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1

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Customers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Customers" Customers" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Number of Customers" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "RV CSU Power II LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1

2

Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators  

SciTech Connect

Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Non-Utility Generation and Transmission Access in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NON-UTILITY GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION ACCESS IN TEXAS' Sarut Panjavan Senior Power Systems Engineer Public Utility Commission ofTexas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Power from non-utility generators (NUG) is an important part of the generation... mix in Texas. In recent years approximately 10 percent of the total sales of electricity in the state was purchased by utilities frOIll NUGs. Access to the transmission system is a key factor in promoting competition in power generation...

Panjavan, S.; Adib, P.

6

ProPower Renewable Energy Shanghai Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProPower Renewable Energy Shanghai Ltd ProPower Renewable Energy Shanghai Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name ProPower Renewable Energy (Shanghai) Ltd Place Shanghai, Shanghai Municipality, China Zip 201314 Sector Solar Product China-based solar-grade silicon manufacturer by applying self-developed UMG method. Coordinates 31.247709°, 121.472618° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.247709,"lon":121.472618,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit:...

8

Pro  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pro Pro gram or Field Office: Project Title and 1. 0. No.: Locati on: u.s. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Office of Legacy Management Routine Activities at the Site AlPlot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor Site. LM # 52-11. Chicago, Illinois Pro posed Action or Project Descri ption : DOE proposes to conduCt routine activities as needed at Site AlPlot M. The site is in the Palos Forest Preserve in Cook County, Illinois, 20 miles southwest of Chicago. The Forest Preserve District of Cook County owns the land. DOE is responsible for the radioactive materials buried onsite. Site A is a 19-acre area that contained experimental laboratories and nuclear reactor research facilities. Plot M, which is about 1,500 feet north of Site A, is a 150-foot-by-140-foot area that was used for the sealed

9

Table N13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" 3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,," " " "," ","Total of",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

10

Table E13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" 3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,"Total of",,,"RSE" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1,1.1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

11

Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002;" Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,"Total of",,,"RSE" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.3,0.9 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

12

Table A30. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.1,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1829," W "," W ",28

13

Wind pro?le assessment for wind power purposes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Preliminary estimation of wind speed at the wind turbine hub height is critically important when planning new wind farms. Wind turbine power output is proportional (more)

Sointu, Iida

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Table A18. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" 8. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",988,940,48,16.2 2011," Meat Packing Plants",0,0,0,"NF"

15

Table A21. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" 1. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,"RSE" " "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States",,, "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.1,1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",188,122,66,35.6 " 20-49",2311,1901,410,39.5 " 50-99",2951,2721,230,9.6 " 100-249",6674,5699,974,7.1

16

Table A31. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers by Census Region," Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers by Census Region," " Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,"RSE" " "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States",,, "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.1,1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",222,164," Q ",23.3 " 20-49",1131,937,194,17.2

17

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Sales"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales" Sales" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Sales (Megawatthours)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",33463,".",33463 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",6883,".",6883 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1820,".",".",1820 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",9651,".",".",9651

18

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Revenue"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue" Revenue" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Revenue (thousand dollars)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1735,".",1735 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",798,".",798 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",243,".",".",243 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",603,".",".",603

19

Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; 5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 347 168 179 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 142 6 136 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 4 10 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 109 88 21 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 66 66 0 3115 Dairy Products 22 0 22 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 1 * 3121 Beverages 1 1 * 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills

20

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 111 86 25 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 72 51 21 311221 Wet Corn Milling 55 42 13 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7 3 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 13 13 0 3115 Dairy Products 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * * 0 3121 Beverages

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Power and Pro-Social Behavior: The Powerful Will Help in the Presence of Others  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a group are less likely to help (Vs. individuals alone) whenHypothesis Powerful people will help as much when they areBehavior The Powerful Will Help in the Presence of Others

Nichiporuk, Nikolay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; 6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of Economic Sales and Utility Nonutility Characteristic(a) Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 194 100 93 20-49 282 280 3 50-99 1,115 922 194 100-249 5,225 4,288 936 250-499 5,595 2,696 2,899 500 and Over 20,770 12,507 8,263 Total 33,181 20,793 12,388 Employment Size Under 50 395 177 218 50-99 3,412 3,408 5 100-249 6,687 3,088 3,599 250-499 5,389 4,175 1,214 500-999 7,082 3,635 3,447

23

The Council of Industrial Boiler Owners special project on non-utility fossil fuel ash classification  

SciTech Connect

Information is outlined on the Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO) special project on non-utility fossil fuel ash classification. Data are presented on; current (1996) regulatory status of fossil-fuel combustion wastes; FBC technology identified for further study; CIBO special project methods; Bevill amendment study factors; data collection; and CIBO special project status.

Svendsen, R.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Highly Robust Thin-Film Composite Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO) Hollow Fiber Membranes with High Power Densities for Renewable Salinity-Gradient Energy Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) Salinity-gradient energy (i.e., osmotic power) generated from the mixing of solutions with different salinities via pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) represents a high potential source of renewable energy. ... Thorsen, T.; Holt, T.The potential for power production from salinity gradients by pressure retarded osmosis J. Membr. ... When using saline water as the feed soln., the efficiency of the osmotic pressure decreases with increasing feed concn. ...

Gang Han; Peng Wang; Tai-Shung Chung

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Pro Ventum International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pro Ventum International Place: Forchheim, Germany Zip: 79362 Sector: Wind energy Product: German-based developer of wind power...

26

SolarPro Energy International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarPro Energy International SolarPro Energy International Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarPro Energy International Place Granite Bay, California Zip 95746 Sector Solar Product SolarPro Energy installs solar power systems using PV panels for residential and commercial properties. References SolarPro Energy International[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. SolarPro Energy International is a company located in Granite Bay, California . References ↑ "SolarPro Energy International" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=SolarPro_Energy_International&oldid=351417" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

27

Applying planning models to study new competition: Analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An integrated electric utility planning model, the Resource Policy Screening Model (RPSM), was used to project acquisitions from independent power producers made by customers of a US power marketing authority. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) markets power from dams in the Pacific Northwest to retail utilities. BPA's historical cost advantage has eroded and customers are evaluating more costly nonutility generation to meet future load growth. If some customers will pay a premium above BPA rates for power, how much load could BPA lose? Steps in the analysis are presented. RPSM is a system dynamics model used in energy policy studies since 1983. This study marked the first application for understanding effects of electric industry deregulation on BPA. RPSM was modified, potential nonutility supplies were forecast, and scenario simulations of acquisitions, loads and rates were performed for utilities in the region. Later, the study method was adapted for other uses at BPA.

Franklin Neubauer; Erik Westman; Andrew Ford

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - adam22 pro domain Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 pro domain Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adam22 pro domain Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Role of Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins in...

29

Energy Pro USA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pro USA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Pro USA Place: Chesterfield, Missouri Zip: MO 63017 Product: Energy Pro funds and implements demand side energy savings programs to...

30

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 U.S. Shipments of Photovoltaic Modules Only by Sector and End Use, 2010 9 U.S. Shipments of Photovoltaic Modules Only by Sector and End Use, 2010 By End Use By Sector 298 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 See "Electric Power Grid" in Glossary. 2 Photovoltaic modules that are connected to the electric power grid, and whose output is fed directly into the grid. 3 Photovoltaic modules that are connected to the electric power grid, and whose output is consumed mainly onsite. 4 Photovoltaic modules that are not connected to the electric power grid, and that are used to provide electric power to remote households or communities. 5 Photovoltaic modules that are not connected to the electric power grid, and that are used to provide electric power for a variety of non-domestic applications.

31

Word Pro - S6  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 Coal (Million Short Tons) Overview, 1949-2013 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2013 Overview, Monthly Electric Power Sector Consumption, Monthly 82 U.S. Energy Information...

32

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

plants. Through 1988, data are for industrial hydroelectric power only. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of...

33

Word Pro - S1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade Stock Change and Other d Consumption Fossil Fuels a Nuclear Electric Power Renew- able Energy b Total Imports Exports Net Imports c Fossil...

34

PRO: Professional Record Online G:\\IR\\PRO\\Implementation Plan\\SC\\PRO Steering Committee Minutes_020312  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRO: Professional Record Online G:\\IR\\PRO\\Implementation Plan\\SC\\PRO Steering Committee Minutes in their work. The data entry team searched for photos/videos of music faculty online and found a few about PRO and will use the PRO website user guide and FAQs to respond to questions. Returning

35

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. Includes 0.1 quadrillion Btu of electricity net

36

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation Coal by Sector, 1989-2012 Petroleum by Sector, 1989-2012 Natural Gas by Sector, 1989-2012 Other Gases b by Sector, 1989-2012 Wood by Sector, 1989-2012 Waste by Sector, 1989-2012 98 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Commercial Industrial Electric Power Electric Power Industrial Industrial Total a Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 Billion Short Tons Total a Electric Power 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Million Barrels Total a Electric Power Industrial a Includes commercial sector. b Blast furnace gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. Through 2010, also includes propane gas . Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#electricity.

37

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.4a) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e...

38

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

95 Table 7.1 Electricity Overview (Billion Kilowatthours) Net Generation Trade T&D Losses e and Unaccounted for f End Use Electric Power Sector a Com- mercial Sector b Indus- trial...

39

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Btu) Year Primary Energy 2 Electric Power Sector 11,12 Retail Electricity 13 Total Energy 9,10,14 Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass 8 Total 9,10 Distillate...

40

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.4b and 8.4c; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 2.0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to

42

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants by Sector, 1989-2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste 242 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011...

43

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5b 5b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation by Sector, 2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 237 7.3 0.6 0.0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 2 4 6 8 Trillion Cubic Feet -CHP¹ (ss) 1 Combined-heat-and-power plants. ² Combined-heat-and-power and electricity-only plants. (s)=Less than 0.5 million short tons. (ss)=Less than 0.05 trillion cubic feet. (sss)=Less than 0.5 million barrels. Sources: Tables 8.5b-8.5d. Electricity-Only Plants 925 8 0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 Million Short Tons (s) Electricity-Only Plants CHP¹ -CHP¹ 47 2 0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 20 40 60 Million Barrels 416 181 24 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 100 200

44

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0 1 2 3 4 5 PV a a a a thermal a electric Power

45

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatthours) Total (All Sectors), Major Sources, 1949-2012 Total (All Sectors), Major Sources, Monthly Electric Power Sector, Major Sources, 2012 Commercial Sector, Major Sources, 2012 Industrial Sector, Major Sources, 2012 94 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Gases b Gas Gas electric Power c Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy a Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 Coal Nuclear Electric Power 2013 2011 2012 Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Coal 1,503 1,138 769 463 20 Coal Natural Nuclear Renewable Petro- 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 50 100 150 200 Petroleum Energy a Gas Electric Power leum 5.9 2.5 0.8 0.1 Natural Waste Coal

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Electric Net Summer Capacity, Total (All Sectors) a Electric Net Summer Capacity, Total (All Sectors) Total, 1949-2011 By Major Category, 2011 By Source, 2011 256 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Total 1 Conventional and pumped storage. 2 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscellaneous technologies. Source: Table 8.11a. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 Million Kilowatts Electric Power 791 140 101 22 Fossil Renewable Nuclear Hydroelectric 0 300 600 900 Million Kilowatts Nuclear Electric Power Fuels Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Energy Pumped Storage Electric Power 413 319 101 101 56 45 7 4 2 1 4 Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Hydro- Petroleum Wind Wood Waste Geothermal Solar/PV

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 7.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.2a; Million Kilowatthours) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage e Renewable Energy Total j Coal a Petro- leum b Natural Gas c Other Gases d Conven- tional Hydro- electric Power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/ PV i Wind Wood g Waste h 1950 Total .................. 154,520 33,734 44,559 NA 0 f ( ) 95,938 390 NA NA NA NA 329,141 1955 Total .................. 301,363 37,138 95,285 NA 0 f ( ) 112,975 276 NA NA NA NA

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 347 Primary Energy Consumption by Source 1 Delivered Total Energy by Sector 8 1 Includes electricity net imports, not shown separately. 2 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 3 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 4 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 5 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 6 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. 7 Calculated as the primary energy consumed by the electric power sector minus the

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b Electric Net Summer Capacity by Sector b Electric Net Summer Capacity by Sector Total (All Sectors) and Sectors, 1989-2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Commercial Sector, 2011 Industrial Sector, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 257 1 Conventional hydroelectric power, solar/PV, wood, wind, blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, batteries, chemicals, hydro- gen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscellaneous technologies. 2 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels 3 Conventional hydroelectric power. 4 Solar/PV, wind, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscel- laneous technologies. (s)=Less than 0.05 million kilowatts.

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumption for Electricity Generation By Major Category, 1949-2011 By Major Fuel, 2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 232 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Conventional hydroelectric power. 2 Geothermal, other gases, electricity net imports, solar thermal and photovoltaic energy, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. Sources: Tables 8.4a-8.4c. Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Quadrillion Btu 18.0 8.3 8.1 3.2 1.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.6 Coal

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Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Renewable . Renewable Energy Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0

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AL PRO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AL PRO AL PRO Jump to: navigation, search Name AL-PRO Place Grossheide, Lower Saxony, Germany Zip 26532 Sector Wind energy Product AL-PRO is an inndependent expert office for wind forecasts, wind potential studies, turbulence inquiries, visualizations as well as sound and shade throw forecasts Coordinates 53.592743°, 7.34313° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.592743,"lon":7.34313,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 10.2c Renewable Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector (Trillion Btu) Hydro- electric Power a Geo- thermal b Solar/PV c Wind d Biomass Total Wood e Waste f Total 1950 Total .................... 1,346 NA NA NA 5 NA 5 1,351 1955 Total .................... 1,322 NA NA NA 3 NA 3 1,325 1960 Total .................... 1,569 (s) NA NA 2 NA 2 1,571 1965 Total .................... 2,026 2 NA NA 3 NA 3 2,031 1970 Total .................... 2,600 6 NA NA 1 2 4 2,609 1975 Total .................... 3,122 34 NA NA (s) 2 2 3,158 1980 Total .................... 2,867 53 NA NA 3 2 4 2,925 1985 Total .................... 2,937 97 (s) (s)

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output Coal by Sector, 1989-2012 Petroleum by Sector, 1989-2012 Natural Gas by Sector, 1989-2012 Other Gases b by Sector, 1989-2012 Wood by Sector, 1989-2012 Waste by Sector, 1989-2012 102 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Industrial Commercial Industrial Electric Power Industrial Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 Billion Short Tons Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 90 180 270 360 Million Barrels Electric Power a Includes commercial sector. b Blast furnace gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. Through 2010, also includes propane gas . Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#electricity.

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Includes Adjustment for Fossil Fuel Equivalence. See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. 2 Includes electricity sales to each sector in addition to Primary Energy consumed in the sector. 3 Small amounts of coal consumed for transportation are reported as industrial sector consumption. Includes net imports of s upplemental liquids and coal coke. 4 Calculated as the primary energy consumed by the electric power sector minus the energy content of electricity retail sales. 26,784 71,220 27,451 23,267 8,711 11,791 98,004 39,579 27,425 19,984 4,175 6,841 Total Transporta- tion Indust- rial Commer- cial Residen- tial Total Electric Power Transporta- tion 3 Indus- trial 3 Commer- cial Residen- tial Electrical System Energy Losses 4 Delivered Total Energy 2 Primary Energy Consumption

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 9 7 18 1 36 - 1 2 9 - - - 12 - - - 47 1990 9 6 28 1 45 - 1 2 15 - - - 18 - - - 63 1995 12 4 44 - 60 - 1 1 21 - - - 23 (s) - - 83 1996 14 4 44 (s) 62 - 1 1 31 - - - 33 (s) - - 95 1997 14 5 40 (s) 59 - 1 1 34 - - - 35 (s) - - 94 1998 11 5 42 (s) 57 - 1 1 32 - - - 34 - - - 91 1999 12 6 40 (s) 57 - 1 (s) 33 - - - 35 (s) - - 92 2000

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2b 2b Electricity Net Generation by Sector By Sector, 2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Industrial and Commercial Sectors, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 223 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). (s) = Less than 0.05 trillion kilowatthours. (ss) = Less than 0.5 billion kilowatthours. Sources: Tables 8.2b-8.2d. 4.0 0.1 (s) Electric Power Industrial Commercial 0 1 2 3 4 5 Trillion Kilowatthours 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 Trillion Kilowatthours Electricity-Only Plants

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy Note 1. Operable Nuclear Reactors. A reactor is generally defined as operable while it possessed a full-power license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission or its predecessor the Atomic Energy Commission, or equivalent permission to operate, at the end of the year or month shown. The definition is liberal in that it does not exclude units retaining full-power licenses during long, non-routine shutdowns that for a time rendered them unable to generate electricity. Examples are: (a) In 1985 the five then-active Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) units (Browns Ferry 1, 2, and 3, and Sequoyah 1 and 2) were shut down under a regulatory forced outage. All five units were idle for several years, restarting in 2007, 1991, 1995, 1988, and 1988, respectively and were counted

59

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 3.7c Petroleum Consumption: Transportation and Electric Power Sectors (Thousand Barrels per Day) Transportation Sector Electric Power Sector a Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil b Jet Fuel c Liquefied Petroleum Gases Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Distillate Fuel Oil e Petro- leum Coke Residual Fuel Oil f Total 1950 Average .................... 108 226 c ( ) 2 64 2,433 524 3,356 15 NA 192 207 1955 Average .................... 192 372 154 9 70 3,221 440 4,458 15 NA 191 206 1960 Average .................... 161 418 371 13 68 3,736 367 5,135 10 NA 231 241 1965 Average .................... 120 514 602 23 67 4,374 336 6,036 14 NA 302 316 1970 Average .................... 55 738 967 32 66 5,589 332 7,778 66 9 853 928 1975 Average .................... 39 998 992 31 70 6,512 310 8,951 107

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Sector, 1949-2011 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Sector, 1949-2011 Residential and Commercial, by Major Source Industrial, by Major Source Transportation, by Major Source Electric Power, by Major Source 304 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Emissions from energy consumption in the electric power sector are allocated to the end- use sectors in proportion to each sector's share of total electricity retail sales (see Tables 8.9 and 11.2e). 2 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multi- plying by 12/44. 3 Includes coal coke net imports. Source: Tables 11.2a-11.2e. Retail Electricity¹ 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 1,250 1,500 1,750 2,000 Million Metric Tons Carbon

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59 59 Table 8.11b Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44.9 0.0 5 ( ) 18.5 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 18.5 NA 63.4 1950 NA NA NA NA 50.0 .0 5 ( ) 19.2 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 19.2 NA 69.2 1955 NA NA NA NA 86.8 .0 5 ( ) 27.4 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 27.4 NA 114.2 1960 NA NA NA NA 130.8 .4 5 ( ) 35.8 .1 10 ( ) (s) NA NA 35.9 NA 167.1 1965 NA NA NA NA 182.9 .8 5 ( ) 51.0 .1 10 ( ) (s) NA NA 51.1 NA

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal 5 Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 1,995 415 569 NA 2,979 0 1,349 6 NA NA NA NA 1,355 NA 5 4,339 1950 2,199 472 651 NA 3,322 0 1,346 5 NA NA NA NA 1,351 NA 6 4,679 1955 3,458 471 1,194 NA 5,123 0 1,322 3 NA NA NA NA 1,325 NA 14 6,461 1960 4,228 553 1,785 NA 6,565 6 1,569 2 NA (s) NA NA 1,571 NA 15 8,158 1965

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 Total (All Sectors) by Source, 2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 By Sector, 2011 228 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). Sources: Tables 8.3a-8.3c. 543 522 296 103 37 36 16 Wood Natural Coal Other Waste Petroleum Other² 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Trillion Btu 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Quadrillion Btu Gases¹ 1.2 0.3 0.1 Industrial Electric Power Commercial 0.0 0.6

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table 8.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.2a; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 6 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 9 Wind Total Wood 7 Waste 8 1949 135.5 28.5 37.0 NA 201.0 0.0 6 ( ) 89.7 0.4 NA NA NA NA 90.1 NA 291.1 1950 154.5 33.7 44.6 NA 232.8 .0 6 ( ) 95.9 .4 NA NA NA NA 96.3 NA 329.1 1955 301.4 37.1 95.3 NA 433.8 .0 6 ( ) 113.0 .3 NA NA NA NA 113.3 NA 547.0 1960 403.1 48.0 158.0 NA 609.0 .5 6 ( ) 145.8 .1 NA (s) NA NA 146.0 NA 755.5 1965

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Figure 7.1 Electricity Overview (Billion Kilowatthours) Overview, 2012 Net Generation by Sector, 1989-2012 Net Generation by Sector, Monthly Trade, 1949-2012 92 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Electric Power Total c Imports Exports 3,899 11 145 59 12 3,687 136 Electric Commercial Industrial Imports Exports Retail Direct 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 End Use Net Generation Trade Sales a Use b Power 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 Total c Electric Power J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 100 200 300 400 500 Industrial 2013 2011 Industrial 2012 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 a Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utili- ties and other energy service providers.

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Electricity Overview (Billion Kilowatthours) Overview, 2012 Net Generation by Sector, 1989-2012 Net Generation by Sector, Monthly Trade, 1949-2012 92 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Electric Power Total c Imports Exports 3,899 11 145 59 12 3,687 136 Electric Commercial Industrial Imports Exports Retail Direct 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 End Use Net Generation Trade Sales a Use b Power 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 Total c Electric Power J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 100 200 300 400 500 Industrial 2013 2011 Industrial 2012 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 a Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utili- ties and other energy service providers. b See "Direct Use" in Glossary.

