Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Non-utility power generation continues to grow  

SciTech Connect

This article examines why the number of non-utility power plants is increasing. The topics include the impact of the changes to the Public Utility Holding Company Act, and bidding for capacity. It includes a look at Texaco's Puget Sound oil refinery and how its efficiency problems were solved using cogeneration including the need to improve energy balance and engineering of the plant. Grayling generating station (wood waste) and Kalaeloa cogeneration power plant (low sulfur fuel oil) are also discussed.

Smith, D.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators  

SciTech Connect

Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides annual aggregate statistics on generating units operated by nonutilities in the United States and the District of Columbia. Provides a 5-year outlook for generating unit additions and changes.

Information Center

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities.

Information Center

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

on standby, test, maintenance/repairs, out of service, and indefinite shutdown represented 43 percent of the total nonutility generating capacity in 1999.

7

Financial impacts of nonutility power purchases on investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

To assist in its these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities. The primary purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities. The existing concern in this area is manifest in the provisions of Section 712 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which required State regulatory commissions to evaluate various aspects of long-term power purchase contracts, including their impact on investor-owned utilities` cost of capital and rates charged to customers. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations by both public and private decision-makers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Table N13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" 3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,," " " "," ","Total of",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

9

Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002;" Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,"Total of",,,"RSE" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.3,0.9 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

10

Table E13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" 3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,"Total of",,,"RSE" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1,1.1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

11

Table A30. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.1,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1829," W "," W ",28

12

Private-sector power generation in Thailand: potential, impediments, and policy issues. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Royal Thai Government (RTG) is exploring ways of involving the private sector in electricity generation. The study: (1) assesses the sector's potential for non-utility power generation, including such options as industrial cogeneration, agricultural-waste-based energy systems, and large-scale systems using domestic fossil fuels; (2) reviews existing power-sector institutions in Thailand and analyzes the major issues and impediments associated with private-sector power generation; and (3) based on U.S. experience, describes possible approaches to establishing the price of non-utility electricity.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Generation of Electric Power in the United States 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The President issued a directive on April 15, 1999, requiring an annual report summarizing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by electricity generation in the United States, including both utilities and nonutilities. In response, this report is jointly submitted by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Information Center

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Strategies for an evolving generation industry  

SciTech Connect

This article deals with the changing structure of the power generation industry to include nonutility generation resources. The topics discussed include the permanence of nonutility generation as a power source, the evolving industry, and the strategies for an evolving industry. The emphasis is on developing sound, sophisticated purchasing procedures to fully benefit from this new generation resource.

Kee, E.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

15

Table A18. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" 8. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",988,940,48,16.2 2011," Meat Packing Plants",0,0,0,"NF"

16

Table A21. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" 1. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,"RSE" " "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States",,, "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.1,1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",188,122,66,35.6 " 20-49",2311,1901,410,39.5 " 50-99",2951,2721,230,9.6 " 100-249",6674,5699,974,7.1

17

Table A31. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers by Census Region," Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers by Census Region," " Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,"RSE" " "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States",,, "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.1,1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",222,164," Q ",23.3 " 20-49",1131,937,194,17.2

18

Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; 5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 347 168 179 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 142 6 136 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 4 10 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 109 88 21 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 66 66 0 3115 Dairy Products 22 0 22 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 1 * 3121 Beverages 1 1 * 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills

19

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 111 86 25 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 72 51 21 311221 Wet Corn Milling 55 42 13 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7 3 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 13 13 0 3115 Dairy Products 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * * 0 3121 Beverages

20

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1985, EPRI has published the Steam Generator Progress Report (SGPR), which provides historical information on worldwide steam generator activities.

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; 6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of Economic Sales and Utility Nonutility Characteristic(a) Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 194 100 93 20-49 282 280 3 50-99 1,115 922 194 100-249 5,225 4,288 936 250-499 5,595 2,696 2,899 500 and Over 20,770 12,507 8,263 Total 33,181 20,793 12,388 Employment Size Under 50 395 177 218 50-99 3,412 3,408 5 100-249 6,687 3,088 3,599 250-499 5,389 4,175 1,214 500-999 7,082 3,635 3,447

22

Commercialization of coal diesel engines for non-utility and export power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic motivation behind this project is to develop coal-burning heat engine technology primarily for 10-100 MW modular stationary power applications in the late 1990`s and beyond, when oil and gas prices may return to the $5--7/MMBtu range. The fuel is a low-cost, coal-based liquid with the consistency of black paint, composed of 12-micron mean size premium 2% ash coal dust mixed 50/50 with water. The Clean Coal Diesel Plant of the future is targeted for the 10-100 MW non-utility generation (NUG) and small utility markets, including independent power producers (IPP) and cogeneration. A family of plant designs will be offered using the Cooper-Bessemer 3.8, 5.0, and 6.3 MW Model LS engines as building blocks. In addition, larger plants will be configured with an engine in the 10-25 MW class (Cooper will license the technology to other large bore stationary engine manufacturers). The reciprocating engine offers a remarkable degree of flexibility in selecting plant capacity. This flexibility exists because the engines are modular in every sense (fuel cell stacks have similar modularity). Scale-up is accomplished simply by adding cylinders (e.g., 20 vs 16) or by adding engines (4 vs 3). There is no scale-up of the basic cylinder size. Thus, there is essentially no technical development needed to scale-up the Cooper-Bessemer Clean Coal Diesel Technology all the way from 2 MW (one 6-cylinder engine) to 50 MW (eight 20-cylinder engines), other than engineering adaptation of the turbocharger to match the engine.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E.; Mayville, R.A.; Itse, D.; Kimberley, J.; Parkinson, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Monthly 2008 Utility and Nonutility Fuel Receipts and Fuel Quality...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tags fossil fuel receipts, coal receipts, oil receipts, gas receipts, fossil fuel consumption, electricity generating fuel Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data...

24

Dairy methane generator. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of the work completed under this contract are presented. During the winter of 1979-80 three students enrolled, in the Mechanical Design Engineering Technology program at the Pennsylvania State University's Capitol Campus (Middletown, PA), undertook a feasibility study for the utilization of the manure generated by the dairy cows located on Mr. Thomas B. Williams farm for the generation and use of methane gas. The results of their effort was the design of an Anaerobic Digester/Electric Generation System. This preliminary designed system was later changed and improved by another group of P.S.U. MDET students in the spring of 1980. The final design included working drawings and an economic analysis of the estimated investment necessary to complete the Methane Generator/Electric Power Generation System.

Williams, T.B.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Progress Report: Revision 18  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundSince 1985, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has published the Steam Generator Progress Report (SGPR), which provides historical information on worldwide steam generator activities. This document was published once a year and distributed via hardcopy. Until 1998, the method of acquiring data for this report had been to issue annual survey forms to all PWR and pressurized heavy water reactor nuclear utilities worldwide. The information included in ...

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

26

Report on Distributed Generation Penetration Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents part of a multiyear research program dedicated to the development of requirements to support the definition, design, and demonstration of a distributed generation-electric power system interconnection interface concept. The report focuses on the dynamic behavior of power systems when a significant portion of the total energy resource is distributed generation. It also focuses on the near-term reality that the majority of new DG relies on rotating synchronous generators for energy conversion.

Miller, N.; Ye, Z.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT INSTRUCTIONS|Year: 2013 No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |PURPOSE|Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry.| |REQUIRED RESPONDENTS|Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT,

28

Steam Generator Group Project. Annual report, 1982  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Generator Group Project (SGGP) is an NRC program joined by additional sponsors. The SGGP utilizes a steam generator removed from service at a nuclear plant (Surry 2) as a vehicle for research on a variety of safety and reliability issues. This report is an annual summary of progress of the program for 1982. Information is presented on the Steam Generator Examination Facility (SGEF), especially designed and constructed for this research. Loading of the generator into the SGEF is then discussed. The report then presents radiological field mapping results and personnel exposure monitoring. This is followed by information on field reduction achieved by channel head decontaminations. The report then presents results of a secondary side examination through shell penetrations placed prior to transport, confirming no change in generator condition due to transport. Decontamination of the channel head is discussed followed by plans for eddy current testing and removal of the plugs placed during service. Results of a preliminary profilometry examination are then provided.

Clark, R.A.; Lewis, M.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Wind-powered generator. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Completion of a wind energy conversion system for a private home is reported. The system included three blades constructed of an aluminum center with marine plywood sandwiched between the aluminum center and the fiberglass outer covering. The wind turbine drives a 1800 rpm generator by a chain drive mechanism. Battery storage is included. (LEW)

Whitesides, R E

30

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

Draft Report Chapter 2: Generation Adequacy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 2: Generation Adequacy More Documents & Publications Draft Report: Chapter 2 Generation Adequacy. Keeping The Lights On In the New World Electricity Advisory Committee...

32

NEXT GENERATION MELTER OPTIONEERING STUDY - INTERIM REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D{sub 2}0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; RAMSEY G; LOMAX J; ALLEN H

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fourth Annual Report presents and analyzes 1995 DOE complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 40 reporting sites in 25 States, and trends DOE waste generation from 1991 through 1995. DOE has established a 50% reduction goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, due by December 31, 1999. Routine operations waste generation decreased 37% from 1994 to 1995, and 43% overall from 1993--1995.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue. This report provides information and forecasts important to the domestic and world nuclear and uranium industries. 1997 represents the most recent publication year.

Dr. Zdenek D.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Wind electric generator project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind generator is installed and connected at Iowa Western Community College. It is heating water through four hot water tanks and has proven to be an excellent demonstration project for the community. The college gets frequent inquiries about the wind mill and has been very cooperative in informing the public about the success. The windmill generates more electricity than is needed to heat four hot water heaters and future plans are to hook up more. The project requires very little maintenance. Attached is a date sheet on the project.

Not Available

1983-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

36

Preventing Biogas Generation in Low Level Waste: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes actions that can be taken to control and prevent biogas generation in waste containers and plant systems. In addition, it describes additional work in progress that will form the basis for the final report. This research was undertaken in response to nuclear power stations experiencing biogas generation from plant systems and low level waste containers.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

37

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1999  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Report summarizes and highlights waste generation, waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost avoidance for 44 U.S. Department of Energy reporting sites for Calendar Year 1999. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1999 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Model documentation report: Short-term Integrated Forecasting System demand model 1985. [(STIFS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) Demand Model consists of a set of energy demand and price models that are used to forecast monthly demand and prices of various energy products up to eight quarters in the future. The STIFS demand model is based on monthly data (unless otherwise noted), but the forecast is published on a quarterly basis. All of the forecasts are presented at the national level, and no regional detail is available. The model discussed in this report is the April 1985 version of the STIFS demand model. The relationships described by this model include: the specification of retail energy prices as a function of input prices, seasonal factors, and other significant variables; and the specification of energy demand by product as a function of price, a measure of economic activity, and other appropriate variables. The STIFS demand model is actually a collection of 18 individual models representing the demand for each type of fuel. The individual fuel models are listed below: motor gasoline; nonutility distillate fuel oil, (a) diesel, (b) nondiesel; nonutility residual fuel oil; jet fuel, kerosene-type and naphtha-type; liquefied petroleum gases; petrochemical feedstocks and ethane; kerosene; road oil and asphalt; still gas; petroleum coke; miscellaneous products; coking coal; electric utility coal; retail and general industry coal; electricity generation; nonutility natural gas; and utility petroleum. The demand estimates produced by these models are used in the STIFS integrating model to produce a full energy balance of energy supply, demand, and stock change. These forecasts are published quarterly in the Outlook. Details of the major changes in the forecasting methodology and an evaluation of previous forecast errors are presented once a year in Volume 2 of the Outlook, the Methodology publication.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Microsoft Word - Power Generation in Pipeline Report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

correctness. LA-UR-05-6354 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Title: Power Generation in Pipeline: Report Author(s): Dipen N. Sinha Submitted to: Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alternative electric generation impact simulator : final summary report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a short summary of three related research tasks that were conducted during the project "Alternative Electric Generation Impact Simulator." The first of these tasks combines several different types of ...

Gruhl, Jim

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Ris Energy Report 4 Distributed generation 1 What is distributed generation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø Energy Report 4 Distributed generation 1 5 What is distributed generation? Distributed as distributed energy resources (DERs). It appears that there is no consensus on precise defi- nitions of DG. Wind energy is presently the fastest growing and largest contributor to distributed genera- tion from

44

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

45

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station - Unit 1 Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides detailed information on the successful decommissioning activities of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS 1). The report describes their experiences and lessons learned for managers of US and international plants beginning or currently engaged in decommissioning.

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

46

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

47

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coal Consumption to Coal Generation Sources: * 1990-1997-EIA, Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report," and Form EIA-867, Annual Nonutility Power Producer Report. *...

48

Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports for SIRS Radiometric Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports for SIRS Radiometric Measurements M. H. L. Anderberg, F. P. Rael, and T. L. Stoffell National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program needs high-quality broadband shortwave (SW) (solar) and longwave (LW) irradiance information for the development and validation of atmospheric circulation and climate models. To this end, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) performs a quality assessment of the data from 22 Solar Infrared Stations (SIRS) in the Southern Great Plains (SGP). Data quality reports (DQRs) are instrumental in passing the resultant information to the scientific community. The value of these reports depends on clear and consistent

49

Milliwatt Generator Project. Progress report, April-September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This formal biannual report covers the effort related to the Milliwatt Generator Project (MWG) carried out for the Department of Energy, Office of Military Applications, by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

Maraman, W.J. (comp.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Milliwatt Generator Project. Progress report, October 1980-March 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This formal biannual report covers the effort related to the Milliwatt Generator Project (MWG) carried out for the Department of Energy, Office of Military Application by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

Maraman, W.J. (comp.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Short-term hydroelectric generation model. Model documentation report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Short-Term Hydroelectric Generation Model (STHGM), describe its basic approach, and to provide details on the model structure. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the general public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with the EIA`s legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Framing Scenarios of Electricity Generation and Gas Use: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a systematic appraisal of trends in electric generation and demands for gas for power generation. Gas-fired generation is the leading driver of forecasted growth in demand for natural gas in the United States, and natural gas is a leading fuel for planned new generating capacity. The report goes behind the numbers and forecasts to quantify key drivers and uncertainties.

1996-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1998  

SciTech Connect

This seventh Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 45 reporting sites from 1993 through 1998. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1998 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments. More detailed information follows this section in the body of the Report. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December31, 1999. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1998 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation decreased 67 percent overall from 1993 to 1998. However, for the first time since 1994, the total amount of materials recycled by the Complex decreased from 109,600 metric tons in 1997 to 92,800 metric tons in 1998. This decrease is attributed to the fact that in 1997, several large ''one-time only'' recycling projects were conducted throughout the Complex. In order to demonstrate commitment to DOE's Complex-wide recycling goal, it is important for sites to identify all potential large-scale recycling/reuse opportunities.

NONE

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990s. Based on current information, the next group of plants whose license will expire will not begin decommissioning for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one plant, the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, in order to capture its experience for future plants.

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

761 761 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142263761 Varnish cache server Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-860 is a generator-level survey that collects specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. The survey data is summarized in reports such as the Electric Power Annual. The survey data is also available for download here. The data are compressed into a self-extracting (.exe) zip folder containing .XLS data files and record layouts. The current file structure (starting with 2009 data) consists

56

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This Report summarizes the waste generation and pollution prevention activities of the major operational sites in the Department of Energy (DOE). We are witnessing progress in waste reduction from routine operations that are the focus of Department-wide reduction goals set by the Secretary on May 3,1996. The goals require that by the end of 1999, we reduce, recycle, reuse, and otherwise avoid waste generation to achieve a 50 percent reduction over 1993 levels. This Report provides the first measure of our progress in waste reduction and recycling against our 1993 waste generation baseline. While we see progress in reducing waste from our normal operations, we must begin to focus attention on waste generated by cleanup and facilities stabilization activities that are the major functions of the Office of Environmental Management. Reducing the generation of waste is one of the seven principles that I have established for the Office of Environmental Management Ten Year Plan. As part of our vision to complete a major portion of the environmental cleanup at DOE sites over the next ten years, we must utilize the potential of the pollution prevention program to reduce the cost of our cleanup program. We have included the Secretarial goals as part of the performance measures for the Ten Year Plan, and we are committed to implementing pollution prevention ideas. Through the efforts of both Federal and contractor employees, our pollution prevention program has reduced waste and the cost of our operations. I applaud their efforts and look forward to reporting further waste reduction progress in the next annual update of this Report.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Model documentation report: Short-Term Hydroelectric Generation Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Short- Term Hydroelectric Generation Model (STHGM), describe its basic approach, and to provide details on the model structure. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the general public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (AYE) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). The STHGM performs a short-term (18 to 27- month) forecast of hydroelectric generation in the United States using an autoregressive integrated moving average (UREMIA) time series model with precipitation as an explanatory variable. The model results are used as input for the short-term Energy Outlook.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Milliwatt Generator Project: April 1988--September 1996. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator (MWG) Project from April 1988 to September 1996. Manufacturing of heat sources for the project ended by September 1990. Beginning in October 1990, the major activities of the project have been surveillance and testing of MWGs, disposal of excess MWGs, and reclamation of the PuO{sub 2} from excess MWG heat sources. Reported activities include fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, compatibility studies, impact testing, examination and electrical testing of surveillance units, and recovery of PuO{sub 2} from heat sources.

Latimer, T.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Low cost high performance generator technology program. Addendum report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a system weight, efficiency, and size analysis which was performed on the 500 W(e) low cost high performance generator (LCHPG) are presented. The analysis was performed in an attempt to improve system efficiency and specific power over those presented in June 1975, System Design Study Report TES-SNSO-3-25. Heat source volume, configuration, and safety as related to the 500 W(e) LCHPG are also discussed. (RCK)

Not Available

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Energy Storage and Distributed Energy Generation Project, Final Project Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as a Final Report under the Energy Storage and Distribution Energy Generation Project carried out by the Transportation Energy Center (TEC) at the University of Michigan (UM). An interdisciplinary research team has been working on fundamental and applied research on: -distributed power generation and microgrids, -power electronics, and -advanced energy storage. The long-term objective of the project was to provide a framework for identifying fundamental research solutions to technology challenges of transmission and distribution, with special emphasis on distributed power generation, energy storage, control methodologies, and power electronics for microgrids, and to develop enabling technologies for novel energy storage and harvesting concepts that can be simulated, tested, and scaled up to provide relief for both underserved and overstressed portions of the Nations grid. TECs research is closely associated with Sections 5.0 and 6.0 of the DOE "Five-year Program Plan for FY2008 to FY2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs, August 2006.

Schwank, Johannes; Mader, Jerry; Chen, Xiaoyin; Mi, Chris; Linic, Suljo; Sastry, Ann Marie; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Thompson, Levi; Varde, Keshav

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Steam generator tube integrity program: Phase II, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program (SGTIP) was a three phase program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The first phase involved burst and collapse testing of typical steam generator tubing with machined defects. The second phase of the SGTIP continued the integrity testing work of Phase I, but tube specimens were degraded by chemical means rather than machining methods. The third phase of the program used a removed-from-service steam generator as a test bed for investigating the reliability and effectiveness of in-service nondestructive eddy-current inspection methods and as a source of service degraded tubes for validating the Phase I and Phase II data on tube integrity. This report describes the results of Phase II of the SGTIP. The object of this effort included burst and collapse testing of chemically defected pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing to validate empirical equations of remaining tube integrity developed during Phase I. Three types of defect geometries were investigated: stress corrosion cracking (SCC), uniform thinning and elliptical wastage. In addition, a review of the publicly available leak rate data for steam generator tubes with axial and circumferential SCC and a comparison with an analytical leak rate model is presented. Lastly, nondestructive eddy-current (EC) measurements to determine accuracy of defect depth sizing using conventional and alternate standards is described. To supplement the laboratory EC data and obtain an estimate of EC capability to detect and size SCC, a mini-round robin test utilizing several firms that routinely perform in-service inspections was conducted.

Kurtz, R.J.; Bickford, R.L.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Wheeler, K.R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission. Program final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report for the Selenide Isotope Generator for the Galileo Mission (SIG/GM) documents the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems (TES) under US Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC01-78ET33009 (formerly ET-78-C-01-2865) during the period April 10, 1978 to June 30, 1979. Because of technical difficulties with the thermoelectric converter being developed by the 3M Company under separate DOE contract, a Stop Work Order, dated January 29, 1979, was issued by DOE. The TES effort up to the receipt of the Stop Work Order as well as limited technical activities up to the contract conclusion on June 30, 1979 are reported.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Technology Management Benchmark Study - Phase 2: Volume 2 - Detailed Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and eleven U.S. domestic power companies participated in a benchmark study of the most successful technology management practices of leading non-utility companies. This report contains the detailed findings of the Technology Management Best Practices Study -- Phase 2 conducted from July 2001 to May 2002.

2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

64

Milliwatt Generator Project. Progress report, April 1986--March 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator Project from April 1986 through March 1988. Activities included fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, fabrication of pressure-burst test units, compatibility studies, impact testing, and examination of surveillance units. The major task of the Los Alamos Milliwatt Generator Project is to fabricate MC2893A heat sources (4.0 W) for MC2730A radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS) and MC3599 heat sources (4.5 W) for MC3500 RTGs. The MWG Project interfaces with the following contractors: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (designer); E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Savannah River Plant (fuel); Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility (metal hardware); and General Electric Company, Neutron Devices Department (RTGs). In addition to MWG fabrication activities, Los Alamos is involved in (1) fabrication of pressure-burst test units, (2) compatibility testing and evaluation, (3) examination of surveillance units, and (4) impact testing and subsequent examination of compatibility and surveillance units.

Latimer, T.W.; Rinehart, G.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

MHD generator component development. Quarterly report, October 1979-December 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following tasks: (1) perform experimental investigations related to MHD channel design and performance by testing existing channel hardware and by fabricating and testing new channel hardware; perform complementary analytical investigations; (2) perform experimental investigations related to MHD channel performance and lifetime, with the principal aim of systematically obtaining data on the prototype electrodes for the coal-fired, subsonic, long-duration CDIF Generator 1B3; (3) perform testing on channel loading and control utilizing the supersonic Reference channel No. 4 and other appropriate channels and/or test modules, at magnetic fields to 4 Tesla; and (4) provide for facility operation and maintenance of the Mk VI and Mk VII test bays. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

MHD generator component development. Quarterly report, July 1983-September 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are two-fold: (1) To contribute, by appropriate systematic experimental and analytical investigations, to the engineering data base necessary for the design and construction of MHD generators at CDIF-scale (50 MW/sub th/) and baseload scale (2000 MW/sub th/). (2) To design and fabricate specific hardware items to be tested at the CDIF site in Butte, Montana. The program consists of a series of related tasks: (1) MHD channel design and performance; (2) MHD channel construction and lifetime; (3) MHD channel loading and control; (4) facility operation; (5) CDIF related hardware; and (6) high interaction tests of a supersonic channel. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Key contributions in MHD power generation. Semi-annual report, December 1, 1978-May 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development on open-cycle coal-fired MHD generators at MIT is reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for progress reported on the four tasks. (WHK)

Louis, J F

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We fi nd that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Failure probabilities of steam generator tubes. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

BNL's efforts focused on the following specific items; the probabilities of failure for perfect steam generator tubes, the probabilities of failure for steam generator tubes containing long axisymmetrically thinned sections, and the probabilities of failure for steam generator tubes containing finite length (relatively short) axisymmetric wastages. (auth)

Reich, M.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

New Report Outlines Key Features of Next-Generation Public ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Smart Grid Interoperability Panel, which includes representatives from a large number of sectors with an interest in the next-generation power grid. ...

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

74

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group The Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation IV goals and (2) identify key fuel cycle issues associated with Generation IV goals. This included examination of "fuel resource inputs and waste outputs for the range of potential Generation IV fuel cycles, consistent with projected energy demand scenarios." This report summarizes the results of the studies. The membership of the FCCG comprised 8 US members and 7 members from Generation IV International Forum (GIF) countries including members from

75

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

SODIUM-HEATED STEAM GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT. Interim Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Design and development of a once -through sodiumheated steam generator are discussed. Research proposals are discussed for evaluating: carbon transfer and mass transfer effects in the steam generator, effect on heat transfer and two- phase flow of coiling tubes, corrosion of Croloy 21/4 in products of sodium-water reactions, procedure for welding tube to back side of the tube sheet, radiographic inspection of back side tube welds, and chemical simulation of sodium environment for leak testing. (N.W.R.)

1964-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

Operational test report for WESF diesel generator diesel tank installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WESF Backup Generator Underground Diesel Tank 101 has been replaced with a new above ground 1000 gallon diesel tank. Following the tank installation, inspections and tests specified in the Operational Test Procedure, WHC-SD-WM-OTP-155, were performed. Inspections performed by a Quality Control person indicated the installation was leak free and the diesel generator/engine ran as desired. There were no test and inspection exceptions, therefore, the diesel tank installation is operable.

Schwehr, B.A.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

Unalaska geothermal exploration project. Electrical power generation analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the most cost-effective power cycle for utilizing the Makushin Volcano geothermal resource to generate electricity for the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. It is anticipated that the geothermal power plant would be intertied with a planned conventional power plant consisting of four 2.5 MW diesel-generators whose commercial operation is due to begin in 1987. Upon its completion in late 1988, the geothermal power plant would primarily fulfill base-load electrical power demand while the diesel-generators would provide peak-load electrical power and emergency power at times when the geothermal power plant would be partially or completely unavailable. This study compares the technical, environmental, and economic adequacy of five state-of-the-art geothermal power conversion processes. Options considered are single- and double-flash steam cycles, binary cycle, hybrid cycle, and total flow cycle.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

An Intelligent User Interface to Support Weather Report Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern-day computers have greatly advanced our ability to generate reasonably accurate weather forecast models in a timely manner. High-powered workstations have put the output from these models, as well as a tremendous amount of raw and analyzed ...

Darryl N. Leon; Michael L. Talbert

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Biomass Support for the China Renewable Energy Law: Feasibility Report -- Agricultural and Forestry Solid Wastes Power Generation Demonstration, December 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report on feasibility of using agricultural and forestry wastes for power generation in China

Not Available

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

ECONOMIC FACTORS OF MFP THERMOELECTRIC GENERATORS. Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

Mixed Fission Products (MFP) for use as a heat source for thermoelectric generators will become increasingly available in the coming years. The Atomic Energy Conamission sponsored program on solidification of nuclear wastes is now entering the hot-bench scale test phase. During this phase approximately 5000 thermal watts of two year old MFP could be produced monthly. Two different types of hot calcination pilot plants are planned for installation at the Hanford National Laboratories in the 1964 to 1966 time period. Each of these plants should be able to produce 160,000 thermal watts of two year MFP and 16,000 thermal watts of ten year MFP on a monthly basis. During this phase, MFP costs should be less than 15 per ihermal watt for two year MFP and 50 for ten year MFP. This cost includes operation of the plant solely to obtain heat sources and sealing the MFP into fuel containers. A full scale plant for a 15,000 Mw(e) nuclear economy is estimated to produce four to five times as much MFP as either of the pilot plants. Costs will be dependent upon AEC policy in effect at the time the plant is operating. lf the policy indicates that the full cost be paid by the user, the prices will approximate that obtained from the pilot plant operation. A conceptual design has been made for MFP fueled generators at several output power levels up to 1000 watts. These are for use at great underwater depths and contain an integral biological shield. A low cost biological shield of high density concrete or cast iron is considered. Economic studies indicate that, in production quantities, a 10 watt generator will cost one tenth an equivalent Strontium90 generator. Because of the low cost for MFP heat sources, radionuclide generators at the hundred and thousand watt level can be reasonably postulated for the first time. At the kilowatt level costs of per watt year are achievable while to 0 are estimated at the ten watt level. Currently available ocean-going craft can handle the placement of MFP generators up to the hundreds of watts level. Investigation of other available vessels is continuing. (auth)

Barmat, M.

