, R. P.

    2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful mitral valve repair is dependent upon a full understanding of normal and abnormal mitral valve anatomy and function. Computational analysis is one such method that can be applied to simulate mitral valve function in order to analyze the roles of individual components, and evaluate proposed surgical repair. We developed the first three-dimensional, finite element (FE) computer model of the mitral valve including leaflets and chordae tendineae, however, one critical aspect that has been missing until the last few years was the evaluation of fluid flow, as coupled to the function of the mitral valve structure. We present here our latest results for normal function and specific pathologic changes using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Normal valve function was first assessed, followed by pathologic material changes in collagen fiber volume fraction, fiber stiffness, fiber splay, and isotropic stiffness. Leaflet and chordal stress and strain, and papillary muscle force was determined. In addition, transmitral flow, time to leaflet closure, and heart valve sound were assessed. Model predictions in the normal state agreed well with a wide range of available in-vivo and in-vitro data. Further, pathologic material changes that preserved the anisotropy of the valve leaflets were found to preserve valve function. By contrast, material changes that altered the anisotropy of the valve were found to profoundly alter valve function. The addition of blood flow and an experimentally driven microstructural description of mitral tissue represent significant advances in computational studies of the mitral valve, which allow further insight to be gained. This work is another building block in the foundation of a computational framework to aid in the refinement and development of a truly noninvasive diagnostic evaluation of the mitral valve. Ultimately, it represents the basis for simulation of surgical repair of pathologic valves in a clinical and educational setting.

  2. Microwave-induced spin currents in ferromagnetic-insulator|normal-metal bilayer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Milan, E-mail: magrawal@physik.uni-kl.de [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz, Gottlieb-Daimler-Strasse 47, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Serga, Alexander A.; Lauer, Viktor; Papaioannou, Evangelos Th.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave technique is employed to simultaneously examine the spin pumping and the spin Seebeck effect processes in a YIG|Pt bilayer system. The experimental results show that for these two processes, the spin current flows in opposite directions. The temporal dynamics of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect exhibits that the effect depends on the diffusion of bulk thermal-magnons in the thermal gradient in the ferromagnetic-insulator|normal-metal system.

  3. Surface-emitting superconductor laser spectroscopy for characterizing normal and sickled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourley, P.L.; Meissner, K.E.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gourley, M.F. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new intracavity laser technique that uses a living or a fixed cell as an integral component of the laser. The cells are placed on an AlGaAs/GaAs surface-emitting semiconductor wafer and covered with a glass dielectric mirror to form a laser resonator. In this arrangement, the cells serve as optical waveguides (or lens elements) to confine (or focus) light generated in the resonator by the semiconductor. Because of the high transparency, the cells aid the lasing process to generate laser light. This ultra sensitive laser provides a novel imaging/spectroscopic technique for histologic examination which we demonstrate with normal and sickled human red blood cells. Extremely high contrast microscopic images of the cells are observed near 830-850 nm. These images correspond to electromagnetic modes of cell structures and are sensitive to shape of the cell. Using a high resolution spectrometer, we resolve the light emitted from these images into very narrow spectral peaks associated with the lasing modes. Analysis of the spectra reveals that the distribution of peaks is quite different for normal and sickled red blood cells. This technique, in a more developed form, may be useful for the rapid analysis of other kinds of normal and abnormal cells.

  4. The Infrared Spectral Energy Distribution of Normal Star-Forming Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel A. Dale; George Helou; Alessandra Contursi; Nancy A. Silbermann; Sonali Kolhatkar

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new phenomenological model for the spectral energy distribution of normal star-forming galaxies between 3 and 1100 microns. A sequence of realistic galaxy spectra are constructed from a family of dust emission curves assuming a power law distribution of dust mass over a wide range of interstellar radiation fields. For each interstellar radiation field heating intensity we combine emission curves for large and very small grains and aromatic feature carriers. The model is constrained by IRAS and ISOCAM broadband photometric and ISOPHOT spectrophotometric observations for our sample of 69 normal galaxies; the model reproduces well the empirical spectra and infrared color trends. These model spectra allow us to determine the infrared energy budget for normal galaxies, and in particular to translate far-infrared fluxes into total (bolometric) infrared fluxes. The 20 to 42 micron range appears to show the most significant growth in relative terms as the activity level increases, suggesting that the 20-42 micron continuum may be the best dust emission tracer of current star formation in galaxies. The redshift dependence of infrared color-color diagrams and the far-infrared to radio correlation for galaxies are also explored.

  5. A sample of X-ray emitting normal galaxies from the BMW -- HRI Catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tajer; G. Trinchieri; A. Wolter; S. Campana; A. Moretti; G. Tagliaferri

    2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained a sample of 143 normal galaxies with X-ray luminosity in the range $10^{38} - 10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$ from the cross-correlation of the ROSAT HRI Brera Multi-scale Wavelet (BMW -- HRI) Catalogue with the Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic Database (LEDA). We find that the average X-ray properties of this sample are in good agreement with those of other samples of galaxies in the literature. We have selected a complete flux limited serendipitous sample of 32 galaxies from which we have derived the logN-logS distribution of normal galaxies in the flux range $1.1 - 110 \\times 10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. The resulting distribution is consistent with the euclidean -1.5 slope. Comparisons with other samples, such as the Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey, the ROSAT All Sky Survey, the XMM - Newton/2dF survey and the Chandra Deep Field Survey indicate that the logN-logS distribution of normal galaxies is consistent with an euclidean slope over a flux range of about 6 decades.

  6. A sample of X-ray emitting normal galaxies from the BMW -- HRI Catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tajer, M; Wolter, A; Campana, S; Moretti, A; Tagliaferri, G

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained a sample of 143 normal galaxies with X-ray luminosity in the range $10^{38} - 10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$ from the cross-correlation of the ROSAT HRI Brera Multi-scale Wavelet (BMW -- HRI) Catalogue with the Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic Database (LEDA). We find that the average X-ray properties of this sample are in good agreement with those of other samples of galaxies in the literature. We have selected a complete flux limited serendipitous sample of 32 galaxies from which we have derived the logN-logS distribution of normal galaxies in the flux range $1.1 - 110 \\times 10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. The resulting distribution is consistent with the euclidean -1.5 slope. Comparisons with other samples, such as the Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey, the ROSAT All Sky Survey, the XMM - Newton/2dF survey and the Chandra Deep Field Survey indicate that the logN-logS distribution of normal galaxies is consistent with an euclidean slope over a flux range of about 6 decades.

  7. INCIDENT # CHARGE SECTION OF NYS PENAL LAW DISPOSITION TYPE REPORTED TO PLACE OF OCCURRENCE DATE & TIME OF OCCURRENCE DATE & TIME REPORTED 1304224 None

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    INCIDENT # CHARGE SECTION OF NYS PENAL LAW DISPOSITION TYPE REPORTED TO PLACE OF OCCURRENCE DATE Public Safety Department Music Building 6442 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 April 29, 2013 2:15PM Building 6660 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 May 1, 2013 12:15PM May 1, 2013 2:50PM 1305279 None Petit

  8. Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety of threats that result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety [4] at UCSD, and help define design windows for the GIMM in a laser-driven IFE power plant of threats that result in damages leading to increased laser absorption, beam quality degradation and reduced

  9. Auklet (Charadriiformes: Alcidae, Aethia spp.) chick meals from the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, have a very low incidence of plastic marine debris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    , have a very low incidence of plastic marine debris Alexander L. Bond a,*, Ian L. Jones a , Jeffrey C t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Plastic Marine debris North Pacific Ocean Auklet Aethia Aleutian Islands a b s t r a c t The ingestion of plastic marine debris is a chronic problem for some of the world

  10. U.S. Seafood Safe and Unaffected by Radiation Contamination from Japanese Nuclear Power Plant Incident; U.S. Monitoring Control Strategy Explained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Seafood Safe and Unaffected by Radiation Contamination from Japanese Nuclear Power Plant about radiation contamination from the Japanese nuclear power plant incident and on the control potential routes by which seafood contaminated with radionuclides from the Japanese nuclear power plant

  11. Degraded Modes and the `Culture of Coping' in Military Operations: An Analysis of a Fatal Incident On-Board HMS Tireless on 20/21 March 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    was following Standard operating Procedures (SOPs) using Self Contained Oxygen Generators (SCOGs) to maintain and operators must work together to ensure that maintenance intervals are scheduled so that critical componentsDegraded Modes and the `Culture of Coping' in Military Operations: An Analysis of a Fatal Incident

  12. The Cost of Policing Security Incidents on the Central VAX Clusters Breaches of security on the central VAX clusters (VXCERN and VXENG) come to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    The Cost of Policing Security Incidents on the Central VAX Clusters Breaches of security on the central VAX clusters (VXCERN and VXENG) come to the attention of the support staff at approximately a rate unpleasant attack that was made on VAXes not just in the CERN Computer Centre, but across the CERN site

  13. {sup 6}Li({pi}{sup +}, {ital pp}){sup 4}He{sub g.s.} reaction at 100 and 165 MeV incident pion energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papandreou, Z.; Huber, G.; Lolos, G.; Cormier, J.; Mathie, E.; Naqvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Ottewell, D.; Tacik, R.; Walden, P. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Jones, G.; Trelle, R. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A6 (Canada); Aslanoglou, X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Humphrey, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential and total cross sections for {pi}{sup +} absorption on {sup 6}Li leading to the {ital pp}+{sup 4}He{sub g.s} final state are presented at incident pion energies of 100 and 165 MeV. The narrow width of the {ital pp} angular correlation is observed and reported.

