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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Non-utility power generation continues to grow  

SciTech Connect

This article examines why the number of non-utility power plants is increasing. The topics include the impact of the changes to the Public Utility Holding Company Act, and bidding for capacity. It includes a look at Texaco's Puget Sound oil refinery and how its efficiency problems were solved using cogeneration including the need to improve energy balance and engineering of the plant. Grayling generating station (wood waste) and Kalaeloa cogeneration power plant (low sulfur fuel oil) are also discussed.

Smith, D.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

on standby, test, maintenance/repairs, out of service, and indefinite shutdown represented 43 percent of the total nonutility generating capacity in 1999.

3

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides annual aggregate statistics on generating units operated by nonutilities in the United States and the District of Columbia. Provides a 5-year outlook for generating unit additions and changes.

Information Center

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators  

SciTech Connect

Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Customers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Customers" Customers" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Number of Customers" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "RV CSU Power II LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1

6

Financial impacts of nonutility power purchases on investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

To assist in its these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities. The primary purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities. The existing concern in this area is manifest in the provisions of Section 712 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which required State regulatory commissions to evaluate various aspects of long-term power purchase contracts, including their impact on investor-owned utilities` cost of capital and rates charged to customers. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations by both public and private decision-makers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth… (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities.

Information Center

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Commercialization of coal diesel engines for non-utility and export power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic motivation behind this project is to develop coal-burning heat engine technology primarily for 10-100 MW modular stationary power applications in the late 1990`s and beyond, when oil and gas prices may return to the $5--7/MMBtu range. The fuel is a low-cost, coal-based liquid with the consistency of black paint, composed of 12-micron mean size premium 2% ash coal dust mixed 50/50 with water. The Clean Coal Diesel Plant of the future is targeted for the 10-100 MW non-utility generation (NUG) and small utility markets, including independent power producers (IPP) and cogeneration. A family of plant designs will be offered using the Cooper-Bessemer 3.8, 5.0, and 6.3 MW Model LS engines as building blocks. In addition, larger plants will be configured with an engine in the 10-25 MW class (Cooper will license the technology to other large bore stationary engine manufacturers). The reciprocating engine offers a remarkable degree of flexibility in selecting plant capacity. This flexibility exists because the engines are modular in every sense (fuel cell stacks have similar modularity). Scale-up is accomplished simply by adding cylinders (e.g., 20 vs 16) or by adding engines (4 vs 3). There is no scale-up of the basic cylinder size. Thus, there is essentially no technical development needed to scale-up the Cooper-Bessemer Clean Coal Diesel Technology all the way from 2 MW (one 6-cylinder engine) to 50 MW (eight 20-cylinder engines), other than engineering adaptation of the turbocharger to match the engine.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E.; Mayville, R.A.; Itse, D.; Kimberley, J.; Parkinson, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Power-Pro: Programmable Power Management Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents Power-Pro architecture (Programmable Power Management Architecture), a novel processor architecture for power reduction. Power-Pro architecture has following two functionalities, (i) Supply voltage and clock frequency can be dynamically varied, (ii) Active data-path width can be dynamically adjusted to requirement of application programs. For the application programs which require less performance or less data-path width, Power-Pro architecture realize dramatic power reduction. I. Introduction With recent popularizations in portable, batterypowered devices such as digital cellular telephones and personal digital assistants, minimizing power consumption of VLSI circuits becomes more important. As the system level power reduction techniques, the choice of optimal supply voltage(V DD ) and optimal active data-path width have strong impacts. In this paper we propose novel processor architecture Power-Pro [2] which can vary VDD and active data-path width of processor ...

Tohru Ishihara; Hiroto Yasuura; Programmable Power Management

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

ProPower Renewable Energy Shanghai Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProPower Renewable Energy Shanghai Ltd ProPower Renewable Energy Shanghai Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name ProPower Renewable Energy (Shanghai) Ltd Place Shanghai, Shanghai Municipality, China Zip 201314 Sector Solar Product China-based solar-grade silicon manufacturer by applying self-developed UMG method. Coordinates 31.247709°, 121.472618° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.247709,"lon":121.472618,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Pro  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pro Pro gram or Field Office: Project Title and 1. 0. No.: Locati on: u.s. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Office of Legacy Management Routine Activities at the Site AlPlot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor Site. LM # 52-11. Chicago, Illinois Pro posed Action or Project Descri ption : DOE proposes to conduCt routine activities as needed at Site AlPlot M. The site is in the Palos Forest Preserve in Cook County, Illinois, 20 miles southwest of Chicago. The Forest Preserve District of Cook County owns the land. DOE is responsible for the radioactive materials buried onsite. Site A is a 19-acre area that contained experimental laboratories and nuclear reactor research facilities. Plot M, which is about 1,500 feet north of Site A, is a 150-foot-by-140-foot area that was used for the sealed

15

Table N13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" 3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,," " " "," ","Total of",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

16

Table E13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" 3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,"Total of",,,"RSE" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1,1.1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

17

Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002;" Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,"Total of",,,"RSE" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.3,0.9 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

18

Table A30. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.1,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1829," W "," W ",28

19

Table A18. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" 8. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",988,940,48,16.2 2011," Meat Packing Plants",0,0,0,"NF"

20

Table A21. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" 1. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,"RSE" " "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States",,, "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.1,1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",188,122,66,35.6 " 20-49",2311,1901,410,39.5 " 50-99",2951,2721,230,9.6 " 100-249",6674,5699,974,7.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table A31. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers by Census Region," Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers by Census Region," " Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,"RSE" " "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States",,, "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.1,1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",222,164," Q ",23.3 " 20-49",1131,937,194,17.2

22

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

6 Includes agricultural byproducts, fish oil, liquid acetonitrile waste, landfill gas, municipal solid waste, solid waste, sludge waste, straw, tires, waste alco-

23

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Revenue"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue" Revenue" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Revenue (thousand dollars)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1735,".",1735 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",798,".",798 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",243,".",".",243 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",603,".",".",603

24

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Sales"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales" Sales" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Sales (Megawatthours)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",33463,".",33463 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",6883,".",6883 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1820,".",".",1820 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",9651,".",".",9651

25

Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; 5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 347 168 179 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 142 6 136 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 4 10 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 109 88 21 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 66 66 0 3115 Dairy Products 22 0 22 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 1 * 3121 Beverages 1 1 * 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills

26

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 111 86 25 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 72 51 21 311221 Wet Corn Milling 55 42 13 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7 3 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 13 13 0 3115 Dairy Products 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * * 0 3121 Beverages

27

Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; 6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of Economic Sales and Utility Nonutility Characteristic(a) Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 194 100 93 20-49 282 280 3 50-99 1,115 922 194 100-249 5,225 4,288 936 250-499 5,595 2,696 2,899 500 and Over 20,770 12,507 8,263 Total 33,181 20,793 12,388 Employment Size Under 50 395 177 218 50-99 3,412 3,408 5 100-249 6,687 3,088 3,599 250-499 5,389 4,175 1,214 500-999 7,082 3,635 3,447

28

Dynamic ModelingDynamic Modeling the Electric Power Networkthe Electric Power Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and distribution of Electric Power (ELECTRIC UTILITIES) At that time, many businesses (non-utilities) generated of power supplied by efficient, low-cost utility generation, transmission, and distribution was a natural;ElectricElectric PowerPower GenerationGeneration Steam Units: Steam produ

Oro, Daniel

29

Electric power annual 1995. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a tabulation of the results of this magazines survey of current plans for new baseload power plants. The table lists the unit name, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, suppliers for steam generator, turbine generator and flue gas desulfurization equipment, date due on-line, and any non-utility participants. The table includes fossil-fuel plants, nuclear plants, geothermal, biomass and hydroelectric plants.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Private-sector power generation in Thailand: potential, impediments, and policy issues. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Royal Thai Government (RTG) is exploring ways of involving the private sector in electricity generation. The study: (1) assesses the sector's potential for non-utility power generation, including such options as industrial cogeneration, agricultural-waste-based energy systems, and large-scale systems using domestic fossil fuels; (2) reviews existing power-sector institutions in Thailand and analyzes the major issues and impediments associated with private-sector power generation; and (3) based on U.S. experience, describes possible approaches to establishing the price of non-utility electricity.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

SolarPro Energy International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarPro Energy International SolarPro Energy International Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarPro Energy International Place Granite Bay, California Zip 95746 Sector Solar Product SolarPro Energy installs solar power systems using PV panels for residential and commercial properties. References SolarPro Energy International[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. SolarPro Energy International is a company located in Granite Bay, California . References ↑ "SolarPro Energy International" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=SolarPro_Energy_International&oldid=351417" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

34

Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

NONE

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Petroleum Consumption Estimates: Transportation and Electric Power Sectors, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Transportation Sector Electric Power Sector 1 Aviation...

36

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b Renewable Energy Consumption: End-Use Sectors and Electric Power Sector End-Use Sectors, 1949-2011 End-Use Sectors and Electric Power Sector, 2011 End-Use Sectors and Electric...

37

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trade Stock Change and Other 8 Consumption Fossil Fuels 2 Nuclear Electric Power 3 Renewable Energy 4 Total Imports Exports Net Imports 1 Fossil Fuels 9 Nuclear Electric Power 3...

38

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2011 Electric Power 3 Transportation 4 Commercial 1 Residential 1 Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. 2 Lease and plant fuel,...

39

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Sector Consumption, Monthly 82 U.S. Energy Information Administration Monthly Energy Review September 2013 2011 20 12 2013 Electric Power Consumption J F MA M J J A S O N...

40

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9 Table 5.13d Petroleum Consumption Estimates: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Electric Power Sector 1 Electricity Only Combined...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

12 Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 4 Power 5 Residential Industrial Commercial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel 6 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 12...

42

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Hydroelectric Power 1 Geothermal 2 SolarPV 3 Wind 4 Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Total 1949 1,349 NA NA NA 6 NA 6...

43

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solarphotovoltaic, wind, and biomass. Note: * See "Primary Energy Consumption" in...

44

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 U.S. Shipments of Photovoltaic Modules Only by Sector and End Use, 2010 9 U.S. Shipments of Photovoltaic Modules Only by Sector and End Use, 2010 By End Use By Sector 298 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 See "Electric Power Grid" in Glossary. 2 Photovoltaic modules that are connected to the electric power grid, and whose output is fed directly into the grid. 3 Photovoltaic modules that are connected to the electric power grid, and whose output is consumed mainly onsite. 4 Photovoltaic modules that are not connected to the electric power grid, and that are used to provide electric power to remote households or communities. 5 Photovoltaic modules that are not connected to the electric power grid, and that are used to provide electric power for a variety of non-domestic applications.

45

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sector 1 Industrial Sector 2 Transportation Sector Electric Power Sector 3 Prices Percentage of Sector 7 Prices Percentage of Sector 7 Prices Percentage of Sector 7 Vehicle Fuel...

46

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade Stock Change and Other d Consumption Fossil Fuels a Nuclear Electric Power Renew- able Energy b Total Imports Exports Net...

47

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity...

48

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

power producers)-consumption for electric generation and useful thermal output at electricity-only and CHP plants within the North American Industry Classification System...

49

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and PV energy used in the commercial, industrial, and electric power sectors. 4 Geothermal heat pump and direct use energy. 5 Municipal solid waste from biogenic sources,...

50

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Energy. Noncombustible renewable energy is the sum of hydroelectric power, geothermal, solarPV, and wind. In Table 1.3, total primary consumption of noncombustible...

51

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Nuclear Power Plant Operations Total Electricity and Nuclear Electricity Net Generation, 1957-2011 Nuclear Share of Total Electricity Net Generation, 1957-2011 Net Summer Capacity...

52

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Table 3.3 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Primary Energy 2 Electric Power Sector 11,12 Retail Electricity 13 Total...

53

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Consumption Biomass Total Renewable Energy 4 Hydro- electric Power 5 Geo- thermal 6 SolarPV 7 Wind 8 Biomass Total Renewable Energy Biofuels 2 Total 3 Wood 9 Waste 10...

54

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. Web Page: http:www.eia.govtotalenergydatamonthlypetroleum. Sources: Tables 3.7a-3.7c....

55

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy 1 Electricity Net Imports 3 Total Coal Coal Coke Net Imports 3 Natural Gas 4...

56

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(All Sectors), Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.4b and 8.4c; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10...

57

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.2b and 8.2d; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy...

58

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. 2 Electricity-only and...

59

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Includes combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. 2 For 1978...

60

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Liquefied petroleum gases. 3 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power plants whose primary business is to sell elec- tricity, or electricity and heat, to the public....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Btu per Cubic Foot) Year Production Consumption 1 Imports Exports Marketed Dry End-Use Sectors 2 Electric Power Sector 3 Total 1949...

62

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants by Sector, 1989-2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste 242 U.S....

63

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011...

64

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2011 Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.7a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum...

65

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

fuels consumed to produce electricity. Data also include fuels consumed to produce useful thermal output at a small number of electric utility combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants....

66

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 2.0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to

67

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. Includes 0.1 quadrillion Btu of electricity net

68

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation Coal by Sector, 1989-2012 Petroleum by Sector, 1989-2012 Natural Gas by Sector, 1989-2012 Other Gases b by Sector, 1989-2012 Wood by Sector, 1989-2012 Waste by Sector, 1989-2012 98 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Commercial Industrial Electric Power Electric Power Industrial Industrial Total a Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 Billion Short Tons Total a Electric Power 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Million Barrels Total a Electric Power Industrial a Includes commercial sector. b Blast furnace gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. Through 2010, also includes propane gas . Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#electricity.

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5b 5b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation by Sector, 2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 237 7.3 0.6 0.0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 2 4 6 8 Trillion Cubic Feet -CHP¹ (ss) 1 Combined-heat-and-power plants. ² Combined-heat-and-power and electricity-only plants. (s)=Less than 0.5 million short tons. (ss)=Less than 0.05 trillion cubic feet. (sss)=Less than 0.5 million barrels. Sources: Tables 8.5b-8.5d. Electricity-Only Plants 925 8 0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 Million Short Tons (s) Electricity-Only Plants CHP¹ -CHP¹ 47 2 0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 20 40 60 Million Barrels 416 181 24 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 100 200

70

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0 1 2 3 4 5 PV a a a a thermal a electric Power

71

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatthours) Total (All Sectors), Major Sources, 1949-2012 Total (All Sectors), Major Sources, Monthly Electric Power Sector, Major Sources, 2012 Commercial Sector, Major Sources, 2012 Industrial Sector, Major Sources, 2012 94 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Gases b Gas Gas electric Power c Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy a Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 Coal Nuclear Electric Power 2013 2011 2012 Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Coal 1,503 1,138 769 463 20 Coal Natural Nuclear Renewable Petro- 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 50 100 150 200 Petroleum Energy a Gas Electric Power leum 5.9 2.5 0.8 0.1 Natural Waste Coal

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 347 Primary Energy Consumption by Source 1 Delivered Total Energy by Sector 8 1 Includes electricity net imports, not shown separately. 2 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 3 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 4 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 5 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 6 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. 7 Calculated as the primary energy consumed by the electric power sector minus the

73

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b Electric Net Summer Capacity by Sector b Electric Net Summer Capacity by Sector Total (All Sectors) and Sectors, 1989-2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Commercial Sector, 2011 Industrial Sector, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 257 1 Conventional hydroelectric power, solar/PV, wood, wind, blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, batteries, chemicals, hydro- gen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscellaneous technologies. 2 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels 3 Conventional hydroelectric power. 4 Solar/PV, wind, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscel- laneous technologies. (s)=Less than 0.05 million kilowatts.

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumption for Electricity Generation By Major Category, 1949-2011 By Major Fuel, 2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 232 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Conventional hydroelectric power. 2 Geothermal, other gases, electricity net imports, solar thermal and photovoltaic energy, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. Sources: Tables 8.4a-8.4c. Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Quadrillion Btu 18.0 8.3 8.1 3.2 1.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.6 Coal

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Electric Net Summer Capacity, Total (All Sectors) a Electric Net Summer Capacity, Total (All Sectors) Total, 1949-2011 By Major Category, 2011 By Source, 2011 256 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Total 1 Conventional and pumped storage. 2 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscellaneous technologies. Source: Table 8.11a. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 Million Kilowatts Electric Power 791 140 101 22 Fossil Renewable Nuclear Hydroelectric 0 300 600 900 Million Kilowatts Nuclear Electric Power Fuels Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Energy Pumped Storage Electric Power 413 319 101 101 56 45 7 4 2 1 4 Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Hydro- Petroleum Wind Wood Waste Geothermal Solar/PV

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 7.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.2a; Million Kilowatthours) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage e Renewable Energy Total j Coal a Petro- leum b Natural Gas c Other Gases d Conven- tional Hydro- electric Power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/ PV i Wind Wood g Waste h 1950 Total .................. 154,520 33,734 44,559 NA 0 f ( ) 95,938 390 NA NA NA NA 329,141 1955 Total .................. 301,363 37,138 95,285 NA 0 f ( ) 112,975 276 NA NA NA NA

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AL PRO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AL PRO AL PRO Jump to: navigation, search Name AL-PRO Place Grossheide, Lower Saxony, Germany Zip 26532 Sector Wind energy Product AL-PRO is an inndependent expert office for wind forecasts, wind potential studies, turbulence inquiries, visualizations as well as sound and shade throw forecasts Coordinates 53.592743°, 7.34313° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.592743,"lon":7.34313,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

78

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas (Dry) Crude Oil 3 NGPL 4 Total Hydro- electric Power 6 Geothermal 7 SolarPV 8 Wind 9 Biomass 10 Total 1949 11.974 5.377 10.683 0.714 28.748 0.000...

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Imports 11 Total Primary Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Total Hydroelectric Power 6 Geothermal 7 SolarPV 8 Wind 9 Biomass 10 Total 1949 1,995 569 415 2,979 0 1,349 NA NA NA 6...

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy 2 Total Primary Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4,5 Total Hydroelectric Power 6 Geothermal 7 SolarPV 8 WInd 9 Biomass 10 Total 1949 1,554 360 735 2,649 NA NA NA NA 20 20...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Renewable . Renewable Energy Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0

82

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2b 2b Electricity Net Generation by Sector By Sector, 2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Industrial and Commercial Sectors, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 223 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). (s) = Less than 0.05 trillion kilowatthours. (ss) = Less than 0.5 billion kilowatthours. Sources: Tables 8.2b-8.2d. 4.0 0.1 (s) Electric Power Industrial Commercial 0 1 2 3 4 5 Trillion Kilowatthours 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 Trillion Kilowatthours Electricity-Only Plants

83

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy Note 1. Operable Nuclear Reactors. A reactor is generally defined as operable while it possessed a full-power license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission or its predecessor the Atomic Energy Commission, or equivalent permission to operate, at the end of the year or month shown. The definition is liberal in that it does not exclude units retaining full-power licenses during long, non-routine shutdowns that for a time rendered them unable to generate electricity. Examples are: (a) In 1985 the five then-active Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) units (Browns Ferry 1, 2, and 3, and Sequoyah 1 and 2) were shut down under a regulatory forced outage. All five units were idle for several years, restarting in 2007, 1991, 1995, 1988, and 1988, respectively and were counted

84

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 3.7c Petroleum Consumption: Transportation and Electric Power Sectors (Thousand Barrels per Day) Transportation Sector Electric Power Sector a Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil b Jet Fuel c Liquefied Petroleum Gases Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Distillate Fuel Oil e Petro- leum Coke Residual Fuel Oil f Total 1950 Average .................... 108 226 c ( ) 2 64 2,433 524 3,356 15 NA 192 207 1955 Average .................... 192 372 154 9 70 3,221 440 4,458 15 NA 191 206 1960 Average .................... 161 418 371 13 68 3,736 367 5,135 10 NA 231 241 1965 Average .................... 120 514 602 23 67 4,374 336 6,036 14 NA 302 316 1970 Average .................... 55 738 967 32 66 5,589 332 7,778 66 9 853 928 1975 Average .................... 39 998 992 31 70 6,512 310 8,951 107

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Sector, 1949-2011 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Sector, 1949-2011 Residential and Commercial, by Major Source Industrial, by Major Source Transportation, by Major Source Electric Power, by Major Source 304 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Emissions from energy consumption in the electric power sector are allocated to the end- use sectors in proportion to each sector's share of total electricity retail sales (see Tables 8.9 and 11.2e). 2 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multi- plying by 12/44. 3 Includes coal coke net imports. Source: Tables 11.2a-11.2e. Retail Electricity¹ 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 1,250 1,500 1,750 2,000 Million Metric Tons Carbon

86

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 10.2c Renewable Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector (Trillion Btu) Hydro- electric Power a Geo- thermal b Solar/PV c Wind d Biomass Total Wood e Waste f Total 1950 Total .................... 1,346 NA NA NA 5 NA 5 1,351 1955 Total .................... 1,322 NA NA NA 3 NA 3 1,325 1960 Total .................... 1,569 (s) NA NA 2 NA 2 1,571 1965 Total .................... 2,026 2 NA NA 3 NA 3 2,031 1970 Total .................... 2,600 6 NA NA 1 2 4 2,609 1975 Total .................... 3,122 34 NA NA (s) 2 2 3,158 1980 Total .................... 2,867 53 NA NA 3 2 4 2,925 1985 Total .................... 2,937 97 (s) (s)

87

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output Coal by Sector, 1989-2012 Petroleum by Sector, 1989-2012 Natural Gas by Sector, 1989-2012 Other Gases b by Sector, 1989-2012 Wood by Sector, 1989-2012 Waste by Sector, 1989-2012 102 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Industrial Commercial Industrial Electric Power Industrial Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 Billion Short Tons Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 90 180 270 360 Million Barrels Electric Power a Includes commercial sector. b Blast furnace gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. Through 2010, also includes propane gas . Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#electricity.

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Includes Adjustment for Fossil Fuel Equivalence. See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. 2 Includes electricity sales to each sector in addition to Primary Energy consumed in the sector. 3 Small amounts of coal consumed for transportation are reported as industrial sector consumption. Includes net imports of s upplemental liquids and coal coke. 4 Calculated as the primary energy consumed by the electric power sector minus the energy content of electricity retail sales. 26,784 71,220 27,451 23,267 8,711 11,791 98,004 39,579 27,425 19,984 4,175 6,841 Total Transporta- tion Indust- rial Commer- cial Residen- tial Total Electric Power Transporta- tion 3 Indus- trial 3 Commer- cial Residen- tial Electrical System Energy Losses 4 Delivered Total Energy 2 Primary Energy Consumption

89

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 9 7 18 1 36 - 1 2 9 - - - 12 - - - 47 1990 9 6 28 1 45 - 1 2 15 - - - 18 - - - 63 1995 12 4 44 - 60 - 1 1 21 - - - 23 (s) - - 83 1996 14 4 44 (s) 62 - 1 1 31 - - - 33 (s) - - 95 1997 14 5 40 (s) 59 - 1 1 34 - - - 35 (s) - - 94 1998 11 5 42 (s) 57 - 1 1 32 - - - 34 - - - 91 1999 12 6 40 (s) 57 - 1 (s) 33 - - - 35 (s) - - 92 2000

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 Total (All Sectors) by Source, 2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 By Sector, 2011 228 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). Sources: Tables 8.3a-8.3c. 543 522 296 103 37 36 16 Wood Natural Coal Other Waste Petroleum Other² 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Trillion Btu 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Quadrillion Btu Gases¹ 1.2 0.3 0.1 Industrial Electric Power Commercial 0.0 0.6

91

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table 8.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.2a; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 6 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 9 Wind Total Wood 7 Waste 8 1949 135.5 28.5 37.0 NA 201.0 0.0 6 ( ) 89.7 0.4 NA NA NA NA 90.1 NA 291.1 1950 154.5 33.7 44.6 NA 232.8 .0 6 ( ) 95.9 .4 NA NA NA NA 96.3 NA 329.1 1955 301.4 37.1 95.3 NA 433.8 .0 6 ( ) 113.0 .3 NA NA NA NA 113.3 NA 547.0 1960 403.1 48.0 158.0 NA 609.0 .5 6 ( ) 145.8 .1 NA (s) NA NA 146.0 NA 755.5 1965

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26 26 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.2b; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 6 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 9 Wind Total Wood 7 Waste 8 Electricity-Only Plants 11 1989 1,554.0 158.3 266.9 - 1,979.3 529.4 6 ( ) 269.2 4.2 6.9 14.6 0.3 2.1 297.3 - 2,805.9 1990 1,560.2 117.6 264.7 (s) 1,942.4 576.9 -3.5 289.8 5.6 10.4 15.4 .4 2.8 324.3 - 2,840.0 1995 1,658.0 62.0 317.4 (s) 2,037.4 673.4 -2.7 305.4 5.9 16.3 13.4 .5 3.2 344.7 - 3,052.8 1996 1,742.8 68.5 272.8 (s)

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Coal . Coal Figure 6.1 Coal (Million Short Tons) Overview, 1949-2012 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2012 Overview, Monthly Electric Power Sector Consumption, Monthly 82 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 2011 20 12 2013 Electric Power Consumption J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Net Exports 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 a Includes combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants and a small number of electricity-only-plants. b For 1978 forward, small amounts of transportation sector use are included in "Industrial." Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#coal. Sources: Tables 6.1-6.2. Production

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59 59 Table 8.11b Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44.9 0.0 5 ( ) 18.5 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 18.5 NA 63.4 1950 NA NA NA NA 50.0 .0 5 ( ) 19.2 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 19.2 NA 69.2 1955 NA NA NA NA 86.8 .0 5 ( ) 27.4 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 27.4 NA 114.2 1960 NA NA NA NA 130.8 .4 5 ( ) 35.8 .1 10 ( ) (s) NA NA 35.9 NA 167.1 1965 NA NA NA NA 182.9 .8 5 ( ) 51.0 .1 10 ( ) (s) NA NA 51.1 NA

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal 5 Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 1,995 415 569 NA 2,979 0 1,349 6 NA NA NA NA 1,355 NA 5 4,339 1950 2,199 472 651 NA 3,322 0 1,346 5 NA NA NA NA 1,351 NA 6 4,679 1955 3,458 471 1,194 NA 5,123 0 1,322 3 NA NA NA NA 1,325 NA 14 6,461 1960 4,228 553 1,785 NA 6,565 6 1,569 2 NA (s) NA NA 1,571 NA 15 8,158 1965

96

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Figure 7.1 Electricity Overview (Billion Kilowatthours) Overview, 2012 Net Generation by Sector, 1989-2012 Net Generation by Sector, Monthly Trade, 1949-2012 92 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Electric Power Total c Imports Exports 3,899 11 145 59 12 3,687 136 Electric Commercial Industrial Imports Exports Retail Direct 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 End Use Net Generation Trade Sales a Use b Power 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 Total c Electric Power J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 100 200 300 400 500 Industrial 2013 2011 Industrial 2012 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 a Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utili- ties and other energy service providers.