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

CDIF-MHD generator system conceptual design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this Program is to conduct a conceptual design of an MHD Generator System (MHD) to be coupled to candidate development coal-fired MHD combustion chambers at the MHD Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) for the purpose of developing design techniques utilized for the design of large MHD generators. The MHD is to be designed for continuous operation. A hexagonal cross section, diagonal conducting wall configuration operating in the supersonic mixed impulse-reaction mode with an inlet Mach number of 1.59 and with a uniform magnetic field of four Tesla throughout were selected. The design operating conditions and performance are presented, and a design analysis is included. (WHK)

Not Available

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

FINAL SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT. SNAP III THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The SNAP-III thermoelectric generator procedures power from the decay heat of 2100 curies of Po/sup 210/. This generator is to be used as a source of auxiliary power in a terrestrial satellite. For purposes of analysis, the satellite system postulated is launched from the Pacific Missile Bange into a 275- statute mile polar orbit with an orbital lifetime of about 1 year. Po/sup 210/ is an alpha emitter having a half life of 138 days and alpha and gamma decay energies of 5.3 and 0.8 mev, respectively. It is a natural component of the earth's crust, as a member of the uranium disintegration series. Sampling of polonium in the biosphere was conducted specifically for this program to determine background radiation levels. Since the fuel is primarily an alpha emitter, there is no direct radiation problem. An analysis was performed to determine the ability of the fuel container to withstand the various thermal, mechanical, and chemical forces imposed upon the generator by vehicle failures. Where theoretical analysis was impossible and experimental evidence was desired, capsules and generators were tested under simulated missile-failure conditions, Thus, the safety limits of SNAP-III in a satellite application were defined. SNAP-III is designed to be aerothermodynamically consumed on reentry into the earth's atmosphere so that the polonium will be dispersed as aerosols in the upper stratosphere. Since heating rates will be lower for aborts occurring prior to orbiting, 65 abort cases have been considered to define the general consequences of vehicle failures. The spatial and temporal relations of vehicle aborts are summarized in cartographic and tabular form. (auth)

Hagis, W.; Dix, G.P.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Milliwatt-Generator Project. Progress report, October 1981-March 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Los Alamos will fabricate the MC 3599 heat source (4.5 W) for the MC 3500 radioisotopic thermoelectric generator (RTG) in addition to the MC 2893A heat source (4.0 W) for the MC 2730A RTG. Progress on the following tasks is described in detail: /sup 238/Pu fuel processing and characterization, fabrication of test units, destructive testing, and quality assurance. (WHK)

Maraman, W.J. (comp.)

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Identification, definition and evaluation of potential impacts facing the US electric utility industry over the next decade. Final report  

SciTech Connect

There are numerous conditions of the generation system that may ultimately develop into system states affecting system reliability and security. Such generation system conditions should also be considered when evaluating the potential impacts on system operations. The following five issues have been identified to impact system reliability and security to the greatest extent: transmission access/retail wheeling; non-utility generators and independent power producers; integration of dispersed storage and generation into utility distribution systems; EMF and right-of-way limitations; Clean Air Act Amendments. Strictly speaking, some issues are interrelated and one issue cannot be completely dissociated from the others. However, this report addresses individual issues separately in order to determine all major aspects of bulk power system operations affected by each issue. The impacts of the five issues on power system reliability and security are summarized. This report examines the five critical issues that the US electric utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility system reliability and security is limited to the system operation viewpoint. Those five issues will undoubtedly influence various planning aspects of the bulk transmission system. However, those subjects are beyond the scope of this report. While the issues will also influence the restructure and business of the utility industry politically, sociologically, environmentally, and economically, all discussion included in the report are focused only on technical ramifications.

Grainger, J.J.; Lee, S.S.H.

1993-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

87

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT|Year:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT|Year: REPORT|Year: 2013 OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and disclosure information, see the provisions stated on the last page of the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction.| |SCHEDULE 1. IDENTIFICATION| |Survey Contact| |Name:__________________________________________|Title:___________________________________________|

88

Final Report for "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data"  

SciTech Connect

The project "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data" adds block-structured (mosaic) grid support, parallel processing, and 2D/3D curvilinear interpolation to the open-source UV-CDAT climate data analysis tool. Block structured grid support complies to the Gridspec extension submitted to the Climate and Forecast metadata conventions. It contains two parts: aggregation of data spread over multiple mosaic tiles (M-SPEC) and aggregation of temporal data stored in different files (F-SPEC). Together, M-SPEC and F-SPEC allow users to interact with data stored in multiple files as if the data were in a single file. For computational expensive tasks, a flexible, multi-dimensional, multi-type distributed array class allows users to process data in parallel using remote memory access. Both nodal and cell based interpolation is supported; users can choose between different interpolation libraries including ESMF and LibCF depending on the their particular needs.

Pletzer, Alexander

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

89

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Many obvious and significant concerns arise when considering the concept of small-scale biodiesel production. Does the fuel produced meet the stringent requirements set by the commercial biodiesel industry? Is the process safe? How are small-scale producers collecting and transporting waste vegetable oil? How is waste from the biodiesel production process handled by small-scale producers? These concerns and many others were the focus of the research preformed in the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation project over the last three years. This project was a unique research program in which undergraduate engineering students at Messiah College set out to research the feasibility of small-biodiesel production for application on a campus of approximately 3000 students. This Department of Energy (DOE) funded research program developed out of almost a decade of small-scale biodiesel research and development work performed by students at Messiah College. Over the course of the last three years the research team focused on four key areas related to small-scale biodiesel production: Quality Testing and Assurance, Process and Processor Research, Process and Processor Development, and Community Education. The objectives for the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project included the following: 1. Preparing a laboratory facility for the development and optimization of processors and processes, ASTM quality assurance, and performance testing of biodiesel fuels. 2. Developing scalable processor and process designs suitable for ASTM certifiable small-scale biodiesel production, with the goals of cost reduction and increased quality. 3. Conduct research into biodiesel process improvement and cost optimization using various biodiesel feedstocks and production ingredients.

Zummo, Michael M; Munson, J; Derr, A; Zemple, T; Bray, S; Studer, B; Miller, J; Beckler, J; Hahn, A; Martinez, P; Herndon, B; Lee, T; Newswanger, T; Wassall, M

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Solar-powered steam generator heliostat. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small-size central-receiver-type solar energy collecting system delivering commercial grade steam is analyzed and a wind avoidance type heliostat designed, built, and successfully tested. The heliostat design effort is described, including reflecting surface materials and measurements, optic considerations and mirror field arrangements, mechanical analysis and fabrication techniques, and economics and cost effectiveness. Measurements of normal incident solar energy at Upton, N.Y., are reported and a method is proposed for estimating this input parameter for other locations proposed.

Cottingham, J G

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Generation in the Pulp and Paper Industry FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Milano. Any use the reader makes of this report, or any reliance upon or decisions to be made based upon this report are the responsibility of the reader. Neither Navigant Consulting, Princeton University nor Politecnico di Milano accepts any responsibility for damages, if any, The U.S. pulp and paper industry, with its substantial capacity for producing and using renewable biomass energy 1.6 quads in 2002 has the potential to contribute significantly to addressing global warming and U.S. energy security concerns, while potentially also improving its own global competitiveness. A key requirement for substantially enhancing renewable energy use in this industry to achieve these goals is the commercialization of breakthrough technologies, especially gasification. Gasification of biomass produces a fuel gas (syngas) consisting largely of hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) that can be cleanly converted into electricity in a gas turbine combined cycle or, in the longer term, into transportation fuels such as Fischer-Tropsch liquids or hydrogen. The predominant form of biomass energy available at pulp mills today is black liquor, the ligninrich byproduct of fiber extraction from wood. Black liquor contains about half the energy of the

Eric D. Larson; Stefano Consonni; Ryan E. Katofsky

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Second-generation-heliostat optimization studies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to define and quantify cost reductions in the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace Second Generation Heliostat resulting from design and cost optimization. These cost reductions were based on optimizing the heliostat performance vs. cost and engineering design, and reviewing the design specification in selected technological areas with a goal of removing nonrealistic requirements and eliminating or minimizing overdesign. Specific technological areas investigated were: (1) designing the heliostat for survival strength rather than stiffness and reducing the operational wind requirements as dictated by this design approach; (2) reducing the pointing accuracy and/or beam quality required for some fraction or all of the heliostat field; (3) modifying the operational temperature range; (4) relaxing the rate at which the heliostat must move in the slew mode; (5) using alternate beam safety strategies; (6) analyzing actual wind data for selected sites in the southwest United States vs. the heliostat design specification survival wind requirements; (7) estimating heliostat damage for winds in excess of the design specification over a 30 year period; (8) evaluating the impact of designing the heliostat for higher wind loads; and (9) investigating the applicability to heliostat design of the standard engineering practices for designing buildings.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

95

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

96

Progress report No. 23 for a program of thermoelectric generator testing and RTG degradation mechanisms evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is reported on selenide technology evaluation, silicon germanium technology, and thermoelectric generator testing and evaluation. Results of thermal conductivity tests, in-gradient tests, thermophysical properties and compatibility tests, and accelerated resistance module tests for selenium are presented and discussed. Thermoelectric property characteristics of silicon germanium alloys are presented, and performance characteristics of silicon germanium thermoelectric generators are discussed. Thermoelectric generators assembled with lead telluride, TAG-85, and silicon-germanium materials being tested at JPL are described. (WHK)

Stapfer, G.; Rouklove, P.; Garvey, L.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Automated Integration of Substation IED Data to Generate Event Reports for Protection Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by EPRI through project titled "Multiple Uses of Substation Data", Paul Myrda - project manager. #12;TABLEAutomated Integration of Substation IED Data to Generate Event Reports for Protection Engineers for automated integration of substation Intelligent Electronic Device (IED) data to generate a customized event

Kezunovic, Mladen

98

RESEARCH ON THE EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THERMIONIC POWER GENERATION. Progress Report No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Research concerned with a theoretical and experimental study of magneto- thermionic power generation is reported. This concept promises a number of advantsges over conventional thermionic generators. Low pressure Cs diodes suffer from an undesirable size limitation, because selfinduced magnetic fields reduce current transmission and hence, efficiency. Although this effect does not arise in the small devices tested to date, it becomes important in building larger generators. Analysis indicates that this problem can be virtually eliminnted by the application of a longitudinal magnetic field. An experimental and theoretical study was initiated to verify the predicted magnetic field effects, and to examine their possible use in a-c generation. (auth)

Schock, A.; Kunen, A.E.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Online Monitoring Technical Basis and Analysis Framework for Emergency Diesel Generators - Interim Report for FY 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is actively conducting research to develop and demonstrate online monitoring capabilities for active components in existing nuclear power plants. Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute are working jointly to implement a pilot project to apply these capabilities to emergency diesel generators and generator step-up transformers. The Electric Power Research Institute Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Software Suite will be used to implement monitoring in conjunction with utility partners: Braidwood Generating Station (owned by Exelon Corporation) for emergency diesel generators, and Shearon Harris Nuclear Generating Station (owned by Duke Energy Progress) for generator step-up transformers. This report presents monitoring techniques, fault signatures, and diagnostic and prognostic models for emergency diesel generators. Emergency diesel generators provide backup power to the nuclear power plant, allowing operation of essential equipment such as pumps in the emergency core coolant system during catastrophic events, including loss of offsite power. Technical experts from Braidwood are assisting Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Power Research Institute in identifying critical faults and defining fault signatures associated with each fault. The resulting diagnostic models will be implemented in the Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Software Suite and tested using data from Braidwood. Parallel research on generator step-up transformers was summarized in an interim report during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

Binh T. Pham; Nancy J. Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Modeling of a second-generation solar-driven Rankine air conditioner. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ten configurations of a second-generation (2G), solar-powered, Rankine-driven air conditioner were simulated and the data presented for use in companion studies. The results of the analysis show that the boiling-in-collector (BIC) configuration generates more power per collector area than the other configurations. The models used to simulate the configuration are presented in this report. The generated data are also presented. Experimental work was done under this study to both improve a novel refrigerant and oil lubrication system for the centrifugal compressor and investigate the aerodynamic unloading characteristics of the centrifugal compressor. The information generated was used to define possible turbo-gearbox configurations for use in the second generation computer simulation.

Denius, M.W.; Batton, W.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration for Ways to Reduce Operating Costs for Small Producers Project: 08123-10 April 30, 2012 Loy Sneary, President Robin Dahlheim, Sales Gulf Coast Green Energy 1801 7th St, Ste 230 Bay City, TX 77414 RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Gulf Coast Green Energy as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO

102

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Entegrity EW50 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Ventera VT10 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

FORM EIA-860M MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PURPOSE Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: a) Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; b) Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and c) Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry. REQUIRED RESPONDENTS Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT, respondents who have indicated in a previous filing to

106

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

Modeling and Verification of Distributed Generation and Voltage Regulation Equipment for Unbalanced Distribution Power Systems; Annual Subcontract Report, June 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the development of models for distributed generation and distribution circuit voltage regulation equipment for unbalanced power systems and their verification through actual field measurements.

Davis, M. W.; Broadwater, R.; Hambrick, J.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

111

Development, Demonstration, and Field Testing of Enterprise-Wide Distributed Generation Energy Management System: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details progress on subcontract NAD-1-30605-1 between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and RealEnergy (RE), the purpose of which is to describe RE's approach to the challenges it faces in the implementation of a nationwide fleet of clean cogeneration systems to serve contemporary energy markets. The Phase 2 report covers: utility tariff risk and its impact on market development; the effect on incentives on distributed energy markets; the regulatory effectiveness of interconnection in California; a survey of practical field interconnection issues; trend analysis for on-site generation; performance of dispatch systems; and information design hierarchy for combined heat and power.

Greenberg, S.; Cooley, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Key contributions in MHD power generation. Quarterly report, 1 June 1979-31 August 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities during the third quarter of the contract period are reported in detail. The tasks reported on include: (1) investigation of electrical behavior in the vicinity of electrode and insulating walls; (2) studies of critical performance issues in the development of combustion disk generators; (3) development and testing of electrode modules, including studies of insulator properties; and (4) determination of coal combustion kinetics and ash behavior relevant to two-stage MHD combustors, and investigation of the mixing and flow aerodynamics of a high swirl geometry second stage.

Louis, J F

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program. Quarterly report, January 1, 1982-March 30, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summaries progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate a number of important problems in the development of MHD generator channels. The areas of research include nonuniformity and stability effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in a 6-Tesla magnet of small dimensions.

Kruger, C.H.; Eustis, R.H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S.A.; Koester, J.K.; Nakamura, T.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC POWER GENERATION. VOLUME I. SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A system analysis was performed to establish the design and performance characteristics of 250- and 1000-Mev MHD generators. The results are presented, and the necessary equations are derived. The results of environmental tests that investigated boundary and bulk conductivity, structural concepts, and combustion phenomena are included. The other five volumes of the report are summarized, together with the principal conclusions. (D.C.W.)

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Steam generator tube integrity program: Annual report, August 1995--September 1996. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on the Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program from the inception of the program in August 1995 through September 1996. The program is divided into five tasks: (1) assessment of inspection reliability, (2) research on ISI (inservice-inspection) technology, (3) research on degradation modes and integrity, (4) tube removals from steam generators, and (5) program management. Under Task 1, progress is reported on the preparation of facilities and evaluation of nondestructive evaluation techniques for inspecting a mock-up steam generator for round-robin testing, the development of better ways to correlate failure pressure and leak rate with eddy current (EC) signals, the inspection of sleeved tubes, workshop and training activities, and the evaluation of emerging NDE technology. Results are reported in Task 2 on closed-form solutions and finite-element electromagnetic modeling of EC probe responses for various probe designs and flaw characteristics. In Task 3, facilities are being designed and built for the production of cracked tubes under aggressive and near-prototypical conditions and for the testing of flawed and unflawed tubes under normal operating, accident, and severe-accident conditions. Crack behavior and stability are also being modeled to provide guidance for test facility design, develop an improved understanding of the expected rupture behavior of tubes with circumferential cracks, and predict the behavior of flawed and unflawed tubes under severe accident conditions. Task 4 is concerned with the acquisition of tubes and tube sections from retired steam generators for use in the other research tasks. Progress on the acquisition of tubes from the Salem and McGuire 1 nuclear plants is reported.

Diercks, D.R.; Bakhtiari, S.; Kasza, K.E.; Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Salary information for health physicists and nuclear engineers, October 1991. Summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a survey conducted by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) to obtain current salary data from employers of health physicists and nuclear engineers. The questionnaires were distributed to 52 utilities and 139 non-utilities in October 1991. The non-utilities include private sector organizations and Department of Energy laboratories and production facilities operated by contractors. Excluded from the survey are government agencies, educational institutions, and medical/health facilities. The employers were asked to provide data on average salaries for BS, MS, and PhD degree level health physicists and nuclear engineers with zero, one, and three years of professional work experience. Responses from individual employers are kept confidential, and the list of respondents provided at the back of this report includes only those organizations authorizing the release of their names. The survey universe consists of those utilities and non-utilities that employed five or more health physicists or nuclear engineers based on data from the 1991 ``Survey of Occupational Employment in Nuclear-Related Activities`` conducted by Oak Ridge Associated Universities which includes information provided by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report 2nd Generation Implementing Architecture  

SciTech Connect

Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document.

CALMUS, R.B.

2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

118

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation (Report Summary) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as "intermittent") output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Report on the September 2011 Meeting of the Next Generation Safegaurds Professional Network  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Safeguards Professional Network (NGSPN) was established in 2009 by Oak Ridge National Laboratory targeted towards the engagement of young professionals employed in safeguards across the many national laboratories. NGSPN focuses on providing a mechanism for young safeguards professionals to connect and foster professional relationships, facilitating knowledge transfer between current safeguards experts and the next generation of experts, and acting as an entity to represent the interests of the international community of young and mid-career safeguards professionals. This is accomplished in part with a yearly meeting held at a national laboratory site. In 2011, this meeting was held at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report documents the events and results of that meeting.

Gitau, Ernest TN; Benz, Jacob M.

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the ARE442 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the ARE 442 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the ARE 442 is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

van Dam, J.; Jager, D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Electrical generation plant design practice intern experience at Power Systems Engineering, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey of the author's internship experience with Power Systems Engineering, Inc. during the period September 1980 through August, 1981 is presented. During this onr year internship, the author was assigned to two engineering projects. One involved design of a 480 MW power plant. The other was the design of a 8.2 MW induction generator for cogeneration. The author's activities during this period can be categorized into two major areas. First, technically oriented, he designed protective relaying and SCADA systems for the projects. Secondly, he assisted the Project Manager in project management activities such as project progress and cost control. The intent of this report is to prepare a training manual for PSE young engineers. It covers both technical guidelines for power plant design and nonacademic professional codes. Although this report is primarily written for young engineers, it can also be used as a reference by older and experienced engineers.

Lee, Ting-Zern Joe, 1950-

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Small power systems study technical summary report. Volume II. Inventory of small generating units in U. S. utility systems  

SciTech Connect

Data identifying small (less than or equal to 10 MW) power units in the United States are tabulated. The data are listed alphabetically by state and are reported sequentially for investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, and electrical cooperatives and other utility systems. For a given utility system, the generating units are divided into steam turbines, diesel generators and gas turbines. The number and size of generating units are listed. A summary tabulation of the number of generating units of each type and total generating capacity by state is presented.

Sitney, L.R.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geotechnical Environmental Aspects of Geothermal Power Generation at Heber, Imperial Valley, California. Topical report 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a portion of the results from a one-year feasibility study sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assess the feasibility of constructing a 25-50 MWe geothermal power plant using low salinity hydrothermal fluid as the energy source. The impact of power generation from hydrothermal resources on subsurface water flow, seismicity and subsidence are of acute interest in the determination of the environmental acceptance of geothermal energy. At the same time, the experience and data bases in these areas are very limited. The objective of the project was to assess the technical, geotechnical, environmental and economic feasibility of producing electricity from hydrothermal resources like those known to exist in the US. The objective of this part of the study was to investigate the geotechnical aspects of geothermal power generation and their relationship to environmental impacts in the Imperial Valley of California. This report discusses geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, seismicity and subsidence in terms of the availability of data, state-of-the-art analytical techniques, historical and technical background and interpretation of current data. it also discusses estimates of the impact of these geotechnical factors on the environment in the Imperial Valley, if geothermal development proceeds.

None

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Maintenance and operation of a small wind generator in the marine environment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the maintenance and operation of a wind-turbine generator that has been undergoing tests as a source of energy for remote Coast Guard lighthouses. The report documents both the effects of operating the wind machine in the marine environment and the maintenance that it required. Design parameters and performance records of the generator are also evaluated. The HR2 is a horizontal-axis, upwind-oriented, three-bladed wind machine. It is equipped with a direct-drive system that allows the kinetic force captured by the propeller to be converted directly into rotational force driving the main shaft. The HR2 alternator and blade/hub system are allowed to tilt out of a near-vertical plane about a shaft and bearing mechanism. The VARCS is a torsion spring- and hinge-mechanism that acts against the lifting dynamics of the spinning blades. As high winds or gusts tilt the alternator about the hinge, the VARCS's spring opposes this force and regulates the blades angle of attack into the wind; the propeller's RPM drop when tilted because of the feathering action. If the wind subsides, the force of the VARCS spring drives the alternator assembly down and presents the blades back into the wind.

Heerlein, W.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, that can help achieve national energy conservation goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. A study of trends reveals that the need for DSG monitoring and control equipment by 1990 to 2000 will be great, measured in tens of thousands. Criteria for assessing DSG integration have been defined and indicate that economic and institutional as well as technical and other factors must be included. The principal emphasis in this report is on the functional requirements for DSG monitoring and control in six major categories. Twenty-four functional requirements have been prepared under these six categories and serve to indicate how to integrate the DSGs with the distribution and other portions of the electric utility system. The results indicate that there are no fundamental technical obstacles to prevent the connection of dispersed storage and generation to the distribution system. However, a communication system of some sophistication will be required to integrate the distribution system and the dispersed generation sources for effective control. The large-size span of generators from 10 kW to 30 MW means that a variety of remote monitoring and control may be required. The results show that an increased effort is required to develop demonstration equipment to perform the DSG monitoring and control functions and to acquire experience with this equipment in the utility distribution environment.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Steam generator tube integrity program. Semiannual report, August 1995--March 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on the Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program from the inception of that program in August 1995 through March 1996. The program is divided into five tasks, namely (1) Assessment of Inspection Reliability, (2) Research on ISI (in-service-inspection) Technology, (3) Research on Degradation Modes and Integrity, (4) Development of Methodology and Technical Requirements for Current and Emerging Regulatory Issues, and (5) Program Management. Under Task 1, progress is reported on the preparation of and evaluation of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for inspecting a mock-up steam generator for round-robin testing, the development of better ways to correlate burst pressure and leak rate with eddy current (EC) signals, the inspection of sleeved tubes, workshop and training activities, and the evaluation of emerging NDE technology. Under Task 2, results are reported on closed-form solutions and finite element electromagnetic modeling of EC probe response for various probe designs and flaw characteristics. Under Task 3, facilities are being designed and built for the production of cracked tubes under aggressive and near-prototypical conditions and for the testing of flawed and unflawed tubes under normal operating, accident, and severe accident conditions. In addition, crack behavior and stability are being modeled to provide guidance on test facility design, to develop an improved understanding of the expected rupture behavior of tubes with circumferential cracks, and to predict the behavior of flawed and unflawed tubes under severe accident conditions. Task 4 is concerned with the cracking and failure of tubes that have been repaired by sleeving, and with a review of literature on this subject.

Diercks, D.R.; Bakhtiari, S.; Chopra, O.K. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reliable, Low-Cost Distributed Generator/Utility System Interconnect: Final Subcontract Report, November 2001-March 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the detailed study and development of new GE anti-islanding controls for two classes of distributed generation. One is inverter-interfaced, while the other is synchronous machine interfaced.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.; Li, L.; Zhou, R.; Garces, L.; Dame, M.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of recuperation, the use of turbine reheat, and the non-consumptive use of EGS make-up water to supplement heat rejection

Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

An innovative demonstration of high power density in a compact MHD generator: Semi-annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the first semi-annual report for this project. It has been prepared in accordance with contractual reporting obligations and contains a written summary of the research work which has been performed since the beginning of the project through March 31, 1988. During this period, research work has included a variety of studies on several aspects of the overall project as was needed to scope out the requirements for proceeding with a detailed design of experimental hardware. One of the major objectives of these efforts was to provide a definition of operating conditions that are required to allow this MHD system to meet the program objectives. These background studies encompassed detailed analyses of the combustion of the aluminum/carbon (Al:C) solid fuel and evaluations of the gas dynamic characteristics of the combustion plasma produced by combustion. Another major effort was that of analyses and predictions of the performance of conceptual designs for the MHD generator. Both of these tasks were directed at obtaining necessary information which would allow geometric scaling of the experimental MHD system. A summary of the design studies that were performed is given within the body of this report. 5 refs., 62 figs., 3 tabs.

Lineberry, J.T.; Schmidt, H.J.; Chapman, J.N.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

MHD generator electrode development. Quarterly report, October-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is directed towards the engineering development of cold metallic electrodes which are alternatives to the use of platinum as an anode clad material for MHD generators. Results of continuing laboratory screening tests are presented. Improvements in the anode arc test methodology and test setup, which have resulted in improved reproducibility as well as test simplification, are discussed. Laboratory electrochemical corrosion testing has been initiated using aqueous and molten salts as the aggressive constituent in the electrolyte. Initial results from these tests are reported. On the basis of these test results, electrochemical corrosion tests using a molten salt are preferred. As a result of ongoing laboratory screening tests, acceptance criteria, which are interim in nature and are likely to change based on future test results have been defined for the anode arc and electrochemical corrosion tests. Reflecting the initial laboratory test results, a listing of candidate advanced alloys which should demonstrate improved corrosion resistance has been defined. Upon completion of WESTF modifications, facility checkout and activation operations have been initiated. Progress, as well as those difficulties which have been encountered, in completing WESTF activation is reported. Detailed engineering and test planning activities in support of WESTF tests are reported.

Sadler, J W; Cadoff, L H; Dietrick, D L

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

Provenzano, J.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Report of tritide study at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a study of sample counting results for wipes from routine surface area monitoring conducted at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center (RNGPDC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The study was initiated in November 2006, with two samples suspected of containing erbium tritide, after some samples were found to exhibit higher tritium counting rates upon recount at a later time. The main goal of the study was to determine whether the current practice of analyzing tritium wipe samples once, within a few days of sample collection, is adequate to accurately quantify the amount of tritium on the sample when tritides may be present. Recommendations are made toward routine recounting of vials suspected of containing particulate forms of tritium.

Burkhart, Robert; Coffey, Jaime

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Evaluation of a once-through heat recovery steam generator concept: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) evaluation of a once-through concept for a combined-cycle heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The project included a review of differences in reliability and maintainability characteristics of the once-through concept and a typical drum-type HRSG design. A special effort was placed on an investigation of the expected performance of the thin-wall alloy 800 boiler tubing used in the once-through HRSG. An analysis was performed by using the UNIRAM computer modeling methodology to compare the predicted availability of the once-through HRSG design with that of a drum-type system. The results of this project provide a basis for understanding the RAM characteristics of the once-through HRSG concept and identify areas where additional research may be beneficial in evaluating this new design for application within the utility industry. 28 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Babione, R.A.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program. Quarterly report, January 1, 1981-March 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields is reported. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities, experiments have been performed to test a multi-channel, fiber optics diagnostic system that yields time-resolved temperature profiles in an MHD channel. For the study of magneto-acoustic fluctuation phenomena, a one-dimensional model has been developed to describe the performance of a non-ideal MHD generator with a generalized electrical configuration. The installation of the hardware for the data acquisition and reduction of the laser Doppler velocimeter data, to be used in the study of turbulence suppression in a magnetic field, has been nearly completed. A two-dimensional MHD computer code has been developed which predicts the dependence on electrode and insulator dimensions of the onset of interelectrode Hall field breakdown. Calculations have been performed of the effects of nonuniformities on the flow and electrical behavior of baseload-sized disk generators.

None

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

High magnetic field MHD generator program. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities and instabilities, theoretical models have been further developed and limits of applicability have been established. An improved laser doppler anemometer, which has been designed for turbulence damping and velocity profile measurements, has been tested in the M-2 facility with favorable results. The theoretical model of Hall field breakdown has been modified to include a two-dimensional insulator analysis, along with a detailed description of the plasma flow over the electrode wall. The model has the capability of predicting both insulator and plasma breakdown and has yielded good agreement with the results of breakdown experiments. The performance of electrode configurations with axial conducting fins has been examined using a three-dimensional numerical solution of the MHD electrical equations. Work progressed on the construction of the peg wall disk generator channel, and the main components of the generator test section are now assembled. Theoretical models of boundary layer effects on the insulator wall and the current discharge in the core are being developed. Data from the linear channel experiment at 5 Tesla are being analyzed and interpreted.

Kruger, C.H.; Eustis, R.H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S.A.; Koester, J.K.; Nakamura, T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the selected thermochemical process and to define the selected reactor and process to the point that capital costs, operating costs and the resultant cost of hydrogen can be estimated. During original contract negotiation, it was necessary to reduce work scope to meet funding limits. As a result, the reactor interface and process will not be iterated to the point that only hydrogen is produced. Rather, hydrogen and electricity will be co-generated and the hydrogen cost will be stated as a function of the electricity sales price.

Brown, L.C.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001  

SciTech Connect

OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the selected thermochemical process and to define the selected reactor and process to the point that capital costs, operating costs and the resultant cost of hydrogen can be estimated. During original contract negotiation, it was necessary to reduce work scope to meet funding limits. As a result, the reactor interface and process will not be iterated to the point that only hydrogen is produced. Rather, hydrogen and electricity will be co-generated and the hydrogen cost will be stated as a function of the electricity sales price.