  14. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Response and Normal Tissue Regeneration After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinauer, Michelle A., E-mail: Michelle.Stinauer@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To characterize changes in standardized uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) scans and determine the pace of normal tissue regeneration after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solid tumor liver metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of patients with liver metastases treated with SBRT to {>=}40 Gy in 3-5 fractions. Evaluable patients had pretreatment PET and {>=}1 post-treatment PET. Each PET/CT scan was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) scan. The maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) for each lesion and the total liver volume were measured on each PET/CT scan. Maximum SUV levels before and after SBRT were recorded. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 35 treated liver lesions were studied. The median follow-up was 15.7 months (range, 1.5-38.4 mo), with 5 PET scans per patient (range, 2-14). Exponential decay curve fitting (r=0.97) showed that SUV{sub max} declined to a plateau of 3.1 for controlled lesions at 5 months after SBRT. The estimated SUV{sub max} decay half-time was 2.0 months. The SUV{sub max} in controlled lesions fluctuated up to 4.2 during follow-up and later declined; this level is close to 2 standard deviations above the mean normal liver SUV{sub max} (4.01). A failure cutoff of SUV{sub max} {>=}6 is twice the calculated plateau SUV{sub max} of controlled lesions. Parenchymal liver volume decreased by 20% at 3-6 months and regenerated to a new baseline level approximately 10% below the pretreatment level at 12 months. Conclusions: Maximum SUV decreases over the first months after SBRT to plateau at 3.1, similar to the median SUV{sub max} of normal livers. Transient moderate increases in SUV{sub max} may be observed after SBRT. We propose a cutoff SUV{sub max} {>=}6, twice the baseline normal liver SUV{sub max}, to score local failure by PET criteria. Post-SBRT values between 4 and 6 would be suspicious for local tumor persistence or recurrence. The volume of normal liver reached nadir 3-6 months after SBRT and regenerated within the next 6 months.

  15. Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

  16. A Local Incident Flux Response Expansion Transport Method for Coupling to the Diffusion Method in Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingkang Zhang; Farzad Rahnema; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A local incident flux response expansion transport method is developed to generate transport solutions for coupling to diffusion theory codes regardless of their solution method (e.g., fine mesh, nodal, response based, finite element, etc.) for reactor core calculations in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cylindrical geometries. In this approach, a Monte Carlo method is first used to precompute the local transport solution (i.e., response function library) for each unique transport coarse node, in which diffusion theory is not valid due to strong transport effects. The response function library is then used to iteratively determine the albedo coefficients on the diffusion-transport interfaces, which are then used as the coupling parameters within the diffusion code. This interface coupling technique allows a seamless integration of the transport and diffusion methods. The new method retains the detailed heterogeneity of the transport nodes and naturally constructs any local solution within them by a simple superposition of local responses to all incoming fluxes from the contiguous coarse nodes. A new technique is also developed for coupling to fine-mesh diffusion methods/codes. The local transport method/module is tested in 2-D and 3-D pebble-bed reactor benchmark problems consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region, and a controlled outer reflector. It is found that the results predicted by the transport module agree very well with the reference fluxes calculated directly by MCNP in both benchmark problems.

  17. Enterprise Incidents Issue 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Sheila

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be trusted; Vulcans were known for their loyalty - they held disloyalty in total abhorrance, he knew; and was convinced that with his luck, he'd strike the one Vulcan Hho .!:@& capable of disloyalty ... anyway, Spock was half Human, and NcCoy certainly...

  18. Enterprise Incidents Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodison, Lorraine

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Captain? I am a Commander nov.!,,11 Kirk bO'ded his head in apology. "Hy mistake, Commander Koloth." I'iThank you" shields up, and, I NoVl, before Vie go any further, may I enquire Vlhy you have your presume, your men at battle stations? I merely...." lIe coulel hear the worry in his captain's voice as Kirk replied to his report. "Okay 0 Carry on as :you are, Scott Yo Turn ber inside out if you have too" "I'm practically doin' He looked back to his men, hurry up? man! I'! that noVl, ""li...

  19. Enterprise Incidents Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodison, Lorraine

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I'G"i.od, that would have boen just r. littlo too muoh for him. He snt nt thu Vulcan I s side ag8.in just e.s Nanr.the 00.00 entrance. Her robo soomed to glow in tho filtered light of Kirk frowned 38 he saw her eyos. Woron't thoy groy bofore? bluCl, ovon bluor than... anything to gi vo us a cluo!" "Ayo, sir - I'll tak' it tao bits if I hav0 tao!" IIThank8, Scotty, II grinned Kirk. Ho walked over to the entrance. "lKeanvihilo, Illl havo another word with our onigmatic quoen." HOWOV0r~ }7anatho was noy/hore to bo so"en...

  20. Incidents of Security Concern

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:DepartmentDepartment of EnergyEnergy JohnExcel12/17/1998NOT

  1. Asymptotic normalization coefficients for N-14 C-13+p from C-13(He-3,d)N-14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bem, P.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Novak, J.; Piskor, S.; Simeckova, E.; Vincour, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Tribble, Robert E.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The C-13(He-3,d) N-14 proton transfer reaction has been measured at an incident energy of 26.3 MeV. Angular distributions for proton transfer to the ground state and excited states at 2.313 and 3.948 MeV in N-14 are analyzed within the framework...

  2. Computation of the normal forms for general M-DOF systems using multiple time scales. Part I: autonomous systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Pei

    computing normal forms up to any high order. The equivalence between the perturbation technique and Poincare in a companion paper. Ã? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Non-linear vibration; Normal form, electrical circuits, control systems, population problems, economics, financial systems, stock market

  3. OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF NORMAL AND GREEN OYSTERS 1 PAUL S. GALTSOFF, Ph. D., In Charge, Oyster Fishery Investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF NORMAL AND GREEN OYSTERS 1 $ By PAUL S. GALTSOFF, Ph. D., In Charge, Oyster _ ~ethod _ Oxygen consumption of normal oyster _ Effect of oxygen tension on oxygen con- sumption _ Page 489 Increased rate of metabolism _ 490 Experiments with green oysters _ 493 Oxygen consumption

  4. The -space Property in Monotonically Normal Spaces and GO-Spaces Harold R. Bennett, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutzer, David J.

    The -space Property in Monotonically Normal Spaces and GO-Spaces by Harold R. Bennett, Texas Tech-8795 Abstract In this paper we examine the role of the -space property (equivalently of the MCM-property) in generalized ordered (GO-)spaces and, more generally, in monotonically normal spaces. We show that a GO-space

  5. Computer Graphics International 2004 (CGI), June 16--19, Crete, Greece. IEEE Computer Society Press. Consistent Normal Orientation for Polygonal Meshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    . Consistent Normal Orientation for Polygonal Meshes Pavel Borodin Gabriel Zachmann Reinhard Klein Institute

  6. Nonlinear resonance of superconductor/normal metal structures to microwaves E. Kandelaki,1 A. F. Volkov,1,2 K. B. Efetov,1 and V. T. Petrashov3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Nonlinear resonance of superconductor/normal metal structures to microwaves E. Kandelaki,1 A. F.024502 PACS number s : 74.45. c, 74.50. r, 85.25.Dq, 03.67.Lx I. INTRODUCTION Superconductor/normal metal S conductance G=dj/dV of a normal metal wire in a superconductor/ normal metal heterostructure with a cross

  7. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Torres, Mylin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Andic, Fundagul [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu Haoyang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen Zhengjia [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Statistics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sun, Xiaoyan [Department of Statistics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group. Patients with RTOG Grade 1 or 2 had greater ultrasound-assessed toxicity percentage changes than patients with RTOG Grade 0. Conclusion: Early and late radiation-induced effects on normal tissue can be reliably assessed using quantitative ultrasound.

  8. Theory and praxis pf map analsys in CHEF part 1: Linear normal form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelotti, Leo; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This memo begins a series which, put together, could comprise the 'CHEF Documentation Project' if there were such a thing. The first--and perhaps only--three will telegraphically describe theory, algorithms, implementation and usage of the normal form map analysis procedures encoded in CHEF's collection of libraries. [1] This one will begin the sequence by explaining the linear manipulations that connect the Jacobian matrix of a symplectic mapping to its normal form. It is a 'Reader's Digest' version of material I wrote in Intermediate Classical Dynamics (ICD) [2] and randomly scattered across technical memos, seminar viewgraphs, and lecture notes for the past quarter century. Much of its content is old, well known, and in some places borders on the trivial.1 Nevertheless, completeness requires their inclusion. The primary objective is the 'fundamental theorem' on normalization written on page 8. I plan to describe the nonlinear procedures in a subsequent memo and devote a third to laying out algorithms and lines of code, connecting them with equations written in the first two. Originally this was to be done in one short paper, but I jettisoned that approach after its first section exceeded a dozen pages. The organization of this document is as follows. A brief description of notation is followed by a section containing a general treatment of the linear problem. After the 'fundamental theorem' is proved, two further subsections discuss the generation of equilibrium distributions and issue of 'phase'. The final major section reviews parameterizations--that is, lattice functions--in two and four dimensions with a passing glance at the six-dimensional version. Appearances to the contrary, for the most part I have tried to restrict consideration to matters needed to understand the code in CHEF's libraries.