97

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Electricity Overview (Billion Kilowatthours) Overview, 2012 Net Generation by Sector, 1989-2012 Net Generation by Sector, Monthly Trade, 1949-2012 92 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Electric Power Total c Imports Exports 3,899 11 145 59 12 3,687 136 Electric Commercial Industrial Imports Exports Retail Direct 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 End Use Net Generation Trade Sales a Use b Power 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 Total c Electric Power J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 100 200 300 400 500 Industrial 2013 2011 Industrial 2012 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 a Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utili- ties and other energy service providers. b See "Direct Use" in Glossary.

98

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.11b; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Electricity-Only Plants 9 1989 296.5 78.0 119.3 0.4 494.2 98.2 18.1 73.6 0.9 1.5 2.6 0.2 1.5 80.3 - 690.7 1990 299.9 76.6 121.8 .4 498.6 99.6 19.5 73.3 1.0 1.9 2.7 .3 1.8 80.9 (s) 698.6 1995 301.3 64.7 145.3 .3 511.5 99.5 21.4 77.4 1.5 2.7 3.0 .3 1.7 86.6 - 719.1 1996 303.1 70.6 143.1 .1 516.9 100.8 21.1 75.3 1.4 2.6 2.9 .3 1.7 84.2 - 723.0

99

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

41 41 Table E1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United States, Selected Years, 1635-1945 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Electricity Net Imports Total Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Total Wood 1 1635 NA - - - - NA - - (s) (s) - - (s) 1645 NA - - - - NA - - 0.001 0.001 - - 0.001 1655 NA - - - - NA - - .002 .002 - - .002 1665 NA - - - - NA - - .005 .005 - - .005 1675 NA - - - - NA - - .007 .007 - - .007 1685 NA - - - - NA - - .009 .009 - - .009 1695 NA - - - - NA - - .014 .014 - - .014 1705 NA - - - - NA - - .022 .022 - - .022 1715 NA - - - - NA - - .037 .037 - - .037

100

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49 49 Table 2.3 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006 End-Use Category Net Electricity 1 Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 2 and NGL 3 Natural Gas Coal 4 Total 5 Million Kilowatthours Million Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Million Short Tons Indirect End Use (Boiler Fuel) ......................................... 12,109 21 4 2 2,059 25 - - Conventional Boiler Use ............................................. 12,109 11 3 2 1,245 6 - - CHP 6 and/or Cogeneration Process .......................... - - 10 1 (s) 814 19 - - Direct End Use All Process Uses ......................................................... 657,810 10 9 10 2,709 19

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.11a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44.9 0.0 5 ( ) 18.5 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 18.5 NA 63.4 1950 NA NA NA NA 50.0 .0 5 ( ) 19.2 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 19.2 NA 69.2 1955 NA NA NA NA 86.8 .0 5 ( ) 27.4 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 27.4 NA 114.2 1960 NA NA NA NA 130.8 .4 5 ( ) 35.8 .1 10

102

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table 8.2d Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.2a; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- themal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 0.7 0.6 2.2 0.1 3.6 - - 0.1 0.1 0.5 - - - 0.7 - 4.3 1990 .8 .6 3.3 .1 4.8 - - .1 .1 .8 - - - 1.1 - 5.8 1995 1.0 .4 5.2 - 6.5 - - .1 .1 1.5 - - - 1.7 (s) 8.2 1996 1.1 .4 5.2 (s) 6.7 - - .1 .1 2.2 - - - 2.4 (s) 9.0 1997 1.0 .4 4.7 (s) 6.2 - - .1 (s) 2.3 - - - 2.5 (s) 8.7 1998 1.0 .4 4.9 (s) 6.3 - - .1 (s) 2.3 - - - 2.5 - 8.7 1999 1.0 .4 4.6 (s) 6.0

103

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 13 8 67 2 90 19 5 24 1 114 1990 21 9 80 4 114 18 6 25 (s) 138 1991 21 6 82 4 113 17 9 26 1 140 1992 28 6 102 5 140 17 8 25 2 167 1993 30 8 107 3 147 16 8 24 1 173 1994 37 9 119 5 170 15 10 24 1 195 1995 40 13 118 4 176 15 12 27 (s) 203 1996 43 12 121 4 180 16 16 33 (s) 213 1997 39 12 132 8 191 16 14 30 (s) 221 1998 43 6 142 5 196 10 16 26 (s) 222 1999 52 7 146 4 208 10 20 30 (s) 238 2000 53 7 158 5 223 6 19 26 (s) 249 2001 52 6 164 5 226 8 4 13 3 243 2002 40 4 214 6 264 8 5 13 5 281 2003 38 7 200 9 255 9 11 20 3 278 2004

104

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

61 61 Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 9 1989 0.3 0.2 0.6 - 1.0 - - (s) (s) 0.2 - - - 0.2 - 1.2 1990 .3 .2 .7 - 1.2 - - (s) (s) .2 - - - .2 - 1.4 1995 .3 .2 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s) .3 - - - .3 - 2.1 1996 .3 .3 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s) .4 - - - .5 - 2.3 1997 .3 .4 1.2 - 1.9 - - (s) (s) .4 - - - .5 - 2.3 1998 .3 .3 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s)

105

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

44 44 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu 1989 639 120 1,471 1 - 1,591 81,670 3 24 6 1 1990 1,266 173 1,630 2 - 1,805 97,330 5 23 8 (s) 1991 1,221 104 995 1 - 1,101 99,868 5 21 11 1 1992 1,704 154 1,045 10 4 1,229 122,908 6 21 10 2 1993 1,794 290 1,074 27 40 1,591 128,743 4 21 10 2 1994 2,241

106

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units, 1955-2011 Year Original Licensing Regulations (10 CFR Part 50) 1 Current Licensing Regulations (10 CFR Part 52) 1 Permanent Shutdowns Operable Units 7 Construction Permits Issued 2,3 Low-Power Operating Licenses Issued 3,4 Full-Power Operating Licenses Issued 3,5 Early Site Permits Issued 3 Combined License Applications Received 6 Combined Licenses Issued 3 1955 1 0 0 - - - - - - 0 0 1956 3 0 0 - - - - - - 0 0 1957 1 1 1 - - - - - - 0 1 1958 0 0 0 - - - - - - 0 1 1959 3 1 1 - - - - - - 0 2 1960 7 1 1 - - - - - - 0 3 1961 0 0 0 - - - - - - 0 3 1962 1 7 6 - - - - - - 0 9 1963 1 3 2 - - - - - - R 1 11 1964 3 2 3 - - - - - - 1 13 1965 1 0 0 - - - - - - 0 13 1966 5 1 2 - - - - - - 1 14 1967 14 3 3 - - - - - - 2 15 1968 23 0 0 - - - - - - R 1 13 1969 7 4 4 - - - - - - 0 17 1970 10 4 3 - - - - - - R 1 20 1971 4 5 2 - - - - - - 0 22 1972 8 6

107

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 7.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.2b and 7.2c; Million Kilowatthours) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage e Renewable Energy Total j Coal a Petro- leum b Natural Gas c Other Gases d Conven- tional Hydro- electric Power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/ PV i Wind Wood g Waste h 1950 Total ................ 154,520 33,734 44,559 NA 0 f ( ) 100,885 390 NA NA NA NA 334,088 1955 Total ................ 301,363 37,138 95,285 NA 0 f ( ) 116,236 276 NA NA NA NA 550,299 1960 Total ................ 403,067 47,987 157,970 NA 518 f ( ) 149,440 140 NA 33 NA NA 759,156 1965 Total ................ 570,926 64,801 221,559 NA 3,657 f ( ) 196,984 269 NA 189 NA NA 1,058,386 1970 Total

108

Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1998. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions and generating unit changes. This report is prepared annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data or nonconfidential data of nonutilities are presented, it is specifically noted as nonutility data. 19 figs., 36 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 8.0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

110

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 12.7 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Consumption (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) By Source By Sector Wood b Biomass Waste c Fuel Ethanol d Bio- diesel Total Resi- dential Com- mercial e Indus- trial f Trans- portation Electric Power g Total 1973 Total ...................... 143 (s) NA NA 143 33 1 109 NA (s) 143 1975 Total ...................... 140 (s) NA NA 141 40 1 100 NA (s) 141 1980 Total ...................... 232 (s) NA NA 232 80 2 150 NA (s) 232 1985 Total ...................... 252 14 3 NA 270 95 2 168 3 1 270 1990 Total ...................... 208 24 4 NA 237 54 8 147 4 23 237 1995 Total ...................... 222 30 8 NA 260 49 9 166 8 28 260 1996 Total ......................

111

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

112

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 10.2a Renewable Energy Consumption: Residential and Commercial Sectors (Trillion Btu) Residential Sector Commercial Sector a Geo- thermal b Solar/ PV c Biomass Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal b Solar/ PV f Wind g Biomass Total Wood d Wood d Waste h Fuel Ethanol i Total 1950 Total .................... NA NA 1,006 1,006 NA NA NA NA 19 NA NA 19 19 1955 Total .................... NA NA 775 775 NA NA NA NA 15 NA NA 15 15 1960 Total .................... NA NA 627 627 NA NA NA NA 12 NA NA 12 12 1965 Total .................... NA NA 468 468 NA NA NA NA 9 NA NA 9 9 1970 Total

113

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Energy Flow, 2011 0 Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 3 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail

114

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 7.3b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.3a) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955 Total .................... 143,759

115

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F1. Conversion Efficiencies of Noncombustible F1. Conversion Efficiencies of Noncombustible Renewable Energy Sources (Percent) 1 Efficiencies may vary significantly for each technology based on site-specific technology and environmental factors. Factors shown represent engineering estimates for typical equipment under specific operational conditions. Sources: Geothermal: Estimated by EIA on the basis of an informal survey of relevant plants. Conventional Hydroelectric: Based on published estimates for the efficiency of large-scale hydroelectric plants. See http://www.usbr.gov/power/edu/pamphlet.pdf. Solar Photovoltaic: Based on the average rated efficiency for a sample of commercially available modules. Rated efficiency is the conversion efficiency under standard test conditions, which represents a fixed, controlled

116

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 10.7 Solar Thermal Collector Shipments by Market Sector, End Use, and Type, 2001-2009 (Thousand Square Feet) Year and Type By Market Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 1 Industrial 2 Electric Power 3 Other 4 Pool Heating Water Heating Space Heating Space Cooling Combined Heating 5 Process Heating Electricity Generation Total Shipments 6 2001 Total .... 10,125 1,012 17 1 35 10,797 274 70 0 12 34 2 11,189 Low 7 .......... 9,885 987 12 0 34 10,782 42 61 0 0 34 0 10,919 Medium 8 .... 240 24 5 0 1 16 232 9 0 12 0 0 268 High 9 .......... 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2002 Total .... 11,000 595 62 4 1

117

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 12.6 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste d Total e Distillate Fuel Oil c Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total 1973 Total ............................ 812 199 20 2 254 276 NA NA 1,286 1975 Total ............................ 824 172 17 (s) 231 248 NA NA 1,244 1980 Total ............................ 1,137 200 12 1 194 207 NA NA 1,544 1985 Total ............................ 1,367 166 6 1 79 86 NA NA 1,619 1990 Total ............................ 1,548 176 7 3 92 102 (s) 6 1,831 1995 Total ............................ 1,661 228 8 8 45 61 (s) 10 1,960 1996 Total ............................ 1,752 205 8 8 50 66 (s) 10 2,033

118

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 7.2c Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.2a; Million Kilowatthours) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petro- leum d Natural Gas e Biomass Total g Coal c Petro- leum d Natural Gas e Other Gases h Hydro- electric Power i Biomass Total k Waste f Wood j Waste f 1950 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 4,946 NA NA 4,946 1955 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3,261 NA NA 3,261 1960 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3,607 NA NA 3,607 1965 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

119

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 10.2b Renewable Energy Consumption: Industrial and Transportation Sectors, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Industrial Sector 1 Transportation Sector Hydro- electric Power 2 Geo- thermal 3 Solar/PV 4 Wind 5 Biomass Total Biomass Wood 6 Waste 7 Fuel Ethanol 8 Losses and Co-products 9 Total Fuel Ethanol 10 Biodiesel Total 1949 76 NA NA NA 468 NA NA NA 468 544 NA NA NA 1950 69 NA NA NA 532 NA NA NA 532 602 NA NA NA 1955 38 NA NA NA 631 NA NA NA 631 669 NA NA NA 1960 39 NA NA NA 680 NA NA NA 680 719 NA NA NA 1965 33 NA NA NA 855 NA NA NA 855

120

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Nuclear Energy . Nuclear Energy Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units Operable Units, 1 1957-2011 Nuclear Net Summer Capacity Change, 1950-2011 Status of All Nuclear Generating Units, 2011 Permanent Shutdowns by Year, 1955-2011 270 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Units holding full-power operating licenses, or equivalent permission to operate, at the end of the year. Note: Data are at end of year. Sources: Tables 9.1 and 8.11a. 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -4 0 4 8 12 -4 Million Kilowatts 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 30 60 90 120 Number of Units 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 0 Number Total Units Ordered: 259 Permanent Shutdowns 28 104 Operable Units¹ U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 7.5 Stocks of Coal and Petroleum: Electric Power Sector Coal a Petroleum Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e,f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels 1950 Year ............................. 31,842 NA NA NA NA 10,201 1955 Year ............................. 41,391 NA NA NA NA 13,671 1960 Year ............................. 51,735 NA NA NA NA 19,572 1965 Year ............................. 54,525 NA NA NA NA 25,647 1970 Year ............................. 71,908 NA NA NA 239 39,151 1975 Year ............................. 110,724 16,432 108,825 NA 31 125,413 1980 Year ............................. 183,010 30,023 105,351 NA 52 135,635 1985 Year .............................

122

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

16 16 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,230 169,653 133,546 363 4,366 1,828,158 13,815 1 810 7 14,633 7,055 390 246 25 7,717 1990 1,534,141 177,232 101,800 384 5,795 1,819,351 13,576 1 628 13 14,218 6,878 390 175 36 7,480 1991 1,534,559 180,541 95,149 398 7,207 1,817,854 13,590 1 621 15 14,227 6,886 384 165 42 7,476 1992 1,556,741 187,730 79,153 400 8,476 1,832,501

123

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table A4. Approximate Heat Content of Natural Gas (Btu per Cubic Foot) Production Consumption a Imports Exports Marketed Dry End-Use Sectors b Electric Power Sector c Total 1950 ............................ 1,119 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 - - 1,035 1955 ............................ 1,120 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1960 ............................ 1,107 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1965 ............................ 1,101 1,032 1,032 1,032 1,032 1,032 1,032 1970 ............................ 1,102 1,031 1,031 1,031 1,031 1,031 1,031 1975 ............................ 1,095 1,021 1,020 1,026 1,021 1,026 1,014 1980 ............................ 1,098 1,026 1,024 1,035 1,026 1,022 1,013 1981 ............................

124

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 10.1 Renewable Energy Production and Consumption by Source (Trillion Btu) Production a Consumption Biomass Total Renew- able Energy d Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal f Solar/ PV g Wind h Biomass Total Renew- able Energy Bio- fuels b Total c Wood i Waste j Bio- fuels k Total 1950 Total .................... NA 1,562 2,978 1,415 NA NA NA 1,562 NA NA 1,562 2,978 1955 Total .................... NA 1,424 2,784 1,360 NA NA NA 1,424 NA NA 1,424 2,784 1960 Total .................... NA 1,320 2,928 1,608 (s) NA NA 1,320 NA NA 1,320 2,928 1965 Total .................... NA 1,335 3,396 2,059 2 NA NA 1,335 NA NA 1,335 3,396 1970 Total .................... NA 1,431 4,070 2,634 6 NA NA 1,429 2 NA 1,431 4,070 1975 Total .................... NA

125

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 2.1d Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Primary Consumption 1 Electricity Retail Sales 11 Electrical System Energy Losses 12 Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy 2 Total Primary Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4,5 Total Hydroelectric Power 6 Geothermal 7 Solar/PV 8 Wind 9 Biomass 10 Total 1949 5,433 -7 3,188 3,475 12,090 76 NA NA NA 468 544 12,633 418 1,672 14,724 1950 5,781 1 3,546 3,960 13,288 69 NA NA NA 532 602 13,890 500 1,852 16,241 1955 5,620 -10 4,701 5,123 15,434 38 NA NA NA 631 669 16,103 887 2,495 19,485 1960 4,543 -6 5,973 5,766 16,277 39 NA NA NA 680 719 16,996 1,107 2,739 20,842 1965 5,127 -18 7,339 6,813 19,260 33 NA NA NA 855 888 20,148 1,463 3,487 25,098

126

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 (Quadrillion Btu) Residential and Commercial a Sectors, Selected Products Industrial a Sector, Selected Products Transportation Sector, Selected Products 56 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Kerosene Residual Fuel Oil LPG b 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Distillate Fuel Oil Asphalt and Road Oil 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 Distillate Fuel Oil d Jet Fuel e Motor Gasoline c a Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. b Liquefied petroleum gases. c Beginning in 1993, includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

127

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 5.15 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, Selected Years, 1984-2010 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Distillate Fuel Oil Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power 1 Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Diesel Military Off-Highway Diesel Other Total 1984 534 360 166 55 208 42 192 115 1,093 46 114 46 2,971 1985 504 291 159 45 202 34 182 111 1,127 43 99 11 2,809 1990 475 260 169 49 222 50 203 135 1,393 46 118 (s) 3,120 1991 442 246 151 48 206 39 188 133 1,336 53 107 (s) 2,949 1992 474 245 150 43 228 35 206 144 1,391 42 114 (s) 3,075 1993 475 241 139 46 222 36 196 141 1,485 32 137 (s) 3,150 1994 472 246 148 44 213 43 205 143 1,594 40 140 (s) 3,289 1995 447 237 146 45 227 39 224 153 1,668 30 142 - - 3,357 1996 450 234 149 48 234 43 224 162 1,754 30 146 - - 3,472 1997 426 216 151 56 231 41 214 168 1,867 28 149 - - 3,546 1998

128

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

73 73 Table A3. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption and Biofuels Production (Million Btu per Barrel) Total Petroleum a Consumption by Sector Liquefied Petroleum Gases Con- sumption f Motor Gasoline Con- sumption g Fuel Ethanol h Fuel Ethanol Feed- stock Factor i Biodiesel Biodiesel Feed- stock Factor j Resi- dential Com- mercial b Indus- trial b Trans- portation b,c Electric Power d,e Total b,c 1950 .................... 5.473 5.817 5.953 5.461 6.254 5.649 4.011 5.253 NA NA NA NA 1955 .................... 5.469 5.781 5.881 5.407 6.254 5.591 4.011 5.253 NA NA NA NA 1960 .................... 5.417 5.781 5.818 5.387 6.267 5.555 4.011 5.253 NA NA NA NA 1965 .................... 5.364 5.760 5.748 5.386 6.267 5.532 4.011 5.253 NA NA NA NA 1970 .................... 5.260 5.708 5.595 5.393 6.252 5.503 f 3.779

129

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Sector 2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide) Total a by End-Use Sector, b 1973-2012 Residential Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Commercial Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Industrial Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Transportation Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Electric Power Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 160 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 Petroleum Natural Gas Retail Electricity b Industrial Transportation Residential Commercial Retail Electricity b 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 Retail Electricity

130

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Electricity-Only Plants 11 1989 767,378 25,574 241,960 3 517 270,125 2,790,567 - 59 111 - 1990 774,213 14,956 181,231 17 1,008 201,246 2,794,110 (s) 87 162 - 1995 832,928 16,169 86,584 133 1,082 108,297 3,287,571 (s)

131

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 8 1989 14 4 10 (s) 27 (s) 10 10 - 38 1990 15 5 16 (s) 36 (s) 10 11 - 46 1995 17 3 29 - 48 (s) 15 15 (s) 63 1996 20 3 33 R - 55 1 17 18 - 73 1997 22 4 40 (s) 66 1 19 20 - 86 1998 20 5 39 (s) 64 1 18 18 - 82 1999 20 3 37 R - 61 1 17 17 - 78 2000 21 4 39 R - 64 1 17 18 - 82 2001 18 4 35 - 58 1 8 8 6 72 2002 18 3 36 - 57 1 6 7 5 69 2003 23 3 17 - 42 1 8 8 6 57 2004 22 4 22 - 49 (s) 8 9 6 64 2005 23 4 20 - 47 (s) 8 9 6 61 2006 22 2 19 (s) 44 (s) 9 9 6 59 2007 23 2 20 - 44 1 6 7 4 55 2008 23 2 20 - 45 (s) 9 9 6 60 2009 20

132

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

175 175 Table A5. Approximate Heat Content of Coal and Coal Coke (Million Btu per Short Ton) Coal Coal Coke Production a Waste Coal Supplied b Consumption Imports Exports Imports and Exports Residential and Commercial Sectors c Industrial Sector Electric Power Sector e,f Total Coke Plants Other d 1950 ........................ 25.090 NA 24.461 26.798 24.820 23.937 24.989 25.020 26.788 24.800 1955 ........................ 25.201 NA 24.373 26.794 24.821 24.056 24.982 25.000 26.907 24.800 1960 ........................ 24.906 NA 24.226 26.791 24.609 23.927 24.713 25.003 26.939 24.800 1965 ........................ 24.775 NA 24.028 26.787 24.385 23.780 24.537 25.000 26.973 24.800 1970 ........................ 23.842 NA 23.203 26.784 22.983 22.573 23.440 25.000 26.982 24.800 1975 ........................