Brown, L.C.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Conceptual design and optimization of a 1-1/2 generation PFBC plant task 14. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The economics and performance of advanced pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC) cycles developed for utility applications during the last 10 years (especially the 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle) are projected to be favorable compared to conventional pulverized coal power plants. However, the improved economics of 2nd-Generation PFBC cycles are accompanied by the perception of increased technological risk related to the pressurized carbonizer and its associated gas cleanup systems. A PFBC cycle that removed the uncertainties of the carbonizer while retaining the high efficiency and low cost of a 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle could improve the prospects for early commercialization and pave the way for the introduction of the complete 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle at some later date. One such arrangement is a PFBC cycle with natural gas topping combustion, referred to as the 1.5-Generation PFBC cycle. This cycle combines the advantages of the 2nd-Generation PFBC plant with the reduced risk associated with a gas turbine burning natural gas, and can potentially be part of a phased approach leading to the commercialization of utility 2nd-Generation PFBC cycles. The 1.5-Generation PFBC may also introduce other advantages over the more complicated 2nd-Generation PFBC system. This report describes the technical and economic evaluation of 1.5-Generation PFBC cycles for utility or industrial power generation.

White, J.S.; Witman, P.M.; Harbaugh, L.; Rubow, L.N.; Horazak, D.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Assessment of a Transportable 200-kW Fuel Cell in Rural Distributed Generation Applications: Final Report: Georgia, Colorado, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation is particularly attractive to electric cooperatives in rural areas because of their low customer densities and the rapid load growth that often occurs at the end of long radial distribution lines. EPRI and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) Cooperative Research Network cosponsored this project to demonstrate the use of transportable 200-kW phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants in rural distributed generation applications. This final report details the proj...

2002-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

142

Operating experience feedback report -- turbine-generator overspeed protection systems: Commercial power reactors. Volume 11  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) review of operating experience of main turbine-generator overspeed and overspeed protection systems. It includes an indepth examination of the turbine overspeed event which occurred on November 9, 1991, at the Salem Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. It also provides information concerning actions taken by other utilities and the turbine manufacturers as a result of the Salem overspeed event. AEOD`s study reviewed operating procedures and plant practices. It noted differences between turbine manufacturer designs and recommendations for operations, maintenance, and testing, and also identified significant variations in the manner that individual plants maintain and test their turbine overspeed protection systems. AEOD`s study provides insight into the shortcomings in the design, operation, maintenance, testing, and human factors associated with turbine overspeed protection systems. Operating experience indicates that the frequency of turbine overspeed events is higher than previously thought and that the bases for demonstrating compliance with NRC`s General Design Criterion (GDC) 4, Environmental and dynamic effects design bases, may be nonconservative with respect to the assumed frequency.

Ornstein, H.L.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Site Selection & Characterization Status Report for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect

In the near future, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will need to make important decisions regarding design and construction of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). One part of making these decisions is considering the potential environmental impacts that this facility may have, if constructed here at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides DOE decision makers with a process to systematically consider potential environmental consequences of agency decisions. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Title VI, Subtitel C, Section 644) states that the 'Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) shall have licensing and regulatory authority for any reactor authorized under this subtitle.' This stipulates that the NRC will license the NGNP for operation. The NRC NEPA Regulations (10 CFR Part 51) require tha thte NRC prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a permit to construct a nuclear power plant. The applicant is required to submit an Environmental report (ER) to aid the NRC in complying with NEPA.

Mark Holbrook

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fueled viking generator S/N 106 acceptance vibration test report  

SciTech Connect

The Viking Generator S/N 106 was vibrated to the Teledyne Isotope Flight Acceptance Schedule (Random Only) with no deviation from normal generator functional output. Radiographic analysis and power tests before and after the vibration test indicated no change in the condition of the generator. The work was conducted in the Alpha Fuels Environmental Test Facility at Mound Laboratory.

Anderson, C.; Brewer, C.O.; Abrahamson, S.G.

1976-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

145

Power generation systems for NOx reduction. CRADA final report for CRADA Number Y-1292-0111  

SciTech Connect

The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) No. Y1292-0111, between Allison Gas Turbine Division of General Motors Corporation and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, under contract to the US Department of Energy, is entitled ``Power Generation Systems for NOx Reduction``. The objective of this effort was to design, develop, and demonstrate an integrated turbine genset suitable for high efficiency power generation requirements. The result of this effort would have been prototype generator hardware including controllers for testing and evaluation by Allison Gas Turbine Division. The generator would have been coupled to a suitably sized and configured gas turbine engine, which would operate on a laboratory load bank. This effort leads to extensive knowledge and design capability in the most efficient and high power density generator design for mobile power generation and potentially to commercialization of these advanced technologies.

Adams, D.J. [Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berenyi, S.G. [General Motors Corp., Indianapolis, IN (United States). Allison Gas Turbine Div.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of > 47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x} SO {sub x} and Particulates < 25% NSPS; Cost of electricity 10% lower; coal > 65% of heat input and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. Most of this report discusses the details of work on these components, and the R&D Plan for future work. The discussion of the combustor designs illustrates how detailed modeling can be an effective tool to estimate NO{sub x} production, minimum burnout lengths, combustion temperatures and even particulate impact on the combustor walls. When our model is applied to the long flame concept it indicates that fuel bound nitrogen will limit the range of coals that can use this approach. For high nitrogen coals a rapid mixing, rich-lean, deep staging combustor will be necessary. The air heater design has evolved into two segments: a convective heat exchanger downstream of the combustion process; a radiant panel heat exchanger, located in the combustor walls; The relative amount of heat transferred either radiatively or convectively will depend on the combustor type and the ash properties.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of > 47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x} SO {sub x} and Particulates 65% of heat input and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. Most of this report discusses the details of work on these components, and the R&D Plan for future work. The discussion of the combustor designs illustrates how detailed modeling can be an effective tool to estimate NO{sub x} production, minimum burnout lengths, combustion temperatures and even particulate impact on the combustor walls. When our model is applied to the long flame concept it indicates that fuel bound nitrogen will limit the range of coals that can use this approach. For high nitrogen coals a rapid mixing, rich-lean, deep staging combustor will be necessary. The air heater design has evolved into two segments: a convective heat exchanger downstream of the combustion process; a radiant panel heat exchanger, located in the combustor walls; The relative amount of heat transferred either radiatively or convectively will depend on the combustor type and the ash properties.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Report covering examination of parts from downhole steam generators. [Combustor head and sleeve parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustor head and sleeve parts were examined by using optical and scanning electron metallography after use in oxygen/diesel and air/diesel downhole steam generators. The degradation of the different alloy components is described in terms of reactions with oxygen, sulfur and carbon in the presence of cyclic stresses, all generated by the combustion process. Recommendations are presented for component materials (alloys and coatings) to extend component lives in the downhole steam generators. 9 references, 22 figures, 3 tables.

Pettit, F. S.; Meier, G. H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Milliwatt generator heat source. Quarterly technical progress report, April 16, 1976--July 15, 1976  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities at MRC associated with the Milliwatt Generator Heat Source efforts over the period April 16, 1976, to July 15, 1976, are presented below.

Amos, W.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary Research and Development, and Task 4, Commercial Generating Plant Design, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, {open_quotes}Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System{close_quotes} between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates {le} 25% NSPS; cost {ge} 65% of heat input; and all solid wastes benign. The report discusses progress in cycle analysis, chemical reactor modeling, ash deposition rate calculations for HITAF (high temperature advanced furnace) convective air heater, air heater materials, and deposit initiation and growth on ceramic substrates.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fourth annual progress report on the electrofluid dynamic wind generator. Final report, 1 April 1979-31 August 1980  

SciTech Connect

In an EFD generator, charge particles of one polarity are seeded into a flowing neutral gas. Viscous interactions with neutral molecules drive the charged particles against an electrical potential and produce dc power of low current density and very high voltage. Demonstration of an energy economic method of producing and distributing low mobility charged droplets is described.

Minardi, J.E.; Lawson, M.O.; Wattendorf, F.L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report

Open Energy Info (EERE)

equipment data collected on the Form EIA-860. The "BoilerGen" identifies which boilers are associated with each generator; the "BoilerCool" tab shows which cooling systems...

153

Experimental two-phase liquid--metal magnetohydrodynamic generator program. Annual report, August 1975--September 1976  

SciTech Connect

The revised ambient-temperature NaK-nitrogen facility is described. The maximum liquid flow rate and generator inlet pressure are 10.9 kg/s 200 gpm) and 1.48 MP/sub a/ absolute (200 psig), respectively, compared with the previous values of 6 kg/s (110 gpm) and 0.72 MPa absolute (90 psig). Satisfactory loop operation has been obtained, and new experiments with the second diverging-channel generator were completed. The principal experimental results were a higher power density for the same generator operating conditions, and an apparent tendency for the efficiency to improve more with increasing quality at higher velocities than lower velocities. An evaluation of an annular generator geometry is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometry are described, the equations developed, and solutions obtained for three cases--constant velocity and no armature reactions, laminar flow with no armature reaction, and armature reaction with constant velocity. Numerical examples show that: (1) the attainable terminal voltages appear to be very low, (2) flow reversal and large viscous loss occur at or below the desired power densities, and (3) armature reaction effects are important and compensation techniques appear impractical. Thus, this annular geometry does not appear attractive for either generator or pump operation. The initial steps in the program to produce and evaluate liquid-metal foams are described. The future directions of the expermental generator program, including foams, are discussed.

Petrick, M.; Fabris, G.; Pierson, E.S.; Carl, D.A.; Fischer, A.K.; Johnson, C.E.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

FINAL SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT--SNAP 1A RADIOISOTOPE FUELED THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The safety aspects involved in utilizing the Task 2 radioisotope-powered thermoelectric generator in a terrestrial satellite are described. It is based upon a generalized satellite mission having a 600-day orbital lifetime. A description of the basic design of the generator is presented in order to establish the analytical model. This includes the generator design, radiocerium fuel properties, and the fuel core. The transport of the generator to the launch site is examined, including the shipping cask, shipping procedures, and shipping hazards. A description of ground handling and vehicle integration is presented including preparation for fuel transfer, transfer, mating of generators to final stage, mating final stage to booster, and auxiliary support equipment. The flight vehicle is presented to complete the analytical model. Contained in this chapter are descriptions of the booster-sustainer, final stage, propellants, and built-in safety systems. The typical missile range is examined with respect to the launch complex and range safety characteristics. The shielding of the fuel is discussed and includes both dose rates and shield thicknesses required. The bare core, shielded generator, fuel transfer operation and dose rates for accidental conditions are treated. mechanism of re-entry from the successful mission is covered. Radiocerium inventories with respect to time and the chronology of re-entry are specifically treated. The multiplicity of conditions for aborted missions is set forth. The definition of aborted missions is treated first in order to present the initial conditions. Following this, a definition of the forces imposed upon the generator is presented. The aborted missions is presented. A large number of initial vehicle failure cases is narrowed down into categories of consequences. Since stratospheric injection of fuel results in cases where the fuel is not contained after re-entry, an extensive discussion of the fall-out mechanism is presented. (auth)

Dix, G.P.

1960-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Experimental two-phase liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic generator program. Annual report, October 1976--September 1977  

SciTech Connect

Testing of the second diverging-channel generator with the revised ambient-temperature NaK-N/sub 2/ facility has been completed. The primary goal of the revised facility, demonstrating reduced slip ratio (ratio of gas velocity to liquid velocity) with higher liquid velocity (flow rate), was accomplished. The reduction in slip ratio was dramatically demonstrated by a series of consecutive runs with varying flow rate (from 6 kg/s to 12 kg/s for the liquid). Substantial increases in generator efficiency were obtained with higher liquid flow rates. Experiments to demonstrate that good liquid-to-gas heat transfer exists in the generator were successfully completed. Good heat transfer is essential because it is the almost-constant-temperature expansion of the gas (vapor) in the generator that yields the higher system efficiencies for liquid-metal MHD power cycles. The feasibility of generating relatively-stable bubbles, hence, a foam, in liquid metals has been demonstrated. Photographic documentation of these phenomena, both motion and still pictures, was made. Surface tension measurements and foaming experiments have shown that viscosity is also a factor in promoting bubble formation and persistence. Wetting and contact angle measurements have been made for stainless steel and carbon steel immersed in eutectic NaK. An analytical study of the liquid shunt (wall) layer sizes and losses has shown that these losses are not expected to be significant for large generators; less than 1.0 percent decrease in efficiency is anticipated. A two-phase pressure-gradient correlation developed for MHD flows has been shown to agree to within 20 percent with the generator data.

Petrick, M.; Fabris, G.; Pierson, E.S.; Fischer, A.K.; Johnson, C.E.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Characterization of open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators. Eleventh quarterly technical progress report, May 1-July 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful design of full-scale open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators for baseload electrical production requires a detailed understanding of the plasma chemical and plasma dynamic characteristics of anticipated combustor and channel fluids. The report documents the development of a diffusion controlled heterogeneous condensation model and channel heat loss model for incorporation into the PACKAGE code used to calculate core flow plasma properties and generator efficiency. PACKAGE calculations comparing realistic baseload subsonic and supersonic generator models are also presented. Progress on the refinement of a laboratory scale coal combustion plasma source and its associated molecular beam mass spectrometer diagnostic and diode laser absorption plasma temperature measurement systems is documented. Finally, progress on the development of a numerical model describing arc behavior in MHD electrode boundary layers is presented.

Kolb, C.E.; Wormhoudt, J.; Yousefian, V.; Cheng, W.; Bien, F.; Dvore, D.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

  Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 7% in 006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9

158

Form EIA-860M MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

INSTRUCTIONS INSTRUCTIONS Year: 2013 No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours PURPOSE Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: a) Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; b) Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and c) Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry. REQUIRED RESPONDENTS Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860,

159

Evaluation of steam-generator fluid mixing during layup. Final report. [PWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop practical methods of achieving an adequately mixed chemical environment on the secondary side of PWR steam generators during periods of shutdown, cold shutdown (layup), and startup. Layup chemicals introduced into the steam generator could then be evenly dispersed to minimize corrosion processes which may occur if the chemical environment was not properly maintained. Systems for chemical feed, mixing, sampling, and removal of contaminant chemicals in the steam generator secondary side were also evaluated and recommendations have been made. Test results from a plexiglass model indicated that forced circulation and turbulent mixing were the most effective methods of achieving a rapid, homogeneous chemical environment. Natural convection and diffusion, on the other hand, were found to be less effective in achieving a thorough mixing.

MacArthur, A.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Progress report, [1992--1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new hypothesis is introduced for the generation of petroleum and natural gas. The transition metals, activated under the reducing conditions of diagenesis, are proposed as catalysts in the generation of light hydrocarbons. The objective of this proposal is to test that hypothesis. Transition metals (Ni, V, Ti, Co, Fe), in kerogen, porphyrins, and as pure compounds, will be tested under catagenic conditions for catalytic activity in the conversion of normal paraffins and hydrogen into light hydrocarbons. If the hypothesis is correct, kerogenous transition metals should become catalytically active under the reducing conditions of diagenesis and catalyze the conversion of paraffins into the light hydrocarbons seen in petroleum. Moreover, the C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbons generated catalytically should be similar in molecular and isotopic compositions to natural gas.

Mango, F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term ( 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fourth generation nuclear weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects, Report ISRI-05-03  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped-charge jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

Andre Gsponer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

Huskey, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program. Quarterly report, April 1, 1981-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields is described. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities, experiments have been performed to test a multi-channel, fiber optics diagnostic system that yields time-resolved temperature profiles in an MHD channel. For the study of magneto-acoustic fluctuation phenomena, a one-dimensional model has been developed to describe the performance of a non-ideal MHD generator with a generalized electrical configuration. The installation of the hardware for the data acquisition and reduction of the laser Doppler velocimeter data, to be used in the study of turbulence suppression in a magnetic field, has been nearly completed and preliminary software has been written. A two-dimensional MHD computer code has been developed which predicts the dependence on electrode and insulator dimensions of the onset of interelectrode Hall field breakdown, as initiated either by breakdown in the insulator or in the plasma. There is good agreement between calculation and measurements. Calculations have been performed of the effects of nonuniformities on the flow and electrical behavior of baseload-sized disk generators. Also, predictions of the performance of baseload inflow disk generators have been calculated and compared with linear generators.

Kruger, C.H.; Eustis, R.H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S.A.; Koester, J.K.; Nakamura, T.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

[Radioisotope thermoelectric generators and ancillary activities]. Monthly technical progress report, 1 April--28 April 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tehnical progress achieved during this period on radioisotope thermoelectric generators is described under the following tasks: engineering support, safety analysis, qualified unicouple fabrication, ETG fabrication/assembly/test, RTG shipping/launch support, design/review/mission applications, and project management/quality assurance/reliability.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Demonstration of a nitrogen based carburizing atmosphere (energy consumption of the endothermic generator). First quarterly report, 1 October 1978--30 December 1978  

SciTech Connect

This first quarterly report details the energy consumption of an endothermic generator. Two different sized generators were studied and found to have basically the same energy usage characteristics. The energy consumption was found to be dependent on generator output, with less energy consumption per unit volume at higher outputs.

Peartree, R.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report on the results of the power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on Entegrity Wind System Inc.'s EW50 small wind turbine.

Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A new emergency lubricating-oil system for steam turbine generators: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A positive-displacement pump, powered by a turbine-shaft driven permanent magnet generator (PMG) can be used to provide lubricating oil over nearly the entire turbine generator speed range. The concept offers high reliability through its simplicity; switchgear, batteries and other auxiliaries are eliminated by hard-wiring the PMG to the pump induction drive motor. In this study, an existing PMG supplying power to the electrohydraulic control (EHC) system was evaluated as the power supply for an induction motor-driven screw pump running in a ''wafting'' mode as a backup to a conventional dc emergency oil system. The screw pump rotates all the time that the turbine shaft turns; check valves allow it to deliver oil instantly if the system pressure falls. It was found that the pump drive motor would start and run reliably with no adverse effects on the PMG or the electrohydraulic control (EHC) system. 6 refs., 23 figs., 11 tabs.

Kalan, G.L.; Oney, W.R.; Steenburgh, J.H.; Elwell, R.C.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Airblast and ground vibration generation and propagation from contour mine blasting. Report of investigations/1984  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines studied airblast and ground vibrations produced by surface coal mine blasting in Appalachia to determine the topographic or other region-specific effects on generation and propagation. Arrays of seismographs were used to measure blast effects in both rolling-terrain and steep-slope contour coal mining areas. Comparisons were then made with previous blasting data from studies of midwest coal mines located in flat areas.

Stachura, V.J.; Siskind, D.E.; Kopp, J.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Radiolytic generation of gases from synthetic waste. Annual report, FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Yields of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}, in simulated waste solutions, containing high nitrate, nitrite, hydroxide and aluminate, were experimentally measured in the presence and absence of moderate concentrations of organic chelators and some of their degradation products. These yields were measured at 30 and 60{degrees}C. No effect of dose rate on yield of H{sub 2} was observed and the amount of H{sub 2} increases linearly with dose and with the concentration of the organic additive. The generation of N{sub 2}O was observed only when organic solutes were present and its yield was dose rate dependent. Rate constants for H atom abstraction from the organic component by free H atoms were determined and these were correlated with the efficiency of the organic solute and in the generation of H{sub 2}. The rate of thermal generation of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O was also measured and was found to substantially increase in solutions that were preirradiated, presumably due to the generation of radiolytic degradation products. Computer modeling of the radiolytic precesses show the yield of H{sub 2} is strongly dependent on the nitrite concentration; the yield decreases with increasing nitrite concentration. The yield will be only weakly dependent on nitrate concentration above 0.5 M. Simulation of the homogeneous reactions that describe the chemistry of the NO{sub x} system indicate that: no N{sub 2}O will be formed in the absence of NO{sub x}-organic reactions. 18 refs., 41 figs., 13 tabs.

Meisel, D.; Diamond, H.; Horwitz, E.P.; Jonah, C.D.; Matheson, M.S.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.; Sullivan, J.C.; Barnabas, F.; Cerny, E.; Cheng, Y.D.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hydrogen generation process. Final report. [Hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical process based on electrolysis of sulfurous acid  

SciTech Connect

The technical and economic feasibility of a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical hydrogen generation process based on the electrolysis of sulfurous acid was assessed. The experimental studies performed were concentrated on those areas important to the success of the process. These included the electrolysis, acid concentration, and sulfur trioxide reduction steps. Engineering and economic studies on the system were also performed to assess its potential for ultimate utilization and to provide information of value in planning the future course of the program.

Farbman, G.H.; Koump, V.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Solar-assisted hydrogen generation by photoelectrocatalysis. Final report mar 81-may 82  

SciTech Connect

The goal was to gain a basic understanding of how surface modifications of illuminated semiconductors can enhance the efficiency of photoelectrolytic hydrogen generation. Semiconductor electrodes have been used to carry out photoassisted electrolysis processes for the production of hydrogen from water. Better photoelectrodes will increase the efficiency of these processes. This was accomplished through modification of the semiconductor surface by deposition of electrocatalysts or by photosensitization. Electrolyte modifications can also result in enhanced photoelectrochemical performance from the semiconductor/liquid junction.

Ang, P.G.P.; Richardson, P.F.; Yen, P.H.; Tiller, A.J.; Sammells, A.F.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program. Quarterly report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate a number of important problems in the development of MHD generator channels is described. The areas of reseach include nonuniformity and stability effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in a 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the area of magneto-acoustic disturbances, a major experiment to study the formation and behavior of propagating waves in a combustion MHD was completed, using the M-2 facility. The results of this experiment are currently being compared with a theoretical model previously developed at Stanford. For the study of the effects of nonuniformities on generator performance, a diagnostic system for measurement of plasma temperature profiles and also a nitrogen injection device were satisfactorily tested in the M-2 flowtrain. An improved laser Doppler velocimeter system for the study of turbulence suppression in a magnetic field has been developed and tested, both on the bench and with the MHD flowtrain. The theoretical model of Hall field breakdown has been modified to better account for the effects of current concentrations. The peg-wall test section of the six-Tesla disk generator has been successfully tested under full thermal and electrical conditions. (WHK)

Kruger, C.H.; Eustis, R.H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S.A.; Koester, J.K.; Nakamura, T.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Testing requirements for variable-speed generating technology for wind turbine applications. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines for evaluating the impacts of integrating variable-speed, constant-frequency (VSCF) wind turbines into electric utility systems have been proposed based upon prior test experiences with the NASA VSCF system and the expected performance of the Westinghouse and OMNION VSCF systems. The NASA and Westinghouse VSCF generating systems use a wound rotor induction generator and a cycloconverter, while the OMNION system uses a wound rotor induction generator and a dc-current link converter. The design of VSCF/utility system interface requirements and test plans is based on utility system electrical issues such as utility system control and operation, protection, voltage/reactive power management, power quality, and reliability. A framework for testing VSCF concepts is proposed which includes a three stage process: modeling of the system to analyze design alternatives and simulate disturbances that could be harmful to the actual system; laboratory testing which involves the use of the system under controlled conditions; and field testing to collect data under actual conditions to validate models and analyze the wind turbine behavior.

Herrera, J.I.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

SciTech Connect

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Radiolytic and radiolytically induced generation of gases from synthetic wastes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To better understand the processes leading to the generation and release of gases from waste tanks, the authors studied the radiolytic and thermal generation of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3} in nonradioactive waste simulant solutions and slurries. The radiolytic sources for H{sub 2} are e{sub aq}{sup {minus}} and its predecessors and H atoms. Radiolysis of the water generates some H{sub 2} and an additional amount comes from the hydrogen abstraction reaction H + RH{yields}H{sub 2}+R{center_dot}. Nitrate scavenges e{sub aq}{sup {minus}} and its predecessors whereas nitrite is the major H-atom scavenger. Computer modeling shows that if [NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}] is above 0.5 M, and [NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}] is above 2M, the addition of other scavengers will have little effect on the yield of H{sub 2}. In the presence of organic molecules O{sub 2} is efficiently destroyed. Small yields of ammonia were measured and the yields increase linearly with dose. The nitrogen in NH{sub 3} comes from organic chelators. The yields of gases in solution depend only weakly on temperature. The rate of thermal generation of gases increases upon preirradiation, reaches a maximum, and then declines. The known radiolytic degradation products of chelators, NTA, IDA, glycolate, glyoxylate, formaldehyde, formate, oxalate, and hydroxylainine were examined for their roles in the thermal generation of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O at 60{degrees}C. In solution or slurry only radiolytically produced Pd intermediate strongly retains H{sub 2}. Radiolytic yields of N{sub 2}O are strongly reduced by Cr(III). In irradiated slurry, loose and tight gas were found. The loose gas could be removed by bubbling from the slurry, but the tight gas could be released only by dissolution of the slurry.

Meisel, D.; Jonah, C.D.; Kapoor, S.; Matheson, M.S.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Final report on the design of the MHD generator channel for the high performance demonstration experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MHD generator for the MHD Performance Demonstration Experiment is designed to demonstrate that enthalpy extraction of the order of 16 to 18% at a turbine efficiency greater than 60% is achievable for commercial application. The generator channel is designed to operate with a subsonic flow of seeded combustion products in a 6 Tesla (T) magnetic field and deliver up to 50 MW of electrical power with a 60 kg/sec mass flow. The heat sink design of the channel limits the operating duration to 15 sec which is adequate to demonstrate performance. Physically, the generator channel is 9 m long, 0.82 m wide by 0.60 m high at the inlet and 1.32 m wide by 1.08 m high at the exit. The channel is fabricated in five sections for ease in handling. The channel consists of an outer pressure vessel lined with a copper heat sink in the form of interior electrode and insulating walls. The outer pressure vessel is comprised of NEMA G-11 laminated fiberglass panels circumferentially reinforced with external stainless steel frames. The interior insulating wall is comprised of 1.9 cm square copper pegs end mounted to the wall with a 1.6 mm refractory filled insulating gap between adjacent pegs. The copper electrodes span the channel height on either side and are similarly insulated from each other. Graphite caps on the electrodes are utilized to produce a high surface temperature and resulting favorable electrical contact with the plasma. There are 485 pairs of electrically accessible electrodes of which only 418 pairs spanning 7 m length in the middle of the channel will be connected to individual loads in the Faraday configuration. The channel is designed to also be operated in an externally connected diagonal configuration in which a single load is connected between inlet and exit electrodes and selected anode and cathode electrodes are shorted elsewhere.

Schmidt, H.J. (ed.)

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Market survey of geothermal wellhead power generation systems. Final report, March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess the market potential for a portable geothermal wellhead power conversion device (1-10 MW generating capacity). Major study objectives included identifying the most promising applications for such a system, the potential impediments confronting their industrialization, and the various government actions needed to overcome these impediments. The heart of the study was a series of structured interviews with key decision-making individuals in the various disciplines of the geothermal community. In addition, some technical and economic analyses of a candidate system were performed to support the feasibility of the basic concept.

Leeds, M.W.; Evensizer, J.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Second-generation PFBC systems R and D. Monthly report, July 1--July 31, 2000  

SciTech Connect

No work was performed on Phase 2; the two remaining Multi Annular Swirl Burner test campaigns are on hold pending selection of a new test facility (replacement for the shut down UTSI burner test facility) and identification of associated testing costs. Phase 3 of the Second-Generation PFB Combustion Plant conceptual design prepared in 1987 is being updated to reflect the benefit of pilot plant test data and the latest advances in gas turbine technology. The updated plant is being designed to operate with 95% sulfur capture and a single Siemens Westinghouse (SW) 501G gas turbine. Using carbonizer and gas turbine data generated by Foster Wheeler (FW) and SW respectively, Parsons Infrastructure and Technology prepared preliminary plant heat and material balances based on carbonizer operating temperatures of 1,700 and 1,800 F, the former yielded the higher plant efficiency and has been selected for the design update. The 501G gas turbine ha san air compressor discharge temperature of 811 F and an exhaust temperature of 1,140 F. Both of these streams represent high sources of heat and must be cooled, the air to 600 F to be compatible with a 650 F PCFB pressure vessel design temperature and the exhaust for a 275 F stack gas temperature. Because of their relatively high temperature, they can be used for feed water heating, steam generation and/or steam superheating and reheating. As a result, the plant could have one boiler (the PCFB boiler), or as many as three boilers if their cooling is used to generate steam. Three different plant arrangements using one, two and then three boilers were considered with the three-boiler arrangement minimizing the feedwater flow/steam turbine size and maximizing the plant efficiency. After reviewing the three arrangements it was felt the operating complexity associated with a three-boiler plant did not justify the 1/2 point increase in plant efficiency it provided and a two-boiler plant was selected.