  9. Status Update on the NCRP Scientific Committee SC 5-1 Report: Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents - 13450

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y. [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2008, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued its final Protective Action Guide (PAG) for radiological dispersal device (RDD) and improvised nuclear device (IND) incidents. This document specifies protective actions for public health during the early and intermediate phases and cleanup guidance for the late phase of RDD or IND incidents, and it discusses approaches to implementing the necessary actions. However, while the PAG provides specific guidance for the early and intermediate phases, it prescribes no equivalent guidance for the late-phase cleanup actions. Instead, the PAG offers a general description of a complex process using a site-specific optimization approach. This approach does not predetermine cleanup levels but approaches the problem from the factors that would bear on the final agreed-on cleanup levels. Based on this approach, the decision-making process involves multifaceted considerations including public health, the environment, and the economy, as well as socio-political factors. In an effort to fully define the process and approach to be used in optimizing late-phase recovery and site restoration following an RDD or IND incident, DHS has tasked the NCRP with preparing a comprehensive report addressing all aspects of the optimization process. Preparation of the NCRP report is a three-year (2010-2013) project assigned to a scientific committee, the Scientific Committee (SC) 5-1; the report was initially titled, Approach to Optimizing Decision Making for Late- Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Terrorism Incidents. Members of SC 5-1 represent a broad range of expertise, including homeland security, health physics, risk and decision analysis, economics, environmental remediation and radioactive waste management, and communication. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and guided by a recent process led by the White House through a Principal Level Exercise (PLE), the optimization approach has since been expanded to include off-site contamination from major nuclear power plant accidents as well as other nuclear or radiological incidents. The expanded application under the current guidance has thus led to a broadened scope of the report, which is reflected in its new title, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. The NCRP report, which is due for publication in 2013, will substantiate the current DHS guidance by clarifying and elaborating on the processes required for the development and implementation of procedures for optimizing decision making for late-phase recovery, enabling the establishment of cleanup goals on a site-specific basis. The report will contain a series of topics addressing important issues related to the long-term recovery from nuclear or radiological incidents. Special topics relevant to supporting the optimization of the decision-making process will include cost-benefit analysis, radioactive waste management, risk communication, stakeholder interaction, risk assessment, and decontamination approaches and techniques. The committee also evaluated past nuclear and radiological incidents for their relevance to the report, including the emerging issues associated with the Fukushima nuclear accident. Thus, due to the commonality of the late-phase issues (such as the potential widespread contamination following an event), the majority of the information pertaining to the response in the late-phase decision-making period, including site-specific optimization framework and approach, could be used or adapted for use in case of similar situations that are not due to terrorism, such as those that would be caused by major nuclear facility accidents or radiological incidents. To ensure that the report and the NCRP recommendations are current and relevant to the effective implementation of federal guidance, SC 5-1 has actively coordinated with the agencies of interest and other relevant stakeholders throughout the duration of the project. The resulting report will be an important resource to guide those involved

  10. Conditions to have 3+1-dimensional thin-shell wormholes supported by normal matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Habib Mazharimousavi; M. Halilsoy

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    From physics standpoint exotic matter problem is a major difficulty in thin-shell wormholes (TSWs) with spherical / cylindrical throat topologies. We aim to circumvent this handicap by considering angular dependent throats in $3+1-$dimensions. By considering the throat of the TSW to be deformed spherical, i.e., a function of $\\theta $ and $\\varphi $, we present general conditions which are to be satisfied by the shape of the throat in order to have the wormhole supported by normal matter. Analytical solutions to those constraint differential equations derived, however, seems to be challenging.

  11. New approach for deriving operator identities by alternately using normally, antinormally, and Weyl ordered integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong-yi Fan; Hong-chun Yuan

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dirac's ket-bra formalism is the "language" of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. In Refs.(Fan et al, Ann. Phys. 321 (2006) 480; 323 (2008) 500) we have reviewed how to apply Newton-Leibniz integration rules to Dirac's ket-bra projectors. In this work by alternately using the technique of integration within normal, antinormal, and Weyl ordering of operators we not only derive some new operator ordering identities, but also deduce some useful integration formulas regarding to Laguerre and Hermite polynomials. This opens a new route of deriving mathematical integration formulas by virtue of the quantum mechanical operator ordering technique.

  12. Mixed normal-superconducting states in the presence of strong electric currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaniv Almog; Bernard Helffer; Xing-Bin Pan

    2015-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Ginzburg-Landau equations in the presence of large electric currents, that are smaller than the critical current where the normal state losses its stability. For steady-state solutions in the large $\\kappa$ limit, we prove that the superconductivity order parameter is exponentially small in a significant part of the domain, and small in the rest of it. Similar results are obtained for the time-dependent problem, in continuation of the paper by the two first authors [3]. We conclude by obtaining some weaker results, albeit similar, for steady-state solutions in the large domain limit.

  13. Exact Solutions of Regge-Wheeler Equation and Quasi-Normal Modes of Compact Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. P. Fiziev

    2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The well-known Regge-Wheeler equation describes the axial perturbations of Schwarzschild metric in the linear approximation. From a mathematical point of view it presents a particular case of the confluent Heun equation and can be solved exactly, due to recent mathematical developments. We present the basic properties of its general solution. A novel analytical approach and numerical techniques for study the boundary problems which correspond to quasi-normal modes of black holes and other simple models of compact objects are developed.

  14. Random Wave Functions with boundary and normalization constraints: Quantum statistical physics meets quantum chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Diego Urbina; Klaus Richter

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an improved version of Berry's ansatz able to incorporate exactly the existence of boundaries and the correct normalization of the eigenfunction into an ensemble of random waves. We then reformulate the Random Wave conjecture showing that in its new version it is a statement about the universal nature of eigenfunction fluctuations in systems with chaotic classical dynamics. The emergence of the universal results requires the use of both semiclassical methods and a new expansion for a very old problem in quantum statistical physics

  15. Order relations and prior distributions in the estimation of multivariate normal parameters with partial data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Nasir, Abdul Majid Hamza

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORDER RELATIONS AND PRIOR DISTRIBU 'IONS IN 1:-IE ESTXYJiTION OF MULTIVARIATE NOPSLAL PARAI'E&iTiS NI~N PARTIAL DATA A Thesis by ABDUL MAJID HA?ZA AL-NASZR Submitt d o the Grad. nate College oi' Texas UM Univ rsity in partial fu' fillment . f... as to style and content by: Chairman oi Committee Head oF Department ?'? Aug st 1968 ABS ~~CT Order Relations and Prior Distributions in the Bstimation of Multivariate Normal Parameters with Part'al Data. (August 1)68) Abdul Madrid Hamza Al-N!asir B...

  16. Cs2Te normal conducting photocathodes in the superconducting rf gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF gun) is one of the latest applications of superconducting rf technology in the accelerator field. Since superconducting photocathodes with high quantum efficiency are yet unavailable, normal conducting cathode material is the main choice for SRF photoinjectors. However, the compatibility between the photocathode and the cavity is one of the challenges for this concept. Recently, a SRF gun with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated in Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. In this paper, we will present the physical properties of Cs2Te photocathodes in the SC cavity, such as the quantum efficiency, the lifetime, the rejuvenation, the charge saturation, and the dark current.

  17. Vibrational excitation induced by electron beam and cosmic rays in normal and superconductive aluminum bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bassan; B. Buonomo; G. Cavallari; E. Coccia; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; L. G. Foggetta; C. Ligi; A. Marini; G. Mazzitelli; G. Modestino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; F. Ronga; P. Valente; S. M. Vinko

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new measurements of the acoustic excitation of an Al5056 superconductive bar when hit by an electron beam, in a previously unexplored temperature range, down to 0.35 K. These data, analyzed together with previous results of the RAP experiment obtained for T > 0.54 K, show a vibrational response enhanced by a factor 4.9 with respect to that measured in the normal state. This enhancement explains the anomalous large signals due to cosmic rays previously detected in the NAUTILUS gravitational wave detector.

  18. Atmospheric dispersion and the radiological consequences of normal airborne effluents from a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, D.; Yang, L. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Sun, C.Z. [Suhou Nuclear Research Inst., Suzhou (China)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the consequences of the normal exhaust of radioactive materials in air from nuclear power plants and atmospheric dispersion is studied. Because the source terms of the exhaust from a nuclear power plant are relatively low and their radiological consequences are far less than the corresponding authoritative limits, the atmospheric dispersion models, their various modifications, and selections of relevant parameters have few effects on those consequences. In the environmental assessment and siting, the emphasis should not be placed on the consequence evaluation of routine exhaust of nuclear power plants, and the calculation of consequences of the exhaust and atmospheric field measurements should be appropriately, simplified. 12 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEnginesVacantmagneticDepartment of Energy Normal

  20. UBC Student & Visitor Incident/Accident Report This report is to be completed by, or on behalf of, Visitors to UBC Campus and UBC Students who have been injured on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karczmarek, Joanna

    UBC Student & Visitor Incident/Accident Report This report is to be completed by, or on behalf of of Transportation to Medical Facility: Department Visited Date and Time of Incident/Accident (m/d/y) ____/____/____ ____:____ am / pm Describe the exact location of accident. (Include building name and room number

  1. Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the military’s nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  3. Stress-dependent normal mode frequencies from the effective mass of granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanqing Hu; David L. Johnson; John J. Valenza; Francisco Santibanez; Hernán A. Makse

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A zero-temperature critical point has been invoked to control the anomalous behavior of granular matter as it approaches jamming or mechanical arrest. Criticality manifests itself in an anomalous spectrum of low-frequency normal modes and scaling behavior near the jamming transition. The critical point may explain the peculiar mechanical properties of dissimilar systems such as glasses and granular materials. Here, we study the critical scenario via an experimental measurement of the normal modes frequencies of granular matter under stress from a pole decomposition analysis of the effective mass. We extract a complex-valued characteristic frequency which displays scaling $|\\omega^*(\\sigma)|\\sim\\sigma^{\\Omega'}$ with vanishing stress $\\sigma$ for a variety of granular systems. The critical exponent is smaller than that predicted by mean-field theory opening new challenges to explain the exponent for frictional and dissipative granular matter. Our results shed light on the anomalous behavior of stress-dependent acoustics and attenuation in granular materials near the jamming transition.

  4. Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

  5. EA-1123: Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium to the United Kingdom; thus,...

  6. Cell-surface glycoproteins of human sarcomas: differential expression in normal and malignant tissues and cultured cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rettig, W.F.; Garin-Chesa, P.; Beresford, H.R.; Oettgen, H.F.; Melamed, M.R.; Old, L.J.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human cells are characterized by specific changes in surface antigen phenotype. In the present study, the authors have defined six cell-surface antigens of human sarcomas and normal mesenchymal cells, by using mixed hemadsorption assays and immunochemical methods for the analysis of cultured cells and immunohistochemical staining for the analysis of normal tissues and > 200 tumor specimens. Differential patterns of F19, F24, G171, G253, S5, and Thy-1 antigen expression were found to characterize (i) subsets of cultured sarcoma cell lines, (ii) cultured fibroblasts derived from various organs, (iii) normal resting and activated mesenchymal tissues, and (iv) sarcoma and nonmesenchymal tumor tissues. These results provide a basic surface antigenic map for cultured mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal tissues and permit the classification of human sarcomas according to their antigenic phenotypes.