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26 26 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.2b; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 6 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 9 Wind Total Wood 7 Waste 8 Electricity-Only Plants 11 1989 1,554.0 158.3 266.9 - 1,979.3 529.4 6 ( ) 269.2 4.2 6.9 14.6 0.3 2.1 297.3 - 2,805.9 1990 1,560.2 117.6 264.7 (s) 1,942.4 576.9 -3.5 289.8 5.6 10.4 15.4 .4 2.8 324.3 - 2,840.0 1995 1,658.0 62.0 317.4 (s) 2,037.4 673.4 -2.7 305.4 5.9 16.3 13.4 .5 3.2 344.7 - 3,052.8 1996 1,742.8 68.5 272.8 (s)

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Coal . Coal Figure 6.1 Coal (Million Short Tons) Overview, 1949-2012 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2012 Overview, Monthly Electric Power Sector Consumption, Monthly 82 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 2011 20 12 2013 Electric Power Consumption J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Net Exports 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 a Includes combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants and a small number of electricity-only-plants. b For 1978 forward, small amounts of transportation sector use are included in "Industrial." Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#coal. Sources: Tables 6.1-6.2. Production

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.11b; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Electricity-Only Plants 9 1989 296.5 78.0 119.3 0.4 494.2 98.2 18.1 73.6 0.9 1.5 2.6 0.2 1.5 80.3 - 690.7 1990 299.9 76.6 121.8 .4 498.6 99.6 19.5 73.3 1.0 1.9 2.7 .3 1.8 80.9 (s) 698.6 1995 301.3 64.7 145.3 .3 511.5 99.5 21.4 77.4 1.5 2.7 3.0 .3 1.7 86.6 - 719.1 1996 303.1 70.6 143.1 .1 516.9 100.8 21.1 75.3 1.4 2.6 2.9 .3 1.7 84.2 - 723.0

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

41 41 Table E1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United States, Selected Years, 1635-1945 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Electricity Net Imports Total Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Total Wood 1 1635 NA - - - - NA - - (s) (s) - - (s) 1645 NA - - - - NA - - 0.001 0.001 - - 0.001 1655 NA - - - - NA - - .002 .002 - - .002 1665 NA - - - - NA - - .005 .005 - - .005 1675 NA - - - - NA - - .007 .007 - - .007 1685 NA - - - - NA - - .009 .009 - - .009 1695 NA - - - - NA - - .014 .014 - - .014 1705 NA - - - - NA - - .022 .022 - - .022 1715 NA - - - - NA - - .037 .037 - - .037

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49 49 Table 2.3 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006 End-Use Category Net Electricity 1 Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 2 and NGL 3 Natural Gas Coal 4 Total 5 Million Kilowatthours Million Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Million Short Tons Indirect End Use (Boiler Fuel) ......................................... 12,109 21 4 2 2,059 25 - - Conventional Boiler Use ............................................. 12,109 11 3 2 1,245 6 - - CHP 6 and/or Cogeneration Process .......................... - - 10 1 (s) 814 19 - - Direct End Use All Process Uses ......................................................... 657,810 10 9 10 2,709 19

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

61 61 Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 9 1989 0.3 0.2 0.6 - 1.0 - - (s) (s) 0.2 - - - 0.2 - 1.2 1990 .3 .2 .7 - 1.2 - - (s) (s) .2 - - - .2 - 1.4 1995 .3 .2 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s) .3 - - - .3 - 2.1 1996 .3 .3 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s) .4 - - - .5 - 2.3 1997 .3 .4 1.2 - 1.9 - - (s) (s) .4 - - - .5 - 2.3 1998 .3 .3 1.2 - 1.8 - - (s) (s)

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

44 44 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu 1989 639 120 1,471 1 - 1,591 81,670 3 24 6 1 1990 1,266 173 1,630 2 - 1,805 97,330 5 23 8 (s) 1991 1,221 104 995 1 - 1,101 99,868 5 21 11 1 1992 1,704 154 1,045 10 4 1,229 122,908 6 21 10 2 1993 1,794 290 1,074 27 40 1,591 128,743 4 21 10 2 1994 2,241

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units, 1955-2011 Year Original Licensing Regulations (10 CFR Part 50) 1 Current Licensing Regulations (10 CFR Part 52) 1 Permanent Shutdowns Operable Units 7 Construction Permits Issued 2,3 Low-Power Operating Licenses Issued 3,4 Full-Power Operating Licenses Issued 3,5 Early Site Permits Issued 3 Combined License Applications Received 6 Combined Licenses Issued 3 1955 1 0 0 - - - - - - 0 0 1956 3 0 0 - - - - - - 0 0 1957 1 1 1 - - - - - - 0 1 1958 0 0 0 - - - - - - 0 1 1959 3 1 1 - - - - - - 0 2 1960 7 1 1 - - - - - - 0 3 1961 0 0 0 - - - - - - 0 3 1962 1 7 6 - - - - - - 0 9 1963 1 3 2 - - - - - - R 1 11 1964 3 2 3 - - - - - - 1 13 1965 1 0 0 - - - - - - 0 13 1966 5 1 2 - - - - - - 1 14 1967 14 3 3 - - - - - - 2 15 1968 23 0 0 - - - - - - R 1 13 1969 7 4 4 - - - - - - 0 17 1970 10 4 3 - - - - - - R 1 20 1971 4 5 2 - - - - - - 0 22 1972 8 6

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.11a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44.9 0.0 5 ( ) 18.5 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 18.5 NA 63.4 1950 NA NA NA NA 50.0 .0 5 ( ) 19.2 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 19.2 NA 69.2 1955 NA NA NA NA 86.8 .0 5 ( ) 27.4 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 27.4 NA 114.2 1960 NA NA NA NA 130.8 .4 5 ( ) 35.8 .1 10

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Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table 8.2d Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.2a; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- themal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 0.7 0.6 2.2 0.1 3.6 - - 0.1 0.1 0.5 - - - 0.7 - 4.3 1990 .8 .6 3.3 .1 4.8 - - .1 .1 .8 - - - 1.1 - 5.8 1995 1.0 .4 5.2 - 6.5 - - .1 .1 1.5 - - - 1.7 (s) 8.2 1996 1.1 .4 5.2 (s) 6.7 - - .1 .1 2.2 - - - 2.4 (s) 9.0 1997 1.0 .4 4.7 (s) 6.2 - - .1 (s) 2.3 - - - 2.5 (s) 8.7 1998 1.0 .4 4.9 (s) 6.3 - - .1 (s) 2.3 - - - 2.5 - 8.7 1999 1.0 .4 4.6 (s) 6.0

77

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 7.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.2b and 7.2c; Million Kilowatthours) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage e Renewable Energy Total j Coal a Petro- leum b Natural Gas c Other Gases d Conven- tional Hydro- electric Power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/ PV i Wind Wood g Waste h 1950 Total ................ 154,520 33,734 44,559 NA 0 f ( ) 100,885 390 NA NA NA NA 334,088 1955 Total ................ 301,363 37,138 95,285 NA 0 f ( ) 116,236 276 NA NA NA NA 550,299 1960 Total ................ 403,067 47,987 157,970 NA 518 f ( ) 149,440 140 NA 33 NA NA 759,156 1965 Total ................ 570,926 64,801 221,559 NA 3,657 f ( ) 196,984 269 NA 189 NA NA 1,058,386 1970 Total

78

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 13 8 67 2 90 19 5 24 1 114 1990 21 9 80 4 114 18 6 25 (s) 138 1991 21 6 82 4 113 17 9 26 1 140 1992 28 6 102 5 140 17 8 25 2 167 1993 30 8 107 3 147 16 8 24 1 173 1994 37 9 119 5 170 15 10 24 1 195 1995 40 13 118 4 176 15 12 27 (s) 203 1996 43 12 121 4 180 16 16 33 (s) 213 1997 39 12 132 8 191 16 14 30 (s) 221 1998 43 6 142 5 196 10 16 26 (s) 222 1999 52 7 146 4 208 10 20 30 (s) 238 2000 53 7 158 5 223 6 19 26 (s) 249 2001 52 6 164 5 226 8 4 13 3 243 2002 40 4 214 6 264 8 5 13 5 281 2003 38 7 200 9 255 9 11 20 3 278 2004

79

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 10.7 Solar Thermal Collector Shipments by Market Sector, End Use, and Type, 2001-2009 (Thousand Square Feet) Year and Type By Market Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 1 Industrial 2 Electric Power 3 Other 4 Pool Heating Water Heating Space Heating Space Cooling Combined Heating 5 Process Heating Electricity Generation Total Shipments 6 2001 Total .... 10,125 1,012 17 1 35 10,797 274 70 0 12 34 2 11,189 Low 7 .......... 9,885 987 12 0 34 10,782 42 61 0 0 34 0 10,919 Medium 8 .... 240 24 5 0 1 16 232 9 0 12 0 0 268 High 9 .......... 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2002 Total .... 11,000 595 62 4 1

80

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 12.6 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste d Total e Distillate Fuel Oil c Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total 1973 Total ............................ 812 199 20 2 254 276 NA NA 1,286 1975 Total ............................ 824 172 17 (s) 231 248 NA NA 1,244 1980 Total ............................ 1,137 200 12 1 194 207 NA NA 1,544 1985 Total ............................ 1,367 166 6 1 79 86 NA NA 1,619 1990 Total ............................ 1,548 176 7 3 92 102 (s) 6 1,831 1995 Total ............................ 1,661 228 8 8 45 61 (s) 10 1,960 1996 Total ............................ 1,752 205 8 8 50 66 (s) 10 2,033

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 7.2c Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.2a; Million Kilowatthours) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petro- leum d Natural Gas e Biomass Total g Coal c Petro- leum d Natural Gas e Other Gases h Hydro- electric Power i Biomass Total k Waste f Wood j Waste f 1950 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 4,946 NA NA 4,946 1955 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3,261 NA NA 3,261 1960 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3,607 NA NA 3,607 1965 Total .................... NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

82

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 10.2b Renewable Energy Consumption: Industrial and Transportation Sectors, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Industrial Sector 1 Transportation Sector Hydro- electric Power 2 Geo- thermal 3 Solar/PV 4 Wind 5 Biomass Total Biomass Wood 6 Waste 7 Fuel Ethanol 8 Losses and Co-products 9 Total Fuel Ethanol 10 Biodiesel Total 1949 76 NA NA NA 468 NA NA NA 468 544 NA NA NA 1950 69 NA NA NA 532 NA NA NA 532 602 NA NA NA 1955 38 NA NA NA 631 NA NA NA 631 669 NA NA NA 1960 39 NA NA NA 680 NA NA NA 680 719 NA NA NA 1965 33 NA NA NA 855 NA NA NA 855

83

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Nuclear Energy . Nuclear Energy Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units Operable Units, 1 1957-2011 Nuclear Net Summer Capacity Change, 1950-2011 Status of All Nuclear Generating Units, 2011 Permanent Shutdowns by Year, 1955-2011 270 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Units holding full-power operating licenses, or equivalent permission to operate, at the end of the year. Note: Data are at end of year. Sources: Tables 9.1 and 8.11a. 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -4 0 4 8 12 -4 Million Kilowatts 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 30 60 90 120 Number of Units 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 0 Number Total Units Ordered: 259 Permanent Shutdowns 28 104 Operable Units¹ U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011

84

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 7.5 Stocks of Coal and Petroleum: Electric Power Sector Coal a Petroleum Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e,f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels 1950 Year ............................. 31,842 NA NA NA NA 10,201 1955 Year ............................. 41,391 NA NA NA NA 13,671 1960 Year ............................. 51,735 NA NA NA NA 19,572 1965 Year ............................. 54,525 NA NA NA NA 25,647 1970 Year ............................. 71,908 NA NA NA 239 39,151 1975 Year ............................. 110,724 16,432 108,825 NA 31 125,413 1980 Year ............................. 183,010 30,023 105,351 NA 52 135,635 1985 Year .............................

85

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 8.0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

86

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 12.7 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Consumption (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) By Source By Sector Wood b Biomass Waste c Fuel Ethanol d Bio- diesel Total Resi- dential Com- mercial e Indus- trial f Trans- portation Electric Power g Total 1973 Total ...................... 143 (s) NA NA 143 33 1 109 NA (s) 143 1975 Total ...................... 140 (s) NA NA 141 40 1 100 NA (s) 141 1980 Total ...................... 232 (s) NA NA 232 80 2 150 NA (s) 232 1985 Total ...................... 252 14 3 NA 270 95 2 168 3 1 270 1990 Total ...................... 208 24 4 NA 237 54 8 147 4 23 237 1995 Total ...................... 222 30 8 NA 260 49 9 166 8 28 260 1996 Total ......................

87

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

88

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 10.2a Renewable Energy Consumption: Residential and Commercial Sectors (Trillion Btu) Residential Sector Commercial Sector a Geo- thermal b Solar/ PV c Biomass Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal b Solar/ PV f Wind g Biomass Total Wood d Wood d Waste h Fuel Ethanol i Total 1950 Total .................... NA NA 1,006 1,006 NA NA NA NA 19 NA NA 19 19 1955 Total .................... NA NA 775 775 NA NA NA NA 15 NA NA 15 15 1960 Total .................... NA NA 627 627 NA NA NA NA 12 NA NA 12 12 1965 Total .................... NA NA 468 468 NA NA NA NA 9 NA NA 9 9 1970 Total

89

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Energy Flow, 2011 0 Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 3 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail

90

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 7.3b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.3a) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955 Total .................... 143,759

91

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F1. Conversion Efficiencies of Noncombustible F1. Conversion Efficiencies of Noncombustible Renewable Energy Sources (Percent) 1 Efficiencies may vary significantly for each technology based on site-specific technology and environmental factors. Factors shown represent engineering estimates for typical equipment under specific operational conditions. Sources: Geothermal: Estimated by EIA on the basis of an informal survey of relevant plants. Conventional Hydroelectric: Based on published estimates for the efficiency of large-scale hydroelectric plants. See http://www.usbr.gov/power/edu/pamphlet.pdf. Solar Photovoltaic: Based on the average rated efficiency for a sample of commercially available modules. Rated efficiency is the conversion efficiency under standard test conditions, which represents a fixed, controlled

92

Electric power annual 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

93

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Sector 2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide) Total a by End-Use Sector, b 1973-2012 Residential Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Commercial Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Industrial Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Transportation Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Electric Power Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 160 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 Petroleum Natural Gas Retail Electricity b Industrial Transportation Residential Commercial Retail Electricity b 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 Retail Electricity

94

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Electricity-Only Plants 11 1989 767,378 25,574 241,960 3 517 270,125 2,790,567 - 59 111 - 1990 774,213 14,956 181,231 17 1,008 201,246 2,794,110 (s) 87 162 - 1995 832,928 16,169 86,584 133 1,082 108,297 3,287,571 (s)

95

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 8 1989 14 4 10 (s) 27 (s) 10 10 - 38 1990 15 5 16 (s) 36 (s) 10 11 - 46 1995 17 3 29 - 48 (s) 15 15 (s) 63 1996 20 3 33 R - 55 1 17 18 - 73 1997 22 4 40 (s) 66 1 19 20 - 86 1998 20 5 39 (s) 64 1 18 18 - 82 1999 20 3 37 R - 61 1 17 17 - 78 2000 21 4 39 R - 64 1 17 18 - 82 2001 18 4 35 - 58 1 8 8 6 72 2002 18 3 36 - 57 1 6 7 5 69 2003 23 3 17 - 42 1 8 8 6 57 2004 22 4 22 - 49 (s) 8 9 6 64 2005 23 4 20 - 47 (s) 8 9 6 61 2006 22 2 19 (s) 44 (s) 9 9 6 59 2007 23 2 20 - 44 1 6 7 4 55 2008 23 2 20 - 45 (s) 9 9 6 60 2009 20

96

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

175 175 Table A5. Approximate Heat Content of Coal and Coal Coke (Million Btu per Short Ton) Coal Coal Coke Production a Waste Coal Supplied b Consumption Imports Exports Imports and Exports Residential and Commercial Sectors c Industrial Sector Electric Power Sector e,f Total Coke Plants Other d 1950 ........................ 25.090 NA 24.461 26.798 24.820 23.937 24.989 25.020 26.788 24.800 1955 ........................ 25.201 NA 24.373 26.794 24.821 24.056 24.982 25.000 26.907 24.800 1960 ........................ 24.906 NA 24.226 26.791 24.609 23.927 24.713 25.003 26.939 24.800 1965 ........................ 24.775 NA 24.028 26.787 24.385 23.780 24.537 25.000 26.973 24.800 1970 ........................ 23.842 NA 23.203 26.784 22.983 22.573 23.440 25.000 26.982 24.800 1975 ........................

97

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 6.2 Coal Consumption by Sector (Thousand Short Tons) End-Use Sectors Electric Power Sector e,f Total Resi- dential Commercial Industrial Trans- portation CHP a Other b Total Coke Plants Other Industrial Total CHP c Non-CHP d Total 1950 Total .................... 51,562 g ( ) 63,021 63,021 104,014 h ( ) 120,623 120,623 224,637 63,011 91,871 494,102 1955 Total .................... 35,590 g ( ) 32,852 32,852 107,743 h ( ) 110,096 110,096 217,839 16,972 143,759 447,012 1960 Total .................... 24,159 g ( ) 16,789 16,789 81,385 h ( ) 96,017 96,017 177,402 3,046 176,685 398,081 1965 Total .................... 14,635 g ( ) 11,041 11,041 95,286 h ( ) 105,560 105,560 200,846 655 244,788 471,965 1970 Total .................... 9,024 g ( ) 7,090

98

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1955 324 63 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 424 (s) NA (s) 1960 396 95 2 NA 42 43 NA NA 535 (s) NA (s) 1965 546 127 2 NA 55 57 NA NA 730 (s) NA (s) 1970 678 215 10 2 154 166 NA NA 1,059 (s) (s) (s) 1975 824 172 17 (s) 231 248 NA NA 1,244 (s) (s) (s) 1976 911 167 18 (s) 255 273 NA NA 1,351 (s) (s) (s) 1977 962 174 21 (s) 285 306 NA NA

99

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

16 16 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,230 169,653 133,546 363 4,366 1,828,158 13,815 1 810 7 14,633 7,055 390 246 25 7,717 1990 1,534,141 177,232 101,800 384 5,795 1,819,351 13,576 1 628 13 14,218 6,878 390 175 36 7,480 1991 1,534,559 180,541 95,149 398 7,207 1,817,854 13,590 1 621 15 14,227 6,886 384 165 42 7,476 1992 1,556,741 187,730 79,153 400 8,476 1,832,501

100

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table A4. Approximate Heat Content of Natural Gas (Btu per Cubic Foot) Production Consumption a Imports Exports Marketed Dry End-Use Sectors b Electric Power Sector c Total 1950 ............................ 1,119 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 - - 1,035 1955 ............................ 1,120 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1960 ............................ 1,107 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1,035 1965 ............................ 1,101 1,032 1,032 1,032 1,032 1,032 1,032 1970 ............................ 1,102 1,031 1,031 1,031 1,031 1,031 1,031 1975 ............................ 1,095 1,021 1,020 1,026 1,021 1,026 1,014 1980 ............................ 1,098 1,026 1,024 1,035 1,026 1,022 1,013 1981 ............................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 10.1 Renewable Energy Production and Consumption by Source (Trillion Btu) Production a Consumption Biomass Total Renew- able Energy d Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal f Solar/ PV g Wind h Biomass Total Renew- able Energy Bio- fuels b Total c Wood i Waste j Bio- fuels k Total 1950 Total .................... NA 1,562 2,978 1,415 NA NA NA 1,562 NA NA 1,562 2,978 1955 Total .................... NA 1,424 2,784 1,360 NA NA NA 1,424 NA NA 1,424 2,784 1960 Total .................... NA 1,320 2,928 1,608 (s) NA NA 1,320 NA NA 1,320 2,928 1965 Total .................... NA 1,335 3,396 2,059 2 NA NA 1,335 NA NA 1,335 3,396 1970 Total .................... NA 1,431 4,070 2,634 6 NA NA 1,429 2 NA 1,431 4,070 1975 Total .................... NA

102

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 2.1d Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Primary Consumption 1 Electricity Retail Sales 11 Electrical System Energy Losses 12 Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy 2 Total Primary Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4,5 Total Hydroelectric Power 6 Geothermal 7 Solar/PV 8 Wind 9 Biomass 10 Total 1949 5,433 -7 3,188 3,475 12,090 76 NA NA NA 468 544 12,633 418 1,672 14,724 1950 5,781 1 3,546 3,960 13,288 69 NA NA NA 532 602 13,890 500 1,852 16,241 1955 5,620 -10 4,701 5,123 15,434 38 NA NA NA 631 669 16,103 887 2,495 19,485 1960 4,543 -6 5,973 5,766 16,277 39 NA NA NA 680 719 16,996 1,107 2,739 20,842 1965 5,127 -18 7,339 6,813 19,260 33 NA NA NA 855 888 20,148 1,463 3,487 25,098

103

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

29 29 Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.3b and 8.3c; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 323 96 462 93 973 546 30 577 39 1,589 1990 363 127 538 141 1,168 651 36 687 40 1,896 1991 352 112 547 148 1,159 623 37 660 44 1,863 1992 367 117 592 160 1,236 658 40 698 42 1,976 1993 373 129 604 142 1,248 668 45 713 41 2,002 1994 388 133 646 144 1,309 722 45 767 42 2,119 1995 386 121 686 145 1,338 721 47 768 44 2,151 1996 392 133 711 150 1,385 701 55 756 43 2,184 1997 389 137 713 150 1,389 731 55 785 53 2,227 1998 382 136 782 167 1,466 700 57 757 46 2,269 1999 386 125 811 179 1,501 690 55 744 48 2,294 2000 384 108 812 184 1,488 707 56 764 50 2,302 2001 354 90 741 133 1,318 557 28 585 55 1,958 2002

104

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 (Quadrillion Btu) Residential and Commercial a Sectors, Selected Products Industrial a Sector, Selected Products Transportation Sector, Selected Products 56 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Kerosene Residual Fuel Oil LPG b 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Distillate Fuel Oil Asphalt and Road Oil 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 Distillate Fuel Oil d Jet Fuel e Motor Gasoline c a Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. b Liquefied petroleum gases. c Beginning in 1993, includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

105

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 5.15 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, Selected Years, 1984-2010 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Distillate Fuel Oil Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power 1 Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Diesel Military Off-Highway Diesel Other Total 1984 534 360 166 55 208 42 192 115 1,093 46 114 46 2,971 1985 504 291 159 45 202 34 182 111 1,127 43 99 11 2,809 1990 475 260 169 49 222 50 203 135 1,393 46 118 (s) 3,120 1991 442 246 151 48 206 39 188 133 1,336 53 107 (s) 2,949 1992 474 245 150 43 228 35 206 144 1,391 42 114 (s) 3,075 1993 475 241 139 46 222 36 196 141 1,485 32 137 (s) 3,150 1994 472 246 148 44 213 43 205 143 1,594 40 140 (s) 3,289 1995 447 237 146 45 227 39 224 153 1,668 30 142 - - 3,357 1996 450 234 149 48 234 43 224 162 1,754 30 146 - - 3,472 1997 426 216 151 56 231 41 214 168 1,867 28 149 - - 3,546 1998

106

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

73 73 Table A3. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption and Biofuels Production (Million Btu per Barrel) Total Petroleum a Consumption by Sector Liquefied Petroleum Gases Con- sumption f Motor Gasoline Con- sumption g Fuel Ethanol h Fuel Ethanol Feed- stock Factor i Biodiesel Biodiesel Feed- stock Factor j Resi- dential Com- mercial b Indus- trial b Trans- portation b,c Electric Power d,e Total b,c 1950 .................... 5.473 5.817 5.953 5.461 6.254 5.649 4.011 5.253 NA NA NA NA 1955 .................... 5.469 5.781 5.881 5.407 6.254 5.591 4.011 5.253 NA NA NA NA 1960 .................... 5.417 5.781 5.818 5.387 6.267 5.555 4.011 5.253 NA NA NA NA 1965 .................... 5.364 5.760 5.748 5.386 6.267 5.532 4.011 5.253 NA NA NA NA 1970 .................... 5.260 5.708 5.595 5.393 6.252 5.503 f 3.779

107

Definition: Independent Power Producer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producer Producer Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Independent Power Producer Any entity that owns or operates an electricity generating facility that is not included in an electric utility's rate base. This term includes, but is not limited to, cogenerators and small power producers and all other nonutility electricity producers, such as exempt wholesale generators, who sell electricity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition An Independent Power Producer is an entity, which is not a public utility, but which owns facilities to generate electric power for sale to utilities and end users. NUGs may be privately held facilities, corporations, cooperatives such as rural solar or wind energy producers, and non-energy industrial concerns capable of feeding excess energy into

108

ProScan IITM 1 Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an Existing Stage 19 4.2 Fitting the ProScan Stage 19 4.3 Cable Connections 20 4.4 USB Operation 20 4.5 Focus only to designated power sources as marked on the product. · Make sure the electrical cord is located manufacturers overstate thei

Gardel, Margaret

109

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table 7.6 Coal Stocks by Sector, Selected Years, End of Year 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Producers and Distributors Consumers Total Residential and Commercial Sectors Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Electric Power Sector 2 Total Coke Plants Other 1 Total 1949 NA 1.4 10.0 16.1 26.0 3 ( ) 22.1 49.5 49.5 1950 NA 2.5 16.8 26.2 43.0 3 ( ) 31.8 77.3 77.3 1955 NA 1.0 13.4 15.9 29.3 3 ( ) 41.4 71.7 71.7 1960 NA .7 11.1 11.6 22.8 3 ( ) 51.7 75.2 75.2 1965 NA .4 10.6 13.1 23.8 3 ( ) 54.5 78.6 78.6 1970 NA .3 9.0 11.8 20.8 3 ( ) 71.9 93.0 93.0 1975 12.1 .2 8.8 8.5 17.3 3 ( ) 110.7 128.3 140.4 1976 14.2 .2 9.9 7.1 17.0 3 ( ) 117.4 134.7 148.9 1977 14.2 .2 12.8 11.1 23.9 3 ( ) 133.2 157.3 171.5 1978 20.7 .4 8.3 9.0 17.3 NA 128.2 145.9 166.6 1979 20.8 .3 10.2 11.8 21.9 NA 159.7 182.0 202.8 1980 24.4 NA 9.1 12.0 21.0 NA 183.0 204.0 228.4 1981

110

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 10.9 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts 1 ) Year By Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 3 Industrial 4 Electric Power 5 Other 6 Grid-Connected 2 Off-Grid 2 Centralized 7 Distributed 8 Domestic 9 Non-Domestic 10 Total Shipments of Photovoltaic Cells and Modules 11 1989 1,439 R 6,057 3,993 785 551 12 ( ) 12 1,251 2,620 8,954 12,825 1990 1,701 R 8,062 2,817 826 432 12 ( ) 12 469 3,097 10,271 13,837 1991 3,624 R 5,715 3,947 1,275 377 12 ( ) 12 856 3,594 10,489 14,939 1992 4,154 R 5,122 4,279 1,553 477 12 ( ) 12 1,227 4,238 10,118 15,583 1993 5,237 R 8,004 5,352 1,503 856 12 ( ) 12 1,096 5,761 14,094 20,951 1994 6,632 R 9,717 6,855 2,364 510 12 ( ) 12 2,296 9,253 14,528 26,077 1995 6,272 R 12,483 7,198 3,759 1,347 12 ( ) 12 4,585 8,233 18,241 31,059 1996 8,475 R 12,297 8,300 4,753

111

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 7.3 Coal Consumption by Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Residential Sector 1 Commercial Sector 1 Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Electric Power Sector 2 Total CHP 3 Other 4 Total Coke Plants Other Industrial Total Electricity Only CHP Total CHP 5 Non-CHP 6 Total 1949 52.4 7 ( ) 64.1 64.1 91.4 8 ( ) 121.2 121.2 212.6 70.2 84.0 NA 84.0 483.2 1950 51.6 7 ( ) 63.0 63.0 104.0 8 ( ) 120.6 120.6 224.6 63.0 91.9 NA 91.9 494.1 1955 35.6 7 ( ) 32.9 32.9 107.7 8 ( ) 110.1 110.1 217.8 17.0 143.8 NA 143.8 447.0 1960 24.2 7 ( ) 16.8 16.8 81.4 8 ( ) 96.0 96.0 177.4 3.0 176.7 NA 176.7 398.1 1965 14.6 7 ( ) 11.0 11.0 95.3 8 ( ) 105.6 105.6 200.8 .7 244.8 NA 244.8 472.0 1970 9.0 7 ( ) 7.1 7.1 96.5 8 ( ) 90.2 90.2 186.6 .3 320.2 NA 320.2 523.2 1975 2.8 7 ( ) 6.6 6.6 83.6 8 ( ) 63.6 63.6 147.2 (s) 406.0 NA

112

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 3.5 Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970-2010 (Million Dollars 1 ) Year Primary Energy 2 Electric Power Sector 11,12 Retail Electricity 13 Total Energy 10,14 Coal Coal Coke Net Imports 3 Natural Gas 4 Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass 9 Total 10 Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel 5 LPG 6 Motor Gasoline 7 Residual Fuel Oil Other 8 Total 1970 4,630 -75 10,891 6,253 1,441 2,395 31,596 2,046 4,172 47,904 44 438 63,872 -4,357 23,345 82,860 1971 4,902 -40 12,065 6,890 1,582 2,483 33,478 2,933 4,449 51,816 73 446 69,312 -5,491 26,202 90,023 1972 5,415 -26 13,198 7,552 1,682 2,834 35,346 3,458 4,777 55,648 104 476 74,893 -6,551 29,712 98,054 1973 6,243 7 13,933 9,524 2,001 R 3,881 39,667 4,667 5,318 R 65,057 177 502 R 86,053 -7,952 33,774 R 111,875 1974 11,118 150 16,380 15,217 3,208 R 5,254 54,194 10,547 8,284 R 96,704 259 544

113

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table 9.2 Nuclear Power Plant Operations, 1957-2011 Year Nuclear Electricity Net Generation Nuclear Share of Total Electricity Net Generation Net Summer Capacity of Operable Units 1 Capacity Factor 2 Billion Kilowatthours Percent Million Kilowatts Percent 1957 (s) (s) 0.1 NA 1958 .2 (s) .1 NA 1959 .2 (s) .1 NA 1960 .5 .1 .4 NA 1961 1.7 .2 .4 NA 1962 2.3 .3 .7 NA 1963 3.2 .3 .8 NA 1964 3.3 .3 .8 NA 1965 3.7 .3 .8 NA 1966 5.5 .5 1.7 NA 1967 7.7 .6 2.7 NA 1968 12.5 .9 2.7 NA 1969 13.9 1.0 4.4 NA 1970 21.8 1.4 7.0 NA 1971 38.1 2.4 9.0 NA 1972 54.1 3.1 14.5 NA 1973 83.5 4.5 22.7 53.5 1974 114.0 6.1 31.9 47.8 1975 172.5 9.0 37.3 55.9 1976 191.1 9.4 43.8 54.7 1977 250.9 11.8 46.3 63.3 1978 276.4 12.5 50.8 64.5 1979 255.2 11.3 49.7 58.4 1980 251.1 11.0 51.8 56.3 1981 272.7 11.9 56.0 58.2 1982 282.8 12.6 60.0 56.6 1983 293.7 12.7 63.0 54.4 1984 327.6 13.5 69.7 56.3 1985 383.7 15.5 79.4 58.0 1986

114

Entity State Ownership Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. 1 Constellation Solar Arizona LLC AZ Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 FRV SI Transport Solar LP AZ Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 MFP Co III, LLC AZ Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 RV CSU Power II LLC AZ Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Scottsdate Solar Holdings LLC AZ Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 SunE M5C Holdings LLC AZ Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 Alliance Star Energy LLC CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Applied Energy Inc CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 CPKelco U S Inc CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 Calpine Corp-Agnews CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 Cardinal Cogen Inc CA Non_Utility . 1 . . 1 City of Madera CA WWTP CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 DPC Juniper, LLC CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 DPC Juniper, LLC CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 Energy Alchemy TA Vernalis, LLC CA Non_Utility . . 1 . 1 Enfinity NorCal 1 FAA LLC

115

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

  Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 7% in 006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9

116

ProEco Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProEco Energy Place: South Dakota Product: US South Dakota-based company specializing ethanol refinery project development. References: ProEco Energy1 This article is a stub....