Robertson, A.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Economic Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) study. Volume I. ERTG design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop and evaluate an ERTG design for a high power, Curium-244 fueled system based on the tubular thermoelectric module technology; (2) to prepare a program plan for the development of a flight qualified ERTG; and (3) to estimate the costs associated with the production of one, ten and twenty flight qualified ERTG's. This volume presents the Reference Design ERTG approach, the results of the engineering trade studies leading to its selection, and the Second Generation ERTG Design proposed for development. (WHK)

Not Available

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Next-generation three-phase inverters. Phase one annual report, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PV-MaT 4A subcontract addresses the cost effective manufacture of PV related end-products. Advanced Energy Systems Inc. (AES Inc.) has undertaken NREL contract No. ZAF-4-14271-10, {open_quotes}Next Generation Three Phase Inverter{close_quotes}, to combine leading industry skill with state-of-the-art technologies to realize cutting-edge PV inverter related products. To this end, in phase one of the PV-MaT contract, AES Inc. has made significant inroads toward establishing low cost manufacture of an intelligent controller PV-hybrid product.

Wesley, A.; Wills, R. [Advanced Energy Systems Inc., Wilton, NH (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Key contributions in MHD power generation. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1979-November 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate entries were made in the data base for the four tasks which include: (1) investigation of electrical behavior in the vicinity of electrode and insulating walls; (2) studies of critical performance issues in the development of combustion disk generators; (3) development and testing of electrode modules, including studies of insulator properties; and (4) determination of coal combustion kinetics and ash behavior relevant to two-stage MHD combustors, and investigation of the mixing and flow aerodynamics of a high swirl geometry second stage. (WHK)

Louis, J F

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Status report - advanced heat exchanger technology for a CCGT power generation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report gives laboratory and field test results of a specially designed heat exchanger for coal-fired power plants. The system incorporates an atmospheric fluidized bed and combustion system for pulverized coal. The heat exchanger was made from both metallic and ceramic materials.

Wright, D.E.; Tignac, L.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Technical and economic feasibility of solar augmented process steam generation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the technical and economic feasibility of solar augmented process steam generation was performed. This approach is analogous to a heat pump that extracts heat from a low temperature reservoir (provided by solar energy) and raises its temperature to a useful level via mechanical work. The shaft power required in the compressor is only one third to one quarter of total steam enthalpy for low pressure process steam (100 psig). This approach permits the use of low cost flat plate collectors. It was concluded that these systems have the potential of yielding payback periods of 5 to 8 years and 10 to 15 years for collector costs of $2/ft/sup 2/ and $5/ft/sup 2/, respectively, depending upon the location. A design study of various components indicated that these components are generally available or need only minor modifications for steam service. The component selection was largely a function of steam generation rate. In general, collector cost was the controlling factor. It was also concluded that additional incentives are probably required for increased utilization of solar energy for industrial process steam.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Specification for strontium-90 500-watt(e) radioisotopic thermoelectric generator. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design for a demonstration 500-watt(e) radioisotopic thermoelectric generator has been created for the Department of Energy. The design effort was divided into two tasks, viz., create a design specification for a capsule strength member that utilizes a standard Strontium-90 fluoride-filled WESF inner liner, and create a conceptual design for a 500-watt(e) RTG. Both tasks have been accomplished. The strength-member specification was designed to survive an external pressure of 24,500 psi and meet the requirements of special-form radioisotope heat sources. Therefore the capsule can, if desired, be licensed for domestic and international transport. The design for the RTG features a radioisotopic heat source, an array of nine capsules in a tungsten biological shield, four current-technology series-connected thermoelectric-conversion modules, low-conductivity thermal insulation, and a passive finned-housing radiator for waste-heat dissipation. The preliminary RTG specification formulated previous to contract award has been met or exceeded. The power source will generate the required power for the required service period at 28 volts dc with a conversion efficiency of 8%, provided the existing in-pool capsules at WESF meet the assumed thermal-inventory requirements.

Hammel, T.; Himes, J.; Lieberman, A.; McGrew, J.; Owings, D.; Schumann, F.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Draft quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary R and D, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, ``Engineering Development of a Coal-Fired High Performance Power Generation System`` between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and particulates {le} 25% NSPS; cost {ge}65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign. A crucial aspect of the authors design is the integration of the gas turbine requirements with the HITAF output and steam cycle requirements. In order to take full advantage of modern highly efficient aeroderivative gas turbines they have carried out a large number of cycle calculations to optimize their commercial plant designs for both greenfield and repowering applications.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Mariah Power Windspire Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of the first round of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. This duration test report focuses on the Mariah Power Windspire wind turbine.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Preliminary assessment of PWR Steam Generator modelling in RELAP5/MOD3. International Agreeement Report  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary assessment of Steam Generator (SG) modelling in the PWR thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5/MOD3 is presented. The study is based on calculations against a series of steady-state commissioning tests carried out on the Wolf Creek PWR over a range of load conditions. Data from the tests are used to assess the modelling of primary to secondary side heat transfer and, in particular, to examine the effect of reverting to the standard form of the Chen heat transfer correlation in place of the modified form applied in RELAP5/MOD2. Comparisons between the two versions of the code are also used to show how the new interphase drag model in RELAP5/MOD3 affects the calculation of SG liquid inventory and the void fraction profile in the riser.

Preece, R.J.; Putney, J.M. [National Power, Leatherhead (United Kingdom). Technology and Environment Centre

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Assessment of PWR Steam Generator modelling in RELAP5/MOD2. International Agreement Report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of Steam Generator (SG) modelling in the PWR thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5/MOD2 is presented. The assessment is based on a review of code assessment calculations performed in the UK and elsewhere, detailed calculations against a series of commissioning tests carried out on the Wolf Creek PWR and analytical investigations of the phenomena involved in normal and abnormal SG operation. A number of modelling deficiencies are identified and their implications for PWR safety analysis are discussed -- including methods for compensating for the deficiencies through changes to the input deck. Consideration is also given as to whether the deficiencies will still be present in the successor code RELAP5/MOD3.

Putney, J.M.; Preece, R.J. [National Power, Leatherhead (GB). Technology and Environment Centre

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Proposed guidelines for reporting performance of a solar dish/Stirling electric generation system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental performance data from dish/Stirling system testing can be analyzed to generate a system performance model. An approach to developing an experimentally based performance model of a dish/Stirling system is given. Two methods for analyzing the experimental data are described. To provide information that will permit comparison of dish/Stirling systems, it is necessary to define many of the details involved in calculating system performance data such as the net system output and system solar-to-electric efficiency. This paper describes a set of guidelines for these calculations, based on past experience, especially with the Vanguard dish/Stirling system. Also presented are a set of rating conditions at which a maximum value for system efficiency can be calculated. Comparison between systems of their rated peak solar-to-electric efficiency is made possible when these rating conditions are in common use by manufacturers and testing agencies.

Stine, W.B. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (US). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Powell, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Economic Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) study. Volume II. Development plan. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop and evaluate an ERTG design for a high power, Curium-244 fueled system based on the tubular thermoelectric module technology; (2) to prepare a program plan for the development of a flight qualified ERTG; and (3) to estimate the costs associated with the production of one, ten and twenty flight qualified ERTG's. This volume summarizes the program plan for developing and producing flight qualified ERTG's. The information presented explains what will be accomplished and when, in relation to the overall technical and management effort - defining a program geared to the design, development, qualification, and delivery within six years of ERTG hardware satisfying specified USAF performance objectives. In addition, cost estimates are supplied for producing ten and twenty follow-on ERTG units based on the Second Generation ERTG Design. (WHK)

Not Available

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Feasibility determination for hydroelectric development at Thermalito Afterbay with STRAFLO turbine-generators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study addresses the development of the Thermalito Afterbay, in California. Presently, the outlet of the afterbay dissipates the afterbay's useful energy through five radial gates into the Feather River complex. The feasibility of constructing a hydroelectric facility to recover this wasted energy through the use of STRAFLO hydro turbines is appraised, and data relevant to the future economic benefits of such a facility as compared to alternate energy alternatives are presented. In addition, the regulatory, ecological, and socio-institutional impacts which form additional considerations to a future thermalito afterbay site development are summarized. The study shows an annual generation potential of 48.82 GWh. The cost of developing the site is estimated to be $23.5 million. Social and environmental effects would be minimal. The final feasibility of development is contingent on power contracts which the state of California will be negotiating in 1983. (LCL)

Mueller, B.L.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effect of Hurricane Andrew on the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station from August 20--30, 1992. [Final report  

SciTech Connect

On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Turkey Point Electrical Generating Station with sustained winds of 145 mph (233 km/h). This is the report of the team that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) jointly sponsored (1) to review the damage that the hurricane caused the nuclear units and the utility`s actions to prepare for the storm and recover from it, and (2) to compile lessons that might benefit other nuclear reactor facilities.

Hebdon, F.J. [Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

FORM EIA-860M MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and disclosure information, see the provisions stated on the last page of the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction. SCHEDULE 1. IDENTIFICATION Survey Contact Name:__________________________________________ Title:___________________________________________ Address:__________________________________________________________________________________________

197

Outlook for Regional Generation Capacity Balances: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is in the midst of a power plant expansion boom, achieving record additions of natural gas-fired combustion turbines and combined-cycle units over the past two years, with 68,000 MW already added since 1998 and 17,000 MW more slated for completion by the end of 2001. This report provides a region-by-region accounting of how this new capacity -- plus hundreds of megawatts of possible additional natural gas and coal capacity -- may change reserve margins and result in many other impacts a...

2002-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

The value of distributed generation: The PVUSA grid-support project serving Kerman Substation. Interim report, April 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A common practice of electric utilities experiencing transmission and distribution (T and D) system overloads is to expand the substation, add lines, or upgrade equipment, all of which are capital intensive options. In 1988, it was hypothesized that strategically sited photovoltaics (PV) could benefit parts of T and D systems near or at overloaded conditions. An evaluation methodology was developed and applied to a test case (Kerman Substation near Fresno, California). Analytical results suggested that the value of PV to the T and D system could substantially exceed its energy and generation capacity value. The importance of this finding indicated the need for empirical validation. This led to the construction of a 0.5 MW PV demonstration plant by Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) at Kerman, California as part of the PVUSA (PV for Utility Scale Applications) project. PVUSA is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale photovoltaic electric generation systems. The Kerman PV plant, commissioned for commercial operation in June, 1993, is reported to be the first grid-support PV demonstration plant in the world. This Interim Report focuses on validating the technical aspects of grid-support PV. It provides interim validation results for four of the eight identified value components that stack up to make the ``value bar``, and compares them to 1992 Case Study estimates. Results are based on improved technical evaluation methodologies, measured plant performance under a variety of conditions, and long-term plant performance estimated using a validated computer simulation program. This report is not intended to be exhaustive in scope. It does, however, provide a thorough progress update of the validation project. Complete documentation of test procedures, data, and evaluation methods will be presented in the Final Report.

Hoff, T.; Wenger, H. [Pacific Energy Group (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

High magnetic field MHD generator program. Final report, July 1, 1976-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A theoretical and experimental program was undertaken to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields. The areas studied were inhomogeneity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown and electrode configuration and current concentrations. In addition, a program was undertaken to study steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. The structure of the inhomogeneities in the Stanford M-2 was characterized and compared with theoretical results from a linearized perturbation analysis. General agreement was obtained and the analysis was used to compute stability regions for large size generators. The Faraday electrical connection was found to be more stable than the Hall or diagonal wall connections. Boundary layer profile measurements were compared with theoretical calculations with good agreement. Extrapolation of the calculations to pilot scale MHD channels indicates that Hartmann effects are important in the analysis of the sidewall, and Joule heating is important in calculating heat transfer and voltage drops for the electrode wall. Hall field breakdown was shown to occur both in the plasma and through the interelectrode insulator with the insulator breakdown threshold voltage lower than the plasma value. The threshold voltage was shown to depend on the interelectrode gap but was relatively independent of plasma conditions. Experiments were performed at 5.5 Tesla with both disk and linear MHD channels.

Eustis, R.H.; Kruger, C.H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S.A.; Koester, J.K.; Nakamura, T.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Form EIA-860M MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year: 2013 Year: 2013 OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and disclosure information, see the provisions stated on the last page of the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction. SCHEDULE 1. IDENTIFICATION Survey Contact Name:__________________________________________ Title:___________________________________________

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test is being conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, four turbines are being tested at the NWTC as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a grid connected ARE 442 wind turbine mounted on a 30.5 meter (100 ft) lattice tower manufactured by Abundant Renewable Energy. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Abundant Renewable Energy.

van Dam, J.; Baker, D.; Jager, D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Second generation ground coupled solar assisted heat pump systems. Six month progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on an investigation of the technical and commercial viability of a novel ground coupled, solar assisted heat pump system for residential space heating and cooling applications. Specific areas of study are solar collector/heat rejector performance, flat plate earth heat exchanger performance, system performance simulations, and commercialization and marketing analysis. Collector/rejector performance, determined by various thermal experiments, is discussed. The design and construction of an experimental site to study ground coupling is discussed. Theoretical analysis is also presented. The performance of the GCSAHP system and conventional alternatives, as determined by simple computer models, is presented and discussed. Finally, the commercial viability of this unique space conditioning system is examined.

Rhodes, G W; Backlund, J C; Helm, J M

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Generation: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the United States and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To utilize landfill gas for power generation using carbonate fuel cells, the LFG must be cleaned up to remove sulfur and chlorine compounds. This not only benefits the operation of the fuel cell, but also benefits the environment by preventing the emission of these contaminants to the atmosphere. Commercial technologies for gas processing are generally economical in relatively large sizes (3 MMSCFD or larger), and may not achieve the low levels of contaminants required. To address the issue of LFG clean-up for fuel cell application, a process was developed utilizing commercially available technology. A pilot-scale test facility utilizing this process was built at a landfill site in Anoka, Minnesota using the EPRI fuel cell test facility used for coal gas testing. The pilot plant was tested for 1000 hours, processing 970,000 SCF (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of landfill gas. Testing indicated that the process could achieve the following concentrations of contaminants in the clean gas: Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppm (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv if any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm (average) Sulfur Dioxide. The paper describes the LFG composition for bulk and trace compounds; evaluation of various methods to clean landfill gas; design of a LFG cleanup system; field test of pilot-scale gas cleanup process; fuel cell testing on simulated landfill gas; single cell testing on landfill gas contaminants and post test analysis; and design and economic analyses of a full scale gas cleanup system.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Progress report No. 29 for a program of thermoelectric generator testing and RTG degradation mechanisms evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity measurements of the P-type and N-type selenide alloys after 17000 hours and 4100 hours, respectively, are in good agreement with the 3M Co data. Ingradient testing of N-legs after 6600 hours show comparable performance to the reported 3M data. Ingradient testing of P-legs at accelerated test conditions, have completed 3600 hours and performance shows reasonable correlation with accelerated temperature and current gradients. N-type samples from both the Thermal Conductivity Tests and Ingradient Performance Tests were removed from test for examination. All samples were found to be severely cracked upon removal from the test fixtures. Metallurgical and x-ray diffraction analysis showed (1) extensive cracking had occurred in the lower half (cold end) of the legs and (2) a crystallographic phase change occurred in the upper half (hot end) of the legs from monoclinic to orthorhombic. It is postulated that the phase change that occurs on heating aggravates the micro-cracks that exist in the as fabricated leg. An initial evaluation of the performance of the Voyager 1 and 2 RTG's after 12,000 hours of operation versus the DEGRA performance prediction code, shows excellent agreement. (WHK)

Stapfer, G.; Garvey, L.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Performance and Economics of Catalytic Glow Plugs and Shields in Direct Injection Natural Gas Engines for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by TIAX and Westport to test and perform cost analysis for catalytic glow plugs and shields for direct-injection natural gas engines for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program.

Mello, J. P.; Bezaire, D.; Sriramulu, S.; Weber, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program Phase I: Clean Air Partners 0.5 g/hp-h NOx Engine Concept; Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by Clean Air Partners to develop 0.5 g/hp-h NOx natural gas engine exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technology for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program.

Wong, H. C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Interim Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine would be reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction. This process provides additional storage space (capacity) in the aquifer, reduces operational risks by relieving overpressure in the aquifer, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations for brines typical of CCS sites. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. This progress report deals mainly with our geochemical modeling of high-salinity brines and covers the first six months of project execution (September, 2008 to March, 2009). Costs and implementation results will be presented in the annual report. The brines typical of sequestration sites can be several times more concentrated than seawater, requiring specialized modeling codes typical of those developed for nuclear waste disposal calculations. The osmotic pressure developed as the brines are concentrated is of particular concern, as are precipitates that can cause fouling of reverse osmosis membranes and other types of membranes (e.g., NF). We have now completed the development associated with tasks (1) and (2) of the work plan. We now have a contract with Perlorica, Inc., to provide support to the cost analysis and nanofiltration evaluation. We have also conducted several preliminary analyses of the pressure effect in the reservoir in order to confirm that reservoir pressure can indeed be used to drive the reverse osmosis process. Our initial conclusions from the work to date are encouraging: (1) The concept of aquifer-pressured RO to provide fresh water associated with carbon dioxide storage appears feasible. (2) Concentrated brines such as those found in Wyoming are amenable to RO treatment. We have looked at sodium chloride brines from the Nugget Formation in Sublette County. 20-25% removal with conventional methods is realistic; higher removal appears achievable with NF. The less concentrated sulfate-rich brines from the Tensleep Formation in Sublette County would support >80% removal with conventional RO. (3) Brines from other proposed sequestration sites can now be analyzed readily. An osmotic pressure curve appropriate to these brines can be used to evaluate cost and equipment specifications. (4) We have examined a range of subsurface brine compositions that is potentially pertinent to carbon sequestration and noted the principal compositional trends pertinent to evaluating the feasibility of freshwater extraction. We have proposed a general categorization for the feasibility of the process based on total dissolved solids (TDS). (5) Withdrawing pressurized brine can have a very beneficial effect on reservoir pressure and total available storage capacity. Brine must be extracted from a deeper location in the aquifer than the point of CO{sub 2} injection to prevent CO{sub 2} from migrating to the brine extraction well.

Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W L

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Progerams Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A&M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. Other university/organizations represented: University of California in LA, Stanford University, and the IAEA. Four of the students that completed this intensive course participated in a 2-month internship at LLNL. The conclusions of the two pilot courses and internships was a NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The Poster sessions were designed to provide a forum for sharing the results of their summer projects and providing experience in presenting their work to a varied audience of students, faculty and laboratory staff. The success of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of their two pilot efforts in the coming years.

Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G; Essner, J; Dougan, A; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokova, E; Wehling, F

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

Control of cascaded induction-generator systems. Final technical report, 1 September 1983-30 August 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an investigation of the stability and control of cascaded doubly fed machines (CDFM). These machines are brushless variable-speed constant-frequency electric power generators with potential for application in aircraft. A previous analytical study indicated the CDFM system would be controllable in the subsynchronous operating mode with a passive RL load. The present study contains two steps. First is an investigation of the machine operation in the supersynchronous mode. The second step is an investigation of machine operation with output capacitors providing excitation VARs for the machine and load. Step 1 results show that the machines exhibit stability characteristics in the supersynchronous mode similar to those observed in the subsynchronous mode. Step 2 results show that output capacitors degrade the system performance, particularly at light loads. The results show that output current feedback can be employed to improve the system performance.

Ortmeyer, T.H.

1984-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

214

FY96-98 Summary Report Mercury: Next Generation Laser for High Energy Density Physics SI-014  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Mercury Laser project encompasses the research, development, and engineering required to build a new generation of diode-pumped solid-state lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The Mercury Laser will be the first integrated demonstration of laser diodes, crystals, and gas cooling within a scalable laser architecture. This report is intended to summarize the progress accomplished during the first three years of the project. Due to the technological challenges associated with production of 900 nm diode-bars, heatsinks, and high optical-quality Yb:S-FAP crystals, the initial focus of the project was primarily centered on the R&D in these three areas. During the third year of the project, the R&D continued in parallel with the development of computer codes, partial activation of the laser, component testing, and code validation where appropriate.

Bayramian, A.; Beach, R.; Bibeau, C.; Chanteloup, J.-C.; Ebbers, C.; Emanuel, M.; Freitas, B.; Fulkerson, S.; Kanz, K.; Hinz, A.; Marshall, C.; Mills, S.; Nakano, H.; Orth, C.; Rothenberg, J.; Schaffers, K.; Seppala, L.; Skidmore, J.; Smith, L.; Sutton, S.; Telford, S.; Zapata, L.

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

FY96-98 Summary Report Mercury: Next Generation Laser for High Energy Density Physics SI-014  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Mercury Laser project encompasses the research, development, and engineering required to build a new generation of diode-pumped solid-state lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The Mercury Laser will be the first integrated demonstration of laser diodes, crystals, and gas cooling within a scalable laser architecture. This report is intended to summarize the progress accomplished during the first three years of the project. Due to the technological challenges associated with production of 900 nm diode-bars, heatsinks, and high optical-quality Yb:S-FAP crystals, the initial focus of the project was primarily centered on the R&D in these three areas. During the third year of the project, the R&D continued in parallel with the development of computer codes, partial activation of the laser, component testing, and code validation where appropriate.

Bayramian, A; Beach, R; Bibeau, C; Chanteloup, J; Ebbers, C; Emanuel, M; Freitas, B; Fulkerson, S; Kanz, K; Hinz, A; Marshall, C; Mills, S; Nakano, H; Orth, C; Rothenberg, J; Schaffers, K; Seppala, L; Skidmore, I; Smith, L; Sutton, S; Telford, S; Zapata, L

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

216

Progress report No. 41 for a program of thermoelectric generator testing and RTG degradation-mechanisms evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sublimation tests conducted on Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ coated SiGe (78%-22%) legs and SiMo hot shoes produced by G.E. were continued during this reporting period. The present test time for the SiGe legs is 1623 hours, while that for the SiMo hot-shoes is 1028 hours. No unexpected results have been observed. G.E.'s conjecture that the coatings on the SiGe legs which we presently have on test are faulty is confirmed, as this material has displayed coating failure on all n-doped samples at 1150/sup 0/C with failures beginning to show at 1100/sup 0/C. No coating failures have been observed on the hot shoes on test. Thermal conductivity tests conducted on SiGe (78% to 22%) material were extended to over 6000 hours with excellent agreement with MHW results. Testing of the 4 couple module PR-1 has been conducted for over 2,000 hours with similar agreement with past MHW tests. Testing of the Q1-A generator is continuing. The present test time is 33,632 hours. The performance of the generator remains smooth and continuous. Testing of the S/N-1 and S/N-3 eighteen couple modules has been extended to 35,105 hours and 32,403 hours, respectively. As with the Q1-A generator, the performance of these modules remains steady and smooth. Comparisons between computer predictions and the actual performance of the RTGs aboard the Voyager I and II spacecrafts has been extended to approximately four years. The agreement with prediction, in both cases, is within 0.5 percent. The corresponding comparisons for the LES-8 and LES-9 RTGs are for over five years with the same excellent agreement.

Shields, V.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States. Released: January 1, 2003. Final issue of this report.

219

CONSULTANT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, renewables, interconnection, integration, electricity, distribution, transmission, costs. Please use Coldwell Project Manager Ivin Rhyne Office Manager Electricity Analysis Office Sylvia Bender Deputy Director Electricity Supply Analysis Division Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director DISCLAIMER

220

Thermal and Radiolytic Gas Generation Tests on Material from Tanks 241-U-103, 241-AW-101, 241-S-106, and 241-S-102: Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress in evaluating thermal and radiolytic flammable gas generation in actual Hanford single-shell tank wastes. The work described was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, whose purpose is to develop information to support DE&S Hanford (DESH) and Project Management Hanford Contract (PHMC) subcontractors in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies performed by Numatec Hanford Corporation (formerly Westinghouse Hanford Company). This report describes the results of laboratory tests of gas generation from actual convective layer wastes from Tank 241-U-103 under thermal and radiolytic conditions. Accurate measurements of gas generation rates from highly radioactive tank wastes are needed to assess the potential for producing and storing flammable gases within the tanks. The gas generation capacity of the waste in Tank 241-U-103 is a high priority for the Flammable Gas Safety Program due to its potential for accumulating gases above the flammability limit (Johnson et al, 1997). The objective of this work was to establish the composition of gaseous degradation products formed in actual tank wastes by thermal and radiolytic processes as a function of temperature. The gas generation tests on Tank 241-U-103 samples focused first on the effect of temperature on the composition and rate of gas generation Generation rates of nitrogen, nitrous oxide, methane, and hydrogen increased with temperature, and the composition of the product gas mixture varied with temperature.

King, C.M.; Bryan, S.A.

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission: copper/water axially-grooved heat pipe topical report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a summary of the major accomplishments for the development, fabrication, and testing of axially-grooved copper/water heat pipes for Selenide Isotopic Generator (SIG) applications. The early development consisted of chemical, physical, and analytical studies to define an axially-grooved tube geometry that could be successfully fabricated and provide the desired long term (up to seven years) performance is presented. Heat pipe fabrication procedures, measured performance and accelerated life testing of heat pipes S/Ns AL-5 and LT-57 conducted at B and K Engineering are discussed. S/N AL-5 was the first axially-grooved copper/water heat pipe that was fabricated with the new internal coating process for cupric oxide (CuO) and the cleaning and water preparation methods developed by Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Heat pipe S/N LT-57 was fabricated along with sixty other axially-grooved heat pipes allocated for life testing at Teledyne Energy Systems. As of June 25, 1979, heat pipes S/Ns AL-5 and LT-57 have been accelerated life tested for 13,310 and 6,292 respectively, at a nominal operating temperature of 225/sup 0/C without any signs of thermal performance degradation. (TFD)

Strazza, N.P.

1979-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report  

SciTech Connect

This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Interface and Electrode Engineering for Next-Generation Organic Photovoltaic Cells: Final Technical Report, March 2005 - August 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to enable next-generation, efficient, easily manufacturable, and durable organic photovoltaics through interface and electrode engineering.

Mason, T. O.; Chang, R. P. H.; Freeman, A. J.; Marks, T. J.; Poeppelmeier, K. R.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

869 * November 2010 869 * November 2010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses NREL Team: Hydrogen Technology Validation, Leslie Eudy Accomplishment: NREL recently reported an increase in durability and reliability for fuel cell systems demonstrated in transit service (first reported in July 2010). Context: The transit industry provides an excellent test-bed for developing and optimizing advanced transportation technologies, such as fuel cells. In coordination with the Federal Transit Administration, the Department of Energy (DOE) funds the evaluation of fuel cell buses (FCBs) in real-world service. Under this funding, NREL has collected and analyzed data on nine early generation FCBs operated by four transit agencies in the United States.

225

Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactor, Gaseous Core Reactor with Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Generator; Final Report - Part I and Part II  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on the power conversion cycle and efficiency. The technical issues involving the ionization mechanisms, the power management and distribution and radiation shielding and safety will be discussed in future reports.

Samim Anghaie; Blair Smith; Travis Knight

2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

226

New approaches for the reduction of plasma arc drop in second-generation thermionic converters. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigations of ion generation and recombination mechanisms in the cesium plasma as they pertain to the advanced mode thermionic energy converter are described. The changes in plasma density and temperature within the converter have been studied under the influence of several promising auxiliary ionization candidate sources. Three novel approaches of external cesium ion generation have been investigated in some detail, namely vibrationally excited N/sub 2/ as an energy source of ionization of Cs ions in a DC discharge, microwave power as a means of resonant sustenance of the cesium plasma, and ion generation in a pulse N/sub 2/-Cs mixture. The experimental data obtained and discussed show that all three techniques - i.e. the non-LTE high-voltage pulsing, the energy transfer from vibrationally excited diatomic gases, and the external pumping with a microwave power - have considerable promise as schemes in auxiliary ion generation applicable to the advanced thermionic energy converter.

Hatziprokopiou, M.E.; Shaw, D.T.

1981-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Impact of Natural Gas Market Conditions on Fuel Flexibility Needs for Existing and New Power Generation: Report Series on Natural Ga s and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ongoing surge in new gas-fired capacity is changing the landscape of how natural gas will be used for power generation, leading to some surprising effects. While the new machines bring greater efficiency, the exit of dual-fuel units leads to a loss in fuel flexibility, greater natural gas price volatility, and less reliability of natural gas-fired generation. This report explores these effects systematically, bringing fresh insight on gas use in the electric sector, its market effects, and the ever-c...

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Characterization of open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators. Ninth-tenth quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1978-April 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful design of full-scale open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators for baseload electrical production requires a detailed understanding of the plasma chemical and plasma dynamic characteristics of anticipated combustor and channel fluids. This report documents progress in efforts to model negative ion formation and slag condensation effects on core flow conductivity, to improve the ability to sample and characterize laboratory produced coal combustion plasmas, and to measure mechanisms and rates of slag oxide condensation. A set of parametric calculations showing the influence of various input parameters on a nominal full-scale, supersonic generator system is also presented.