  7. Uptake of radiolabeled ions in normal and ischemia-damaged brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dienel, G.A.; Pulsinelli, W.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regional concentrations of nine radiochemicals were measured in rat brain after induction of cerebral ischemia to identify tracers concentrated by brain undergoing selective neuronal necrosis. Transient (30 minute) forebrain ischemia was produced in the rat; 24 hours after cerebral recirculation the radiochemicals were injected intravenously and allowed to circulate for 5 hours. The brain concentrations of the radiochemicals in dissected regions were determined by scintillation counting. Forebrain ischemia of this nature will produce extensive injury to striatal neurons but will spare the great majority of neocortical neurons at 24 hours. The regional concentrations of these radiochemicals varied considerably in both control and ischemic animals. In postischemic animals, 4 radionuclides (/sup 63/Ni, /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, /sup 22/Na, and (/sup 3/H)tetracycline) were concentrated in the irreversibly damaged striatum in amounts ranging from 1.4 to 2.4 times greater than in normal tissue. The concentrations of /sup 65/Zn, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, and /sup 147/Pm in postischemic brain were similar to or less than those in normal brain. The concentration of (14C)EDTA was increased in injured and uninjured brain of postischemic rats. Autoradiographic analysis of the distribution patterns of some of these ions in normal animals showed that /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, /sup 22/Na, /sup 65/Zn, and /sup 59/Fe were distributed more uniformly throughout the brain than were /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, /sup 63/Ni, and /sup 147/Pm. At 24 or 48 hours after ischemia, /sup 63/Ni, /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, and /sup 22/Na were preferentially concentrated in the damaged striatum and hippocampus, whereas /sup 65/Zn, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, and /sup 147/Pm did not accumulate in irreversibly injured tissue. Of the radiochemicals tested to date, Ni, TcO/sub 4/, and tetracycline may be useful for diagnosing ischemic brain injury in humans, using positron emission tomography.

  8. Neuronal glycosylation differentials in normal, injured and chondroitinase-treated environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilcoyne, Michelle; Sharma, Shashank [Glycoscience Group, National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)] [Glycoscience Group, National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); McDevitt, Niamh; O'Leary, Claire [Anatomy, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)] [Anatomy, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Joshi, Lokesh [Glycoscience Group, National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)] [Glycoscience Group, National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); McMahon, Siobhan S., E-mail: siobhan.mcmahon@nuigalway.ie [Anatomy, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbohydrates are important in the CNS and ChABC has been used for spinal cord injury (SCI) treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuronal glycosylation in injury and after ChABC treatment is unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In silico mining verified that glyco-related genes were differentially regulated after SCI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro model system revealed abnormal sialylation in an injured environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model indicated a return to normal neuronal glycosylation after ChABC treatment. -- Abstract: Glycosylation is found ubiquitously throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are a group of molecules heavily substituted with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and are found in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell surfaces. Upon CNS injury, a glial scar is formed, which is inhibitory for axon regeneration. Several CSPGs are up-regulated within the glial scar, including NG2, and these CSPGs are key inhibitory molecules of axonal regeneration. Treatment with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) can neutralise the inhibitory nature of NG2. A gene expression dataset was mined in silico to verify differentially regulated glycosylation-related genes in neurons after spinal cord injury and identify potential targets for further investigation. To establish the glycosylation differential of neurons that grow in a healthy, inhibitory and ChABC-treated environment, we established an indirect co-culture system where PC12 neurons were grown with primary astrocytes, Neu7 astrocytes (which overexpress NG2) and Neu7 astrocytes treated with ChABC. After 1, 4 and 8 days culture, lectin cytochemistry of the neurons was performed using five fluorescently-labelled lectins (ECA MAA, PNA, SNA-I and WFA). Usually {alpha}-(2,6)-linked sialylation scarcely occurs in the CNS but this motif was observed on the neurons in the injured environment only at day 8. Treatment with ChABC was successful in returning neuronal glycosylation to normal conditions at all timepoints for MAA, PNA and SNA-I staining, and by day 8 in the case of WFA. This study demonstrated neuronal cell surface glycosylation changes in an inhibitory environment and indicated a return to normal glycosylation after treatment with ChABC, which may be promising for identifying potential therapies for neuronal regeneration strategies.

  9. Measurement of normal thrust and evaluation of upper-convected Maxwell models for molten plastics in large amplitude oscillatory shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jason Glen

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Relaxation Spectrum Re- ported by Khan and Larson (1987) . IV. 5 Normal Thrust Measurements IV. 6 Mewts-Denn Model Compared With Normal Thrust Measure- ments 37 42 44 46 49 V CONCLUSION REFERENCES APPENDIX FIGURES . . APPENDIX Pa, ge B FIRST... tensor, this is also referred to as the Maxwell model. I. 5 1 Maxwell Model Dealy and Wissbrun (1990) give the Boltzmann superposition principle in the material objective (ie. frame indifferent) integral form in terms of a memory function...

  10. Testing the normality of the gravitational wave data with a low cost recursive estimate of the kurtosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Chassande-Mottin

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a monitoring indicator of the normality of the output of a gravitational wave detector. This indicator is based on the estimation of the kurtosis (i.e., the 4th order statistical moment normalized by the variance squared) of the data selected in a time sliding window. We show how a low cost (because recursive) implementation of such estimation is possible and we illustrate the validity of the presented approach with a few examples using simulated random noises.

  11. Strong Evidence of Normal Heat Conduction in a one-Dimensional Quantum System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiji Saito

    2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate how the normal energy transport is realized in one-dimensional quantum systems using a quantum spin system. The direct investigation of local energy distribution under thermal gradient is made using the quantum master equation, and the mixing properties and the convergence of the Green-Kubo formula are investigated when the number of spin increases. We find that the autocorrelation function in the Green-Kubo formula decays as $\\sim t^{-1.5}$ to a finite value which vanishes rapidly with the increase of the system size. As a result, the Green-Kubo formula converges to a finite value in the thermodynamic limit. These facts strongly support the realization of Fourier heat law in a quantum system.

  12. The Abundance of Fluorine in Normal G and K Stars of the Galactic Thin Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilachowski, Catherine A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The abundance of fluorine is determined from the (2-0) R9 2.3358 micron feature of the molecule HF for several dozen normal G and K stars in the Galactic thin disk from spectra obtained with the Phoenix IR spectrometer on the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak. The abundances are analyzed in the context of Galactic chemical evolution to explore the contributions of supernovae and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to the abundance of fluorine in the thin disk. The average abundance of fluorine in the thin disk is found to be [F/Fe] = +0.23 +/- 0.03, and the [F/Fe] ratio is flat or declines slowly with metallicity in the range from -0.6 supernovae contributes significantly to the Galactic fluorine abundance, although contributions from AGB stars may also be important.

  13. Comparison of Direct Normal Irradiance Derived from Silicon and Thermopile Global Hemispherical Radiation Detectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar applications utilize direct normal irradiance (DNI) radiation, a measurement rarely available. The solar concentrator industry has begun to deploy numerous measurement stations to prospect for suitable system deployment sites. Rotating shadowband radiometers (RSR) using silicon photodiodes as detectors are typically deployed. This paper compares direct beam estimates from RSR to a total hemispherical measuring radiometer (SPN1) multiple fast thermopiles. These detectors simultaneously measure total and diffuse radiation from which DNI can be computed. Both the SPN1 and RSR-derived DNI are compared to DNI measured with thermopile pyrheliometers. Our comparison shows that the SPN1 radiometer DNI estimated uncertainty is somewhat greater than, and on the same order as, the RSR DNI estimates for DNI magnitudes useful to concentrator technologies.

  14. Learning about probabilistic inference and forecasting by playing with multivariate normal distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Agostini, Giulio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of the normal distribution under linear transformation, as well the easy way to compute the covariance matrix of marginals and conditionals, offer a unique opportunity to get an insight about several aspects of uncertainties in measurements. The way to build the overall covariance matrix in a few, but conceptually relevant cases is illustrated: several observations made with (possibly) different instruments measuring the same quantity; effect of systematics (although limited to offset, in order to stick to linear models) on the determination of the 'true value', as well in the prediction of future observations; correlations which arise when different quantities are measured with the same instrument affected by an offset uncertainty; inferences and predictions based on averages; inference about constrained values; fits under some assumptions (linear models with known standard deviations). Many numerical examples are provided, exploiting the ability of the R language to handle large matrices and ...

  15. OY Car During Normal Outburst: Balmer Emission From The Red Star And The Gas Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. T. Harlaftis; T. R. Marsh

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of OY Car, obtained with the Anglo-Australian Telescope, during a normal outburst in August 1991. Two sinusoidal components are resolved in the H$\\beta$ trailed spectra and we determine the location of the narrow component to be on the secondary star with a maximum contributed flux of ~2.5 per cent to the total flux. Imaging of the line distribution reveals that the other emission component is associated with the gas stream. This follows a velocity close to the ballistic one from the red star to a distance of ~0.5 R$_{L_{1}}$ from the white dwarf. This emission penetrates the accretion disc (from 0.5--0.1 R$_{L_{1}}$), with a velocity now closer (but lower) to the keplerian velocities along the path of the gas stream. We finally discuss the implications of having observed simultaneously line emission from the gas stream and the red star during outburst.

  16. Automatic coke oven heating control system at Burns Harbor for normal and repair operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, E.T.; Chen, K.L. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., Burns Harbor, IN (United States); [Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic heating control system for coke oven batteries was developed in 1985 for the Burns Harbor No. 1 battery and reported in the 1989 Ironmaking Conference Proceedings. The original system was designed to maintain a target coke temperature at a given production level under normal operating conditions. Since 1989, enhancements have been made to this control system so that it can also control the battery heating when the battery is under repair. The new control system has improved heating control capability because it adjusts the heat input to the battery in response to anticipated changes in the production schedule. During a recent repair of this 82 oven battery, the pushing schedule changed from 102 ovens/day to 88 ovens/day, then back to 102 ovens/day, then to 107 ovens/day. During this repair, the control system was able to maintain the coke temperature average standard deviation at 44 F, with a maximum 75 F.