117

SPR Pro Forma Contract | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

SPR Pro Forma Contract SPR Pro Forma Contract An exchange agreement for SPR oil involves return of the principal amount of similar quality crude oil to the SPR, plus payment of an...

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

brain natriuretic Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 HEDS Discussion...

119

Pro/INTRALINK Users Guide NCSX-GUID-PRO/INTR-00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: ______________________________________ ______________________________________ T Brown, NCSX Design Integration J. Chrzanowski, Mechanical Design Manager Branch HeadNCSX Pro/INTRALINK Users Guide NCSX-GUID-PRO/INTR-00 May 4, 2005 Prepared by:52:43 -04'00' #12;NCSX Pro/INTRALINK Users Guide Pro/INTRALINK Users Guide Revision 0 i Record of Revisions

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

120

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% in 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9 Utility Interest in Wind Asset Ownership Strengthens; Community Wind Grows Modestly . . . . . . . . . . . .

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121

ProForm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProForm ProForm Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: ProForm Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: - Landfill Gas, Energy Efficiency, Solar, Wind Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: poet.lbl.gov/Proform/ Cost: Paid References: ProForm[1] Related Tools ICCT Roadmap Model General Equilibrium Modeling Package (GEMPACK) Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS Logo: ProForm ProForm is a software tool designed to support a basic assessment of the

122

Pro Integris | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integris Integris Jump to: navigation, search Name Pro Integris Place Split, Croatia Sector Hydro, Solar Product Croatia-based engineering firm. The firm is involved in a JV developing small hydro and solar projects. Coordinates 43.506985°, 16.441718° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.506985,"lon":16.441718,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants: ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005343  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seyed Dastgheib seyed Dastgheib Principal Investigator Illinois State Geological Survey 615 E. Peabody Drive Champaign, Illinois 61820-6235 217-265-6274 dastgheib@isgs.uius.edu Reuse of PRoduced WateR fRom co 2 enhanced oil RecoveRy, coal-Bed methane, and mine Pool WateR By coal-Based PoWeR Plants: PRomis /PRoject no. : de-nt0005343 Background Coal-fired power plants are the second largest users of freshwater in the United States. In Illinois, the thermoelectric power sector accounts for approximately 84 percent of the estimated 14 billion gallons per day of freshwater withdrawals and one-third of the state's 1 billion gallons per day of freshwater consumption. Illinois electric power generation capacity is projected to expand 30 percent by 2030, increasing water consumption by

124

Entity State Ownership Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,735 ,735 . 1,735 Constellation Solar Arizona LLC AZ Non_Utility . . 798 . 798 FRV SI Transport Solar LP AZ Non_Utility . 243 . . 243 MFP Co III, LLC AZ Non_Utility . 603 . . 603 RV CSU Power II LLC AZ Non_Utility . 436 . . 436 Scottsdate Solar Holdings LLC AZ Non_Utility . 49 . . 49 SunE M5C Holdings LLC AZ Non_Utility . . 212 . 212 Alliance Star Energy LLC CA Non_Utility . 266 . . 266 Applied Energy Inc CA Non_Utility . . 935 . 935 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 183 . . 183 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 382 . . 382 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 583 . . 583 Bloom Energy 2009 PPA CA Non_Utility . 771 . . 771 CPKelco U S Inc CA Non_Utility . . 4 . 4 Calpine Corp-Agnews CA Non_Utility . 47 . . 47 Cardinal Cogen Inc CA Non_Utility . 15,846 . . 15,846 City of Madera CA WWTP CA Non_Utility . . 310 . 310 DPC Juniper, LLC CA Non_Utility . . 21 . 21 DPC Juniper, LLC

125

Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants ProMIS/Project No.:DE-NT0005647  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement to AIr2AIr® technology Improvement to AIr2AIr® technology to reduce Fresh-WAter evAporAtIve coolIng loss At coAl-BAsed thermoelectrIc poWer plAnts promIs/project no. :de-nt0005647 Background The production of electricity requires a reliable, abundant, and predictable source of freshwater - a resource that is limited in many parts of the United States and throughout the world. The process of thermoelectric generation from fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas is water intensive. According to the 2000 U.S. Geological Survey, thermoelectric-power withdrawals accounted for 48 percent of total water use, 39 percent of total freshwater withdrawals (136 billion gallons per day) for all categories, and 52 percent of fresh surface water withdrawals. As a growing economy drives the need for more electricity, demands on freshwater

126

BatPRO: Battery Manufacturing Cost Estimation | Argonne National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BatPRO: Battery Manufacturing Cost Estimation BatPRO models a stiff prismatic pouch-type cell battery pack with cells linked in series. BatPRO models a stiff prismatic pouch-type...

127

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by Sector Consumption by Sector Note 1. Electrical System Energy Losses. Electrical system energy losses are calculated as the difference between total primary consumption by the electric power sector (see Table 2.6) and the total energy content of elec- tricity retail sales (see Tables 7.6 and A6). Most of these losses occur at steam-electric power plants (conventional and nuclear) in the conversion of heat energy into mechanical energy to turn electric generators. The loss is a thermodynamically necessary feature of the steam- electric cycle. Part of the energy input-to-output losses is a result of imputing fossil energy equivalent inputs for hydroelectric, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic, and wind energy sources. In addition to conversion losses, other losses include power plant use of electricity,

128

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Major Source, 1949-2012 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-August By Major Source, August 2013 . 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 2011 2012 2013 Nuclear Electric Power Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy Coal Renewable Energy Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.6 1.2 1.8 2.4 Nuclear Electric Power Petroleum Coal 26.971 26.079 25.936 2011 2012 2013 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 1.575 0.917 0.747 0.363 0.024 Coal Petroleum 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Nuclear Electric Power Natural Gas Renewable

129

Bonneville Power Administration Attachment P Oversupply Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Provider will displace all such Generators on a pro-rata basis. Bonneville Power Administration Attachment P Oversupply Management Protocol Open Access Transmission...

130

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 2.6 Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy b Elec- tricity Net Imports e Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum Total Hydro- electric Power d Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total ...................... 2,199 651 472 3,322 0 1,346 NA NA NA 5 1,351 6 4,679 1955 Total ...................... 3,458 1,194 471 5,123 0 1,322 NA NA NA 3 1,325 14 6,461 1960 Total ...................... 4,228 1,785 553 6,565 6 1,569 (s) NA NA 2 1,571 15 8,158 1965 Total ...................... 5,821 2,395 722 8,938 43 2,026 2 NA NA 3 2,031 (s) 11,012 1970 Total ...................... 7,227 4,054 2,117 13,399 239 2,600 6 NA NA 4 2,609 7 16,253 1975 Total ...................... 8,786 3,240 3,166 15,191 1,900 3,122 34 NA NA 2 3,158 21 20,270

131

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Total Coal b Natural Gas (Dry) Crude Oil c NGPL d Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................. 14.060 6.233 11.447 0.823 32.563 0.000 1.415 NA NA NA 1.562 2.978 35.540 1955 Total .................. 12.370 9.345 14.410 1.240 37.364 .000 1.360 NA NA NA 1.424 2.784 40.148 1960 Total .................. 10.817 12.656 14.935 1.461 39.869 .006 1.608 (s) NA NA 1.320 2.928 42.803 1965 Total .................. 13.055 15.775 16.521 1.883 47.235 .043 2.059 .002 NA NA 1.335 3.396 50.674 1970 Total .................. 14.607 21.666 20.401 2.512 59.186 .239 2.634 .006 NA NA 1.431 4.070 63.495 1975 Total ..................

132

Word Pro - S4.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 4.1 Natural Gas (Trillion Cubic Feet) Overview, 1949-2012 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2012 Overview, Monthly Consumption by Sector, Monthly Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#naturalgas. Sources: Tables 4.1 and 4.3. 68 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Commercial Electric Power Industrial Industrial Trans- portation Transportation 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 -5 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Consumption Dry Production Net Imports Consumption Dry Production Net Imports 2011 2012 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Residential Electric Power Residential 2011 2012 2013

133

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.2 (s) Process Heating Machine Drive Facility HVAC² Process Cooling and Refrigeration Electrochemical Processes Facility Lighting Conventional Electricity Generation 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Quadrillion Btu 5.5 2.9 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 Natural Gas Net Electricity Coal³ Residual Fuel Oil Distillate

134

KooPeratIonsProGraMMe CooPeratIon ProGraMs03  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

und Innovation haben die Max-Planck-Gesellschaft und die Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft ihre Kooperationen for Research and Innovation, the Max Planck Society and Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft intend to continue50 KooPeratIonsProGraMMe CooPeratIon ProGraMs03 Kooperationen mit der Fraunhofer

135

Word Pro - S9.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 9.10 Natural Gas Prices (Dollars a per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wellhead Price f City- gate Price g Consuming Sectors b Residential Commercial c Industrial d Transportation Electric Power e Price h Percentage of Sector i Price h Percentage of Sector i Price h Percentage of Sector i Vehicle Fuel j Price h Price h Percentage of Sector i,k 1950 Average .................... 0.07 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1955 Average .................... .10 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1960 Average .................... .14 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1965 Average .................... .16 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1970 Average .................... .17 NA 1.09 NA .77 NA .37 NA NA .29 NA 1975 Average .................... .44 NA 1.71 NA 1.35 NA .96 NA NA .77 96.1 1980 Average ....................

136

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Source, a 1949-2012 By Source, a Monthly Total, January-August By Source, a August 2013 a Small quantities of net imports of coal coke and electricity are not shown. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.3. 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 15 30 45 Petroleum Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M

137

Pro Corn LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pro Corn LLC Pro Corn LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Pro-Corn LLC Place Preston, Minnesota Zip 55965 Product Minnesotan farmer owned bioethanol production company. Coordinates 47.526531°, -121.936019° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.526531,"lon":-121.936019,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

138

ProLogis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProLogis ProLogis Jump to: navigation, search Name ProLogis Place Aurora, Colorado Zip 80011 Sector Services Product Provider of distribution facilities and services. Coordinates 39.325162°, -79.54975° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.325162,"lon":-79.54975,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

139

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Elec- tricity Retail Sales f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum d Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 1,542 401 872 2,815 NA NA NA NA 19 19 2,834 225 834 3,893 1955 Total .................... 801 651 1,095 2,547 NA NA NA NA 15 15 2,561 350 984 3,895 1960 Total .................... 407 1,056 1,248 2,711 NA NA NA NA 12 12 2,723 543 1,344 4,609 1965 Total .................... 265 1,490 1,413 3,168 NA NA NA NA 9 9 3,177 789 1,880 5,845 1970 Total .................... 165 2,473 1,592 4,229 NA NA NA NA 8 8 4,237 1,201 2,908 8,346 1975 Total ....................

140

Word Pro - S4.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Gas Resource Development . 4. Natural Gas Figure 4.1 Natural Gas (Trillion Cubic Feet) Overview, 1949-2012 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2012 Overview, Monthly Consumption by Sector, Monthly Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#naturalgas. Sources: Tables 4.1 and 4.3. 68 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Commercial Electric Power Industrial Industrial Trans- portation Transportation 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 -5 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Consumption Dry Production Net Imports Consumption Dry Production Net Imports 2011 2012 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Energy Consumption 2. Energy Consumption by Sector Figure 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Quadrillion Btu) Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, August 2013 22 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Transportation Residential 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Industrial Transportation Residential Commercial J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 1 2 3 4 Industrial Commercial 2011 2012 2013 1.664 1.511 2.610 2.385 3.644 0.231 0.188 1.728 2.379 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation 0 1 2 3 4 Primary Consumption Total Consumption Electric Power Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#consumption. Source: Table 2.1. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013

142

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Elec- tricity Retail Sales g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total e Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum d Total e Hydro- electric Power f Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 5,781 3,546 3,960 13,288 69 NA NA NA 532 602 13,890 500 1,852 16,241 1955 Total .................... 5,620 4,701 5,123 15,434 38 NA NA NA 631 669 16,103 887 2,495 19,485 1960 Total .................... 4,543 5,973 5,766 16,277 39 NA NA NA 680 719 16,996 1,107 2,739 20,842 1965 Total .................... 5,127 7,339 6,813 19,260 33 NA NA NA 855 888 20,148 1,463 3,487 25,098 1970 Total .................... 4,656 9,536 7,776 21,911 34 NA NA NA 1,019 1,053 22,964 1,948 4,716 29,628 1975 Total ....................

143

Word Pro - S4.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 4.3 Natural Gas Consumption by Sector (Billion Cubic Feet) End-Use Sectors Electric Power Sector f,g Total Resi- dential Com- mercial a Industrial Transportation Lease and Plant Fuel Other Industrial Total Pipelines d and Dis- tribution e Vehicle Fuel Total CHP b Non-CHP c Total 1950 Total .................... 1,198 388 928 h ( ) 2,498 2,498 3,426 126 NA 126 629 5,767 1955 Total .................... 2,124 629 1,131 h ( ) 3,411 3,411 4,542 245 NA 245 1,153 8,694 1960 Total .................... 3,103 1,020 1,237 h ( ) 4,535 4,535 5,771 347 NA 347 1,725 11,967 1965 Total .................... 3,903 1,444 1,156 h ( ) 5,955 5,955 7,112 501 NA 501 2,321 15,280 1970 Total .................... 4,837 2,399 1,399 h ( ) 7,851 7,851 9,249 722 NA 722 3,932 21,139 1975 Total .................... 4,924 2,508 1,396 h ( ) 6,968 6,968

144

Win pro energy group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Win pro energy group Win pro energy group Jump to: navigation, search Name win:pro energy group Place Berlin, Berlin, Germany Zip 12165 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Win:pro offers location search, development, implementation, operational management and financing for renewable energy projects. Traditionally focused on wind it is now active in the solar and biogas area as well. Coordinates 52.516074°, 13.376987° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.516074,"lon":13.376987,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

145

Pro-Am Collaboration and the AAVSO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Professionals need to be aware that there is a valuable resource available and waiting to be used - the amateur astronomy community. We give some examples of how pro-am collaborations have worked in the past, indicate the advantages and disadvantages of such collaborations, and suggest methods by which a professional can find and work effectively with amateur astronomers.

Arne A. Henden

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

146

Definition: Pro Forma Tariff | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forma Tariff Forma Tariff Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Pro Forma Tariff Usually refers to the standard OATT and/or associated transmission rights mandated by the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Order No. 888.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms transmission lines, transmission line References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Pro_Forma_Tariff&oldid=480579" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

147

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: COLDWIND Pro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COLDWIND Pro COLDWIND Pro Computes coldroom and freezer refrigeration loads, in either Imperial or SI units, for projects drawn directly on-screen, with any number of walls, in any number of rooms, arranged at any angles, with any mix of insulation materials, organized into any number of zones and located anywhere in the world. Automatic and correctly weighted energy profiling at 30-minute intervals for every day of the year. Dynamically links to correctly weighted refrigeration equipment selection and balancing programs. Screen Shots Keywords Refrigeration, Heat Load Calculation Validation/Testing Designed to ASHRAE and CIBSE standards. Standard curriculum teaching aid in leading colleges and universities throughout Europe and Far East. Expertise Required Totally intuitive and dynamically error trapped. Suitable for novices and

148

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AIRWIND Pro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AIRWIND Pro AIRWIND Pro Computes building air conditioning cooling and heating loads, in either Imperial or SI units, for projects drawn directly on-screen, with any number of walls, in any number of rooms, arranged at any angle, with any mix of construction materials and fenestration, organized into any number of zones and located anywhere in the world. Automatic and correctly weighted energy profiling at 30-minute intervals for every day of the year. Dynamically links to correctly weighted air conditioning equipment selection programs. Screen Shots Keywords Air Conditioning Load Calculation Validation/Testing Designed to ASHRAE and CIBSE standards. Standard curriculum teaching aid in leading colleges and universities throughout Europe and Far East. Expertise Required

149

Cryogenic system for BERLinPro  

SciTech Connect

In 2010 Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) received funding to design and build the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project BERLinPro. The goal of this compact Energy recovery linac (ERL) is to develop the accelerator physics and technology required to generate and accelerate a 100-mA, 1-mm mrad emittance electron beam. The BERLinPro know-how can then be transferred to various ERL-based applications. All accelerating RF cavities including the electron source are based on superconducting technology operated at 1.8 K. A Linde L700 helium liquefier is supplying 4.5 K helium. The subatmospheric pressure of 16 mbar of the helium bath of the cavities will be achieved by pumping with a set of cold compressors and warm vacuum pumps. While the L700 is already in operating, the 1.8 K system and the helium transfer system are in design phase.

Anders, W.; Hellwig, A.; Knobloch, J.; Pflckhahn, D.; Rotterdam, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert Einstein Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BinMaker Pro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BinMaker Pro BinMaker Pro BinMaker Pro logo. Creates summaries of U.S. hourly weather data for 239 cities. BinMaker PRO exports the resulting electronic files for use in spreadsheets, or other computer analysis programs. BinMaker PRO provides the following five functions: BIN summaries by dry bulb temperature or by wet bulb temperature, humidity ration or wind speed. It creates accurate summaries by the choice of four primary variables. Mean coincident values for any of the other three variables (plus enthalpy) are also calculated when requested by user. User may also define a specific operating schedule rather than summarizing all 8760 hours of the year. Ventilation Load BIN Summaries. When a user defines a space-neutral temperature and humidity, BinMaker PRO automatically calculates the

151

Coal-fueled diesel system for stationary power applications -- Technology development. Final report, March 1988--June 1994  

SciTech Connect

Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Cooper-Bessemer and Arthur D. Little have developed the technology to enable coal-water slurry to be utilized in large-bore, medium-speed diesel engines. The target application is modular power generation in the 10 to 100 MW size, with each plant using between two and eight engines. Such systems are expected to be economically attractive in the non-utility generation market after 2000, when oil and natural gas prices are expected to escalate rapidly compared to the price of coal. During this development program, over 1,000 hours of prototype engine operation have been achieved on coal-water slurry (CWS), including over 100 hours operation of a six-cylinder, 1.8 MW engine with an integrated emissions control system. Arthur D. Little, Inc., managed the coal-fueled diesel development, with Cooper-Bessemer as the principal subcontractor responsible for the engine design and testing. Several key technical advances which enable the viability of the coal-fueled diesel engine were made under this program. Principal among them are the development and demonstration of (1) durable injection nozzles; (2) an integrated emissions control system; ad (3) low-cost clean coal slurry formulations optimized for the engine. Significant advances in all subsystem designs were made to develop the full-scale Cooper-Bessemer coal engine components in preparation for a 100-hour proof-of-concept test of an integrated system, including emissions controls. The Clean Coal Diesel power plant of the future will provide a cost-competitive, low-emissions, modular, coal-based power generation option to the non-utility generation, small utility, independent power producer, and cogeneration markets. Combined cycle efficiencies will be approximately 48% (lower heating value basis) and installed cost will be approximately $1,300/kW (1992 dollars).

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Entity State Ownership Residential Commercial Industrial Transportatio...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. 9,651 . . 9,651 RV CSU Power II LLC AZ NonUtility . 5,083 . . 5,083 Scottsdate Solar Holdings LLC AZ NonUtility . 580 . . 580 SunE M5C Holdings LLC AZ NonUtility . ....

153

Snugg Home's iAudit Pro | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snugg Home's iAudit Pro Snugg Home's iAudit Pro Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: iAudit Pro Agency/Company /Organization: Snugg Home Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.snugghome.com Web Application Link: www.snugghome.com/contractors.html Cost: Paid iAudit Pro Screenshot References: Snugg Home[1] Logo: iAudit Pro A time-saving, accurate, whole-house, state-of-the-art modeling audit tool with the ease and functionality that busy energy efficiency professionals need. Overview Data is entered into the app throughout the walk-though energy audit, then allows the findings to be presented to the homeowner in a easy to understand comprehensive report, showing the entire work scope with drill

154

PowerHerd: Dynamic Satisfaction of Peak Power Constraints in Interconnection Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Cooling costs can be pro- hibitive (consider the high power budgets of industry-standard six- foot serverPowerHerd: Dynamic Satisfaction of Peak Power Constraints in Interconnection Networks Li Shang Li,peh,jha}@ee.princeton.edu Niraj K. Jha ABSTRACT Power consumption is a critical issue in interconnection network design, driven

Shang, Li

155

"Cosmologists have used these supernovae very pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detail the ori- gins of every naturally occurring element. Carbon, oxygen, iron, gold--these elements theories about what causes these brief but powerful flashes of gamma radiation. Observations now support and more like nature because they are beginning to have the same complexity as nature." UC Santa Cruz

Zhang, Yi

156

Thermo2Pro: Knowledge dissemination for deep geothermal exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1/12 Thermo2Pro: Knowledge dissemination for deep geothermal exploration Philippe Calcagno1 territoires, Voreppe, France # now at Kitware, Villeurbanne, France p.calcagno@brgm.fr Keywords: Deep geothermal exploration, information system, Web tool, sedimentary basin, dissemination. Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

157

Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California  

SciTech Connect

The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

Farhar, B. C.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4. Comparison of Coal Consumption to Coal Generation Sources: * 1990-1997-EIA, Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report," and Form EIA-867, Annual Nonutility Power Producer...

159

Thermodynamic and Energy Efficiency Analysis of Power Generation from Natural Salinity Gradients by Pressure Retarded Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Gibbs free energy of mixing dissipated when fresh river water flows into the sea can be harnessed for sustainable power generation. Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is one of the methods proposed to generate power from natural salinity gradients. In ...

Ngai Yin Yip; Menachem Elimelech

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

160

http://pro.sagepub.com/ Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://pro.sagepub.com/ Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting Proceedings of the Human Factors and http: 1027Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting Shadeequa Miller, Bilge and Ergonomics Society can be found at:Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting

Mutlu, Bilge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

http://pro.sagepub.com/ Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://pro.sagepub.com/ Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting Proceedings of the Human Factors and http: 945Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting Clayton T. Stanley, Michael and Ergonomics Society can be found at:Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting

Byrne, Mike

162

ProDy: Protein Dynamics Inferred from Theory and Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......protein. Given a query protein, fast and flexible...and examples. 2.2 Protein from experiments The experimental data refer to ensembles of structures, X-ray...data due to unresolved disordered regions. In ProDy...Bahar, 2009). 2.3 Protein dynamics from theory......