Kolb, C.E.; Wormhoudt, J.; Yousefian, V.; Cheng, W.; Bien, F.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Silver, J.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evaluation of technical feasibility of closed-cycle non-equilibrium MHD power generation with direct coal firing. Final report, Task I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program accomplishments in a continuing effort to demonstrate the feasibility of direct coal-fired, closed-cycle MHD power generation are reported. This volume contains the following appendices: (A) user's manual for 2-dimensional MHD generator code (2DEM); (B) performance estimates for a nominal 30 MW argon segmented heater; (C) the feedwater cooled Brayton cycle; (D) application of CCMHD in an industrial cogeneration environment; (E) preliminary design for shell and tube primary heat exchanger; and (F) plant efficiency as a function of output power for open and closed cycle MHD power plants. (WHK)

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, D.E. (INEEL); Hamp, S. (DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office)

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

231

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, D.E. (INEEL); Hamp, S. (DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office)

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

232

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen- containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOEs Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a "program level" roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, Dale Elden; Hamp, S.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Coal-fueled diesel system for stationary power applications -- Technology development. Final report, March 1988--June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Cooper-Bessemer and Arthur D. Little have developed the technology to enable coal-water slurry to be utilized in large-bore, medium-speed diesel engines. The target application is modular power generation in the 10 to 100 MW size, with each plant using between two and eight engines. Such systems are expected to be economically attractive in the non-utility generation market after 2000, when oil and natural gas prices are expected to escalate rapidly compared to the price of coal. During this development program, over 1,000 hours of prototype engine operation have been achieved on coal-water slurry (CWS), including over 100 hours operation of a six-cylinder, 1.8 MW engine with an integrated emissions control system. Arthur D. Little, Inc., managed the coal-fueled diesel development, with Cooper-Bessemer as the principal subcontractor responsible for the engine design and testing. Several key technical advances which enable the viability of the coal-fueled diesel engine were made under this program. Principal among them are the development and demonstration of (1) durable injection nozzles; (2) an integrated emissions control system; ad (3) low-cost clean coal slurry formulations optimized for the engine. Significant advances in all subsystem designs were made to develop the full-scale Cooper-Bessemer coal engine components in preparation for a 100-hour proof-of-concept test of an integrated system, including emissions controls. The Clean Coal Diesel power plant of the future will provide a cost-competitive, low-emissions, modular, coal-based power generation option to the non-utility generation, small utility, independent power producer, and cogeneration markets. Combined cycle efficiencies will be approximately 48% (lower heating value basis) and installed cost will be approximately $1,300/kW (1992 dollars).

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Topical report: Natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) evaluation for generating additional reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) data.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept. One of the key passive safety features of the VHTR is the potential for decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-cooled RCCS concept is notably similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that was developed for the General Electric PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor. As part of the DOE R&D program that supported the development of this fast reactor concept, the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) was developed at ANL to provide proof-of-concept data for the RVACS under prototypic natural convection flow, temperature, and heat flux conditions. Due to the similarity between RVACS and the RCCS, current VHTR R&D plans call for the utilization of the NSTF to provide RCCS model development and validation data, in addition to supporting design validation and optimization activities. Both air-cooled and water-cooled RCCS designs are to be included. In support of this effort, ANL has been tasked with the development of an engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF to ensure that sufficiently detailed temperature, heat flux, velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained to adequately qualify the codes under the expected range of air-cooled RCCS flow conditions. Next year, similar work will be carried out for the alternative option of a water-cooled RCCS design. Analysis activities carried out in support of this experiment planning task have shown that: (a) in the RCCS, strong 3-D effects result in large heat flux, temperature, and heat transfer variations around the tube wall; (b) there is a large difference in the heat transfer coefficient predicted by turbulence models and heat transfer correlations, and this underscores the need of experimental work to validate the thermal performance of the RCCS; and (c) tests at the NSTF would embody all important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena in the RCCS, in addition to covering the entire parameter ranges that characterize these phenomena. Additional supporting scaling study results are available in Reference 2. The purpose of this work is to develop a high-level engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF in order to meet the following two technical objectives: (1) provide CFD and system-level code development and validation data for the RCCS under prototypic (full-scale) natural convection flow conditions, and (2) support RCCS design validation and optimization. As background for this work, the report begins by providing a summary of the original NSTF design and operational capabilities. Since the facility has not been actively utilized since the early 1990's, the next step is to assess the current facility status. With this background material in place, the data needs and requirements for the facility are then defined on the basis of supporting analysis activities. With the requirements for the facility established, appropriate mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF are then developed in order to meet the overall project objectives. A cost and schedule for modifying the facility to satisfy the RCCS data needs is then provided.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Pointer, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Characterization of open-cycle coal-fired MHD generators. 16th quarterly technical progress report, December 16, 1980-March 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful design of full-scale, open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators for baseload electrical production requires a detailed understanding of the plasma chemical and plasma dynamic characteristics of anticipated combustor and channel fluids. Progress in efforts to model the efficiency of an open-cycle, coal-fired MHD channel based on the characterization of the channel flow as well as laboratory experiments to validate the modeling effort is reported. In addition, studies related to understanding arcing and corrosion phenomena in the vicinity of an anode are reported.

Wormhoudt, J.; Yousefian, V.; Weinberg, M.; Kolb, C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Cheng, W.; Dvore, D.; Freedman, A.; Stanton, A.; Stewart, G.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Status and integration of the gas generation studies performed for the Hydrogen Safety Program. FY-1992 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste in Tank 241-SY-101 on the Hanford Site generates and periodically releases hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gases. Studies have been conducted at several laboratories to determine the chemical mechanisms for the gas generation and release. Results from these studies are presented and integrated in an attempt to describe current understanding of the physical properties of the waste and the mechanisms of gas generation and retention. Existing tank data are consistent with the interpretation that gases are uniformly generated in the tank, released continuously from the convecting layer, and stored in the nonconvecting layer. Tank temperature measurements suggest that the waste consists of ``gobs`` of material that reach neutral buoyancy at different times. The activation energy of the rate limiting step of the gas generating process was calculated to be about 7 kJ/mol but measured in the laboratory at 80 to 100 kJ/mol. Based on observed temperature changes in the tank the activation energy is probably not higher than about 20 kJ/mol. Several simulated waste compositions have been devised for use in laboratory studies in the place of actual waste from Tank 241-SY-101. Data from these studies can be used to predict how the actual waste might behave when heated or diluted. Density evaluations do not confirm that heating waste at the bottom of the tank would induce circulation within the waste; however, heating may release gas bubbles by dissolving the solids to which the bubbles adhere. Gas generation studies on simulated wastes indicated that nitrous oxide and hydrogen yields are not particularly coupled. Solubility studies of nitrous oxide, the most soluble of the principal gaseous products, indicate it is unlikely that dissolved gases contribute substantially to the quantity of gas released during periodic events.

Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Investigation of Small Wind-Turbine Induction Generators : Final Technical Report, September 16, 1980-December 31, 1982.  

SciTech Connect

A new and accurate experimental set-up was developed to test induction machines in the 1-5 kW range. Two single-phase induction generators were tested - the Enertech 1500 and Enertech 1800. A detailed mathematical model to evaluate the performance of single-phase induction generators was developed and documented in the form of a FORTRAN computer simulation program. Then the program was used to analyze the Enertech 1800 and the results were compared with the test results. (LEW)

Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Boardman, Ethan C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

FINAL REPORT Modeling and Simulation of a Distributed Generation-Integrated Intelligent Microgrid SERDP Project SI-1650  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The publication of this report does not indicate endorsement by the Department of Defense, nor should the contents be construed as reflecting the official policy or position of the Department of Defense. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the Department of Defense. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved

Saifur Rahman; Manisa Pipattanasomporn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Fourth Annual Progress Report on the Electrofluid Dynamic Wind Generator: Final Report for the Period 1 April 1979 - 31 August 1980  

SciTech Connect

Conventional wind energy systems are limited in wind turbine diameter by allowable rotor stresses at power levels of several megawatts. In contrast, the Electrofluid Dynamic (EFD) wind driven generator has no fundamental limits on cross sectional area. It is a direct energy conversion device which employs unipolar charged particles transported by the wind against a retarding voltage gradient to a high potential. As no moving parts are exposed to the wind, extremely large power units may be feasible.

Minardi, J. E.; Lawson, M. O.; Wattendorf, F. L.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

100-WATT CURIUM-242 FUELED THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR--CONCEPTUAL DESIGN. SNAP Subtask 5.7 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A thermoelectric generator which produces 100 watts of electrical power continuously over a six-month operational life in a space environment was designed. It employs the heat produced by the decay of Cm/sup 24/ as the source of power. Uniform output over the operational life of the generator is accomplished by means of a thermally actuated shutter which maintains the hot junction temperature of the thermoelectric conventer at a constunt figure by varying the amount of surplus heat which is radiated directly to space from the heat source. The isotopic heat source is designed to safely contain the Cm/sup 242/ under conditions of launch pad abont and rocket failure, but to burn up upon re-entry to the earth's atmosphere from orbital velocity. (W.L.H.)

Weddell, J.B.; Bloom, J.

1960-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Potential use of wood and agriculture wastes as steam generator fuel for thermal enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhanced oil recovery by steam injection methods produces over 200,000 barrels per day of crude oil in California. A sizeable portion of the produced crude, up to 40% for some projects, may be burned to generate steam for injection into the reservoir. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential to use wood and agriculture wastes to replace crude oil as steam generator fuel. The Bakersfield area of California's San Joaquin Valley is the focus for this paper. Production from thermal EOR methods centers around Bakersfield and agriculture and wood wastes are available from the San Joaquin Valley and the nearby Sierra Nevada mountains. This paper documents the production of waste materials by county, estimated energy value of each material, and estimated transportation cost for each material. Both agriculture and wood wastes were found to be available in sizeable quantities and could become attractive steam generation fuels. However, some qualifications need to be made on the use of these materials. Transportation costs will probably limit the range of shipping these materials to perhaps 50 to 100 miles. Availability is subject to competition from existing and developing uses of these materials, such as energy sources in their immediate production area. Existing steam generators probably cannot be retrofitted to burn these materials. Fluidized bed combustion, or low Btu gasification, may be a good technology for utilization. FBC or FBG could accept a variety of waste materials. This will be important because the amount of any single waste may not be large enough to support the energy requirements of a good size thermal f a good size thermal EOR operation.

Kosstrin, H.M.; McDonald, R.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Sales"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales" Sales" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Sales (Megawatthours)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",33463,".",33463 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",6883,".",6883 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1820,".",".",1820 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",9651,".",".",9651

243

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Customers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Customers" Customers" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Number of Customers" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "RV CSU Power II LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1

244

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

6 Includes agricultural byproducts, fish oil, liquid acetonitrile waste, landfill gas, municipal solid waste, solid waste, sludge waste, straw, tires, waste alco-

245

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Revenue"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue" Revenue" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Revenue (thousand dollars)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1735,".",1735 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",798,".",798 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",243,".",".",243 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",603,".",".",603

246

Economic Analysis of the Environmental Effects of the Coal-Fired Electric Generator at Boardman, Oregon. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This study is one of several commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to estimate the economic value of the environmental costs and benefits of different electricity-generating resources. In it we described and quantify the environmental costs and benefits of coal-fired generators, using the plant in Boardman, Oregon, as the basis for our estimations. The Boardman plant uses pulverized coal to produce steam for generating electricity. It is nominally rated at 550 megawatts. This study assumes a 70% load factor and an annual production of 3373 x 10/sup 6/ kWh. Cooling water comes from a 1400-acre cooling pond; coal comes from Wyoming in 100-car unit-trains every two days. The estimated service life of the plant is 40 years. We developed a socioeconomic-environmental model to assess the final physical impacts of each of the initial impacts resulting from the fuel cycle. The analysis of environmental effects comprises four steps: (1) identify all the potential environmental impacts stemming from the entire fuel cycle associated with the plant; (2) determine which effects warrant detailed economic analysis; (3) complete the economic analysis for the effects selected in step 2; and (4) estimate the extent to which the results of the case study apply to other potential plants using the coal-fuel cycle. 102 references, 5 figures, 10 tables.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

247

Final Report - Gas Generation Testing of Uranium Metal in Simulated K Basin Sludge and in Grouted Sludge Waste Forms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is being considered for the disposal of K Basin sludge as RH-TRU. Because the hydrogen gas concentration in the 55-gallon RH-TRU sealed drums to be transported to WIPP is limited by flammability safety, the number of containers and shipments likely will be driven by the rate of hydrogen generated by the uranium metal-water reaction (U + 2 H{sub 2}O {yields} UO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}) in combination with the hydrogen generated from water and organic radiolysis. Gas generation testing was conducted with uranium metal particles of known surface area, in simulated K West (KW) Basin canister sludge and immobilized in candidate grout solidification matrices. This study evaluated potential for Portland cement and magnesium phosphate grouts to inhibit the reaction of water with uranium metal in the sludge and thereby permit higher sludge loading to the disposed waste form. The best of the grouted waste forms decreased the uranium metal-water reaction by a factor of four.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Gano, Sue; Thornton, Brenda M.

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Georgia/EZFeed Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

that was enacted to promote conservation and to encourage use of alternative sources of power generation. PURPA established a class of non-utility generators comprised of small...

249

Georgia/EZ Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

that was enacted to promote conservation and to encourage use of alternative sources of power generation. PURPA established a class of non-utility generators comprised of small...

250

Consumption Continuing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

generators. Much of the natural gas consumed by nonutility generators is used for cogeneration. During the cogeneration process, a single energy input, such as natural gas, is...

251

Main Generator Rotor Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Main generator rotors are constructed and designed to provide decades of reliable and trouble-free operation. However, a number of incidences have occurred over the years that can adversely impact reliable operation of generator rotors and, ultimately, production of electrical power. This report is a guide for power plant personnel responsible for reliable operation and maintenance of main generators. As a guide, this report provides knowledge and experience from generator experts working at power plants...

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

252

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Quality Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the power quality test on the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Independent Testing Project. In total five turbines are being tested as part of the project. Power quality testing is one of up to five test that may be performed on the turbines including power performance, safety and function, noise, and duration tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

Curtis, A.; Gevorgian, V.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is being conducted by a team consisting of AlliedSignal Aerospace Systems & Equipment (ASE) (formerly AiResearch Los Angeles Division) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hot-Cell Examination and Assessment Report for a Next Generation Fuel Skeleton Irradiated in Millstone-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lead test assemblies (LTAs) of the 17 x 17 Next Generation Fuel (17NGF) fuel design from Westinghouse Electric Company have been irradiated at Millstone Unit 3 for up to three cycles and have accumulated up to ~64,000 megawatt days per metric ton of uranium (MWD/MTU) of exposure. The objective of this project is to perform a full hot-cell examination of one LTA skeleton at discharge exposure, including two main activities: general characterization (for example, wear, dimensional stability, ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

255

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

256

FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS REPORT (FAR) A NEW GAS TURBINE ENGINE CONCEPT FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATION WITH INCREASED EFFICIENCY AND POWER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report was prepared as a result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission (Commission). It does not necessarily represent the views of the Commission, its employees, or the state of California. The Commission, the state of California, its employees, contractors, and subcontractors make no warranty, express or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the use of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the Commission nor has the Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information in this report. PREFACE The Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program supports public interest energy research and development that will help improve the quality of life in California by bringing environmentally safe, affordable and reliable energy services and products to the marketplace. The PIER Program, managed by the California Energy Commission (Commission), annually awards up to $62 million of which $3 million/year is allocated to the Energy Innovation Small Grant (EISG) Program for grants. The EISG Program is administered by the San Diego State

Eisg Awardee

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI): On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring for Next Generation Nuclear Plants - Phase I Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This OSTI ID belongs to an IWO and is being released out of the system. The Program Manager Rebecca Richardson has confirmed that all reports have been received. The objective of this project is to design and demonstrate the operation of the real-time intelligent self-diagnostic and prognostic system for next generation nuclear power plant systems. This new self-diagnostic technology is titled, ''On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System'' (SDMS). This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS on a pilot plant scale service water system, where a distributed array of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures typical of next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. This project employs state-of-the-art sensors, instrumentation, and computer processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and to provide diagnostic and automated prognostics capabilities.

L. J. Bond; S. R. Doctor; R. W. Gilbert; D. B. Jarrell; F. L. Greitzer; R. J. Meador

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Wind Turbinie Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Mariah Windspire 1-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the Mariah Windspire 1-kW wind turbine. During this test, two configurations were tested on the same turbine. In the first configuration, the turbine inverter was optimized for power production. In the second configuration, the turbine inverter was set for normal power production. In both configurations, the inverter experienced failures and the tests were not finished.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Summary of Chariton Valley Switchgrass Co-Fire Testing at the Ottumwa Generating Station in Chillicothe, Iowa: Milestone Completion Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of the switchgrass co-firing tests conducted at the Ottumwa Generating Station in Chillicothe, Iowa as part of the Chariton Valley Biomass Project. After several years of planning, the Chariton Valley Biomass Project successfully completed two months of switchgrass co-fire testing at the Ottumwa Generating Station (OGS) in Chillicothe, Iowa. From November 30, 2000, through January 25, 2001, the switchgrass team co-fired 1,269 tons (1,151 tonnes) of switchgrass at rates up to 16.8 tons/h (15.2 tonne/h), representing about 3% heat input to the 725-MW power plant. Stack testing was completed when co-firing switchgrass and when burning only coal. Fuel and ash samples were collected for analysis, and boiler performance and emissions data were collected. Numerous improvements were made to the feed-handling equipment during testing. The co-fire testing was completed with no environmental incidents, no injuries to personnel, and no loss in electricity output from OGS. The goals of the this--the first of three rounds of co-fire tests--were: to identify the effects of co-firing on boiler performance, to measure any changes in emissions during co-firing, and to gather information to improve the design of the switchgrass handling equipment. All three of these goals were met. The design target for the switchgrass handling system was 12.5 ton/h (11.3 tonne/h), which we exceeded after a redesign of the secondary grinder in our system. We had hoped to burn over 3,000 tons (2,722 tonnes) of switchgrass during this first round of testing, but because of poor equipment performance in December, we were unable to meet this target before the planned boiler shutdown in January. There were, however, several days in January when we burned more than 100 tons (91 tonnes) of switchgrass.

Amos, W.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Characterization of open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators. Seventh-eighth quarterly technical progress report, January 1-June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful design of full-scale open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators for baseload electrical production requires a detailed understanding of the plasma chemical and plasma dynamic characteristics of anticipated combustor and channel fluids. This report documents progress in efforts to model negative ion formation and slag condensation effects on core flow conductivity, to improve the ability to sample and characterize laboratory produced coal combustion plasmas, and to define a mathematical model of the diffuse discharge plasma sheath in the anode boundary layer.

Kolb, C.E.; Elgin, J.B.; Wormhoudt, J.; Yousefian, V.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Dvore, D.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Development of an 8 kW wind turbine generator for residential type applications. Phase I: design and analysis. Volume II. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This Phase I summary report contains a description of the 8 kW wind energy conversion system developed by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for the Department of Energy. The wind turbine employs the UTRC Bearingless Rotor Concept in conjunction with a passive pendulum control system which controls blade pitch for start-up, efficient power generation, and high-speed survivability. The report contains a summary of the experimental and analytical programs in support of design efforts. These supporting programs include materials tests, a wind tunnel program, and aeroelastic analyses to evaluate system stability. An estimate is also made of the projected manufacturing cost of the system if produced in quantity.

Cheney, M.C.

1979-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Dr. Katherine Ayers (Primary Contact), Andy Roemer Proton Energy Systems d/b/a Proton OnSite 10 Technology Drive Wallingford, CT 06492 Phone: (203) 678-2190 Email: kayers@protononsite.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: Dave Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE000276 Subcontractors: * Entegris, Inc., Chaska, MN * The Electrochemical Engine Center at Penn State, University Park, PA * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Project Start Date: September 1, 2009

263

Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part II: Prismatic Reactor Cross Section Generation  

SciTech Connect

The deep-burn prismatic high temperature reactor is made up of an annular core loaded with transuranic isotopes and surrounded in the center and in the periphery by reflector blocks in graphite. This disposition creates challenges for the neutronics compared to usual light water reactor calculation schemes. The longer mean free path of neutrons in graphite affects the neutron spectrum deep inside the blocks located next to the reflector. The neutron thermalisation in the graphite leads to two characteristic fission peaks at the inner and outer interfaces as a result of the increased thermal flux seen in those assemblies. Spectral changes are seen at least on half of the fuel blocks adjacent to the reflector. This spectral effect of the reflector may prevent us from successfully using the two step scheme -lattice then core calculation- typically used for light water reactors. We have been studying the core without control mechanisms to provide input for the development of a complete calculation scheme. To correct the spectrum at the lattice level, we have tried to generate cross-sections from supercell calculations at the lattice level, thus taking into account part of the graphite surrounding the blocks of interest for generating the homogenised cross-sections for the full-core calculation. This one has been done with 2 to 295 groups to assess if increasing the number of groups leads to more accurate results. A comparison with a classical single block model has been done. Both paths were compared to a reference calculation done with MCNP. It is concluded that the agreement with MCNP is better with supercells, but that the single block model remains quite close if enough groups are kept for the core calculation. 26 groups seems to be a good compromise between time and accu- racy. However, some trials with depletion have shown huge variations of the isotopic composition across a block next to the reflector. It may imply that at least an in- core depletion for the number density calculation may be necessary in the complete calculation scheme.

Vincent Descotes

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1998. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions and generating unit changes. This report is prepared annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data or nonconfidential data of nonutilities are presented, it is specifically noted as nonutility data. 19 figs., 36 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

ETX-I: First-generation single-shaft electric propulsion system program: Volume 2, Battery final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research and development program was to advance ac powertrain technology for electric vehicles (EV). The program focused on the design, build, test, and refinement of an experimental advanced electric vehicle powertrain suitable for packaging in a Ford Escort or equivalent-size vehicle. A Mercury LN7 was subsequently selected for the test bed vehicle. Although not part of the initial contract, the scope of the ETX-I Program was expanded in 1983 to encompass the development of advanced electric vehicle batteries compatible with the ETX-I powertrain and vehicle test bed. The intent of the battery portion of the ETX-I Program was to apply the best available battery technology based on existing battery developments. The battery effort was expected to result in a practical scale-up of base battery technologies to the vehicle battery subsystem level. With the addition of the battery activity, the ETX-I Program became a complete proof-of-concept ''ac propulsion system'' technology development program. In this context, the term ''propulsion system'' is defined as all components and subsystems (from the driver input to the vehicle wheels) that are required to store energy on board the vehicle and, using that energy, to provide controlled motive power to the vehicle. This report, Volume II, describes the battery portion of the ETX-I Program. The powertrain effort is reported in Volume I.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Final report, September 1989--March 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has successfully advanced the technology for MSOFCs for coal-based power generation. Major advances include: tape-calendering processing technology, leading to 3X improved performance at 1000 C; stack materials formulations and designs with sufficiently close thermal expansion match for no stack damage after repeated thermal cycling in air; electrically conducting bonding with excellent structural robustness; and sealants that form good mechanical seals for forming manifold structures. A stack testing facility was built for high-spower MSOFC stacks. Comprehensive models were developed for fuel cell performance and for analyzing structural stresses in multicell stacks and electrical resistance of various stack configurations. Mechanical and chemical compatibility properties of fuel cell components were measured; they show that the baseline Ca-, Co-doped interconnect expands and weakens in hydrogen fuel. This and the failure to develop adequate sealants were the reason for performance shortfalls in large stacks. Small (1-in. footprint) two-cell stacks were fabricated which achieved good performance (average area-specific-resistance 1.0 ohm-cm{sup 2} per cell); however, larger stacks had stress-induced structural defects causing poor performance.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Evaluation of wear resistant ceramic valve seats in gas-fueled power generation engines. Topical report, December 1991-April 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project is directed at the reduction of valve recession in natural gas-fueled engines. Ceramic valve seat inserts have been procured, installed in a Caterpillar G3516 natural gas generator set, and tested for 1000 hours. Two different silicon nitride materials are being utilized for the valve seats in addition to stock Eatonite metallic inserts. Three valve face materials are being tested. These include stock Caterpillar stellite 1 faced, stellite 6 faced, and unfaced valves. A test matrix was used to allow comparison of all three valve face materials in combination with all three insert materials. The testing is scheduled to continue for an additional 7000 hours. No problems have been encountered with the test materials. In general, it has been shown that two types of silicon nitride materials have at least short term durability in engine operation. Neither material has exhibited any deficiencies thus far. An economic analysis spreadsheet has been created to calculate potential cost savings potential using ceramic valve seat inserts. Valve recession data for the first 1000 hours shows expected trends. Exhaust valve positions are wearing more than intake valve positions. If the intake positions and all positions with unfaced valve are ignored, then ceramic inserts paired with Stellite 1 valves show the most wear.

Burrahm, R.W.; Branecky, R.J.; Sui, P.C.; Latusek, J.P.; Hsu, S.M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Next Generation H2 Station Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Sam Sprik (Primary Contact), Keith Wipke, Todd Ramsden, Chris Ainscough, Jen Kurtz National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-4431 Email: sam.sprik@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Collect data from state-of-the-art hydrogen (H2) fueling * facilities, such as those funded by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), to enrich the analyses and composite data products (CDPs) on H2 fueling originally established by the Learning Demonstration project.

269

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a solar hydrogen economy has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a solar hydrogen economy has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

APSTNG: Associated particle sealed-tube neutron generator studies for arms control. Final report on NN-20 Project ST220  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory has performed research and development on the use of Associated Particle Sealed-Tube Neutron Generator (APSTNG) technology for treaty verification and non-proliferation applications, under funding from the DOE Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. Results indicate that this technology has significant potential for nondestructively detecting elemental compositions inside inspected objects or volumes. The final phase of this project was placement of an order for commercial procurement of an advanced sealed tube, with its high-voltage supply and control systems. Procurement specifications reflected lessons learned during the study. The APSTNG interrogates a volume with a continuous 14-MeV neutron flux. Each neutron is emitted coincident with an {open_quotes}associated{close_quotes} alpha-particle emitted in the opposite direction. Thus detection of an alpha-particle marks the emission of a neutron in a cone opposite to that defined by the alpha detector. Detection of a gamma ray coincident with the alpha indicates that the gamma was emitted from a neutron-induced reaction inside the neutron cone: the gamma spectra can be used to identify fissionable materials and many isotopes having an atomic number larger than that of boron. The differences in gamma-ray and alpha-particle detection times yield a coarse measurement of the distance along the cone axis from the APSTNG emitter to each region containing the identified nuclide. A position-sensitive alpha detector would permit construction of coarse three-dimensional images. The source and emission-detection systems can be located on the same side of the interrogated volume. The neutrons and gamma rays are highly penetrating. A relatively high signal-to-background ratio allows the use of a relatively small neutron source and conventional electronics.

Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; Brunner, T.; Hess, A.; Tylinski, S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Thin film battery/fuel cell power generating system. Second quarterly report, July 1, 1978-September 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the development of the high-temperature solid-oxide electrolyte fuel cell. Oxygen loss behavior in the lanthanum chromite interconnection material was investigated by the microweighing technique. RF sputtered interconnection bands have been produced that display suitable density to permit the technique to be used in the construction of cell stacks. Electrochemical vapor deposition equipment has been modified to enable preparation of 20 cell fuel cell stack fabrication to proceed. The fuel electrode process and equipment have been improved to permit fabrication of long (0.3 m) tube segments, showing good mechanical and electrical properties. Long tube sections have been used to fabricate air electrodes, having desired porosity without loss of conductivity. Porous support tube work (involving equipment and fabrication techniques) is being extended to the fabrication of 0.3 m long tubes, needed for the fabrication of the 20 cell stacks. Work continues on the construction of the 5 station fuel cell stack life test facility. Theoretical interpretations of fuel cell stack polarization losses have been compared with actual measured losses in the 5 cell fuel cell stack previously tested in the program. Analyses of the intercell leakage current in the five cell fuel cell stack that was life tested for 700 hours were conducted. (WHK)

Feduska, W.

