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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Record of Decision for the Final EIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5091 5091 Friday May 17, 1996 Part IV Department of Energy Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel; Notice 25092 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 97 / Friday, May 17, 1996 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: DOE, in consultation with the Department of State, has decided to implement a new foreign research reactor spent fuel acceptance policy as specified in the Preferred Alternative contained in the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed

2

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs SHARE Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs image Oak Ridge National Laboratory covers the entire spectrum of nuclear nonproliferation work, from...

3

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation As more countries embrace nuclear power as a cost-effective and clean alternative to fossil fuels, the need exists to ensure that the nuclear fuel cycle is...

4

Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS), Nonproliferation and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS) Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nonproliferation and National Security Program Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS)

5

Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on DOE nuclear nonproliferation activities...

6

SRS - Programs - Nonproliferation Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 SEARCH GO spacer SRS Home Nonproliferation Programs In the crucial field of nuclear nonproliferation, SRS employee contributions helped to advance all three of the planned plutonium disposition facilities at the Savannah River Site: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF); Waste Solidification Building (WSB); and the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. A $345 million project, the WSB will process liquid waste from the MOX facility. After material is processed at the WSB, transuranic waste will be packaged and sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, and low-level waste will be packaged and sent to onsite or commercial off-site low-level waste disposal facilities. The mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility will be a major component in the United States' program to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium.

7

Nonproliferation & Forensics | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation & Nuclear Forensics Argonne strives to strengthen the nation's ability to detect, prevent, and interdict proliferation of nuclear, radiological, chemical, and...

8

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy 18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This study analyzes the potential environmental impacts of adopting a policy to manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States. In particular, the study examines the comparative impacts of several alternative approaches to managing the spent fuel. The analysis demonstrates that the impacts on the environmental, workers and the general public of implementing any of the alternative management approaches would be small and within applicable Federal and state regulator limits. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

9

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of nuclear nonproliferation by combining two groups within its Global Security organization. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

10

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation & International Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security Nonproliferation & International Security

11

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation & International Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security Nonproliferation & International Security

12

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

13

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

14

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation Nonproliferation One of the gravest threats the United States and the international community face is the possibility that terrorists or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA,

15

Nonproliferation and National Security Program - Nuclear Engineering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Major Programs > Nonproliferation and Major Programs > Nonproliferation and National Security Program Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nonproliferation and National Security Program (NPNS)

16

Strategic Trade Control: Nonproliferation Engagement and Training  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Engagement and Training Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nonproliferation and National Security Program Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS)

17

Non-Proliferation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Non-Proliferation Non-Proliferation Non-Proliferation GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the transfer, storage or disposition of nuclear materials recovered by DOE for public health, safety or nonproliferation purposes. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) operates several domestic and international programs aimed at securing vulnerable nuclear materials, such as orphan and disused sealed sources and foreign research reactor fuel, in support of nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear security initiatives. GC-52 also supports DOE in its interactions with other federal agencies, state and local governments, and the public. Applicable Laws Atomic Energy Act of 1954 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 National Nuclear Security Administration Act Further Information

18

Office Of NONprOliferatiON  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Of NONprOliferatiON Of NONprOliferatiON aNd iNterNatiONal Security July 2011 www.nnsa.doe.gov National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Develop and implement DOE/NNSA nonproliferation and arms control policy to reduce the risk of weapons of mass destruction. control the spread of WMD-related material, equipment, technology and expertise. Safeguard and Secure nuclear material to prevent its diversion, theft and sabotage. Negotiate, monitor and verify compliance with international nonproliferation and arms control treaties and agreements. NNSA's Office of Nonproliferation and international Security (NiS) provides leadership in the formulation and implementation of nonproliferation, nuclear security and arms control

19

International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and Nonproliferation and National Security Program > TNPS > Strategic Trade Control > International Programs > INECP Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr

20

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Final Report Port and Modal Elasticity Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Final Report Port and Modal Elasticity Study Prepared for Southern California Association................................................................................................. 23 Financing Transportation Infrastructure for Port Access ..................................................................................... 27 Comparison of West Coast Port Facilities

California at Berkeley, University of

22

Nonproliferation and National Security Multimedia - Argonne National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and National Security Nonproliferation and National Security > Multimedia Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Engineering Development & Applications Argonne's Nuclear Science & Technology Legacy Other Multimedia Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Bookmark and Share Nonproliferation and National Security: Multimedia Related Resources Nonproliferation and National Security Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Click on the "Date" header to sort the videos/podcasts in chronological order (ascending or descending). You may also search for a specific keyword; click on the reset button refresh to remove the keyword filter and show again all the Videos/Podcasts.

23

Nonproliferation and National Security - Nuclear Engineering Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and Nonproliferation and National Security CAPABILITIES Overview Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Nuclear Systems Technologies Risk and Safety Assessments Nonproliferation and National Security Materials Testing Engineering Computation & Design Engineering Experimentation Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Capabilities Nonproliferation and National Security Bookmark and Share Nuclear Export Controls Nuclear Exports Controls We provide technical advisory services to DOE in the implementation of U.S. nonproliferation policy. This includes assessments of proliferation risks presented by emerging technologies and

24

Nonproliferation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

p>

Representatives at the workshop were from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Japan, Jordan, Mexico, South Africa, Taiwan, The Netherlands, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom...

25

Advanced Design Studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARIES-CS project was a multi-year multi-institutional project to assess the feasibility of a compact stellarator as a fusion power plant. The work herein describes efforts to help design one aspect of the device, the divertor, which is responsible for the removal of particle and heat flux from the system, acting as the first point of contact between the magnetically confined hot plasma and the outside world. Specifically, its location and topology are explored, extending previous work on the sub ject. An optimized design is determined for the thermal particle flux using a suite of 3D stellarator design codes which trace magnetic field lines from just inside the confined plasma edge to their strike points on divertor plates. These divertor plates are specified with a newly developed plate design code. It is found that a satisfactory thermal design exists which maintains the plate temperature and heat load distribution below tolerable engineering limits. The design is unique, including a toroidal taper on the outboard plates which was found to be important to our results. The maximum thermal heat flux for the final design was 3.61 M W/m2 and the maximum peaking factor was 10.3, below prescribed limits of 10 M W/m2 and 15.6, respectively. The median length of field lines reaching the plates is about 250 m and their average angle of inclination to the surface is 2 deg. Finally, an analysis of the fast alphas, resulting from fusion in the core, which escape the plasma was performed. A method is developed for obtaining the mapping from magnetic coordinates to real-space coordinates for the ARIES-CS. This allows the alpha exit locations to be identified in real space for the first time. These were then traced using the field line algorithm as well as a guiding center routine accounting for their mass, charge, and specific direction and energy. Results show that the current design is inadequate for accommodating the alpha heat flux, capturing at most 1/3 of lost alphas. However the distribution of the alphas on the device first wall indicates that a viable solution likely exists. It is noted that future designs must be sought which specifically address the fusion alphas through an integrated approach involving physics and engineering teams.

Steiner, Don [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine...

27

2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference November 7, 2005 - 12:36pm Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Sam Bodman I am very glad to be with all of you today. Let me just say to Rose and to everyone associated with the Carnegie Endowment that the Bush Administration values the work that you do. This is particularly so with this series of conferences dedicated to exploring the complicated issues of nonproliferation policy. And allow me to offer the congratulations of my Department to Director General El Baradei and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the award conferred last month by the Nobel Foundation. We should applaud the Agency's staff and all the member nations that come

28

2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 5 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference November 7, 2005 - 12:36pm Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Sam Bodman I am very glad to be with all of you today. Let me just say to Rose and to everyone associated with the Carnegie Endowment that the Bush Administration values the work that you do. This is particularly so with this series of conferences dedicated to exploring the complicated issues of nonproliferation policy. And allow me to offer the congratulations of my Department to Director General El Baradei and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the award conferred last month by the Nobel Foundation. We should applaud the Agency's staff and all the member nations that come

29

HANFORD THYROID DISEASE STUDY FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HANFORD THYROID DISEASE STUDY FINAL REPORT Study Management Team Scott Davis, Ph.D., Principal;Acknowledgments Many individuals have contributed to the success of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. We wish: Dr. Floyd Frost and Mr. Eugene Sobota; 3) history of Hanford: Dr. Michelle Stenejhem; 4) statistical

30

Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States December 10, 2013 - 2:30pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and State Corporation for Nuclear Energy (Rosatom) Director General Sergey Kirienko today held talks in Washington, D.C., about the future of U.S.-Russia collaborative work in the nuclear energy field, including nuclear research and development, commercial aspects of cooperation, nuclear safety, and nonproliferation. The meeting coincided with the arrival of the final shipment of low

31

Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

Satkowiak, Lawrence [Director, Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security Programs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

32

Proactive Intelligence for Nuclear Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project described in this paper leverages predictive models for proliferation detection in order to assess the complementary questions of capability and intent as they relate to the potential for nuclear weapon development. The ability to proactively assess the likelihood of a state to engage in nuclear power acquisition and development for non-peaceful purposes is one of the greatest challenges for analysts and policy makers working on proliferation detection and deterrence. Of further difficulty is determining whether a state is at risk to provide indirect support for proliferation via the relationship between industrial input/output and the legal framework of trade. In general, it is possible to gather evidence about precursor activities to the achieved nuclear potential of a state that function as indicators of the state's intent to acquire and develop capabilities to support nuclear weapons. Reasoning with these indicators to predict intent and capability to proliferate is of utmost importance to facilitate nuclear safeguards, e.g. through proactive implementation of countermeasures. Such a predictive reasoning task is difficult to perform without computational aid. While the need for a proactive and multi-perspective approach to proliferation detection is widely recognized, there is a lamentable lack of computational tools applied directly to the task. Applications of predictive modeling to the domain of nuclear nonproliferation are limited to physical/chemical properties of nuclear materials, such as nuclear weapons simulations and stockpile stewardship. The aim of this project is to address this gap by leveraging methods and data from different mission areas in support of proliferation detection and prevention in innovative ways. More specifically, the approach implemented in this project combines methods in information analysis and probabilistic evidentiary reasoning with expert knowledge from discipline areas germane to proliferation detection, and evidence extracted from relevant data sources, to assess alternative hypotheses about specific proliferation detection problems.

Peterson, Danielle J.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Baddeley, Robert L.; Franklin, Lyndsey

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

33

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20).

34

Non-Proliferation Treaty at 25  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is a review of nuclear nonproliferation issues during the 25 years that have passed since the signing of the first nonproliferation treaty. A historical background is provided, both declared and undeclared nuclear powers are noted, and considerable attention is given to issues brought about by the dissolution of the Soviet Union and by the renegade actions of a number of signatories, e.g. Iraq, and several of the non-signatories. Present/future policies are discussed, as is the impact of the present Administration in Washington.

Cooper, M.H.

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern...

36

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety » Nuclear Security & Safety » Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration’s effort to assist Japanese personnel with nuclear issues related to the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Above, scientists, technicians and engineers from the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office board an Air Force C-17. | Photo courtesy of NNSA. Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy

39

Nuclear nonproliferation strategies for South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continued expansion of the nuclear weapons capabilities of India and Pakistan, coupled with ongoing conflict between them, raises the probability of nuclear war in South Asia. A nuclear arms race between India and Pakistan could also harm efforts to discourage other nations from acquiring nuclear weapons. United States policy opposes the spread of nuclear weapons because proliferation increases threats to U.S. national security and to world peace and stability. However, there is debate on the dangers of an escalating arms race in South Asia. Steps taken by the United States and other countries to persuade India and Pakistan to end their nuclear weapons programs have had limited success, at most slowing down their pace. A complicating factor is that India maintains a nuclear capability in part to deter China, whereas Pakistan`s nuclear weapons capability is aimed at deterring India`s superior conventional and nuclear capabilities. Analysts and policy officials are divided on how to avoid an arms race in South Asia. The Clinton Administration has renewed efforts to break the deadlock over nonproliferation, but longstanding obstacles have blocked progress. Pakistan favors a regional approach to nonproliferation, while India insists on a global approach that treats the nuclear powers on an equal basis with non nuclear weapon countries. This report analyzes the nuclear capabilities of India and Pakistan and reviews several options for U.S. nonproliferation policy in South Asia.