133

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 6.2 Coal Consumption by Sector (Thousand Short Tons) End-Use Sectors Electric Power Sector e,f Total Resi- dential Commercial Industrial Trans- portation CHP a Other b Total Coke Plants Other Industrial Total CHP c Non-CHP d Total 1950 Total .................... 51,562 g ( ) 63,021 63,021 104,014 h ( ) 120,623 120,623 224,637 63,011 91,871 494,102 1955 Total .................... 35,590 g ( ) 32,852 32,852 107,743 h ( ) 110,096 110,096 217,839 16,972 143,759 447,012 1960 Total .................... 24,159 g ( ) 16,789 16,789 81,385 h ( ) 96,017 96,017 177,402 3,046 176,685 398,081 1965 Total .................... 14,635 g ( ) 11,041 11,041 95,286 h ( ) 105,560 105,560 200,846 655 244,788 471,965 1970 Total .................... 9,024 g ( ) 7,090

134

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1955 324 63 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 424 (s) NA (s) 1960 396 95 2 NA 42 43 NA NA 535 (s) NA (s) 1965 546 127 2 NA 55 57 NA NA 730 (s) NA (s) 1970 678 215 10 2 154 166 NA NA 1,059 (s) (s) (s) 1975 824 172 17 (s) 231 248 NA NA 1,244 (s) (s) (s) 1976 911 167 18 (s) 255 273 NA NA 1,351 (s) (s) (s) 1977 962 174 21 (s) 285 306 NA NA

135

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

29 29 Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.3b and 8.3c; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 323 96 462 93 973 546 30 577 39 1,589 1990 363 127 538 141 1,168 651 36 687 40 1,896 1991 352 112 547 148 1,159 623 37 660 44 1,863 1992 367 117 592 160 1,236 658 40 698 42 1,976 1993 373 129 604 142 1,248 668 45 713 41 2,002 1994 388 133 646 144 1,309 722 45 767 42 2,119 1995 386 121 686 145 1,338 721 47 768 44 2,151 1996 392 133 711 150 1,385 701 55 756 43 2,184 1997 389 137 713 150 1,389 731 55 785 53 2,227 1998 382 136 782 167 1,466 700 57 757 46 2,269 1999 386 125 811 179 1,501 690 55 744 48 2,294 2000 384 108 812 184 1,488 707 56 764 50 2,302 2001 354 90 741 133 1,318 557 28 585 55 1,958 2002

136

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table 7.6 Coal Stocks by Sector, Selected Years, End of Year 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Producers and Distributors Consumers Total Residential and Commercial Sectors Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Electric Power Sector 2 Total Coke Plants Other 1 Total 1949 NA 1.4 10.0 16.1 26.0 3 ( ) 22.1 49.5 49.5 1950 NA 2.5 16.8 26.2 43.0 3 ( ) 31.8 77.3 77.3 1955 NA 1.0 13.4 15.9 29.3 3 ( ) 41.4 71.7 71.7 1960 NA .7 11.1 11.6 22.8 3 ( ) 51.7 75.2 75.2 1965 NA .4 10.6 13.1 23.8 3 ( ) 54.5 78.6 78.6 1970 NA .3 9.0 11.8 20.8 3 ( ) 71.9 93.0 93.0 1975 12.1 .2 8.8 8.5 17.3 3 ( ) 110.7 128.3 140.4 1976 14.2 .2 9.9 7.1 17.0 3 ( ) 117.4 134.7 148.9 1977 14.2 .2 12.8 11.1 23.9 3 ( ) 133.2 157.3 171.5 1978 20.7 .4 8.3 9.0 17.3 NA 128.2 145.9 166.6 1979 20.8 .3 10.2 11.8 21.9 NA 159.7 182.0 202.8 1980 24.4 NA 9.1 12.0 21.0 NA 183.0 204.0 228.4 1981

137

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 3.5 Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970-2010 (Million Dollars 1 ) Year Primary Energy 2 Electric Power Sector 11,12 Retail Electricity 13 Total Energy 10,14 Coal Coal Coke Net Imports 3 Natural Gas 4 Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass 9 Total 10 Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel 5 LPG 6 Motor Gasoline 7 Residual Fuel Oil Other 8 Total 1970 4,630 -75 10,891 6,253 1,441 2,395 31,596 2,046 4,172 47,904 44 438 63,872 -4,357 23,345 82,860 1971 4,902 -40 12,065 6,890 1,582 2,483 33,478 2,933 4,449 51,816 73 446 69,312 -5,491 26,202 90,023 1972 5,415 -26 13,198 7,552 1,682 2,834 35,346 3,458 4,777 55,648 104 476 74,893 -6,551 29,712 98,054 1973 6,243 7 13,933 9,524 2,001 R 3,881 39,667 4,667 5,318 R 65,057 177 502 R 86,053 -7,952 33,774 R 111,875 1974 11,118 150 16,380 15,217 3,208 R 5,254 54,194 10,547 8,284 R 96,704 259 544

138

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 10.9 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts 1 ) Year By Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 3 Industrial 4 Electric Power 5 Other 6 Grid-Connected 2 Off-Grid 2 Centralized 7 Distributed 8 Domestic 9 Non-Domestic 10 Total Shipments of Photovoltaic Cells and Modules 11 1989 1,439 R 6,057 3,993 785 551 12 ( ) 12 1,251 2,620 8,954 12,825 1990 1,701 R 8,062 2,817 826 432 12 ( ) 12 469 3,097 10,271 13,837 1991 3,624 R 5,715 3,947 1,275 377 12 ( ) 12 856 3,594 10,489 14,939 1992 4,154 R 5,122 4,279 1,553 477 12 ( ) 12 1,227 4,238 10,118 15,583 1993 5,237 R 8,004 5,352 1,503 856 12 ( ) 12 1,096 5,761 14,094 20,951 1994 6,632 R 9,717 6,855 2,364 510 12 ( ) 12 2,296 9,253 14,528 26,077 1995 6,272 R 12,483 7,198 3,759 1,347 12 ( ) 12 4,585 8,233 18,241 31,059 1996 8,475 R 12,297 8,300 4,753

139

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 7.3 Coal Consumption by Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Residential Sector 1 Commercial Sector 1 Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Electric Power Sector 2 Total CHP 3 Other 4 Total Coke Plants Other Industrial Total Electricity Only CHP Total CHP 5 Non-CHP 6 Total 1949 52.4 7 ( ) 64.1 64.1 91.4 8 ( ) 121.2 121.2 212.6 70.2 84.0 NA 84.0 483.2 1950 51.6 7 ( ) 63.0 63.0 104.0 8 ( ) 120.6 120.6 224.6 63.0 91.9 NA 91.9 494.1 1955 35.6 7 ( ) 32.9 32.9 107.7 8 ( ) 110.1 110.1 217.8 17.0 143.8 NA 143.8 447.0 1960 24.2 7 ( ) 16.8 16.8 81.4 8 ( ) 96.0 96.0 177.4 3.0 176.7 NA 176.7 398.1 1965 14.6 7 ( ) 11.0 11.0 95.3 8 ( ) 105.6 105.6 200.8 .7 244.8 NA 244.8 472.0 1970 9.0 7 ( ) 7.1 7.1 96.5 8 ( ) 90.2 90.2 186.6 .3 320.2 NA 320.2 523.2 1975 2.8 7 ( ) 6.6 6.6 83.6 8 ( ) 63.6 63.6 147.2 (s) 406.0 NA

140

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 9.2 Nuclear Power Plant Operations, 1957-2011 Year Nuclear Electricity Net Generation Nuclear Share of Total Electricity Net Generation Net Summer Capacity of Operable Units 1 Capacity Factor 2 Billion Kilowatthours Percent Million Kilowatts Percent 1957 (s) (s) 0.1 NA 1958 .2 (s) .1 NA 1959 .2 (s) .1 NA 1960 .5 .1 .4 NA 1961 1.7 .2 .4 NA 1962 2.3 .3 .7 NA 1963 3.2 .3 .8 NA 1964 3.3 .3 .8 NA 1965 3.7 .3 .8 NA 1966 5.5 .5 1.7 NA 1967 7.7 .6 2.7 NA 1968 12.5 .9 2.7 NA 1969 13.9 1.0 4.4 NA 1970 21.8 1.4 7.0 NA 1971 38.1 2.4 9.0 NA 1972 54.1 3.1 14.5 NA 1973 83.5 4.5 22.7 53.5 1974 114.0 6.1 31.9 47.8 1975 172.5 9.0 37.3 55.9 1976 191.1 9.4 43.8 54.7 1977 250.9 11.8 46.3 63.3 1978 276.4 12.5 50.8 64.5 1979 255.2 11.3 49.7 58.4 1980 251.1 11.0 51.8 56.3 1981 272.7 11.9 56.0 58.2 1982 282.8 12.6 60.0 56.6 1983 293.7 12.7 63.0 54.4 1984 327.6 13.5 69.7 56.3 1985 383.7 15.5 79.4 58.0 1986

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

2006 UDI directory of electric power producers and distributors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The directory contains profiles of nearly 5,000 energy-related companies across the USA and Canada. This includes over 17,000 executives and other key personnel at: 3,600 regulated electric utilities and holding companies; 700 non-utility generators and service companies; 350 associations; power pools and independent system operators, architects, engineers, consultants, agencies and commissions. The directory covers such essential business information as: electric customer classifications; revenues and sales for utilities; number of employees; electric production and delivery system design; performance data; major interconnections; sources of purchased power; and service territories.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

AgPro | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name AgPro Place Massena, New York Product Operator of biodiesel plant based on soy. References AgPro1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

143

ProEco Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProEco Energy Place South Dakota Product US South Dakota-based company specializing ethanol refinery project development. References ProEco Energy1 LinkedIn Connections...

144

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

145

Electric power annual 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

146

ProMAT: protein microarray analysis tool  

SciTech Connect

Summary: ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from ELISA microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code. Availability: ProMAT is available at http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT. ProMAT requires Java version 1.5.0 and R version 1.9.1 (or more recent versions) which are distributed with the tool.

White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Zangar, Richard C.

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

Definition: Independent Power Producer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producer Producer Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Independent Power Producer Any entity that owns or operates an electricity generating facility that is not included in an electric utility's rate base. This term includes, but is not limited to, cogenerators and small power producers and all other nonutility electricity producers, such as exempt wholesale generators, who sell electricity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition An Independent Power Producer is an entity, which is not a public utility, but which owns facilities to generate electric power for sale to utilities and end users. NUGs may be privately held facilities, corporations, cooperatives such as rural solar or wind energy producers, and non-energy industrial concerns capable of feeding excess energy into

148

ProForm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProForm ProForm Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: ProForm Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: - Landfill Gas, Energy Efficiency, Solar, Wind Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: poet.lbl.gov/Proform/ Cost: Paid References: ProForm[1] Related Tools ICCT Roadmap Model General Equilibrium Modeling Package (GEMPACK) Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS Logo: ProForm ProForm is a software tool designed to support a basic assessment of the

149

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

  Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 7% in 006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9

150

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Archelios PRO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archelios PRO toolarcheliospro Archelios is developed since 2001 by CYTHELIA. This PV solar software was at first designed for educational purposes, to teach students notions...

151

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Snugg Pro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Its fast to use, easy to learn and creates compelling reports that turn skeptical homeowners into satisfied customers. Snugg Pro makes educating the homeowner and closing the...

152

Pro Integris | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integris Integris Jump to: navigation, search Name Pro Integris Place Split, Croatia Sector Hydro, Solar Product Croatia-based engineering firm. The firm is involved in a JV developing small hydro and solar projects. Coordinates 43.506985°, 16.441718° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.506985,"lon":16.441718,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

153

Entity State Ownership Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. 1 Constellation Solar Arizona LLC AZ Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 FRV SI Transport Solar LP AZ Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 MFP Co III, LLC AZ Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 RV CSU Power II LLC AZ Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Scottsdate Solar Holdings LLC AZ Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 SunE M5C Holdings LLC AZ Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 Alliance Star Energy LLC CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Applied Energy Inc CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 CPKelco U S Inc CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 Calpine Corp-Agnews CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Cardinal Cogen Inc CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 City of Madera CA WWTP CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 DPC Juniper, LLC CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 DPC Juniper, LLC CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 Energy Alchemy TA Vernalis, LLC CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 Enfinity NorCal 1 FAA LLC

154

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade Stock Change and Other d Consumption Fossil Fuels a Nuclear Electric Power Renew- able Energy b Total Imports Exports Net...

155

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants: ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005343  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seyed Dastgheib seyed Dastgheib Principal Investigator Illinois State Geological Survey 615 E. Peabody Drive Champaign, Illinois 61820-6235 217-265-6274 dastgheib@isgs.uius.edu Reuse of PRoduced WateR fRom co 2 enhanced oil RecoveRy, coal-Bed methane, and mine Pool WateR By coal-Based PoWeR Plants: PRomis /PRoject no. : de-nt0005343 Background Coal-fired power plants are the second largest users of freshwater in the United States. In Illinois, the thermoelectric power sector accounts for approximately 84 percent of the estimated 14 billion gallons per day of freshwater withdrawals and one-third of the state's 1 billion gallons per day of freshwater consumption. Illinois electric power generation capacity is projected to expand 30 percent by 2030, increasing water consumption by

156

Word Pro - S7.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Stocks of Coal and Petroleum: Electric Power Sector Coal, 1949-2012 Total Petroleum, 1949-2012 Coal, Monthly Total Petroleum, Monthly 106 U.S. Energy Information Administration ...

157

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Total f Coal Natural Gas b Petro- leum c Total d Hydro-...

158

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BinMaker Pro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States Related Links BinMaker Pro BinMaker Pro logo. Creates summaries of U.S. hourly weather data for 239 cities. BinMaker PRO exports the resulting electronic files for use...

159

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BinMaker Pro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Country Related Links BinMaker Pro BinMaker Pro logo. Creates summaries of U.S. hourly weather data for 239 cities. BinMaker PRO exports the resulting electronic files for use...

160

Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants ProMIS/Project No.:DE-NT0005647  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement to AIr2AIr® technology Improvement to AIr2AIr® technology to reduce Fresh-WAter evAporAtIve coolIng loss At coAl-BAsed thermoelectrIc poWer plAnts promIs/project no. :de-nt0005647 Background The production of electricity requires a reliable, abundant, and predictable source of freshwater - a resource that is limited in many parts of the United States and throughout the world. The process of thermoelectric generation from fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas is water intensive. According to the 2000 U.S. Geological Survey, thermoelectric-power withdrawals accounted for 48 percent of total water use, 39 percent of total freshwater withdrawals (136 billion gallons per day) for all categories, and 52 percent of fresh surface water withdrawals. As a growing economy drives the need for more electricity, demands on freshwater

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by Sector Consumption by Sector Note 1. Electrical System Energy Losses. Electrical system energy losses are calculated as the difference between total primary consumption by the electric power sector (see Table 2.6) and the total energy content of elec- tricity retail sales (see Tables 7.6 and A6). Most of these losses occur at steam-electric power plants (conventional and nuclear) in the conversion of heat energy into mechanical energy to turn electric generators. The loss is a thermodynamically necessary feature of the steam- electric cycle. Part of the energy input-to-output losses is a result of imputing fossil energy equivalent inputs for hydroelectric, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic, and wind energy sources. In addition to conversion losses, other losses include power plant use of electricity,

162

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% in 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9 Utility Interest in Wind Asset Ownership Strengthens; Community Wind Grows Modestly . . . . . . . . . . . .

163

Laboratory Equipment - DynaPro NanoStar Dynamic Light ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DynaPro NanoStar Dynamic Light Scattering. Description: Location: E136. The DynaPro NanoStar is a dynamic light scattering ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Major Source, 1949-2012 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-August By Major Source, August 2013 . 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 2011 2012 2013 Nuclear Electric Power Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy Coal Renewable Energy Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.6 1.2 1.8 2.4 Nuclear Electric Power Petroleum Coal 26.971 26.079 25.936 2011 2012 2013 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 1.575 0.917 0.747 0.363 0.024 Coal Petroleum 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Nuclear Electric Power Natural Gas Renewable

165

Section 5.8 Electric Power Systems: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency on site and pro- curing green power. UTILIZATION EFFICIENCY Electric utility bills include both energy charges in kilowatt-hours and power demand charges in...

166

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 2.6 Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy b Elec- tricity Net Imports e Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum Total Hydro- electric Power d Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total ...................... 2,199 651 472 3,322 0 1,346 NA NA NA 5 1,351 6 4,679 1955 Total ...................... 3,458 1,194 471 5,123 0 1,322 NA NA NA 3 1,325 14 6,461 1960 Total ...................... 4,228 1,785 553 6,565 6 1,569 (s) NA NA 2 1,571 15 8,158 1965 Total ...................... 5,821 2,395 722 8,938 43 2,026 2 NA NA 3 2,031 (s) 11,012 1970 Total ...................... 7,227 4,054 2,117 13,399 239 2,600 6 NA NA 4 2,609 7 16,253 1975 Total ...................... 8,786 3,240 3,166 15,191 1,900 3,122 34 NA NA 2 3,158 21 20,270

167

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.2 (s) Process Heating Machine Drive Facility HVAC² Process Cooling and Refrigeration Electrochemical Processes Facility Lighting Conventional Electricity Generation 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Quadrillion Btu 5.5 2.9 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 Natural Gas Net Electricity Coal³ Residual Fuel Oil Distillate

168

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Total Coal b Natural Gas (Dry) Crude Oil c NGPL d Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................. 14.060 6.233 11.447 0.823 32.563 0.000 1.415 NA NA NA 1.562 2.978 35.540 1955 Total .................. 12.370 9.345 14.410 1.240 37.364 .000 1.360 NA NA NA 1.424 2.784 40.148 1960 Total .................. 10.817 12.656 14.935 1.461 39.869 .006 1.608 (s) NA NA 1.320 2.928 42.803 1965 Total .................. 13.055 15.775 16.521 1.883 47.235 .043 2.059 .002 NA NA 1.335 3.396 50.674 1970 Total .................. 14.607 21.666 20.401 2.512 59.186 .239 2.634 .006 NA NA 1.431 4.070 63.495 1975 Total ..................

169

Word Pro - S4.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 4.1 Natural Gas (Trillion Cubic Feet) Overview, 1949-2012 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2012 Overview, Monthly Consumption by Sector, Monthly Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#naturalgas. Sources: Tables 4.1 and 4.3. 68 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Commercial Electric Power Industrial Industrial Trans- portation Transportation 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 -5 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Consumption Dry Production Net Imports Consumption Dry Production Net Imports 2011 2012 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Residential Electric Power Residential 2011 2012 2013

170

Entity State Ownership Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,735 ,735 . 1,735 Constellation Solar Arizona LLC AZ Non_Utility . . 798 . 798 FRV SI Transport Solar LP AZ Non_Utility . 243 . . 243 MFP Co III, LLC AZ Non_Utility . 603 . . 603 RV CSU Power II LLC AZ Non_Utility . 436 . . 436 Scottsdate Solar Holdings LLC AZ Non_Utility . 49 . . 49 SunE M5C Holdings LLC AZ Non_Utility . . 212 . 212 Alliance Star Energy LLC CA Non_Utility . 266 . . 266 Applied Energy Inc CA Non_Utility . . 935 . 935 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 183 . . 183 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 382 . . 382 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 583 . . 583 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 771 . . 771 CPKelco U S Inc CA Non_Utility . . 4 . 4 Calpine Corp-Agnews CA Non_Utility . 47 . . 47 Cardinal Cogen Inc CA Non_Utility . 15,846 . . 15,846 City of Madera CA WWTP CA Non_Utility . . 310 . 310 DPC Juniper, LLC CA Non_Utility . . 21 . 21 DPC Juniper, LLC

171

Word Pro - S9.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 9.10 Natural Gas Prices (Dollars a per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wellhead Price f City- gate Price g Consuming Sectors b Residential Commercial c Industrial d Transportation Electric Power e Price h Percentage of Sector i Price h Percentage of Sector i Price h Percentage of Sector i Vehicle Fuel j Price h Price h Percentage of Sector i,k 1950 Average .................... 0.07 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1955 Average .................... .10 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1960 Average .................... .14 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1965 Average .................... .16 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1970 Average .................... .17 NA 1.09 NA .77 NA .37 NA NA .29 NA 1975 Average .................... .44 NA 1.71 NA 1.35 NA .96 NA NA .77 96.1 1980 Average ....................

172

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Source, a 1949-2012 By Source, a Monthly Total, January-August By Source, a August 2013 a Small quantities of net imports of coal coke and electricity are not shown. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.3. 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 15 30 45 Petroleum Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M

173

Pro Corn LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pro Corn LLC Pro Corn LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Pro-Corn LLC Place Preston, Minnesota Zip 55965 Product Minnesotan farmer owned bioethanol production company. Coordinates 47.526531°, -121.936019° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.526531,"lon":-121.936019,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

174

ProLogis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProLogis ProLogis Jump to: navigation, search Name ProLogis Place Aurora, Colorado Zip 80011 Sector Services Product Provider of distribution facilities and services. Coordinates 39.325162°, -79.54975° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.325162,"lon":-79.54975,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

175

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Elec- tricity Retail Sales g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total e Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum d Total e Hydro- electric Power f Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 5,781 3,546 3,960 13,288 69 NA NA NA 532 602 13,890 500 1,852 16,241 1955 Total .................... 5,620 4,701 5,123 15,434 38 NA NA NA 631 669 16,103 887 2,495 19,485 1960 Total .................... 4,543 5,973 5,766 16,277 39 NA NA NA 680 719 16,996 1,107 2,739 20,842 1965 Total .................... 5,127 7,339 6,813 19,260 33 NA NA NA 855 888 20,148 1,463 3,487 25,098 1970 Total .................... 4,656 9,536 7,776 21,911 34 NA NA NA 1,019 1,053 22,964 1,948 4,716 29,628 1975 Total ....................

176

Word Pro - S4.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 4.3 Natural Gas Consumption by Sector (Billion Cubic Feet) End-Use Sectors Electric Power Sector f,g Total Resi- dential Com- mercial a Industrial Transportation Lease and Plant Fuel Other Industrial Total Pipelines d and Dis- tribution e Vehicle Fuel Total CHP b Non-CHP c Total 1950 Total .................... 1,198 388 928 h ( ) 2,498 2,498 3,426 126 NA 126 629 5,767 1955 Total .................... 2,124 629 1,131 h ( ) 3,411 3,411 4,542 245 NA 245 1,153 8,694 1960 Total .................... 3,103 1,020 1,237 h ( ) 4,535 4,535 5,771 347 NA 347 1,725 11,967 1965 Total .................... 3,903 1,444 1,156 h ( ) 5,955 5,955 7,112 501 NA 501 2,321 15,280 1970 Total .................... 4,837 2,399 1,399 h ( ) 7,851 7,851 9,249 722 NA 722 3,932 21,139 1975 Total .................... 4,924 2,508 1,396 h ( ) 6,968 6,968

177

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Elec- tricity Retail Sales f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum d Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 1,542 401 872 2,815 NA NA NA NA 19 19 2,834 225 834 3,893 1955 Total .................... 801 651 1,095 2,547 NA NA NA NA 15 15 2,561 350 984 3,895 1960 Total .................... 407 1,056 1,248 2,711 NA NA NA NA 12 12 2,723 543 1,344 4,609 1965 Total .................... 265 1,490 1,413 3,168 NA NA NA NA 9 9 3,177 789 1,880 5,845 1970 Total .................... 165 2,473 1,592 4,229 NA NA NA NA 8 8 4,237 1,201 2,908 8,346 1975 Total ....................

178

Word Pro - S4.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Gas Resource Development . 4. Natural Gas Figure 4.1 Natural Gas (Trillion Cubic Feet) Overview, 1949-2012 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2012 Overview, Monthly Consumption by Sector, Monthly Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#naturalgas. Sources: Tables 4.1 and 4.3. 68 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Commercial Electric Power Industrial Industrial Trans- portation Transportation 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 -5 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Consumption Dry Production Net Imports Consumption Dry Production Net Imports 2011 2012 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4

179

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Energy Consumption 2. Energy Consumption by Sector Figure 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Quadrillion Btu) Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, August 2013 22 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Transportation Residential 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Industrial Transportation Residential Commercial J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 1 2 3 4 Industrial Commercial 2011 2012 2013 1.664 1.511 2.610 2.385 3.644 0.231 0.188 1.728 2.379 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation 0 1 2 3 4 Primary Consumption Total Consumption Electric Power Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#consumption. Source: Table 2.1. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013

180

TheIndustriallandscape 1 ProNova  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used to have flour mills, a smith's hammer, a weapons factory and abundant salmon and eel fishing. 7, gathered together in what used to be the famous Tuppen spinning mill. ProNova is a part of Norrköping as a cotton mill and is the oldest kept industrial building in the Industrial Landscape. The centre's activity

Zhao, Yuxiao

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Win pro energy group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Win pro energy group Win pro energy group Jump to: navigation, search Name win:pro energy group Place Berlin, Berlin, Germany Zip 12165 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Win:pro offers location search, development, implementation, operational management and financing for renewable energy projects. Traditionally focused on wind it is now active in the solar and biogas area as well. Coordinates 52.516074°, 13.376987° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.516074,"lon":13.376987,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

Electric Power monthly, November 1995 with data for August 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents monthly electricity statistics, with the purpose of providing energy decisionmakers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities; the information are from six data sources: forms EIA-759, FERC Form 423, EIA-826, EIA-861, EIA-860, and Form OE-417R. An article on reclicensing and environmental issues affecting hydropower is included. Then the statistics are presented in: US electric power at a glance, utility net generation, utility consumption of fossil fuels, fossil-fuel stocks at utilities, fossil fuel receipts and costs, utility sales/revenue/average revenue per kWh, and monthly plant aggregates. Finally, nonutility power producer statistics, bibliography, technical notes, and a glossary are presented.