  17. Autonomous monitoring of control hardware to predict off-normal conditions using NIF automatic Alignment Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awwal, A; Wilhelmsen, K; Leach, R; Kamm, V M; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Cohen, S

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high power laser system capable of supporting high-energy-density experimentation as a user facility for the next 30 years. In order to maximize the facility availability, preventive maintenance enhancements are being introduced into the system. An example of such an enhancement is a camera-based health monitoring system, integrated into the automated alignment system, which provides an opportunity to monitor trends in measurements such as average beam intensity, size of the beam, and pixel saturation. The monitoring system will generate alerts based on observed trends in measurements to allow scheduled pro-active maintenance before routine off-normal detection stops system operations requiring unscheduled intervention.

  18. Thermal rectification of electrons in hybrid normal metal-superconductor nanojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giazotto, F., E-mail: giazotto@sns.it [NEST, Instituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bergeret, F. S., E-mail: sebastian-bergeret@ehu.es [Centro de Física de Materiales (CFM-MPC), Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Manuel de Lardizabal 4, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Manuel de Lardizabal 5, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate heat transport in hybrid normal metal-superconductor (NS) nanojunctions focusing on the effect of thermal rectification. We show that the heat diode effect in the junction strongly depends on the transmissivity and the nature of the NS contact. Thermal rectification efficiency can reach up to ?123% for a fully transmissive ballistic junction and up to 84% in diffusive NS contacts. Both values exceed the rectification efficiency of a NIS tunnel junction (I stands for an insulator) by a factor close to ?5 and ?3, respectively. Furthermore, we show that for NS point-contacts with low transmissivity, inversion of the heat diode effect can take place. Our results could prove useful for tailoring heat management at the nanoscale, and for mastering thermal flux propagation in low-temperature caloritronic nanocircuitry.

  19. Normal Ordering for Deformed Boson Operators and Operator-valued Deformed Stirling Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob Katriel; Maurice Kibler

    2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The normal ordering formulae for powers of the boson number operator $\\hat{n}$ are extended to deformed bosons. It is found that for the `M-type' deformed bosons, which satisfy $a a^{\\dagger} - q a^{\\dagger} a = 1$, the extension involves a set of deformed Stirling numbers which replace the Stirling numbers occurring in the conventional case. On the other hand, the deformed Stirling numbers which have to be introduced in the case of the `P-type' deformed bosons, which satisfy $a a^{\\dagger} - q a^{\\dagger} a = q^{-\\hat{n}}$, are found to depend on the operator $\\hat{n}$. This distinction between the two types of deformed bosons is in harmony with earlier observations made in the context of a study of the extended Campbell-Baker-Hausdorff formula.

  20. Short- and Mid-term Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on Normal Renal Tissue: An Animal Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendler, J. J., E-mail: johann.wendler@med.ovgu.de; Porsch, M.; Huehne, S.; Baumunk, D. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany)] [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany); Buhtz, P. [Institute of Pathology, University of Magdeburg (Germany)] [Institute of Pathology, University of Magdeburg (Germany); Fischbach, F.; Pech, M. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany)] [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Mahnkopf, D. [Institute of Medical Technology and Research (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Technology and Research (Germany); Kropf, S. [Institute of Biometry, University of Magdeburg (Germany)] [Institute of Biometry, University of Magdeburg (Germany); Roessner, A. [Institute of Pathology, University of Magdeburg (Germany)] [Institute of Pathology, University of Magdeburg (Germany); Ricke, J. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany)] [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Schostak, M.; Liehr, U.-B. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany)] [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel nonthermal tissue ablation technique by high current application leading to apoptosis without affecting extracellular matrix. Previous results of renal IRE shall be supplemented by functional MRI and differentiated histological analysis of renal parenchyma in a chronic treatment setting. Three swine were treated with two to three multifocal percutaneous IRE of the right kidney. MRI was performed before, 30 min (immediate-term), 7 days (short-term), and 28 days (mid-term) after IRE. A statistical analysis of the lesion surrounded renal parenchyma intensities was made to analyze functional differences depending on renal part, side and posttreatment time. Histological follow-up of cortex and medulla was performed after 28 days. A total of eight ablations were created. MRI showed no collateral damage of surrounded tissue. The highest visual contrast between lesions and normal parenchyma was obtained by T2-HR-SPIR-TSE-w sequence of DCE-MRI. Ablation zones showed inhomogeneous necroses with small perifocal edema in the short-term and sharp delimitable scars in the mid-term. MRI showed no significant differences between adjoined renal parenchyma around ablations and parenchyma of untreated kidney. Histological analysis demonstrated complete destruction of cortical glomeruli and tubules, while collecting ducts, renal calyxes, and pelvis of medulla were preserved. Adjoined kidney parenchyma around IRE lesions showed no qualitative differences to normal parenchyma of untreated kidney. This porcine IRE study reveals a multifocal renal ablation, while protecting surrounded renal parenchyma and collecting system over a mid-term period. That offers prevention of renal function ablating centrally located or multifocal renal masses.

  1. NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY OF A NORMAL SPIRAL GALAXY VIEWED THROUGH THE TAURUS MOLECULAR CLOUD COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemens, Dan P.; Cashman, L. R.; Pavel, M. D., E-mail: clemens@bu.edu, E-mail: pavelmi@utexas.edu, E-mail: lcashman@bu.edu [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Few normal galaxies have been probed using near-infrared polarimetry, even though it reveals magnetic fields in the cool interstellar medium better than either optical or radio polarimetry. Deep H-band (1.6 {mu}m) linear imaging polarimetry toward Taurus serendipitously included the galaxy 2MASX J04412715+2433110 with adequate sensitivity and resolution to map polarization across nearly its full extent. The observations revealed the galaxy to be a steeply inclined ({approx}75 Degree-Sign ) disk type with a diameter, encompassing 90% of the Petrosian flux, of 4.2 kpc at a distance of 53 Mpc. Because the sight line passes through the Taurus Molecular Cloud complex, the foreground polarization needed to be measured and removed. The foreground extinction A{sub V} of 2.00 {+-} 0.10 mag and reddening E(H - K) of 0.125 {+-} 0.009 mag were also assessed and removed, based on analysis of Two Micron All Sky Survey, UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, Spitzer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry using the Near-Infrared Color Excess, NICE-Revisited, and Rayleigh-Jeans Color Excess methods. Corrected for the polarized foreground, the galaxy polarization values range from 0% to 3%. The polarizations are dominated by a disk-parallel magnetic field geometry, especially to the northeast, while either a vertical field or single scattering of bulge light produces disk-normal polarizations to the southwest. The multi-kiloparsec coherence of the magnetic field revealed by the infrared polarimetry is in close agreement with short-wavelength radio synchrotron observations of edge-on galaxies, indicating that both cool and warm interstellar media of disk galaxies may be threaded by common magnetic fields.

  2. MODELING THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE NORMAL GALAXY X-RAY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tremmel, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, U.W., Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, U.W., Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Fragos, T.; Zezas, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P. [The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Belczynski, K. [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland)] [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland); Kalogera, V.; Farr, W. M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Exploration in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)] [Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Exploration in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Basu-Zych, A. R.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A., E-mail: mjt29@astro.washington.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission from X-ray binaries (XRBs) is a major component of the total X-ray luminosity of normal galaxies, so X-ray studies of high-redshift galaxies allow us to probe the formation and evolution of XRBs on very long timescales ({approx}10 Gyr). In this paper, we present results from large-scale population synthesis models of binary populations in galaxies from z = 0 to {approx}20. We use as input into our modeling the Millennium II Cosmological Simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history (SFH) and metallicity evolution of each galaxy. We run a grid of 192 models, varying all the parameters known from previous studies to affect the evolution of XRBs. We use our models and observationally derived prescriptions for hot gas emission to create theoretical galaxy X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for several redshift bins. Models with low common envelope efficiencies, a 50% twins mass ratio distribution, a steeper initial mass function exponent, and high stellar wind mass-loss rates best match observational results from Tzanavaris and Georgantopoulos, though they significantly underproduce bright early-type and very bright (L{sub x} > 10{sup 41}) late-type galaxies. These discrepancies are likely caused by uncertainties in hot gas emission and SFHs, active galactic nucleus contamination, and a lack of dynamically formed low-mass XRBs. In our highest likelihood models, we find that hot gas emission dominates the emission for most bright galaxies. We also find that the evolution of the normal galaxy X-ray luminosity density out to z = 4 is driven largely by XRBs in galaxies with X-ray luminosities between 10{sup 40} and 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}.

  3. STELLAR ORBITAL STUDIES IN NORMAL SPIRAL GALAXIES. I. RESTRICTIONS TO THE PITCH ANGLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Villegas, A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E., E-mail: barbara@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We built a family of non-axisymmetric potential models for normal non-barred or weakly barred spiral galaxies as defined in the simplest classification of galaxies: the Hubble sequence. For this purpose, a three-dimensional self-gravitating model for the spiral arm PERLAS is superimposed on the galactic axisymmetric potentials. We analyze the stellar dynamics varying only the pitch angle of the spiral arms, from 4 Degree-Sign to 40 Degree-Sign for an Sa galaxy, from 8 Degree-Sign to 45 Degree-Sign for an Sb galaxy, and from 10 Degree-Sign to 60 Degree-Sign for an Sc galaxy. Self-consistency is indirectly tested through periodic orbital analysis and through density response studies for each morphological type. Based on ordered behavior, periodic orbit studies show that, for pitch angles up to approximately 15 Degree-Sign , 18 Degree-Sign , and 20 Degree-Sign for Sa, Sb, and Sc galaxies, respectively, the density response supports the spiral arms' potential, a requisite for the existence of a long-lasting large-scale spiral structure. Beyond those limits, the density response tends to ''avoid'' the potential imposed by maintaining lower pitch angles in the density response; in that case, the spiral arms may be explained as transient features rather than long-lasting large-scale structures. In a second limit, from a phase-space orbital study based on chaotic behavior, we found that for pitch angles larger than {approx}30 Degree-Sign , {approx}40 Degree-Sign , and {approx}50 Degree-Sign for Sa, Sb, and Sc galaxies, respectively, chaotic orbits dominate the all phase-space prograde region that surrounds the periodic orbits sculpting the spiral arms and even destroying them. This result seems to be in good agreement with observations of pitch angles in typical isolated normal spiral galaxies.