Ahmet Bakan; Lidio M. Meireles; Ivet Bahar

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Biomedical companies catch and bleed horseshoe crabs for the pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

293 Biomedical companies catch and bleed horseshoe crabs for the pro- duction of Limulus amebocyte product. The biomedical industry harvest- ed approximately 260,000 horseshoe crabs in 1997 (HCTC1). However, approximately 25% of the horseshoe crabs landed for biomedical purposes were rejected for use

164

DOE/EIA-0035(93/07) Monthly Energy Review W S. IRA W,  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

from leaking underground storage tricity generation by requiring electric utilities to tanks. Current regulations prohibit the development of buy power from certain nonutility...

165

Dominance testing for pro-poor growth with an application to European growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article introduces statistical testing procedures to evaluate pro-poor growth. Our measure of pro-poorness follows Kakwani (J Quant Econ 16(1):67...2000), Kakwani and Pernia (Asian Dev Rev 18(1...2000),...

Daniel Sotelsek-Salem; Ismael Ahamdanech-Zarco; John A. Bishop

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

VWA-0015 - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWA-0015 - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. VWA-0015 - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. VWA-0015 - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Barry Stutts, a former security officer for Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. (Am-Pro). It is undisputed that: Mr. Stutts and a fellow security officer, Michael Wolfe, made a protected disclosure, i.e., that their supervisors did not prepare an "incident report" concerning an open top secret safe. Two weeks after the protected disclosure, Am-Pro terminated Mr. Wolfe, who had worked at the DOE for 16 years. Eight weeks after the protected disclosure, Am-Pro terminated Mr. Stutts, who had worked at the DOE for almost two years. As explained below, Am-Pro has failed to

167

Center for Power Electronics Systems 2014 ANNUAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systems at Virginia Tech is a research center dedicated to improving electrical power pro- cessing- orative research and education for creating advanced electric power processing systems of the highestCenter for Power Electronics Systems 2014 ANNUAL REPORT VIRGINIA TECH · BLACKSBURG, VIRGINIA #12

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

168

Efficient RC Power Grid Verification Using Node Elimination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient RC Power Grid Verification Using Node Elimination Ankit Goyal Department of ECE to reduce the size of power grids but their fo- cus is more on simulation. In verification, we are concerned. This paper pro- poses a novel approach to systematically reduce the power grid and accurately compute

Najm, Farid N.

169

Optimal temperature pro les for post-exposure bake of photo-resist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal temperature pro les for post-exposure bake of photo-resist Anders Hansson and Stephen Boyd how to compute optimal temperature pro les for post-exposure bake of photo-resist. The pro les are optimal in the sense that the worst case non-uniformity of the dissolution rate in the photo

170

Powering Health | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powering Health Powering Health Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Powering Health Agency/Company /Organization: USAID Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Health Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.poweringhealth.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America Language: English Related Tools SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook ProForm Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) ... further results

171

Boosting medicine with nanotechnology to destroy cancers AnProN AnProN http://anpron.eu/?p=738[4/21/2011 11:41:09 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boosting medicine with nanotechnology to destroy cancers « « AnProN AnProN http://anpron.eu/?p=738Org Posts Related to Boosting medicine with nanotechnology to destroy cancers » Nanoparticles With Honeycomb[4/21/2011 11:41:09 AM] AnProNAnalysis Prognosis News Home About AnProN Contacts Boosting medicine

Brinker, C. Jeffrey

172

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API #12;pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API #12;pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API #12;pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO

173

Power Plant Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

Tingley, Joseph V.

174

Power Factor Reactive Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power: 130 watts Induction motor PSERC Incandescent lights 0 0.002 0.004 0.006 0.008 0.01 0.012 0.014 0 power: 150 watts #12;Page 4 PSERC Incandescent Lights PSERC Induction motor with no load #12;Page 5 Incandescent Lights #12;Page 7 PSERC Incandescent lights power: Power = 118 V x 1.3 A = 153 W = 0.15 kW = power

175

El fenmeno pro-drop en portugus de Brasil y espaol peninsular Resumen: espaol y portugus son lenguas pro-drop. No obstante, diversos estudios indican que el  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

El fenómeno pro-drop en portugués de Brasil y español peninsular Resumen: español y portugués son portugués de Brasil una lengua parcialmente pro-drop. En este trabajo se analiza el fenómeno pro-drop en portugués de Brasil a través de una comparación con el español peninsular, utilizando para ello corpus

176

V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data August 3, 2013 - 2:37am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in HP Printers. A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. PLATFORM: HP LaserJet Pro products ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP LaserJet Pro printers. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to gain unauthorized access to data. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID 1028869 CVE-2013-4807 Vendor URL IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The following models are affected: HP LaserJet Pro P1102w CE657A/CE658A HP LaserJet Pro P1606dn CE749A HP LaserJet Pro M1212nf MFP CE841A HP LaserJet Pro M1213nf MFP CE845A

177

VenueTM 11 Pro The ultimate 2-in-1 flexibility: power of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

video as well as advanced connectivity options to keep you in touch with the people and information with extreme flexibility in mind with the ability to use USB 3.0 connections, Micro-SD storage devices. 9 The stated Watt Hour (WHr) is not an indication of battery life. 10 Weights vary depending

Fiebig, Peter

178

Statistical analysis and optimization of processing parameters in high-power direct diode laser cladding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-power direct diode laser (HPDDL) offers a wide laser beam with a top-hat intensity distribution, ... making it an ideal tool for large-area cladding. In this study, a systemic study on the HPDDL cladding pro...

Shuang Liu; Radovan Kovacevic

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Pro Solar Solarstrom GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solarstrom GmbH Solarstrom GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Pro Solar Solarstrom GmbH Place Ravensburg, Germany Zip 88214 Sector Solar Product Distributor of PV modules, including Canadian Solar's, in Germany. Coordinates 47.782018°, 9.614622° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.782018,"lon":9.614622,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

Time and Energy Pro ling in Production Sensor Networks with Quanto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time and Energy Pro ling in Production Sensor Networks with Quanto Basil Crow Department to production sensor networks alike. Introduction Energy is a scarce resource in battery-operated embedded [ ]. To make matters worse, the infrastructure for time and energy pro ling in production sensor networks

Fonseca, Rodrigo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

VWA-0015 - Deputy Secretary Decision - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWA-0015 - Deputy Secretary Decision - In the Matter of Am-Pro VWA-0015 - Deputy Secretary Decision - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. VWA-0015 - Deputy Secretary Decision - In the Matter of Am-Pro Protective Services, Inc. Barry Stutts, Complainant v. Am-Pro Protective Agency, Inc., Respondent, OHA Case No. VWA-0015 DECISION DENYING REVIEW OF INITIAL AGENCY DECISION This is a request for review by Complainant Barry Stutts, from the Initial Agency Decision by the Office of Hearings and Appeals ("OHA"), finding that reinstatement of Mr. Stutts as a security guard is a necessary and appropriate action to effect full relief for a retaliatory termination made by the previous security contractor at Forrestal and Germantown, Am-Pro Protective Agency, Inc. Based upon my review of the regulatory language,

182

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Environmental assessment of German electricity generation from coal-fired power plants with amine-based carbon capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the most important sources of global carbon dioxide emissions is the combustion of fossil...2 emissions. Therefore, the increased requirements for climate protection are a great challenge for the power pro...

Andrea Schreiber; Petra Zapp

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ICPEAC XX: A Retro- and Pro-Spective Analysis  

SciTech Connect

There is something magical about ``round birthdays.`` They make one stop and think about where he is, how he got there, and where he is going. The same is apparently true of conferences, especially those like ICPEAC which represent the periodic coming together of a broad range of scientists in a reasonably well-defined discipline. This Vienna conference is the 20th in the ICPEAC series, and a retro- and pro-spective analysis seems appropriate. At the first ICPEAC in New York (1958), there were about 50 participants. In Vienna (1997), there were more than 800 participants. How do we account for this growth? ICPEAC is one of the most democratic conferences of its size. For example, input from a general committee of 50 representing the many geographic and sub- disciplinary areas gives continuous refreshment of ideas for the invited program. And, as in any democracy, there is a constant state of turmoil and self doubt. After all, atomic collisions is a ``mature`` field, and was a ``mature`` field at the time of the first ICPEAC in 1958, 50 what can one expect in new developments? This self doubt is best expressed in the comment of Ben Bederson (the ``Father of ICPEAC``) following the second in Boulder, Colorado, in 1961: ``This conference is the second in a series of informal meetings organized by a group of workers in the general field of electronic and atomic collisions. The first such meeting was held at New York University in 1958, and we will probably continue to meet at irregular intervals in the future....`` As part of my ``keynote`` talk at the New York ICPEAC XVI in 1989, I gave a brief history of the conference which we can build on to round things off for our twentieth.

Datz, S.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Outcomes Researcher, Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) ICON is a global provider of outsourced development services to the pharmaceutical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outcomes Researcher, Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) ICON is a global provider of outsourced selection to Phase I - IV clinical studies ICON enjoys a strong reputation for quality and is focused what set us apart. Overview of the role The ICON PRO group is seeking an Outcomes Researcher. The PRO

Klein, Ophir

186

HC-Pro Suppression of Transgene Silencing Eliminates the Small RNAs but Not Transgene Methylation or the Mobile Signal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and if HC-Pro interferes with this process, we developed a polymerase chain reaction...enzyme ( ), HC-Pro may target the process at this step. There are several possible...the two branches of gene silencing are interrelated and if HC-Pro affects VIGS in the same...

Allison C. Mallory; Lara Ely; Trent H. Smith; Rajendra Marathe; Radhamani Anandalakshmi; Mathilde Fagard; Herve Vaucheret; Gail Pruss; Lewis Bowman; Vicki B. Vance

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have been developed to allow the in vitro evolution of a range of Summary: . Man-made enzymes may also find applications in therapy in areas such as pro-drug processing and...

188

DC Pro Software Tool Suite, Data Center Fact Sheet, Industrial Technologies Program  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how DOE's Data Center Energy Profiler (DC Pro) Software Tool Suite and other resources can help U.S. companies identify ways to improve the efficiency of their data centers.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Pennsylvanias Comprehensive, Statewide, Pro-Active Industrial Energy Efficiency (E2) Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Pennsylvanias Comprehensive, Statewide, Pro-Active Industrial Energy Efficiency (E2) Program captures lost energy efficiency implementation by offering trainings, technical assistance, and information to industrial companies within the region.

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - aminoterminal pro b-type Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

results for: aminoterminal pro b-type Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 84, pp. 4791-4795, July 1987 Summary: -driven translocation: Dependence on...

191

A network of floating docks pro-posed by Assistant Professor of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A network of floating docks pro- posed by Assistant Professor of Architecture Richard Garber of three vertical turbines on the underside of each dock, generating up to 24 kilowatts of constant energy

Bieber, Michael

192

EIA COPY. Tear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COPY. COPY. Tear out, complete, and return to: Energy Information Administration: EI-441 Mail Station: BG-094 FORSTL U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Attn: Form EIA-176 SHORT FORM A2. Form EIA-176, Short Form Figure Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1996 220 nonutility nonutility nonutility nonutility Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1996 221 5.4.4.2 EIA-176, ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION, 19 RESPO NDENT CO PY Page 3 PART V: CONTINUATION, DISPOSITION OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS WITHIN OR TRANSPORTED OUT OF REPORT STATE 1.0 Control No. 2.0 Company Name 3.0 Report State 4.0 Resubmittal EIA Date Volume (Mcf at 14.73 psia) e or f Cost or Revenue (Including taxes) e or f 5.4.4 Other Nonutility Power Producer Sales

193

High power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 1970s technomanic projects such as nuclear power stations were still in vogue. Environmentalists argued that solar power seemed a far safer, cheaper and reassuringly low-tech power source. The technomaniacs ... tech power source. The technomaniacs, fearing that they were losingthis argument, sought to hijack solar power themselves. They proposed an enormously expensive and complicated ...

David Jones

1994-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

194

Annual Energy Review 1998  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

207 Coal 18.72 Hydroelectric Power 3.14 Nuclear Electric Power 7.16 Petroleum 1.17 Natural Gas 3.32 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 33.64 Electric Utilities Nonutility...

195

Annual Energy Review 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

207 Coal 18.44 Hydroelectric Power 3.49 Nuclear Electric Power 6.69 Petroleum 0.84 Natural Gas 3.03 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 32.62 Electric Utilities Nonutility...

196

Annual Energy Review, 1996  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Nuclear Electric Power 7.17 Petroleum 0.73 Natural Gas 2.80 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 32.13 Electric Utilities Nonutility Power Producers Gross Generation of...

197

The Need for Speed and Stability in Data Center Power Capping Arka A. Bhattacharya, David Culler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

because from the power generation standpoint, the cost and environmental impact for large scale power generation plants such as hydro-electric plants as well as green energy installations such as solar or wind by pro- visioning expensive electrical equipment (such as UPS, diesel generators, and cooling capacity

Hunt, Galen

198

14 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 2008 THE CONTRIBUTION OF HYDRO-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the International Energy Agency). Producers Canada China Brazil United States Russia Norway Japan Sweden France14 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 2008 T THE CONTRIBUTION OF HYDRO- power to modern to be in the spotlight because of two com- pletely opposite views. On one hand, supporters quote its clean energy pro

Dixon, Juan

199

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever infections reported by ProMED  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryObjective There are limited sources describing the global burden of emerging diseases. We reviewed the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) infections reported by ProMED and assessed the reliability of the data retrieved compared to published reports. We evaluated the effectiveness of ProMED as a source of epidemiological data by focusing on CCHFV infections. Methods Using the keywords Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever and Crimean Congo in the ProMED search engine, we reviewed all the information about the news and harvested data using a structured form, including year, country, gender, occupation, the number of infected individuals, and the number of fatal cases. Results We identified 383 entries reported between January 1998 and October 2013. A total 3426 infected cases were reported, with 451 fatal cases, giving an overall case fatality rate (CFR) of 13%. Out of 144 cases for which the gender was reported, 97 (67%) were male. Most of the cases were reported from Turkey, followed by Russia, Iran, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. Conclusions Case reporting systems such as ProMED are useful to gather information and synthesize knowledge on the emerging infections. Although certain areas need to be improved, ProMED provided good information about Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

Yavuz Ince; Cagla Yasa; Mert Metin; Melda Sonmez; Ece Meram; Barlas Benkli; Onder Ergonul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UGPS' Marketing Service Area Power Marketing As a marketer of Federal power in the Upper Great Plains Region, the Power Marketing staff provides a variety of services for customers...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Using HyPro to Evaluate Competing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using HyPro to Evaluate Competing Hydrogen Pathways Using HyPro to Evaluate Competing Hydrogen Pathways Project Summary Full Title: Using HyPro to Evaluate Competing Hydrogen Pathways Project ID: 217 Principal Investigator: Brian D. James Keywords: Steam methane reforming (SMR); electrolysis; biomass; fuel cell vehicles (FCV); costs Purpose This project provides analysis of the options and trade-offs associated with establishing the required hydrogen production infrastructure to provide hydrogen to fuel cell vehicles in the 2020 timeframe and beyond. Performer Principal Investigator: Brian D. James Organization: Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) Address: 3601 Wilson Blvd., Suite 650 Arlington, VA 22201 Telephone: 703-778-7114 Email: Brian_James@directedtechnologies.com Additional Performers: Sentech, Inc.; H2Gen Innovations, Inc.; ChevronTexaco Technology Ventures; Teledyne Energy Services

202

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SolarPro 2.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SolarPro 2.0 SolarPro 2.0 SolarPro 2.0 logo. Simulates the operation of an active solar hot water heating system, hour by hour, for one year based on Typical Meteorological Year 2 (TMY2) information available from NREL. Dozens of customizable variables are incorporated into the simulation. Keywords solar water heating, thermal processes, alternative energy, simulation Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required General knowledge of solar thermal processes. Users New Software Product. Audience Solar design engineers, solar contractors, do-it-yourselfers. Input Main inputs required: TMY2 datafile 239 U.S. locations provided on the CD-ROM, solar collector OG-100 panel ratings (database included), tank size and insulation factor, customer hot water use pattern. Output Solar fraction, hourly charts, hour-by-hour simulation end points in

203

Is Aquaculture Pro-Poor? Empirical Evidence of Impacts on Fish Consumption in Bangladesh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Aquaculture is widely held to contribute to poverty reduction and food security in the Global South, but robust evidence is limited. Using nationally representative data from Bangladesh, this study analyses changes in fish consumption from 2000 to 2010. Rapid expansion of commercial aquaculture pegged down fish prices, resulting in increased fish consumption by extreme poor and moderate poor consumers and those in rural areas. These outcomes are closely linked to the pro-poor nature of national economic growth during this period. These findings contribute to a broadening of the debate on whether the growth of aquaculture in Bangladesh has been pro-poor.

Kazi Ali Toufique; Ben Belton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The standard computer models for 2014 are the Dell 9020 desktop, Dell e6440 laptop, Apple 21.5" iMac desktop and Apple 13" Mac Book Pro laptop or Apple 13" Mac Book Pro with Retina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard computer models for 2014 are the Dell 9020 desktop, Dell e6440 laptop, Apple 21.5" iMac desktop and Apple 13" Mac Book Pro laptop or Apple 13" Mac Book Pro with Retina Display (see important distinctions below). Keep in mind that Dell and Apple are continuously modifying their lines, so although

Aalberts, Daniel P.

205

ClusPro: a fully automated algorithm for protein protein docking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possible to evaluate billions of putative complex structures covering a large set of the translationalClusPro: a fully automated algorithm for protein­ protein docking Stephen R. Comeau1 , David W.rcsb.org/pdb/). The docking algorithms evalu- ate billions of putative complexes, retaining a preset number with favorable

Vajda, Sandor

206

LFM-Pro: a tool for detecting significant local structural sites in proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......capabilities of LFM-Pro, we used a dataset that was previously utilized...et al., 2004). The first dataset (C 1) includes two families from different SCOP classes: nuclear receptor ligand-binding domain...all-beta class. The second dataset (C 2) uses ESP (19 proteins......

Ahmet Sacan; Ozgur Ozturk; Hakan Ferhatosmanoglu; Yusu Wang

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

LM Glasfiber er verdens strste pro-ducent af vinger til vindmller.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LM Glasfiber er verdens største pro- ducent af vinger til vindmøller. Udvikling og afprøvning af mekaniske test", forklarer civilinge- niør Torben Jacobsen fra LM Glasfiber. LM Glasfiber i Lunderskov er internationale vindmølle-fabrikanter. Torben Jacobsen kom til LM Glasfiber fra Risø, hvor han var tilknyttet

208

proGrams, resources & services center for engineering diversity fye merit research women in engr.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 proGrams, resources & services center for engineering diversity · fye · merit research · women in engr. career services · honors program · Kiuel · progressive degree program freshmen academies · 3 as they express an interest in engineering and continues working with them until, and in some cases after

Rohs, Remo

209

Human Resources hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Worksafe NZ , any restricted work as defined in regulation 2 and 26 of The Health and Safety in EmploymentHuman Resources ­ hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing Protocol & Safety Manager Contact: Health & Safety Team Table of Contents Introduction

Hickman, Mark

210

Pro-poor indirect tax reforms, with an application to Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Section4 applies the methodology to Mexicos indirect tax system using Mexicos 2004 ENIGH database. We find for...Food or on Energy would be relatively pro-poor, and that this conclusion would be valid for a ve...

Jean-Yves Duclos; Paul Makdissi; Abdelkrim Araar

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Security API analysis with the spi-calculus and the ProVerif tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security API analysis with the spi-calculus and the ProVerif tool Technical Report copyright©2008 Notations 5 3 HSMs and APIs 5 3.1 Tamper evidence and Tamper resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.2 The role of HSMs and cryptoprocessors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.3 API

Bencsáth, Boldizsár

212

Poverty and income growth: measuring pro-poor growth in the case of Romania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper attempts to examine the extent to which income growth was beneficial to poverty reduction in Romania between the years 2000 and 2007. We build income growth incidence curves, both in absolute and relative terms, on the basis of mean individual ... Keywords: economic growth, growth incidence curve, income, inequality, poverty, pro-poor growth

Eva Militaru; Cristina Stroe

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Pro-active Strategies for the Frugal Feeding Problem in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensor Networks. The FFP attempts to find energy-efficient routes for a mobile service entity for the case of a fixed rendezvous location (i.e., service facility with limited number of docking ports) and mobile capable entities (sensors). Our pro-active solution reduces the FFP to finding energy

Lanthier, Mark

214

ProChat: Dynamic Formal Collaboration Protocols in a Chat Tool for Handheld Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ProChat: Dynamic Formal Collaboration Protocols in a Chat Tool for Handheld Collaboration Randal K, or collaboration protocols, can be developed outside the application, analyzed for errors, shared among users protocols are used to modify the user interface to control the collaboration. We conclude with some open

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

215

Mechanism of the Interaction between the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminus of the Pro-Apoptotic ARTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Intrinsically Disordered C- Terminus of the Pro-Apoptotic ARTS Protein and the Bir3 Domain of XIAP. PLoS ONE 6 disordered proteins (IDPs) or regions (IDRs) in proteins lack stable tertiary structures under physiologicalMechanism of the Interaction between the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminus of the Pro

Lebendiker, Mario

216

Wind Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Power As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe...

217

How Three Retail Buyers Source Large-Scale Solar Electricity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Large-scale, non-utility solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) are still a rarity despite the growing popularity of PPAs across the country. In this webinar, participants will learn more about how...

218

Nuclear Powers Benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Powers Benefits ... Using nuclear power in place of fossil-fuel energy sources, such as coal, has prevented some 1.8 million air-pollution-related deaths and 64 gigatons of carbon emissions globally over the past four decades, a study concludes. ... These estimates suggest policymakers should continue to rely on and expand nuclear power in place of fossil fuels to mitigate climate change, the authors say (Environ. ...

MARK SCHROPE

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 7, NO. 2, MAY 1992, PP. 673 683. POINT OF COLLAPSE METHODS APPLIED TO AC DC POWER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-node bifurcations in power systems including high voltage direct current HVDC transmission. Bus voltage pro les, become plausible when the dynamics for the HVDC system are included. Keywords: Voltage collapse, HVDC the subject of increasing study over the past few years 1 . Furthermore, the relative wide spread use of HVDC

Cañizares, Claudio A.

220

ProMC: Input-output data format for HEP applications using varint encoding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new data format for Monte Carlo (MC) events, or any structural data, including experimental data, is discussed. The format is designed to store data in a compact binary form using variable-size integer encoding as implemented in the Google's Protocol Buffers package. This approach is implemented in the ProMC library which produces smaller file sizes for MC records compared to the existing input-output libraries used in high-energy physics (HEP). Other important features of the proposed format are a separation of abstract data layouts from concrete programming implementations, self-description and random access. Data stored in ProMC files can be written, read and manipulated in a number of programming languages, such C++, JAVA and PYTHON.

Chekanov, S V; Van Gemmeren, P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ProMC: Input-output data format for HEP applications using varint encoding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new data format for Monte Carlo (MC) events, or any structural data, including experimental data, is discussed. The format is designed to store data in a compact binary form using variable-size integer encoding as implemented in the Google's Protocol Buffers package. This approach is implemented in the ProMC library which produces smaller file sizes for MC records compared to the existing input-output libraries used in high-energy physics (HEP). Other important features of the proposed format are a separation of abstract data layouts from concrete programming implementations, self-description and random access. Data stored in ProMC files can be written, read and manipulated in a number of programming languages, such C++, JAVA, FORTRAN and PYTHON.

S. V. Chekanov; E. May; K. Strand; P. Van Gemmeren

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

222

Pro le-Assisted Instruction Scheduling William Y. Chen Scott A. Mahlke Nancy J. Warter Sadun Anik Wen-mei W. Hwu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information are studied: control- ow and memory-dependence. Pro le-assisted code scheduling techniques have scheduling to use control- ow and memory-dependence pro ling. In addition to explaining the usefulnessPro le-Assisted Instruction Scheduling William Y. Chen Scott A. Mahlke Nancy J. Warter Sadun Anik

Hwu, Wen-mei W.

223

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject Board for Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Astronomy and Astrophysics& Devendra.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Electrodynamics I Numerical Methods

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

224

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject Board for Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject Courses #12;pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API;pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Reading Courses

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

225

HyPro: A Financial Tool for Simulating Hydrogen Infrastructure Development, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a multi-year Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI) project to study the build-out of hydrogen production facilities during the transition from gasoline internal combustion engine vehicle to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The primary objectives of the project are to develop an enhanced understanding of hydrogen production issues during the transition period (out to 2050) and to develop recommendations for the DOE on areas of further study. These objectives are achieved by conducting economic and scenario analysis to predict how industry would provide the hydrogen production, delivery and dispensing capabilities necessary to satisfy increased hydrogen demand. The primary tool used for the analysis is a custom created MatLab simulation tool entitled HyPro (short for Hydrogen Production). This report describes the calculation methodology used in HyPro, the baseline assumptions, the results of the baseline analysis and several corollary studies. The appendices of this report included a complete listing of model assumptions (capital costs, efficiencies, feedstock prices, delivery distances, etc.) and a step-by-step manual on the specific operation of the HyPro program. This study was made possible with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Brian D. James, Peter O. Schmidt, Julie Perez

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nuclear Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Power ... THIS WEEKS issue contains six letters on nuclear power, a representative sample of the letters C&EN received in response to the editorial, Resist Hysteria, I wrote shortly after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan devastated the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (C&EN, March 21, page 5). ... Four of the six letters take sharp issue with the primary point I made in the editorial, which was that, despite the severity of the situation in Japan, nuclear power remains an essential component of our overall energy mix for the near to mid-term because it will help us avert the worst impacts of global climate disruption. ...