Davis, Z.S.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

40

Regimes At Work: The Nonproliferation Order And Indian Nuclear Policy .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis claims that by constituting a certain range of possible identities for countries, the nuclear nonproliferation regime facilitated India's forging of non-weaponized nuclear deterrence (more)

Sasikumar, Karthika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Interim Report of the Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This interim report of the SEAB Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation sets forth its findings and recommendations to date in five timely and important areas

42

Tag: nuclear nonproliferation | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear ... Tag: nuclear nonproliferation Displaying 1 - 1 of 1... Category: News Jamaican Connection Y-12 joins Jamaica and Canada in helping a research reactor on the Caribbean...

43

Automated diagnostics scoping study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Automated Diagnostics Scoping Study was to investigate the needs for diagnostics in building operation and to examine some of the current technologies in automated diagnostics that can address these needs. The study was conducted in two parts. In the needs analysis, the authors interviewed facility managers and engineers at five building sites. In the technology survey, they collected published information on automated diagnostic technologies in commercial and military applications as well as on technologies currently under research. The following describe key areas that the authors identify for the research, development, and deployment of automated diagnostic technologies: tools and techniques to aid diagnosis during building commissioning, especially those that address issues arising from integrating building systems and diagnosing multiple simultaneous faults; technologies to aid diagnosis for systems and components that are unmonitored or unalarmed; automated capabilities to assist cause-and-effect exploration during diagnosis; inexpensive, reliable sensors, especially those that expand the current range of sensory input; technologies that aid predictive diagnosis through trend analysis; integration of simulation and optimization tools with building automation systems to optimize control strategies and energy performance; integration of diagnostic, control, and preventive maintenance technologies. By relating existing technologies to perceived and actual needs, the authors reached some conclusions about the opportunities for automated diagnostics in building operation. Some of a building operator`s needs can be satisfied by off-the-shelf hardware and software. Other needs are not so easily satisfied, suggesting directions for future research. Their conclusions and suggestions are offered in the final section of this study.

Quadrel, R.W.; Lash, T.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Pipeline bottoming cycle study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of applying bottoming cycles to the prime movers that drive the compressors of natural gas pipelines was studied. These bottoming cycles convert some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas of the prime movers into shaft power and conserve gas. Three typical compressor station sites were selected, each on a different pipeline. Although the prime movers were different, they were similar enough in exhaust gas flow rate and temperature that a single bottoming cycle system could be designed, with some modifications, for all three sites. Preliminary design included selection of the bottoming cycle working fluid, optimization of the cycle, and design of the components, such as turbine, vapor generator and condensers. Installation drawings were made and hardware and installation costs were estimated. The results of the economic assessment of retrofitting bottoming cycle systems on the three selected sites indicated that profitability was strongly dependent upon the site-specific installation costs, how the energy was used and the yearly utilization of the apparatus. The study indicated that the bottoming cycles are a competitive investment alternative for certain applications for the pipeline industry. Bottoming cycles are technically feasible. It was concluded that proper design and operating practices would reduce the environmental and safety hazards to acceptable levels. The amount of gas that could be saved through the year 2000 by the adoption of bottoming cycles for two different supply projections was estimated as from 0.296 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a low supply projection to 0.734 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a high supply projection. The potential market for bottoming cycle equipment for the two supply projections varied from 170 to 500 units of varying size. Finally, a demonstration program plan was developed.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evolution and resilience of the nuclear nonproliferation regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of the nonproliferation regime. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. First, I make the case that the nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system. Next, I discuss key themes from the literature on systems resilience and apply them to the nonproliferation system: the difference between resilience and stability; the need for evolution to maintain function; the importance of functional diversity; and the concept of the adaptive cycle. I show that most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience and that the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies. According to the literature on systems resilience, this increases its vulnerability to collapse. I argue that the resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by increasing international participation in setting the nonproliferation agenda, developing general international response capabilities, focusing on non-coercive approaches to decreasing demand, and applying systems thinking more rigorously to nonproliferation.

Pregenzer, Arian L. [Senior Scientist, Retired, Sandia National Laboratories, 13013 Arroyo de Vista NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

46

Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the fina optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 A) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change-outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. The work or portions of the work completed this year have been published in several papers and a dissertation [l-5].

Burnham, A; Peterson, P F; Scott, J M

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geothermal Exploration Techniques a Case Study. Final Report...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to library Report: Geothermal Exploration Techniques a Case Study. Final Report Abstract The objective of this project was to review and perform a critical evaluation of...

48

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Steve Mladineo Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific

49

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Steve Mladineo Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific

50

Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young Professionals to Careers in Nonproliferation and National Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber ... Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young

51

Atoms for peace and the nonproliferation treaty: unintended consequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2009, President Obama revived nonproliferation and arms control efforts with a speech calling for the worldwide abolition of nuclear weapons. His speech correctly acknowledged the threat of nuclear terrorism and the vulnerabilities of the related unsecure nuclear materials. Unfortunately, the president did not mention and has not mentioned in any speech the threat posed by at-risk radiological materials. Nonproliferation efforts have a well documented history of focus on special nuclear materials (fissionable weapons usable materials or SNM), and other key materials (chemical and biological) and technologies for a Weapon of Mass Destruction (WMD). Such intense focus on WMD related materials/technologies is essential for international safety and security and merit continued attention and funding. However, the perception that radioactive sealed sources (sources) are of less concern than WMD is unfortunate. These perceptions are based solely on the potentially enormous and tragic consequences associated with their deliberate or accidental misuse and proliferation concerns. However, there is a documented history of overemphasis on the nuclear threat at the expense of ignoring the far more likely and also devastating chemical and biological threats. The radiological threat should not be minimized or excluded from policy discussions and decisions on these far ranging scopes of threat to the international community. Sources have a long history of use; and a wider distribution worldwide than fissile materials. Pair this with their broad ranges in isotopes/activities along with scant national and international attention and mechanisms for their safe and secure management and it is not difficult to envision a deadly threat. Arguments that minimize or divert attention away from sources may have the effect of distracting necessary policy attention on preventing/mitigating a radiological dispersal event. The terrorist attacks on 9/11 should be a clear reminder of the inherent danger of diminishing or dismissing lower-level threats in exchange for enhanced focus on high priority special nuclear materials with the basis for this emphasis being solely on the magnitude of the consequences of a single event. Mitigating all possible or likely terrorist attacks is impossible; however, weaponized sources, in the form of a radiological dispersal device, have been a declared target material of Al-Qaida. Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative promoted the spread of the paradoxical beneficial yet destructive properties of the atom. Typically, the focus of nonproliferation efforts focuses on the fissile materials associated with Weapons of Mass Destruction, with less emphasis on radioactive materials that could be used for a Weapon of Mass Disruption. Most nonproliferation policy discussion involves securing or preventing the diversion of weapons grade fissile materials (uranium (U) with concentration of over 90% of the isotope {sup 235}U (HEU) and plutonium with more than 90% of the isotope {sup 239}Pu), with scant attention given to the threat posed by a prolific quantity of sources spread worldwide. Further acerbating the problem of inattention, it appears that the momentum of the continued evolution in the beneficial applications of sources will only increase in the near future. Several expert studies have demonstrated on the potentially devastating economic, psychological and public health impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or radiation emitting device (ROD/RED) in a metropolis. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the radioactive material to the technical knowledge needed to fashion it into an ROD, is many orders of magnitude easier than diverting enough fissile material for and fabrication/acquisition of a nuclear weapon. Unlike nuclear weapons, worldwide, there are many well documented accounts of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. As of the end of 2008, the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Illicit Trafficking Database had logge

Streeper, Charles Blamires [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium, and Nonproliferation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium and Nuclear Nonproliferation Resources with Additional Information · Awards Siegfried S. Hecker Photo Credit: Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory LeRoy Sanchez On September 17, 2009, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu named Siegfried S. Hecker as a winner of the Enrico Fermi Award 'in recognition for his contributions to plutonium metallurgy, his broad scientific leadership and for his energetic and continuing efforts to reduce the danger of nuclear weapons around the globe. Dr. Hecker is credited with resolving a long-standing controversy involving the stability of certain structures (or phases) in plutonium alloys near equilibrium that arose from significant discrepancies between U.S. and former USSR research on plutonium metallurgy.'1

53

Nuclear Deterrence in the Age of Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fallacy of zero nuclear weapons, even as a virtual goal, is discussed. Because the complete abolition of nuclear weapons is not verifiable, nuclear weapons will always play a role in the calculus of assure, dissuade, deter and defeat (ADDD). However, the relative contribution of nuclear weapons to international security has diminished. To reconstitute the Cold War nuclear capability, with respect to both the nuclear weapons capability and their associated delivery systems, is fiscally daunting and not warranted due to competing budgetary pressures and their relative contribution to international security and nonproliferation. A proposed pathway to a sustainable nuclear weapons capability end-state is suggested which provides enough ADDD; a Dyad composed of fewer delivery and weapon systems, with trickle production at the National Laboratories and private sector to maintain capability and guard against technological surprise.

Richardson, J

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

54

Administrator D'Agostino on Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Speeches > Administrator D'Agostino on Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation Speech Administrator D'Agostino on Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation Oct 28, 2010 As prepared for delivery at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for

55

EA-1238: Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

38: Proposed Construction and Operation of the 38: Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1238: Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate the Nonproliferation and International Security Center within the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 3 located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1999 EA-1238: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center July 22, 1999

56

United States Nuclear Energy and Non-Proliferation Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I believe that U.S. nuclear energy and non-proliferation policy is not well understood, and I hope ... I shall speak first about the role of nuclear energy within the context of overall energy policy, then about ...

Daniel P. Serwer

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

SciTech Connect: Arms control and nonproliferation technologies...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), conducted by the Department of Energy at the Nevada Test Site. Through an introduction and pictorial walk-through, Marv Denny and Jay Zucca of...

58

Draft Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Draft Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed Plan Colorado School of Mines, Colorado 80021 #12;The S.M. Stoller Corporation Flood Plain Remedial Investigation / Feasibility Study ..................................................................................................... 1-8 1.6 Previous Investigations

59

Canister storage building trade study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was performed to evaluate the impact of several technical issues related to the usage of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) to safely stage and store N-Reactor spent fuel currently located at K-Basin 100KW and 100KE. Each technical issue formed the basis for an individual trade study used to develop the ROM cost and schedule estimates. The study used concept 2D from the Fluor prepared ``Staging and Storage Facility (SSF) Feasibility Report`` as the basis for development of the individual trade studies.

Swenson, C.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Fourth quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes information concerning: the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation; the nuclear inspections in Iraq, lessons for verification; detection technologies needed for each step of nuclear weapon development; nuclear proliferation problems; strengthening the nuclear reactor fuel cycle against proliferation; monitoring using unattended remote nondestructive assay; seismic monitoring in a proliferation environment; forensic science center, remote infrared spectrometry for nonproliferation applications; and acoustic instrument for identifying chemical munitions.

Staehle, G.; Talaber, C.; Stull, S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Barwood CNG Cab Fleet Study: Final Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a fleet study conducted over a 12-month period to evaluate the operation of dedicated compress natural gas (CNG) Ford Crown Victoria sedans in a taxicab fleet. In the study, we assess the performance and reliability of the vehicles and the cost of operating the CNG vehicles compared to gasoline vehicles. The study results reveal that the CNG vehicles operated by this fleet offer both economic and environmental advantages. The total operating costs of the CNG vehicles were about 25% lower than those of the gasoline vehicles. The CNG vehicles performed as well as the gasoline vehicles, and were just as reliable. Barwood representatives and drivers have come to consider the CNG vehicles an asset to their business and to the air quality of the local community.