  4. Integral radiation dose to normal structures with conformal external beam radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoyama, Hidefumi [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States) and Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)]. E-mail: hao@radi.med.hokudai.ac.jp; Westerly, David Clark [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Mackie, Thomas Rockwell [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Olivera, Gustavo H. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Patel, Rakesh R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Jaradat, Hazim [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ritter, Mark A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate the integral dose (ID) received by normal tissue from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five radiation treatment plans including IMRT using a conventional linac with both 6 MV (6MV-IMRT) and 20 MV (20MV-IMRT), as well as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) using 6 MV (6MV-3DCRT) and 20 MV (20MV-3DCRT) and IMRT using tomotherapy (6MV) (Tomo-IMRT), were created for 5 patients with localized prostate cancer. The ID (mean dose x tissue volume) received by normal tissue (NTID) was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Results: The 6MV-IMRT resulted in 5.0% lower NTID than 6MV-3DCRT; 20 MV beam plans resulted in 7.7%-11.2% lower NTID than 6MV-3DCRT. Tomo-IMRT NTID was comparable to 6MV-IMRT. Compared with 6MV-3DCRT, 6MV-IMRT reduced IDs to the rectal wall and penile bulb by 6.1% and 2.7%, respectively. Tomo-IMRT further reduced these IDs by 11.9% and 16.5%, respectively. The 20 MV did not reduce IDs to those structures. Conclusions: The difference in NTID between 3DCRT and IMRT is small. The 20 MV plans somewhat reduced NTID compared with 6 MV plans. The advantage of tomotherapy over conventional IMRT and 3DCRT for localized prostate cancer was demonstrated in regard to dose sparing of rectal wall and penile bulb while slightly decreasing NTID as compared with 6MV-3DCRT.

  5. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: Zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased, number of skin cancers in the EBRT patients compared with that of the general population.

  6. LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO-FIR CORRELATION IN NORMAL GALAXIES AT {approx}1 kpc SCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Aritra; Roy, Subhashis; Mitra, Dipanjan, E-mail: aritra@ncra.tifr.res.in, E-mail: roy@ncra.tifr.res.in, E-mail: dmitra@ncra.tifr.res.in [National Center for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind Road, Pune-411007 (India)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the radio-FIR correlation between the nonthermal (synchrotron) radio continuum emission at {lambda}90 cm (333 MHz) and the far-infrared emission due to cool ({approx}20 K) dust at {lambda}70 {mu}m in spatially resolved normal galaxies at scales of {approx}1 kpc. The slope of the radio-FIR correlation significantly differs between the arm and interarm regions. However, this change is not evident at a lower wavelength of {lambda}20 cm (1.4 GHz). We find the slope of the correlation in the arm to be 0.8 {+-} 0.12 and we use this to determine the coupling between equipartition magnetic field (B{sub eq}) and gas density ({rho}{sub gas}) as B{sub eq}{proportional_to}{rho}{sup 0.51{+-}0.12}{sub gas}. This is close to what is predicted by magnetohydrodynamic simulations of turbulent interstellar medium, provided the same region produces both the radio and far-infrared emission. We argue that at 1 kpc scales this condition is satisfied for radio emission at 1.4 GHz and may not be satisfied at 333 MHz. The change of slope observed in the interarm region could be caused by propagation of low energy ({approx}1.5 GeV) and long-lived ({approx}10{sup 8} yr) cosmic-ray electrons at 333 MHz.

  7. University Loaned Normal Uranium Slug Disposition Study: University survey responses. Predecisional draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, G.W. Jr.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 1950`s and 1960`s, the Atomic Energy Commission loaned rejected natural uranium slugs from the Savannah River Site to United States universities for use in subcritical assemblies. Currently, there are sixty-two universities holding 91,798 slugs, containing about 167 metric tons of natural uranium. It was originally planned that the universities would return the material to Fernald when they no longer required it. Fernald has not received slugs since it was shut down in 1988. The Department of Energy`s Office of Weapons and Materials Planning requested that the Planning Support Group develop information to assist them in facilitating the return of the unwanted slugs to one or more of their facilities and develop alternatives for the ultimate disposition of this material. This supplemental report to the University Loaned Normal Uranium Slug Disposition Study documents responses to and summarizes the results of a survey of fifty-eight universities. University contacts and survey responses covering loaned slug descriptions, historical information, radiological data, current status, and plans and schedules are documented.

  8. Modeling the effect of anisotropic pressure on tokamak plasmas normal modes and continuum using fluid approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Zhisong; Fitzgerald, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extending the ideal MHD stability code MISHKA, a new code, MISHKA-A, is developed to study the impact of pressure anisotropy on plasma stability. Based on full anisotropic equilibrium and geometry, the code can provide normal mode analysis with three fluid closure models: the single adiabatic model (SA), the double adiabatic model (CGL) and the incompressible model. A study on the plasma continuous spectrum shows that in low beta, large aspect ratio plasma, the main impact of anisotropy lies in the modification of the BAE gap and the sound frequency, if the q profile is conserved. The SA model preserves the BAE gap structure as ideal MHD, while in CGL the lowest frequency branch does not touch zero frequency at the resonant flux surface where $m+nq=0$, inducing a gap at very low frequency. Also, the BAE gap frequency with bi-Maxwellian distribution in both model becomes higher if $p_\\perp > p_\\parallel$ with a q profile dependency. As a benchmark of the code, we study the m/n=1/1 internal kink mode. Numerical...

  9. Casimir interaction between normal or superfluid grains in the Fermi sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Wirzba; Aurel Bulgac; Piotr Magierski

    2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a new force that acts on cavities (literally empty regions of space) when they are immersed in a background of non-interacting fermionic matter fields. The interaction follows from the obstructions to the (quantum mechanical) motions of the fermions caused by the presence of bubbles or other (heavy) particles in the Fermi sea, as, for example, nuclei in the neutron sea in the inner crust of a neutron star or superfluid grains in a normal Fermi liquid. The effect resembles the traditional Casimir interaction between metallic mirrors in the vacuum. However, the fluctuating electromagnetic fields are replaced by fermionic matter fields. We show that the fermionic Casimir problem for a system of spherical cavities can be solved exactly, since the calculation can be mapped onto a quantum mechanical billiard problem of a point-particle scattered off a finite number of non-overlapping spheres or disks. Finally we generalize the map method to other Casimir systems, especially to the case of a fluctuating scalar field between two spheres or a sphere and a plate under Dirichlet boundary conditions.

  10. SN 2013ab : A normal type IIP supernova in NGC 5669

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal; Pumo, Maria Letizia; Zampieri, Luca; Sand, David; Kumar, Brijesh; Pastorello, Andrea; Sutaria, Firoza; Maccarone, Thomas J; Kumar, Brajesh; Graham, M L; Howell, D Andy; Ochner, Paolo; Chandola, H C; Pandey, Shashi B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present densely-sampled ultraviolet/optical photometric and low-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of the type IIP supernova 2013ab in the nearby ($\\sim$24 Mpc) galaxy NGC 5669, from 2 to 190d after explosion. Continuous photometric observations, with the cadence of typically a day to one week, were acquired with the 1-2m class telescopes in the LCOGT network, ARIES telescopes in India and various other telescopes around the globe. The light curve and spectra suggest that the SN is a normal type IIP event with a plateau duration of $ \\sim80 $ days with mid plateau absolute visual magnitude of -16.7, although with a steeper decline during the plateau (0.92 mag 100 d$ ^{-1} $ in $ V $ band) relative to other archetypal SNe of similar brightness. The velocity profile of SN 2013ab shows striking resemblance with those of SNe 1999em and 2012aw. Following the Rabinak & Waxman (2011) prescription, the initial temperature evolution of the SN emission allows us to estimate the progenitor radius to be...

  11. Rapid and transient stimulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by melatonin in normal and tumor leukocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radogna, Flavia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Paternoster, Laura [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Istitututo di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Urbino Carlo Bo (Italy); De Nicola, Milena; Cerella, Claudia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ammendola, Sergio [Ambiotec (Italy); Bedini, Annalida; Tarzia, Giorgio [Istituto di Chimica Farmaceutica, Universita di Urbino Carlo Bo (Italy); Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ghibelli, Lina [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: ghibelli@uniroma2.it

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Melatonin is a modified tryptophan with potent biological activity, exerted by stimulation of specific plasma membrane (MT1/MT2) receptors, by lower affinity intracellular enzymatic targets (quinone reductase, calmodulin), or through its strong anti-oxidant ability. Scattered studies also report a perplexing pro-oxidant activity, showing that melatonin is able to stimulate production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that on U937 human monocytes melatonin promotes intracellular ROS in a fast (< 1 min) and transient (up to 5-6 h) way. Melatonin equally elicits its pro-radical effect on a set of normal or tumor leukocytes; intriguingly, ROS production does not lead to oxidative stress, as shown by absence of protein carbonylation, maintenance of free thiols, preservation of viability and regular proliferation rate. ROS production is independent from MT1/MT2 receptor interaction, since a) requires micromolar (as opposed to nanomolar) doses of melatonin; b) is not contrasted by the specific MT1/MT2 antagonist luzindole; c) is not mimicked by a set of MT1/MT2 high affinity melatonin analogues. Instead, chlorpromazine, the calmodulin inhibitor shown to prevent melatonin-calmodulin interaction, also prevents melatonin pro-radical effect, suggesting that the low affinity binding to calmodulin (in the micromolar range) may promote ROS production.