RUDY M. BAUM

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

Power LCAT  

SciTech Connect

POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

Drennen, Thomas

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Yakama Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Administration FROM: J.D. Williams Attorney RE: Initial Comments on Draft Load Following Regional Dialogue Contract Template Dear Mark, Please allow these comments...

229

Power LCAT  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

Drennen, Thomas

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

230

Creating .DXF files from ProE (Wildfire 5.0) for use with ESPRIT CNC Software College of Engineering students and staff should be aware that ProE (Wildfire x.x) is available through the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Creating .DXF files from ProE (Wildfire 5.0) for use with ESPRIT CNC Software College to be converted into a vector / line format to be used with the machine shop CNC software ESPRIT. This requires

Thomas, Brian G.

231

Control Theory Techniques Applied to Biological Population Problems Project Mentors: Professor Richard Rebarber (Department of Mathematics), Pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richard Rebarber (Department of Mathematics), Pro- fessor Andrew Tyre (School of Natural Resources excluder devices" (TEDs), which are escape hatches inserted into existing shrimp nets. The number of TEDs

Logan, David

232

Solar Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Solar Power Project Opportunities Abound in the Region The WIPP site is receives abundant solar energy with 6-7 kWh/sq meter power production potential As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the WIPP site enjoys abundant year-round sunshine. With an average solar power production potential of 6-7 kWh/sq meter per day, one exciting project being studied for location at WIPP is a 30-50 MW Solar Power Tower: The American Solar Energy Society (ASES) is is a national trade association promoting solar energy as a clean source of electricity, and provides a comprehensive resource for additional information. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is also a comprehensive resource for more information on renewable energy.

233

Power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

Thin-Film Composite Pressure Retarded Osmosis Membranes for Sustainable Power Generation from Salinity Gradients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thin-Film Composite Pressure Retarded Osmosis Membranes for Sustainable Power Generation from Salinity Gradients ... Pressure retarded osmosis has the potential to produce renewable energy from natural salinity gradients. ... Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. ...

Ngai Yin Yip; Alberto Tiraferri; William A. Phillip; Jessica D. Schiffman; Laura A. Hoover; Yu Chang Kim; Menachem Elimelech

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Power of Duality: Exact Results in 4D SUSY Field Theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......interesting phenomena. The Power of Duality 345 for the phase transitions without supersymmetry. One way such a study can pro- ceed is by perturbing a supersymmetric theory whose solution is known by soft breaking terms. When these terms are small they do......

N. Seiberg

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

An Energy-Efficient Power Allocation Game with Selfish Channel State Reporting in Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Energy-Efficient Power Allocation Game with Selfish Channel State Reporting in Cellular Networks Information (CSI) reports, reducing the cell's energy efficiency. To analyze this conflict of interest, we paper pro- vides valuable theoretical insight to energy-efficient networks when CSI reports cannot

Boyer, Edmond

237

Strathclyde powerS ahead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strathclyde powerS ahead the future of renewable energy SHARING AND ENHANCING RESEARCH Discover the vision of Principal Professor Jim McDonald THE FUTURE OF ENERGY Strathclyde pioneers renewableEdicinE Snapshot the reSearcher Following a decade of environmental research in her native egypt, nabila saleem

Mottram, Nigel

238

Form EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases 906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases Dataset Summary Description The EIA-906, EIA-920, EIA-923 and predecessor forms provide monthly and annual data on generation and fuel consumption at the power plant and prime mover level. A subset of plants, steam-electric plants 10 MW and above, also provides boiler level and generator level data. Data for utility plants are available from 1970, and for non-utility plants from 1999. Beginning with January 2004 data collection, the EIA-920 was used to collect data from the combined heat and power plant (cogeneration) segment of the non-utility sector; also as of 2004, nonutilities filed the annual data for nonutility source and disposition of electricity. Beginning in 2007, environmental data was collected on Schedules 8A - 8F of the Form 923 and includes by-product

239

Power America  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Power America will focus on wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors - the same materials used in LED light fixtures and many flat screen TVs. The Institute will use $70 million provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office to support and manage its programs over the next five years. This Institute is one of three new innovation hubs announced by President Obama in his 2013 State of the Union address and part of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI). Power America was formerly called the Next Generation Power Electronics National Manufacturing Innovation Institute.

240

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1997 36 normal weather in 1997, commercial consumption climbed to a new record level in 1997, 3.2 trillion cubic feet, 2 per- cent above last year's record. A 7-percent rise in the num- ber of commercial consumers may have contributed to the increase. The number of commercial consumers grew by 284,157 from 1996 to 1997, more than the total growth in consumers in this sector shown from 1993 to 1996. Industrial In recent years, more than 40 percent of natural gas deliver- ies have been used by industrial consumers. After increas- ing in a steady upward trend for 10 consecutive years, de- liveries to this sector fell slightly in 1998 to 8.8 trillion cu- bic feet, but were still slightly above the previous historical high set more than 20 years ago in 1973. Industrial con- sumption includes deliveries to all nonutility power pro- ducers. Because

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

242

Power Struggle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Disparate forces such as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in the U.S.; the phaseout of nuclear power in Germany; and renewable energy promotion in Europe are conspiring to lessen ... ...

ALEX SCOTT

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Media coverage and government policy of nuclear power in the People's Republic of China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract China has vigorously pursued nuclear power and has developed a series of ambitious nuclear power policies in the past several years. To smoothly implement these policies, the Chinese government wants to mobilize public support because a high level of public acceptance helps legitimize these policies. Considering that news media can influence public opinion, we analyzed the content of news articles related to nuclear power in two Chinese mainstream newspapers, The People's Daily and The Guangming Daily, between 2004 and 2013. The results show that the articles in the two newspapers primarily reflected pro-nuclear or informational statements, whereas anti-nuclear opinions were rarely published. Pro-nuclear arguments most often focused on environmental benefits and safety, which have been frequently emphasized in the Chinese government's nuclear power policies. These findings indicate that the mainstream news coverage of nuclear power is highly consistent with the Chinese government's pro-nuclear policies, which suggests that the government had a significant impact on the content reported by the mainstream media in China. Lastly, this study proposes some policy recommendations for nuclear power development in China.

Yongxiang Wang; Nan Li; Jingping Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Power inverters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Power inverters include a frame and a power module. The frame has a sidewall including an opening and defining a fluid passageway. The power module is coupled to the frame over the opening and includes a substrate, die, and an encasement. The substrate includes a first side, a second side, a center, an outer periphery, and an outer edge, and the first side of the substrate comprises a first outer layer including a metal material. The die are positioned in the substrate center and are coupled to the substrate first side. The encasement is molded over the outer periphery on the substrate first side, the substrate second side, and the substrate outer edge and around the die. The encasement, coupled to the substrate, forms a seal with the metal material. The second side of the substrate is positioned to directly contact a fluid flowing through the fluid passageway.

Miller, David H. (Redondo Beach, CA); Korich, Mark D. (Chino Hills, CA); Smith, Gregory S. (Woodland Hills, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. March 10, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert Power supplies convert the AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and durable. If they meet those criteria, then they're all alike, except for cost, right? Well, not exactly. You see, there's one other important feature that sets them apart: efficiency. And I don't know about you, but I believe waste is bad. For me, high efficiency is one important feature that's needed for something to be high quality. So isn't it ridiculous that most power

246

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. March 10, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert Power supplies convert the AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and durable. If they meet those criteria, then they're all alike, except for cost, right? Well, not exactly. You see, there's one other important feature that sets them apart: efficiency. And I don't know about you, but I believe waste is bad. For me, high efficiency is one important feature that's needed for something to be high quality. So isn't it ridiculous that most power

247

Star Power  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

None

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

Solar Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of desert solar energy farm with 30 percent conversion...85 percent of the solar farm energy now reflected back...Washington, D.C. 20550. Wind Power Martin Wolf (19...counting the cost of the offshore platforms, would thus...15 billion. If these wind generators were placed...

Paul E. Damon

1974-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

249

Star Power  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

None

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

250

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

Knobloch,Jürgen

251

Power superconducting power transmission cable  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

978-1-4244-4439-7/09/$25.00 c 2009 IEEE Minimizing Energy Consumption by Power-Efficient Radio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

978-1-4244-4439-7/09/$25.00 c 2009 IEEE Minimizing Energy Consumption by Power-Efficient Radio herve.rivano@sophia.inria.fr Abstract In this paper, we investigate on minimizing the energy consumption a piecewise linear convex function that pro- vides a good approximation of the energy consumption on the links

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

Power Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here: Find a Car Home > Power Search You are here: Find a Car Home > Power Search Power Search Expand any feature by selecting its title bar. Choose as many or as few features as you like. Model Year From: 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 To: 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 MSRP Under $15,000 $15,000-$20,000 $20,000-$25,000 $25,000-$30,000 $30,000-$35,000 $35,000-$40,000 $40,000-$45,000 $45,000-$50,000 $50,000-$55,000 $55,000-$60,000 $60,000-$65,000 $65,000-$70,000 $70,000-$75,000 $75,000-$80,000 $80,000-$85,000 Over $85,000 - OR - Minimum: Select... $5,000 $6,000 $7,000 $8,000 $9,000 $10,000 $11,000

254

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

lot of the electricity they consume? Higher efficiency power supplies reduce energy consumption, thus cutting your electricity bill. They reduce power consumption, helping your...

255

Wind power and Wind power and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

256

Power Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) - 2,870,000 x 0.8 6 W - 3414 = 70 kw (or 900 hp). When recovering power from an expanding gas, consideration should be given to the final gas temperature. This tem;:>f'rature can be estimated by the formula: T 2 Final temperature, oR. Other... with the requirements make generation fqr more useful. Presently a recovery level of around 500 kw (or 657 hp) appears to be the minimum level which will support an in stallation. In order to achieve reasonable effi ciency, quality equipment with good control...

Murray, F.

257

The signal recognition particle (SRP) and the SRP receptor (SR) mediate the co-translational targeting of nascent pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

articles The signal recognition particle (SRP) and the SRP receptor (SR) mediate the co-translational targeting of nascent pro- tein­ribosome complexes to the membrane translocation apparatus1. The SRP protein for SRP targeting to the mem- brane, and GTP hydrolysis is required for subsequent dissociation of the SRP

Walter, Peter

258

Formal Verification of the SeVeCom HSM API with the Applied -calculus and the ProVerif tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formal Verification of the SeVeCom HSM API with the Applied -calculus and the ProVerif tool Ta Vinh Programming Interface (API) of the HSM. Besides the physical protection provided by the hardware of the HSM, its API must also be secure and resistant against attempts of logical break-ins. Unfortunately

Bencsáth, Boldizsár

259

Decrease in Protein Solubility and Cataract Formation Caused by the Pro23 to Thr Mutation in Human D-Crystallin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decrease in Protein Solubility and Cataract Formation Caused by the Pro23 to Thr Mutation in Human 21, 2004; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed NoVember 23, 2004 ABSTRACT: The P23T mutation in the human D the molecular mechanism of lens opacity caused by this mutation, we expressed human D-crystallin (HGD), the P23T

Benedek, George B.

260

Second IEEE Workshop on Agile Cooperative Process-Aware Information Systems (ProGility 2007) -Workshop Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Second IEEE Workshop on Agile Cooperative Process-Aware Information Systems (ProGility 2007 an interest in agile cooperative process-aware information systems. The vision is to be able to rapidly im with each other in networks that are dynamic, flex- ible, ad-hoc, and adaptive. Thus enterprises are develop

Ulm, Universität

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject Board for Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Aspects of Field Theory S. Trivedi

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

262

Power transaction issues in deregulated power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the introduction of the deregulation in the power industry, it becomes possible to wheel power across the transmission network. Hence, some issues involving the network's physical capability to transfer power and the allocation of the network...

Roycourt, Henrik

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Battery-Electric Powered Special Purpose Vehicles, SAELead-Acid Powered Electric Vehicles, Fifth Internationalmeantime, battery-powered electric vehicles can be expected

Cairns, Elton J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Power Operations Training Center You'll find the "Power" of learning at Southwestern's Power Operations Training Center (POTC). POTC's...

265

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rate Schedules Skip Navigation Links Excess Energy Hydro Peaking Power Hydro Power and Energy Sold to Sam Rayburn Dam Electric Cooperative (Rayburn) Hydro Power and Energy Sold to...

266

2025 Power Marketing Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Allocations Rates 2025 Power Marketing Initiative The Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Firm Electric Service (FES) contracts expire September 30, 2024. Western Area Power...

267

Power management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

Processing and Testing of the SRF Photoinjector Cavity for BERLinPro  

SciTech Connect

The BERLinPro project is a compact, c.w. SRF energy recovery linac (ERL) that is being built to develop the accelerator physics and technology required to operate the next generation of high current ERLs. The machine is designed to produce a 50 MeV 100 mA beam, with better than 1 mm-mrad emittance. The electron source for the ERL will be a SRF photoinjector equipped with a multi-alkali photocathode. In order to produce a SRF photoinjector to operate reliably at this beam current HZB has undertaken a 3 stage photoinjector development program to study the operation of SRF photoinjectors in detail. The 1.4 cell cavity being reported on here is the second stage of this development, and represents the first cavity designed by HZB for use with a high quantum efficiency multi-alkali photocathode. This paper will describe the work done to prepare the cavity for RF testing in the vertical testing dewar at Jefferson Laboratory as well as the results of these RF tests.

Burrill, Andrew; Anders, W.; Frahm, A.; Knobloch, Jens; Neumann, Axel; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Kneisel, Peter; Turlington, Larry; Zaplatin, Evgeny

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Natural Gas Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of a power plant is to generate electric power. Therefore, the key performance metric of an electric power generator is the net thermal efficiency, which is the ratio of the electric power measured...

Raub W. Smith; Dr. S. Can Glen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Solar powered desalination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.18: Largest PV Power Plants32 TableTable 1.18: Largest PV Power Plants 19 Power (MW) LocationWorld Canada, Sarnia PV power plant Sarnia (Ontario) Italy,

Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

PowerPoint Presentation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Computer networks Local power network Local Power network Local Power network Bulk Power Grid Low-level security domain Medium-level security domain High-level security domain...

272

Water Power Program: Publications  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE Water Power Program Information Resources Publications...

273

Thermodynamic analysis of a stand-alone reverse osmosis desalination system powered by pressure retarded osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, a methodology is developed to assess the feasibility of a reverse osmosis (RO) desalination system powered by a stand-alone salinity driven pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) technology. First, the proposed hybrid ROPRO system is analysed as a thermodynamic cycle and its feasibility is mathematically interpreted using a feasible condition (FC) number, several dimensionless operational variables and a number of constraints to represent the objective of zero brine discharge. Then, a study of the stand-alone feasibility of a hybrid seawater ROPRO system is carried out. The results show that lower RO water recovery and higher dimensionless flow rate improve the stand-alone feasibility of the system. A subsystem, a look inside the PRO, is developed to study the applied pressure and the required membrane area to achieve the operations with optimum FC numbers. It is found that the optimum applied hydraulic pressure is inversely proportional to the dimensionless flow rate in the feasible range of stand-alone operations and more area of membrane is required by a larger FC number. Finally, a case study of a selected operation is presented based on its energy performance, and two influencing factors, the inefficiency of the components and the salinity concentration of the feed water.

Wei He; Yang Wang; Adel Sharif; Mohammad Hasan Shaheed

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ProActive DNS ProActive DNS Blacklisting Gene Rackow Argonne National Laboratory The Basics of DNS Hostname to IP mapping and back Host aliases Mail server locations Services Security records What is DNS Blacklisting? DNS Blacklist also known as a DNS Blackhole. Local server fakes zones know to contain: Malware Spyware Command/Control Advertising Political Issues What are DNS Blacklist Benefits Preventing hosts from getting to bad stuff. If you are not presented with the malware, Chances are you are not going to be infected. Estimates are that blocking Advertising sites stops 85% of infections. DNS Blacklist Sources of information Bad News about DNS Blacklisting Typically It's ReActive. Entries are added AFTER something happened. Some machines have already been

275

2011, ProQuest, LLC All rights reserved 1 What is COS Pivot?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your password Contact Help Desk ­ if you need additional assistance logging in to Pivot, let us know how we can assist you and someone from the Help Desk will be in contact with you within one business opportunities with the right people is routine. Pivot is a power tool that Provides access to the most

Berdichevsky, Victor

276

Pro le-Guided Automatic Inline Expansion for C Programs Pohua P. Chang, Scott A. Mahlke, William Y. Chen and Wen-mei W. Hwu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pro le-Guided Automatic Inline Expansion for C Programs Pohua P. Chang, Scott A. Mahlke, William Y study, Allen and Johnson identi ed inline expansion as an essential part of a vectorizing C compiler 5

Hwu, Wen-mei W.

277

6 IEEE CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS MAGAZINE 1531-6364/04/$20.002004 IEEE FOURTH QUARTER 2004 The theory and methods of signal pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and context free grammars. Several new directions in genomic signal processing are briefly outlined in the end this information in ways that are useful to humankind. Traditional as well as modern signal pro- cessing methods

Vaidyanathan, P. P.

278

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject Board for Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject? Try out the HTML to PDF API Phase transition and Critical Phenomenon Mustansir Barma barma Spring 2004

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

279

Dynamic power systems for power generation  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of dynamic power systems have considerable potential value, especially for the space station. The base of technology that makes these dynamic power systems practical is reviewed. The following types of power-generating systems are examined herein: organic Rankine cycle, potassium Rankine cycle, Brayton cycle, and Stirling cycle.

English, R.E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Can solar power deliver?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...technologies, such as wind power, which often peaks...generators such as nuclear power, enabling it be rapidly...exceeded those for wind, nuclear and gas...Contributions from wind, solar and conventional sources to power generation on the...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Power and the People  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Air Act for the electric power industry, are dealt with in a single...find no discussion of the Bonneville Power Administration, and only limited discussion...find no discussion of the Bonneville Power Administration, and only limited discussion...

M. Granger Morgan

1998-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

Green Power Network: Green Power Markets Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Markets Green Markets Search Search Help More Search Options Search Site Map News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports Green Pricing Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies Overview The essence of green power marketing is to provide market-based choices for electricity consumers to purchase power from environmentally preferred sources. The term "green power" is used to define power generated from renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, geothermal, hydropower and various forms of biomass. Green power marketing has the potential to expand domestic markets for renewable energy technologies by fostering greater availability of renewable electric service options in retail markets. Although renewable energy development has traditionally been limited by cost considerations, customer choice allows consumer preferences for cleaner energy sources to be reflected in market transactions. In survey after survey, customers have expressed a preference and willingness to pay more, if necessary, for cleaner energy sources. You can find more information about purchase options on our "Buying Green Power" page.

283

PowerPoint Presentation  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Power Generation & Distribution-Technologies that generate on-site power or manage energy markets (e.g. PV, microgrid control systems) What are We Looking for?...

284

Fusion Power Associates Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Power Associates Awards Fusion Power Associates is "a non-profit, tax-exempt research and educational foundation, providing information on the status of fusion development...

285

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exceptions include: traffic signals, exit signs, kitchen equipment, network power management, power strips, showerheads, clothes washers, water heaters and ag stock...

286

Bonneville Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

agreement (Agreement) between the BC Hydro and Power uthority (BCH) and the Bonneville Power Administration (BP A), jointly the Parties, which BA for accounting purposes is...

287

Portable Power Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's Portable Power, Auxiliary Power Units, and R&D for Off-Road Fuel Cell Applications Research Projects Awarded April 2004

288

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of four Power Marketing Administrations in the United States, Southwestern markets hydroelectric power in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas from 24 U.S....

289

BPA Power Services (PBL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Rates Previous Power Rates Resource Program Average System Cost Methodology (ASCM) Wind Integration Tiered Rate Methodology Supplemental Rate Case Tiered Rate Methodology...

290

HOUSEHOLD SOLAR POWER SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Photovoltaic power has become one of the most popular research area in new energy field. In this report, the case of household solar power (more)

Jiang, He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Solar powered desalination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a clean energy source, solar power is inexhaustible,renewables for energy sources, including solar power. Also,Requirements Energy Source Natural Gas Nuclear Solar Wind

Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California, September 2008 Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California,...

293

Georgia Power Company (GPC), Oglethorpe Power Corporation (OPC...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Georgia Power Company (GPC), Oglethorpe Power Corporation (OPC), Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia (MEAG) Georgia Power Company (GPC), Oglethorpe Power Corporation (OPC),...

294

Power network analysis and optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hierarchical power distribution design with a power tree [T. Roy, Power distribution system design methodology andChen, 3D Power Distribution Network Co-design for Nanascale

Zhang, Wanping

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Power Purchase Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the power purchase agreements taken from the FEMP Alternative Finance Options (AFO) webinar.

296

TVA chooses nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TVA chooses nuclear power ... In giving the nod to a nuclear (over a coal) power generating station 10 days ago, TVA probably gave nuclear power its biggest boost to date. ... The $247 million nuclear power planta dual boiling-water reactor unit with a total capacity of 2.2 million kw(e).will ...

1966-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

297

Offshore Wind Power USA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

298

Power blackouts likely  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... generating stations switch off if they cannot transmit their power. As power stations and transmission substations were knocked out, power was shifted to lines further down the network, causing them ... a map of the United States containing more than 14,000 generating, transmission and distribution substations, and over 19,000 connecting power lines. ...

Philip Ball

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

299

Can solar power deliver?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Articles 1002 117 Discussion Meeting Issue Can solar power deliver? organized and edited by...S. Roberto Amendolia and Can Li Can solar power deliver? Jenny Nelson 1 2 Christopher...of 15 to a Discussion Meeting Issue Can solar power deliver? . Solar power represents...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Power Series Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Series 16.4 Introduction In this section we consider power series. These are examples of infinite series where each term contains a variable, x, raised to a positive integer power. We use the ratio test to obtain the radius of convergence R, of the power series and state the important result

Vickers, James

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Geothermal Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of the renewed market interest in using geothermal for power generation including a concise look at what's driving interest in geothermal power generation, the current status of geothermal power generation, and plans for the future. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of geothermal power generation including its history, the current market environment, and its future prospects; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving renewed interest in geothermal power generation; an analysis of the challenges that are hindering the implementation of geothermal power generation projects; a description of geothermal power generation technologies; a review of the economic drivers of geothermal power generation project success; profiles of the major geothermal power producing countries; and, profiles of the major geothermal power project developers.

NONE

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind Awards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department and the American Public Power Association named Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority and Silicon Valley Power as the winners of the 2014 Public Power Wind Awards.

303

Power Reactor Progress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Argonne kicks off EBWR; Allis-Chalmers plans power reactor using both nuclear and conventional fuels ... NUCLEAR POWER took two giant steps last week. ... Just as the first nuclear power system in the U. S. designed and built solely for the generation of electric power went into full operation at Argonne, Allis-Chalmers came up with a new twist in power reactorsa controlled recirculation boiling reactor (CRBR) using both nuclear and conventional fuels (C&EN, Feb. 18, page 7). ...

1957-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

304

Transmission Power Management for Wireless Health Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conference on Body area networks, 2008. [Arduino]Arduino, [Online]. Available: http://www.arduino.cc/ [IEEE, 2005, pp. 37-44. [Arduino] Arduino CC. Arduino Pro

Amini, Navid

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Green Power Network: Green Power Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies govern_purch Community Choice Aggregation Disclosure Policies Green Power Policies Net Metering Policies Green Power Policies A number of state and local governments have policies in place that encourage the development of green power markets. Government green power purchasing mandates or goals have been established by the federal government, as well as state and local governments to procure renewable energy for the electricity used by government facilities or operations. Community choice aggregation allows communities to determine their electricity generation sources by aggregating the community load and purchasing electricity from an alternate electricity supplier while still receiving transmission and distribution service from their existing provider.

307

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

308

Power beaming providing a space power infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

This study, based on two levels of technology, applies the power beaming concept to four planned satellite constellations. The analysis shows that with currently available technology, power beaming can provide mass savings to constellations in orbits ranging from low earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit. Two constellations, space surveillance and tracking system and space based radar, can be supported with current technology. The other two constellations, space-based laser array and boost surveillance and tracking system, will require power and transmission system improvements before their breakeven specific mass is achieved. A doubling of SP-100 conversion efficiency from 10 to 20/% would meet or exceed breakeven for these constellations.

Bamberger, J.A.; Coomes, E.P.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Power Factor Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Savings Through Power Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Harmonics can be cause of inefficient distribution of power, power line carrier (PLC), egg. Clocks and Energy Management Systems (EMS). Finally, harmonics can cause utility meters, KW Demand and KWH consumption, to register false readings. Electro...