1995-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Definition: Pro Forma Tariff | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forma Tariff Forma Tariff Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Pro Forma Tariff Usually refers to the standard OATT and/or associated transmission rights mandated by the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Order No. 888.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms transmission lines, transmission line References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Pro_Forma_Tariff&oldid=480579" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

184

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: COLDWIND Pro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COLDWIND Pro COLDWIND Pro Computes coldroom and freezer refrigeration loads, in either Imperial or SI units, for projects drawn directly on-screen, with any number of walls, in any number of rooms, arranged at any angles, with any mix of insulation materials, organized into any number of zones and located anywhere in the world. Automatic and correctly weighted energy profiling at 30-minute intervals for every day of the year. Dynamically links to correctly weighted refrigeration equipment selection and balancing programs. Screen Shots Keywords Refrigeration, Heat Load Calculation Validation/Testing Designed to ASHRAE and CIBSE standards. Standard curriculum teaching aid in leading colleges and universities throughout Europe and Far East. Expertise Required Totally intuitive and dynamically error trapped. Suitable for novices and

185

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AIRWIND Pro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AIRWIND Pro AIRWIND Pro Computes building air conditioning cooling and heating loads, in either Imperial or SI units, for projects drawn directly on-screen, with any number of walls, in any number of rooms, arranged at any angle, with any mix of construction materials and fenestration, organized into any number of zones and located anywhere in the world. Automatic and correctly weighted energy profiling at 30-minute intervals for every day of the year. Dynamically links to correctly weighted air conditioning equipment selection programs. Screen Shots Keywords Air Conditioning Load Calculation Validation/Testing Designed to ASHRAE and CIBSE standards. Standard curriculum teaching aid in leading colleges and universities throughout Europe and Far East. Expertise Required

186

Inventory of power plants in the United States 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Inventory of Power Plants in the US provides year-end statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of December 31, 1994. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal, and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data of nonutility capacity are presented, it is specifically noted as such.

NONE

1995-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

Electric power annual 1998. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report, Electric Power Annual 1998 Volume 1 (EPAVI), is to provide a comprehensive overview of the electric power industry during the most recent year for which data have been collected, with an emphasis on the major changes that occurred. In response to the changes of 1998, this report has been expanded in scope. It begins with a general review of the year and incorporates new data on nonutility capacity and generation, transmission information, futures prices from the Commodity futures Trading commission, and wholesale spot market prices from the pennsylvania-new Jersey-Maryland Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange. Electric utility statistics at the Census division and State levels on generation, fuel consumption, stocks, delivered cost of fossil fuels, sales to ultimate customers, average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold, and revenues from those retail sales can be found in Appendix A. The EPAVI is intended for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BinMaker Pro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BinMaker Pro BinMaker Pro BinMaker Pro logo. Creates summaries of U.S. hourly weather data for 239 cities. BinMaker PRO exports the resulting electronic files for use in spreadsheets, or other computer analysis programs. BinMaker PRO provides the following five functions: BIN summaries by dry bulb temperature or by wet bulb temperature, humidity ration or wind speed. It creates accurate summaries by the choice of four primary variables. Mean coincident values for any of the other three variables (plus enthalpy) are also calculated when requested by user. User may also define a specific operating schedule rather than summarizing all 8760 hours of the year. Ventilation Load BIN Summaries. When a user defines a space-neutral temperature and humidity, BinMaker PRO automatically calculates the

189

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States. Released: January 1, 2003. Final issue of this report.

190

Managing Pro Bono: Doing Well by Doing Better  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organization, we compiled information from the NALP Directory.Directory (ninety-six percent, n=53) has a “formal pro bono policy that sets forth the organization’

Cummings, Scott L; Rhode, Deborah L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Snugg Home's iAudit Pro | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snugg Home's iAudit Pro Snugg Home's iAudit Pro Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: iAudit Pro Agency/Company /Organization: Snugg Home Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.snugghome.com Web Application Link: www.snugghome.com/contractors.html Cost: Paid iAudit Pro Screenshot References: Snugg Home[1] Logo: iAudit Pro A time-saving, accurate, whole-house, state-of-the-art modeling audit tool with the ease and functionality that busy energy efficiency professionals need. Overview Data is entered into the app throughout the walk-though energy audit, then allows the findings to be presented to the homeowner in a easy to understand comprehensive report, showing the entire work scope with drill

192

ProPortal: A Database for Prochlorococcus  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Prochlorococcus is a marine cyanobacterium that numerically dominates the mid-latitude oceans, and is the smallest known oxygenic phototroph. All isolates described thus far can be assigned to either a tightly clustered high-light (HL) adapted clade, or a more divergent low-light (LL) adapted group. They are closely related to, but distinct from, marine Synechococcus. The genomes of 12 strains have been sequenced and they range in size from 1.6 to 2.6 Mbp. They represent diverse lineages, spanning the rRNA diversity (97 to 99.93% similarity) of cultured representatives of this group. Our analyses of these genomes inform our understanding of how adaptation occurs in the oceans along gradients of light, nutrients, and other environmental factors, providing essential context for interpreting rapidly expanding metagenomic datasets. [Copied from http://proportal.mit.edu/project/prochlorococcus/] ProPortal allows users to browse and search genome date for not only Prochlorococcus, but Cyanophage and Synechococcus. Microarray data, environmental cell concentration data, and metagenome information are also available.

Huang, Katherine [Chisholm lab, MIT

193

Coal-fueled diesel system for stationary power applications -- Technology development. Final report, March 1988--June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Cooper-Bessemer and Arthur D. Little have developed the technology to enable coal-water slurry to be utilized in large-bore, medium-speed diesel engines. The target application is modular power generation in the 10 to 100 MW size, with each plant using between two and eight engines. Such systems are expected to be economically attractive in the non-utility generation market after 2000, when oil and natural gas prices are expected to escalate rapidly compared to the price of coal. During this development program, over 1,000 hours of prototype engine operation have been achieved on coal-water slurry (CWS), including over 100 hours operation of a six-cylinder, 1.8 MW engine with an integrated emissions control system. Arthur D. Little, Inc., managed the coal-fueled diesel development, with Cooper-Bessemer as the principal subcontractor responsible for the engine design and testing. Several key technical advances which enable the viability of the coal-fueled diesel engine were made under this program. Principal among them are the development and demonstration of (1) durable injection nozzles; (2) an integrated emissions control system; ad (3) low-cost clean coal slurry formulations optimized for the engine. Significant advances in all subsystem designs were made to develop the full-scale Cooper-Bessemer coal engine components in preparation for a 100-hour proof-of-concept test of an integrated system, including emissions controls. The Clean Coal Diesel power plant of the future will provide a cost-competitive, low-emissions, modular, coal-based power generation option to the non-utility generation, small utility, independent power producer, and cogeneration markets. Combined cycle efficiencies will be approximately 48% (lower heating value basis) and installed cost will be approximately $1,300/kW (1992 dollars).

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EnergyPro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by DOE-2.1E are not handled by the EnergyPro interface. Examples include cogeneration, daylighting, and off-site steam production. The user must model the basic building...

195

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 5.9 - Number of Utilities by Class of Ownership and Nonutilities 1980 1990 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Investor-Owned Utilities 240 266 238 240 232 230 223 220 Federally...

196

Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Pro-forma issued January 20091 Programme Specification HNC Building Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements of CIBSE (chartered institute of Building Services #12;Pro-forma issued January 20092 Engineers

St Andrews, University of

198

Performance issues for a changing electric power industry  

SciTech Connect

Extremely cold weather created record demands for electricity in the eastern two-thirds of the United States during the week of January 16, 1994. Fuel-related problems, mostly the result of transportation constraints resulting from ice accumulation on roads and water-ways, and unexpected generating capacity outages at utilities and nonutilities resulted in demand not being met. Some utilities asked nonessential customers along with State governments and a portion of the Federal Government to shut down. Two electric control areas, the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection (PJM) and Virginia Electric & Power Company (VEPCO), instituted rolling blackouts. This disturbance was reported widely in the press and, along with other disturbances, peaked renewed interest in the reliability of the electric power system. The renewed interest in reliability has coincided with substantial changes that are beginning to occur in the structure and competitiveness of the electric power industry. Juxtaposing the question of reliability and the issue of changing industry structure leads to the central concern of this report: What effect, if any, will the changing structure of the industry have on the reliability of the system?

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Quantum computing: pro and con BY JOHN PRESKILL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum computing: pro and con BY JOHN PRESKILL Charles C. Lauritsen Laboratory of High Energy Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA I assess the potential of quantum computation. Broad and important applications must be found to justify construction of a quantum computer; I

Preskill, John

200

Reverse Engineering Code with IDA Pro, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If you want to master the art and science of reverse engineering code with IDA Pro for security R&D or software debugging, this is the book for you. Highly organized and sophisticated criminal entities are constantly developing more complex, obfuscated, ... Keywords: Programming, Security

IOActive

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ProMoVer: modular verification of temporal safety properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes ProMoVer, a tool for fully automated procedure-modular verification of Java programs equipped with method-local and global assertions that specify safety properties of sequences of method invocations. Modularity at the procedure-level ...

Siavash Soleimanifard; Dilian Gurov; Marieke Huisman

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

Farhar, B. C.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The power of mass spectrometry in the detection of fraud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fraudulent products cost industry billions of dollars each year. Perfumes are a good example. The power of mass spectrometry in the detection of fraud Inform Magazine Analytical Chemistry Biochemistry Biotechnology Bert Poepping Fraudulent pro

204

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Use (Electric utility and Nonutility power producers): ... (Check One): Form Approved No. 2 Diesel < 500 ppm Sulfur, Low (include Ultra Low Sulfur)

205

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coal Consumption to Coal Generation Sources: * 1990-1997-EIA, Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report," and Form EIA-867, Annual Nonutility Power Producer Report. *...

206

VWA-0015 - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWA-0015 - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. VWA-0015 - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. VWA-0015 - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Barry Stutts, a former security officer for Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. (Am-Pro). It is undisputed that: Mr. Stutts and a fellow security officer, Michael Wolfe, made a protected disclosure, i.e., that their supervisors did not prepare an "incident report" concerning an open top secret safe. Two weeks after the protected disclosure, Am-Pro terminated Mr. Wolfe, who had worked at the DOE for 16 years. Eight weeks after the protected disclosure, Am-Pro terminated Mr. Stutts, who had worked at the DOE for almost two years. As explained below, Am-Pro has failed to

207

Laboratory Equipment - DynaPro-LSR 99-E-15 Dynamic Light ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DynaPro-LSR 99-E-15 Dynamic Light Scattering. Description: Location: N/A. Specifications / Capabilities: Uses: Measuring ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Powering Health | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powering Health Powering Health Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Powering Health Agency/Company /Organization: USAID Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Health Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.poweringhealth.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America Language: English Related Tools SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook ProForm Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) ... further results

209

Georgia/EZFeed Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

that was enacted to promote conservation and to encourage use of alternative sources of power generation. PURPA established a class of non-utility generators comprised of small...

210

Georgia/EZ Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

that was enacted to promote conservation and to encourage use of alternative sources of power generation. PURPA established a class of non-utility generators comprised of small...

211

PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Zip Code 9. Reference Year . 2010 . 10. Type of Report (Check One) ... Electric Power (Electric utility and Nonutility): 33 . No. 2 Diesel ? 500 ppm Sulfur, Low

212

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

heat and power (CHP) plants and a small number of industrial electricity-only plants, and natural gas-to-liquids heatpower production; excludes consumption by nonutility...

213

Annual Electric Utility Data – EIA-906/920/923 Data File  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power plant data prior to 2001 are separate files for utility and nonutility plants. For 2001 data and subsequent years, the data are Excel spreadsheet files that ...

214

V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data August 3, 2013 - 2:37am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in HP Printers. A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. PLATFORM: HP LaserJet Pro products ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP LaserJet Pro printers. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to gain unauthorized access to data. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID 1028869 CVE-2013-4807 Vendor URL IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The following models are affected: HP LaserJet Pro P1102w CE657A/CE658A HP LaserJet Pro P1606dn CE749A HP LaserJet Pro M1212nf MFP CE841A HP LaserJet Pro M1213nf MFP CE845A

215

Monthly 2008 Utility and Nonutility Fuel Receipts and Fuel Quality...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tags fossil fuel receipts, coal receipts, oil receipts, gas receipts, fossil fuel consumption, electricity generating fuel Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data...

216

Pro Solar Solarstrom GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solarstrom GmbH Solarstrom GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Pro Solar Solarstrom GmbH Place Ravensburg, Germany Zip 88214 Sector Solar Product Distributor of PV modules, including Canadian Solar's, in Germany. Coordinates 47.782018°, 9.614622° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.782018,"lon":9.614622,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

217

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: iAudit Pro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

entry. It harnesses the power of utility bills and dozens of national databases for weather data, housing characteristics, and installed costs to produce beautiful,...

218

Sams Teach Yourself Paint Shop Pro 6 in 24 Hours, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:This easily accessible tutorial uses a friendly, conversational approach to teach you the basics of Paint Shop Pro 6. With its careful, step-by-step approach, Sams Teach Yourself Paint Shop Pro 6 in 24 Hours makes it easy even for ...

T. Michael Clark; Michael Clark / Kris Tufto

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

VWA-0015 - Deputy Secretary Decision - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWA-0015 - Deputy Secretary Decision - In the Matter of Am-Pro VWA-0015 - Deputy Secretary Decision - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. VWA-0015 - Deputy Secretary Decision - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. Barry Stutts, Complainant v. Am-Pro Protective Agency, Inc., Respondent, OHA Case No. VWA-0015 DECISION DENYING REVIEW OF INITIAL AGENCY DECISION This is a request for review by Complainant Barry Stutts, from the Initial Agency Decision by the Office of Hearings and Appeals ("OHA"), finding that reinstatement of Mr. Stutts as a security guard is a necessary and appropriate action to effect full relief for a retaliatory termination made by the previous security contractor at Forrestal and Germantown, Am-Pro Protective Agency, Inc. Based upon my review of the regulatory language,

220

18 IEEE power & energy magazine september/october 2010 on the winds of change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18 IEEE power & energy magazine september/october 2010 R on the winds of change impact a much larger area than a coal or a gas power plant to pro- duce a given amount of energy. A wind power.937465 RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOL- ogies are being welcomed in many countries worldwide because of their minor

Rudnick, Hugh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Strategies for an evolving generation industry  

SciTech Connect

This article deals with the changing structure of the power generation industry to include nonutility generation resources. The topics discussed include the permanence of nonutility generation as a power source, the evolving industry, and the strategies for an evolving industry. The emphasis is on developing sound, sophisticated purchasing procedures to fully benefit from this new generation resource.

Kee, E.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

222

DC Pro Software Tool Suite, Data Center Fact Sheet, Industrial Technologies Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes how DOE's Data Center Energy Profiler (DC Pro) Software Tool Suite and other resources can help U.S. companies identify ways to improve the efficiency of their data centers.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

1 INTRODUCTION Probabilistic risk (or safety) assessments (PRA) pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reliability analyses. Finally, a case study in- volving a nuclear reactor is presented in Section 3. Dynamic for managing risks linked to engineering systems, notably in nuclear power plants, aerospace, and chemical of dynamic reliability was established under the name of Con- tinuous Event Tree (CET) theory, (Devooght

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

224

A Projective Model Structure on Pro Simplicial Sheaves, and the Relative \\'Etale Homotopy Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In \\cite{Isa}, Isaksen showed that a proper model category $\\cC$, induces a model structure on the pro category $Pro(\\cC)$. In this paper we generalize Isaksen's theorem to the case when $\\cC$ possess a weaker structure, which we call a "weak fibration category". Namely, we show that if $\\mcal{C}$ is a weak fibration category, that satisfies an extra condition, there is a naturally induced model structure on $Pro(\\cC)$. We then apply our theorem to the case when $\\cC$ is the weak fibration category of simplicial sheafs on a Grothendieck site, where both weak equivalences and fibrations are local as in \\cite{Jar}. This gives a new model structure on the category of pro simplicial sheaves. Using this new model structure we give a definition of the \\'etale homotopy type of Artin and Mazur \\cite{AM}, as the result of applying a derived functor. Our definition actually gives as object in $Pro(\\cS)$ and not just in $Pro(Ho(\\cS))$ as in \\cite{AM}. Our definition also extends naturally to a relative notion of the \\'e...

Barnea, Ilan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Power Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Operations Outage Coordination Standards of Conduct Transmission Planning You are here: SN Home page > Power Operations Power Operations Western's Sierra Nevada Region...

226

ProSteam- A Structured Approach to Steam System Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal operation of site utility systems is becoming an increasingly important part of any successful business strategy as environmental, legislative and commercial pressures grow. A reliable steam model allows a clear understanding of the system and of any operational constraints. It can also be used to determine the true cost of improvement projects, relating any changes in steam demand back to purchased utilities (fuel, power, and make-up water) at the site boundary. Example projects could include improved insulation, better condensate return, increased process integration, new steam turbines or even the installation of gas-turbine based cogeneration. This approach allows sites to develop a staged implementation plan for both operational and capital investment projects in the utility system. Steam system models can be taken one step further and linked to the site DCS data to provide real-time balances and improve the operation of the system, providing an inexpensive but very effective optimizer. Such a model ensures that the steam system is set in the optimum manner to react to current utility demands, emissions regulations, equipment availability, fuel and power costs, etc. This optimization approach typically reduces day-to-day utility system operating costs by between 1% and 5% at no capital cost.

Eastwood, A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Standby Power System Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Critical Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

PFP's Standby Power System consists of the diesel generators, the generator control system, Rm 308 UPS, switchgear batteries, and the electrical equipment used to distribute this power. Due to the nature of the equipment and its use throughout general industry, the majority of the system falls within the CGI definition HNF-PRO-268, ''Control of Purchased Items and Services'' and HNF-PRO-1819, ''PHMC Engineering Requirements'' require that the critical characteristics of CGI-procured equipment be established in an engineering document prior to placing the order. HNF-5043 established these critical characteristics for the Standby Power System. This modification adds several items to the document.

DEHKORDI, N.H.

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

229

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Using HyPro to Evaluate Competing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using HyPro to Evaluate Competing Hydrogen Pathways Using HyPro to Evaluate Competing Hydrogen Pathways Project Summary Full Title: Using HyPro to Evaluate Competing Hydrogen Pathways Project ID: 217 Principal Investigator: Brian D. James Keywords: Steam methane reforming (SMR); electrolysis; biomass; fuel cell vehicles (FCV); costs Purpose This project provides analysis of the options and trade-offs associated with establishing the required hydrogen production infrastructure to provide hydrogen to fuel cell vehicles in the 2020 timeframe and beyond. Performer Principal Investigator: Brian D. James Organization: Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) Address: 3601 Wilson Blvd., Suite 650 Arlington, VA 22201 Telephone: 703-778-7114 Email: Brian_James@directedtechnologies.com Additional Performers: Sentech, Inc.; H2Gen Innovations, Inc.; ChevronTexaco Technology Ventures; Teledyne Energy Services

230

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SolarPro 2.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SolarPro 2.0 SolarPro 2.0 SolarPro 2.0 logo. Simulates the operation of an active solar hot water heating system, hour by hour, for one year based on Typical Meteorological Year 2 (TMY2) information available from NREL. Dozens of customizable variables are incorporated into the simulation. Keywords solar water heating, thermal processes, alternative energy, simulation Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required General knowledge of solar thermal processes. Users New Software Product. Audience Solar design engineers, solar contractors, do-it-yourselfers. Input Main inputs required: TMY2 datafile 239 U.S. locations provided on the CD-ROM, solar collector OG-100 panel ratings (database included), tank size and insulation factor, customer hot water use pattern. Output Solar fraction, hourly charts, hour-by-hour simulation end points in

231

The Science Teacher36 n my role as director of Columbia University's pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Science Teacher36 I n my role as director of Columbia University's pro- gram in Earth and Environmental Science Jour- nalism, I encounter many students who love both science and writing. This article provides practical guidance for science teachers to help such students explore careers

Kastens, Kim Anne

232

Promotion of efficient heat pumps for heating (ProHeatPump)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and towns have (some) district heating, and DH currently supplies 1% of heating for buildings in Norway.2 to district heating if there is a supply. According to HP industry representatives, howeverProject Promotion of efficient heat pumps for heating (ProHeatPump) EIE/06/072 / S12

233

ProForm: A Tool for Pre-Feasibility Analysis of Renewable Energy and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Landfill methane gas capture projects · Cogeneration projects #12;Pre-Feasibility Analysis · ProForm aids-generation, landfill methane and energy efficiency projects · Available in English and in Spanish #12;Rationale.e., projects with greenhouse gas reduction benefits) · Lack of familiarity among small entrepreneurs

234

Source Code Optimization and Pro ling of Energy Consumption in Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Model L2 Cache Memory L1 Cache Energy Model Energy Model Processor Core Model DC-DC ConverterSource Code Optimization and Pro ling of Energy Consumption in Embedded Systems Tajana Simunic in optimizing software performance and energy in embed- ded systems. Code optimizations are applied at three

Simunic, Tajana

235

Applications in space Space physics is the scienti c discipline which studies the physical pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an important role in space weather. The supersonic and super-Alfv#19;enic solar wind generates a bow shock the physical pro- cesses that are at work in our solar system and in the coupled solar- terrestrial system. Processes in the earth's magnetosphere and phe- nomena in the solar corona are important topics of research

De Sterck, Hans

236

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Generation of Electric Power in the United States 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The President issued a directive on April 15, 1999, requiring an annual report summarizing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by electricity generation in the United States, including both utilities and nonutilities. In response, this report is jointly submitted by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Information Center

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

EIA COPY. Tear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COPY. COPY. Tear out, complete, and return to: Energy Information Administration: EI-441 Mail Station: BG-094 FORSTL U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Attn: Form EIA-176 SHORT FORM A2. Form EIA-176, Short Form Figure Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1996 220 nonutility nonutility nonutility nonutility Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1996 221 5.4.4.2 EIA-176, ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION, 19 RESPO NDENT CO PY Page 3 PART V: CONTINUATION, DISPOSITION OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS WITHIN OR TRANSPORTED OUT OF REPORT STATE 1.0 Control No. 2.0 Company Name 3.0 Report State 4.0 Resubmittal EIA Date Volume (Mcf at 14.73 psia) e or f Cost or Revenue (Including taxes) e or f 5.4.4 Other Nonutility Power Producer Sales

238

Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in comparing the costs of renewable energy across ownershipof low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy productionCost Recovery System Non-Utility Generator Power Purchase Agreement Public Power Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

HyPro: A Financial Tool for Simulating Hydrogen Infrastructure Development, Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a multi-year Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI) project to study the build-out of hydrogen production facilities during the transition from gasoline internal combustion engine vehicle to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The primary objectives of the project are to develop an enhanced understanding of hydrogen production issues during the transition period (out to 2050) and to develop recommendations for the DOE on areas of further study. These objectives are achieved by conducting economic and scenario analysis to predict how industry would provide the hydrogen production, delivery and dispensing capabilities necessary to satisfy increased hydrogen demand. The primary tool used for the analysis is a custom created MatLab simulation tool entitled HyPro (short for Hydrogen Production). This report describes the calculation methodology used in HyPro, the baseline assumptions, the results of the baseline analysis and several corollary studies. The appendices of this report included a complete listing of model assumptions (capital costs, efficiencies, feedstock prices, delivery distances, etc.) and a step-by-step manual on the specific operation of the HyPro program. This study was made possible with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Brian D. James, Peter O. Schmidt, Julie Perez

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Power Electronics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Power electronics (PE) play a critical role in transforming the current electric grid into the next-generation grid.  PE enable utilities to deliver power to their customers effectively while...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Wind Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe Mountains,...

242

Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 5 Typical medium-frequency induction power supply incorporating (a) a parallel inverter and (b) a series inverter...