1978-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

273

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report provides a summary of results of the Cost of Ownership Model and the circumstances under which a distributed fuel cell is economically viable. The analysis is based on a series of micro computer models estimate the capital and operations cost of a fuel cell central utility plant configuration. Using a survey of thermal and electrical demand profiles, the study defines a series of energy user classes. The energy user class demand requirements are entered into the central utility plant model to define the required size the fuel cell capacity and all supporting equipment. The central plant model includes provisions that enables the analyst to select optional plant features that are most appropriate to a fuel cell application, and that are cost effective. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. Other applications are also practical; however, such applications have a higher relative demand for thermal energy, a characteristic that is well-suited to a fuel cell application with its free source of hot water or steam. The analysis combines the capital and operation from the preceding models into a Cost of Ownership Model to compute the plant capital and operating costs as a function of capacity and principal features and compares these estimates to the estimated operating cost of the same central plant configuration without a fuel cell.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fuel cell research on second-generation molten-carbonate systems. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the FY 1978 program are to (a) improve the performance and endurance of the molten carbonate fuel cell and (b) develop cost-effective cell components. The required effort is subdivided into three tasks: Task 1 is cell and component development. Improved components and cost-effective fabrication processes will be developed. This will include developing stable anode structures and improved electrolyte structures that can be fabricated by cost-effective processes. Task 2 is directed to fuel cell electrolyte optimization. New melt compositions will be tested in laboratory- and bench-scale cells. Supporting information necessary for electrolyte selection and for understanding the processes occurring in these systems will be obtained by developing models to describe cell performance and by electrochemical measurements. Task 3 involves cell operation at high pressure. Molten carbonate fuel cells will be operated (during the 3rd and 4th Quarters) at high pressure to identify and provide solutions to cell decay mechanisms and to identify problems associated with operating these cells at high pressures. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Renewable Electricity Purchases: History and Recent Developments  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article presents an analysis of prices of renewable-based electricity that utilities have paid to nonutilities, the primary generators of renewable electricity.

Information Center

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements Reviews Reports Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Reports ESnet publishes reports from science network Program Requirements Reviews on a regular basis. View the most recent of these below. Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2012 Eli Dart, Brian Tierney, Editors, "Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop, November 2012 - Final Report"", November 29, 2012, LBNL LBNL-6395E

278

Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Tri-Generation Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Mark F. Ruth* (Primary Contact), Michael E. Goldsby † , Timothy J. Sa † , Victor Diakov* *National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Pkwy. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 817-6160 Email: Mark.Ruth@nrel.gov † Sandia National Laboratories DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: December 1, 2010 Project End Date: October 31, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop a macro-system model (MSM): * Aimed at performing rapid cross-cutting analysis - Utilizing and linking other models - Improving consistency between models - Incorporate tri-generation systems into the MSM and * develop a methodology for MSM users to analyze

279

Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Portec Voltage Regulators: for Emergency Diesel Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information to help utilities address emergency diesel generator voltage regulator issues.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Generator Bushing Installation and Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a comprehensive guide to generator high-voltage bushing (HVB) installation and maintenance.

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

282

Task 3.14 - demonstration of technologies for remote power generation in Alaska. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This paper very briefly summarizes progress in the demonstration of a small (up to 6 MWe), environmentally acceptable electric generating system fueled by indigenous fuels and waste materials to serve power distribution systems typical of Alaskan Native communities. Two detailed appendices supplement the report. The project is focused on two primary technologies: (1) atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC), and (2) coalbed methane and coal-fired diesel technologies. Two sites have been selected as possible locations for an AFBC demonstration, and bid proposals are under review. The transfer of a coal-fired diesel clean coal demonstration project from Maryland to Fairbanks, Alaska was approved, and the environmental assessment has been initiated. Federal support for a fuel cell using coalbed methane is also being pursued. The appendices included in the report provide: (1) the status of the conceptual design study for a 600-kWe coal-fired cogeneration plant in McGrath, Alaska; and (2) a global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

Jones, M.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Neither Pinnacle Technologies, Inc. nor any person acting on behalf of Pinnacle: * Makes any warranty or representation, express or implied, with respect to the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the information contained in this report, or that the use of any apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report may not infringe privately owned rights; or * Assumes any liability with respect to the use of, or for damages resulting from the use of, any information, apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions DE-FC26-02NT41663 Final Report for National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, WV Project No.: USDE-0511 Report Date: December 2005 By:

284

Micro Turbine Generator Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of micro turbines generators have recently been announced as currently commercially available for sale to customers, such as end users, utilities, and energy service providers. Manufacturers and others are reporting certain performance capabilities ...

Stephanie L. Hamilton

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Zip Code 9. Reference Year . 2010 . 10. Type of Report (Check One) ... Electric Power (Electric utility and Nonutility): 33 . No. 2 Diesel ? 500 ppm Sulfur, Low

286

Status report on renewable energy in the States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the concept of integrated resource planning has spread among states and utilities, a reexamination of the role of renewable energy sources in the utility resource mix is taking place. This report documents the findings of a study of state regulatory commissions undertaken to: (1) help assess the state of knowledge and awareness about renewable energy resources and technologies; (2) assess the impacts of state policies on renewable energy development; and (3) identify important information needs. The key findings from this effort are: Renewable energy development has occurred only slowly over the last decade, and a small number of states account for the bulk of development. The development that has occurred has been limited to non-utility entities. Directed state policies have been a key driver in renewable energy development. Those states not currently addressing renewables may need more data and information before they proceed with directed policies. Other important observations are: The cost of renewables is an overriding concern. Regulators distinguish between ``emerging`` and ``established`` renewable energy technologies. Specific data are lacking on state-level renewable energy development. Detailed renewable resource assessments have yet to be performed in many states. This report identifies renewable energy information needs of state regulators. However, a number of concerns are also identified that must be addressed before renewables will receive serious attention in many of those states with limited renewables experience. Finally, the report catalogs a wide variety of policies that have been utilized in the states to promote greater development of renewable energy.

Swezey, B.; Sinclair, K.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Status report on renewable energy in the States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the concept of integrated resource planning has spread among states and utilities, a reexamination of the role of renewable energy sources in the utility resource mix is taking place. This report documents the findings of a study of state regulatory commissions undertaken to: (1) help assess the state of knowledge and awareness about renewable energy resources and technologies; (2) assess the impacts of state policies on renewable energy development; and (3) identify important information needs. The key findings from this effort are: Renewable energy development has occurred only slowly over the last decade, and a small number of states account for the bulk of development. The development that has occurred has been limited to non-utility entities. Directed state policies have been a key driver in renewable energy development. Those states not currently addressing renewables may need more data and information before they proceed with directed policies. Other important observations are: The cost of renewables is an overriding concern. Regulators distinguish between emerging'' and established'' renewable energy technologies. Specific data are lacking on state-level renewable energy development. Detailed renewable resource assessments have yet to be performed in many states. This report identifies renewable energy information needs of state regulators. However, a number of concerns are also identified that must be addressed before renewables will receive serious attention in many of those states with limited renewables experience. Finally, the report catalogs a wide variety of policies that have been utilized in the states to promote greater development of renewable energy.

Swezey, B.; Sinclair, K.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Kivalina wind generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project reported was to construct a system to harness the winds of an Arctic site to generate electricity that would power a greenhouse where fruit and vegetables could be raised for local consumption. The installation of the tower and an Enertech 4K wind generator are described. (LEW)

Aldrich, D.

1984-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

289

Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Researchers For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Business Development Services Berkeley Lab LaunchPad Funding - Innovation Grants Forms and Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Employment Export Control Record of Invention Software Disclosure and Abstract See Also FAQs for Researchers Entrepreneurial Resources Webcast: Transferring Technology to the Marketplace Pre-Publication Review Report Invention/Software The next step is for Lab researchers to report the invention or software to the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management Department. The invention report is not a patent application and in and of itself secures no intellectual property rights. It is used by the Lab to make a decision as to whether to proceed with a patent application.

290

Thin Film Materials and Processing Techniques for a Next Generation Photovoltaic Device: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-470  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research extends thin film materials and processes relevant to the development and production of a next generation photovoltaic device.

van Hest, M.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Report on the study of the tax and rate treatment of renewable energy projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was conducted in response to the requirements of Section 1205 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), which states: The Secretary (of Energy), in conjunction with State regulatory commissions, shall undertake a study to determine if conventional taxation and ratemaking procedures result in economic barriers to or incentives for renewable energy power plants compared to conventional power plants. The purpose of the study, therefore, is not to compare the cost-effectiveness of different types of renewable and conventional electric generating plants. Rather, it is to determine the relative impact of conventional ratemaking and taxation procedures on the selection of renewable power plants compared to conventional ones. To make this determination, we quantify the technical and financial parameters of renewable and conventional electric generating technologies, and hold them fixed throughout the study. Then, we vary taxation and ratemaking procedures to determine their effects on the financial criteria that investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) and nonutility electricity generators (NUGs) use to make technology-adoption decisions. In the planning process of a typical utility, the opposite is usually the case. That is, utilities typically hold ratemaking and taxation procedures constant and look for the least-cost mix of resources, varying the values of engineering and financial parameters of generating plants in the process.

Hadley, S.W.; Hill, L.J.; Perlack, R.D.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

293

Steam generator tube rupture study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes our investigation of steam generator behavior during a postulated tube rupture accident. Our study was performed using the steam generator, thermal-hydraulic analysis code THERMIT-UTSG. The purpose ...

Free, Scott Thomas

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT of the INFRASTRUCTURE TASK FORCE of the DOE NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE January 16, 2003 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On October 1, 2002 the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee was asked to provide specific, focused updates to its Nuclear Science and Technology Infrastructure Roadmap and review the specific issues at the DOE key nuclear energy research and development (R&D) laboratories. This activity was assigned to a five-member Infrastructure Task Force (ITF). After receiving extensive written materials from DOE, the Idaho Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), on November 6-8, 2002 the ITF visited the Idaho site and received briefings and tours of the INEEL and ANL-W facilities. INEEL and

295

Generator backup overcurrent protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concern that the characteristics and correct application of the generator backup relay are misunderstood is addressed in this report to the Power Systems Protection Committee. It is inherently a secure device, and rarely has the opportunity to operate in its intended capacity. So the question was asked, ''Do generator backup overcurrent relays really protect anything.'' In response a description of the function and operating characteristics of the backup relays, a discussion of generator fault current behavior, examples of relay settings for a typical application, and methods and criteria for determining that the relay both protects the generator and operates selectively with other protective devices are included.

Baker, D.S.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

297

Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update to "Technology Assessment of Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets" (EPRIsolutions report 1000772). That previous report dealt with fuel cells, stirling engine generators, and reciprocating engine generators; this current report focuses on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems fueled with natural gas or propane and sized for residential loads.

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

Environmental implications of increased biomass energy use. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study reviews the environmental implications of continued and increased use of biomass for energy to determine what concerns have been and need to be addressed and to establish some guidelines for developing future resources and technologies. Although renewable biomass energy is perceived as environmentally desirable compared with fossil fuels, the environmental impact of increased biomass use needs to be identified and recognized. Industries and utilities evaluating the potential to convert biomass to heat, electricity, and transportation fuels must consider whether the resource is reliable and abundant, and whether biomass production and conversion is environmentally preferred. A broad range of studies and events in the United States were reviewed to assess the inventory of forest, agricultural, and urban biomass fuels; characterize biomass fuel types, their occurrence, and their suitability; describe regulatory and environmental effects on the availability and use of biomass for energy; and identify areas for further study. The following sections address resource, environmental, and policy needs. Several specific actions are recommended for utilities, nonutility power generators, and public agencies.

Miles, T.R. Sr.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy [1-1,1-2]. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties [1-3,1-4]. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.''

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy [1-1,1-2]. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties [1-3,1-4]. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.''

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biogas-fueled Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a case study of the use of digester gas produced at two wastewater treatment plants in Omaha, NE to fuel electric power generators.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

A major objective of the coal-fired high performance power systems (HIPPS) program is to achieve significant increases in the thermodynamic efficiency of coal use for electric power generation. Through increased efficiency, all airborne emissions can be decreased, including emissions of carbon dioxide. High Performance power systems as defined for this program are coal-fired, high efficiency systems where the combustion products from coal do not contact the gas turbine. Typically, this type of a system will involve some indirect heating of gas turbine inlet air and then topping combustion with a cleaner fuel. The topping combustion fuel can be natural gas or another relatively clean fuel. Fuel gas derived from coal is an acceptable fuel for the topping combustion. The ultimate goal for HIPPS is to, have a system that has 95 percent of its heat input from coal. Interim systems that have at least 65 percent heat input from coal are acceptable, but these systems are required to have a clear development path to a system that is 95 percent coal-fired. A three phase program has been planned for the development of HIPPS. Phase 1, reported herein, includes the development of a conceptual design for a commercial plant. Technical and economic feasibility have been analysed for this plant. Preliminary R&D on some aspects of the system were also done in Phase 1, and a Research, Development and Test plan was developed for Phase 2. Work in Phase 2 include s the testing and analysis that is required to develop the technology base for a prototype plant. This work includes pilot plant testing at a scale of around 50 MMBtu/hr heat input. The culmination of the Phase 2 effort will be a site-specific design and test plan for a prototype plant. Phase 3 is the construction and testing of this plant.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

SNAP 7 PROGRAM: TASK 8--STRONTIUM-90 FUELED THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT. Quarterly Progress Report No. 4, August 1, 1961-October 31, 1961  

SciTech Connect

Progress during the period includes completion of the SNAP 7C system tests, completion of safety analysis for the SNAP 7A and C systems, assembly and initial testing of SNAP 7A, assembly of a modified reliability model, and assembly of a 10-W generator. Other activities include completion of thermal and safety analyses for SNAP 7B and D generators and fuel processing for these generators. (J.R.D.)

West, W.S.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation generation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 16, and contains only the reference case. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO generation renewable energy renewable energy generating capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

305

NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) PROGRAM GRANT NUMBER DE-FG03-00SF22168 TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT (Nov. 15, 2001 - Feb. 15,2002) ''Design and Layout Concepts for Compact, Factory-Produced, Transportable, Generation IV Reactor Systems''  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to develop and evaluate nuclear power plant designs and layout concepts to maximize the benefits of compact modular Generation IV reactor concepts including factory fabrication and packaging for optimal transportation and siting. Three nuclear power plant concepts are being studied representing water, helium and lead-bismuth coolants. This is the sixth quarterly progress report.

Fred R. Mynatt; Andy Kadak; Marc Berte; Larry Miller; Mohammed Khan; Joe McConn; Lawrence Townsend; Wesley Williams; Martin Williamson

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Reports  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Reports Reports . . . . , Book -1. Service Open File Information for Project Rulison, Production Testing Phase, . , August 28,1970 : . "; DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. DESCRIPTION O F PU1:T41C I-l!lkI,T;-1 SE1:VICh: 0P:SN F I L E INPOPt4ATION i[ ' 7 S&u-~%uestcrn E a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h 1,aboratol-p r? U. S. Depaieraent o f I l e a l t h ,. E d u c a t i o n aud Welfa,re i i I t - - . L-J~ub-l-ic H e a l t h ' ~ c r v i c e : Y T h i s s u r v e i l l a ~ l c e p e r f o r m e d u n d e r r e , a Memorandum o f ~ n d e k s t a n d i n ~ (No. SF 5 1 & L A U. S . . A t o m i c E n e r g y Commission i hk, ! i ilYo.,jh,asic g r o u p s o f i n f o r m a t i o n a r e p l a c e d i n t h e P u b l i c H e a l t h i k e l ~ e r v i k e , \ ~ o u t h w e s t c r n R a t i i o l o g i c a l H

307

Development of Novel Nanocrystal-based Solar Cell to Exploit Multiple Exciton Generation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00227  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to develop new design and fabrication techniques for NC solar cells with the goal of demonstrating enhanced photocurrent and efficiency by exploiting multiple exciton generation and to investigate multiple exciton generation and charge carrier dynamics in semiconductor NC films used in NC-based solar cells.

Ellingson, R.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie...

309

US/USSR cooperative program in open-cycle MHD electrical power generation: joint test report No. 3. Tests in the U-25B facility: MHD generator tests No. 4 and 5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of the modifications made to improve the plasma parameters of the U-25B Facility is presented. The oxygen enrichment system was modified to allow oxygen enrichment of up to 50% (by volume) ahead of the preheaters. Optimum design and operating conditions of the seed injection system were defined as a result of experimental investigations. An account of the extensive diagnostic studies performed and a description of the measurement techniques and of the new submillimeter laser interferometer are given. The performance of the MHD generator is analyzed for different operating modes. Studies of fluctuations and nonuniformities, current take-off distributions, local electrical analysis, overall heat transfer history of the MHD channel, and an extensive parametric study of the generator are presented. A detailed account of the complete disassembly and inspection of channel No. 1 after more than 100 hours of operation with the combustor, and of the condition of its various elements is also given.

Picologlou, B F; Batenin, V M [eds.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

US/USSR cooperative program in open-cycle MHD electrical power generation: joint test report No. 4. Tests in the U-25B facility: MHD generator tests No. 6 and 7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of the main results obtained during Tests No. 6 and 7 at the U-25B Facility using the new channel No. 2 is presented. The purpose of these tests was to operate the MHD generator at its design parameters. Described here are new plasma diagnostic devices: a traversing dual electrical probe for determining distribution of electron concentrations, and a traversing probe that includes a pitot tube for measuring total and static pressure, and a light detector for measuring plasma luminescence. Data are presented on heat flux distribution along the channel, the first data of this type obtained for an MHD facility of such size. Results are given of experimental studies of plasma characteristics, gasdynamic, thermal, and electrical MHD channel performance, and temporal and spatial nonuniformities. Typical modes of operation are analyzed by means of local electrical analyses. Computer models are used to obtain predictions for both localized and overall generator characteristics. These theoretical predictions agree closely with the results of the local analyses, as well as with measurements of the overall gasdynamic and electrical characteristics of the generator.

Picologlou, B F; Batenin, V M

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Multi-Hundred Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Program, LES 8/9 Program, MJS Program. Bi-monthly progress report, 1 September--31 October 1974  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant events, activities and achievements on the MHW LES 8/9 and MJS Programs for the reporting period are reported. Topics discussed include programmatic, safety, systems, isotope heat source, converter, product assurance, acceptance testing, and converter fabrication. (TFD)

Not Available

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY ROADMAP FOR CALIFORNIA;ABSTRACT This report defines a year 2020 policy vision for distributed generation and cogeneration and cogeneration. Additionally, this report describes long-term strategies, pathways, and milestones to take

313

SNAP PROGRAMS TASK 8--STRONTIUM-90 FUELED THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT. Quarterly Progress Report No. 2, February 1, 1961 through April 30, 1961  

SciTech Connect

Work in the processing of Sr/sup 90/ into heat sources for 4 radioisotope-fueled thermoelectric power generation systems is described. The design and engineering analysis of these thermoelectric generators are discussed. Fuel process flow and associated equipment requirements for remote conversion of Sr/sup 90/ feed material to strontium titanate pellets are covered. Previously evolved technical standards concerning raw fuel material specification were coordinated. (M.C.G.)

West, W.

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

EIA - Distributed Generation in Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Previous reports Previous reports Distributed Generation in Buildings - AEO2005 Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models - July 2002 Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Release date: August 29, 2013 Distributed and dispersed generation technologies generate electricity near the particular load they are intended to serve, such as a residential home or commercial building. EIA defines distributed generation (DG) as being connected to the electrical grid and intended to directly offset retail sales, and dispersed generation as being off-grid and often used for remote applications where grid-connected electricity is cost-prohibitive. Dispersed generation in the buildings sector is not currently gathered by

315

SNAP 7 PROGRAM--TASK 8--STRONTIUM-90 FUELED THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT. Quarterly Progress Report No. 5, November 1, 1961 to January 31, 1962  

SciTech Connect

The SNAP 7A battery and converter were subjected to the required shock, vibration and temperature teats. The generator was fueled, postfueling radiation levels were checked and the generator was integrated into the complete SNAP 7A system. After the completion of acceptance tests, the SNAP 7A system was installed in a buoy which, in turn, was anchored in the bay where it will be subjected to further evaluation. The SNAP 7C generator was shipped for transport to Antarctica. The generator will power a five-watt U. S. Navy remote weather station. Tests were also conducted to determine the operational characteristics of SNAP 7B and 7D thermoelectric couples. Also, the reliability model of the generator was operated at high temperature for 23 days. The electrical, converter and battery specifications for the SNAP 7D system were completed and released. The primary effort in the fael processing phase of the program was to provide the necessary liaison with the personnel installing the processing equipment. Maintenance and checkout guides were written to assure satisfactory installation and continued performance throughout the fuel processing span. An operation procedure guide was written to describe the engineering concept of the fuel processing operation. The guide was written for the personnel who will be conducting the fuel processing operation. (auth)

McDonald, W.A.

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Electrical power generation: comparative risks and benefits. Final report, August 6, 1973--August 10, 1973. A one-week workshop for high school science teachers  

SciTech Connect

A live-in type workshop available for academic credit covering basic nuclear power generation and the tradeoffs and problems that exist between nuclear power and alternative means to generate electricity was held for 37 high- school teachers at the Madison campus for the University of Wisconsin. Significant improvements over last year's program included the distribution of a large amount of information and the distribution of two minicourse outlines on the subject of power and the environment entitled: The Environmental Impact of Electrical Power Generation: Nuclear and Fossil'' prepared by the Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, and Science II Matter-Energy Interactions in Natural Systems'' prepared by Carl Pfeiffer of Monona Grove High School, Monona, Wisconsin. (MCW)

Carbon, M.W.; Hartwig, K.T.

1973-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

317

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume VI. Electrical power generation; master control subsystems; balance of plant CDRL item 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Honeywell electrical power generation subsystem centers on a General Electric dual admission, triple extraction turbine generator sized to the output requirements of the Pilot Plant. The turbine receives steam from the receiver subsystem and/or the thermal storage subsystem and supplies those subsystems with feedwater. The turbine condensor is wet cooled. The plant control system consists of a coordinated digital master and subsystem digital/analog controls. The remainder of the plant, work spaces, maintenance areas, roads, and reception area are laid out to provide maximum convenience compatible with utility and safety. Most of the activities are housed in a complex around the base of the receiver tower. This volume contains a description of the relationship of the electrical power generation subsystem to the rest of the plant, the design methodology and evolution, the interface integration and control, and the operation and maintenance procedures.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas fired fuel cell. Draft and final progress report for the period May 1, 1993--July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is an account of the work performed from May 1, 1993 to July 30,1993 on the economic feasibility generating electrical power by natural gas-fired fuel cells. The study is comprised of a survey of energy users, the development of numeric models of an energy distribution system and a central plant utilities system that includes a fuel cell. A model of the capital cost of the hardware elements is combined with a series of ownership scenarios and an operations model that provide the necessary input for a model of the cost of ownership of a fuel cell-based power generation system. The primary model development tasks are complete. The remaining study emphasis is to perform an economic analysis of varied ownership scenarios using the model. This report outlines the progress to date.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

SNAP 7 PROGRAM--TASK 8--STRONTIUM-90 FUELED THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT. Quarterly Progress Report No. 7, May 1 through July 31, 1962  

SciTech Connect

The effort on SNAP 7A and 7C was confined to operating the reliability model. There were fluctuations in output power that can be attributed to variations in the operating parameters, plus an increase in the internal resistance. In the SNAP 7B project the second 60-watt generator was completed and has undergone the beginning-of-life (maximum input, helium gas) portion of the parametric tests. The performance was nearly identical to that of the first 60-watt generator. The unit will be used with the SNAP 7B system. The installation concept for the SNAP 7B system was approved by the U. S. Coast Guard. The generator is to be housed in a finned aluminum container that will provide the required radiator surface. This container will be filled with a water- ethylene glycol mixture that is necessary to transfer the heat from the generator into the container. The battery-converter compartment is an integral part of the container lid. During the time the entire SNAP 7D system was subjected to shock and vibratlon tests, no mechanical or functional deficiencies were detected. The required temperature tests followed the mechanical tests. During this period the complete system was operated at maximum intermediate and minimum temperatures. Design objectives were satisfied throughout the test. The SNAP 7D generator was fueled at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on June 12, 1962, with a total thermal input of 1435 watts. The iueled generator was returned and integrated with the system. The system was demonstrated and accepted on July 3, 1962. (auth)

McDonald, W.A.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Multi-Hundred Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Program, LES 8/9 Program, MJS Program, Bi-monthly progress report, 1 November--31 December 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant events, activities and achievements on the MHW LES 8/9 and MJS Programs for the reporting period are reported. Topics discussed include safety systems, isotope heat source, converter, product assurance, hardware fabrication, acceptance testing, and ground support equipment. (TFD)

Not Available

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Multi-Hundred Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Program, LES 8/9 Program, MJS Program. Bi-monthly progress report, 1 May--30 June 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant events, activities and achievements on the MHW LES 8/9 and MJS Programs for the reporting period are reported. Topics discussed include programmatic, safety, systems, isotope heat source, converter, product assurance, hardware fabrication, acceptance testing, and ground support equipment. (TFD)

Not Available

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Multi-Hundred Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Program, LES 8/9 Program, MJS Program. Bi-monthly progress report, 1 July--31 August 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant events, activities and achievements on the MHW LES 8/9 and MJS Programs for the reporting period are reported. Topics discussed include safety systems, isotope heat source, converter, product assurance, hardware fabrication, acceptance testing, and ground support equipment. (TFD)

Not Available

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fossil Generating Case Histories 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report is a compilation of events and activities that occurred at member fossil generating stations in 2008. The purpose of this report is to share these operating experiences (OEs) with other member utilities so that lessons can be learned and an opportunity provided to improve overall performance across the generation fleet. The report also includes an appendix that contains four assessments that took place at plants during 2008. The focus of these a...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Photovoltaic Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is an overview of photovoltaic power generation. The purpose of the report is to provide the reader with a general understanding of photovoltaic power generation and how PV technology can be practically applied. There is a brief discussion of early research and a description of how photovoltaic cells convert sunlight to electricity. The report covers concentrating collectors, flat-plate collectors, thin-film technology, and building-integrated systems. The discussion of photovoltaic cell types includes single-crystal, poly-crystalline, and thin-film materials. The report covers progress in improving cell efficiencies, reducing manufacturing cost, and finding economic applications of photovoltaic technology. Lists of major manufacturers and organizations are included, along with a discussion of market trends and projections. The conclusion is that photovoltaic power generation is still more costly than conventional systems in general. However, large variations in cost of conventional electrical power, and other factors, such as cost of distribution, create situations in which the use of PV power is economically sound. PV power is used in remote applications such as communications, homes and villages in developing countries, water pumping, camping, and boating. Gridconnected applications such as electric utility generating facilities and residential rooftop installations make up a smaller but more rapidly expanding segment of PV use. Furthermore, as technological advances narrow the cost gap, more applications are becoming economically feasible at an accelerating rate. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ...................................................................................v

Tom Penick; Gale Greenleaf Instructor; Thomas Penick; Bill Louk; Bill Louk

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

generating | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating generating Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

326

Local entropy generation analysis  

SciTech Connect

Second law analysis techniques have been widely used to evaluate the sources of irreversibility in components and systems of components but the evaluation of local sources of irreversibility in thermal processes has received little attention. While analytical procedures for evaluating local entropy generation have been developed, applications have been limited to fluid flows with analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature fields. The analysis of local entropy generation can be used to evaluate more complicated flows by including entropy generation calculations in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The research documented in this report consists of incorporating local entropy generation calculations in an existing CFD code and then using the code to evaluate the distribution of thermodynamic losses in two applications: an impinging jet and a magnetic heat pump. 22 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Documentation of Steam Turbine-Generator Failures2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update report presents a review of turbine-generator failures that occurred during 2010.

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

Annual energy review 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 13th edition presents the Energy Information Administration`s historical energy statistics. For most series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1994; thus, this report is well-suited to long-term trend analyses. It covers all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels and electricity. Statistics on renewable energy sources are also included: this year, for the first time, usage of renewables by other consumers as well as by electric utilities is included. Also new is a two-part, comprehensive presentation of data on petroleum products supplied by sector for 1949 through 1994. Data from electric utilities and nonutilities are integrated as ``electric power industry`` data; nonutility power gross generation are presented for the first time. One section presents international statistics (for more detail see EIA`s International Energy Annual).

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The analysis and specification of large high-pressure, high-temperature valves for combustion turbine protection in second-generation PFB power plants: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to provide a specification for the high-pressure/high-temperature valves for turbine overspeed protection in a commercial-scale second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant. In the event of a loss of external (generator) load, the gas turbine rapidly accelerates from its normal operating speed. Protection from excessive overspeed can be maintained by actuation of fuel isolation and air bypass valves. A design specification for these valves was developed by analyses of the turbine/compressor interaction during a loss of load and analyses of pressure and flow transients during operation of the overspeed protection valves. The basis for these analyses was the Phase 1 plant conceptual design prepared in 1987.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Characterization of open-cycle coal-fired MHD generators. Quarterly technical summary report No. 6, October 1--December 31, 1977. [PACKAGE code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research has included theoretical modeling of important plasma chemical effects such as: conductivity reductions due to condensed slag/electron interactions; conductivity and generator efficiency reductions due to the formation of slag-related negative ion species; and the loss of alkali seed due to chemical combination with condensed slag. A summary of the major conclusions in each of these areas is presented. A major output of the modeling effort has been the development of an MHD plasma chemistry core flow model. This model has been formulated into a computer program designated the PACKAGE code (Plasma Analysis, Chemical Kinetics, And Generator Efficiency). The PACKAGE code is designed to calculate the effect of coal rank, ash percentage, ash composition, air preheat temperatures, equivalence ratio, and various generator channel parameters on the overall efficiency of open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators. A complete description of the PACKAGE code and a preliminary version of the PACKAGE user's manual are included. A laboratory measurements program involving direct, mass spectrometric sampling of the positive and negative ions formed in a one atmosphere coal combustion plasma was also completed during the contract's initial phase. The relative ion concentrations formed in a plasma due to the methane augmented combustion of pulverized Montana Rosebud coal with potassium carbonate seed and preheated air are summarized. Positive ions measured include K/sup +/, KO/sup +/, Na/sup +/, Rb/sup +/, Cs/sup +/, and CsO/sup +/, while negative ions identified include PO/sub 3//sup -/, PO/sub 2//sup -/, BO/sub 2//sup -/, OH/sup -/, SH/sup -/, and probably HCrO/sub 3/, HMoO/sub 4//sup -/, and HWO/sub 3//sup -/. Comparison of the measurements with PACKAGE code predictions are presented. Preliminary design considerations for a mass spectrometric sampling probe capable of characterizing coal combustion plasmas from full scale combustors and flow trains are presented and discussed.