  12. Neutronics and Fuel Performance Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Fuel under Normal Operation Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Wu; Piyush Sabharwall; Jason Hales

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the analysis of neutronics and fuel performance analysis for enhanced accident tolerance fuel, with Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent and INL’s fuel performance code BISON, respectively. The purpose is to evaluate two of the most promising candidate materials, FeCrAl and Silicon Carbide (SiC), as the fuel cladding under normal operating conditions. Substantial neutron penalty is identified when FeCrAl is used as monolithic cladding for current oxide fuel. From the reactor physics standpoint, application of the FeCrAl alloy as coating layer on surface of zircaloy cladding is possible without increasing fuel enrichment. Meanwhile, SiC brings extra reactivity and the neutron penalty is of no concern. Application of either FeCrAl or SiC could be favorable from the fuel performance standpoint. Detailed comparison between monolithic cladding and hybrid cladding (cladding + coating) is discussed. Hybrid cladding is more practical based on the economics evaluation during the transition from current UO2/zircaloy to Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) system. However, a few issues remain to be resolved, such as the creep behavior of FeCrAl, coating spallation, inter diffusion with zirconium, etc. For SiC, its high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, low thermal neutron absorption cross section, irradiation stability (minimal swelling) make it an excellent candidate materials for future nuclear fuel/cladding system.

  13. Fuzzy Approach to Critical Bus Ranking under Normal and Line Outage Contingencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shankar, Shobha

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of critical or weak buses for a given operating condition is an important task in the load dispatch centre. It has become more vital in view of the threat of voltage instability leading to voltage collapse. This paper presents a fuzzy approach for ranking critical buses in a power system under normal and network contingencies based on Line Flow index and voltage profiles at load buses. The Line Flow index determines the maximum load that is possible to be connected to a bus in order to maintain stability before the system reaches its bifurcation point. Line Flow index (LF index) along with voltage profiles at the load buses are represented in Fuzzy Set notation. Further they are evaluated using fuzzy rules to compute Criticality Index. Based on this index, critical buses are ranked. The bus with highest rank is the weakest bus as it can withstand a small amount of load before causing voltage collapse. The proposed method is tested on Five Bus Test System.

  14. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ten-Ming, E-mail: tmw@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  15. Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

  16. eFRMAC Overview: Data Management and Enabling Technologies for Characterization of a Radiological Release A Case Study: The Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J. [NNSA; Clark, Harvey W. [NSTec; Essex, James J. [NSTec; Wagner, Eric C. [NSTec

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eFRMAC enterprise is a suite of technologies and software developed by the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Emergency Response to coordinate the rapid data collection, management, and analysis required during a radiological emergency. This enables the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center assets to evaluate a radiological or nuclear incident efficiently to facilitate protective actions to protect public health and the environment. This document identifies and describes eFRMAC methods including (1) data acquisition, (2) data management, (3) data analysis, (4) product creation, (5) quality control, and (6) dissemination.

  17. Effect of normal stress during hydration and shear on the shear strength of GCL/textured geomembrane interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewitt, R.D.; Soydemir, C. [Haley and Aldrich, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Stulgis, R.P. [Haley and Aldrich, Inc., Manchester, NH (United States); Coombs, M.T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory testing program was performed to evaluate the interface shear strength of a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL)/textured geomembrane interface utilizing two pre-shear inundation methods designed to simulate field conditions. Two commercially-available products were tested, a needlepunched and a stitch-bonded GCL. Oedometer swell tests provided swell data for the two products which were used to design the interface shear testing program. Interface shear tests were performed for (1) GCL samples inundated under a low normal stress for a short time and sheared under a higher normal stress, and (2) GCL samples inundated for a longer period under the design normal stress. The results for the two different GCL materials and the two preshear inundation conditions are compared.

  18. SU-E-J-178: A Normalization Method Can Remove Discrepancy in Ventilation Function Due to Different Breathing Patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, H; Yu, N; Stephans, K; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a normalization method to remove discrepancy in ventilation function due to different breathing patterns. Methods: Twenty five early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients were included in this study. For each patient, a ten phase 4D-CT and the voluntarily maximum inhale and exhale CTs were acquired clinically and retrospectively used for this study. For each patient, two ventilation maps were calculated from voxel-to-voxel CT density variations from two phases of the quiet breathing and two phases of the extreme breathing. For the quiet breathing, 0% (inhale) and 50% (exhale) phases from 4D-CT were used. An in-house tool was developed to calculate and display the ventilation maps. To enable normalization, the whole lung of each patient was evenly divided into three parts in the longitude direction at a coronal image with a maximum lung cross section. The ratio of cumulated ventilation from the top one-third region to the middle one-third region of the lung was calculated for each breathing pattern. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated on the ratios of the two breathing patterns for the group. Results: For each patient, the ventilation map from the quiet breathing was different from that of the extreme breathing. When the cumulative ventilation was normalized to the middle one-third of the lung region for each patient, the normalized ventilation functions from the two breathing patterns were consistent. For this group of patients, the correlation coefficient of the normalized ventilations for the two breathing patterns was 0.76 (p < 0.01), indicating a strong correlation in the ventilation function measured from the two breathing patterns. Conclusion: For each patient, the ventilation map is dependent of the breathing pattern. Using a regional normalization method, the discrepancy in ventilation function induced by the different breathing patterns thus different tidal volumes can be removed.

  19. Effect of bird density and dietary protein levels on the performance of midget and normal commercial inbred cross layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez Delfino, Andres

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Midgets 2 were fed two levels of prot'ein, 17 and. 16%. For nor- mal-sized birds a 16. 1% protein was used. . Body weights ranged from 1057 to 1125 gms. for midgets and from 1595 to 1601 gms. for normal-sized birds. The midgets weighed approximately... were statistically significant and reflected the smaller maintenance requirements of midget birds. Normal-sized birds produced significantly more eggs (69, 'o) than midgets (5P/o). Midgets housed. two per cage had the highest hen-day egg production...

  20. Evolution of globular cluster systems in elliptical galaxies. I. Log-normal initial mass function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Vesperini

    2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of globular cluster systems (GCS) in elliptical galaxies and explore the dependence of their main properties on the mass and the size of the host galaxy.The dependence of the evolution of the GCS mass function (GCMF), of the fraction of surviving clusters and of the ratio of the final to initial mass in clusters on the structure of the host galaxy as well as their variation with the galactocentric distance inside individual host galaxies has been thoroughly investigated.After a survey over a large number of different host galaxies we have restricted our attention to a sample of galaxies with effective masses and radii equal to those observed for dwarf,normal and giant ellipticals. We show that, in spite of large differences in the fraction of surviving clusters, the final mean masses of the GCMF in massive galaxies are very similar to each other with a small galaxy-to-galaxy dispersion;low-mass compact galaxies tend to have smaller values of the final mean mass and a larger galaxy-to-galaxy dispersion. These findings are in agreement with those of recent observational analyses. The fraction of surviving clusters increases with the mass of the host galaxy. We show that a small difference between the initial and the final mean mass and dispersion of the GCMF and the lack of a significant radial dependence of the mean mass inside individual galaxies do not necessarily imply that evolutionary processes have been unimportant in the evolution of the initial population of clusters. For giant galaxies most disruption occurs within the effective radius while for low-mass galaxies a significant disruption of clusters takes place also at larger galactocentric distances. The dependence of the results obtained on the initial mean mass of the GCMF is investigated. (abridged)

  1. Grouping normal type Ia supernovae by UV to optical color differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milne, Peter A. [University of Arizona, Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Brown, Peter J. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Roming, Peter W. A. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Corporation, P.O. Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 (United States); Bufano, Filomena [Universidad Andres Bello, Departmento de Cincias Fisicas, Avda. Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Gehrels, Neil, E-mail: pbrown@physics.tamu.edu [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Codes 660.1 and 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of many Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) for multiple epochs per object with the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope instrument have revealed that there exists order to the differences in the UV-optical colors of optically normal supernovae (SNe). We examine UV-optical color curves for 23 SNe Ia, dividing the SNe into four groups, and find that roughly one-third of 'NUV-blue' SNe Ia have bluer UV-optical colors than the larger 'NUV-red' group. Two minor groups are recognized, 'MUV-blue' and 'irregular' SNe Ia. While we conclude that the latter group is a subset of the NUV-red group, containing the SNe with the broadest optical peaks, we conclude that the 'MUV-blue' group is a distinct group. Separating into the groups and accounting for the time evolution of the UV-optical colors lowers the scatter in two NUV-optical colors (e.g., u – v and uvw1 – v) to the level of the scatter in b – v. This finding is promising for extending the cosmological utilization of SNe Ia into the NUV. We generate spectrophotometry of 33 SNe Ia and determine the correct grouping for each. We argue that there is a fundamental spectral difference in the 2900-3500 Å wavelength range, a region suggested to be dominated by absorption from iron-peak elements. The NUV-blue SNe Ia feature less absorption than the NUV-red SNe Ia. We show that all NUV-blue SNe Ia in this sample also show evidence of unburned carbon in optical spectra, whereas only one NUV-red SN Ia features that absorption line. Every NUV-blue event also exhibits a low gradient of the Si II ?6355 absorption feature. Many NUV-red events also exhibit a low gradient, perhaps suggestive that NUV-blue events are a subset of the larger low-velocity gradient group.