243

Power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul (Seminole, FL); Hamilton, Pamela Jane (Seminole, FL); Brubaker, Michael Allen (Loveland, CO)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

244

Putting Economic Power In Distributed Power t  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Putting Economic Power in Distributed Power. A distributed electricity generation system, often called distributed power, usually consists of ...

245

Design and Validation of a Mobile Robot for PowerDesign and Validation of a Mobile Robot for PowerDesign and Validation of a Mobile Robot for PowerDesign and Validation of a Mobile Robot for Power Line Inspection and MaintenanceLine Inspection and Mainten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montambault1 and Nicolas Pouliot2 Hydro-Québec Research Institute (IREQ) 1740 Lionel-Boulet Blvd, Varennes even though power line maintenance work must be car- ried out routinely in hostile environments as part of a Hydro-Québec research program that aims at pro- viding robotic technologies to perform

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

246

Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certificate Solicitations Benefit Review Energy Services Rates and Repayment WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Send correspondence to: Power Marketing Manager Western...

247

Influence of Pro-Qura-generated Plans on Postimplant Dosimetric Quality: A Review of a Multi-Institutional Database  

SciTech Connect

The influence of Pro-Qura-generated plans vs. community-generated plans on postprostate brachytherapy dosimetric quality was compared. In the Pro-Qura database, 2933 postplans were evaluated from 57 institutions. A total of 1803 plans were generated by Pro-Qura and 1130 by community institutions. Iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) plans outnumbered Palladium 103 ({sup 103}Pd) plans by a ratio of 3:1. Postimplant dosimetry was performed in a standardized fashion by overlapping the preimplant ultrasound and the postimplant computed tomography (CT). In this analysis, adequacy was defined as a V{sub 100} > 80% and a D{sub 90} of 90% to 140% for both isotopes along with a V{sub 150} < 60% for {sup 125}I and < 75% for {sup 103}Pd. The mean postimplant V{sub 100} and D{sub 90} were 88.6% and 101.6% vs. 89.3% and 102.3% for Pro-Qura and community plans, respectively. When analyzed in terms of the first 8 sequence groups (10 patients/sequence group) for each institution, Pro-Qura planning resulted in less postimplant variability for V{sub 100} (86.2-89.5%) and for D{sub 90} (97.4-103.2%) while community-generated plans had greater V{sub 100} (85.3-91.2%) and D{sub 90} (95.9-105.2%) ranges. In terms of sequence groups, postimplant dosimetry was deemed 'too cool' in 11% to 30% of cases and 'too hot' in 12% to 27%. On average, no clinically significant postimplant dosimetric differences were discerned between Pro-Qura and community-based planning. However, substantially greater variability was identified in the community-based plan cohort. It is possible that the Pro-Qura plan and/or the routine postimplant dosimetric evaluation may have influenced dosimetric outcomes at community-based centers.

Allen, Zachariah [Wheeling Hospital, Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States)]|[Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)]|[Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)]|[Pro-Qura, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Wheeling Hospital, Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States)]|[Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)]|[Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)]|[Pro-Qura, Seattle, WA (United States)], E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Grimm, Peter; Blasko, John; Sylvester, John; Butler, Wayne; Chaudry, Usman-Ul-Haq; Sitter, Michael [Wheeling Hospital, Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States)]|[Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)]|[Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)]|[Pro-Qura, Seattle, WA (United States)

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cannabidiol induced a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect between freshly isolated and precultured human monocytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been documented that cannabidiol (CBD) induced apoptosis in a variety of transformed cells, including lymphocytic and monocytic leukemias. In contrast, a differential sensitivity between normal lymphocytes and monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis has been reported. The present study investigated the pro-apoptotic effect of CBD on human peripheral monocytes that were either freshly isolated or precultured for 72 h. CBD markedly enhanced apoptosis of freshly isolated monocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, whereas precultured monocytes were insensitive. By comparison, both cells were sensitive to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. CBD significantly diminished the cellular thiols and glutathione in freshly isolated monocytes. The apoptosis induced by CBD was abrogated in the presence of N-acetyl-{sub L}-cysteine, a precursor of glutathione. In addition, precultured monocytes contained a significantly greater level of glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) compared to the freshly isolated cells. The HO-1 competitive inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin partially but significantly restored the sensitivity of precultured monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrated a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect of CBD between precultured and freshly isolated monocytes, which was closely associated with the cellular level of glutathione and the antioxidative capability of the cells.

Wu, Hsin-Ying; Chang, An-Chi; Wang, Chia-Chi; Kuo, Fu-Hua; Lee, Chi-Ya [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Der-Zen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jan, Tong-Rong, E-mail: tonyjan@ntu.edu.t [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

250

Solar Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Solar Power Project Opportunities Abound in the Region The WIPP site is receives abundant solar energy with 6-7 kWh/sq meter power production potential As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the WIPP site enjoys abundant year-round sunshine. With an average solar power production potential of 6-7 kWh/sq meter per day, one exciting project being studied for location at WIPP is a 30-50 MW Solar Power Tower: The American Solar Energy Society (ASES) is is a national trade association promoting solar energy as a clean source of electricity, and provides a comprehensive resource for additional information. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is also a comprehensive resource for more information on renewable energy.

251

Replacing Hazelwood Power Station – Critique of Environment Victoria report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazelwood Power Station is Australia’s most CO2 emission intensive power station. Replacing it with cleaner technology could reduce Australia’s CO2 emissions by 12 to 16 Mt/a. Energy Victoria recently commissioned a report by Green Energy Markets Pty Ltd to consider options. But the report has a pro-renewables bias, avoids the best option (gas only), and contains many inconsistencies. Comparing the ‘renewables and gas ’ option against the ‘gas only ’ option shows Emissions saved per year: 12.2 Mt/a versus 11.8 Mt/a; Capital cost: $6-$7 billion versus $2 billion;

Peter Lang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

253

Green Power Network: Green Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to main content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Green Power Network About the GPN Green Power Markets Buying Green Power Onsite Renewable...

254

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1997 36 normal weather in 1997, commercial consumption climbed to a new record level in 1997, 3.2 trillion cubic feet, 2 per- cent above last year's record. A 7-percent rise in the num- ber of commercial consumers may have contributed to the increase. The number of commercial consumers grew by 284,157 from 1996 to 1997, more than the total growth in consumers in this sector shown from 1993 to 1996. Industrial In recent years, more than 40 percent of natural gas deliver- ies have been used by industrial consumers. After increas- ing in a steady upward trend for 10 consecutive years, de- liveries to this sector fell slightly in 1998 to 8.8 trillion cu- bic feet, but were still slightly above the previous historical high set more than 20 years ago in 1973. Industrial con- sumption includes deliveries to all nonutility power pro- ducers. Because

255

Power inverters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Power inverters include a frame and a power module. The frame has a sidewall including an opening and defining a fluid passageway. The power module is coupled to the frame over the opening and includes a substrate, die, and an encasement. The substrate includes a first side, a second side, a center, an outer periphery, and an outer edge, and the first side of the substrate comprises a first outer layer including a metal material. The die are positioned in the substrate center and are coupled to the substrate first side. The encasement is molded over the outer periphery on the substrate first side, the substrate second side, and the substrate outer edge and around the die. The encasement, coupled to the substrate, forms a seal with the metal material. The second side of the substrate is positioned to directly contact a fluid flowing through the fluid passageway.

Miller, David H. (Redondo Beach, CA); Korich, Mark D. (Chino Hills, CA); Smith, Gregory S. (Woodland Hills, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Standby Power System Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Critical Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PEP's Standby Power System consists of the diesel generators, the generator control system, Rm 308 UPS, switchgear batteries, and the electrical equipment used to distribute this power. Due to the nature of the equipment and its use throughout general industry, the majority of the system falls within the CGI definition HNF-PRO-268. ''Control of Purchased Items and Services'' and HNF-PRO-1819, ''PHMC Engineering Requirements'' require that the critical characteristics of CGI-procured equipment be established in an engineering document prior to placing the order. HNF-5043 establishes these critical characteristics for the Standby Power System. Equipment will be added to the list as required to support future CGI procurements.

BUSCH, M.S.

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

257

Form EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases 906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases Dataset Summary Description The EIA-906, EIA-920, EIA-923 and predecessor forms provide monthly and annual data on generation and fuel consumption at the power plant and prime mover level. A subset of plants, steam-electric plants 10 MW and above, also provides boiler level and generator level data. Data for utility plants are available from 1970, and for non-utility plants from 1999. Beginning with January 2004 data collection, the EIA-920 was used to collect data from the combined heat and power plant (cogeneration) segment of the non-utility sector; also as of 2004, nonutilities filed the annual data for nonutility source and disposition of electricity. Beginning in 2007, environmental data was collected on Schedules 8A - 8F of the Form 923 and includes by-product

258

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. March 10, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert Power supplies convert the AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and durable. If they meet those criteria, then they're all alike, except for cost, right? Well, not exactly. You see, there's one other important feature that sets them apart: efficiency. And I don't know about you, but I believe waste is bad. For me, high efficiency is one important feature that's needed for something to be high quality. So isn't it ridiculous that most power

259

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. March 10, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert Power supplies convert the AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and durable. If they meet those criteria, then they're all alike, except for cost, right? Well, not exactly. You see, there's one other important feature that sets them apart: efficiency. And I don't know about you, but I believe waste is bad. For me, high efficiency is one important feature that's needed for something to be high quality. So isn't it ridiculous that most power

260

Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Characteristics of the four major power sources for induction heating...state 180 Hz to 50 kHz 1 kW to 2 MW 75â??95 No standby current; high efficiency; no moving parts;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Satellite power system (SPS) public acceptance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to develop a preliminary perspective on the public acceptability of the Solar Satellite Power System (SPS) Program, and a means to monitor it. A literature review and informal contacts with interest groups likely to take a position on the program reveal a number of concerns (anti-SPS arguments), as well as potential benefits (pro-SPS arguments). The concerns expressed include: environmental issues (microwaves, high altitude air pollution from space launches, land use), the program's cost in dollars, energy and other resources; communications interference; military implications; ownership and control of the system (particularly strengthening the power of utility monopolies); SPS as representing a centralized, high technology hard energy policy (rather than a decentralized smaller-scale soft approach); and the fear that SPS might dominate solar R and D budgets at the expense of decentralized solar technologies. Pro-SPS arguments stress its efficiency compared to terrestrial solar applications (i.e. virtually continuous exposure, no atmospheric attenuation). The program could be a major contributor to solving America's (and the world's) long-term energy crisis. It would improve our balance of payments; create many jobs both directly and through technology spinoffs; advance the space program; strengthen the U.S. position as a world leader in high technology; provide a great boost to American national pride; and would be environmentally preferable to alternative power generation technologies (e.g. coal, nuclear). Several key issues in SPS acceptability are: the outcome (and credibility) of future research into program environmental and non-environmental impacts, and the comparison of SPS impacts with those of alternative energy options. Recommendations for future research are given.

Bachrach, A.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Power superconducting power transmission cable  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world of the twenty first century is an energy consuming society. Due to increasing population and living standards, each year the world requires more energy and new efficient systems for delivering it. Furthermore, the new systems must be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. The goal of the book is to show the current state-of-the-art in the covered technical areas as well as to demonstrate how general engineering principles and methods can be applied to nuclear power systems.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Power supply  

SciTech Connect

An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

Hart, Edward J. (Albuquerque, NM); Leeman, James E. (Albuquerque, NM); MacDougall, Hugh R. (Albuquerque, NM); Marron, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Calvin C. (Amarillo, TX)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Power Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here: Find a Car Home > Power Search You are here: Find a Car Home > Power Search Power Search Expand any feature by selecting its title bar. Choose as many or as few features as you like. Model Year From: 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 To: 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 MSRP Under $15,000 $15,000-$20,000 $20,000-$25,000 $25,000-$30,000 $30,000-$35,000 $35,000-$40,000 $40,000-$45,000 $45,000-$50,000 $50,000-$55,000 $55,000-$60,000 $60,000-$65,000 $65,000-$70,000 $70,000-$75,000 $75,000-$80,000 $80,000-$85,000 Over $85,000 - OR - Minimum: Select... $5,000 $6,000 $7,000 $8,000 $9,000 $10,000 $11,000

266

Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

327310," Cements","W",16,"W",1 327410," Lime",0,0,0,0 327993," Mineral Wool",0,0,0,0 331,"Primary Metals","W","W",673,1.4 331111," Iron and Steel...

267

Non-utility marketers provide over 20% of residential natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... customers–averaging over 85% of total deliveries since 2000. Starting October 1, 1999, all residential natural gas customers ...

268

Low Power Design Low PowerLow Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, correlations among system state transitions #12;Low Power Design USC/LPCAD Page 11 USCUSC Low PowerLow Power for the requestsIncoming rates for the requests 21,rr 12 ,rr, :, : State transition ratesState transition rates OS and hardware Abstract, hierarchical finite-state machine Each state represents power

Pedram, Massoud

269

NatioNal aNd Global Forecasts West VirGiNia ProFiles aNd Forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· NatioNal aNd Global Forecasts · West VirGiNia ProFiles aNd Forecasts · eNerGy · Healt;#12;Copyright ©2012 by WVU Research Corporation Unless otherwise noted, data used for this forecast is from IHS Population 2 GlOBAl OUTlOOk 3 Current Trends 3 Forecast 6 UNITED STATES OUTlOOk 9 Global and United States

Mohaghegh, Shahab

270

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTC Home Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Virtual University Power Operations Training Center You'll find the "Power" of learning at Southwestern's Power Operations...

271

Power management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

Solar powered desalination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, uses concentrated solar power to split water. Figurethe main reason the potential for solar power is boundless.a clean energy source, solar power is inexhaustible, fairly

Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Solar powered desalination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.13: California Power Generation by Source……………………………………31for hydro- electric power generation would be reached inother end users include the power generation industry (4%),

Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schedules Skip Navigation Links Excess Energy Hydro Peaking Power Hydro Power and Energy Sold to Sam Rayburn Dam Electric Cooperative (Rayburn) Hydro Power and Energy Sold to Sam...

275

Hybrid-Intelligent POWER “HI-POWER”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... T T T A A A SMART-T Current Situation Current Situation ... Page 10. 22 Power Grid • Plug & Play architecture • Multiple power sources • Renewables ...

2013-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

276

Power oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

Zinn, W.H.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Power plant  

SciTech Connect

A two stroke internal combustion engine is described that has at least one cylinder within which a piston reciprocates. The engine is joined to a gearbox which includes a ring gear. A pair of gears having diameters half that of the ring gear move within the latter. At least one of the pair of gears is connected to a piston by a pin extending between the piston and the periphery of said gear. An additional pair of gears are fixed to respective ones of the first-mentioned gear pair and are operatively joined to a pinion to which a drive shaft is secured. A turbine and filter arrangement is positioned on the side of the engine opposite the gearbox whereby exhaust gases from the engine are directed to the turbine to develop power at an output drive shaft joined to the turbine and to filter pollutants from the gases.

Finn, H.I. Jr.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Sector ; Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector; Annual Totals: ...

280

Electric Power Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid Our country's way of life depends on the electric power distribution system. ...

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

22 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 2005 M O R E T H A N E V E R , T H E  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The articles pro- vide background on generation supply and transmission interconnections in the geographic guesteditorial energizing the world electric energy in emerging economies 1540-7977/05/$20.00©2005 IEEE OUTLETS:©EYEWIRE,MAP power sec- tor and reviews the strategies leading to phased development of an integrat- ed African grid

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

282

Putting Economic Power in Distributed Power  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Electric Power Research Institute's Distributed Resources Week 1997 (October 22, 1997)AUTHOR: John Herbert

Information Center

1997-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

283

Windows NT Workstation Performance Evaluation Based on Pro/E 2000i BENCHMARK  

SciTech Connect

A performance evaluation of several computers was necessary, so an evaluation program, or benchmark, was run on each computer to determine maximum possible performance. The program was used to test the Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) ability of each computer by monitoring the speed with which several functions were executed. The main objective of the benchmarking program was to record assembly loading times and image regeneration times and then compile a composite score that could be compared with the same tests on other computers. The three computers that were tested were the Compaq AP550, the SGI 230, and the Hewlett-PackardP750C. The Compaq and SGI computers each had a Pentium III 733mhz processor, while the Hewlett-Packard had a Pentium III 750mhz processor. The size and speed of Random Access Memory (RAM) in each computer varied, as did the type of graphics card. Each computer that was tested was using Windows NT 4.0 and Pro/ENGINEER{trademark} 2000i CAD benchmark software provided by Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). The benchmarking program came with its own assembly, automatically loaded and ran tests on the assembly, then compiled the time each test took to complete. Due to the automation of the tests, any sort of user error affecting test scores was virtually eliminated. After all the tests were completed, scores were then compiled and compared. The Silicon Graphics 230 was by far the overall winner with a composite score of 8.57. The Compaq AP550 was next with a score of 5.19, while the Hewlett-Packard P750C performed dismally, achieving a score of 3.34. Several factors, including motherboard chipset, graphics card, and the size and speed of RAM, were involved in the differing scores of the three machines. Surprisingly the Hewlett-Packard, which had the fastest processor, came back with the lowest score. The above factors most likely contributed to the poor performance of the Hewlett-Packard. Based on the results of the benchmark test, the SGI 230 appears to be the best CAD software solution. The Hewlett-Packard most likely performed poorly due to the fact that it was only running a 100mhz Front Side Bus (FSB), while the SGI machine was running at a 133mhz. The Compaq was using a new type of RAM called RDRAM. While this RAM was at first perceived to be a great performer, various benchmarks, including this one, have found that the computers using RDRAM really only achieve average performance.

DAVIS,SEAN M.

2000-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

284

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ProActive DNS ProActive DNS Blacklisting Gene Rackow Argonne National Laboratory The Basics of DNS Hostname to IP mapping and back Host aliases Mail server locations Services Security records What is DNS Blacklisting? DNS Blacklist also known as a DNS Blackhole. Local server fakes zones know to contain: Malware Spyware Command/Control Advertising Political Issues What are DNS Blacklist Benefits Preventing hosts from getting to bad stuff. If you are not presented with the malware, Chances are you are not going to be infected. Estimates are that blocking Advertising sites stops 85% of infections. DNS Blacklist Sources of information Bad News about DNS Blacklisting Typically It's ReActive. Entries are added AFTER something happened. Some machines have already been

285

Understanding Mercury Chemistry via the Reaction Engineering International (REI) ProMerc(tm) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury chemistry in a coal-fired boiler remains poorly understood. As a result, power company engineers cannot predict with confidence the level of mercury emissions they would experience at a given site if they change coals, add/enhance criteria pollutant controls, or implement mercury controls. Similarly, they cannot predict with confidence how mercury control test results at one site extrapolate to other sites. This report documents a modeling study conducted by Reaction Engineering International (RE...

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

286

ZigBee Stack, ZigBee PRO Profile, and Smart Energy Profile Technical Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZigBee is a wireless network protocol specifically designed for low-data rate sensors and control networks. There are a number of distributed applications that can benefit from ZigBee wireless networks, including building automation, home security, industrial control networks, advanced metering, and other applications. The key advantages that the ZigBee wireless protocol offers over other wireless protocols include low complexity, low power consumption, reduced resource requirements, and standardized app...

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electric power 2007  

SciTech Connect

Subjects covered include: power industry trends - near term fuel strategies - price/quality/delivery/opportunity; generating fleet optimization and plant optimization; power plant safety and security; coal power plants - upgrades and new capacity; IGCC, advanced combustion and CO{sub 2} capture technologies; gas turbine and combined cycle power plants; nuclear power; renewable power; plant operations and maintenance; power plant components - design and operation; environmental; regulatory issues, strategies and technologies; and advanced energy strategies and technologies. The presentations are in pdf format.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

SOLAR POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage (TES) is an integral part of a concentrated solar power (CSP) system. It enables plant operators to generate electricity beyond on sun hours and supply power to the grid to meet peak demand. Current CSP sensible heat storage systems employ molten salts as both the heat transfer fluid and the heat storage media. These systems have an upper operating temperature limit of around 400 C. Future TES systems are expected to operate at temperatures between 600 C to 1000 C for higher thermal efficiencies which should result in lower electricity cost. To meet future operating temperature and electricity cost requirements, a TES concept utilizing thermochemical cycles (TCs) based on multivalent solid oxides was proposed. The system employs a pair of reduction and oxidation (REDOX) reactions to store and release heat. In the storage step, hot air from the solar receiver is used to reduce the oxidation state of an oxide cation, e.g. Fe3+ to Fe2+. Heat energy is thus stored as chemical bonds and the oxide is charged. To discharge the stored energy, the reduced oxide is re-oxidized in air and heat is released. Air is used as both the heat transfer fluid and reactant and no storage of fluid is needed. This project investigated the engineering and economic feasibility of this proposed TES concept. The DOE storage cost and LCOE targets are $15/kWh and $0.09/kWh respectively. Sixteen pure oxide cycles were identified through thermodynamic calculations and literature information. Data showed the kinetics of re-oxidation of the various oxides to be a key barrier to implementing the proposed concept. A down selection was carried out based on operating temperature, materials costs and preliminary laboratory measurements. Cobalt oxide, manganese oxide and barium oxide were selected for developmental studies to improve their REDOX reaction kinetics. A novel approach utilizing mixed oxides to improve the REDOX kinetics of the selected oxides was proposed. It partially replaces some of the primary oxide cations with selected secondary cations. This causes a lattice charge imbalance and increases the anion vacancy density. Such vacancies enhance the ionic mass transport and lead to faster re-oxidation. Reoxidation fractions of Mn3O4 to Mn2O3 and CoO to Co3O4 were improved by up to 16 fold through the addition of a secondary oxide. However, no improvement was obtained in barium based mixed oxides. In addition to enhancing the short term re-oxidation kinetics, it was found that the use of mixed oxides also help to stabilize or even improve the TES properties after long term thermal cycling. Part of this improvement could be attributed to a reduced grain size in the mixed oxides. Based on the measurement results, manganese-iron, cobalt-aluminum and cobalt iron mixed oxides have been proposed for future engineering scale demonstration. Using the cobalt and manganese mixed oxides, we were able to demonstrate charge and discharge of the TES media in both a bench top fixed bed and a rotary kiln-moving bed reactor. Operations of the fixed bed configuration are straight forward but require a large mass flow rate and higher fluid temperature for charging. The rotary kiln makes direct solar irradiation possible and provides significantly better heat transfer, but designs to transport the TES oxide in and out of the reactor will need to be defined. The final reactor and system design will have to be based on the economics of the CSP plant. A materials compatibility study was also conducted and it identified Inconel 625 as a suitable high temperature engineering material to construct a reactor holding either cobalt or manganese mixed oxides. To assess the economics of such a CSP plant, a packed bed reactor model was established as a baseline. Measured cobalt-aluminum oxide reaction kinetics were applied to the model and the influences of bed properties and process parameters on the overall system design were investigated. The optimal TES system design was found to be a network of eight fixed bed reactors at 18.75 MWth each with charge and

PROJECT STAFF

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Power Tower Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In power tower concentrating solar power systems, numerous large, flat, sun-tracking mirrors, known as heliostats, focus sunlight onto a receiver at the top of a tall tower. A heat-transfer fluid...

290

Resonant Power Conditioning and Compact Pulse Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (FEEDBACK) HV RECTIFIER AND FILTER NETWORK ... Los Alamos High Frequency “Polyphase Resonant Power Conditioning” ... 30 KW Loss ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Dynamic power management with hybrid power sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DPM (Dynamic Power Management) is an effective technique for reducing the energy consumption of embedded systems that is based on migrating to a low power state when possible. While conventional DPM minimizes the energy consumption of the embedded system, ... Keywords: DPM, embedded system, fuel cell, hybrid power

Jianli Zhuo; Chaitali Chakrabarti; Kyungsoo Lee; Naehyuck Chang

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates December 14, 2011 Mike Dunne LLNL #12;NIf-1111-23714.ppt LIFE power plant 2 #12;LIFE delivery timescale NIf-1111-23714.ppt 3 #12;Timely delivery is enabled near-term, NIF based, NIC-derivative fusion performance § 3 allows small, thin Fresnel lenses ­ enables

293

Dynamic power management in environmentally powered systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a framework for energy management in energy harvesting embedded systems is presented. As a possible example scenario, we focus on wireless sensor nodes which are powered by solar cells. We demonstrate that classical power management solutions ... Keywords: embedded systems, energy harvesting, model predictive control, power management, real-time scheduling, reward maximization

Clemens Moser; Jian-Jia Chen; Lothar Thiele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Acute Toxicity of Radiochemotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients: A Risk Particularly for Carriers of the TGFB1 Pro25 variant  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Transforming growth factor-beta1 is related to adverse events in radiochemotherapy. We investigated TGFB1 genetic variability in relation to quality of life-impairing acute organ toxicity (QAOT) of neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy under clinical trial conditions. Methods and Materials: Two independent patient cohorts (n = 88 and n = 75) diagnosed with International Union Against Cancer stage II/III rectal cancer received neoadjuvant radiation doses of 50.4 Gy combined with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Toxicity was monitored according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. QAOT was defined as a CTCAE grade {>=}2 for at least one case of enteritis, proctitis, cystitis, or dermatitis. Nine germline polymorphisms covering the common genetic diversity in the TGFB1 gene were genotyped. Results: In both cohorts, all patients carrying the TGFB1 Pro25 variant experienced QAOT (positive predictive value of 100%, adjusted p = 0.0006). In a multivariate logistic regression model, gender, age, body mass index, type of chemotherapy, or disease state had no significant impact on QAOT. Conclusion: The TGFB1 Pro25 variant could be a relevant marker for individual treatment stratification and carriers may benefit from adaptive clinical care or specific radiation techniques.