Kolb, C.E.; Yousefian, V.; Wormhoudt, J.; Haimes, R.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Kerrebrock, J.L.

1978-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

GENERATING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating capacity consistent with mandatory reliability criteria. A large part of the problem can be associated with the failure of wholesale spot market prices for energy and operating reserves to rise to high enough levels during periods when generating capacity is fully utilized. Reforms to wholesale energy markets, the introduction of well-design forward capacity markets, and symmetrical treatment of demand response and generating capacity resources to respond to market and institutional imperfections are discussed. This policy reform program is compatible with improving the efficiency of spot wholesale electricity markets, the continued evolution of competitive retail markets, and restores incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity consistent with operating reliability criteria applied by system operators. It also responds to investment disincentives that have been associated with volatility in wholesale energy prices, limited hedging opportunities and to concerns about regulatory opportunism. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Evaluation of technical feasibility of closed-cycle non-equilibrium MHD power generation with direct coal firing. Final report, Task 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program accomplishments in a continuing effort to demonstrate the feasibility of direct coal fired, closed cycle, magnetohydrodynamic power generation are detailed. These accomplishments relate to all system aspects of a CCMHD power generation system including coal combustion, heat transfer to the MHD working fluid, MHD power generation, heat and cesium seed recovery and overall systems analysis. Direct coal firing of the combined cycle has been under laboratory development in the form of a high slag rejection, regeneratively air cooled cyclone coal combustor concept, originated within this program. A hot bottom ceramic regenerative heat exchanger system was assembled and test fired with coal for the purposes of evaluating the catalytic effect of alumina on NO/sub x/ emission reduction and operability of the refractory dome support system. Design, procurement, fabrication and partial installation of a heat and seed recovery flow apparatus was accomplished and was based on a stream tube model of the full scale system using full scale temperatures, tube sizes, rates of temperature change and tube geometry. Systems analysis capability was substantially upgraded by the incorporation of a revised systems code, with emphasis on ease of operator interaction as well as separability of component subroutines. The updated code was used in the development of a new plant configuration, the Feedwater Cooled (FCB) Brayton Cycle, which is superior to the CCMHD/Steam cycle both in performance and cost. (WHK)

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Generator Maintenance Guide for Emergency Diesel Generators (Japanese Version)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a Japanese translation of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technical Report 1021479. EPRI developed this report to address maintenance and improve long-term reliability and availability of generators within nuclear power plant emergency diesel generator (EDG) systems. Maintenance of generator stators and rotors is the focus of this report, which highlights maintenance tasks and strategies that can be performed to identify generator degradation and prevent unforeseen failures. This ...

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

Ultrafine calcium aerosol: Generation and use of a sorbent for sulfur in coal combustion. Volume 2, Economics: Final report, August 1, 1988--October 31, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to determine the cost effectiveness of using calcium-hydroxide powder sorbent in a commercial power plant flue gas desulfurization (FGD) application. The cost analysis methodology found herein is a direct application of the one found in the January 1986 report, ``Economic Evaluation of Dry-Injection Flue Gas Desulfurization Technology by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The EPRI study addresses the economic issue of installing a dry-injection FGD system on a 1000 MW (2-500 MW units) power plant using sodium-rich powder sorbents derived from nahcolite and trona ores. In this report`s treatment, the calcium-based derivatives of hydrated limestone are compared directly to nahcolite and trona for both low and high sulfur coals. This type of evaluation is allowable due to the similar material handling properties of 1/4 inch hydrated limestone in comparison to those properties for nahcolite and trona. Thus, this report repeats the EPRI cost analysis for a slightly modified limestone-based FGD design. Note that the calculation methodology is not discussed, in this report as it has already been outlined in the EPRI study. Instead, Appendices A and B contain copies of the calculation spreadsheets based on the EPRI method for the hydrated limestone system.

Alam, M.K.; Nahar, N.U.; Stewart, G.D.; Prudich, M.E. [comps.] [Ohio Coal Research Center, Athens, OH (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Evaluation of the heating operation and transmission district: Feasibility of cogeneration. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The General Services Administration, through its National Capital Region, operates a district heating system - called the Heating Operation and Transmission District - that provides steam to approximately 100 government buildings in Washington, D.C. HOTD is examining a host of options that will improve its ability to provide reliable, environmentally sound, and cost-effective service to its customers. This report evaluates one of those options - cogeneration, a technology that would enable HOTD to produce steam and electricity simultaneously. The study concluded that, under current regulations, cogeneration is not attractive economically because the payback period (15 years) exceeds Federal return-on-investment guidelines. However, if the regulatory environment changes to allow wheeling (transmission of power by a non-utility power producer to another user), cogeneration would be attractive; HOTD would save anywhere from $38 million to $118 million and the investment would pay back in 7 to 10 years. Although incorporating cogeneration into the HOTD system has no strong benefit at this time, the report recommends that GSA reevaluate cogeneration in one or two years because Federal regulations regarding wheeling are under review. It also recommends that GSA work with the District of Columbia government to develop standards for cogeneration.

Cable, J.H.; Gilday, L.T.; Moss, M.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Magnetocumulative generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

1981-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Quarterly technical status report, January--March 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

338

User's guide for the Data Analysis, Retrieval, and Tabulation System (DARTS), revised edition: A mainframe computer code for generating cross-tabulation reports  

SciTech Connect

A computer system unknown as the Data Analysis, Retrieval, and Tabulation System (DARTS) was developed by the Energy Systems Division at Argonne National Laboratory to generate tables of descriptive statistics derived from analyses of housing and energy data sources. Through a simple input command, the user can request the preparation of a hierarchical table based on any combination of several hundred of the most commonly analyzed variables. The system was written in the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) language and designed for use on a large-scale IBM mainframe computer.

Anderson, J.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Solar-assisted hydrogen generation by photoelectrocatalysis: electric birefringence and ellipsometric spectroscopy of the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. Annual report 3 Sep 82-31 Aug 83  

SciTech Connect

The project goals are to apply and develop electro-optical techniques (electric birefringence and ellipsometric spectroscopy) for in-situ investigation of modified and unmodified photoelectrode/liquid junctions. This information will be used in conjunction with other spectroscopic and photoelectro-chemical techniques to delineate those features, necessary at this interface, for the achievement of high photo-electrolysis efficiencies. The thorough understanding obtained for both the photoelectrode and its liquid junction with aqueous electrolytes will be directed toward the development of high-efficiency photo-electrochemical cells for hydrogen generation.

Ang, P.G.P.; St. John, M.R.; Sammells, A.F.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

PLASMA GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

Foster, J.S. Jr.

1958-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric generator having a rigid coupling or stack'' between the heat source and the hot strap joining the thermoelements is described. The stack includes a member of an insulating material, such as ceramic, for electrically isolating the thermoelements from the heat source, and a pair of members of a ductile material, such as gold, one each on each side of the insulating member, to absorb thermal differential expansion stresses in the stack. (Official Gazette)

Pryslak, N.E.

1974-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Photon generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni (Shoreham, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Cluster generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

Donchev, Todor I. (Urbana, IL); Petrov, Ivan G. (Champaign, IL)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Steam Generator Management Program: Alloy 800 Steam Generator Tubing Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear grade (NG) Alloy 800 has been used for steam generator tubing since 1972 in over 50 nuclear power plants worldwide. The operational performance of this alloy has been very good, although some degradation modes have recently been observed. This report describes worldwide operating experience for Alloy 800 steam generator tubing along with differences in tubing material, plant design, and operating conditions that can affect tube degradation. The various types of plants with Alloy 800 steam generat...

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

345

Steam Generator Management Program: Assessment of Steam Generator Tube Plugs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI Steam Generator Management Program guidelines require that utilities perform integrity assessments of all steam generator (SG) components, including tube plugs. SG inspection outages should specifically include monitoring of degradation in tube hardware such as plugs. This report provides guidance for utility engineers to use in determining tube plug inspection requirements, including scope, technique, and periodicity.BackgroundGenerally, utilities perform ...

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Integrity Assessment Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for evaluating the condition of steam generator (SG) tubes based on nondestructive examination (NDE) or in situ pressure testing. The integrity assessments are normally performed during a reactor refueling outage. Nuclear power plant licensees who follow the guidance in this report will have satisfied the requirements for degradation assessments, condition monitoring, and operational assessment as defined in the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Steam Generator Program Guidelin...

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

347

EIA COPY. Tear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COPY. COPY. Tear out, complete, and return to: Energy Information Administration: EI-441 Mail Station: BG-094 FORSTL U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Attn: Form EIA-176 SHORT FORM A2. Form EIA-176, Short Form Figure Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1996 220 nonutility nonutility nonutility nonutility Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1996 221 5.4.4.2 EIA-176, ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION, 19 RESPO NDENT CO PY Page 3 PART V: CONTINUATION, DISPOSITION OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS WITHIN OR TRANSPORTED OUT OF REPORT STATE 1.0 Control No. 2.0 Company Name 3.0 Report State 4.0 Resubmittal EIA Date Volume (Mcf at 14.73 psia) e or f Cost or Revenue (Including taxes) e or f 5.4.4 Other Nonutility Power Producer Sales

348

Fuel Switching on a Dime -- Boiler Capabilities of Electric Utilities and Industrial Companies: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities play an unusual and important role in the natural gas market because so much of their ongoing gas demand is price sensitive. This report, which focuses on the pattern of this demand, tracks how switching between gas and alternative fuels by major users affects the overall market. Events over the past four years and new plant-specific data have changed our understanding of this phenomenon.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fossil Generating Station Case Histories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual EPRI Technical Update is a compilation of several case histories of events and activities that occurred at member fossil generating stations in 2007. The purpose of this report is to share this operating experience with other member utilities so that lessons can be learned and an opportunity provided to improve overall performance across the generation fleet.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

350

Task 3.14 -- Demonstration of technologies for remote power generation in Alaska. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is a site specific demonstration of a small, environmentally acceptable electric generating system fueled on indigenous fuels and waste materials to serve the microgrid or stand alone power distribution systems typical of remote, isolated Alaska Native communities. The objective of the project is to develop a commercialization plan that includes an analysis of the quantity, quality, and cost of the available fuels; a mapping of the electricity and district heating needs of a selected community, including electrical distribution layout and interconnecting steam piping; a step by step review of the environmental regulations and permit applications that need to be met; and a preliminary design and budget for the demonstration of a 0.5 to 6 MWe power system to be completed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in a manner that provides technical and regulatory readiness to proceed with implementation of the demonstration.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

HEAT GENERATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. First quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

This project is Phase I of a multi-phased program for the design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Phase I comprises the conceptual design and associated cost estimates of a stationary Stirling engine capable of being fueled by a variety of heat sources, with emphasis on coal firing, followed by the preparation of a plan for implementing the design, fabrication and testing of a demonstration engine by 1985. The main effort in Phase I is the generation of state-of-the-art conceptual designs having greatest potential for prototype testing in 1985. The conceptual designs include a heat transport system for integrating the engine heater head with such energy sources as conventional oil/gas combustors, fluidized bed and other coal combustors, and combustors using coal-derived liquid fuels, and low/medium BTU gases. The heat transport systems being investigated include forced convection with gases or liquids, heat pipes, and direct firing. Currently, the leading choice for the solid fuel combustion system is the atmospheric fluidized bed, with low BTU gasification still a viable alternative. Both systems will continue to be evaluated further, but with greater emphasis on FBC. To date, there appears no clear choice among the heat pipe, forced convection gas loop, or direct firing as the prime candidate for the heat transport sub-system. Conceptual design and analysis will continue on all three sub-systems. Scale-up of United Stirling's P-75 engine to serve as the conceptual design of the 500 HP engine module is continuing. (LCL)

Not Available,

1980-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

without steam gen. ) Steam generator Control Rods Refuelingcooling system, steam generator, and auxiliary coolingcooling system and steam generator. A brief look at tables

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Magnetocumulative generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

Pettibone, Joseph S. (Livermore, CA); Wheeler, Paul C. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Chemical characterization of ash generated from alfalfa stem gasification: Agricultural and environmental implications. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report provides results of Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedures (TCLP) and Synthetic Leachate Test Procedure (SLTP) for the alfalfa stem ash. The TCLP simulates solute leaching in landfill by using acetic acid as a solvent and SLTP simulates potential for leaching from synthetic acid rain. This report also provides information on detailed chemical characterization of organic and inorganic constituents of the ash. The analysis performed includes information on compounds that may represent a potential risk to human or animal health and those constituents that may have beneficial use as soil amendments and conditioners. A sample of the fly (filter) ash from the test burn conducted in Finland was received in May 1997 and used for initial investigation. Three additional fly ash samples and one sample of bottom ash (reactor bed ash) were received in June 1997. The samples were either tested at the University of Minnesota or sent to a reputable laboratory, and various tests were conducted according to the standard methods. The result of the comprehensive tests conducted in May 1997 (report submitted previously) were used as a screening procedure for conducting tests on June 1997 samples. To provide a more comprehensive representation of ash characteristics the results for fly ash received in May are presented along with results from fly ash samples received in July. The average, range and coefficient of variation (CV) are provided. The TCLP and SLTP tests conducted in the laboratory indicated that the concentration of heavy metals were below or close to the detection limits for fly and bottom ash samples (Tables 1 and 2). The ash was also characterized for a number of classes of organic compounds that may pose potential environmental or health risks. These are polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total and individual dioxin and furan compounds.

Rosen, C.; Mozaffari, M.; Russelle, M.; Nater, E.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Silicon germanium (SiGe) radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) program for space missions. Nineteenth technical progress report, December 1980-January 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work accomplished during the reporting period on the DOE Silicon Germanium RTG Program, Contract DE-AC01-79ET-32043 is described. This program consists of the following three tasks: multi-hundred watt RTG for the Galileo probe mission; reestablishment of silicon germanium unicouple capability; and general purpose heat source RTG for the international solar polar and Galileo orbiter missions. Details of program progress for each task, including a milestone schedule and a discussion of current problem areas (if any) are presented.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Distributed Generation Biofuel Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update report documents testing performed to assess aspects of using biofuel as an energy source for distributed generation. Specifically, the tests involved running Caterpillar Power Module compression ignition engines on palm methyl ester (PME) biofuel and comparing the emissions to those of the same engines running on ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel. Fuel consumption and energy efficiency were also assessed, and some relevant storage and handling properties of the PME were noted. The tests...

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Progress report for the period November 1989 through December 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of three material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base materials, and Ti-base materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments included anoxic brine and anoxic brine with overpressures of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of a protective iron sulfide reaction product. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

U. S. Navy shipboard-generated plastic-waste pilot-recycling program. Research and development report, Apr 90-Jan 91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From April 1990 through January 1991, the feasibility of recycling Navy shipboard-generated plastic wastes was explored. Normally, plastic wastes are source separated aboard Navy ships and retained for shoreside disposal in accordance with new fleet requirements implementing MARPOL Annex V that prohibits the discharge of plastics at sea. Over 23,000 pounds of shipboard plastic wastes from USS Lexington (AVT 16) and ships from the Norfolk Naval Base were recycled into park benches, picnic tables and carstops that have been distributed back to the Navy bases for use. Navy shipboard plastics must undergo sorting prior to recycling because Navy plastic waste contains large quantities of composite plastic items (e.g., plastic/paper) that are not easily recyclable. Recycling food-contaminated plastics is not practical due to sanitation problems encountered during handling. However, certain items have good resale value if separated by resin type and color (e.g., sonobuoy casings, hard plastic containers, packaging films). Education, feedback, and command support for shipboard recycling programs are required to ensure maximum participation and to minimize contamination with non-plastic items. Specially marked plastics only containers increase convenience and effectiveness of the recycling program.

Middleton, L.B.; Huntley, J.Y.; Burgiel, J.J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume II. Final report, Appendix A: selected DSG technologies and their general control requirements  

SciTech Connect

A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. The purpose of this survey and identification of DSG technologies is to present an understanding of the special characteristics of each of these technologies in sufficient detail so that the physical principles of their operation and the internal control of each technology are evident. In this way, a better appreciation can be obtained of the monitoring and control requirements for these DSGs from a remote distribution dispatch center. A consistent approach is being sought for both hardware and software which will handle the monitoring and control necessary to integrate a number of different DSG technologies into a common distribution dispatch network. From this study it appears that the control of each of the DSG technologies is compatible with a supervisory control method of operation that lends itself to remote control from a distribution dispatch center.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary-power-generation applications in the 500- to 3000-horsepower range. Phase I final report  

SciTech Connect

A program plan and schedule for the implementation of the proposed conceptual designs through the remaining four phases of the overall large Stirling engine development program was prepared. The objective of Phase II is to prepare more detailed designs of the conceptual designs prepared in Phase I. At the conclusion of Phase II, a state-of-the-art design will be selected from the candidate designs developed in Phase I for development. The objective of Phase III is to prepare manufacturing drawings of the candidate engine design. Also, detailed manufacturing drawings of both 373 kW (500 hp) and 746 kW (1000 hp) power pack skid systems will be completed. The power pack skid systems will include the generator, supporting skid, controls, and other supporting auxiliary subsystems. The Stirling cycle engine system (combustion system, Stirling engine, and heat transport system) will be mounted in the power pack skid system. The objective of Phase IV is to procure parts for prototype engines and two power pack skid systems and to assemble Engines No. 1 and 2. The objective of Phase V is to perform extensive laboratory and demonstration testing of the Stirling engines and power pack skid systems, to determine the system performance and cost and commercialization strategy. Scheduled over a 6 yr period the cost of phases II through V is estimated at $22,063,000. (LCL)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Volume 1. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This project was Phase I of a multiphased program for the design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Phase I comprised the conceptual design and associated cost estimates of a stationary Stirling engine capable of being fueled by a variety of heat sources, with emphasis on coal firing, followed by the preparation of a plan for implementing the design, fabrication and testing of a demonstration engine by 1985. The development and evaluation of conceptual designs have been separated into two broad categories: the A designs which represent the present state-of-the-art and which are demonstrable by 1985 with minimum technical risk; and the B designs which involve advanced technology and therefore would require significant research and development prior to demonstration and commercialization, but which may ultimately offer advantages in terms of lower cost, better performance, or higher reliability. The majority of the effort in Phase I was devoted to the A designs.

Not Available,

1980-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Biogass Generator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Another internet tool by: Another internet tool by: Build Your Own Page 1 of 5 Teach...build...learn...renewable energy! Biogas Generator A Renewable Energy Project Kit The Pembina Institute What Is Biogas? Biogas is actually a mixture of gases, usually carbon dioxide and methane. It is produced by a few kinds of microorganisms, usually when air or oxygen is absent. (The absence of oxygen is called "anaerobic conditions.") Animals that eat a lot of plant material, particularly grazing animals such as cattle, produce large amounts of biogas. The biogas is produced not by the cow or elephant, but by billions of microor- ganisms living in its digestive system. Biogas also develops in bogs and at the bottom of lakes, where decaying organic matter builds up under wet and

364

Unitized Design for Home Refueling Appliance for Hydrogen Generation to 5,000 psi - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Timothy Norman (Primary Contact), Monjid Hamdan Giner, Inc. (formerly Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC) 89 Rumford Avenue Newton, MA 02466 Phone: (781) 529-0556 Email: tnorman@ginerinc.com DOE Manager HQ: Eric L. Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@hq.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0001486 Project Start Date: August 15, 2010 Project End Date: August 14, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Detail design and demonstrate subsystems for a unitized * electrolyzer system for residential refueling at 5,000 psi to meet DOE targets for a home refueling appliance (HRA) Fabricate and demonstrate unitized 5,000 psi system * Identify and team with commercialization partner(s) * Technical Barriers

365

Power Generation from an Integrated Biomass Reformer and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SBIR Phase III) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Quentin Ming (Primary Contact), Patricia Irving InnovaTek, Inc. 3100 George Washington Way, Suite 108 Richland, WA 99354 Phone: (509) 375-1093 Email: ming@innovatek.com DOE Managers HQ: Charles Russomanno Phone: (202) 586-7543 Email: Charles.Russomanno@ee.doe.gov HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0004535 Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: September 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Establish the requirements and design for an integrated * fuel cell and fuel processor that will meet the technical and operational needs for distributed energy production. Develop and integrate key system components - *

366

Final Technical Report for Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models, DE-FG02-07ER64429  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for a DOE-funded research project describing the outcome of research on non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. The main results consist of extensive development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes.

Smyth, Padhraic [University of California, Irvine

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Phase II CRADA ORNL99-0568 Report : Developing Transmission-Less Inverter Drive Systems for Axial-Gap Permanent magnet Accessory and Traction Motors and Generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNLs) Power Electronics and Electric Machine Research Center (PEEMRC) collaborated with Visual Computing Systems (VCS) to develop an electric axial-gap permanent magnet (PM) motor controlled by a self-sensing inverter for driving vehicle accessories such as power steering, air conditioning, and brakes. VCS designed an 8 kW motor based on their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) technology. ORNL designed a 10 kW inverter to fit within the volume of a housing, which had been integrated with the motor. This modular design was pursued so that multiple modules could be used for higher power applications. ORNL built the first inverter under the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) ORNL 98-0514 and drove a refurbished Delta motor with no load during the Merit Review at ORNL on Monday, May 17, 1999. Inverter circuitry and instructions for assembling the inverters were sent to VCS. A report was prepared and delivered during the Future Car Congress in April 2000, at Arlington, Virginia. Collaboration continued under CRADA ORNL 99-0568 as VCS designed and built a SEMA motor with a dual coil platter to be the traction motor for an electric truck. VCS and ORNL assembled two 45 kW inverters. Each inverter drove one coil, which was designed to deliver 15 kW continuous power and 45 kW peak power for 90 s. The vehicle was road tested as part of the Future Truck Competition. A report was prepared and delivered during the PCIM in October 2000, at Boston, Massachusetts.

McKeever, J.W.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

368

Phase II CRADA ORNL99-0568 Report : Developing Transmission-Less Inverter Drive Systems for Axial-Gap Permanent magnet Accessory and Traction Motors and Generators  

SciTech Connect

Researchers of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNLs) Power Electronics and Electric Machine Research Center (PEEMRC) collaborated with Visual Computing Systems (VCS) to develop an electric axial-gap permanent magnet (PM) motor controlled by a self-sensing inverter for driving vehicle accessories such as power steering, air conditioning, and brakes. VCS designed an 8 kW motor based on their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) technology. ORNL designed a 10 kW inverter to fit within the volume of a housing, which had been integrated with the motor. This modular design was pursued so that multiple modules could be used for higher power applications. ORNL built the first inverter under the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) ORNL 98-0514 and drove a refurbished Delta motor with no load during the Merit Review at ORNL on Monday, May 17, 1999. Inverter circuitry and instructions for assembling the inverters were sent to VCS. A report was prepared and delivered during the Future Car Congress in April 2000, at Arlington, Virginia. Collaboration continued under CRADA ORNL 99-0568 as VCS designed and built a SEMA motor with a dual coil platter to be the traction motor for an electric truck. VCS and ORNL assembled two 45 kW inverters. Each inverter drove one coil, which was designed to deliver 15 kW continuous power and 45 kW peak power for 90 s. The vehicle was road tested as part of the Future Truck Competition. A report was prepared and delivered during the PCIM in October 2000, at Boston, Massachusetts.

McKeever, J.W.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary-power-generation applications in the 500- to 3000-hp range. Phase I final report  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 373 kW (500 hp) to 2237 kW (3000 hp) range was completed. The tasks in Phase I include conceptual designs of large Stirling cycle stationary engines and program plan for implementing Phases II through V. Four different heater head designs and five different machine designs were prepared in sufficient detail to select a design recommended for development in the near future. A second order analysis was developed for examining the various loss mechanisms in the Stirling engine and for predicting the thermodynamic performance of these engines. The predicted engine thermal brake efficiency excluding combustion efficiency is approximately 42% which exceeds the design objective of 40%. The combustion system designs were prepared for both a clean fuel combustion system and a two-stage atmospheric fluidized bed combustion system. The calculated combustion efficiency of the former is 90% and of the latter is 80%. Heat transport systems, i.e., a heat exchanger for the clean fuel combustion system and a sodium heat pipe system for coal and other nonclean fuel combustion systems were selected. The cost analysis showed that for clean fuels combustion the proposed 2237 kW (3000 hp) system production cost is $478,242 or $214/kW ($159/hp) which is approximately 1.86 times the cost of a comparable size diesel engine. For solid coal combustion the proposed 2237 kW (3000 hp) system production cost is approximately $2,246,242 which corresponds to a cost to power capacity ratio of $1004/kW ($749/hp). The two-stage atmospheric fluidized bed combustion system represents 81% of the total cost; the engine represents 14% depending on the future price differential between coal and conventional clean fuels, a short payback period of the proposed Stirling cycle engine/FBC system may justify the initial cost. (LCL)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes several approaches to reduce the costs and enhance the performance of geothermal power generation plants. Electricity supply planners, research program managers, and engineers evaluating geothermal power plant additions or modifications can use this report to compare today's geothermal power systems to several near- and long-term future options.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

371

Thin film battery/fuel cell power generating system. Sixth quarterly report, July-September 1977. [LaMgCrAlO/sub 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research program is the demonstration of the technical feasibility of a high-temperature, solid-electrolyte fuel cell, building on the presently-existing technological base. The bulk of the work consists of identifying and selecting candidate component materials, fabricating cells and cell stacks from these materials, and testing these cells and cell stacks under conditions which might be expected in operation. The major emphasis is on the invention and fabrication of an interconnection film, which has the following properties at 1000/sup 0/C, the proposed temperature of stack operation: (1) chemical stability in air and fuel gas; (2) electronic resistivity in the working environment of less than 50 ohm-cm; (3) thermal expansion characteristics compatible with other components; and (4) non-reactivity with adjoining components. Emphasis is also being placed on the fabrication of porous support tubes of calcia-stabilized zirconia, to the desired specifications of tensile strength, porosity, surface finish, and purity. Concurrently, tubes will be prepared in-house and also will be purchased from commercial suppliers and evaluated for compliance with the following specifications: (1) tensile strength of 5000 to 10,000 psi; (2) open porosity of 25 to 30 volume percent; and (3) no surface pore greater than 10 ..mu..m in diameter. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1977-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

Work Management Improvement at Louisa Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results of a Work Management Improvement project at the Louisa Generating Station, MidAmerican Energy Company, Muscatine, Iowa.