Mehrdad, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nuclear power: an outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power: an outlook ... For nuclear power to regain public acceptance and investor confidence, the nation's nuclear plants must sustain an unblemished safety record, reflecting an industrywide commitment to the highest professional standards. ...

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

312

ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that is powered by an electric motor which is driven byPower module Reactor Electric motor Toyota EVlH electricdesign package including an electric motor and associated

Cairns, Elton J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low power situations there's a mechanism: lBurst mode deep cycles e-caps, which can overheat them, and cause wearout quicker. lAlso, at low power the converters are less...

314

Body powered thermoelectric systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Great interest exists for and progress has be made in the effective utilization of the human body as a possible power supply in hopes of powering such applications as sensors and continuously monitoring medical devices ...

Settaluri, Krishna Tej

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fundamentals of Power Electronics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter gives a description and overview of power electronic technologies including a description of the fundamental systems that are the building blocks of power electronic systems. Technologies that are de...

Edison R. C. da Silva; Malik E. Elbuluk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Data Center Power Consumption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Power Consumption Center Power Consumption A new look at a growing problem Fact - Data center power density up 10x in the last 10 years 2.1 kW/rack (1992); 14 kW/rack (2007) Racks are not fully populated due to power/cooling constraints Fact - Increasing processor power Moore's law Fact - Energy cost going up 3 yr. energy cost equivalent to acquisition cost Fact - Iterative power life cycle Takes as much energy to cool computers as it takes to power them. Fact - Over-provisioning Most data centers are over-provisioned with cooling and still have hot spots November 2007 SubZero Engineering An Industry at the Crossroads Conflict between scaling IT demands and energy efficiency Server Efficiency is improving year after year Performance/Watt doubles every 2 years Power Density is Going Up

317

Arguments Pro and Against Shale Gas Exploitation Worldwide and in Romania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shale gas emerges as a new and important source of energy for the post - industrial world. It is assumed that countries that have considerable shale deposits will be better placed in the 21st century competition between states. The United States have one of biggest deposits of shale gas, underscores a domestic production boom and is on the verge of becoming a gas exporter in Western Europe. The United States still has few capabilities to export shale gas to Europe. It would have to build new liquefaction facilities to do that. On the other side, Russia is, for the moment, the energy giant of Europe, its massive exports of natural gas to the area, acting as a powerful political leverage especially on the eastern and central European space. But in Europe, at least 10 countries are believed to hold significant shale gas reserves; among them, Romania is assumed to have huge unconventional gas reserves, whose exploitation could ensure its medium-term energy independence, and combined with newly discovered gas in the Black Sea, and energy efficiency improvement measures, provide not only the energy independence but transform Romania into a regional power pole. The interesting fact is how each country in Europe, will choose to convert resources in shale gas reserves and to exploit them to the benefit of the economy, the society and the environment. Besides some clear positive effects (decreasing energy imports, creating a stronger negotiating position against external (fossil fuel) suppliers and diversifying Europe's energy mix) will shale gas extraction succeed to decrease gas bill for population, by reducing prices, or will it stick only to royalties and fees collection, as well as with some local social and economic effects, with the consequence of prolonged pollution or even potentially devastating effects on the environment? In order that gas-gas competition begins to act effectively and exert a strong competitive pressure on gas import prices in Europe (by changing their base and weaken the link with oil prices, up to a possible decoupling of it) it is necessary that Europe will benefit from a big inflow of gas supplies, shale gas included, from different sources than

Mariana Papatulica

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistant material for contact with s Low-cost seals Low-cost electrolyte Specific power is low Thermal

Cairns, Elton J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

wind power station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

wind power station [It may consist of just one wind turbine or a network of windmills] ? Windkraftanlage

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hydroxyproline-containing collagen analogs trigger the release and activation of collagen-sequestered proMMP 2 by competition with prodomain-derived peptide P33-42  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

various collagens, gelatine, elastin, fibronectin and aggrecan [1]. The diversity of MMP-binding partners and of MMP substrates suggests a central role for MMPs in the protease web beyond their proteolytic activity. MMPs were described to be involved... liver tissue sample were incubated with 60 ng of Cy2-proMMP-2 in the dark for 24 h before unbound Cy2-proMMP-2 was removed by washing. (B) Slides were treated with Cy2-proMMP-2 alone. (C) Cy2- proMMP-2 was mixed with a 10-fold molar excess of (GPO)10...

Ruehl, Martin; Muche, Marion; Freise, Christian; Erben, Ulrike; Neumann, Ulf; Schuppan, Detlef; Popov, Yury; Dieterich, Walburga; Zeitz, Martin; Farndale, Richard W; Somasundaram, Rajan

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

TERRORISM AND NUCLEAR POWER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TERRORISM AND NUCLEAR POWER ... The attacks of Sept. 11 raise fear that U.S. nuclear power plants may be vulnerable ... THE TERRORIST ATTACKS ON THE World Trade Center and Pentagon are forcing a reexamination of the security of the nation's 103 nuclear power plants by nuclear's advocates and foes alike. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2001-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

323

Green Power Inverter Prvningsrapport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green Power Inverter Prøvningsrapport SolenergiCentret Søren Poulsen Ivan Katic Oktober 2004 #12;Green Power Inverter målerapport.doc SolenergiCentret - 04-03-2005 2 Forord Nærværende rapport indeholder Teknologisk Instituts bidrag til målinger i forbindelse med PSO projektet "Green Power Inverter

324

Acetyl-Ala-Pro-Ala/porcine pancreatic elastase: X-ray diffraction analysis of the product complex at physiological pH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the product complex. 18 3. Hydrogen-bond distances in the active site of the Acetyl-Ala-Pro-Ala-OH/PPE complex. . . . 26 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1. A proposed mechanism for serine protease hydrolysis of peptides or amides. 2. Electron density... Hydrogen-bond distances in the active site of the Acetyl- Ala-Pro-Ala-OH/PPE complex Product residue H-bond group Enzyme residue H-bond group Donor-Acceptor distance (A) APA7. 5 APA5* ACE-600 ALA-601 ALA-601 ALA-603 ALA-603 -C 0 -NH -C...

Crook, Roberta Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Acute cold stress improved the transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines of Chinese soft-shelled turtle against Aeromonas hydrophila  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, is widely cultured in East and Southeast Asian countries. It frequently encounters the stress of abrupt temperature change, which leads to mass death in most cases. However, the mechanism underlying the stress-elicited death remains unknown. We have suspected that the stress impaired the immune function of Chinese soft-shelled turtle, which could result in the mass death, as we noticed that there was a clinical syndrome of infection in dead turtles. To test our hypothesis, we first performed bioinformatic annotation of several pro-inflammatory molecules (IL-1?, TNF?, IL-6, IL-12?) of Chinese soft-shelled turtle. Then, we treated the turtles in six groups, injected with Aeromonas hydrophila before acute cold stress (25?C) and controls, after acute cold stress (15?C) and controls as well as after the temperature was restored to 25?C and controls, respectively. Subsequently, real-time PCR for several pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, TNF?, IL-6, IL-12?, IL-8 and IFN?) was performed to assess the turtle immune function in spleen and intestine, 24 hours after the injection. We found that the mRNA expression levels of the immune molecules were all enhanced after acute cold stress. This change disappeared when the temperature was restored back to 25?C. Our results suggest that abrupt temperature drop did not suppress the immune function of Chinese soft-shelled turtle in response to germ challenge after abrupt temperature drop. In contrast, it may even increase the expression of various cytokines at least, within a short time after acute cold stress.

Zuobing Zhang; Bojian Chen; Lin Yuan; Cuijuan Niu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Wind for Schools Project Power System Brief, Wind Powering America...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Wind for Schools Project Power System Brief Wind for Schools Project Power System Brief Wind for...

327

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Place: India...

328

Electric Power Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Monthly Excel files zipped 2010 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2009 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2008 January February March March Supplement April May June July August September October November December 2007 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2006 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2005 January February March April May June July August September October November December

329

Multimode power processor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In one embodiment, a power processor which operates in three modes: an inverter mode wherein power is delivered from a battery to an AC power grid or load; a battery charger mode wherein the battery is charged by a generator; and a parallel mode wherein the generator supplies power to the AC power grid or load in parallel with the battery. In the parallel mode, the system adapts to arbitrary non-linear loads. The power processor may operate on a per-phase basis wherein the load may be synthetically transferred from one phase to another by way of a bumpless transfer which causes no interruption of power to the load when transferring energy sources. Voltage transients and frequency transients delivered to the load when switching between the generator and battery sources are minimized, thereby providing an uninterruptible power supply. The power processor may be used as part of a hybrid electrical power source system which may contain, in one embodiment, a photovoltaic array, diesel engine, and battery power sources.

O'Sullivan, George A. (Pottersville, NJ); O'Sullivan, Joseph A. (St. Louis, MO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Northern Power Systems, Inc 6 Northern Power Systems, Inc Northern Power Systems 182 Mad River Park Waitsfield, VT 05673 Ultracapacitor EnergyBridge(tm) UPS for Palmdale Water District DOE/ESS PEER Review November 3, 2006 11/03/2006 Northern Power Systems, Inc © 2006 2 Northern Power  Distributed Energy Systems Corp (NASDAQ:DESC)  Energy Solutions since 1974  Products, Systems and Services Divisions  Hundreds of Projects around the World  HQ and Manufacturing in Vermont  Regional offices in NY, TX, CA, England, and Mexico 11/03/2006 Northern Power Systems, Inc © 2006 3 Project Overview  CEC - California Energy Commission  Funding agency  Palmdale Water District  Award recipient, host site  Northern Power  Technology provider  Black & Veatch  Owner's engineer

331

Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Electronics to Power Electronics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Power Electronics The power electronics activity focuses on research and development (R&D)

332

Power network analysis and optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marek-Sadowska, On-chip power supply network optimizationtechniques for full-chip power supply noise analysis IEEEFull-chip vectorless dynamic power integrity analysis and

Zhang, Wanping

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Principle Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Principle Power Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94120 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Principle Power is a global independent power producer committed to delivering green,...

334

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Records Scheduling Request Records Scheduling Request DOE F 243.2 (8-2013) Instructions: Complete one request per records schedule or series item. Appointed records contacts will submit completed form to the Departmental Records Officer via DOERM@hq.doe.gov for review, decision and coordination, as appropriate. 1. RLO/RMFO Name (Prepare) 2. PRO Name (Review/Clear) Date (IM-23 Use Only) 3. Program Subject Matter Expert Name(s) - position title(s) optional 4. DOE Element (e.g., OCIO (IM-1)) 5. Subordinate Organizational Unit (e.g., RMD (IM-23))- if applicable 6. Requested Action: (select one) Establish (new) Revise Cancel (discontinue active schedule) 7. Schedule Authority - If establishing, no information needed. If requesting revision to supersede a NARA- approved schedule, or requesting cancellation, cite the NARA schedule authority. (e.g.,GRS 1 item 4, N1-

335

ANL Study Shows Wind Power Decreases Power Sector Emissions ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ANL Study Shows Wind Power Decreases Power Sector Emissions ANL Study Shows Wind Power Decreases Power Sector Emissions May 1, 2012 - 3:38pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the...

336

Scotrenewables Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Scotrenewables Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd Place: Orkey, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Sector:...

337

EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

338

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fifth Northwest Power Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.........................................................................................................................................15 E. Wind power................................................................................................................................................24 M. Fish and Wildlife

339

Bioprinting cell-laden matrigel for radioprotection study of liver by pro-drug conversion in a dual-tissue microfluidic chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-tissue microfluidic chip This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text for radioprotection study of liver by pro-drug conversion in a dual-tissue microfluidic chip J E Snyder1, Q Hamid1, C of this paper is to introduce a novel cell printing and microfluidic system to serve as a portable ground model

Sun, Wei

340

Abstract 3792: Population Pharmacokinetic (PPK) modeling of ProLindac (AP5346), a nanopolymer prodrug of diaminocyclohexane (DACH)-platinum (Pt) in recurrent advanced ovarian cancer (AOC) patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ProLindac (AP5346), a nanopolymer prodrug of diaminocyclohexane (DACH)-platinum (Pt) in recurrent advanced ovarian cancer (AOC) patients Keyvan Rezai 1 Saik Urien 1 Sophie Weill 1 Mohamed Bekradda 2 Fabrice Bourdel 2 David P. Nowotnik 3 Esteban Cvitkovic...

Keyvan Rezai; Saik Urien; Sophie Weill; Mohamed Bekradda; Fabrice Bourdel; David P. Nowotnik; Esteban Cvitkovic; Francois Lokiec

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

PRO-DAIRY Alert and Action Statement Water use reporting required for New York State dairy farms that use large quantities of water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 PRO-DAIRY Alert and Action Statement Water use reporting required for New York State dairy farms to have plentiful water, the reporting of water usage provides NYSDEC information to manage the state that use large quantities of water. All dairy farms should be aware of this requirement, especially those

Walter, M.Todd

342

The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro-vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro- vides absolute calibration of spectral. It has been selected by the National Institute of Standards and Technology to replace the 1000 watt, DXW-pin 1000 watt lamp that is adapted by Gamma Scientific into a bi-post configuration. It is used

343

he defining element of modern wind farms is the pro-peller-like structure known as a horizontal-axis wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T he defining element of modern wind farms is the pro- peller-like structure known as a horizontal-axis wind turbine.Amarvel of engineering, the HAWT typically comprises more than 8000 parts, and its blades it converts wind energy into electricity. In 1920 Albert Betz derived a theoretical limit on that efficiency

Dabiri, John O.

344

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject Board for Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Astronomy and Astrophysics& D version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Courses Instructor(s) e-mail Quantum Mechanics II

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

345

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject Board for Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Astronomy and Astrophysics& A. Ray akr Nuclear Physics& R a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Courses Instructor(s) e-mail Quantum Mechanics II@$* Deepak Dhar

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

346

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject Board for Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Topics in Theoretical Physics Kedar Damle a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Admission SBP-guidelines Events Courses Contact SBP-members SBP Home

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

347

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Share Facebook Tw itter Share StumbleUpon Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Share a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API MORE INFORMATION ARBORETUM PLANT SALE ARBORETUM PLANT SALE Where a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API well drilling boom 1 month, 1 week ago "Normal" irrigation can make

Pasternack, Gregory B.

348

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject Board for Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdfcrowd.comopen in browser PRO version Are you a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Subject the HTML to PDF API Astronomy and Astrophysics& D. Narasimha/D. Ojha dna/ojha Nuclear Physics& Indranil a developer? Try out the HTML to PDF API Courses Instructor(s) e-mail Quantum Mechanics II@$* Sunil Mukhi

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

349

ENGINEERING GRaduatE PRoGRams Biological SyStemS engineering Biomedical engineering chemical engineering civil and environmental engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties and devices, fluid mechanics and rheology, green engineering and design, interfaces, mathematical resources engineering (hydraulics and fluid mechanics, hydrology, and systems planning and designENGINEERING GRaduatE PRoGRams Biological SyStemS engineering § Biomedical engineering § chemical

California at Davis, University of

350

ENGINEERING GRaduatE PRoGRams Biological SyStemS engineering Biomedical engineering chemical engineering civil and environmental engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling, environmental engineering, fluid mechanics and rheology, materials processing, nanotechnology resources engineering (hydraulics and fluid mechanics, hydrology, and systems planning and designENGINEERING GRaduatE PRoGRams Biological SyStemS engineering § Biomedical engineering § chemical

California at Davis, University of

351

An Optimally Fair Coin Toss We address one of the foundational problems in cryptography: the bias of coin-flipping pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the foundational problems in cryptography: the bias of coin-flipping pro- tocols. Coin-flipping protocols allow if the malicious party does not abort prematurely (note that the malicious party can decide to abort after learning applications, in many cases fairness is required to hold even if one of the parties aborts prematurely

352

Biomass: Potato Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTATO POWER POTATO POWER Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemical/carbon cycles, plants, energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: Grades 2 to 3 Small groups (3 to 4) Time: 30 to 40 minutes Summary: Students assemble a potato battery that will power a digital clock. This shows the connection between renewable energy from biomass and its application. Provided by the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and BP America Inc. BIOPOWER - POTATO POWER Purpose: Can a potato power a clock? Materials:  A potato  A paper plate  Two pennies  Two galvanized nails  Three 8 inch insulated copper wire, with 2 inches of the insulation removed from the ends  A digital clock (with places for wire attachment)

353

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. DOE Peer Review November 2-3, 2006 Marcelo Schupbach, Ph.D. Senior Engineer APEI, Inc. 535 Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone: (479)-443-5759 Email: marcelo@apei.net Website: www.apei.net High Temperature and High Power Density SiC Power Electronic Converters Energy Storage Systems Program 2 Overview * APEI, Inc. Corporate Status * Broader Impact of SiC-based Power Converter * DOE Energy Storage System Program Phase I SBIR - SBIR Topic: Wide Band Gap Power Converter Application - APEI's Goals - Phase I Accomplishments * DOE Energy Storage System Program Phase II SBIR - APEI's Goals - Research Team and Partners - Project Status Energy Storage Systems Program 3 APEI, Inc. Mission Statement We are a small business dedicated to

354

DSW Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates DSW Power Projects Boulder Canyon: Straddling the Colorado River near the Arizona-Nevada border, Hoover Dam in Boulder Canyon creates Lake Mead. River waters turning turbines at Hoover Powerplant produce about 2,074 MW--enough electricity for nearly 8 million people. Western markets this power to public utilities in Arizona, California and Nevada over 53.30 circuit-miles of transmission line. Central Arizona: Authorized in 1968, the Central Arizona Project in Arizona and western New Mexico was built to improve water resources in the Colorado River Basin. Segments of the authorization allowed for Federal participation in the Navajo Generating Station. The Federal share of the powerplant's combined capacity is 547 MW.

355

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 North American Power Group, Ltd. 11 North American Power Group, Ltd. November 17, 2011 North American Power Group, Ltd. Two Elk Energy Park Carbon Site Characterization Study Preliminary Geologic Model-Update DOE NETL Annual Meeting November, 15-17, 2011 North American Power Group Copyright 2011 NAPG Two Elk Project Location 2 North American Power Group Copyright 2011 NAPG Work Flow and Project Integration 3 North American Power Group Copyright 2011 NAPG Modeling Approach  Model basin architecture is basically constructed from data within a 25 x 25 mile square area  Geologists reviewed data and correlated tops and surfaces  Porosity, permeability, petrophysics and other information correlated from that data to create a baseline model  Additional data has yet to be added from seismic information and from on-site penetrations

356

Peak power ratio generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

Moyer, Robert D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Entangling Power of Permutations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The notion of entangling power of unitary matrices was introduced by Zanardi, Zalka and Faoro [PRA, 62, 030301]. We study the entangling power of permutations, given in terms of a combinatorial formula. We show that the permutation matrices with zero entangling power are, up to local unitaries, the identity and the swap. We construct the permutations with the minimum nonzero entangling power for every dimension. With the use of orthogonal latin squares, we construct the permutations with the maximum entangling power for every dimension. Moreover, we show that the value obtained is maximum over all unitaries of the same dimension, with possible exception for 36. Our result enables us to construct generic examples of 4-qudits maximally entangled states for all dimensions except for 2 and 6. We numerically classify, according to their entangling power, the permutation matrices of dimension 4 and 9, and we give some estimates for higher dimensions.

Lieven Clarisse; Sibasish Ghosh; Simone Severini; Anthony Sudbery

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

Alternative Energy Technologies Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Alternative Energy Technologies Solar Power Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Power;Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Reflector material is Aluminum or Silver Tube material ..... Several possible, Philippines Vanadium ........ Swaziland, Central Africa Zinc ................ Peru, Canada, Mexico Silver

Scott, Christopher

359

Southeastern Power Administration | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration View All Maps Addthis...

360

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Funding Source SaskPower State Saskatchewan Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Provider SaskPower The Small Power Producers Program accommodates customers who wish to generate up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity for the purpose of offsetting power that would otherwise be purchased from SaskPower or for selling all of the power generated to SaskPower. At the beginning of the application process, you need to choose between one of two options: Sell all of the power you produce to SaskPower, or sell the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Place India Sector Wind energy Product India-based wind power project developer. References Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV is a company located in India . References ↑ "Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Karnataka_Power_Corporation_Limited_and_National_Thermal_Power_Corporation_JV&oldid=3479

362

Trumping and Power Majorization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majorization is a basic concept in matrix theory that has found applications in numerous settings over the past century. Power majorization is a more specialized notion that has been studied in the theory of inequalities. On the other hand, the trumping relation has recently been considered in quantum information, specifically in entanglement theory. We explore the connections between trumping and power majorization. We prove an analogue of Rado's theorem for power majorization and consider a number of examples.

David W. Kribs; Rajesh Pereira; Sarah Plosker

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

363

Nuclear power browning out  

SciTech Connect

When the sad history of nuclear power is written, April 26, 1986, will be recorded as the day the dream died. The explosion at the Chernobyl plant was a terrible human tragedy- and it delivered a stark verdict on the hope that nuclear power will one day replace fossil fuel-based energy systems. Nuclear advocates may soldier on, but a decade after Chernobyl it is clear that nuclear power is no longer a viable energy option for the twenty-first century.

Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Power Metering Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many devices around campus that use electricity, but it helps to have an understanding of how much power each type of device uses. With this information, you are better able to focus efforts on reducing power consumption. With basic power data collection and analysis, we can begin to answer questions like: how much money does it cost the school to leave all the computers on at night?

365

Interleaved power converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power converter architecture interleaves full bridge converters to alleviate thermal management problems in high current applications, and may, for example, double the output power capability while reducing parts count and costs. For example, one phase of a three phase inverter is shared between two transformers, which provide power to a rectifier such as a current doubler rectifier to provide two full bridge DC/DC converters with three rather than four high voltage inverter legs.

Zhu, Lizhi (Canton, MI)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

366

Does it matter which Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) tool you choose? a comparative assessment of SimaPro and GaBi  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract SimaPro and GaBi are the leading software tools used for life cycle assessments. Assessing product systems applying the exact same unit process foundation would be expected to yield comparable result sets with either tool. The software performances are compared based on a random sample of 100 unit processes. The research question investigated here is; can there be a difference between SimaPro and GaBi influencing the results and the decisions based on them? In many cases the results are identical between SimaPro and GaBi or nearly so, but in other cases the results reveal differences. Some of these differences are so large that they could influence the conclusions. For some of the 100 unit processes, six elementary flows were inventoried differently in SimaPro and GaBi, with an extreme maximum comparative ratio of 109. The implementation of the impact assessment methodologies shows notable differences. For the same life cycle inventory the maximum result ratio for the characterized results is 0.0076 for Terrestrial Ecotoxicity Potential. The observed differences appear to originate primarily from errors in the software databases for both inventory and impact assessment. SimaPro and GaBi are used by many Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) practitioners worldwide as a decision-support tool; if the results of the present analysis are representative of the differences obtained when using either one or the other, then the implications of this paper are worrying. It is clearly in the interest of both software developers and LCA practitioners that the observed differences be addressed, for example through ring tests comparing the tools.

Ivan T. Herrmann; Andreas Moltesen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Power Supply Synchronization without Communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Micro-Grid based Electrical Power Systems ­ MGEPS [2]; and in Parallel Connected Uninterruptible Power

Moehlis, Jeff

368

EIA Electric Power Forms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Forms Electric Power Forms EIA Electric Power Forms Listing of Publicly Available and Confidential Data EIA's statistical surveys encompass each significant electric supply and demand activity in the United States. Most of the electric power survey forms resulting data elements are published, but respondent confidentiality is required. The chart below shows the data elements for each survey form and how each data element is treated in regard to confidentiality. Data Categories Data collection forms EIA- 411 EIA- 826 EIA- 860 EIA- 860M EIA- 861 EIA- 923 Frame Information Utility identification and iocation -- -- -- -- X -- Plant identification and iocation -- -- -- X -- X Generation and fuel Latitude and longitude -- -- X -- -- --

369

Magnets and Power Supplies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 1 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Bending radius 38.9611 m Power supply limit 500.0 A Field at 7 GeV 0.599 T Dipole trim coils Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 80 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Power supply limit 20.0 A Maximum field 0.04 T Horizontal Correction Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317 Magnetic length 0.160 m Core length 0.07 m Power supply limit 150.0 A Maximum field 0.16 T Max. deflection at 7 GeV 1.1 mrad Vertical Corrector Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317

370

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 ANNUAL REPORT 7 ANNUAL REPORT Southwestern Power Administration Letter to the Secretary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 About Southwestern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Accomplishments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Supplementary Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

371

Combined Heat and Power  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

energy costs and 31 emissions while also providing more resilient and reliable electric power and thermal energy 1 . CHP 32 systems combine the production of heat (for both...

372

SOLAR MARKET POWERS SILICON  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SOLAR MARKET POWERS SILICON ... Polysilicon shortages are boon to manufacturers, bane of solar energy industry ... Solar energy is a relatively new market for polysilicon manufacturers. ...

JEAN-FRA&CCEDIL;NOIS TREMBLAY

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation Rate Credit (CRC) - A current funding mechanism that provides a discounted power rate to participating utilities, conditioned on documented expenditures on qualifying...

374

Bonneville Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

o Includes option to elect into Shared Rate Plan, if room under limit Bonneville Power Administration 061708 Revision (Original version issued externally April 11, 2008)...