Schirmer, Markus Anton; Mergler, Caroline Patricia Nadine [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Medical Center, Goettingen (Germany); Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Herrmann, Markus Karl; Hennies, Steffen [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center, Goettingen (Germany); Gaedcke, Jochen; Conradi, Lena-Christin; Jo, Peter [Department of General and Visceral Surgery, University Medical Center, Goettingen (Germany); Beissbarth, Tim [Department of Medical Statistics, University Medical Center, Goettingen (Germany); Hess, Clemens Friedrich [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center, Goettingen (Germany); Becker, Heinz; Ghadimi, Michael [Department of General and Visceral Surgery, University Medical Center, Goettingen (Germany); Brockmoeller, Juergen [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Medical Center, Goettingen (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center, Goettingen (Germany); Wolff, Hendrik Andreas, E-mail: hendrik.wolff@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center, Goettingen (Germany)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

P2Pro(RSM) : a computerized management tool for implementing DOE's authorized release process for radioactive scrap metals.  

SciTech Connect

Within the next few decades, several hundred thousand tons of metal and several million cubic meters of concrete are expected to be removed from nuclear facilities across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex as a result of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. These materials, together with large quantities of tools, equipment, and other items that are commonly recovered from site cleanup or D&D activities, constitute non-real properties that warrant consideration for release from regulatory control for reuse or recycle, as permitted and practiced under current DOE policy. The provisions for implementing this policy are contained in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Non-Real Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material published by DOE in 1997 and distributed to DOE Field Offices for interim use and implementation. This manual describes a computer management tool, P2Pro(RSM), that implements the first 5 steps of the 10-step process stipulated by the Handbook. P2Pro(RSM) combines an easy-to-use Windows interface with a comprehensive database to facilitate the development of authorized release limits for non-real property.

Arnish, J.; Chen, S. Y.; Kamboj, S.; Nieves, L.

1999-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

296

Power and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author examines the development of nuclear power throughout the world, commencing with proposals for California, USA. Evidence that nuclear power remains viable in Asia include Japan Atomic Power Co.'s announcement of plans for a 1300 MW reactor ...

G. Zorpette

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Solar powered desalination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photon capture area and electrical power consumption. Bothcapture area (m 2 ) Electrical power consumption (kWh/kg HType 2 Type 3 Type 4 Electrical power consumption for these

Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

power module - High temperature operation - Size reduction - 3-kW 120V single-phase inverter (250 C+) Input Power Output Power > 90% efficiency (estimated) Phase I: Very High...

299

Green Power Network: Green Power Markets Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Markets Green Markets Search Search Help More Search Options Search Site Map News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports Green Pricing Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies Overview The essence of green power marketing is to provide market-based choices for electricity consumers to purchase power from environmentally preferred sources. The term "green power" is used to define power generated from renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, geothermal, hydropower and various forms of biomass. Green power marketing has the potential to expand domestic markets for renewable energy technologies by fostering greater availability of renewable electric service options in retail markets. Although renewable energy development has traditionally been limited by cost considerations, customer choice allows consumer preferences for cleaner energy sources to be reflected in market transactions. In survey after survey, customers have expressed a preference and willingness to pay more, if necessary, for cleaner energy sources. You can find more information about purchase options on our "Buying Green Power" page.

300

Siemens Power Generation, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presented at the 2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Page 1 of 10 Siemens Power Generation, Inc., All Rights Reserved Development of a Catalytic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Laser Radiometry: Powering Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Radiometry: Powering Up. June 11, 2012. ... Contact: Marla Dowell 303-497- 7455. Chris Cromer examines one of PML's next-generation power meters ...

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

302

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOIAPrivacy Act Submit a FOIA Request DOE FOIA Requester Service Center Electronic Reading Room FOIA Links Power Marketing Administrations' FOIA Links Bonneville Power...

303

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CT (USA), international presence in USA, Canada, Germany (Fraunhofer, IKTS) and South Korea (Posco) Delivering Direct FuelCell (DFC ) power plants for On-Site Power and...

304

Radioisotope Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioisotope Power Generation Long lived power sources are needed for equipment that is too remote or inaccessible for replacement. By choosing a radioactive element with a long...

305

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net Generation by Energy Source: Commercial Combined Heat and Power Sector . Table 1.5. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Combined Heat and Power Sector .

306

Nuclear Fusion Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Nuclear fusion reactors, if they can be made to work, promise virtually unlimited power for the indefinite future. This is because the fuel, isotopes of hydrogen, are...

307

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

302011 Essential PV power plant features Reliable power conversion Extensive service network Remote monitoring & diagnostics Plant level control Advanced grid-friendly features...

310

Sunrise II Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sunrise Power Company, LLC (Sunrise), has planned the modification of an existing power plant project to increase its generation capacity by 265 megawatts by 2003. The initial...

311

Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems...

312

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia)...

313

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...

314

Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Flex power perspectives of indirect...

315

Pro-Energy: A novel energy prediction model for solar and wind energy-harvesting wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy harvesting is one of the most promising technologies towards the goal of perpetual operation of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Environmentally-powered systems, however, have to deal with the variable behavior of ambient energy sources, which ... Keywords: Rechargeable sensors,Energy predictions,Energy harvesting,Environmentally-powered WSNs,Solar-powered WSNs,Wind-powered WSNs,Green WSNs,Multi-source energy harvesting

Alessandro Cammarano, Chiara Petrioli, Dora Spenza

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Military power requirements and backup power considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All US Air Force (USAF) facilities have certain critical power requirements that must be met in order to carry out their mission successfully. Internal USAF studies have shown that the mission can degrade precipitously as the available power decreases below the mission critical level. Now, more than ever before, the military and private industry are finding that certain functions, such as automated data processing and automated process control, respond catastrophically to power reductions. Furthermore, increased reliance on electrical power means, in the case of the Air Force, that critical power requirements are anticipated to increase by half over the next 15 yr. For these reasons and others, the USAF is investigating several means of improving the availability of electric power under adverse conditions above that which can be provided by an off-base supplier. Among the approaches to this problem being pursued at this time are a program to improve all sorts of generator sets on a service-wide basis and the Multimegawatt Terrestrial Power (MTP) Program, which is pursuing the design and testing of a small dedicated nuclear power source to provide critical mission power. The purpose of this paper is to provide some insight into some of the issues associated with USAF power programs.

Botts, T.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Microsoft PowerPoint - GVR2_Poster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(2) Flight Research Laboratory, National Research Council (NRC), Ottawa, Canada Instrument: Funded by a Phase II DOE SBIR contract, ProSensing Inc. developed a...

318

Agile machining and inspection thrust area team-on-machine probing / compatibility assessment of Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) pro/CMM DMIS with Zeiss DMISEngine.  

SciTech Connect

The charter goal of the Agile Machining and Inspection Thrust Area Team is to identify technical requirements, within the nuclear weapons complex (NWC), for Agile Machining and Inspection capabilities. During FY 2008, the team identified Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) Pro/CMM as a software tool for use in off-line programming of probing routines--used for measurement--for machining and turning centers. The probing routine would be used for in-process verification of part geometry. The same Pro/CMM program used on the machine tool could also be employed for program validation / part verification using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Funding was provided to determine the compatibility of the Pro/CMM probing program with CMM software (Zeiss DMISEngine).

Wade, James Rokwel; Tomlinson, Kurt; Bryce, Edwin Anthony

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Superconducting Power Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Watch (Techwatch) report on superconducting power applications (EPRI report 1019995, Superconducting Power Equipment: Technology Watch 2010) introduced coverage about superconducting magnetic energy storage systems and superconducting transformers. The 2011 report contains additional information about superconducting power equipment, including progress to demonstrations in some projects. The 2011 report also includes a section on superconductin...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

Power Purchase Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the power purchase agreements taken from the FEMP Alternative Finance Options (AFO) webinar.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Transportation and Stationary Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat, hydrogen and power (CHHP) "trigeneration" systems can hypothetically be configured to provide (1

322

Green Power Network: Green Power Leadership Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards will highlight the accomplishments of green power suppliers (utilities, retail suppliers, REC marketers, and renewable energy project developers) that are innovators and...

323

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Mechanisms Involved in the Pro-Apoptotic Effect of Melatonin in Cancer Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: It is well established that melatonin exerts antitumoral effects in many cancer types, mostly decreasing cell proliferation at low concentrations. On the other hand, induction of apoptosis by melatonin has been described in the last few years in some particular cancer types. The cytotoxic effect occurs after its administration at high concentrations, and the molecular pathways involved have been only partially determined. Moreover, a synergistic effect has been found in several cancer types when it is administered in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. In the present review, we will summarize published work on the pro-apoptotic effect of melatonin in cancer cells and the reported mechanisms involved in such action. We will also construct a hypothesis on how different cell signaling pathways may relate each other on account for such effect.

Carmen Rodriguez; Vanesa Martín; Federico Herrera; Guillermo García-santos; Jezabel Rodriguez-blanco; Sara Casado-zapico; Ana María Sánchez-sánchez; Santos Suárez; Noelia Puente-moncada; María José Anítua; Isaac Antolín

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

PitPro 1.1 User's Manual; Pit-tag to SURPH Data Translation Utility, Technical Manual 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual describes the use of Program PitPro to convert PIT-tag data files in PTAGIS (PIT Tag Information System, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission) to input files ready for survival analysis in Program SURPH 2.1. This utility converts the various PIT-tag detections at the multitude of detector coils within a juvenile bypass or at adult counting windows and ladders into capture histories. The capture histories indicate whether a tagged fish was detected, not detected, or detected and censored at the major hydroprojects in the Columbia Basin. A major update to this program is the inclusion of adult upstream detection histories. Adult detection histories include not only whether the fish was detected or not but also the year of detection for proper adult survival estimation. The SURPH program is a valuable tool for estimating survival and detection probabilities of fish migrating in the Snake and Columbia rivers. Using special input data files, SURPH computes reach-to-reach statistics for any release group passing a system of detection sites. However, PIT-tag data, as available from PTAGIS, comes in a form that is not ready for use as SURPH input. SURPH requires a capture history for each fish. A capture history consists of a series of fields, one for each detection site, that has a code for whether the fish was detected and returned to the river, detected and removed, or not detected. The data, as received from PTAGIS, has one line for each detection with information such as fish identification (id), detection date and time, number of coil hits and detector coil ids, etc. Because an individual fish may be detected at several coils within a detection site as well as at several detection sites, each fish is often represented by multiple lines in the PTAGIS data file. For the PTAGIS data to be usable by SURPH, it must be preprocessed. The data must be condensed down to one line per fish with the relevant detection information from the PTAGIS file represented compactly on each line. In addition, the PTAGIS coil information must be passed through a series of logic algorithms to determine whether or not a fish was returned to the river after detection. Program PitPro was developed to allow the user to properly preprocess the PTAGIS data files for input to program SURPH through a user friendly graphical user interface (GUI). This utility takes PTAGIS data files as input and creates a SURPH data file as well as other output including travel time records, detection date records, and a data error file. PitPro allows a user to download PTAGIS files and easily process the data for use with SURPH. Program PitPro is based on the command line utility CaptHist.

Westhagen, Peter; Skalski, John

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

326

High power fast ramping power supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

327

Active Power Control from Wind Power (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

Ela, E.; Brooks, D.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Green Power Network: Green Power Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies govern_purch Community Choice Aggregation Disclosure Policies Green Power Policies Net Metering Policies Green Power Policies A number of state and local governments have policies in place that encourage the development of green power markets. Government green power purchasing mandates or goals have been established by the federal government, as well as state and local governments to procure renewable energy for the electricity used by government facilities or operations. Community choice aggregation allows communities to determine their electricity generation sources by aggregating the community load and purchasing electricity from an alternate electricity supplier while still receiving transmission and distribution service from their existing provider.

329

I'm scared to look but I'm dying to know: information seeking and sharing on Pro-Ana weblogs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As individuals' access to the Internet has grown, so has the diversity of lifestyles and interests represented on the web. On the Internet, members of any subculture can communicate and share information anonymously and directly on a variety of platforms. ... Keywords: information practice, information seeking and sharing, online communities, peer information sharing, pro-anorexia, sharing harmful information

Rachel A. Fleming-May; Laura E. Miller

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

www.stke.org/cgi/content/full/sigtrans;2003/212/re15 Page 1 The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, is a pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the control of cell growth and proliferation. The activity of mTOR is controlled not only by amino acids the activity of TOR is controlled have been mysterious. Within the past year, a spate of reports from several, but also by hormones and growth factors that activate the pro- tein kinase Akt. The signaling pathway

331

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN THE GEOSCIENCES In this lab we will use Google Earth (Part 1) and Google Earth Pro (Part 2) to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN THE GEOSCIENCES 1 In this lab we will use Google Earth (Part 1) and Google Earth Pro (Part 2) to inspect a few different geographic regions and a large earthquake data set. In Google Earth, you will learn to create placemarks with text, web links, movies, and more. You will also

Smith-Konter, Bridget

332

IBM POWER6 microarchitecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the implementation of the IBM POWER6™ microprocessor, a two-way simultaneous multithreaded (SMT) dual-core chip whose key features include binary compatibility with IBM POWER5™ microprocessor-based systems; increased ...

H. Q. Le; W. J. Starke; J. S. Fields; F. P. O'Connell; D. Q. Nguyen; B. J. Ronchetti; W. M. Sauer; E. M. Schwarz; M. T. Vaden

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

2025 Power Marketing Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and is in the process of developing a plan for marketing and allocating LAP hydroelectric power after the FES contracts expire. We call this plan our 2025 Power Marketing...

334

Body powered thermoelectric systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Great interest exists for and progress has be made in the effective utilization of the human body as a possible power supply in hopes of powering such applications as sensors and continuously monitoring medical devices ...

Settaluri, Krishna Tej

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Power and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and manufacture of electric power equipment, the one electrotechnology in which Europe could gain worldwide dominance by the end of the century, is examined. All three power-equipment categories-generation, transmission, and distribution-are ...

G. Zorpette

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Space Solar Power Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information pertaining to the Space Solar Power Program is presented on energy analysis; markets; overall development plan; organizational plan; environmental and safety issues; power systems; space transportation; space manufacturing, construction, operations; design examples; and finance.

Arif, H.; Barbosa, H.; Bardet, C.; Baroud, M.; Behar, A.; Berrier, K.; Berthe, P.; Bertrand, R.; Bibyk, I.; Bisson, J.; Bloch, L.; Bobadilla, G.; Bourque, D.; Bush, L.; Carandang, R.; Chiku, T.; Crosby, N.; De Seixas, M.; De Vries, J.; Doll, S.; Dufour, F.; Eckart, P.; Fahey, M.; Fenot, F.; Foeckersperger, S.; Fontaine, J.E.; Fowler, R.; Frey, H.; Fujio, H.; Gasa, J.M.; Gleave, J.; Godoe, J.; Green, I.; Haeberli, R.; Hanada, T.; Ha

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Power Management Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

additional savings of 1.3 billion are lost because power management is present, but disabled. In some cases, power management is not compatible with the application or doesn't...

338

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resolved Power capture and conversion in line with prediction 11 CF16539GG 1 OCEAN POWER DELIVERY LTD PROJECTS 12 CF16539GG 1 Enersis - Project 1 Enersis Portugal's largest...

339

Data Center Power Consumption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Power Consumption Center Power Consumption A new look at a growing problem Fact - Data center power density up 10x in the last 10 years 2.1 kW/rack (1992); 14 kW/rack (2007) Racks are not fully populated due to power/cooling constraints Fact - Increasing processor power Moore's law Fact - Energy cost going up 3 yr. energy cost equivalent to acquisition cost Fact - Iterative power life cycle Takes as much energy to cool computers as it takes to power them. Fact - Over-provisioning Most data centers are over-provisioned with cooling and still have hot spots November 2007 SubZero Engineering An Industry at the Crossroads Conflict between scaling IT demands and energy efficiency Server Efficiency is improving year after year Performance/Watt doubles every 2 years Power Density is Going Up

340

Electric Power Metrology News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next-generation "smart" electrical meters for residential and commercial ... NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction Devices Release ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Wind powering America: Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet contains information about green power programs in Colorado and a description of the Ponnequin Wind Farm.

O'Dell, K.

2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

342

Concentrating Solar Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

disconnect switches, microprocessor relays, power transformers, surge arresters, and transformer bushings information resources management equipment and supplies such as monitors,...

344

Power Conversion System Architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Transformers • Vacuum Pressure Impregnated (VPI) • Oil Immersed • Cast Coil Transformer Configurations • Single winding 5/24/2012 Power ...

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

345

Soldier power. Battery charging.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soldier power. Marine. Battery charging. Advertising. Remote. SOFC (NanoDynamics, AMI) 60 watts q SOFC #12;

Hong, Deog Ki

346

Increased Power Flow Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Increased Power Flow (IPF) Guidebook is a state-of-the-art and best practices guidebook on increasing power flow capacities of existing overhead transmission lines, underground cables, power transformers, and substation equipment without compromising safety and reliability. The Guidebook discusses power system concerns and limiting conditions to increasing capacity, reviews available technology options and methods, illustrates alternatives with case studies, and analyzes costs and benefits of differe...

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

347

Superconducting Power Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power cables constructed from superconducting materials are being realized in utility demonstrations within the United States. Cooled by liquid nitrogen, high temperature superconducting power cables can transfer large amounts of power through relatively small cross sections. The key to their high power capacity is the high current density inherent with superconductors; a superconducting wire can conduct several times as much current as copper or aluminum conductors of the same cross section. For the pas...

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Search for fusion power  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the basics of fusion power is given. Both inertial confinement and magnetic confinement fusion are discussed.

Post, R.F.

1978-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Peak power identification on power bumps during test application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peak power during test can seriously impact circuit performance as well as the power safety for both CUT and tester. In this paper, we propose a method of layout-aware weighted switching activity identification flow that evaluates peak current/power ... Keywords: CMOS device, peak power identification, power bumps, test application, layout-aware weighted switching activity identification flow, dynamic power model, parasitic capacitance, resistance network, power bus, power delivery path, IR-drop, commercial power sign-off analysis tool

Wei Zhao; M. Tehranipoor

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Soft Magnetic Materials for High Power and High Frequency Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and ... are in high demand for the next generation of miniaturized power electronics.

352

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November 23, 2011 - 1:43pm Addthis Wind...

353

Power factors revealed  

SciTech Connect

When it comes to power, not all electric appliances are equal. To find out how much power an appliance consumes, energy auditors occasionally multiply line voltage by the current reading obtained from a clamp-on ammeter. However, depending on the appliance, this simple calculation will not always reflect true power usages. Since utilities bill only for true energy usage, residential energy audits should reflect the true power usage. This article explains in detail measuring power usage, ending with a number of suggestions including use of a wattmeter rather than a ammeter. 2 figs.

Brule, P.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ADEPT: Efficient Power Conversion  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: In today’s increasingly electrified world, power conversion—the process of converting electricity between different currents, voltage levels, and frequencies—forms a vital link between the electronic devices we use every day and the sources of power required to run them. The 14 projects that make up ARPA-E’s ADEPT Project, short for “Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,” are paving the way for more energy efficient power conversion and advancing the basic building blocks of power conversion: circuits, transistors, inductors, transformers, and capacitors.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electric Power Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Monthly Excel files zipped 2010 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2009 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2008 January February March March Supplement April May June July August September October November December 2007 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2006 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2005 January February March April May June July August September October November December

356

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Coal industry annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Multimode power processor  

SciTech Connect

In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources.

O' Sullivan, George A. (Pottersville, NJ); O' Sullivan, Joseph A. (St. Louis, MO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Multimode power processor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources. 31 figs.

O' Sullivan, G.A.; O' Sullivan, J.A.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

360

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Records Scheduling Request Records Scheduling Request DOE F 243.2 (8-2013) Instructions: Complete one request per records schedule or series item. Appointed records contacts will submit completed form to the Departmental Records Officer via DOERM@hq.doe.gov for review, decision and coordination, as appropriate. 1. RLO/RMFO Name (Prepare) 2. PRO Name (Review/Clear) Date (IM-23 Use Only) 3. Program Subject Matter Expert Name(s) - position title(s) optional 4. DOE Element (e.g., OCIO (IM-1)) 5. Subordinate Organizational Unit (e.g., RMD (IM-23))- if applicable 6. Requested Action: (select one) Establish (new) Revise Cancel (discontinue active schedule) 7. Schedule Authority - If establishing, no information needed. If requesting revision to supersede a NARA- approved schedule, or requesting cancellation, cite the NARA schedule authority. (e.g.,GRS 1 item 4, N1-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Northern Power Systems, Inc 6 Northern Power Systems, Inc Northern Power Systems 182 Mad River Park Waitsfield, VT 05673 Ultracapacitor EnergyBridge(tm) UPS for Palmdale Water District DOE/ESS PEER Review November 3, 2006 11/03/2006 Northern Power Systems, Inc © 2006 2 Northern Power  Distributed Energy Systems Corp (NASDAQ:DESC)  Energy Solutions since 1974  Products, Systems and Services Divisions  Hundreds of Projects around the World  HQ and Manufacturing in Vermont  Regional offices in NY, TX, CA, England, and Mexico 11/03/2006 Northern Power Systems, Inc © 2006 3 Project Overview  CEC - California Energy Commission  Funding agency  Palmdale Water District  Award recipient, host site  Northern Power  Technology provider  Black & Veatch  Owner's engineer

362

Solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal power is produced by three types of concentrating systems, which utilize parabolic troughs, dishes, and heliostats as the solar concentrators. These systems are at various levels of development and commercialization in the United States and in Europe. The U.S. Industry is currently developing these systems for export at the end of this century and at the beginning of the next one for remote power, village electrification, and grid-connected power. U.S. utilities are not forecasting to need power generation capacity until the middle of the first decade of the 21{sup st} century. At that time, solar thermal electric power systems should be cost competitive with conventional power generation in some unique U.S. markets. In this paper, the authors describe the current status of the development of trough electric, dish/engine, and power tower solar generation systems. 46 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Mancini, T.R.; Kolb, G.J.; Prairie, M.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Green Power Network: News Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to main content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Green Power Network About the GPN Green Power Markets Buying Green Power Onsite Renewable...

364

Principle Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Principle Power Place San Francisco, California Zip 94120 Sector Renewable Energy Product Principle Power is a global independent power producer committed to delivering green,...

365

Heat gain from power panelboard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on estimating the power loss from power panelboards by means of power loss models. The model is intended to be used by… (more)

Piesciorovsky, Emilio Carlos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Energy Harvesting Aware Power Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Schiller, “Utilizing solar power in wireless sensorthat only the actual solar power available, and not anyconverted to electric power using solar cells. The magnitude

Kansal, Aman; Srivastava, Mani B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Southwestern Power Administration One West...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the United States Department of Energy Southwestern Power Administration Strategic Plan March 2013 Administrator's Message The Southwestern Power Administration powers the...

368

Microsoft PowerPoint - IP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Topics covered have included: * Sustainable Energy Development * Power Reactors * Nuclear Power Plant Planning * Nuclear Power Plant Pre-Operational Support IAEA's 10 Years...

369

Solartech Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solartech Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Solartech Power Place Cerritos, California Zip 90703 Sector Solar Product Solartech power is a distributer of solar modules....

370

Peak Power at Peak Efficiency  

Peak Power At Peak Efficiency. 21. st. Industry Growth Forum. October 2008. PJ Piper (857) 350?3100. ... At <$10/bbl oil, QM Power’s electric ...