Whalen, P.; Kelly, K.; John, M.

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

62

Ramakrishna Mission initiative impact study: final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by the Tata Energy Research Institute (TERI) for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It presents the results of the evaluation and impact assessment of solar photovoltaic lighting systems in the region of Sunderbans, West Bengal, that were deployed by a reputable non-governmental organization (Ramakrishna Mission) under the auspices of the INDO-US collaborative project. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the solar photovoltaic systems for their impact on the individual households as well as on the community, to assess the effectiveness of the implementation and financial mechanisms, and to draw a long-term strategy for NREL's activities in Sunderbans based on case studies of similar interventions. Under the project, provision was made to supply 300 domestic lighting systems (DLS) based on 53-Wp module capacity to individual households and a few other systems such as for lighting, medical refrigeration, and pumping water to community centers. For this study, 152 households were surveyed, of which 29 had also been a part of earlier pre- and post-installation surveys, 47 had been a part of the earlier post-installation survey, and 76 were households that were surveyed for the first time. A set of 46, out of the total 152 households, was selected for evaluating the systems for their technical performance with respect to module output, condition of the battery, and daily energy consumption. Of the total 300 modules, 2 had been stolen, 9 out of the total 300 batteries needed to be replaced, and 10 out of the 300 charge controllers were non-functional. The statistics for the surveyed households indicate 32 luminaire-related faults (blackening or flickering of compact fluorescent lights) and 11 other faults related to fuses, switches, etc.

Chaurey, A.

2000-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

63

Generic turbine design study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of Task 12, Generic Turbine Design Study was to develop a conceptual design of a combustion turbine system that would perform in a pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) application. A single inlet/outlet casing design that modifies the W251B12 combustion turbine to provide compressed air to the PFBC and accept clean hot air from the PFBC was developed. Performance calculations show that the net power output expected, at an inlet temperature of 59{degrees}F, is 20,250 kW.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Geochemistry studies in Eastern Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented here are the results of inorganic geochemical studies on well cuttings from fourteen wells in the Big Sandy Gas Field. Both x-ray fluorescence and x-ray diffraction were used in analysis. Resultant mineralic data and elemental data were mapped by computer and by hand for five intervals of Ohio Shale and for the Berea/Bedford sequence. Comparisons of the geochemistry trend maps were made with lithology, structure, thermal maturation, gas open flow, and paleoenvironment. Techniques used included visual map comparison, computer map comparison programs utilizing correlation coefficients based on grid derived data sets, cluster analysis, x-y plots, and r/sup 2/ (coefficient of determination). A limited number of regional maps are included. It is concluded that inorganic geochemical analysis can be useful in: (1) suggesting paleoenvironmental trends; (2) establishing depositional trends; (3) enhancing exploration in terms of setting limits and pinpointing potential areas for hydrocarbon recovery; and (4) identification of likely locations for large gas fields when used with other geological studies. Elemental data analysis is the most accurate, and can be done quickly and inexpensively. It is concluded that the Big Sandy gas field area is a unique stratigraphic-structural gas trap, in which sedimentary factors, depositional basin features, plant evolution and occurrence, and structural elements all played important roles. Combinations of certain of these ingredients in different amounts may exist in other parts of the basin, and thus, suggest areas for hydrocarbon accumulation and potential recovery.

Negus-de Wys, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Bern clothes washer study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US market for domestic clothes washers is currently dominated by conventional, vertical axis washers, which typically require about 40 gallons of water for each load. Although small for an individual load, the fact that 35 billion loads of laundry are washed annually in the US results in a substantial quantity of water and energy use. Although much smaller, today`s market for high-efficiency clothes washers which use much less water and energy is growing albeit slowly as manufacturers are making washers based around tumble-action, horizontal axis designs available, information about their performance and benefits is being developed, and consumers are made aware of these benefits. To help build awareness of these benefits and to accelerate markets for high-efficiency washers, DOE, under its Energy Star Program and in cooperation with Maytag Appliances, conducted a field-evaluation of high-efficiency washers using Bern, Kansas (population approximately 200) as a test bed. Baseline washer performance data as well as customer washing behavior were obtained from data collected on the existing washers of more than 100 participants in this instrumented study. Following a 2-month initial study period, all conventional washers were replaced by high-efficiency, tumble action washers, and the experiment continued for another 3-month period. Based on measured data from over 20,000 loads of laundry, the impact of the washer replacement on (1) individual customers` energy and water consumption, (2) customers` laundry habits and perceptions, and (3) the community`s water supply and waste water systems were determined and reported.

Tomlinson, J.J.; Rizy, D.T.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Hydrogen energy systems studies. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of previous studies suggest that the use of hydrogen from natural gas might be an important first step toward a hydrogen economy based on renewables. Because of infrastructure considerations (the difficulty and cost of storing, transmitting and distributing hydrogen), hydrogen produced from natural gas at the end-user`s site could be a key feature in the early development of hydrogen energy systems. In the first chapter of this report, the authors assess the technical and economic prospects for small scale technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas (steam reformers, autothermal reformers and partial oxidation systems), addressing the following questions: (1) What are the performance, cost and emissions of small scale steam reformer technology now on the market? How does this compare to partial oxidation and autothermal systems? (2) How do the performance and cost of reformer technologies depend on scale? What critical technologies limit cost and performance of small scale hydrogen production systems? What are the prospects for potential cost reductions and performance improvements as these technologies advance? (3) How would reductions in the reformer capital cost impact the delivered cost of hydrogen transportation fuel? In the second chapter of this report the authors estimate the potential demand for hydrogen transportation fuel in Southern California.

Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.; Kartha, S.; Iwan, L.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

67

AC Electrostatic Field Study : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phenomenon of fast transients propagating to the outer sheath of a gas insulated substation (GIS) during switching and disconnect operations as well as the distortion of the electric field gradient around an electric transmission line in the presence of field measuring equipment are examples of electrostatic and electromagnetic field problems that are very much on the minds of both power engineers and maintenance personnel alike. Maintenance personnel working on high voltage equipment want to know the areas that have the highest electric field strength gradients and they want to reduce the risk of being shocked when touching a conventionally 60 Hz grounded GIS enclosure due to fast transients initiated by faults and switching operations. In studying these phenomena during the performance period of this grant, tower configurations for the electric field strength gradient measurements were tested with the ESURF3D program acquired from BPA and gas insulated substation test pole (GISTP) models were tested using the Alternative Transients Program (ATP) version Electromagnets Transients Program (EMTP). The results of these two modeling paradigms are presented in this report not as the last word on these subjects, but as a couple of the many ways one can approach two classical electromagnetic waves problems. 19 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Lebby, Gary L.

1990-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Joint DOE-PNC research on the use of transparency in support of nuclear nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNC and LANL collaborated in research on the concept of transparency in nuclear nonproliferation. The research was based on the Action Sheet No. 21, which was signed in February 1996, ``The Joint Research on Transparency in Nuclear Nonproliferation`` under the ``Agreement between the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan (PNC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) for Cooperation in Research and Development Concerning Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Measures for Safeguards and Nonproliferation``. The purpose of Action Sheet 21 is to provide a fundamental study on Transparency to clarify the means to improve worldwide acceptability for the nuclear energy from the nuclear nonproliferation point of view. This project consists of independent research and then joint discussion at workshops that address a series of topics and issues in transparency. The activities covered in Action Sheet 21 took place over a period of 18 months. Three workshops were held; the first and the third hosted by PNC in Tokyo, Japan and the second hosted by LANL in Los Alamos, New Mexico, US. The following is a summary of the three workshops. The first workshop addressed the policy environment of transparency. Each side presented its perspective on the following issues: (1) a definition of transparency, (2) reasons for transparency, (3) detailed goals of transparency and (4) obstacles to transparency. The topic of the second workshop was ``Development of Transparency Options.`` The activities accomplished were (1) identify type of facilities where transparency might be applied, (2) define criteria for applying transparency, and (3) delineate applicable transparency options. The goal of the third workshop, ``Technical Options for Transparency,`` was to (1) identify conceptual options for transparency system design; (2) identify instrumentation, measurement, data collection and data processing options; (3) identify data display options; and (4) identify technical options for reprocessing, enrichment, and MOX fuel fabrication facilities.

Mochiji, Toshiro; Keeney, R.; Tazaki, Makiko [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. (Japan). Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation; Nakhleh, C.; Puckett, J.; Stanbro, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Safeguards System Group

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

FINAL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, TN, and Columbus, GA

70

The Linkage Between Non-Proliferation, Deterrence Policy, Nuclear Testing and the Arms Race  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A major focal point for strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which is the central legal and political basis of the non-proliferation regime has been negotiation of a comprehensive test ban (CTB). ...

Lawrence Scheinman

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Jump to: navigation, search Name DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) Place Washington, Washington, DC Zip 20585 Product String representation "Washington D.C. ... ear operations." is too long. Coordinates 38.89037°, -77.031959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.89037,"lon":-77.031959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

72

Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community.

NONE

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear ...

75

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

76

Nonproliferation Human Capital Development in Malaysia | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Capital Development in Malaysia | National Nuclear Human Capital Development in Malaysia | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Nonproliferation Human Capital Development in Malaysia Nonproliferation Human Capital Development in Malaysia Posted By NNSA Public Affairs NNSA Blog Photo Credit: National University of Malaysia

77

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear ...

78

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

79

Final  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

, , Final for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards . Environmental Assessment Prepared for Southwestern Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy - _ . . . " Prepared by Black & Veatch October 13,1995 ' Table of Contents 1 . 0 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Description of the Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 Alternative 1 . No Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Alternative 2 . Mechanical and Manual Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Alternative 3 . Proposed Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 Foliar Spray Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2 Soil-Spot Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

80

Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, Annual Report, Class of 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 32-pp annual report/brochure describes the accomplishments of the Class of 2012 of the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (the last class of this program), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The time period covers Sept 2011 through June 2013.

McMakin, Andrea H.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow Served at U.S. Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of her training and professional experiences, Rosalyn Leitch, a Security Specialist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow with NIS (2012-2013) was able to transition into temporary assignment as UNVIE Acting Nuclear Security Attach from November 2013 through February 2014.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nonproliferation - Tell-tale seals | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SHARE SHARE Nonproliferation - Tell-tale seals Using an Oak Ridge National Laboratory technology, inspectors of containers of nuclear material will be able to know with unprecedented confidence whether an intruder has tampered with a seal. The system uses a light source of entangled photons to verify the continuity of a fiber-based seal, according to Travis Humble, who led the development team. Entanglement is a feature of quantum physics that describes how two spatially disparate systems exhibit strong correlations in otherwise independent behaviors. The work, sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, is vital to ensure compliance with nonproliferation treaties because inspectors must confirm the uninterrupted containment and surveillance of any nuclear material.