375

Clean Coal Power Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Clean coal technology" describes a new generation of energy processes that sharply reduce air emissions and other pollutants from coal-burning power plants.

376

Wind Power Forecasting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrospective Reports 2011 Smart Grid Wind Integration Wind Integration Initiatives Wind Power Forecasting Wind Projects Email List Self Supplied Balancing Reserves Dynamic...

377

Balancing of Wind Power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In the future, renewable energy share, especially wind power share, in electricity generation is expected to increase. Due to nature of the wind, wind (more)

lker, Muhammed Akif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Wind Power Forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has configured a Wind Power Forecasting System for Xcel Energy that integrates high resolution and ensemble...

Sue Ellen Haupt; William P. Mahoney; Keith Parks

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Characterization (SciChar) Workshop Characterization Capabilities Battery Questions Neutron Advantages * Scattering Power unrelated to Z - Many low Z elements have high cross...

380

Municipal Electric Power (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes energy procurement for local utilities operating in Minnesota and provides a means for Minnesota cities to construct and operate hydroelectric power plants. The statute gives...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open Access Tariff Standards of Conduct Transmission Planning Open Access Tariff Pursuant to an agreement between Southwestern and Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP), which became...

382

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equipment, and services to support its mission of marketing and delivering Federal hydroelectric power: 1569138161-kV field equipment such as circuit breakers, coupling...

383

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Southwestern's mission of marketing and delivering Federal hydroelectric power fully supports the U.S. Department of Energy's strategic goal of improving...

384

Power System Electrician Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest states (Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho). The...

385

Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

available today." -American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy What is Combined Heat & Power (CHP)? Federal Utility Partnership Working Group May 7 - 8, 2014 Virginia...

386

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards Lab-Level Objectives distinguish PNNL Chemical Imaging of Dynamic Systems Chemical Conversions for Sustainable Energy Efficient and Secure Power Grid Disruption of Illicit...

387

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 22, 2014 Lake Texoma Hydropower Generation to Remain Low for Near Future TULSA, OK - Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) announced today that in response to...

388

Power System Electrician Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest in Custer, Washington. Custer is a designated...

389

Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SOLAR POWER PROGRAM REVIEW 2013 Receiver Cavity * Receiver cavity can reduce heat loss from black surface or selective surface 18 With blackbody absorber: With 20%...

390

Northwest, the Bonneville Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by a similar event. Overgrown trees came in contact with high-voltage transmission lines, causing a protective shutdown that created cascading power outages across the...

391

Wide Bandgap Power Electronics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Acquiring new prototype devices. - Building new gate drivers and test set- ups for power switches with fast switching times * Total project funding - DOE 100% * FY08 - 432K *...

392

Power Purchase Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) is a financing structure that enables property owners or tenants, including state and local governments, to realize the benefits of renewable energy generation...

393

Power Purchase Agreement Webinars  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Provides a listing of past power purchase agreement webinars and associated files. Author: U. S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

394

Solar Power Purchase Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Provides an overview of solar power purchase agreements including how they work, benefits and challenges and eligibility. Author: United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

395

Contemporary Trends power point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power point slides guiding presentation on closing the gap between political acceptability and administrative sustainability as a prerequisite for effective governance. Leadership challenges are described

Nalbandian, John

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Alabama Power- UESC Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentationgiven at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingdiscusses Alabama Power and its utility energy service contract (UESC) projects and activities.

397

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Monitoring Market Monitoring Tools Bernie Lesieutre - LBNL Bob Thomas - Cornell October 18, 2006 Washington, D.C. OE Visualization and Controls Peer Review Market Monitoring Tools: Overview Approach: Use dispatch, profit, revenue/offer price, withholding sensitivities to identify opportunities for local advantage that give some participants market power potential. 2006 Technical Work: Extend prior results to large, RTO-scale systems. Initiate large-scale analysis with RTO (PJM). Evaluate reactive power effects on energy markets. Publication and presentation of results. Market Power: Substitutability Market power boils down to the issue of substitutability Locational Advantage: "Load Pockets" Physical network constraints limit supply to certain loads, so that the incremental demand

398

Power Supply Negotiations  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Southeastern Federal Power Alliance Incremental Decay in Energy March 11, 2014 2 Incremental Decay in Energy Hydropower customers observations from our review of the Buford...

399

Solar power satellites.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During energy crisis at the end of the Sixties, a new idea to exploit solar energy arose: Solar Power Satellites. These satellites need a huge (more)

Palmas, Alessandro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Green Power Network: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports News Archive Subscribe to Green Power News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is increasing the capacity of its renewable energy power purchase programs by 7 peercent over 2013, with a total capacity of 126 megawatts (MW) being offered. The increase in capacity is being spread across two of TVA's three power purchase programs - Green Power Providers, Solar Solutions Initiative, and the Renewable Standard Offer. The Green Power Providers program has 10 MW of available capacity for the development of small-scale solar, wind, biomass and hydro generation systems that are 50 kilowatts (kW) or less. Within the Green Power Providers program TVA has doubled the residential capacity from 2 MW to 4 MW and will be paying all power providers a total of 14¢ per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The Solar Solutions Initiative program, which focuses on installations between 50 kW and 1 MW, has been expanded from 10 MW of capacity to 16 MW and now pays a premium of 6¢/kWh. TVA's third power purchase program, the Renewable Standard Offer continues to have 100 MW of available capacity for projects between 1 MW and 20 MW. Prior to these program expansions TVA's renewables portfolio consisted of 128 MW of operating or committed solar, 1,500 MW of wind, and 60 MW of biomass.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nuclear Power for Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ITALY HAS DECIDED to use British know-how to build its first big nuclear power plant. A.G.I.P. Nucleare, a subsidiary of the Italian government-owned petroleum organization, E.N.I., and Britain's Nuclear Power Plant Co. will sign final agreement next ...

1957-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

402

Nuclear power engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... been easy to write 950 pages of unrelenting tedium. But both volumes of Pedersen's Nuclear Power read like computer printouts, an avalanche of factual information recited in a dogged monotone, ... even the most ingenious intricacy is embalmed lifeless on the page. Indeed both volumes of Nuclear Power read disconcertingly like each other. The first is called ...

Walt Patterson

1979-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

Catechism for nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... doses of radiation exposure are potentially harmful to people, and should be avoided. -"Nuclear power stations, and the nuclear industry in general, are sources of artificial radiation to which ... general, are sources of artificial radiation to which people may be exposed." Therefore nuclear power stations should not be built."Hither explain in no more than 250 words which ...

1986-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Bonneville Power Administrator Compares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administrator Compares Missouri Basin Reservoirs with Pacific Northwest's by Pat-16 was the dinner speech of a former Nebraskan from Schuyler, James Jura. Now administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Ore., Jura has been with Bonneville for the past 10 ears. He spoke to the group

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

405

NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners

406

Atomic Power in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NUCLEAR ENERGY will provide most of the power requirements in Japan by the end of this century. So predicts Charles H. Weaver, vice president in charge of atomic power activities for Westinghouse Electric.Addressing the Conference on Peaceful Uses of ...

1957-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

SPOTLIGHT ON NUCLEAR POWER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SPOTLIGHT ON NUCLEAR POWER ... TOUGHER RULES are needed to improve the safety of U.S. nuclear power facilities and to better protect the public from the type of disaster that occurred this spring at Japans Fukushima Daiichi nuclear energy plant, says a preliminary report released by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on July 12. ...

GLENN HESS

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

World Power Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A TWO-DAY meeting of the International Executive Council of the World Power Conference has been held at Stockholm. Nineteen countries were represented : Australia, Austria, Belgium, ... of the International Executive Council and of the British National Committee of the World Power Conference, who presided ; Mr. Harold Hobson, vice-chairman of the British National Committee ...

1948-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

World Power Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE theme of the Canadian Sectional Meeting of the World Power Conference, to be held in Montreal during September 7-11, 1958, will be "Economic ... other application forms, can be obtained from the Secretary, British National Committee, World Power Conference, 201 Grand Buildings, Trafalgar Square, London, W.C.2. At the meeting ...

1958-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Opposite power series  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to analyze the singularities of a power series function P(t) on the boundary of its convergent disc, we introduced the space @W(P) of opposite power series in the opposite variable s=1/t, where P(t) was, mainly, the growth function (Poincare ...

Kyoji Saito

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Underground Power Cables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1973 research-article Underground Power Cables J. D. Endacott Up to the present, effectively...particular, in recent years, the oil-filled cable system using cellulose paper impregnated...design of supertension underground power cable systems are considered. The limitations...

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

BPA Power Generation (pbl/main)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Power Generation Hydro Power Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Hydro Projects FCRPS...

413

Power, Media & Montesquieu. New forms of public power and the balance of power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY Power, Media & Montesquieu. New forms of public power and the balance of power are organized it is crucial to restrain the power that the state exerts on its citizens. The state has three functions, commonly known as powers: the legislative, executive and judicial powers. This three

van den Brink, Jeroen

414

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey-level Detail Data Files Survey-level Detail Data Files Electric power data are collected on survey instruments. Data collection is mandated by Congress to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding. The most widely used data are disseminated in reports, such as the Electric Power Monthly and the Electric Power Annual. Publicly available electric power data is available down to the plant level in the Electricity Data Browser and in detailed spreadsheets by survey below. Description Data availability State-level data (consolidated across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, revenue, number of customers, and retail prices; generating capacity; and financial data. 1990-2012 (monthly and annual) Electric power sales and revenue data - monthly (Form EIA-826)

415

Green Power Network: Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports Publications Alphabetical Listing Categorical Listing Chronological Listing Featured Reports The Green Power Network library contains articles and reports on green power, green pricing, and related topics. Whenever possible, we provide a link to publications available online. The publications are grouped by the following topics to help you in your search. If you are aware of other documents that should be added to this list, please notify our Webmaster.

416

Introduction to MEAG Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Introduction to MEAG Power Introduction to MEAG Power Southeastern Federal Power Alliance Meeting October 9, 2013 Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia ■ Joint Action Agency ─ Formed in 1975 ─ Owns and operates electric generation and transmission facilities ─ Provides bulk electric power to 48 cities and 1 county in the State of Georgia ■ All 49 Participants have reaffirmed 50-year power sales extensions ■ Take-or-pay contracts with participants are court validated contracts with a General Obligation pledge from each city ■ Generation ownership interest in 10 generating units and a transmission system ─ 2,069 MW generating capacity online ─ 500 MW Plant Vogtle Units 3 & 4 under development ■ Schedules the output from the SEPA contracts for the 49 members

417

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loveland Area Projects November 29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development of the 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Comment Period & Proposal Information * Questions 3 Overview of Western Area Power Administration (Western) * One of four power marketing administrations within the Department of Energy * Mission: Market and deliver reliable, renewable, cost-based Federal hydroelectric power and related services within a 15-state region of the central and western U.S. * Vision: Provide premier power marketing and transmission services Rocky Mountain Region (RMR) is one of five regional offices 4 Rocky Mountain Region

418

Wind Powering America  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

These news items are notable additions These news items are notable additions to the Wind Powering America Web site. The Wind Powering America Web site reports recent national and state wind market changes by cataloging wind activities such as wind resource maps, small wind consumer's guides, local wind workshops, news articles, and publications in the areas of policy, public power, small wind, Native Americans, agricultural sector, economic development, public lands, and schools. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/ Nominate an Electric Cooperative for Wind Power Leadership Award by January 15 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4076 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4076 Mon, 16

419

Fuel Cell Portable Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Power Department of Energy Workshop January 17, 2002 2 Portable Markets - Table of Contents 1. Opportunity Summary for Portable Markets 2. Commercialization Path and Resource Map 3. Value Chain Issues 4. Ballard "State of the Art" 5. Fuel Options and Issues 6. Where can the D.O.E. Help 3 Opportunity Summary - Portable Markets Infrequent Frequent Typical Applications Backup - Batteries & Gensets Peaking power and seasonal use; mobile power Preferred Fuels Hydrocarbon & Hydrogen Hydrocarbon (H2?) Total Available Market Large - But Fractured into many apps Moderate Price Target Low (Pockets willing to pay high $ for certain attributes) Moderate (Lifecycle) Environmental Impact Low Moderate Timing Short term Mid term 4 Technical Challenge Low High Micro Markets H2 Backup Power HC Frequent

420

Power module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

Campbell, Jeremy B. (Torrance, CA); Newson, Steve (Redondo Beach, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels as a Potential Biomarker for Cardiac Damage After Radiotherapy in Patients With Left-Sided Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiac biomarkers may aid in identifying patients with radiation-mediated cardiac dysfunction. We evaluated the correlation between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin (TnI) and the dose of radiation to the heart in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: NT-proBNP and TnI plasma concentrations were measured in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 55.0 years) 5 to 22 months after RT (Group I) and in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 57.0 years) before RT as control group (Group II). Dosimetric and geometric parameters of heart and left ventricle were determined in all patients of Group I. Seventeen patients underwent complete two-dimensional echocardiography. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (p = 0.03) in Group I (median, 90.0 pg/ml; range, 16.7-333.1 pg/ml) than in Group II (median, 63.2 pg/ml; range, 11.0-172.5 pg/ml). TnI levels remained below the cutoff threshold of 0.07 ng/ml in both groups. In patients with NT-proBNP values above the upper limit of 125 pg/ml, there were significant correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 3Gy}(%) (p = 0.001), the ratios D{sub 15cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.01), the ratios D{sub 15cm}{sup 3}/D{sub 50%} (Gy) (p = 0.008) for the heart and correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 2Gy} (%) (p = 0.002), the ratios D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.03), and the ratios D{sub 0.5cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub 50%}(Gy) (p = 0.05) for the ventricle. Conclusions: Patients with left-sided breast cancer show higher values of NT-pro BNP after RT when compared with non-RT-treated matched patients, increasing in correlation with high doses in small volumes of heart and ventricle. The findings of this study show that the most important parameters are not the mean doses but instead the small percentage of organ volumes (heart or ventricle) receiving high dose levels, supporting the notion that the heart behaves as a serial organ.

D'Errico, Maria P., E-mail: patderrico@libero.it [Department of Laboratory Medicine, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Grimaldi, Luca [Department of Medical Physics, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Petruzzelli, Maria F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Gianicolo, Emilio A.L. [Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy); Tramacere, Francesco [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Monetti, Antonio; Placella, Roberto [Department of Laboratory Medicine, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Pili, Giorgio [Department of Medical Physics, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio [Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy); Portaluri, Maurizio [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Periodical: Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Abstract Two binary geothermal power plants inaugurated today with a total capacity of 65 MW: They will generate enough energy to meet the needs of some 40 thousand American households. Author Hank Sennott Published Press Release, 04/15/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Citation Hank Sennott. 04/15/2009. Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada. Press Release. 1-2. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Enel_Green_Power-_Innovative_Geothermal_Power_for_Nevada&oldid=680547"

423

Power Consumption Prediction and Power-Aware Packing in Consolidated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Consumption Prediction and Power-Aware Packing in Consolidated Environments Jeonghwan Choi the power consumption of groups of colocated applications. Such characterization is crucial for effective prediction and enforcement of appropriate limits on power consumption--power budgets--within the data center

Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

424

Reducing Power Load Fluctuations on Ships Using Power Redistribution Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is supplied from generators driven by diesel en- gines, gas engines, and/or gas/steam turbines. In a powerReducing Power Load Fluctuations on Ships Using Power Redistribution Control Damir Radan,1 Asgeir J generated by consumers operating in marine power systems is proposed. The controller redistributes the power

Johansen, Tor Arne

425

Wind power generating system  

SciTech Connect

Normally feathered propeller blades of a wind power generating system unfeather in response to the actuation of a power cylinder that responds to actuating signals. Once operational, the propellers generate power over a large range of wind velocities. A maximum power generation design point signals a feather response of the propellers so that once the design point is reached no increase in power results, but the system still generates power. At wind speeds below this maximum point, propeller speed and power output optimize to preset values. The propellers drive a positive displacement pump that in turn drives a positive displacement motor of the swash plate type. The displacement of the motor varies depending on the load on the system, with increasing displacement resulting in increasing propeller speeds, and the converse. In the event of dangerous but not clandestine problems developing in the system, a control circuit dumps hydraulic pressure from the unfeathering cylinder resulting in a predetermined, lower operating pressure produced by the pump. In the event that a problem of potentially cladestine consequence arises, the propeller unfeathering cylinder immediately unloads. Upon startup, a bypass around the motor is blocked, applying a pressure across the motor. The motor drives the generator until the generator reaches a predetermined speed whereupon the generator is placed in circuit with a utility grid and permitted to motor up to synchronous speed.

Schachle, Ch.; Schachle, E. C.; Schachle, J. R.; Schachle, P. J.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

426

Power Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CRSP Management Center CRSP Management Center Western Area Power Administration January 2011 Power Economic Analysis of Operational Restrictions at Glen Canyon Dam In February, 1997, the operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam were changed. Operation was restricted to a Modified Low Fluctuating Flow as described in the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona, Final Environmental Impact Statement, March, 1995. These restrictions reduced the operating flexibility of the hydroelectric power plant and therefore the economic value of the electricity it produced. The Environmental Impact Statement provided impact information to support the Record of Decision governing dam operations. The impact

427

POWER CENTRALIZED SEMIGROUPS PRIMOZ MORAVEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POWER CENTRALIZED SEMIGROUPS PRIMOZ MORAVEC Abstract. A semigroup is said to be power centralized if for every pair of elements x and y there exists a power of x commuting with y. The structure of power centralized groups and semigroups is investigated. In particular, we characterize 0-simple power centralized

428

Power System Operation with Large Penetrations of Wind Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The characteristics of wind power result in unique challenges for system operators when integrating large penetrations of wind generation into power systems. This chapter discusses some of the power system ope...

Eleanor Denny

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Membrane for CO 2 Capture and Power Generation DE-FE0007634 Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh FuelCell Energy, Inc. 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting July 10, 2013 Pittsburgh, PA FuelCell Energy, Inc. 1.4 MW plant at a municipal building 2.4 MW plant owned by an Independent power producer 600 kW plant at a food processor 11.2 MW plant - largest fuel cell park in the world Delivering ultra-clean baseload distributed generation globally Premier developer of stationary fuel cell products, with >40 years of experience Headquarters in Danbury, CT (USA), international presence in USA, Canada, Germany (Fraunhofer, IKTS) and South Korea (Posco) Delivering Direct FuelCell ® (DFC ® ) power plants for On-Site Power and Utility Grid

430

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPA and Federal Hydropower APPA and Federal Hydropower Will Coffman Senior Government Relations Representative American Public Power Association Atlanta, Georgia Oct. 20, 2013 Overview * APPA, the American Public Power Association (APPA): trade association for the more than 2,000 community-owned, not-for- profit electric utilities providing service to 47 mil Americans in 49 states. Many of our members purchase power from Corps projects - Approx. 1,200 public power systems and rural electric cooperatives in 33 states. * We, along with NRECA, advocate for federal hydro customers in Congress and with the Administration Areas of Advocacy 1. Congress - Provide background on PMA customer issues to Committees of jurisdiction * Senate: Energy and Natural Resources * House: Natural Resources

431

SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

01 01 SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DETERMINATION BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION: Hydroelectric Power Rate Increase for the Integrated System of Hydropower Projects. PROPOSED BY: Southwestern Power Administration. NUMBER AND TITLE OF THE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION BEING APPLIED: ( 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D, 1-1-03 Edition, Part B4.3 - Electric power marketing rate changes. REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS IN 10 CFR 1021.410(B): (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix, A or B to Subpart D. (2) There are no extraordinary circumstances related to the proposal that may affect the Significance of the environmental effects of the proposal; and (3) The proposal is not "connected" to other actions with potentially significant impacts, is not related to

432

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Association Association S.2900 Reducing the Electric Power Carbon Footprint October 20, 2010 Richard S. Tuthill, Chair Board of Directors Gas Turbine Association 2 * Alstom Power * Florida Turbine Technologies * General Electric * Rolls Royce * Siemens Energy * Solar Turbines * Strategic Power Systems * United Technologies * Vibro Meter Gas Turbine Association 3 S.2900 * Introduced By Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) * Prime Objective is to Fund Ground Power Gas Turbine Technologies - Raise Natural Gas Fired Gas Turbine Efficiencies ○ Phase One - Combined Cycle > 62%, Simple Cycle > 47% ○ Phase Two - Combined Cycle > 65%, Simple Cycle > 50% - Authorizes $340M Over Four Years ($85M per Year) - Combined Cycle, Simple Cycle, CHP, All Engine Sizes * Similar Bill Has Passed the US House (Under Suspension of Rules)

433

Wireless Power Transmission  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

88 88 Lunar Wireless Power Transfer Feasibility Study March 2008 Prof. Zoya Popovic, University of Colorado, Boulder David R. Beckett, Scott R. Anderson, Diana Mann, Stuart Walker, Independent Consultants Sheldon Fried, Ph.D., National Security Technologies, LLC Abstract - This study examines the feasibility of a multi-kilowatt wireless radio frequency (RF) power system to transfer power between lunar base facilities. Initial analyses, show that wireless power transfer (WPT) systems can be more efficient and less expensive than traditional wired approaches for certain lunar and terrestrial applications. The study includes evaluations of the fundamental limitations of lunar WPT systems, the interrelationships of possible operational parameters, and a baseline design approach for a notionial system that could be used in the near

434

SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9/01 9/01 SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DETERMINATION BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION: Hydroelectric Power Rate Increase for the Integrated System of Hydropower Projects. PROPOSED BY: Southwestern Power Administration. NUMBER AND TITLE OF THE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION BEING APPLIED: ( 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D, 1-1-03 Edition, Part B4.3 - Electric power marketing rate changes. REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS IN 10 CFR 1021.410(B): (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix, A or B to Subpart D. (2) There are no extraordinary circumstances related to the proposal that may affect the Significance of the environmental effects of the proposal; and (3) The proposal is not "connected" to other actions with potentially significant impacts, is not related to

435

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip Navigation Links Skip Navigation Links Annual Performance Plan Annual Report Mission Organization Strategic Plan SWPA - Overview Video System Map About the Agency Southwestern Power Administration was established in 1943 by the Secretary of the Interior as a Federal Agency that today operates within the Department of Energy under the authority of Section 5 of the Flood Control Act of 1944. As one of four Power Marketing Administrations in the United States, Southwestern markets hydroelectric power in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas from 24 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers multipurpose dams. By law, Southwestern's power is marketed and delivered primarily to public bodies such as rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities. Southwestern has over one hundred such "preference" customers, and these

436

PowerPoint Presentation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

David Sun, PhD David Sun, PhD david.sun@power.alstom.com Power Automation & Controls, Alstom Power Session: Intelligent Electric Systems Smart Power Future of Energy Sustainability © ALSTOM 2011. All rights reserved. Information contained in this document is provided without liability for information purposes only and is subject to change without notice. No representation or warranty is given or to be implied as to the completeness of information or fitness for any particular purpose. Reproduction, use or disclosure to third parties, without express written authority, is strictly prohibited. EIA Conference April 26, 2011 - EIA Conference 26 A Drivers for New Energy Eco-system Emission Management Distributed Empowerment Energy Efficiency Generation 40%

437

Power Purchase Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Purchase Agreements Power Purchase Agreements Chandra Shah, NREL 303-384-7557 chandra.shah@nrel.gov February 2011 revised 2 | Federal Energy Management Program eere.energy.gov Overview * Customer-sited power purchase agreement (PPA) definition * Project process * Project examples * Utility Renewable Energy Services Contract (URESC) * Enhanced use lease (EUL) * PPA support, resources and key points 3 | Federal Energy Management Program eere.energy.gov * Private entity purchases, installs, owns, operates and maintains customer-sited renewable equipment * Site purchases electricity through power purchase agreement (PPA) * Pros - Renewable developer (or partner) eligible for tax incentives, accelerated depreciation - No agency up-front capital required - Renewable developer provides O&M - Minimal risk to government

438

Power Supply Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Crystal Displays require dedicated power supply circuits to support their specific requirements. Many different display technologies coexist in the market and compete for their market share. While the p...

Oliver Nachbaur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

British Nuclear Power Policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the late seventies nuclear power had become both a major and a highly controversial element in British energy policy. The process by which this situation had ... throws on the making and implementing of public...

Roger Williams

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Introducing nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... about the second part of the book, most of which deals with the hazards of nuclear power. It seems to me that, in his anxiety to make a case which is ... not a metallic fuel.

Lord Hinton

1976-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Bonneville Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENT OFFS Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 ' 91 FS F P Portland, Oregon 97208-3621 PUBLIC AFFAIRS April 20, 2011 In reply refer to: DK-7...

442

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Steps 5:00 Adjourn About the Post-2011 Review Process BPA invited its public power customers and regional stakeholders to participate in the Energy Efficiency Post-2011...

443

Bonneville Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- NT oc Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration * r ' P.Q. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208-3621 PUBLIC AFFAIRS September 30. 201 1 In reply refer to: DK-7 Richard...

444

Bonneville Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is your final response to your request for information that you made to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552. You...

445

Bonneville Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

http:www.bpa.gov PR 02 14 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 CONTACT: Kevin Wingert, 503-230-4140971-207-8390 or 503-230-5131 BPA...

446

Bonneville Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is a final response to your request for information that you made to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 USC 552. You...