371

Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Electronics to Power Electronics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Power Electronics The power electronics activity focuses on research and development (R&D)

372

Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Although many operational aspects affect wind power plant operation, this paper focuses on power quality. Because a wind power plant is connected to the grid, it is very important to understand the sources of disturbances that affect the power quality.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Chacon, J.; Romanowitz, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels as a Potential Biomarker for Cardiac Damage After Radiotherapy in Patients With Left-Sided Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiac biomarkers may aid in identifying patients with radiation-mediated cardiac dysfunction. We evaluated the correlation between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin (TnI) and the dose of radiation to the heart in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: NT-proBNP and TnI plasma concentrations were measured in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 55.0 years) 5 to 22 months after RT (Group I) and in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 57.0 years) before RT as control group (Group II). Dosimetric and geometric parameters of heart and left ventricle were determined in all patients of Group I. Seventeen patients underwent complete two-dimensional echocardiography. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (p = 0.03) in Group I (median, 90.0 pg/ml; range, 16.7-333.1 pg/ml) than in Group II (median, 63.2 pg/ml; range, 11.0-172.5 pg/ml). TnI levels remained below the cutoff threshold of 0.07 ng/ml in both groups. In patients with NT-proBNP values above the upper limit of 125 pg/ml, there were significant correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 3Gy}(%) (p = 0.001), the ratios D{sub 15cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.01), the ratios D{sub 15cm}{sup 3}/D{sub 50%} (Gy) (p = 0.008) for the heart and correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 2Gy} (%) (p = 0.002), the ratios D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.03), and the ratios D{sub 0.5cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub 50%}(Gy) (p = 0.05) for the ventricle. Conclusions: Patients with left-sided breast cancer show higher values of NT-pro BNP after RT when compared with non-RT-treated matched patients, increasing in correlation with high doses in small volumes of heart and ventricle. The findings of this study show that the most important parameters are not the mean doses but instead the small percentage of organ volumes (heart or ventricle) receiving high dose levels, supporting the notion that the heart behaves as a serial organ.

D'Errico, Maria P., E-mail: patderrico@libero.it [Department of Laboratory Medicine, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Grimaldi, Luca [Department of Medical Physics, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Petruzzelli, Maria F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Gianicolo, Emilio A.L. [Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy); Tramacere, Francesco [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Monetti, Antonio; Placella, Roberto [Department of Laboratory Medicine, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Pili, Giorgio [Department of Medical Physics, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio [Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy); Portaluri, Maurizio [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Magnetic Materials for High Frequency Power Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and Power ... in power conditioning, conversion, and generation applications.

375

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. DOE Peer Review November 2-3, 2006 Marcelo Schupbach, Ph.D. Senior Engineer APEI, Inc. 535 Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone: (479)-443-5759 Email: marcelo@apei.net Website: www.apei.net High Temperature and High Power Density SiC Power Electronic Converters Energy Storage Systems Program 2 Overview * APEI, Inc. Corporate Status * Broader Impact of SiC-based Power Converter * DOE Energy Storage System Program Phase I SBIR - SBIR Topic: Wide Band Gap Power Converter Application - APEI's Goals - Phase I Accomplishments * DOE Energy Storage System Program Phase II SBIR - APEI's Goals - Research Team and Partners - Project Status Energy Storage Systems Program 3 APEI, Inc. Mission Statement We are a small business dedicated to

376

DSW Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates DSW Power Projects Boulder Canyon: Straddling the Colorado River near the Arizona-Nevada border, Hoover Dam in Boulder Canyon creates Lake Mead. River waters turning turbines at Hoover Powerplant produce about 2,074 MW--enough electricity for nearly 8 million people. Western markets this power to public utilities in Arizona, California and Nevada over 53.30 circuit-miles of transmission line. Central Arizona: Authorized in 1968, the Central Arizona Project in Arizona and western New Mexico was built to improve water resources in the Colorado River Basin. Segments of the authorization allowed for Federal participation in the Navajo Generating Station. The Federal share of the powerplant's combined capacity is 547 MW.

377

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 North American Power Group, Ltd. 11 North American Power Group, Ltd. November 17, 2011 North American Power Group, Ltd. Two Elk Energy Park Carbon Site Characterization Study Preliminary Geologic Model-Update DOE NETL Annual Meeting November, 15-17, 2011 North American Power Group Copyright 2011 NAPG Two Elk Project Location 2 North American Power Group Copyright 2011 NAPG Work Flow and Project Integration 3 North American Power Group Copyright 2011 NAPG Modeling Approach  Model basin architecture is basically constructed from data within a 25 x 25 mile square area  Geologists reviewed data and correlated tops and surfaces  Porosity, permeability, petrophysics and other information correlated from that data to create a baseline model  Additional data has yet to be added from seismic information and from on-site penetrations

378

Solar power towers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high desert near Barstow, California, has witnessed the development of this country`s first two solar power towers. Solar One operated successfully from 1982 to 1988 and proved that power towers work efficiently to produce utility-scale power from sunlight. Solar Two was connected to the utility grid in 1996 and is operating today. Like its predecessor, Solar Two is rated at 10 megawatts. An upgrade of the Solar One plant, Solar Two demonstrates how solar energy can be stored in the form of heat in molten salt for power generation on demand. The experience gained with these two pilot power towers has established a foundation on which industry can develop its first commercial plants. These systems produce electricity on a large scale. They are unique among solar technologies because they can store energy efficiently and cost effectively. They can operate whenever the customer needs power, even after dark or during cloudy weather.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Solar power towers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high desert near Barstow, California, has witnessed the development of this country's first two solar power towers. Solar One operated successfully from 1982 to 1988 and proved that power towers work efficiently to produce utility-scale power from sunlight. Solar Two was connected to the utility grid in 1996 and is operating today. Like its predecessor, Solar Two is rated at 10 megawatts. An upgrade of the Solar One plant, Solar Two demonstrates how solar energy can be stored in the form of heat in molten salt for power generation on demand. The experience gained with these two pilot power towers has established a foundation on which industry can develop its first commercial plants. These systems produce electricity on a large scale. They are unique among solar technologies because they can store energy efficiently and cost effectively. They can operate whenever the customer needs power, even after dark or during cloudy weather.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Biomass: Potato Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTATO POWER POTATO POWER Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemical/carbon cycles, plants, energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: Grades 2 to 3 Small groups (3 to 4) Time: 30 to 40 minutes Summary: Students assemble a potato battery that will power a digital clock. This shows the connection between renewable energy from biomass and its application. Provided by the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and BP America Inc. BIOPOWER - POTATO POWER Purpose: Can a potato power a clock? Materials:  A potato  A paper plate  Two pennies  Two galvanized nails  Three 8 inch insulated copper wire, with 2 inches of the insulation removed from the ends  A digital clock (with places for wire attachment)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Place India Sector Wind energy Product India-based wind power project developer. References Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV is a company located in India . References ↑ "Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Karnataka_Power_Corporation_Limited_and_National_Thermal_Power_Corporation_JV&oldid=3479

382

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Funding Source SaskPower State Saskatchewan Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Provider SaskPower The Small Power Producers Program accommodates customers who wish to generate up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity for the purpose of offsetting power that would otherwise be purchased from SaskPower or for selling all of the power generated to SaskPower. At the beginning of the application process, you need to choose between one of two options: Sell all of the power you produce to SaskPower, or sell the

383

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Power Quality Waveform Identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the desired functionality, attributes and proposed development approach of a power quality (PQ) event identification tool that is planned to be developed under the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Power Quality program P1.BackgroundPQ monitors capture a wide variety of disturbance events, ranging in frequency from direct current to a few megahertz. Advances in PQ monitoring and instrumentation allow continuous measurement and ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Interleaved power converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power converter architecture interleaves full bridge converters to alleviate thermal management problems in high current applications, and may, for example, double the output power capability while reducing parts count and costs. For example, one phase of a three phase inverter is shared between two transformers, which provide power to a rectifier such as a current doubler rectifier to provide two full bridge DC/DC converters with three rather than four high voltage inverter legs.

Zhu, Lizhi (Canton, MI)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

386

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 ANNUAL REPORT 7 ANNUAL REPORT Southwestern Power Administration Letter to the Secretary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 About Southwestern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Accomplishments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Supplementary Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

387

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

between alternative fuels and power plant communities needs to be improved Photosynthesis Biomass EtOH, Advanced biofuels Algae Pyrolysis oils Biodiesel, Advanced biofuels...

388

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 7-8, 2006 Southwestern Power Administration Drought Operations Guides * Non-Hydro Guide Curve * Inflow trends * Drought Indices * Storage Remaining * Long-term weather...

389

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTC Home Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Virtual University POTC Virtual University In an effort to expand electric power training opportunities while saving money...

390

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTC Home Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Virtual University Power Operations Training Center Instructors All instructors at Southwestern's POTC are NERC-approved...

391

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTC Home Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Virtual University 2013 Power Operations Training Center Courses Please follow the links on this page to view course...

392

Electric Power Annual 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Annual 2004 iii Contacts Questions regarding this report may be directed to: Energy Information Administration, EI-53

393

Balancing of Wind Power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In the future, renewable energy share, especially wind power share, in electricity generation is expected to increase. Due to nature of the wind, wind… (more)

Ülker, Muhammed Akif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Objectives Program Objective: Develop novel solvent and process for post- combustion capture of CO 2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% Capture efficiency, and...

395

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2011 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks...

396

PowerPoint ?????????  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yongchen Song Dalian University of Technology Dalian, Liaoning China powere@dlut.edu.cn 13889533878 CO 2 Reduction and Ocean Storage Background CO 2 Storage Technology ...

397

RM Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in 1990. The projects serve Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska and Wyoming with 830 MW of installed capacity and 3,360 miles of transmission line. About Power Marketing...

398

ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but the commercial electric vehicle industry continued tostrong interest in the electric vehicle industry to developTuyl, Effect of Electric Vehicles on the Power Industry, SAE

Cairns, Elton J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly with Data for October 2012. December 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy . ...

400

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly with Data for August 2012. October 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy . ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Grain-oriented electrical steels for high efficiency power and distribution transformers. * Alloys for renewable energy systems. * Alloy design for optimization of...

402

Power Purchase Agreements Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers an update on power purchase agreements and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

403

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 3.19. Net Generation from Geothermal by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric...

404

Power conversion technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Power Conservation Technologies thrust area supports initiatives that enhance the core competencies of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Engineering Directorate in the area of solid-state power electronics. Through partnerships with LLNL programs, projects focus on the development of enabling technologies for existing and emerging programs that have unique power conversion requirements. This year, a multi-disciplinary effort was supported which demonstrated solid-state, high voltage generation by using a dense, monolithic photovoltaic array. This effort builds upon Engineering's strengths in the core technology areas of power conversion, photonics, and microtechnologies.

Haigh, R E

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Net Generation from Wind by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent...

406

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Industrial Combined Heat and Power, 2001 - 2011 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Other...

407

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors)...

408

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities...

409

PowerPoint ????  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of methanesteam reforming Strong endothermic reaction reactor water boiler steam Thermal energy combustor coal Steam generation in conventional power plant Synthetic use...

410

Municipal Electric Power (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes energy procurement for local utilities operating in Minnesota and provides a means for Minnesota cities to construct and operate hydroelectric power plants. The statute gives...

411

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Chuck Herman and Guy Sliker * NGK - Hiroyuke Abe * EPRI funders (Con Edison, CPS Energy, HECO, Hydro One, NYISO, SDG&E, and TVA) 3 2009 Electric Power Research...

412

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Monitoring Market Monitoring Tools Bernie Lesieutre - LBNL Bob Thomas - Cornell October 18, 2006 Washington, D.C. OE Visualization and Controls Peer Review Market Monitoring Tools: Overview Approach: Use dispatch, profit, revenue/offer price, withholding sensitivities to identify opportunities for local advantage that give some participants market power potential. 2006 Technical Work: Extend prior results to large, RTO-scale systems. Initiate large-scale analysis with RTO (PJM). Evaluate reactive power effects on energy markets. Publication and presentation of results. Market Power: Substitutability Market power boils down to the issue of substitutability Locational Advantage: "Load Pockets" Physical network constraints limit supply to certain loads, so that the incremental demand

413

EIA Electric Power Forms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Forms Electric Power Forms EIA Electric Power Forms Listing of Publicly Available and Confidential Data EIA's statistical surveys encompass each significant electric supply and demand activity in the United States. Most of the electric power survey forms resulting data elements are published, but respondent confidentiality is required. The chart below shows the data elements for each survey form and how each data element is treated in regard to confidentiality. Data Categories Data collection forms EIA- 411 EIA- 826 EIA- 860 EIA- 860M EIA- 861 EIA- 923 Frame Information Utility identification and iocation -- -- -- -- X -- Plant identification and iocation -- -- -- X -- X Generation and fuel Latitude and longitude -- -- X -- -- --

414

Magnets and Power Supplies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 1 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Bending radius 38.9611 m Power supply limit 500.0 A Field at 7 GeV 0.599 T Dipole trim coils Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 80 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Power supply limit 20.0 A Maximum field 0.04 T Horizontal Correction Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317 Magnetic length 0.160 m Core length 0.07 m Power supply limit 150.0 A Maximum field 0.16 T Max. deflection at 7 GeV 1.1 mrad Vertical Corrector Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317

415

Generalized power domination of graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce the concept of k-power domination which is a common generalization of domination and power domination. We extend several known results for power domination to k-power domination. Concerning the complexity of the k-power domination ... Keywords: Domination, Electrical network monitoring, Power domination

Gerard Jennhwa Chang; Paul Dorbec; Mickael Montassier; André Raspaud

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, Selected Years, 1949-2010 Year Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase 1 Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase 2 Heavy-Duty Trucks 3 All Motor Vehicles 4 Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Miles per Vehicle Gallons per Vehicle Miles per Gallon Miles per Vehicle Gallons per Vehicle Miles per Gallon Miles per vehicle Gallons per vehicle Miles per Gallon Miles per Vehicle Gallons per Vehicle Miles per Gallon 1949 9,388 627 15.0 5 ( ) 5 ( ) 5 ( ) 9,712 1,080 9.0 9,498 726 13.1 1950 9,060 603 15.0 5 ( ) 5 ( ) 5 ( ) 10,316 1,229 8.4 9,321 725 12.8 1955 9,447 645 14.6 5 ( ) 5 ( ) 5 ( ) 10,576 1,293 8.2 9,661 761 12.7 1960 9,518 668 14.3 5 ( ) 5 ( ) 5 ( ) 10,693 1,333 8.0 9,732 784 12.4 1965 9,603

417

TEXT Pro Force Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basic Protective Basic Protective Force Training Program DOE/IG-0641 March 2004 * None of the 10 sites included instruction in rappelling even though it was part of the special response team core curriculum and continued to be offered by the Nonprolif- eration and National Security Institute; * Only one site conducted basic training on use of a shotgun, despite the fact that a num- ber of sites used the weapon for breaching exercises and other purposes; and, * Seven of the sites modified prescribed training techniques by reducing the intensity or delivery method for skills that some security experts characterized as critical, such as handcuffing, hand-to- hand combat, and vehicle assaults. We found that the Department's facilities were not required to report departures from the core

418

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Overview Petroleum Overview (Million Barrels per Day) Overview, 1949-2012 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Plant Liquids Field Production, 1949-2012 Overview, January-October Total Field Production, a Monthly 36 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids Total Field Production a 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 Products Supplied Net Imports 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Crude Oil b J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 2011 2012 2013 9.9 6.5 18.8 8.8 7.6 18.5 7.8 8.6 18.9 0 5 10 15 20 25 2011 2012 2013 Net Imports Products Supplied Total Field Production a a Crude oil, including lease condensate, and natural gas plant liquids field

419

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Appendix D Table D1. Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and Implicit Price Deflator, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year Population U.S. Gross Domestic Product United States 1 World United States as Share of World Billion Nominal Dollars 2 Billion Real (2005) Dollars 3 Implicit Price Deflator 4 (2005 = 1.00000) Million People Percent 1949 149.2 NA NA 267.2 R 1,843.1 R 0.14499 1950 152.3 2,556.5 6.0 293.7 R 2,004.2 R .14656 1955 165.9 2,781.2 6.0 414.7 R 2,498.2 R .16601 1960 180.7 3,042.4 5.9 526.4 R 2,828.5 R .18612 1965 194.3 R 3,350.3 5.8 719.1 R 3,607.0 R .19936 1970 205.1 3,713.0 5.5 1,038.3 R 4,266.3 R .24338 1975 216.0 R 4,090.6 5.3 1,637.7 R 4,875.4 R .33591 1976 218.0 R 4,161.9 5.2 1,824.6 R 5,136.9 R .35519 1977 220.2 R 4,233.9 5.2 2,030.1 R 5,373.1 R .37783 1978 222.6 R 4,306.1 5.2 2,293.8 R 5,672.8 R .40435 1979 225.1 R 4,381.1 5.1 2,562.2

420

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

69 69 Table 3.1 Fossil Fuel Production Prices, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) Year Coal 1 Natural Gas 2 Crude Oil 3 Fossil Fuel Composite 4 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Percent Change 7 1949 0.21 1.45 0.05 0.37 0.44 3.02 0.26 1.81 - - 1950 .21 1.41 .06 .43 .43 R 2.95 .26 1.74 -3.6 1955 .19 1.12 .09 .54 .48 2.88 .27 R 1.63 -3.6 1960 .19 1.04 .13 .68 .50 2.67 .28 1.52 -2.3 1965 .18 .92 .15 .73 .49 R 2.47 .28 1.39 -1.5 1970 .27 1.09 .15 .63 .55 R 2.25 .32 1.31 .8 1975 .85 2.52 .40 1.20 1.32 3.94 .82 2.45 10.9 1976 .86 2.41 .53 R 1.49 1.41 3.98 .90 2.54 3.8 1977 .88 2.34 .72 R 1.91 1.48 3.91 1.01 2.67 5.1 1978 .98 2.43 .84 2.07 1.55 3.84 1.12 2.76 3.4 1979 1.06 R 2.41 1.08 2.47 2.18 4.98 1.42 R 3.23 17.3 1980 1.10 2.30 1.45 3.03 3.72 R 7.79 2.04 R 4.27 32.1 1981 1.18 R 2.26 1.80 R 3.43 5.48 R 10.48 R 2.74 R 5.25 22.9 1982 1.23 2.21

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate, Total Technically Dry Natural Gas, Total Technically Recoverable Resources Recoverable Resources Crude Oil and Lease Condensate by Type Dry Natural Gas by Type 88 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 58% 25% 18% 48 States¹ Onshore 48 States¹ Offshore Alaska 20% 13% 13% 54% 48 States¹ Onshore 48 States¹ Offshore Gas Alaska Tight Gas, Shale Gas, and Coalbed Methane Total 220 billion barrels Reserves Resources Technically Recoverable Resources Total 2,203 trillion cubic feet 22 198 220 Proved Unproved Total 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Barrels 273 1,931 2,203 Proved Unproved Total 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 Trillion Cubic Feet Reserves Technically Recoverable Resources

422

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 3.7 Value of Fossil Fuel Imports, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Billion Dollars) Year Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Crude Oil 1 Petroleum Products 2 Total Nominal 3 Real 4 Nominal 3 Real 4 Nominal 3 Real 4 Nominal 3 Real 4 Nominal 3 Real 4 Nominal 3 Real 4 1949 (s) 0.02 (s) 0.03 0.00 0.00 0.30 2.10 0.14 0.95 0.45 3.09 1950 (s) .02 .01 .04 .00 .00 .37 2.52 .21 R 1.46 .59 4.04 1955 (s) .02 (s) .01 (s) .01 .65 R 3.94 .44 2.66 1.10 6.64 1960 (s) .01 (s) .01 .03 .15 .90 4.81 .73 3.93 1.66 R 8.91 1965 (s) .01 (s) .01 .11 .53 1.12 5.62 .92 R 4.63 2.15 R 10.79 1970 (s) (s) (s) .01 .26 1.06 1.26 5.18 1.48 R 6.09 3.00 R 12.34 1975 .02 .06 .16 .47 1.15 3.43 18.29 R 54.45 6.77 R 20.15 26.39 R 78.56 1976 .02 .05 .11 .31 1.66 R 4.67 25.46 R 71.67 6.65 R 18.73 33.90 R 95.43 1977 .04 .10 .13 .35 2.00 R 5.29 33.59 R 88.91 8.42 R 22.28 44.18 R 116.93 1978 .07 .18 .41

423

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 3.4 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity 3 Total 4 Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Retail Electricity 3 Total 6,7 Coal Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Biomass 8 Retail Electricity 3 Total 7,9 Petroleum 5 Total 7,10 1970 1.06 1.54 6.51 2.10 0.75 R 0.90 6.09 1.97 0.45 0.38 0.98 1.59 2.99 0.84 2.31 2.31 1971 1.12 1.59 6.80 2.24 .80 1.02 6.44 2.15 .50 .41 1.05 1.59 3.22 R .93 2.37 2.37 1972 1.18 R 1.61 7.09 2.37 .86 1.05 6.71 2.32 .55 .46 1.05 1.59 3.40 .99 2.38 2.38 1973 1.26 R 2.09 7.44 2.71 .91 R 1.20 7.06 2.55 .63 .50 1.18 1.60 3.66 1.10 2.57 2.57 1974 1.42 2.85 9.09 3.38 1.05 R 2.25 8.91 R 3.40 1.22 .67 R 2.25 1.60 4.95 1.78 3.70 3.70 1975 1.67 R 3.02 10.29 3.80 1.32 R 2.39 10.11 R 4.06 1.50 .95 R 2.47 1.60 6.07

424

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 4.6 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory Wells, Selected Years, 1949-2010 Year Wells Drilled Successful Wells Footage Drilled 1 Average Footage Drilled Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Crude Oil 2 Natural Gas 3 Dry Holes 4 Total Number Percent Thousand Feet Feet per Well 1949 1,406 424 7,228 9,058 20.2 5,950 2,409 26,439 34,798 4,232 5,682 3,658 3,842 1950 1,583 431 8,292 10,306 19.5 6,862 2,356 30,957 40,175 4,335 5,466 3,733 3,898 1955 2,236 874 11,832 14,942 20.8 10,774 5,212 53,220 69,206 4,819 5,964 4,498 4,632 1960 1,321 868 9,515 11,704 18.7 6,829 5,466 43,535 55,831 5,170 6,298 4,575 4,770 1965 946 515 8,005 9,466 15.4 5,366 3,757 40,081 49,204 5,672 7,295 5,007 5,198 1970 757 477 6,162 7,396 16.7 4,729 3,678 35,123 43,530 6,247 7,695 5,700 5,885 1975 982 1,248 7,129 9,359 23.8 5,806

425

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Biomass Resources 6 Biomass Resources U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 113 Notes: * Data are for total biomass per square kilometer. * km 2 = square kilometer. * This study estimates the biomass resources currently available in the United States by county. It includes the following feedstock categories: crop residues (5 year average: 2003-2007), forest and primary mill residues (2007), secondary mill and urban wood waste (2002), methane emis- sions from landfills (2008), domestic wastewater treatment (2007), and animal manure (2002). For more information on the data development, please refer to http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy06osti/39181.pdf. Although, the document contains the methodology for the development of an older assessment,

426

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Solar Thermal Collector Domestic Shipments by Market Sector, End-Use, and Type, 2009 7 Solar Thermal Collector Domestic Shipments by Market Sector, End-Use, and Type, 2009 End Use Market Sector Type of Collector End Use by Type of Collector 294 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Combined space and water heating. 2 Space heating, combined heating, and space cooling. 3 Collectors that generally operate at temperatures below 110 degrees Fahrenheit. 4 Collectors that generally operate in the temperature range of 140 degrees Fahrenheit to 180 degrees Fahrenheit but can also operate at temperatures as low as 110 degrees Fahrenheit. 5 Collectors that generally operate at temperatures above 180 degrees Fahrenheit. 6 Water heating and combined heating.

427

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 a Exact conversion. b Calculated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. c The Btu used in this table is the International Table Btu adopted by the Fifth International Conference on Properties of Steam, London, 1956. d To convert degrees Fahrenheit (ºF) to degrees Celsius (ºC) exactly, subtract 32, then multiply by 5/9. Notes: * Spaces have been inserted after every third digit to the right of the decimal for ease of reading. * Most metric units belong to the International System of Units (SI), and the liter, hectare, and metric ton are accepted for use with the SI units. For more information about the SI units, see http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/index.html.