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Final Report: Detection and Characterization of Underground Facilities by Stochastic Inversion and Modeling of Data from the New Generation of Synthetic Aperture Satellites  

SciTech Connect

Many clandestine development and production activities can be conducted underground to evade surveillance. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a technique to detect underground facilities by broad-area search and then to characterize the facilities by inversion of the collected data. This would enable constraints to be placed on the types of activities that would be feasible at each underground site, providing a basis the design of targeted surveillance and analysis for more complete characterization. Excavation of underground cavities causes deformation in the host material and overburden that produces displacements at the ground surface. Such displacements are often measurable by a variety of surveying or geodetic techniques. One measurement technique, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), uses data from satellite-borne (or airborne) synthetic aperture radars (SARs) and so is ideal for detecting and measuring surface displacements in denied access regions. Depending on the radar frequency and the acquisition mode and the surface conditions, displacement maps derived from SAR interferograms can provide millimeter- to centimeter-level measurement accuracy on regional and local scales at spatial resolution of {approx}1-10 m. Relatively low-resolution ({approx}20 m, say) maps covering large regions can be used for broad-area detection, while finer resolutions ({approx}1 m) can be used to image details of displacement fields over targeted small areas. Surface displacements are generally expected to be largest during or a relatively short time after active excavation, but, depending on the material properties, measurable displacement may continue at a decreasing rate for a considerable time after completion. For a given excavated volume in a given geological setting, the amplitude of the surface displacements decreases as the depth of excavation increases, while the area of the discernable displacement pattern increases. Therefore, the ability to detect evidence for an underground facility using InSAR depends on the displacement sensitivity and spatial resolution of the interferogram, as well as on the size and depth of the facility and the time since its completion. The methodology development described in this report focuses on the exploitation of synthetic aperture radar data that are available commercially from a number of satellite missions. Development of the method involves three components: (1) Evaluation of the capability of InSAR to detect and characterize underground facilities ; (2) inversion of InSAR data to infer the location, depth, shape and volume of a subsurface facility; and (3) evaluation and selection of suitable geomechanical forward models to use in the inversion. We adapted LLNL's general-purpose Bayesian Markov Chain-Monte Carlo procedure, the 'Stochastic Engine' (SE), to carry out inversions to characterize subsurface void geometries. The SE performs forward simulations for a large number of trial source models to identify the set of models that are consistent with the observations and prior constraints. The inverse solution produced by this kind of stochastic method is a posterior probability density function (pdf) over alternative models, which forms an appropriate input to risk-based decision analyses to evaluate subsequent response strategies. One major advantage of a stochastic inversion approach is its ability to deal with complex, non-linear forward models employing empirical, analytical or numerical methods. However, while a geomechanical model must incorporate adequate physics to enable sufficiently accurate prediction of surface displacements, it must also be computationally fast enough to render the large number of forward realizations needed in stochastic inversion feasible. This latter requirement prompted us first to investigate computationally efficient empirical relations and closed-form analytical solutions. However, our evaluation revealed severe limitations in the ability of existing empirical and analytical forms to predict deformations from undergro

Foxall, W; Cunningham, C; Mellors, R; Templeton, D; Dyer, K; White, J

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

374

Development and demonstration of compound parabolic concentrators for solar thermal power generation and heating and cooling applications. Progress report, July--December 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on the development of Compound Parabolic Concentrators (CPC) is described. A tenfold concentrator with a cavity receiver was constructed and tested. The optical efficiency was very good (65 percent), but the thermal performance was degraded by heat losses of the cavity receiver. A 20 ft/sup 2/ (1.86 m/sup 2/) concentrating collector (5.3x) has been tested for thermal and optical performance, and the optical efficiency was excellent (68 percent). In this collector, aluminum extrusions were used to define the CPC shape and provide the fluid-flow path. A 30 ft (9.14 m) long collector (10x) has been designed and is being built for daily-cycle testing. The expected performance of this collector has been evaluated. The conceptual design of a lightweight collector using evacuated glass tubes around the absorber is presented. Various construction techniques for use with low-cost materials, such as plastics, are being evaluated for this collector. Optical design studies of Compound Parabolic Concentrators for tubular absorbers and for use as secondary concentrators are discussed. Comparison of the CPC with tube and the CPC with one-sided flat absorber shows that the tubular configuration is preferable not only because of lower heat losses but also because of lower collector cost. For tracking concentrators with line focus, the use of second-stage concentrators is found to be cost effective; the CPC is found to be significantly better for this application than a V-trough. A summary of the results of subcontracts described in the previous progress report are presented, and the influence of these results on ANL programs is noted.

Allen, J.W.; Levitz, N.M.; Rabl, A.; Reed, K.A.; Schertz, W.W.; Thodos, G.; Winston, R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Energy Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

376

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology: Topical report No. 7, Task 4. 1: Testing of first generation mathematical model predictions; Topical report No. 8, Task 4. 2: Testing of second generation mathematical model predictions, Duct Injection Test Facility, Muskingum River Power Plant, Beverly, OH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) and Southern Research Institute have completed a project under DOE sponsorship entitled Scaleup Tests and Supporting Research for the Development of Duct Injection Technology''. The project included extensive modifications to DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility (DITF) located at the Muskingum River Plant of Ohio Power Company. A comprehensive test program was performed at the facility to evaluate So[sub 2] removal and overall process operability with duct injection of slaked lime slurries and dry injection of calcium hydroxide powder with humidification. Detailed results from the project are presented in the following reports: Topical Report No. 1 -- Literature Review; Topical Report No. 2 -- Evaluation of System Performance; Topical Report No. 3 -- Scale-Up Testing; Advanced Configurations Process Controls; Failure Modes; and Waste characterization. Project Final Report. The purposes of this report are: (1) to satisfy a contractual requirement for a separate topical report concerning the subject of mathematical model validation, and (2) to briefly describe the status of the model development and validation effort.

Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P. (Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology: Topical report No. 7, Task 4.1: Testing of first generation mathematical model predictions; Topical report No. 8, Task 4.2: Testing of second generation mathematical model predictions, Duct Injection Test Facility, Muskingum River Power Plant, Beverly, OH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) and Southern Research Institute have completed a project under DOE sponsorship entitled ``Scaleup Tests and Supporting Research for the Development of Duct Injection Technology``. The project included extensive modifications to DOE`s Duct Injection Test Facility (DITF) located at the Muskingum River Plant of Ohio Power Company. A comprehensive test program was performed at the facility to evaluate So{sub 2} removal and overall process operability with duct injection of slaked lime slurries and dry injection of calcium hydroxide powder with humidification. Detailed results from the project are presented in the following reports: Topical Report No. 1 -- Literature Review; Topical Report No. 2 -- Evaluation of System Performance; Topical Report No. 3 -- Scale-Up Testing; Advanced Configurations Process Controls; Failure Modes; and Waste characterization. Project Final Report. The purposes of this report are: (1) to satisfy a contractual requirement for a separate topical report concerning the subject of mathematical model validation, and (2) to briefly describe the status of the model development and validation effort.

Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Characterization of open-cycle coal-fired MHD generators. Quarterly technical summary report No. 3, January 1--March 31, 1977. [Negative ion formation, electron/slag interaction, and alkali/slag interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this contract effort is to understand how nonfuel components of coal will affect the electron and alkali seed chemistry in a high temperature coal combustion system like that envisioned for direct fired MHD generators. Three specific problems are being considered during this contract period. The first problem area is to characterize the formation of negative ions due to electron attachment processes in the combustion flow. While some stable negative ions may be formed from hydrocarbon combustion species (OH/sup -/), the bulk of the stable negative ions are expected to be formed from oxidized inorganic coal slag constituents (BO/sup -//sub 2/, PO/sup -//sub 2/, AlO/sup -//sub 2/, etc). Negative ion formation can reduce the conductivity of the MHD plasma, particularly at the low temperature end of the MHD channel, thus decreasing the efficiency of power generation. The second problem area involves the role slag condensation may play in determining the electron density through recombination, also adversely affecting conductivity in the core flow. The competitive balance between thermionic emission from slag droplets and electron/ion recombination on the droplet surfaces may be severely tipped in favor of electron loss processes, depending on the slag properties. The third problem area is the heterogeneous interaction of alkali seed with particles formed by slag condensation in the generator channel. Alkali seed material can be chemically bound into the molten slag particles tightly enough that seed recovery becomes prohibitively expensive. The loss of significant amounts of alkali seed with the slag could have a serious economic impact on proposed MHD systems. A coupled approach, involving both theoretical modeling and experimental measurements, has been devised to explore the negative ion formation, the electron/slag interaction, and the alkali/slag interaction problems. Research progress is reported.

Kolb, C.E.; Yousefian, V.; Wormhoudt, J.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Kerrebrock, J.L.

1977-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Generator Maintenance Guide for Emergency Diesel Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed this report to address maintenance and improve long-term reliability and availability of generators within nuclear power plant emergency diesel generator (EDG) systems.

2010-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fossil Generating Station Case Histories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2005, EPRI Operations and Management Program managers and contractors have collected information on events that have occurred in fossil generating stations. These events represent only a small sample of those being experienced by the power generation industry, but provide a basis for understanding where actions to improve operations are necessary. Sufficient details have been included for analyzing the events without divulging sources. Recognizing that these reports represent actual events and not...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fossil Generating Station Case Histories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2006, EPRI Operations and Management Program managers have collected information on events that have occurred in fossil generating stations. These events represent only a small sample of those being experienced by the power generation industry, but provide a basis for understanding where actions to improve operations are necessary. Sufficient details have been included for analyzing the events without divulging sources. Recognizing that these reports represent actual events and not discounting the...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

Distribution Screening for Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the deployment of renewable distributed generation increases, the need for traditional energy providers to interact with these resources increases. Detailed modeling and simulation of the distribution and distributed resources is a critical element to better analyze, understand and predict these interactions. EPRI has developed a tool for such analysis called OpenDSS. In addition, as part of the renewable integration program an applet was created for screening distributed generation (DG). This report ...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

Steam Generator Integrity Assessment Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for evaluating the condition of steam generator (SG) tubes based on nondestructive examination (NDE) or in situ pressure testing. This integrity assessment is normally performed during a reactor refueling outage. Nuclear power plant licensees who follow this document's guidelines will have satisfied their requirements for condition monitoring and operational assessment as defined in the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) initiative, Steam Generator Program Guidelines, NEI 97-06.

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

384

Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) - Generation Capacity Addition Topics: 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Generation Capacity Addition Topics report was first published in 2012 and discussed the challenges facing the power industry with regard to capacity addition. This report is intended to be a companion report to the Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) Power Generation and Technology Options report (Electric Power Research Institute [EPRI] report 3002001434).BackgroundTAG is widely considered the industry standard and has been ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

Microgrids: distributed on-site generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microgrids: distributed on-site generation Suleiman Abu-Sharkh, Rachel Li, Tom Markvart, Neil Ross for Climate Change Research Technical Report 22 #12;1 Microgrids: distributed on-site generation Tyndall production by small scale generators in close proximity to the energy users, integrated into microgrids

Watson, Andrew

386

Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics  

SciTech Connect

A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: â?¢ Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. â?¢ Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. â?¢ Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. â?¢ Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. â?¢ Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. â?¢ Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. â?¢ Completed final reporting and deliverables

Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

DOEGO85004_1: Final Non-proprietary Technical Report, Generating Process and Economic Data for Preliminary Design of PureVision Biorefineries DOEGO85004_2: One Original Final Proprietary Technical Report to be mailed to DOE Golden.  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project was to define a two-stage reactive fractionation process for converting corn stover into a solid cellulose stream and two liquid streams containing mostly hemicellulosic sugars and lignin, respectively. Toward this goal, biomass fractionation was conducted using a small continuous pilot unit with a nominal capacity of 100 pounds per day of dry biomass to generate performance data using primarily corn stover as feedstock. In the course of the program, the PureVision process was optimized for efficient hemicellulose hydrolysis in the first stage employing autohydrolysis and delignification in the second stage using sodium hydroxide as a catalyst. The remaining cellulose was deemed to be an excellent substrate for producing fermentation sugars, requiring 40% less enzymes for hydrolysis than conventional pretreatment systems using dilute acid. The fractionated cellulose was also determined to have potential higher-value applications as a pulp product. The lignin coproduct was determined to be substantially lower in molecular weight (MW) compared to lignins produced in the kraft or sulfite pulping processes. This low-MW lignin can be used as a feed and concrete binder and as an intermediate for producing a range of high-value products including phenolic resins. This research adds to the understanding of the biomass conversion area in that a new process was developed in the true spirit of biorefineries. The work completed successfully demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process at the pilot level indicating the technology is ready to advance to a 23 ton per day scale. No technical showstoppers are anticipated in scaling up the PureVision fractionation process to commercial scale. Also, economic feasibility of using the PureVision process in a commercial-scale biorefinery was investigated and the minimum ethanol selling price for the PureVision process was calculated to be $0.94/gal ethanol vs. $1.07/gal ethanol for the NREL process. Thus, the PureVision process is economically attractive. Given its technical and economic feasibility, the project is of benefit to the public in the following ways: 1) it demonstrated a novel biomass fractionation process that can provide domestic supply of renewable transportation fuel from all three biomass components (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), 2) the lignin stream from the process has many higher-value applications beyond simply burning the lignin for energy as proposed by competing technologies, 3) it can be deployed in rural areas and create jobs in these areas, and 3) it can add to the nations economy and security.

Kadam, Kiran L., Ph.D; Lehrburger, Ed

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Milliwatt Generator Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator Project from April 1986 through March 1988. Activities included fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, fabrication of pressure-burst test units, compatibility studies, impact testing, and examination of surveillance units. The major task of the Los Alamos Milliwatt Generator Project is to fabricate MC2893A heat sources (4.0 W) for MC2730A radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS) and MC3599 heat sources (4.5 W) for MC3500 RTGs. The MWG Project interfaces with the following contractors: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (designer); E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Savannah River Plant (fuel); Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility (metal hardware); and General Electric Company, Neutron Devices Department (RTGs). In addition to MWG fabrication activities, Los Alamos is involved in (1) fabrication of pressure-burst test units, (2) compatibility testing and evaluation, (3) examination of surveillance units, and (4) impact testing and subsequent examination of compatibility and surveillance units.

Latimer, T.W.; Rinehart, G.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF WASTE TRANS -PORT IN SELECTED ROCKS: 1977 ANNUAL REPORT OF LBL CONTRACT NO. 45901AK. Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program-Collection and Generation of Transport Data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiment. Wash: Hanford, Works, Report BW-61476. crib.Richland, Wash. : Hanford Works, Report BW-71573. Noshkin,soil, Richland, Wash. : Hanford Works, Report HW-24548, 21

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Non-utility marketers provide over 20% of residential natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... customersaveraging over 85% of total deliveries since 2000. Starting October 1, 1999, all residential natural gas customers ...

392

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

327310," Cements","W",16,"W",1 327410," Lime",0,0,0,0 327993," Mineral Wool",0,0,0,0 331,"Primary Metals","W","W",673,1.4 331111," Iron and Steel...

395

Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in comparing the costs of renewable energy across ownershipof low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy productionCost Recovery System Non-Utility Generator Power Purchase Agreement Public Power Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fossil Generating Station Case Histories 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has compiled the events and activities that occurred at member fossil generating stations in 2009. The purpose of this report is to share this operating experience with other member utilities so that lessons can be learned and applied to improve overall performance across the generation fleet. The report also includes a summary of findings from plant operations and maintenance assessments that were conducted in 20082009. The focus of these ass...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Operating Reserves and Variable Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report tries to first generalize the requirements of the power system as it relates to the needs of operating reserves. It also includes a survey of operating reserves and how they are managed internationally in system operations today and then how new studies and research are proposing they may be managed in the future with higher penetrations of variable generation.

Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Circumferential cracking of steam generator tubes  

SciTech Connect

On April 28, 1995, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 95-03, {open_quote}Circumferential Cracking of Steam Generator Tubes.{close_quote} GL 95-03 was issued to obtain information needed to verify licensee compliance with existing regulatory requirements regarding the integrity of steam generator tubes in domestic pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). This report briefly describes the design and function of domestic steam generators and summarizes the staff`s assessment of the responses to GL 95-03. The report concludes with several observations related to steam generator operating experience. This report is intended to be representative of significant operating experience pertaining to circumferential cracking of steam generator tubes from April 1995 through December 1996. Operating experience prior to April 1995 is discussed throughout the report, as necessary, for completeness.

Karwoski, K.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generate steam to drive a steam turbine, giving rise to theValves and Pi~ing STEAM TURBINE COMPONENT OUTAGE CAUSESbasically of a steam-driven turbine, an electric generator

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a. b. c. Pump Ap S(WDB) OK NT(NC) W(WDB) Steam generatorsuperheat Steam generator tube leaks D. Core thermaland radial models Steam generator tube leaks Critical heat

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

generation capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation capacity generation capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

402

The improvement of near-term CdTe processing and product capabilities and establishment of next-generation CdTe technology. Annual technical progress report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of photovoltaics to become a major global business enterprise still lingers outside the limits of industrial capabilities. For the Cadmium Sulfide/Cadmium Telluride (CdS/CdTe) system this potential has continued to focus on improvements in efficiency, stability, and cost reduction. This triad is the primary objective of the present subcontract with NREL entitled {open_quotes}The Improvement of Near-term CdTe Processing and Product Capabilities & Establishment of Next Generation CdTe Technology{close_quotes}. This subcontract represents an intermediate stage of NREL`s plan to assist the growth of the photovoltaic industry in overcoming the scientific and technical barriers to commercialization. This report outlines the progress that has been made during the period of August 1995 through August 1996. The objectives of this subcontract are to improve processing methods, quantify and understand efficiency improvement mechanisms, meet life-testing goals, and address cadmium safety concerns. Task and subtask goals are defined to meet these objectives in specific areas. The approach to fulfilling the subcontract goals is through a balanced plan of process improvement and mechanism identification. These are carried out and continued through monitoring under various long term and accelerated stress conditions. GPI maintains an on-going awareness of all safety related issues, can in particular, those involving cadmium.

Kester, J.; Albright, S. [Golden Photon, Inc., CO (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Investigation of the viability and cost effectiveness of solid fuel gasifiers close coupled to internal combustion engines for 200 kWe power generation. Technical progress report No. 9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The viability and cost effectiveness of a 200 kWe engine generator unit fueled by a direct coupled, solid fuel gasifier were studied. Recent literature describing gasifier technology was obtained and personal visits were made to test facility sites and engine manufacturing plants to discuss the subject with researchers and engineers. Two prototype units were inspected, one of which was in partial operation. This report presents a brief discussion of fuel and gasifier technology, gas treatment (clean up) for engine use, engine use technology, other uses for gasifiers, the viability of close coupled units, and an estimate of cost effectiveness. Present small experimental gasifier systems perform as expected and have served to demonstrate the technology. Typically they operate with fuel species which are present and collected on the site of a processing plant. Certain needed development efforts are discussed. Also, fuel must be available at low cost and even then electric power produced in this way is unlikely to be competitive economically where utility poles are available. (LTN)

Mingle, J. G.; Junge, D. C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

CAIRS Injury and Illness Reporting Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provides centralized collection of these individual accident reports, allows users to query the individual accident report fields directly to create custom reports, generate...

405

Next Generation Radioisotope Generators | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

» Next Generation Radioisotope Generators » Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) - The ASRG is currently being developed as a high-efficiency RPS technology to support future space missions on the Martian surface or in the vacuum of space. This system uses Stirling convertors, which have moving parts to mechanically convert heat to electricity. This power conversion system, if successfully deployed, will reduce the weight of each RPS and the amount of Pu-238 needed per mission. A HISTORY OF MISSION SUCCESSES For over fifty years, the Department of Energy has enabled space exploration on 27 missions by providing safe reliable radioistope power systems and radioisotope heater units for NASA, Navy and Air Force.

406

Small Distributed Generation Applications in the Industrial Sector: A Screening Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a screening assessment of small distributed generation applications in the industrial sector.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

407

Demonstration of Security Benefits of Renewable Generation at FE Warren Air Force Base  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report detailing field demonstration of security benefits of renewable generation at FE Warren Air Force Base.

Warwick, William M.; Myers, Kurt; Seifert, Gary

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Steam Generator Management Program: Dynamic Analysis of a Steam Generator: Part 2 Stability Analysis of Representative Steam Gener ators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a project that examined the effect of tube support plate blockage in recirculating steam generators on water level stability. This report builds upon Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1025134.BackgroundWater level oscillations in recirculating steam generators occur due to hydrodynamic instabilities in the natural circulation system. Utilities have reported water level oscillations in operating steam ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

Study of capital requirements for solar energy. Final report, Volume 1. Analysis of the macroeconomic effects of increased solar energy market penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report defines the analytical framework for, and presents the results of, a study to determine the macroeconomic effects of increased market penetration of solar energy technologies over the 1977-2000 time period. For the purposes of this document, solar technologies are defined as wind, photovoltaics, ocean thermal electric (OTEC), small-scale (non-utility) hydroelectric and all solar active and passive thermal technologies. This research has been undertaken in support of the National Plan to Accelerate Commercialization (NPAC) of Solar Energy. The capital and operating requirements for three market penetration levels are first determined; the effects of these requirements on economic performance are then estimated using the Hudson-Jorgenson Energy/Economic Model. The analytical design, computational methods, data sources, assumptions and scenario configurations for this analysis are defined in detail. The results of the analysis of the economic impact of solar energy are presented in detail, and the implications of these results are discussed. Appendix A explains the methodology for transforming investment to capital stocks. Appendix B, which is provided in a separate volume, describes the Hudson-Jorgenson Model in greater detail. (WHK)

Pleatsikas, C.J.; Hudson, E.A.; O'Connor, D.C.; Funkhouser, D.H.

1979-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Engineered Solutions. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop 2 Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  Intro to Teledyne Energy Systems  H 2 Generator Basics & Major Subsystems  H 2 Generating & Storage System Overview  Electrolysis System Efficiency & Economics  Focus for Attaining DOE H 2 Production Cost Goals 3 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Hunt Valley, Maryland  State-of-the-art thermoelectric,

411

Siemens Power Generation, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presented at the 2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Page 1 of 10 Siemens Power Generation, Inc., All Rights Reserved Development of a Catalytic...

412

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

413

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), in 9 volumes,Commission Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), in 9 volumes,Commission Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), in 9 volumes,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Form EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases 906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases Dataset Summary Description The EIA-906, EIA-920, EIA-923 and predecessor forms provide monthly and annual data on generation and fuel consumption at the power plant and prime mover level. A subset of plants, steam-electric plants 10 MW and above, also provides boiler level and generator level data. Data for utility plants are available from 1970, and for non-utility plants from 1999. Beginning with January 2004 data collection, the EIA-920 was used to collect data from the combined heat and power plant (cogeneration) segment of the non-utility sector; also as of 2004, nonutilities filed the annual data for nonutility source and disposition of electricity. Beginning in 2007, environmental data was collected on Schedules 8A - 8F of the Form 923 and includes by-product

415

NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) PROGRAM GRANT NUMBER DE-FG03-00SF22168 TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT (Nov. 15, 2001 - Feb. 15,2002) ''Design and Layout Concepts for Compact, Factory-Produced, Transportable, Generation IV Reactor Systems''  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to develop and evaluate nuclear power plant designs and layout concepts to maximize the benefits of compact modular Generation IV reactor concepts including factory fabrication and packaging for optimal transportation and siting. Three nuclear power plant concepts are being studied representing water, helium and lead-bismuth coolants. This is the sixth quarterly progress report.

Fred R. Mynatt; Andy Kadak; Marc Berte; Larry Miller; Mohammed Khan; Joe McConn; Lawrence Townsend; Wesley Williams; Martin Williamson

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Wind Generation Feasibility Study in Bethel, AK  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report studies the wind resources in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC) region, located in southwestern Alaska, and the applicability of wind generation technologies to YKHC facilities.

Tom Humphrey, YKHC; Lance Kincaid, EMCOR Energy & Technologies

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MWe l. l. l. l. l. l. l. CONDENSER o. o. o. o. GENERATOR o.Code BOILER TURBINE CONDENSER MWe MWe MWe 600 & Above MWe O.3) pE rcentage of total CONDENSER l. 23l. O. GENERATOR l.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Ammonium generation during SRAT cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the IDMS noble-metal demonstration runs ammonium nitrate deposition was found in the vessel vent system of the feed preparation area. In the bench-scale experiments of studying the hydrogen generation during the sludge treatment cycle, ammonium ion production was also monitored. It was found that: During a simulation of the DWPF Cold Chemical Runs SRAT cycle no detectable amount of ammonium ions was generated when treating a non-noble-metal containing sludge simulant according to the nitric acid flowsheet. Ammonium ions were generated during the SRAT-SME cycle when treating the noble-metal containing sludge with either formic acid or nitric acid/late-washing PHA. This is due to the reaction between formic acid and nitrate catalyzed by the noble metals in the sludge simulant. Ammonium ion production closely followed the hydrogen evolution from the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. This report summarizes the results of the production of ammonia during the SRAT cycle.

Hsu, C.W.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

University Advanced Coal Generation Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was a sponsor of projects conducted under the auspices of two consortia that support university research for coal-based power generation: the Biomass and Fossil Fuel Research Alliance (BF2RA) in the United Kingdom and the University Turbine System Research (UTSR) program of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This technical update report describes the progress made in both of those ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

Using Backup Generators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Power outages are commonplace during disasters, and they may last for several days. You can reduce losses and speed the recovery process by installing an emergency generator. Portable generators...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entry are u Table 4-6 GAS TURBINE FOR 1965-1974 (OUTAGES)AVERAGE utage Cause Code GAS TURBINE GENERATOR FORCED OUTAGEof fossil units, and for gas turbine units, the basic data

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

C. A. La Electricidad de Caracas: Feasibility-study definitional report. Arreciffs Units 1 through 5 repowering project, electric power generation expansion Venezuela thermal power plant. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

C.A. La Electricidad de Caracas (E.de C.) is a private company which in 1991 served some 830,000 customers in an area of 4,160 square kilometers surrounding Caracas. A program is underway by E.de C. for upgrading equipment and expanding the capacity of several of its existing generating facilities. The Arrecifes repowering project will involve the addition of about 330 MW of new natural gas fired gas turbine generators and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) to five existing thermal power units built 30 to 40 years ago which have steam turbine generator sets of 26 to 41 MW each. The existing steam boilers will be removed. The limited but seemingly sufficient space available is to be a primary focus of the feasibility study.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which steam is raised. nuclear fuel generates heat that isattention to nuclear and fossil-fuel plants, and these areFor all the fossil-fuel and nuclear (However, categories,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Next Generation Light Source  

Next Generation Light Source Super Thin Light Bulb, Energy Efficient, Long Life, Dimmable, and Uniform Illumination High Entry Barrier 71 ...

426

Generating safe template languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Template languages are widely used within generative programming, because they provide intuitive means to generate software artefacts expressed in a specific object language. However, most template languages perform template instantiation on the level ... Keywords: generative programming, language extension, safe authoring, template language

Florian Heidenreich; Jendrik Johannes; Mirko Seifert; Christian Wende; Marcel Bhme

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Examination of Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous EPRI reports have documented problems associated with operation and maintenance of complex heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs). The EPRI report Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failure Manual (1004503) provides information about known HRSG tube failures and necessary steps that can be taken to diagnose and prevent similar problems. The EPRI report Delivering High Reliability Heat Recovery Steam Generators (1004240) provides guidance for continued and reliable operation of HRSGs from initial...

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Water Use for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes how thermoelectric plants use water and the strengths, limitations, and costs of available technologies for increasing water use efficiency (gal/MWh). The report will be of value to power company strategic planners, environmental managers, and generation managers as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

429

Draft Submission; Social Cost of Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide a general understanding of the social costs associated with electric power generation. Based on a thorough review of recent literature on the subject, the report describes how these social costs can be most fully and accurately evaluated, and discusses important considerations in applying this information within the competitive bidding process. [DJE 2005

1990-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

430

Central Internet Database (CID) Reports  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Home > CID Reports Home > CID Reports Central Internet Database CID Photo Banner Reports The CID offers a choice of standard and archived reports. Standard reports are based on the most recently available DOE data related to the information requirements specified in the Settlement Agreement. Report categories include: Radioactive Waste Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Facilities Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste Toxic Release Inventory Waste The standard reports menu includes reports generated directly by the CID and reports generated by other systems. The CID generated reports allow users to select criteria to customize the report output. For the most current radioactive waste reports, CID users are directed to the Waste Information Management System (WIMS) Exit CID Website . WIMS provides radioactive waste disposition reports and disposition maps. While WIMS is a public site, you need to register and provide contact information the first time you enter WIMS.

431

Motor/generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Converting Site Electricity to Include Generation and Transmission...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Electricity Consumption in the Manufacturing Division The energy intensities presented in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation...

433

Most electric generating capacity additions in the last decade ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report, and Form EIA-860M (see Table ES3 in the March 2011 ...

434

renewable energy generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy generating capacity energy generating capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 16, and contains only the reference case. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO generation renewable energy renewable energy generating capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

435

Negative Sequence Effects on Generator Rotors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second part of a study of the effects of severe negative sequence events on round rotor turbine generators. The first part (EPRI report 1014910) introduced simplified models to investigate the thermal and mechanical stresses resulting from unbalanced short circuits and other events. The current report provides documentation on these simplified models. It also describes further studies of the retaining ring and introduces additional models for the pole face and cross-slot regions.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plant Reliability-Availability and State Regulation,"Report on Equipment Availability: Fossil and NuclearBasic Definitions* Availability: Reliability: Base Loading:

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NP-263, October 1976. Edison Electric Institute, "Report onREGULATION Data from the Edison Electric Institute annualpower plants. However, the Edison Electric Institute, in its

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charges Relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety," 1976, availableissues impor tant to nuclear reactor safety. This report wasstudies of overall nuclear reactor safety have been

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Automatic generation of weather forecast texts using comprehensive probabilistic generation-space models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two important recent trends in natural language generation are (i) probabilistic techniques and (ii) comprehensive approaches that move away from traditional strictly modular and sequential models. This paper reports experiments in which pCRU ...

Anja Belz

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Steam Generator Management Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Steam Generator Examination Guidelines: Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides requirements for examination plans and processes that are necessary to meet the performance criteria set forth in the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) 97-06, Steam Generator Program.

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonutility generators reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.