83

Consequence Management, Safeguards & Non-Proliferation Tools | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consequence Consequence Management, Safeguards, and Non-Proliferation Tools SHARE Consequence Management, Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Tools UF 6 Enrichment Facility Visualization of the gamma radiation field in a mock-up of a UF-6 enrichment facility. The solution was generated on a desktop computer using ORNL's Denovo SN transport code and ADVANTG interface, using geometry and material descriptions from an NRL SWORD input file. ORNL is a leader in developing state-of-the-art radiation transport modeling and simulation tools and in applying these tools to solve challenging problems in national and global nuclear security. Recent developments in high-performance, high-fidelity, deterministic Monte Carlo, and hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic radiation transport codes within

84

Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The President's arms control and nonproliferation agenda is still evolving and the details of initiatives supporting it remain undefined. This means that DOE, NNSA, NA-20, NA-24 and the national laboratories can help define the agenda, and the policies and the initiatives to support it. This will require effective internal and interagency coordination. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda is broad and includes the path-breaking goal of creating conditions for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Responsibility for various elements of the agenda will be widely scattered across the interagency. Therefore an interagency mapping exercise should be performed to identify the key points of engagement within NNSA and other agencies for creating effective policy coordination mechanisms. These can include informal networks, working groups, coordinating committees, interagency task forces, etc. It will be important for NA-20 and NA-24 to get a seat at the table and a functional role in many of these coordinating bodies. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda comprises both mature and developing policy initiatives. The more mature elements such as CTBT ratification and a follow-on strategic nuclear arms treaty with Russia have defined milestones. However, recent press reports indicate that even the START follow-on strategic arms pact that is planned to be complete by the end of 2009 may take significantly longer and be more expansive in scope. The Russians called for proposals to count non-deployed as well as deployed warheads. Other elements of the agenda such as FMCT, future bilateral nuclear arms reductions following a START follow-on treaty, nuclear posture changes, preparations for an international nuclear security summit, strengthened international safeguards and multilateral verification are in much earlier stages of development. For this reason any survey of arms control capabilities within the USG should be structured to address potential needs across the near-term (1-4) years and longer-term (5-10) years planning horizons. Some final observations include acknowledging the enduring nature of several key objectives on the Obama Administration's arms control and nonproliferation agenda. The CTBT, FMCT, bilateral nuclear arms reductions and strengthening the NPT have been sought by successive U.S. Administrations for nearly thirty years. Efforts towards negotiated arms control, although de-emphasized by the G.W. Bush Administration, have remained a pillar of U.S. national security strategy for decades and are likely to be of enduring if not increasing importance for decades to come. Therefore revitalization and expansion of USG capabilities in this area can be a positive legacy no matter what near-term arms control goals are achieved over the next four years. This is why it is important to reconstruct integrated bureaucratic, legislative, budgetary and diplomatic strategies to sustain the arms control and nonproliferation agenda. In this endeavor some past lessons must be taken to heart to avoid bureaucratic overkill and keep interagency policy-making and implementation structures lean and effective. On the Technical side a serious, sustained multilateral program to develop, down select and performance test nuclear weapons dismantlement verification technologies and procedures should be immediately initiated. In order to make this happen the United States and Russia should join with the UK and other interested states in creating a sustained, full-scale research and development program for verification at their respective nuc1ear weapons and defense establishments. The goals include development of effective technologies and procedures for: (1) Attribute measurement systems to certify nuclear warheads and military fissile materials; (2) Chain-of-custody methods to track items after they are authenticated and enter accountability; (3) Transportation monitoring; (4) Storage monitoring; (5) Fissile materials conversion verification. The remainder of this paper focuses on transparency and verification for nuclear arms a

Doyle, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meek, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University?¢????s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

Stephen Spain

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

87

MCNPX-PoliMi for Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past few years, efforts to develop new measurement systems to support nuclear nonproliferation and homeland security have increased substantially. Monte Carlo radiation transport is one of the simulation methods of choice for the analysis of data from existing systems and for the design of new measurement systems; it allows for accurate description of geometries, detailed modeling of particle-nucleus interactions, and event-by-event detection analysis. This paper describes the use of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX-PoliMi for nuclear-nonproliferation applications, with particular emphasis on the simulation of spontaneous and neutron-induced nuclear fission. In fact, of all possible neutron-nucleus interactions, neutron-induced fission is the most defining characteristic of special nuclear material (such as U-235 and Pu-239), which is the material of interest in nuclear-nonproliferation applications. The MCNP-PoliMi code was originally released from the Radiation Safety Shielding Center (RSSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2003 [1]; the MCNPX-PoliMi code contains many enhancements and is based on MCNPX ver. 2.7.0. MCNPX-PoliMi ver. 2.0 was released through RSICC in 2012 as a patch to MCNPX ver. 2.7.0 and as an executable [2].

S. A. Pozzi; S. D. Clarke; W. Walsh; E. C. Miller; J. Dolan; M. Flaska; B. M. Wieger; A. Enqvist; E. Padovani; J. K. Mattingly; D. L. Chichester; P. Peerani

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The future of the Non-Proliferation Treaty and U.S. nuclear weapons policy .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis addresses the viability of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons NPT for short in light of U.S. nuclear weapons (more)

Claussen, Bjrn Ragnar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

2012 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within the NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation.

90

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Sign Agreement to Allow Nonproliferation and Threat Reduction Cooperation Secretary Bodman and Rosatom Director Kiriyenko Meet to Discuss U.S.-Russia Nuclear Security Progress...

91

SciTech Connect: Proceedings of the Symposium on the Non-Proliferation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Symposium on the Non-Proliferation Experiment: Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, Rockville, Maryland, April 19-21, 1994 Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

92

The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation comprises SEAB members and individuals with expertise and experience in the technologies, institutions, and...

93

Ferrocyanide safety project ferrocyanide aging studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report gives the results of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from FY 1992 to FY 1996 on the Ferrocyanide Aging Studies, part of the Ferrocyanide Safety Project. The Ferrocyanide Safety Project was initiated as a result of concern raised about the safe storage of ferrocyanide waste intermixed with oxidants, such as nitrate and nitrite salts, in Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs). In the laboratory, such mixtures can be made to undergo uncontrolled or explosive reactions by heating dry reagents to over 200{degrees}C. In 1987, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Final Environmental Impact Statement, Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level Transuranic and Tank Waste, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, included an environmental impact analysis of potential explosions involving ferrocyanide-nitrate mixtures. The EIS postulated that an explosion could occur during mechanical retrieval of saltcake or sludge from a ferrocyanide waste tank, and concluded that this worst-case accident could create enough energy to release radioactive material to the atmosphere through ventilation openings, exposing persons offsite to a short-term radiation dose of approximately 200 mrem. Later, in a separate study (1990), the General Accounting Office postulated a worst-case accident of one to two orders of magnitude greater than that postulated in the DOE EIS. The uncertainties regarding the safety envelope of the Hanford Site ferrocyanide waste tanks led to the declaration of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) in October 1990.

Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Alderson, E.V. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies, final rept (May 1997), Subcontract No. B291847  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. Various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the final optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 {Angstrom}) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change- outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. In addition to the work described briefly above, we performed extensive analysis of the target-chamber thermal response to in- chamber CO{sub 2} Cleaning and of work performed to model the behavior of silica vapor. The work completed this year has been published in several papers and a dissertation [1-6]. This report provides a summary of the work completed this year, as well as copies fo presentation materials that have not been published elsewhere. In particular, the Appendix contains copies of presentations made on CO{sub 2} cleaning that are not available elsewhere.

Peterson, P.F.; Jin, H.; Scott, J.M. [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Microsoft Word - Sys-study-Final-SENT-Apr2006.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

System Study of System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL ® ) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines Final Report Report Period Starting Date : 10/1/2002 Report Period End Date : 6/30/2004 Principal Authors: Dr. Shahrokh Etemad, Dr. Lance Smith, Mr. Kevin Burns Date: December, 2004 (Rev III) DOE Contract No. DE-FG26-02NT41521 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Prepared by: Precision Combustion, Inc. North Haven, Connecticut 06473 ii Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

96

Study of electron and neutrino interactions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for the DOE-sponsored experimental particle physics program at Virginia Tech to study the properties of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. This contract (DE-AS05-80ER10713) covers the period from August 1, 1980 to January 31, 1993. Task B of this contract, headed by Professor Alexander Abashian, is described in this final report. This program has been pursued on many fronts by the researchers in a search for axions at SLAC, in electron-positron collisions in the AMY experiment at the TRISTAN collider in Japan, in measurements of muon decay properties in the MEGA and RHO experiments at the LAMPF accelerator, in a detailed analysis of scattering effects in the purported observation of a 17 keV neutrino at Oxford, in a search for a disoriented chiral condensate with the MiniMax experiment at Fermilab, and in an R&D program on resistive plate counters that could find use in low-cost high-quality charged particle detection at low rates.

Abashian, A.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

Verifying nonproliferation treaties: Obligation, process, and sovereignty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The foregoing chapters examine what verification is and why states would bother with so difficult and politically sensitive an issue when negotiating agreements on arms control and disarmament issues. Now it is necessary to confront the question of whether there are any meaningful conclusions to be drawn from this exercise. Are the patterns discerned in the history of these treaties meaningful for understanding how other treaties have evolved or will evolve. Are there lessons here which might benefit future negotiators. This final chapter seeks to provide some answers, albeit partial ones, to these questions. There are in fact several interesting and potentially important conclusions to be drawn. Verification of multilateral treaty obligations contains its own intrinsic structure and logic, independent of the obligations undertaken by the parties and the political context in which those undertakings are negotiated and made. The many significant similarities in the verification processes for the CFE Treaty, the NPT, and the CWC demonstrate the degree to which there is such an underlying structure regardless of whether the behavior or activity is strictly military or has essentially civilian dimensions, whether all relevant states participate or only some of the most important states agree from the beginning to participate, and whether the agreement is global or regional in scope.

Kessler, J.C.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Waste package/repository impact study: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Package/Repository Impact Study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the current reference salt waste package in the salt repository conceptual design. All elements of the repository that may impact waste package parameters, i.e., (size, weight, heat load) were evaluated. The repository elements considered included waste hoist feasibility, transporter and emplacement machine feasibility, subsurface entry dimensions, feasibility of emplacement configuration, and temperature limits. The evaluations are discussed in detail with supplemental technical data included in Appendices to this report, as appropriate. Results and conclusions of the evaluations are discussed in light of the acceptability of the current reference waste package as the basis for salt conceptual design. Finally, recommendations are made relative to the salt project position on the application of the reference waste package as a basis for future design activities. 31 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Electric Power Delivery Testing Feasibility Study Task 6 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report is covers the completion of the Electric Power Delivery Testing Feasibility Study. The objective of this project was to research, engineer, and demonstrate high-power laboratory testing protocols to accurately reproduce the conditions on the electric power grid representing both normal load switching and abnormalities such as short-circuit fault protection. Test circuits, equipment, and techniques were developed and proven at reduced power levels to determine the feasibility of building a large-scale high-power testing laboratory capable of testing equipment and systems at simulated high-power conditions of the U.S. power grid at distribution levels up through 38 kiloVolts (kV) and transmission levels up through 230 kV. The project delivered demonstrated testing techniques, high-voltage test equipment for load testing and synthetic short-circuit testing, and recommended designs for future implementation of a high-power testing laboratory to test equipment and systems, enabling increased reliability of the electric transmission and distribution grid.

Thomas Tobin

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Study of B Meson Decays to ppbarh Final States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

B mesons are unique among well-established non-quarkonium mesons in their ability to decay into baryons. Baryonic B decays offer a wide range of interesting areas of study: they can be used to test our theoretical understanding of rare decay processes involving baryons, search for direct CP violation and study low-energy QCD. This thesis presents measurements of branching fractions and a study of the decay dynamics of the charmless three-body decays of B meson into p{bar p}h final states, where h = {pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}. With a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BaBar detector, we report the first observation of the B {yields} p{bar p}K*{sup 0} decay, and provide improved measurements of branching fractions of the other modes. The distribution of the three final-state particles is of particular interest since it provides dynamical information on the possible presence of exotic intermediate states such as the hypothetical pentaquark states {Theta}*{sup ++} and {Theta}{sup +}in the m{sub pK{sup +}} and m{sub pK{sub S}{sup 0}} spectra, respectively, or glueball states (such as the tensor glueball f{sub J}(2220)) in the m{sub p{bar p}} spectrum. No evidence for exotic states is found and upper limits on the branching fractions are set. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed in all the B {yields} p{bar p}h modes, and its shape is compared between the decay modes and with the shape of the time-like proton form factor. A Dalitz plot asymmetry in B {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} mode suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this decay and disfavors the possibility that the low mass p{bar p} enhancement originates from the presence of a resonance below threshold (such as the recently seen baryonium candidate at 1835 MeV/c{sup 2}). We also identify decays of the type B {yields} X{sub c{bar c}}h {yields} p{bar p}h, where h = K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}, and X{sub c{bar c}} = {eta}{sub c} or J/{psi}. In particular, we report on the evidence of the B {yields} {eta}{sub c}K*{sup +} decay and provide a measurement of the width of {eta}{sub c}.