428

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Total Wood 6 Total 6 1949 121 55 51 21 7 80 66 321 99 99 1950 120 66 61 25 9 95 69 350 94 94 1955 83 117 87 27 13 127 110 436 73 73 1960 56 170 115 26 19 160 156 542 59 59 1965 34 214 125 24 24 174 223 644 44 44 1970 20 265 137 22 35 194 355 833 38 38 1975 6 266 132 12 32 176 419 867 40 40 1976 6 273 145 13 34 192 442 913 45 45 1977 5 261 146 12 33 191 478 935 51 51 1978 5 264 143 11 32 186 484 938 58 58 1979 4 268 119 10 21 150 496 918 68 68 1980 3 256 96 8 20 124 529 911 80 80 1981 3 245 84 6 19 109 522 878 82 82 1982 3 250 77 7 18 102 518 873 91 91 1983 3 238 68 6 22 95 531 867 91 91 1984 4 247 80 12 18 109 542 902 92 92 1985 4 241

429

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 7.6 Electricity End Use (Million Kilowatthours) Retail Sales a Direct Use f Total End Use g Discontinued Retail Sales Series Residential Commercial b Industrial c Transpor- tation d Total Retail Sales e Commercial (Old) h Other (Old) i 1950 Total .................... 72,200 E 65,971 146,479 E 6,793 291,443 NA 291,443 50,637 22,127 1955 Total .................... 128,401 E 102,547 259,974 E 5,826 496,748 NA 496,748 79,389 28,984 1960 Total .................... 201,463 E 159,144 324,402 E 3,066 688,075 NA 688,075 130,702 31,508 1965 Total .................... 291,013 E 231,126 428,727 E 2,923 953,789 NA 953,789

430

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 12.2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Retail Electricity e Total f Distillate Fuel Oil c Kerosene LPG d Total 1973 Total .......................... 9 264 147 16 36 199 435 907 1975 Total .......................... 6 266 132 12 32 176 419 867 1980 Total .......................... 3 256 96 8 20 124 529 911 1985 Total .......................... 4 241 80 11 20 111 553 909 1990 Total .......................... 3 238 72 5 22 98 624 963 1995 Total .......................... 2 263 66 5 25 96 678 1,039 1996 Total .......................... 2 284 68 6 30 104 710 1,099 1997 Total .......................... 2 270 64 7 29 99 719 1,090 1998 Total .......................... 1 247 56 8 27 91 759 1,097 1999 Total ..........................

431

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Energy Review 2011 Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 5.1a Petroleum and Other Liquids Overview, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year Production 1 Production as Share of Estimated Consumption Net Imports 2 Net Imports as Share of Estimated Consumption Balancing Item 3 Estimated Consumption 4 Thousand Barrels per Day Percent Thousand Barrels per Day Percent Thousand Barrels per Day 1949 5,475 95.0 318 5.5 -30 5,763 1950 5,908 91.5 545 8.4 5 6,458 1955 7,611 90.0 880 10.4 -37 8,455 1960 8,110 82.8 1,613 16.5 74 9,797 1965 9,234 80.2 2,281 19.8 -2 11,512 1970 11,656 79.3 3,161 21.5 -119 14,697 1975 10,467 64.1 5,846 35.8 8 16,322 1976 10,213 58.5 7,090 40.6 159 17,461 1977 10,387 56.4 8,565 46.5 -520 18,431 1978 10,771 57.2 8,002 42.5 74 18,847 1979 10,662 57.6 7,985 43.1 -135 18,513 1980 10,767 63.1 6,365 37.3 -76 17,056 1981 10,693 66.6 5,401 33.6 -31 16,063 1982 10,744 70.2 4,298

432

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. 0. Petroleum Flow, 2011 (Million Barrels per Day) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 117 1 Unfinished oils, hydrogen/oxygenates/renewables/other hydrocarbons, and motor gasoline and aviation gasoline blending components. 2 Renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production (0.972), net imports (1.164) and adjustments (0.122) minus stock change (0.019) and product supplied (0.001). 3 Finished petroleum products, liquefied petroleum gases, and pentanes plus. 4 Natural gas plant liquids. 5 Field production (2.183) and renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production (-.019) minus refinery and blender net inputs (0.489). 6 Petroleum products supplied. (s)=Less than 0.005. Notes: * Data are preliminary. * Values are derived from source data prior to rounding for

433

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methane Emissions Methane Emissions Total, 1980-2009 By Source, 2009 Energy Sources by Type 1980-2009 Agricultural Sources by Major Type, 1980-2009 310 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Chemical production, and iron and steel production. 2 Natural gas production, processing, and distribution. 3 Petroleum production, refining, and distribution. 4 Consumption of coal, petroleum, natural gas, and wood for heat or electricity. 5 Emissions from passenger cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles, and other transport. 6 Methane emitted as a product of digestion in animals such as cattle, sheep, goats, and swine. Source: Table 11.3. Sources Sources Management Processes¹ 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0 10 20 30 40 Million Metric Tons of Methane 12.1 8.6 8.3 0.2 Energy Agricultural

434

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 1.7 Heating Degree-Days by Month, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year January February March April May June July August September October November December Total 1949 858 701 611 330 128 21 7 9 94 209 503 763 4,234 1950 761 721 693 412 162 40 11 18 85 196 565 872 4,536 1955 927 759 600 272 121 48 9 6 56 237 600 886 4,521 1960 884 780 831 278 160 33 7 11 48 254 502 936 4,724 1965 907 780 738 355 114 48 11 14 78 271 494 739 4,549 1970 1,063 758 685 344 120 31 4 9 55 253 541 801 4,664 1975 821 742 686 449 117 37 5 13 100 235 462 805 4,472 1976 974 609 544 309 178 28 8 19 81 367 668 941 4,726 1977 1,188 751 529 270 119 38 6 13 59 295 493 844 4,605 1978 1,061 958 677 350 157 31 7 11 59 283 517 847 4,958 1979 1,079 950 575 364 148 37 6 15 58 271 528 750 4,781 1980 887 831 680 338 142 49 5 10 54 316 564 831 4,707 1981 984 689 620 260 165 25 6 11 76 327 504 845

435

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

85 85 a Exact conversion. b Calculated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Specifications, Tolerances, and Other Techni- cal Requirements for Weighing and Measuring Devices, NIST Handbook 44, 1994 Edition (Washington, DC, October 1993), pp. B-10, C-17 and C-21. cubic feet (ft 3 ) 128 a = 1 cord (cd) shorts tons 1.25 b = 1 cord (cd) Wood kilograms (kg) 1,000 a = 1 metric ton (t) pounds (lb) 2,240 a = 1 long ton pounds (lb) 2,000 a = 1 short ton Coal U.S. gallons (gal) 42 a = 1 barrel (bbl) Petroleum alent in Final Units Equiv Original Unit Energy Source

436

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

chemical chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH(3)-(CH(2)) n -OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). See Fuel Ethanol. Alternative Fuel: Alternative fuels, for transportation applications, include the following: methanol; denatured ethanol, and other alcohols; fuel mixtures containing 85 percent or more by volume of methanol, denatured ethanol, and other alcohols with motor gasoline or other fuels; natural gas; liquefied petroleum gas (propane); hydro- gen; coal-derived liquid fuels; fuels (other than alcohol) derived from biological materials (biofuels such as soy diesel fuel); electricity (including electricity from solar

437

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption Total¹ 1949-2011 Economic Growth and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1949-2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Biomass¹ Source, 2011 302 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 ¹ Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are excluded from total emissions. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. 2 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multi- plying by 12/44. 3 Based on chained (2005) dollars. Sources: Tables 1.5, 11.1, and 11.2a-11.2e. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Billion Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide² Real³ Gross Domestic Product Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

438

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 3.8a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption: Residential and Commercial Sectors (Trillion Btu) Residential Sector Commercial Sector a Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Total Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Motor Gasoline b Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total 1950 Total ........................ 829 347 146 1,322 262 47 39 100 NA 424 872 1955 Total ........................ 1,194 371 202 1,767 377 51 54 133 NA 480 1,095 1960 Total ........................ 1,568 354 305 2,227 494 48

439

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 3.2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs and Net Production (Thousand Barrels per Day) Refinery and Blender Net Inputs a Refinery and Blender Net Production b Crude Oil d NGPL e Other Liquids f Total Distillate Fuel Oil g Jet Fuel h LPG c Motor Gasoline j Residual Fuel Oil Other Products k Total Propane i Total 1950 Average .................... 5,739 259 19 6,018 1,093 h ( ) NA 80 2,735 1,165 947 6,019 1955 Average .................... 7,480 345 32 7,857 1,651 155 NA 119 3,648 1,152 1,166 7,891 1960 Average .................... 8,067 455 61 8,583 1,823 241 NA 212 4,126 908 1,420 8,729 1965 Average .................... 9,043 618 88 9,750 2,096 523 NA 293 4,507 736 1,814 9,970 1970 Average .................... 10,870 763 121 11,754 2,454 827 NA 345 5,699 706 2,082 12,113 1975 Average ....................

440

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 8.12b Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Winter Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted) Year Noncoincident Peak Load 1 by North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 2 Regional Assessment Area Capacity Margin 21 (percent) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT 4 Western Inter- connection All Inter- connections FRCC 5 NPCC 6 Balance of Eastern Region 3 ECAR 7,8 MAAC 8,9 MAIN 8,10 MAPP 11 MISO 12 MRO 13 PJM 14 RFC 8,15 SERC 16 SPP 17 Subtotal TRE 18 WECC 19 Total 20 1986 - - 37,976 64,561 32,807 28,036 - - - - 18,850 - - - - 101,849 33,877 279,980 28,730 76,171 422,857 NA 1987 - - 41,902 68,118 35,775 30,606 - - - - 19,335 - - - - 105,476 34,472 293,782 31,399 81,182 448,265 NA 1988 - - 42,951 67,771 36,363 30,631 - - - - 20,162 - - - -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 3.4 Petroleum Stocks (Million Barrels) Crude Oil a Distillate Fuel Oil f Jet Fuel g LPG b Motor Gasoline i Residual Fuel Oil Other j Total SPR c Non-SPR d,e Total e Propane h Total 1950 Year ..................... - - 248 248 72 g ( ) NA 2 116 41 104 583 1955 Year ..................... - - 266 266 111 3 NA 7 165 39 123 715 1960 Year ..................... - - 240 240 138 7 NA 23 195 45 137 785 1965 Year ..................... - - 220 220 155 19 NA 30 175 56 181 836 1970 Year ..................... - - 276 276 195 28 NA 67 209 54 188 1,018 1975 Year ..................... - - 271 271 209 30 82 125 235 74 188 1,133 1980 Year ..................... 108 358 466 205 42 65 120 261 92 205 1,392 1985 Year ..................... 493 321 814 144 40 39 74 223 50 174 1,519 1990 Year ..................... 586 323 908 132 52 49 98 220 49 162 1,621 1995 Year .....................

442

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003 0 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003 Buildings by Energy Source Used Consumption Consumption per Square Foot Square Footage per Building by Expenditures Expenditures Per Square Foot Energy Source Used 62 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Electricity only; excludes electrical system energy losses. 2 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, and kerosene. 3 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: For years not shown, there are no data available. Source: Table 2.10. District Heat 1979 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1999 2003 0 1 2 3 4 5 Thousands of Buildings 1979 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1999 2003 0 25 50 75 100 125 Thousand Btu Fuel Oil² 1979 1983 1986

443

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 5.23 All Sellers Sales Prices for Selected Petroleum Products, 1994-2010 (Dollars 1 per Gallon, Excluding Taxes) Product 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Sales Prices to Resellers 2 Motor Gasoline ......................................... 0.602 0.630 0.715 0.703 0.530 0.645 0.966 0.888 0.832 1.001 1.288 1.675 1.973 2.186 2.587 1.773 2.169 Unleaded Regular ................................... .571 .599 .689 .677 .504 .621 .946 .868 .813 .982 1.271 1.659 1.956 2.165 2.570 1.753 2.151 Conventional 3 ...................................... .565 .583 .672 .658 .484 .596 .918 .838 .794 .950 1.241 1.639 1.930 3 2.145 3 2.564 3 1.732 3 2.133 Oxygenated 3 ........................................ .627 .662 .745 .754 .575 .690 1.016 .947 .858 1.031

444

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 3.9 Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Billion Dollars) Year Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Crude Oil Petroleum Products 1 Total Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 1949 -0.29 R -2.03 (s) -0.03 (s) -0.01 0.21 1.42 -0.32 -2.24 -0.42 -2.89 1950 -.27 -1.82 (s) -.01 (s) -.02 .27 1.82 -.18 -1.23 -.18 -1.26 1955 -.48 R -2.90 -.01 -.04 -.01 -.03 .62 3.71 -.16 -.95 -.04 -.22 1960 -.35 -1.89 -.01 -.03 .02 .13 .89 4.77 .26 1.42 .82 4.40 1965 -.48 R -2.38 -.01 -.07 .10 .49 1.11 R 5.59 .48 2.43 1.21 R 6.05 1970 -.96 -3.95 -.08 -.31 .23 R .93 1.24 R 5.10 .98 4.03 1.41 5.81 1975 -3.24 -9.64 .08 .24 1.06 3.16 18.29 R 54.45 5.76 R 17.15 21.96 R 65.36 1976 -2.89 R -8.14 .04 .12 1.56 4.39 25.43 R 71.59 5.58 R 15.71 29.72 R 83.68 1977 -2.62 R -6.92 .06 .16 1.89 R 5.01 33.38 R 88.35 7.28

445

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 10.5 Estimated Number of Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use and Fuel Consumption, 1992-2010 Year Alternative and Replacement Fuels 1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases Compressed Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Methanol, 85 Percent (M85) 3 Methanol, Neat (M100) 4 Ethanol, 85 Percent (E85) 3,5 Ethanol, 95 Percent (E95) 3 Elec- tricity 6 Hydro- gen Other Fuels 7 Subtotal Oxygenates 2 Bio- diesel 10 Total Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether 8 Ethanol in Gasohol 9 Total Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use 11 (number) 1992 NA 23,191 90 4,850 404 172 38 1,607 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1993 NA 32,714 299 10,263 414 441 27 1,690 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994 NA 41,227 484 15,484 415 605 33 2,224 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1995 172,806 50,218 603 18,319 386 1,527

446

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells Total Wells Drilled, 1949-2010 Total Wells Drilled by Type, 1949-2010 Successful Wells, 1949-2010 Wells Drilled, 2010 Footage Drilled, 2010 Average Depth, 2010 96 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Data are for exploratory and development wells combined. Sources: Tables 4.5-4.7. Total¹ 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 25 50 75 100 Thousand Wells 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Thousand Wells 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 Percent Total¹ Development Exploratory Development Exploratory Natural Gas Wells Crude Oil Wells Dry Holes 16.3 17.0 4.3 15.6 15.9 3.2 0.7 1.0 1.1 Crude Oil Natural Gas Dry Holes 0 5 10 15 20 Thousand Wells Exploratory Development Total 101 147 22 95 138 16 6 9 6 Crude Oil

447

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 5.24 Retail Motor Gasoline and On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Gallon) Year Motor Gasoline by Grade Regular Motor Gasoline by Area Type On-Highway Diesel Fuel Leaded Regular Unleaded Regular Unleaded Premium All Grades Conventional Gasoline Areas 1,2 Reformulated Gasoline Areas 3,4 All Areas Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Nominal 5 Nominal 5 Nominal 5 1949 0.268 R 1.848 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1950 .268 R 1.829 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1955 .291 R 1.753 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1960 .311 R 1.671 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1965 .312 R 1.565 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1970 .357 R 1.467 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

448

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen- sive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evalu- ate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information...."

449

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 5.2 Crude Oil Production and Crude Oil Well Productivity, Selected Years, 1954-2011 Year Crude Oil Production Crude Oil Well 1 Productivity 48 States 2 Alaska 3 Total Onshore Offshore Total Producing Wells 4 Average Productivity 5 Federal State Total Thousand Barrels per Day Thousand Barrels per Day Thousands Barrels per Day per Well 1954 6,342 0 6,342 6,209 NA NA 133 6,342 511 12.4 1955 6,807 0 6,807 6,645 NA NA 162 6,807 524 13.0 1960 7,034 2 7,035 6,716 NA NA 319 7,035 591 11.9 1965 7,774 30 7,804 7,140 NA NA 665 7,804 589 13.2 1970 9,408 229 9,637 8,060 NA NA 1,577 9,637 531 18.1 1975 8,183 191 8,375 7,012 NA NA 1,362 8,375 500 16.8 1976 7,958 173 8,132 6,868 NA NA 1,264 8,132 499 16.3 1977 7,781 464 8,245 7,069 NA NA 1,176 8,245 507 16.3 1978 7,478 1,229 8,707 7,571 NA NA 1,136 8,707 517 16.8 1979 7,151 1,401 8,552

450

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table A6. Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity, and Heat Content of Electricity, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Year Approximate Heat Rates 1 for Electricity Net Generation Heat Content 10 of Electricity 11 Fossil Fuels 2 Nuclear 8 Noncombustible Renewable Energy 7,9 Coal 3 Petroleum 4 Natural Gas 5 Total Fossil Fuels 6,7 1949 NA NA NA 15,033 - - 15,033 3,412 1950 NA NA NA 14,030 - - 14,030 3,412 1955 NA NA NA 11,699 - - 11,699 3,412 1960 NA NA NA 10,760 11,629 10,760 3,412 1965 NA NA NA 10,453 11,804 10,453 3,412 1970 NA NA NA 10,494 10,977 10,494 3,412 1975 NA NA NA 10,406 11,013 10,406 3,412 1976 NA NA NA 10,373 11,047 10,373 3,412 1977 NA NA NA 10,435 10,769

451

Word Pro - S3  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review December 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review December 2013 Table 3.3c Petroleum Trade: Imports From OPEC Countries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Algeria a Angola b Ecuador c Iraq Kuwait d Libya e Nigeria f Saudi Arabia d Vene- zuela Other g Total OPEC 1960 Average ...................... a ( ) b ( ) c ( ) 22 182 e ( ) f ( ) 84 911 34 1,233 1965 Average ...................... a ( ) b ( ) c ( ) 16 74 42 f ( ) 158 994 155 1,439 1970 Average ...................... 8 b ( ) c ( ) 0 48 47 f ( ) 30 989 172 1,294 1975 Average ...................... 282 b ( ) 57 2 16 232 762 715 702 832 3,601 1980 Average ...................... 488 b ( ) 27 28 27 554 857 1,261 481 577 4,300 1985 Average ...................... 187 b ( ) 67 46 21 4 293 168 605 439 1,830 1990 Average ...................... 280 b ( ) 49 518 86 0 800 1,339 1,025 199 4,296 1995 Average ......................

452

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P F P F Ma r c h 2 0 1 2 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

453

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Quadrillion Btu) Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, June 2013 22 Energy...

454

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Table 6.7 Natural Gas Wellhead, Citygate, and Imports Prices, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Wellhead 1 Citygate 2 Imports Nominal 3 Real 4...

455

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quadrillion Btu Natural Gas Electrical Losses Electrical Losses Electrical Losses Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Coal Renewable Energy Coal Petroleum Electricity...

456

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Average Retail Prices of Electricity Total, 1960-2011 By Sector, 2011 By Sector, Nominal Prices, 1960-2011 By Sector, Real 1 Prices, 1960-2011 254 U.S. Energy Information...

457

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC)" in Glossary. Notes: * Values for 2011 are forecast. * The winter peak period is October through May. Source: Table 8.12b....

458

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010 Development Wells Drilled by Well Type Development Footage Drilled by Well Type Development Wells Average Depth, All Wells...

459

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Production and Crude Oil Well Productivity, 1954-2011 Crude Oil Production by Location Number of Producing Wells Crude Oil Production, 48 States and Alaska Crude Oil...

460

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b Petroleum Overview Overview, 1949-2011 Overview, 2011 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Plant Liquids Field Production, 1949-2011 Trade, 1949-2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

expenditures. * There are no direct fuel costs for hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, or solar energy. * Totals may not equal the sum of components due to independent rounding....

462

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Photovoltaic Solar Resources U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 109 Notes: * Annual average solar resource data are shown for a tiltlatitude...

463

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 10.2a Renewable Energy Consumption: Residential and Commercial Sectors, Selected Years, 1949-2011...

464

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

is a result of imputing fossil energy equivalent inputs for hydroelectric, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic, and wind energy sources. In addition to conversion losses,...

465

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Concentrating Solar Resources 108 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Notes: * Annual average direct normal solar resource data are shown. * kWhm...

466

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

reports to the Interstate Oil Compact Commission and the U.S. Minerals Management Service. Volumetric data are converted, as necessary, ...

467

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 8 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kero- sene LPG 5 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke...

468

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gases Lubricants Motor Gasoline 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 5 Total Percentage Change From Previous Year 6 Propane 3 Total 1949 157 93 902 2 ( ) 281 NA 187 91...

469

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gases Lubricants Motor Gasoline 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 5 Total Percentage Change From Previous Year Propane 3 Total 1949 380 172 1,918 2 ( ) 582 NA 274 201...

470

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Consumption, Production, and Imports, 1973-2012 Consumption, Production, and Imports, Monthly Overview, April 2013 Net Imports,...

471

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Energy Overview Overview, 1949-2011 Production and Consumption, 2011 Overview, 2011 Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual...

472

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals by Well Type, 2011 180 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Dry Gas Production 1 Volume reduction resulting from the removal of...

473

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Fuel, 1949-2011 Overview, 2011 70 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Production 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross...

474

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Coal Flow, 2011 (Million Short Tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 197 Notes: * Production categories are estimated; all data are...

475

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Estimated Consumption, 1949-2011 118 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Note: Production includes production of crude oil (including lease...

476

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Major Source, 1949-2011 198 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Dry natural gas production as share of natural gas consumption. 2...

477

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Energy Production (Quadrillion Btu) Total, 1973-2012 Total, Monthly By Source, 1973-2012 By Source, Monthly Total, January-April By Source, April 2013 a Natural gas plant...

478

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

dataannualpetroleum for all annual data beginning in 1949. * See http:www.eia.govpetroleum for related information. Sources: * 1949-1975-Bureau of Mines, Mineral Industry...

479

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2011 1 Fuel oil nos. 1, 2, and 4. 2 Fuel oil nos. 5 and 6. 3 Jet fuel and kerosene. 4 Petroleum coke, which is reported in short tons, is converted at a rate of 5 barrels per...

480

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

on calculations of data from 1971 through 2000. Source: Table 1.7. 494 (2000) 577 (1954) 687 (2006) 683 (1956) 396 (2001) 449 (1975) 831 (1960) 367 (1976) 668 (1976) 1,188...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1966-2010 Fuel Economy, 1966-2010 58 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Miles per gallon. 2 Miles per vehicle. 3 Gallons per vehicle. 4 Through...

482

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Table A2. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Production, Imports, and Exports, Selected Years, 1949-2011...

483

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Degree-Days by Month, 1949-2011 18 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 April May June July August September October 0 100 200 300 400 500 Cooling...

484

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Products Supplied, 1949-2011 140 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases. 2 Asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline,...

485

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Census Division, 2011 22 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500...

486

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Non-OPEC Countries, 1960-2011 126 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 On this graph, imports from Nigeria are shown beginning in 1971, when...

487

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Census Division, 2011 20 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000...

488

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production of Selected Products 134 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 See Table 5.8, footnote 4. Source: Table 5.8. Residual Fuel Oil 1950...

489

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1949-2011 Imports, 1972-2011 190 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 In chained (2005) dollars,...

490

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Withdrawals, 1949-2011 178 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Dry gas. 2 Underground storage. For 1980-2010, also includes liquefied...

491

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

To Resellers To End Users 168 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in...

492

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Type, 1949-2011 By Type, 2011 94 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Rigs drilling for miscellaneous purposes, such as service wells,...

493

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Selected Product, 1949-2011 138 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Source: Table 5.10. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500...

494

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2011 Energy Imports Energy Exports 10 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Quadrillion Btu Petroleum...

495

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste 236 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Residual Fuel Oil Total Petroleum Source: Table 8.5a. 1989 1992 1995 1998...

496

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Footage Drilled, Selected Years 104 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 In 2002 and 2003, data are withheld to avoid disclosure. Source: Table...

497

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rank By Mining Method By Location 200 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Anthracite Lignite Subbituminous Coal Subbituminous coal and...

498

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 5.14b Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption Estimates: Industrial Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011...

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption Net Imports From OPEC 132 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Note: OPECOrganization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Source:...

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1949-2011 By Product, 2011 128 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases. Asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline,...