447

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 Nosh Makujina Boise 208.631.5961 nosh.makujina@energysmartindustrial.com Clearwater Power Co. 12109 Richard Jarvis Kalispell 406.257.3013 rich.jarvis@energysmartindustrial.co...

448

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us U.S. Department of Energy Southwestern Power Administration Gore Maintenance Office Mailing Address: P.O. Box 728 Gore, OK 74435-0728 Delivery Address: 14165 East 143rd...

449

Industrial power by research?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The largest nation on the Earth is at last on the road to becoming an industrial power matching in prosperity and creativity the most successful nations elsewhere in the world. ... ask whether China has always been so certain of itself.

1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

450

Power System Dispatcher  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As a Power System Dispatcher, you will be working in the Operations Center in Springfield, Missouri as part of the Division of Scheduling & Operations, Office of Corporate Operations. You will...

451

Concentrated Thermoelectric Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and night using no moving parts at both the utility and distributed scale. Concentrating Solar Power MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM: SunShot CSP R&D 2012 TOPIC:...

452

Power System Operator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

At Southeastern, you can make a direct impact by helping us deliver low-cost hydroelectric power to over one hundred electric cooperatives and municipal utilities, and over eight million end-use...

453

Wind Power Today  

SciTech Connect

Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

Not Available

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Wind Power Today  

SciTech Connect

Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

Not Available

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Structural power flow measurement  

SciTech Connect

Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

PowerPoint Presentation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Director of Solar Materials R&D at SunEdison Brad Mattson, CEO at Siva Power Mark A. Johnson, Director at EERE Advanced Manufacturing Office SUNSHOT GRAND CHALLENGE A LOOK AHEAD:...

457

Global Wind Power Installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several countries now have operational offshore wind power plants in Europe. These include Denmark, Sweden, the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland, and Finland (see Table 8). Although significant development o...

Dr. Thomas Ackermann; Dr. Rena Kuwahata

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Global Wind Power Installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several countries now have operational offshore wind power plants in Europe. These include Denmark, Sweden, the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland, and Finland (see Table 8). Although significant development o...

Dr. Thomas Ackermann; Dr. Rena Kuwahata

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Measuring Standby Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 62301 test procedure describes a method for testing standby power use in appliances. The summary below introduces the general approach. However, consult the official document before undertaking the test.

460

Mesofluidic magnetohydrodynamic power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much of the previous research into magnetohydrodynamics has involved large-scale systems. This thesis explores the miniaturization and use of devices to convert the power dissipated within an expanding gas flow into ...

Fucetola, Jay J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility power pro" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The Power of People  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Power of People ... Once, about 20 years ago, I was swimming in the ocean along North Carolina's Outer Banks when an innocent-looking wave wiped me out. ...

MADELEINE JACOBS

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

462

Power System Electrician Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest in The Dalles. Oregon. The Dalles is the county...

463

Power System Electrician Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest in Lewiston, Idaho. Lewiston is a city in north...

464

Power System Electrician Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest near Vancouver, Washington. Vancouver is a city on...

465

Power System Electrician Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest near Kent, Washington, a city located in King...

466

Washington's power supply collapse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ON 25 July 1983 the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) defaulted on 2,250 million of municipal revenue bonds. This, ... has been polemical and accusatory in nature, blaming the Washington State Supreme Court, the Bonneville ...

Roger H. Bezdek

1985-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

467

More Power from Below  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MWe). Most new geothermal power plants brought...electric generation. Geothermal water at temperatures...used for bathing, heating, and greenhouses...Large-scale district heating projects have operated...are heated with geothermal water. Temperatures...

Joseph N. Moore; Stuart F. Simmons

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

468

Crowd-powered systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crowd-powered systems combine computation with human intelligence, drawn from large groups of people connecting and coordinating online. These hybrid systems enable applications and experiences that neither crowds nor ...

Bernstein, Michael Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACTS Control for Long- and Short- FACTS Control for Long- and Short- Term Energy Storage Mehdi Ferdowsi Missouri University of Science and Technology Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE/ESS) through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Issues * Short- and Long-Term Energy Storage * Storage Integration * Cyber Security 33 v v Transmission Line Generation FACTS Wind Power Energy Storage Solar Power Energy Storage FACTS Device Distributed Decisions Power Electronics Communications Sensing and monitoring Inputs Power Electronics

470

Geothermal Power [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...May 1974 research-article Geothermal Power [and...with the development of utilization...increase in geothermal production...electric energy generated...geothermoelectric energy costs ranged...The total geothermal capacity...remarkable development in this type...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nuclear Power: Canada Candu?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... with full details of one of the world's most successful nuclear power projects?the Candu system in use at the Pickering station at Toronto?in return for collaboration on heavy ... water reactors.

1972-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

472

Energy from nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power should play a pivotal and expanded role in supplying world energy, the authors says. Risks must be minimized by designing a new generation of safe reactors. Atomic energy's vast potential can be harnessed only if issues of safety, waste and nuclear-weapon proliferation are addressed by a globally administered institution. The current situation in nuclear power is described before addressing its future.

Haefele, W.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Reactive Power Compensator.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

474

Reactive power compensator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

NSTX Electrical Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been designed and installed in the existing facilities at Princeton Plasma Physic Laboratory (PPPL). Most of the hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, and power systems originally used for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used with suitable modifications to reflect NSTX needs. The design of the NSTX electrical power system was tailored to suit the available infrastructure and electrical equipment on site. Components were analyzed to verify their suitability for use in NSTX. The total number of circuits and the location of the NSTX device drove the major changes in the Power system hardware. The NSTX has eleven (11) circuits to be fed as compared to the basic three power loops for TFTR. This required changes in cabling to insure that each cable tray system has the positive and negative leg of cables in the same tray. Also additional power cabling had to be installed to the new location. The hardware had to b e modified to address the need for eleven power loops. Power converters had to be reconnected and controlled in anti-parallel mode for the Ohmic heating and two of the Poloidal Field circuits. The circuit for the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) System had to be carefully developed to meet this special application. Additional Protection devices were designed and installed for the magnet coils and the CHI. The thrust was to making the changes in the most cost-effective manner without compromising technical requirements. This paper describes the changes and addition to the Electrical Power System components for the NSTX magnet systems.

A. Ilic; E. Baker; R. Hatcher; S. Ramakrishnan; et al

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

476

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 5.17 Strategic Petroleum Reserve, 1977-2011 (Million Barrels, Except as Noted) Year Foreign Crude Oil Receipts Domestic Crude Oil Receipts Withdrawals End-of-Year Stocks Days of Petroleum Net Imports 4 Imported by SPR Imported by Others 1,2 Purchases Exchanges 2 Sales Exchanges Quantity Percent of Crude Oil 3 Stocks Percent of Total Petroleum Stocks 1977 7.54 0.00 5 0.37 0.00 0.00 0.00 7.46 2.1 0.6 1 1978 58.80 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 66.86 17.8 5.2 8 1979 24.43 .00 (s) .00 .00 .00 91.19 21.2 6.8 11 1980 16.07 .00 1.30 .00 .00 .00 107.80 23.1 7.7 17 1981 93.30 .00 28.79 .00 .00 .00 230.34 38.8 15.5 43 1982 60.19 .00 3.79 .00 .00 .00 293.83 45.7 20.5 68 1983 85.29 .00 .42 .00 .00 .00 379.09 52.4 26.1 88 1984 72.04 .00 .05 .00 .00 .00 450.51 56.6 28.9 96 1985 43.12 .00 .17 .00 .00 .00 493.32 60.6 32.5 115 1986 17.56 .00 1.21 .00 .00 .00 511.57 60.7

477

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs, 1989-2010 Year Actual Peakload Reductions 1 Energy Savings Electric Utility Costs 4 Energy Efficiency 2 Load Management 3 Total Megawatts Million Kilowatthours Thousand Dollars 5 1989 NA NA 12,463 14,672 872,935 1990 NA NA 13,704 20,458 1,177,457 1991 NA NA 15,619 24,848 1,803,773 1992 7,890 9,314 17,204 35,563 2,348,094 1993 10,368 12,701 23,069 45,294 2,743,533 1994 11,662 13,340 25,001 52,483 2,715,657 1995 13,212 16,347 29,561 57,421 2,421,284 1996 14,243 15,650 29,893 61,842 1,902,197 1997 13,327 11,958 25,284 56,406 1,636,020 1998 13,591 13,640 27,231 49,167 1,420,920 1999 13,452 13,003 26,455 50,563 1,423,644 2000 12,873 10,027 22,901 53,701 1,564,901 2001 13,027 11,928 24,955 53,936 1,630,286 2002 13,420 9,516 22,936 54,075 1,625,537 2003 13,581 9,323

478

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Note. Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Note. Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from the combustion of biomass to produce energy are excluded from the total energy-related CO 2 emissions reported in the Annual Energy Review Section 11, but appear separately in Tables 11.1-11.2e. According to current international convention (see the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's "2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inven- tories"), carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combus- tion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time. (This is not to

479

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Total, 1949-2012 Petroleum Products Supplied as Share of Total Energy Consumption, 1949-2012 By Product, October 2013 50 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Quadrillion Btu 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Percent d 0.074 0.002 0.708 0.244 0.001 0.258 0.022 1.462 0.061 0.033 0.302 Asphalt Aviation Distillate Jet Kerosene Liquefied Lubricants Motor Petroleum Residual Other 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Quadrillion Btu a Includes renewable diesel fuel (including biodiesel) blended into distil- late fuel oil. b Includes kerosene-type jet fuel only. c Includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

480

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Coal Mining Productivity 7 Coal Mining Productivity Total, 1949-2011 By Mining Method, 2011 By Location, 2011 By Mining Method, 1 1949-2011 By Region and Mining Method, 2011 210 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Mississippi 1 For 1979 forward, includes all coal; prior to 1979, excludes anthracite. Note: Beginning in 2001, surface mining includes a small amount of refuse recovery. Source: Table 7.7. 2.68 15.98 East of the West of the 0 5 10 15 20 Short Tons per Employee Hour 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 2 4 6 8 Short Tons per Employee Hour Mississippi 2.76 8.86 Underground Surface 0 3 6 9 12 Short Tons per Employee Hour 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 3 6 9 12 Short Tons per Employee Hour 2.52 3.03 5.54 19.34 Underground Surface Underground Surface 0 6 12 18 24 Short Tons

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481

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted) Year Noncoincident Peak Load 1 by North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 2 Regional Assessment Area Capacity Margin 21 (percent) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT 4 Western Inter- connection All Inter- connections FRCC 5 NPCC 6 Balance of Eastern Region 3 ECAR 7,8 MAAC 8,9 MAIN 8,10 MAPP 11 MISO 12 MRO 13 PJM 14 RFC 8,15 SERC 16 SPP 17 Subtotal TRE 18 WECC 19 Total 20 1986 - - 39,026 69,606 37,564 35,943 - - - - 21,029 - - - - 105,570 47,123 316,835 39,335 81,787 476,983 NA 1987 - - 42,651 72,561 40,526 37,446 - - - - 23,162 - - - - 109,798 47,723 331,216 39,339 82,967

482

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy Note. Renewable Energy Production and Consump- tion. In Tables 1.1, 1.3, and 10.1, renewable energy consumption consists of: conventional hydroelectricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate-see Table A6); geothermal electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate-see Table A6), and geothermal heat pump and geothermal direct use energy; solar thermal and photovoltaic electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate -see Table A6), and solar thermal direct use energy; wind electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil- fuels heat rate-see Table A6); wood and wood-derived fuels consumption; biomass waste (municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge waste, agricul-

483

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 11.4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 3 Total Mobile Combustion 1 Stationary Combustion 2 Total Waste Combustion Human Sewage in Wastewater Total Nitrogen Fertilization of Soils Crop Residue Burning Solid Waste of Domesticated Animals Total 1980 60 44 104 1 10 11 364 1 75 440 88 642 1981 63 44 106 1 10 11 364 2 74 440 84 641 1982 67 42 108 1 10 11 339 2 74 414 80 614 1983 71 43 114 1 11 11 337 1 75 413 79 617 1984 86 45 132 1 11 11 355 2 74 431 87 661 1985 98 46 143 1 11 12 344 2 73 419 88 662 1986 107 45 152 1 11 12 329 2 71 402 86 652 1987 120 46 166 1 12 13 328 1 71 400 90 669 1988 138 48 185 1 12 13 329 1 71 401 95 694 1989 146 49 195 1 12 13 336 1 70 407 98 713 1990 88 47 135 1 12 13 432 1 66 499 96 743 1991 93 46 139 1 13 14 429 1 66 497 98 748 1992 96 47 143 1 13 14 445 2 66 512 95

484

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 3.3d Petroleum Trade: Imports From Non-OPEC Countries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Brazil Canada Colombia Mexico Nether- lands Norway Russia a United Kingdom U.S. Virgin Islands Other Total Non-OPEC 1960 Average ...................... 1 120 42 16 NA NA 0 (s) NA NA 581 1965 Average ...................... 0 323 51 48 1 0 0 (s) 0 606 1,029 1970 Average ...................... 2 766 46 42 39 0 3 11 189 1,027 2,126 1975 Average ...................... 5 846 9 71 19 17 14 14 406 1,052 2,454 1980 Average ...................... 3 455 4 533 2 144 1 176 388 903 2,609 1985 Average ...................... 61 770 23 816 58 32 8 310 247 913 3,237 1990 Average ...................... 49 934 182 755 55 102 45 189 282 1,128 3,721 1995 Average ...................... 8 1,332 219 1,068 15 273 25 383 278 1,233 4,833 2000 Average ......................

485

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 12. Environment Figure 12.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide) Total, 1973-2012 Total, a Monthly By Major Source, 1973-2012 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-August By Major Source, August 2013 158 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Natural Gas 196 162 102 Petroleum Coal Natural Gas 0 50 100 150 200 250 0 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 100 200 300 Coal b Petroleum b a a 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 200 400 600 800 2011 2012 2013 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 Petroleum Coal b Natural Gas 2011 2012 2013

486

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 3.7b Petroleum Consumption: Industrial Sector (Thousand Barrels per Day) Industrial Sector a Asphalt and Road Oil Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Lubricants Motor Gasoline b Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other c Total 1950 Average .................... 180 328 132 100 43 131 41 617 250 1,822 1955 Average .................... 254 466 116 212 47 173 67 686 366 2,387 1960 Average .................... 302 476 78 333 48 198 149 689 435 2,708 1965 Average .................... 368 541 80 470 62 179 202 689 657 3,247 1970 Average .................... 447 577 89 699 70 150 203 708 866 3,808 1975 Average .................... 419 630 58 844 68 116 246 658 1,001 4,038 1980 Average .................... 396 621 87 1,172

487

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8 1989 2,320 1,542 637 - 804 5,303 37 (s) 5 1 43 9 3 2 3 17 1990 2,418 2,294 706 - 959 6,377 39 (s) 4 1 45 10 6 1 4 21 1991 2,680 2,287 544 - 1,014 6,526 32 (s) 3 1 35 10 6 1 4 21 1992 2,552 2,787 474 - 1,258 7,070 32 (s) 3 1 35 10 7 1 4 21 1993 2,988 3,315 616 - 1,285 8,205 40 (s) 3 1 44 12 7 1 4 24 1994 2,932 3,722 654 - 1,292 8,601 39 (s) 3 (s) 42 11 8 1 4 24 1995 3,106 4,070 509 -

488

Word Pro - S5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

77 77 Table 5.1 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity Measurements (Number of Rigs) Rotary Rigs in Operation a Active Well Service Rig Count c By Site By Type Total b Onshore Offshore Crude Oil Natural Gas 1950 Average ........................ NA NA NA NA 2,154 NA 1955 Average ........................ NA NA NA NA 2,686 NA 1960 Average ........................ NA NA NA NA 1,748 NA 1965 Average ........................ NA NA NA NA 1,388 NA 1970 Average ........................ NA NA NA NA 1,028 NA 1975 Average ........................ 1,554 106 NA NA 1,660 2,486 1980 Average ........................ 2,678 231 NA NA 2,909 4,089 1985 Average ........................ 1,774 206 NA NA

489

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.15 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels, Selected Years, 1980-2011 Year Petroleum Products Natural Gas 4 Coal Total Percent of Total Energy Consumption Asphalt and Road Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1 Lubricants Petro- chemical Feedstocks 2 Petroleum Coke Special Naphthas Other 3 Total Physical Units 5 1980 145 230 58 253 R 14 37 58 R 795 639 2.4 - - - - 1985 156 R 278 53 144 R 16 30 41 R 719 500 1.1 - - - - 1990 176 R 373 60 199 20 20 39 R 887 R 567 .6 - - - - 1991 162 R 426 53 203 17 17 44 R 922 573 .6 - - - - 1992 166 R 448 54 214 R 28 20 35 R 966 R 606 1.2 - - - - 1993 174 R 436 55 216 R 18 20 35 R 955 R 640 .9 - - - - 1994 176 R 483 58 224 R 21 15 35 R 1,013 673 .9 - - - - 1995 178 R 479 57 215 R 20 13 33 R 996 R 695 .9 - - - - 1996 177 R 502 55 217 R 20 14 33 R 1,019 R 718 .9 - - - - 1997 184 R 501 58 250 R 15 14 34 R 1,056 R 740 .9 - - - - 1998 190 R 485 61 252 25 20 39 R 1,073 762 .8 - - - - 1999 200 R 566 62 238

490

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Cumulative Production and Proved Reserves, 1977-2010 Crude Oil Natural Gas (Dry) Cumulative Production and Proved Reserves, Indexed 90 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Notes: * Data are at end of year. * Crude oil includes lease condensate. Source: Table 4.2. Natural Gas (Dry) Cumulative Production Crude Oil Cumulative Production Natural Gas (Dry) Proved Reserves Crude Oil Proved Reserves 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 50 100 150 200 250 Index: 1977=100 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 300 600 900 1,200 1,500 Trillion Cubic Feet 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Barrels Cumulative Production Cumulative Production Proved Reserves

491

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Geothermal Resources 5 Geothermal Resources 112 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Notes: * Data are for locations of identified hydrothermal sites and favorability of deep enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). * Map does not include shallow EGS resources located near hydrothermal sites or USGS assessment of undiscovered hydrothermal resources. * *"N/A" regions have temperatures less than 150°C at 10 kilometers (km) depth and were not assessed for deep EGS potential. * **Temperature at depth data for deep EGS in Alaska and Hawaii not available. Web Page: For related information, see http://www.nrel.gov/gis/maps.html. Sources: This map was created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Department of Energy (October 13, 2009). Source data for deep EGS includes tempera-

492

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 12.3 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Commercial Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Retail Electricity f Total g Distillate Fuel Oil c Kerosene LPG d Motor Gasoline e Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total 1973 Total ........................ 15 141 47 5 9 6 NA 52 120 334 609 1975 Total ........................ 14 136 43 4 8 6 NA 39 100 333 583 1980 Total ........................ 11 141 38 3 6 8 NA 44 98 412 662 1985 Total ........................ 13 132 46 2 6 7 NA 18 79 480 704 1990 Total ........................ 12 142 39 1 6 8 0 18 73 566 793 1995 Total ........................ 11 164 35 2 7 1 (s) 11 56 620 851 1996 Total ........................ 12 171 35 2 8 2 (s) 11 57 643 883

493

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 5.7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, Selected Years, 1960-2011 Year Persian Gulf 2 Selected OPEC 1 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 1 Countries Total Net Imports Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption 5 Net Imports From OPEC 1 Algeria Nigeria Saudi Arabia 3 Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Mexico United Kingdom U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Total Non-OPEC 4 Share of Total Net Imports 6 Share of Consumption 7 Thousand Barrels per Day Percent 1960 NA 8 ( ) 9 ( ) 84 910 1,232 86 -2 -12 34 381 1,613 16.5 76.4 12.6 1965 NA 8 ( ) 9 ( ) 158 994 1,438 297 21 -11 45 843 2,281 19.8 63.0 12.5 1970 NA 8 9 ( ) 30 989 1,294 736 9 -1 270 1,867 3,161 21.5 40.9 8.8 1971 NA 15 102 128 1,019 1,671 831 -14 1 365 2,030 3,701 24.3 45.1 11.0 1972 NA 92 251 189 959 2,044 1,082 -20 -1 428 2,475 4,519 27.6 45.2 12.5 1973 NA 136 459 485 1,134 2,991 1,294 -28 6 426

494

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 4.8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 (Billion Short Tons) Region and State Anthracite Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Total Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Surface 1 Underground Surface Total Appalachian .............................................. 4.0 3.3 68.2 21.9 0.0 0.0 1.1 72.1 26.3 98.4 Alabama ................................................... .0 .0 .9 2.1 .0 .0 1.1 .9 3.1 4.0 Kentucky, Eastern .................................... .0 .0 .8 9.1 .0 .0 .0 .8 9.1 9.8 Ohio .......................................................... .0 .0 17.4 5.7 .0 .0 .0 17.4 5.7 23.1

495

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source 1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide) Total, 1973-2012 Total, a Monthly By Major Source, 1973-2012 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-August By Major Source, August 2013 158 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Natural Gas 196 162 102 Petroleum Coal Natural Gas 0 50 100 150 200 250 0 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 100 200 300 Coal b Petroleum b a a 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 200 400 600 800 2011 2012 2013 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 Petroleum Coal b Natural Gas 2011 2012 2013

496

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Figure 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption Total¹ 1949-2011 Economic Growth and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1949-2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Biomass¹ Source, 2011 302 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 ¹ Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are excluded from total emissions. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. 2 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multi- plying by 12/44. 3 Based on chained (2005) dollars. Sources: Tables 1.5, 11.1, and 11.2a-11.2e. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Billion Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide² Real³ Gross Domestic Product

497

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Table 4.2 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Cumulative Production and Proved Reserves, 1977-2010 Year Crude Oil and Lease Condensate 1 Natural Gas (Dry) Cumulative Production Proved Reserves 2 Cumulative Production Proved Reserves 3 Billion Barrels Trillion Cubic Feet 1977 118.1 31.8 514.4 207.4 1978 121.3 31.4 533.6 208.0 1979 124.4 31.2 553.2 201.0 1980 127.5 31.3 572.6 199.0 1981 130.7 31.0 591.8 201.7 1982 133.8 29.5 609.6 201.5 1983 137.0 29.3 625.7 200.2 1984 140.2 30.0 643.2 197.5 1985 143.5 29.9 659.6 193.4 1986 146.7 28.3 675.7 191.6 1987 149.7 28.7 692.3 187.2 1988 152.7 28.2 709.4 168.0 1989 155.5 27.9 726.7 167.1 1990 158.2 27.6 744.5 169.3 1991 160.9 25.9 762.2 167.1 1992 163.5 25.0 780.1 165.0 1993 166.0 24.1 798.2 162.4 1994 168.4 23.6 817.0 163.8 1995 170.8 23.5 835.6 165.1 1996 173.2 23.3 854.5 166.5 1997 175.6 23.9 873.4 167.2 1998 177.8 22.4 892.4

498

Word Pro - A  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review December 2013 Table A2. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Production, Imports, and Exports (Million Btu per Barrel) Production Imports Exports Crude Oil a Natural Gas Plant Liquids Crude Oil a Petroleum Products Total Crude Oil a Petroleum Products Total 1950 ................................ 5.800 4.522 5.943 6.263 6.080 5.800 5.751 5.766 1955 ................................ 5.800 4.406 5.924 6.234 6.040 5.800 5.765 5.768 1960 ................................ 5.800 4.295 5.911 6.161 6.021 5.800 5.835 5.834 1965 ................................ 5.800 4.264 5.872 6.123 5.997 5.800 5.742 5.743 1970 ................................ 5.800 4.146 5.822 6.088 5.985 5.800 5.811 5.810 1975 ................................

499

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum and Other Liquids Petroleum and Other Liquids THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 5.0. Petroleum Flow, 2011 (Million Barrels per Day) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 117 1 Unfinished oils, hydrogen/oxygenates/renewables/other hydrocarbons, and motor gasoline and aviation gasoline blending components. 2 Renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production (0.972), net imports (1.164) and adjustments (0.122) minus stock change (0.019) and product supplied (0.001). 3 Finished petroleum products, liquefied petroleum gases, and pentanes plus. 4 Natural gas plant liquids. 5 Field production (2.183) and renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production (-.019) minus refinery and blender net inputs (0.489). 6 Petroleum products supplied. (s)=Less than 0.005.

500

Word Pro - S3  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review December 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review December 2013 43 Table 3.3b Petroleum Trade: Imports and Exports by Type (Thousand Barrels per Day) Imports Exports Crude Oil a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel d LPG b Motor Gasoline f Residual Fuel Oil Other g Total Crude Oil a Petroleum Products Total SPR c Total Propane e Total 1950 Average ................ - - 487 7 d ( ) 0 0 (s) 329 27 850 95 210 305 1955 Average ................ - - 782 12 d ( ) 0 0 13 417 24 1,248 32 336 368 1960 Average ................ - - 1,015 35 34 NA 4 27 637 62 1,815 8 193 202 1965 Average ................ - - 1,238 36 81 NA 21 28 946 119 2,468 3 184 187 1970 Average ................ - - 1,324 147 144 26 52 67 1,528 157 3,419 14 245 259 1975 Average ................ - - 4,105 155 133 60 112 184 1,223 144 6,056 6 204 209 1980 Average ................