Hryn'ova, Tetiana B.; /SLAC

2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Tags and seals for controling nuclear materials, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies summarizes demonstrations and addresses related topics. The first article, ``Basic Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Concepts as Might be Applied to the Uranium from the US-Russian HEU Purchase,`` describes safeguards sybsystems necessary for effective nuclear material safeguards. It also presents a general discussion on HEU-to-low-enrichment uranium (LEU) commingling processes and suggests applicable key measurement points. The second article, ``A Framework for Evaluating Tamper-Indicating-Device Technologies (TIDs),`` describes their uses, proper selection, and evaluation. The final three articles discuss the tags and seals applications and general characteristics of several nuclear material containers: the Type 30B uranium hexafluoride container, the AT-400R container, and the DOT Specification 6M container for SNM. Finally, the Appendix displays short descriptions and illustrations of seven tags and seals, including: the E-cup and wire seal, the python seal, the secure loop inspectable tag/seal (SLITS), bolt-and-loop type electronic identification devices, and the shrink-wrap seal.

Staehle, G; Talaber, C; Stull, S; Moulthrop, P [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad range of subjects, including nuclear material accountancy principles, legal definitions and the regulatory base and inspection tools and techniques. This 60% core part is given by representatives from regulatory bodies (The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Directorate General for Nuclear Energy and Transport), industry (AREVA, British Nuclear Group), and research (Stockholm University, Hamburg University, Joint Research Centre-Institute of Transuranic Elements, and Joint Research Centre-Institute for the Protection of the Citizen). The remaining part is completed with topical lectures addressed by invited lecturers, such as from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the IAEA addressing topics of physical protection, illicit trafficking, the Iraq case study, exercises, including satellite imagery interpretation etc. With this structure of a stable core plus a variable set of invited lectures, the course will remain sustainable and up-to-date. A syllabus provides the students a homogeneous set of information material in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation matters at the European and international level. In this way, the ESARDA TKMWG aims to contribute to a two-fold scientific-technical and political-juridical education and training.

Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

Summary of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Non-Proliferation Treaty rests on a basic bargain between the five declared nuclear-weapon states-the United States, Russia, Britain, France and China and 167 states that do not possess nuclear weapons. In addition, to the arms control and disarmaments commitments in Article VI, the parties pledge in the treaty`s pramble their determination to seek a comprehensive test ban (CTB) and express the understanding that in connection with the treaty on general and complete disarmament the parties should seek the cessation of manufacture of nuclear weapons, the liquidation of all their existing stock piles, and the elimination from national arsenals of nuclear weapons and means of their delivery. The author summaries key elements of these agreements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Future directions for arms control and nonproliferation. Conference summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions at the Spring 1994 CNSN-Wilton Park Conference. The Conference was one of a series on US-European security cooperation organized by The Center for National Security Negotiations (CNSN) of Science Applications International Corporation. These conferences bring together government and non-government experts, primarily from the United States and Europe, to discuss a range of regional and global security issues. The conferences provide an opportunity to explore, in a frank and off-the-record environment, common interests and concerns, as well as differences in approach that affect trans-Atlantic cooperation. This report is divided into the following three areas: (1) implementation of existing and pending agreements; (2) non-proliferation: prospects for trans-Atlantic cooperation; and (3) future directions in arms control.

Not Available

1994-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

FINAL REPORT ON THE AQUATIC MERCURY ASSESSMENT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 2000, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 issued a proposed Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for total mercury in the middle and lower Savannah River. The initial TMDL, which would have imposed a 1 ng/l mercury limit for discharges to the middle/lower Savannah River, was revised to 2.8 ng/l in the final TMDL released in February 2001. The TMDL was intended to protect people from the consumption of contaminated fish, which is the major route of mercury exposure to humans. The most bioaccumulative form of mercury is methylmercury, which is produced in aquatic environments by the action of microorganisms on inorganic mercury. Because of the environmental and economic significance of the mercury discharge limits that would have been imposed by the TMDL, the Savannah River Site (SRS) initiated several studies concerning: (1) mercury in SRS discharges, SRS streams and the Savannah River, (2) mercury bioaccumulation factors for Savannah River fish, (3) the use of clams to monitor the influence of mercury from tributary streams on biota in the Savannah River, and (4) mercury in rainwater falling on the SRS. The results of these studies are presented in detail in this report. The first study documented the occurrence, distribution and variation of total and methylmercury at SRS industrial outfalls, principal SRS streams and the Savannah River where it forms the border with the SRS. All of the analyses were performed using the EPA Method 1630/31 ultra low-level and contaminant-free techniques for measuring total and methylmercury. Total mercury at National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfalls ranged from 0.31-604 ng/l with a mean of 8.71 ng/l. Mercury-contaminated groundwater was the source for outfalls with significantly elevated mercury concentrations. Total mercury in SRS streams ranged from 0.95-15.7 ng/l. Mean total mercury levels in the streams varied from 2.39 ng/l in Pen Branch to 5.26 ng/l in Tims Branch. Methylmercury ranged from 0.002 ng/l in Upper Three Runs to 2.60 ng/l in Tims Branch. Total mercury in the Savannah River ranged from 0.62 ng/l to 43.9 ng/l, and methylmercury ranged from 0.036 ng/l to 7.54 ng/l. Both total and methylmercury concentrations were consistently high in the river near the mouth of Steel Creek. Total mercury was positively correlated with methylmercury (r = 0.88). Total mercury bound to particulates ranged from 41% to 57% in the river and from 28% to 90% in the streams. Particulate methylmercury varied from 9% to 37% in the river and from 6% to 79% in the streams. Small temporary pools in the Savannah River swamp area near and around Fourmile Branch had the highest concentrations observed in the Savannah River watershed, reaching 1,890 ng/l for total mercury and 34.0 ng/l for methylmercury. The second study developed a mercury bioaccumulation factor (BAF) for the Savannah River near SRS. A BAF is the ratio of the concentration of mercury in fish flesh to the concentration of mercury in the water. BAFs are important in the TMDL process because target concentrations for mercury in water are computed from BAFs. Mercury BAFs are known to differ substantially among fish species, water bodies, and possibly seasons. Knowledge of such variation is needed to determine a BAF that accurately represents average and extreme conditions in the water body under study. Analysis of fish tissue and aqueous methylmercury samples collected at a number of locations and over several seasons in a 110 km (68 mile) reach of the Savannah River demonstrated that BAFs for each species under study varied by factors of three to eight. Influences on BAF variability were location, habitat and season-related differences in fish mercury levels and seasonal differences in methylmercury levels in the water. Overall (all locations, habitats, and seasons) average BAFs were 3.7 x 10{sup 6} for largemouth bass, 1.4 x 10{sup 6} for sunfishes, and 2.5 x 10{sup 6} for white catfish. This study showed that determination of representative BAFs for large rivers requires the collect

Halverson, N

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) NBL Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials Program Measurement Evaluation Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support Measurement Services Measurement Development Training Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) Training Categorical Exclusion Determinations News Contact Information New Brunswick Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Building 350 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439-4899 P: (630) 252-2442 (NBL) P: (630) 252-2767 (CRM sales) F: (630) 252-6256 E: usdoe.nbl@ch.doe.gov Programs Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) is owned and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NBL is the U.S. Government's Certifying Authority for

107

Of carrots and sticks or air power as a nonproliferation tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proliferation of nuclear weapons has become one of the principal threats to international peace and security. Postwar revelations from Iraq demonstrate how close a determined nation can come to covertly developing nuclear weapons without detection. In the past two years the issue of nonproliferation has increased in importance and the regime is becoming more intrusive. On the other hand, a number of nations hostile to the international order are attempting to develop or otherwise obtain nuclear weapons These states include North Korea, Iran, and Iraq. This paper argues that the use or threat of force must be incorporated into the nonproliferation regime. When properly integrated into nonproliferation strategy, force offers positive effects in terms of deterrence, compellence, and defense. Thus, the paper calls for the institutionalization of force options into the nonproliferation tool kit, ideally as part of chapter 7 enforcement actions under the authority of the UN Security Council.

Wolf, F.R.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ionospheric measurements for the Non-Proliferation Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection of explosions using ionospheric techniques relies on measuring perturbations induced in radio propagation by acoustics waves which disturb the electron density of the ionosphere. Such techniques have been applied to the detection of atmospheric explosions, underground nuclear tests, earthquakes, and surface mining explosions. The nighttime ionosphere presents a difficulty for the detection of explosions because in the absence of solar ionization radiation the electron density in the altitude range of 90 to 200 km decays after sunset and perturbation effects are correspondingly reduced. On the other hand, acoustic waves produced by weak sources reach a maximum amplitude in the altitude range of 100 to 150 km and are highly attenuated at altitudes above 200 km. For safety reasons, most planned explosions are conducted during daylight which has limited the experimental measurements during nighttime. However a recent opportunity for a nighttime measurement occurred in connection with the Non-Proliferation Experiment which consisted of the detonation of a large chemical charge underground at the Nevada Test Site near midnight local time. the results, based on a new technique of using medium frequency radio transmissions provided by commercial broadcasts to detect explosion effects, were negative. The most likely explanation for the negative result is that the radio transmissions did not reflect at a low enough altitude to sense the perturbations produced by the acoustic waves.

Fitzgerald, T.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding to complete the Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study project. The main goal of the project was to complete an alternative energy feasibility study. This study was completed to evaluate the potential for development of a variety of renewable energy projects and to conduct an alternative energy feasibility study that determines which alternative energy resources have the greatest economic opportunity for the Tribe, while respecting cultural and environmental values (Baker-Tilly, 2014). The study concluded that distributed generation solar projects are the best option for renewable energy development and asset ownership for the Washoe Tribe. Concentrating solar projects, utility scale wind projects, geothermal, and biomass resource projects were also evaluated during the study and it was determined that these alternatives would not be feasible at this time.

Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and CA

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification Technology Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Project Manager: James R. Longanbach Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Norma J. Kuehn Ronald L. Schoff Vladimir Vaysman Jay S. White Power Plant Water Usage and Loss Study i August 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...................................................................................................................... I LIST OF TABLES.............................................................................................................................III

111

Integrated two-stage coal liquefaction studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies have been undertaken to evaluate variables associated with the dissolution of coal and with the upgrading of residuum containing recycle solvent in an integrated two stage coal liquefaction process. Areas studied include dissolver solvent quality, disposable dissolver catalysts, dissolver pressure effects, non-disposable hydrotreater catalysts and distillate:residuum:coal weight ratios. In order to effectively study the effects of a residuum containing solvent on coal liquefaction at short residence times, a stirred microautoclave reactor, the ''Borgialli'' microreactor, was designed and constructed as part of this program. 24 refs., 55 figs., 52 tabs.

Silver, H.F.; Frazee, W.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Final Report: Feasibility Study of Biomass in Snohomish County, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report and its attachments summarizes the results of a unique tribal-farmer cooperative study to evaluate the feasibility of building one or more regional anaerobic digestion systems in Snohomish County, Washington.

Daryl Williams (Tulalip Tribes); Ray Clark (Clark Group)

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Radiation worker health study: Scoping phase: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to develop a scope of work for an epidemiologic study of the health of workers at nuclear utilities. We propose a study of cancer mortality among electric utility personnel assigned to nuclear generating stations. The primary goal of the study is to provide information to assist in maintaining a healthy work environment in electric utilities; such information would also help to resolve some uncertainties about the effects of low-level ionizing radiation by providing direct observation of human beings exposed at low doses and dose rates. Workers at each nuclear generating station would be identified from company records, their dose histories would be collected, and their vital status would be ascertained as well as cause of death, if deceased. This study would be historical in that past records would be used and prospective in that employees would continue to be followed in future years. Our estimates indicate that a study population composed of employees and contractors at all commercial nuclear generating stations would total approximately 2,000,000 person-years of observation and would be adequate to detect (or exclude) a 50 percent increase in leukemia with reasonable statistical power. 44 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Dreyer, N.A.; Wilkinson, G.S.; Loughlin, J.E.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Economic impact study of consumer product efficiencies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economic impact study of household appliance efficiencies is briefly reported. Task I, Direct Impact on Industry, contains 4 subtasks: materials, labor inputs, energy inputs, and investment. Task II, Direct Impact on Consumers, contains 3 subtasks: life-cycle cost to the consumer, usage patterns, and long-term demand forecast and analysis. The 2 subtasks in Task III, Energy Savings and Impact on Utilities, are residential energy savings and cost and impact on utility generating capacity.