  2. The Hot Interstellar Medium in Normal Elliptical Galaxies III: The Thermal Structure of the Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven Diehl; Thomas S. Statler

    2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third paper in a series analyzing X-ray emission from the hot interstellar medium in a sample of 54 normal elliptical galaxies observed by Chandra, focusing on 36 galaxies with sufficient signal to compute radial temperature profiles. We distinguish four qualitatively different types of profile: positive gradient (outwardly rising), negative gradients (falling), quasi-isothermal (flat) and hybrid (falling at small radii, then rising). We measure the mean logarithmic temperature gradients in two radial regions: from 0--2 $J$-band effective radii $R_J$ (excluding the central point source), and from 2--$4R_J$. We find the outer gradient to be uncorrelated with intrinsic host galaxy properties, but strongly influenced by the environment: galaxies in low-density environments tend to show negative outer gradients, while those in high-density environments show positive outer gradients, suggesting influence of circumgalactic hot gas. The inner temperature gradient is unaffected by the environment but strongly correlated with intrinsic host galaxy characteristics: negative inner gradients are more common for smaller, optically faint, low radio-luminosity galaxies, whereas positive gradients are found in bright galaxies with stronger radio sources. There is no evidence for bimodality in the distribution of inner or outer gradients. We propose three scenarios to explain the inner temperature gradients: (1) Weak AGN heat the ISM locally, higher-luminosity AGN heat the system globally through jets inflating cavities at larger radii; (2) The onset of negative inner gradients indicates a declining importance of AGN heating relative to other sources, such as compressional heating or supernovae; (3) The variety of temperature profiles are snapshots of different stages of a time-dependent flow.

  3. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Miften, Moyed, E-mail: Moyed.Miften@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  4. Elastin-insufficient mice show normal cardiovascular remodeling in 2K1C hypertension despite higher baseline pressure and unique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Robert

    Elastin-insufficient mice show normal cardiovascular remodeling in 2K1C hypertension despite higher that would be expected in an animal demonstrat- ing hypertensive remodeling. To determine whether this is due-clip Goldblatt model of hypertension. Successfully clipped mice have a systolic pressure increase of at least 15

  5. Dissertation Embargo Policy Doctoral dissertations and abstracts are normally made publicly available upon degree conferral when they are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    6.13 Dissertation Embargo Policy Doctoral dissertations and abstracts are normally made publicly circumstances, a doctoral student may wish to postpone public release of the final dissertation of record is considering such a postponement, also called a dissertation embargo, should discuss this option with his

  6. ERK1-Deficient Mice Show Normal T Cell Effector Function and Are Highly Susceptible to Experimental Autoimmune

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ERK1-Deficient Mice Show Normal T Cell Effector Function and Are Highly Susceptible to Experimental cascades, including the ERK1/2 (p44/p42) pathway. It has been suggested that ERKs integrate TCR signal of ERKs for the effector functions of peripheral mature T cells and, specifically, for T cell

  7. 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Eleven keratoconic (KC) patients (13 eyes) and one normal eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Geunyoung

    (13 eyes) and one normal eye were recruited in this study. · Conventional scleral lenses were fitted to individual eyes and aberration measurements were performed on each eye with the scleral lens on using a Shack, Perry Rosenthal2 1Flaum Eye Institute, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY; 2Boston Foundation

  8. Normal muscle oxygen consumption and fatigability in sickle cell patients despite reduced microvascular oxygenation and hemorheological abnormalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sickle cell anemia (SS) patients. Results: Muscle microvascular oxygenation was reduced in SS patients;4 Introduction Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are characterized by anemia and altered blood rheology1 Normal muscle oxygen consumption and fatigability in sickle cell patients despite reduced

  9. Abstract. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Transformation of a normal cell to a malignant one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Transformation of a normal regulators of growth. Biomarkers associated with cancer were examined in human breast epithelial cells transformed by high-LET radiation in the presence of 17Ã?-estradiol. An established cancer model was used

  10. Asymptotic normalization coefficients for B-8 -> Be-7+p from a study of Li-8 -> Li-7+n 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trache, L.; Azhari, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Clark, HL; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Lui, YW; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Tang, X.; Timofeyuk, N.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for Li-8-->Li-7+n have been extracted from the neutron transfer reaction C-13(Li-7,Li-8)C-12 at 63 MeV. These are related to the ANCs in B-8-->Be-7 + p using charge symmetry. ...

  11. Normalized Lift: An Energy Interpretation of the Lift Coefficient Simplifies Comparisons of the Lifting Ability of Rotating and Flapping Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgers, Phillip; Alexander, David E.

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    coefficient of a fixed wing slightly differently, as the work exerted by the wing on the surrounding flow field (L/?·S), compared against the total kinetic energy required for generating said lift, ½v2. This reinterpreted coefficient, the normalized lift...

  12. Digital transcriptome profiling of normal and glioblastoma-derived neural stem cells identifies genes associated with patient survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engström, Pär G; Tommei, Diva; Stricker, Stefan H; Ender, Christine; Pollard, Steven M; Bertone, Paul

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    of cell lines, we assayed 82 core differentially expressed genes in 16 GNS cell lines (derived from independent patient tumors) and six normal NS cell lines by qRT-PCR using custom-designed TaqMan microfluidic arrays. The 82 vali- dation targets...

  13. Computation of Normal Shocks Running into a Cloud of Particles using a High-Order Particle-Source-in-Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Gustaaf "Guus"

    Computation of Normal Shocks Running into a Cloud of Particles using a High-Order Particle are studied with bronze particle cloud in the accelerated flow behind a running shock. The forty thousands particle clouds are arranged initially in a rectangular, triangular and circular shape. The flows

  14. Source and thermal maturity of bitumen in Precambrian Nonesuch Formation inferred from isotopic compositions of individual normal alkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hieshima, G.B. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a continuing study of organic geochemistry of the 1.05 Ga Nonesuch Formation in the North American Mid-Continents rift, isotopic compositions of individual normal alkanes were measured using compound-specific isotopic analysis. This is a relatively new technique that can be used in conjunction with traditional biomarker analysis in interpretation of thermal maturity, oil-source rock correlation, and paleoecologic reconstruction. Carbon-isotopic compositions of individual normal alkanes from C{sub 15} to C{sub 25} in five bitumens and one oil from Nonesuch strata vary from {minus}28.8 to {minus}34.5{per thousand} (versus PDB). Within a given sample, isotopic compositions of n-alkanes span a range of 2 to 4 {per thousand}%. Homologues from C{sub 15} to C{sub 19} are isotopically light (depleted) by approximately 0.5{per thousand} relative to higher homologues from C{sub 20} to C{sub 25}. Two sources of normal alkanes are interpreted from the distribution of isotopic compositions. Based on chain length, the series from C{sub 15} to C{sub 19} may have been derived from algal components. Isotopically heavy, higher homologues are suspected to have been derived from bacterial sources. The pattern of isotopic compositions of bitumens is similar to that of the oil, demonstrating an oil-source rock relationship. Superimposed upon this primary, bimodal distribution of normal alkanes is the influence of thermal maturity on isotopic composition. Normal alkanes in samples of higher thermal maturity are enriched isotopically by 0.25 to 2{per thousand} relative to those of lower thermal maturity. Isotopic enrichment with increasing thermal maturity is interpreted to be the result of either addition of isotopically heavy components derived from kerogen and/or preferential loss through cracking of isotopically light components in bitumen.

  15. Differential cross section of gamma n to K+ Sigma- on bound neutrons with incident photons from 1.1 to 3.6 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Anefalos Pereira; M. Mirazita; P. Rossi; E. De Sanctis; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; S. Stepanyan; for the CLAS Collaboration

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential cross sections of the reaction gamma d to K+ Sigma- (p) have been measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab using incident photons with energies between 1.1 and 3.6 GeV. This is the first complete set of strangeness photoproduction data on the neutron covering a broad angular range. At energies close to threshold and up to E_gamma ~ 1.8 GeV, the shape of the angular distribution is suggestive of the presence of s-channel production mechanisms. For E_gamma > 1.8 GeV, a clear forward peak appears and becomes more prominent as the photon energy increases, suggesting contributions from t-channel production mechanisms. These data can be used to constrain future analysis of this reaction.

  16. Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, A R; Norman, E B; Hurley, D L; Lo, B T; Chan, Y D; Guillaumon, P V; Harvey, B G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found...

  17. Normal Scalar Curvature Inequalities Normal Scalar Curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiqin

    Scalar Curvature Inequalities Introduction In 1999, De Smet, Dillen, Verstraelen and Vrancken (DDVV, F. Dillen, L. Verstraelen, and L. Vrancken, A pointwise inequality in submanifold theory, Arch. Math

  18. Formation of quark phases in protoneutron stars: the transition from the 2SC to the normal quark phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. ~Pagliara

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the process of formation of quark phases in protoneutron stars. After calculating the phase transition between nucleonic matter and the 2SC phase at fixed entropy and lepton fraction, we show that an unpairing transition between the 2SC phase and the normal quark phase occurs for low lepton fractions. We then calculate the process of diffusion of neutrinos in protoneutron stars and show that for intermediate values of the mass of the star, the deleptonization triggers the phase transition between the two quark phases after a temporal delay of a few seconds. In less massive stars instead only the normal quark phase is formed at the end of the deleptonization stage. We also discuss the possible astrophysical implications of our scenario.

  19. M. ,PELLET. -CON'l'RIBUTION 13 et elle sera ralise en Allemagne cette anne. Le flacon normal, dans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    M. ,PELLET. - CON'l'RIBUTION 13 et elle sera réalisée en Allemagne cette année. Le flacon normal. CONTRIBUTION A L'�TUDE DU LAIT ST�RILIS� par M. PELLET, Ingénieur agronome. La stérilisation du lait a été j- vations à la Laiterie municipale de Nantes . .Simultanément, M. Pellet donna-t dans le « Lait» (Septembre

  20. The serum transaminase activities of Equus caballus: a study of the transaminase levels under normal and disease conditions. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Mark Francis

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE SERUM TRANSAtujINASE ACTIVITIES OP ggJg CABALLUS: A STUDY OF THE TRANSAMINASE LEVELS UNDER NORMAL AND DISEASE CONDITIONS A Thesis By MARK FRANCIS YOUNG Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... FRANCIS YOUNG Accepted as to style and content by: airman of Committee (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) January 1964 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author wishes to express his sincere gratitude to the following people: Dr, J. C. Ramge, chairman...