Not Available

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1991 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The population of Yakima River spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) has been drastically reduced from historic levels reported to be as high as 250,000 adults (Smoker 1956). This reduction is the result of a series of problems including mainstem Columbia dams, dams within the Yakima itself, severely reduced flows due to irrigation diversions, outmigrant loss in irrigation canals, increased thermal and sediment loading, and overfishing. Despite these problems, the return of spring chinook to the Yakima River has continued at levels ranging from 854 to 9,442 adults since 1958. In October 1982, the Bonneville Power Administration contracted the Yakima Indian Nation to develop methods to increase production of spring chinook in the Yakima system. The Yakima Nation's current enhancement policy attempts to maintain the genetic integrity of the spring chinook stock native to the Yakima Basin. Relatively small numbers of hatchery fish have been released into the basin in past years. The goal of this study was to develop data that will be used to present management alternatives for Yakima River spring chinook. A major objective of this study is to determine the distribution, abundance and survival of wild Yakima River spring chinook. The second major objective of this study is to determine the relative effectiveness of different methods of hatchery supplementation. The last three major objectives of the study are to locate and define areas in the watershed that may be used for the rearing of spring chinook; to define strategies for enhancing natural production of spring chinook in the Yakima River; and to determine the physical and biological limitations on production within the system. 47 refs., 89 figs., 67 tabs.

Fast, David E.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Aerosol analysis for the regional air pollution study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and operation of an aerosol sampling and analysis program implemented during the 1975 to 1977 St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study is described. A network of ten samplers were operated at selected sites in the St. Louis area and the total mass and elemental composition of the collected particulates were determined. Sampling periods of 2 to 24 hours were employed. The samplers were capable of collecting aerosol particles in two distinct size ranges corresponding to fine (< 2.4 ..mu..m diameter) and coarse (> 2.4 ..mu..m diameter) particles. This unique feature allowed the separation of the particulate samples into two distinct fractions with differing chemical origins and health effects. The analysis methods were also newly developed for use in the St. Louis RAPS study. Total particulate mass was measured by a beta-particle attenuation method in which a precision of +- 5 ..mu..m/cm/sup 2/ could be obtained in a one minute measurement time. Elemental compositions of the samples were determined using an energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence method in which detectable limits of 5 ng/cm/sup 2/ or less were routinely achieved for elements ranging in atomic number from Al to Pb. The advantages of these analytical methods over more conventional techniques arise from the ability to automate the measurements. During the course of the two year study, a total of more than 35,000 individual samples were processed and a total of 28 concentrations measured for each sample.

Jaklevic, J.M.; Gatti, R.C.; Goulding, F.S.; Loo, B.W.; Thompson, A.C.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Atlanta NAVIGATOR case study. Final report, May 1996--Jun 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atlanta metropolitan region was the location of one of the most ambitious Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) deployments in the United States. This deployment included several individual projects--a Central Transportation Management Center (TMC), six Traffic Control Centers (TCC), one Transit Information Center (TIC), the Travel Information Showcase (TIS), and the extension of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) rail network and the new high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-85 and I-75. The Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games created a focus for these projects. All of these systems were to be brought on line in time for the Olympic Games. This report presents the findings of the NAVIGATOR Case Study and documents the lessons learned from the Atlanta ITS deployment experience in order to improve other ITS deployments in the future. The Case Study focuses on the institutional, programmatic, and technical issues and opportunities from planning and implementing the ITS deployment in Atlanta. The Case Study collected data and information from interviews, observations, focus groups, and documentation reviews. It presents a series of lessons learned and recommendations for enabling successful ITS deployments nationwide.

Amodei, R.; Bard, E.; Brong, B.; Cahoon, F.; Jasper, K.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

White phosphorus pits focused feasibility study final July 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP) Area of Concern (AOC) is a site of about 5.5 acres (2.2 ha) located in the J-Field Study Area, in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland (Figure 1.1). Considerable information about the WPP exists as a result of efforts to characterize the hazards associated with J-Field. Contamination in the J-Field Study Area was first detected during an environmental survey of the APG Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 (Nemeth et al. 1983) by the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA; predecessor to the U.S. Army Environmental Center). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field (three of them at the WPP) (Nemeth 1989). Contamination was also detected in 1983 during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science (1984). The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved installing and sampling nine wells (four at the WPP) and collecting and analyzing surficial and deep composite soil samples (including samples from the WPP area). In 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a post-wide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field. In 1987, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phase hydrogeologic assessment in which data were collected to model groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil-gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed (four at the WPP), a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today. The results of the USGS study were published by Hughes (1993).

Davis, B.; Martino, L.

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

119

Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) final report summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) has resulted in an overview of a first-generation tandem mirror reactor. The central cell fusion plasma is self-sustained by alpha heating (ignition), while electron-cyclotron resonance heating and negative ion beams maintain the electrostatic confining potentials in the end plugs. Plug injection power is reduced by the use of high-field choke coils and thermal barriers, concepts to be tested in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) and Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Carlson, G.A.; Perkins, L.J.; Werner, R.W.; Gordon, J.D.; Parmer, J.F.; Bilton, J.R.; Glancy, J.E.; Kulcinski, G.L.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Industry Coupled Case Study Program final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Industry Coupled Case Study Program was conceived as a short-term cooperative program between the Federal government and private industry. Federal funds were committed to stimulate geothermal exploration and development between 1977 and 1979, although some work under the program continues into 1982. Federal funding has been phased out and the remaining information developed during the program is being disseminated and reported. This report presents an overview of the program and documents the technical results and open-file data base resulting from the program.

Stringfellow, J. [ed.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Microsoft Word - RISMC ATR Case Study - Final.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2-27015 2-27015 Revision 0 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study August 2012 DOE Office of Nuclear Energy DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trade mark,

123

Studies of New Albany shale in western Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany (Upper Devonian) Shale in western Kentucky can be zoned by using correlative characteristics distinguishable on wire-line logs. Wells drilled through the shale which were logged by various methods provided a basis for zonation of the subsurface members and units of the Grassy Creek, Sweetland Creek, and Blocher. Structure and isopach maps and cross sections were prepared. The Hannibal Shale and Rockford Limestone were found in limited areas; isopach maps were not made for these members. Samples of cuttings from selected wells were studied in order to identify the contact of the shale with underlying and overlying rock units. A well-site examination of cuttings through the shale section was conducted, and the presence of natural gas was observed in the field. The New Albany Shale has the potential for additional commercially marketable natural gas production. Exploratory drilling is needed to evaluate the reservoir characteristics of the New Albany Shale.

Schwalb, H.R.; Norris, R.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Studies of exotic nuclei with few-nucleon transfer reactions Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the activities conducted under DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER41320, titled "Study of exotic nuclei with few-nucleon transfer reactions," A. H. Wuosmaa Principal Investigator.

Wuosmaa, Alan H. [Western Michigan University

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

Gorsline, D.S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Studies of Transport Properties of Fractures: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We proposed to study several key factors controlling the character and evolution of fracture system permeability and transport processes. We suggest that due to surface roughness and the consequent channeling in single fractures and in fracture intersections, the tendency of a fracture system to plug up, remain permeable, or for permeability to increase due to chemical dissolution/precipitation conditions will depend strongly on the instantaneous flow channel geometry. This geometry will change as chemical interaction occurs, thus changing the permeability through time. To test this hypothesis and advance further understanding toward a predictive capability, we endeavored to physically model and analyze several configurations of flow and transport of inert and chemically active fluids through channels in single fractures and through fracture intersections. This was an integrated program utilizing quantitative observations of fractures and veins in drill core, quantitative and visual observations of flow and chemical dissolution and precipitation within replicas of real rough-walled fractures and fracture intersections, and numerical modeling via lattice Boltzmann methods.

Stephen R. Brown

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

LIMB process development studies. Final report, September 1985-September 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report covers basic and applied studies concerned with three Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) process objectives: (1) avoiding degradation of collection efficiency in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) during LIMB, (2) achieving satisfactory sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal, and (3) disposing of LIMB waste products. Tests were performed on Southern Research Institute's (SRI's) pilot scale combustor and on the full scale operating ESP at the Edgewater plant. SRI's testing coincided with the Edgewater LIMB demonstration, and significant test results were incorporated into the demonstration to enable the demonstration to meet its goals. The use of low-level spray humidification was found adequate to restore clear stack conditions which had severely deteriorated under LIMB without humidification. Water spray was also required for the enhancement of SO2 capture. Analytical data gathered on the waste product appears to confirm the acceptability of disposal in a landfill. There is also a report on the preliminary evaluation of the Advanced Silicate process, concluding that the process offers potential for greatly enhancing SO2 removal in connection with LIMB but cautions that substantial increase in entrained solids has to be considered.

Gooch, J.P.; Marchant, G.H.; Faulkner, M.G.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan September 29, 2006 - 9:01am Addthis Agreement Reached To Downblend HEU and Convert Reactor WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) today announced that they have reached an important agreement-in-principle with the Government of Kazakhstan to move forward with the down-blending of highly enriched uranium (HEU) currently stored at Kazakhstan's Institute of Nuclear Physics. The agreement also calls for the conversion of the VVR-K research reactor to operate on low enriched uranium fuel instead of HEU, which can be used in nuclear weapons. The

129

Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors` spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE`s Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE`s efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE`s activities in taking back spent fuel.

NONE

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

Final Report: July 2007 Study 1: Timber Supply Future of Washington's Forest and Forest Industries Study Page 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final Report: July 2007 Study 1: Timber Supply Future of Washington's Forest and Forest Industries Ceder, Elaine Oneil, Jim McCarter, Hiroo Imaki, Alicia Sullivan Table of Contents Statement of Intent: ......................................................................................................................16 Westside Management Alternatives and Impacts

131

NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

133

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons 101. 3. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. 4. Testing The TestPutting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons

Gilfoyle, Jerry

134

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons 101. 3. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. 4. Testing The Test Ban Treaty. 5. Why should you care

Gilfoyle, Jerry

135

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Alterntive Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Change in the U.S. Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy toward India (1998-2005):Accommodating the Anomaly.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??For more than three decades, the U.S. prohibited the transfer of advanced nuclear technologies to Indiaa nonsignatory of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). In 1998, (more)

Bhatia, Vandana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Physics and Nuclear Nonproliferation Goals of WATCHMAN: A WAter CHerenkov Monitor for ANtineutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article describes the physics and nonproliferation goals of WATCHMAN, the WAter Cherenkov Monitor for ANtineutrinos. The baseline WATCHMAN design is a kiloton scale gadolinium-doped (Gd) light water Cherenkov detector, placed 13 kilometers from a civil nuclear reactor in the United States. In its first deployment phase, WATCHMAN will be used to remotely detect a change in the operational status of the reactor, providing a first- ever demonstration of the potential of large Gd-doped water detectors for remote reactor monitoring for future international nuclear nonproliferation applications. During its first phase, the detector will provide a critical large-scale test of the ability to tag neutrons and thus distinguish low energy electron neutrinos and antineutrinos. This would make WATCHMAN the only detector capable of providing both direction and flavor identification of supernova neutrinos. It would also be the third largest supernova detector, and the largest underground in the western hemisphere. In a...

Askins, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dye, S T; Handler, T; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hellfeld, D; Jaffke, P; Kamyshkov, Y; Land, B J; Learned, J G; Marleau, P; Mauger, C; Gann, G D Orebi; Roecker, C; Rountree, S D; Shokair, T M; Smy, M B; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Vagins, M R; van Bibber, K A; Vogelaar, R B; Wetstein, M J; Yeh, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The US??India nuclear agreement: progress toward nuclear cooperation with India and a new paradigm in non-proliferation policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The enactment of the Henry J. Hyde United States??India Peaceful Atomic Energy Cooperation Act on December 18, 2006 opened the door to a sea change in US nuclear export policy toward India. The new legislation could reverse three decades of US nuclear non-proliferation policy by facilitating India's exemption from the requirement of full-scope safeguards as a prerequisite for nuclear trade and cooperation. Notwithstanding the Hyde Act, however, major US nuclear exports to India remain unlawful until further implementing steps are taken. This article outlines the history of the estranged nuclear trade relations between the US and India and the motivations for reviving substantial civil nuclear cooperation. It then describes the parties' recent agreements and the changes to US law necessary to fulfill those agreements. Finally, the article discusses the provisions of the Hyde Act itself and the remaining principal obstacles to US??India nuclear trade.

Jay R. Kraemer; Frank Aum

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Framework for Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection for Nonproliferation Impact Assessments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a framework for proliferation resistance and physical protection evaluation for the fuel cycle systems envisioned in the expansion of nuclear power for electricity generation. The methodology is based on an approach developed as part of the Generation IV technical evaluation framework and on a qualitative evaluation approach to policy factors similar to those that were introduced in previous Nonproliferation Impact Assessments performed by DOE.

Bari,R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Final Report: AST-0613577 "Experimental study of magnetic bubble expansion as a model for extragalactic radio lobes"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report for project "Experimental study of magnetic bubble expansion as a model for extragalactic radio lobes" supported by NSF/DOE Joint Program in Basic Plasma Science.

Lynn, Alan [University of New Mexico

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A Visual Analytics Approach to Structured Data Analysis to Enhance Nonproliferation and Arms Control Verification Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis activities for Nonproliferation and Arms Control verification require the use of many types of data. Tabular structured data, such as Excel spreadsheets and relational databases, have traditionally been used for data mining activities, where specific queries are issued against data to look for matching results. The application of visual analytics tools to structured data enables further exploration of datasets to promote discovery of previously unknown results. This paper discusses the application of a specific visual analytics tool to datasets related to the field of Arms Control and Nonproliferation to promote the use of visual analytics more broadly in this domain. Visual analytics focuses on analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces (Wong and Thomas 2004). It promotes exploratory analysis of data, and complements data mining technologies where known patterns can be mined for. Also with a human in the loop, they can bring in domain knowledge and subject matter expertise. Visual analytics has not widely been applied to this domain. In this paper, we will focus on one type of data: structured data, and show the results of applying a specific visual analytics tool to answer questions in the Arms Control and Nonproliferation domain. We chose to use the T.Rex tool, a visual analytics tool developed at PNNL, which uses a variety of visual exploration patterns to discover relationships in structured datasets, including a facet view, graph view, matrix view, and timeline view. The facet view enables discovery of relationships between categorical information, such as countries and locations. The graph tool visualizes node-link relationship patterns, such as the flow of materials being shipped between parties. The matrix visualization shows highly correlated categories of information. The timeline view shows temporal patterns in data. In this paper, we will use T.Rex with two different datasets to demonstrate how interactive exploration of the data can aid an analyst with arms control and nonproliferation verification activities. Using a dataset from PIERS (PIERS 2014), we will show how container shipment imports and exports can aid an analyst in understanding the shipping patterns between two countries. We will also use T.Rex to examine a collection of research publications from the IAEA International Nuclear Information System (IAEA 2014) to discover collaborations of concern. We hope this paper will encourage the use of visual analytics structured data analytics in the field of nonproliferation and arms control verification. Our paper outlines some of the challenges that exist before broad adoption of these kinds of tools can occur and offers next steps to overcome these challenges.

Gillen, David S.

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

Final Report Experimental Study of Impulsive Reconnection in a Current Carrying Magnetic Arcade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wheaton Impulsive Reconnection Experiment (WIRX) is a new experiment now underway at Wheaton College for the study of magnetic reconnection. The experiment is composed of two parallel electrodes, linked by a magnetic arcade that is generated by a coil surrounding the electrodes. Current is driven along the arcade from one electrode to another. When enough current is driven, the arcade is expected to disrupt or segment by reconnection allowing a study of 3D reconnection. This report is the final report for a three year grant period.

Craig, Darren [Wheaton College

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

Maine firewood study. Final report, 1 November 1978-15 January 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The barriers and incentives to fuelwood use were examined with particular emphasis on woodburners, woodlot owners and firewood dealers. A draft guide for woodlot owners managing for firewood production was prepared, along with a handbook for fuelwood dealers. Cost-benefit studies were completed for three fuelwood businesses in addition to an analysis of firewood marketing systems. The analysis revealed marginal though distinct opportunity for profit during the first year of a firewood venture. Landowner attitudes were also studied and programmatic suggestions offered to improve the effectiveness of existing services. Finally, legislative barriers to increased wood energy use were targetted and remedies proposed.

Swain, E.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Coordinated studies in support of hydraulic fracturing of coalbed methane. Final report, July 1990-May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to provide laboratory data that is pertinent to designing hydraulic fracturing treatments for coalbed methane. Coal fluid interactions studies, fracture conductivity, fluid leak-off through cleats, rheology, and proppant transport are designed to respresent Black Warrior and San Juan treatments. A second objective is to apply the information learned in laboratory testing to actual hydraulic fracturing treatments in order to improve results. A final objective is to review methods currently used to catalog well performance following hydraulic fracturing for the purpose of placing the data in a useable database that can be accessed by users to determine the success of various treatment scenarios.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Michigan regulatory incentives study for electric utilities. Phase 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of Phase I of the Michigan Regulatory Incentives Study for Electric Utilities, a three-phase review of Michigan`s regulatory system and its effects on resource selection by electric utilities. The goal of Phase I is to identify and analyze financial incentive mechanisms that encourage selection of resources in accord with the principles of integrated resource planning (IRP) or least-cost planning (LCP). Subsequent study phases will involve further analysis of options and possibly a collaborative formal effort to propose regulatory changes. The Phase I analysis proceeded in three steps: (1) identification and review of existing regulatory practices that affect utilities; selection of resources, particularly DSM; (2) preliminary analysis of ten financial mechanisms, and selection of three for further study; (3) detailed analysis of the three mechanisms, including consideration of how they could be implemented in Michigan and financial modeling of their likely impacts on utilities and ratepayers.

Reid, M.W.; Weaver, E.M. [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

The doctrine of the nuclear-weapon states and the future of non-proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Less than a year remains before the critical conference in April 1995 to review and extend the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the main international barrier to the proliferation of nuclear weapons. This is a critical moment for the United States. With the end of the Cold War, the likelihood of nuclear war with the states of the former Soviet Union has been radically reduced, but there is greatly increased concern over the potential threats from states or sub-state groups seeking to develop or acquire nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction.

Panofsky, W.K.H.; Bunn, G.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of tetrahydrofuran in mice and rats: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tetrahydrofuran (THF), a four-carbon cyclic ether, is widely used as an industrial solvent. Although it has been used in large quantities for many years, few long-term toxicology studies, and no reproductive or developmental studies, have been conducted on THF. This study addresses the potential for THF to cause developmental toxicity in rodents by exposing Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 600, 1800, or 5000 ppm tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapors, 6 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.33 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6--17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as O dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 27 refs., 6 figs., 23 tabs.

Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

DovERA-65)q---7- Final Report Theoretical Studies of Magnetic Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DovERA-65)q---7- DovERA-65)q---7- Final Report - Theoretical Studies of Magnetic Systems ' L. P. Gor'kov M. A. Novotny J. R. Schrieffer endpoint to the pub lication or Ve have *no o bjection fro g s a patent August 1, 1994 - November 30, 19gssen tination of this materials. l'e altYYQA(A.,-' '-a- 1 0 9 f National High Magnetic Field Labora Florida State University / _,iktiI,,, Fez, of Intellectual 1800 E Paul Dirac Dr. Property Counsel I. During the grant period we have studied five areas of research, 1) low dimensional ferrimagnets, 2) lattice effects in the mixed valence problem, 3) spin compensation in the one dimensional Kondo lattice, 4) the interaction of quasi particles in short coherence length superconductors, and 5) novel effects in angle resolved photoemission spectra from nearly

149

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Market Price Forecast Study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents BPA's market price forecasts for the Final Proposal, which are based on AURORA modeling. AURORA calculates the variable cost of the marginal resource in a competitively priced energy market. In competitive market pricing, the marginal cost of production is equivalent to the market-clearing price. Market-clearing prices are important factors for informing BPA's power rates. AURORA was used as the primary tool for (a) estimating the forward price for the IOU REP Settlement benefits calculation for fiscal years (FY) 2008 and 2009, (b) estimating the uncertainty surrounding DSI payments and IOU REP Settlements benefits, (c) informing the secondary revenue forecast and (d) providing a price input used for the risk analysis. For information about the calculation of the secondary revenues, uncertainty regarding the IOU REP Settlement benefits and DSI payment uncertainty, and the risk run, see Risk Analysis Study WP-07-FS-BPA-04.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Safeguards and nonproliferation aspects of a dry fuel recycling technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory undertook an independent assessment of the proliferation potentials and safeguardability of a dry fuel recycling technology, whereby spent pressurized-water reactor (PWR) fuels are used to fuel canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors. Objectives of this study included (1) the evaluation of presently available technologies that may be useful to safeguard technology options for dry fuel recycling (2) and identification of near-term and long-term research needs to develop process-specific safeguards requirements. The primary conclusion of this assessment is that like all other fuel cycle alternatives proposed in the past, the dry fuel recycle entails prolfferation risks and that there are no absolute technical fixes to eliminate such risks. This study further concludes that the proliferation risks of dry fuel recycling options are relatively minimal and presently known safeguards systems and technologies can be modified and/or adapted to meet the requirements of safeguarding such fuel recycle facilities.

Pillay, K.K.S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Title Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-51101 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Shendell, Derek G., Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, William J. Fisk, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Seung-Min Lee, Douglas P. Sullivan, Michael G. Apte, and Leo I. Rainer Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms - one in each pair - based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

152

Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments and heterogeneity. Final report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A case study approach using Terry Sandstone production from the Hambert-Aristocrat Field, Weld County, Colorado was used to document the process of integration. One specific project goal is to demonstrate how a multidisciplinary approach can be used to detect reservoir compartmentalization and improve reserve estimates. The final project goal is to derive a general strategy for integration for independent operators. Teamwork is the norm for the petroleum industry where teams of geologists, geophysicists, and petroleum engineers work together to improve profits through a better understanding of reservoir size, compartmentalization, and orientation as well as reservoir flow characteristics. In this manner, integration of data narrows the uncertainty in reserve estimates and enhances reservoir management decisions. The process of integration has proven to be iterative. Integration has helped identify reservoir compartmentalization and reduce the uncertainty in the reserve estimates. This research report documents specific examples of integration and the economic benefits of integration.

Van Kirk, C.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Nuclear Nonproliferation,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Wireless Sensing, Sensory Substitution, Multi-rotor Damage Detection, Drill Vibration Reduction, Laser Ultrasonics for Non Destructive Evaluation T y p i c a l P r o j e...

155

Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Primer Prepared for the Blue Ribbon Commission on Americas Nuclear Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To provide a brief overview of key arms control and nonproliferation arrangements for the layperson that may be relevant to the Commission's comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Primer would be published by the Commission and made publicly available, probably as an appendix to a larger Commission report.

Williams, Laura S.

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

A Non-Proliferating Fuel Cycle: No Enrichment, Reprocessing or Accessible Spent Fuel - 12375  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current fuel cycles offer a number of opportunities for access to plutonium, opportunities to create highly enriched uranium and access highly radioactive wastes to create nuclear weapons and 'dirty' bombs. The non-proliferating fuel cycle however eliminates or reduces such opportunities and access by eliminating the mining, milling and enrichment of uranium. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces the production of plutonium per unit of energy created, eliminates reprocessing and the separation of plutonium from the spent fuel and the creation of a stream of high-level waste. It further simplifies the search for land based deep geologic repositories and interim storage sites for spent fuel in the USA by disposing of the spent fuel in deep sub-seabed sediments after storing the spent fuel at U.S. Navy Nuclear Shipyards that have the space and all of the necessary equipment and security already in place. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces transportation risks by utilizing barges for the collection of spent fuel and transport to the Navy shipyards and specially designed ships to take the spent fuel to designated disposal sites at sea and to dispose of them there in deep sub-seabed sediments. Disposal in the sub-seabed sediments practically eliminates human intrusion. Potential disposal sites include Great Meteor East and Southern Nares Abyssal Plain. Such sites then could easily become international disposal sites since they occur in the open ocean. It also reduces the level of human exposure in case of failure because of the large physical and chemical dilution and the elimination of a major pathway to man-seawater is not potable. Of course, the recovery of uranium from sea water and the disposal of spent fuel in sub-seabed sediments must be proven on an industrial scale. All other technologies are already operating on an industrial scale. If externalities, such as reduced terrorist threats, environmental damage (including embedded emissions), long term care, reduced access to 'dirty' bomb materials, the social and political costs of siting new facilities and the psychological impact of no solution to the nuclear waste problem, were taken into account, the costs would be far lower than those of the present fuel cycle. (authors)

Parker, Frank L. [Vanderbilt University (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

FY 93 thermal loading systems study final report: Volume 1. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to meet the overall performance requirements for the proposed Mined Geology Disposal System at Yucca Mountain, Nevada requires the two major subsystem (natural barriers and engineered barriers) to positively contribute to containment and radionuclide isolation. In addition to the postclosure performance the proposed repository must meet preclosure requirements of safety, retrievability, and operability. Cost and schedule were also considered. The thermal loading strategy chosen may significantly affect both the postclosure and preclosure performance of the proposed repository. Although the current Site Characterization Plan reference case is 57 kilowatts (kW)/acre, other thermal loading strategies (different areal mass loadings) have been proposed which possess both advantages and disadvantages. The objectives of the FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study were to (1) place bounds on the thermal loading which would establish the loading regime that is ``too hot`` and the loading regime that is ``too cold``, to (2) ``grade`` or evaluate the performance, as a function of thermal loading, of the repository to contain high level wastes against performance criteria and to (3) evaluate the performance of the various options with respect to cost, safety, and operability. Additionally, the effort was to (4) identify important uncertainties that need to be resolved by tests and/or analyses in order to complete a performance assessment on the effects of thermal loading. The FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study was conducted from December 1, 1992 to December 30, 1993 and this final report provides the findings of the study. Volume 1 contains the Introduction; Performance requirements; Input and assumptions; Near-field thermal analysis; Far-field thermal analysis; Cost analysis; Other considerations; System analysis; Additional thermal analysis; and Conclusions and recommendations. 71 refs., 54 figs.

Saterlie, S.F.; Thomson, B.H.

1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

Final waste forms project: Performance criteria for phase I treatability studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document defines the product performance criteria to be used in Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project. In Phase I, treatability studies will be performed to provide {open_quotes}proof-of-principle{close_quotes} data to establish the viability of stabilization/solidification (S/S) technologies. This information is required by March 1995. In Phase II, further treatability studies, some at the pilot scale, will be performed to provide sufficient data to allow treatment alternatives identified in Phase I to be more fully developed and evaluated, as well as to reduce performance uncertainties for those methods chosen to treat a specific waste. Three main factors influence the development and selection of an optimum waste form formulation and hence affect selection of performance criteria. These factors are regulatory, process-specific, and site-specific waste form standards or requirements. Clearly, the optimum waste form formulation will require consideration of performance criteria constraints from each of the three categories. Phase I will focus only on the regulatory criteria. These criteria may be considered the minimum criteria for an acceptable waste form. In other words, a S/S technology is considered viable only if it meet applicable regulatory criteria. The criteria to be utilized in the Phase I treatability studies were primarily taken from Environmental Protection Agency regulations addressed in 40 CFR 260 through 265 and 268; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations addressed in 10 CFR 61. Thus the majority of the identified criteria are independent of waste form matrix composition (i.e., applicable to cement, glass, organic binders etc.).

Gilliam, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hutchins, D.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chodak, P. III [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Improving the nuclear data base for non-proliferation and homeland security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the technical advances in non-proliferation and homeland security require calculations of transport of neutrons and gamma-rays through materials. The nuclear data base on which these calculations are made must be of high quality in order for the calculated responses to be credible. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, three spallation neutron sources are being used to provide high-quality cross section and structure data with reactions induced by neutrons. Neutron transmission, neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections, neutron emission in fission, and gamma-ray production by neutrons are principal areas of research. Furthermore, these sources are also being used to validate calculations of the characterization and response of new detectors and detection techniques. Current research activities are summarized here.

Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitteker, Leo J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matthew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fotiadis, Nikolaos [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gavron, Avigdor [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Tony S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ronald O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O'donnell, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taddeucci, Terry N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ulmann, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Final Report Phase I Study to Characterize the Market Potential for Non-Motorized Travel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The idea of livable communities suggests that people should have the option to utilize non-motorized travel (NMT), specifically walking and bicycling, to conduct their daily tasks. Forecasting personal travel by walk and bike is necessary as part of regional transportation planning, and requires fine detail not only about individual travel, but also on transportation and neighborhood infrastructure. In an attempt to characterize the 'market' potential for NMT, the Office of Planning, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) funded the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to conduct a study. The objectives of this effort were to identify factors that influence communities to walk and bike and to examine why, or why not, travelers walk and bike in their communities. This study relied on information collected under the 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) as the major source of data, and was supplemented with data from the American Community Survey (ACS), educational survey, health, employment, and others. Initial statistical screening methods were applied to sort through over 400 potential predictor variables, and examined with various measures (e.g., walk trip per person, walk mileage per person, bike trip per person, bike mileage per person) as the dependent variables. The best geographic level of detail used in the modeling for this study was determined to be the Census block group level for walking and Census tract level for biking. The need for additional supplemental private data (i.e., Walk Scores and Nielsen employment data), and geospatial information that reflects land use and physical environments, became evident after an examination of findings from the initial screening models. To be feasible, in terms of costs and time, the geographic scale of the study region was scaled down to nine selected NHTS add-on regions. These regions were chosen based on various criteria including transit availability, population size, and a mix of geographic locations across the nation. Given the similarities in modeling results from walk trips and walk mileages, additional modeling efforts conducted under the later part of this study were focused on walk trips per person. Bike models were limited only with the stepwise logistic models using Census tracts in the selected regions. Due to NHTS sampling limitations, only about 12% of these tracts have bike trips recorded from NHTS sampled households. The modeling with NHTS bike data proved to be more challenging and time consuming than what was anticipated. Along with the late arrival of Nielsen employment data, the project team had to limit the modeling effort to focus on walking. Therefore, the final modeling and discriminant analysis was conducted only for walking trips.

Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [Macrosys; Wilson, Daniel W [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Final cost reduction study for the Geysers Recharge Alternative. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not cost reduction opportunities exist for the Geysers Recharge Alternative as defined in the Santa Rosa Subregional Long-Term Wastewater Project EIR/EIS. The City of Santa Rosa has been directed to have a plan for reclaimed water disposal in place by 1999 which will meet future capacity needs under all weather conditions. A Draft EIR/EIS released in July 1996 and a Final EIR certified in June 1997 examine four primary alternatives plus the No Action Alternative. Two of the primary alternatives involve agricultural irrigation with reclaimed water, either in western or southern Sonoma County. Another involves increased discharge of reclaimed water into the Russian River. The fourth involves using reclaimed water to replenish the geothermal reservoir at the Geysers. The addition of this water source would enable the Geysers operators to produce more steam from the geothermal area and thereby prolong the life and economic production level of the steamfield and the geothermal power plants supplied by the steamfield. This study provides additional refined cost estimates for new scenarios which utilize an alternative pipeline alignment and a range of reclaimed water flows, which deliver less water to the Geysers than proposed in the EIR/EIS (by distributing flow to other project components). Also, electrical power rates were revised to reflect the recent changes in costs associated with deregulation of the power industry. In addition, this report provides information on sources of potential public and private funding available and future environmental documentation required if the cost reduction scenarios were to be selected by the City as part of their preferred alternative.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Nuclear non-proliferation regime effectiveness : an integrated methodology for analyzing highly enriched uranium production scenarios at gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dramatic change in the international security environment after the collapse of the bipolar system has had a negative impact on the effectiveness of the existing nuclear non-proliferation regime. Furthermore, the success ...

Kwak, Taeshin (Taeshin S.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nuclear-powered satellite studies. Final report, October 1, 1978-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress achieved during the period October 1, 1978 to March 31, 1980, on US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-76ET33013.M003 is reported. Discussions of several pertinent aspects are included, e.g., schedule, personnel, and technology developments. The reporting period represents the final 18 months of activities of a project which was designed to provide continuing support in the area of nuclear space power technology. Important results have been obtained and communicated to the scientific community via publications and presentations. Project personnel have participated in point design efforts, a NASA Space Power Committee, and periodically provided support to Department of Energy activities as the need arose. This final report is intended to summarize activities over the life of the project.

Kaplan, M.H.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Downhole steam-generator study. Volume I. Conception and feasibility evaluation. Final report, September 1978-September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility evaluation of a downhole steam generator was performed by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International, under contract to Sandia National Laboratories, from September 1978 to September 1980. The study was conducted in four phases: (1) selection of a preliminary system design, (2) parametric analysis of the selected system, (3) experimental studies to demonstrate feasibility and develop design data, and (4) development of a final system design based on the parametric and experimental results. The feasibility of a low pressure combustion, indirect contact, downhole steam generator system was demonstrated. Key results from all phases of the study are presented herein.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Precision Studies of Hadronic and Electro-Weak Interactions for Collider Physics. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was directed toward developing precision computational tools for proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, focusing primarily on electroweak boson production and electroweak radiative corrections. The programs developed under this project carried the name HERWIRI, for High Energy Radiation With Infra-Red Improvements, and are the first steps in an ongoing program to develop a set of hadronic event generators based on combined QCD and QED exponentiation. HERWIRI1 applied these improvements to the hadronic shower, while HERWIRI2 will apply the electroweak corrections from the program KKMC developed for electron-positron scattering to a hadronic event generator, including exponentiated initial and final state radiation together with first-order electroweak corrections to the hard process. Some progress was also made on developing differential reduction techniques for hypergeometric functions, for application to the computation of Feynman diagrams.

Yost, Scott A [The Citadel, Charleston, SC (United States)] [The Citadel, Charleston, SC (United States)

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, the relationship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is the most important international security arrangement that we have that is protecting the world community and this has been true for many years. But it did not happen by accident, it is a strategic bargain in which 184 states gave up the right forever to acquire the most powerful weapon ever created in exchange for a commitment from the five states allowed to keep nuclear weapons under the NPT (U.S., U.K., Russia, France and China), to share peaceful nuclear technology and to engage in disarmament negotiations aimed at the ultimate elimination of their nuclear stockpiles. The most important part of this is the comprehensive nuclear test ban (CTBT); the thinking by the 184 NPT non-nuclear weapon states was and is that they understand that the elimination of nuclear weapon stockpiles is a long way off, but at least the NPT nuclear weapon states could stop testing the weapons. The CTBT has been ratified by 161 states but by its terms it can only come into force if 44 nuclear potential states ratify; 36 have of the 44 have ratified it, the remaining eight include the United States and seven others, most of whom are in effect waiting for the United States. No state has tested a nuclear weapon-except for complete outlier North Korea-in 15 years. There appears to be no chance that the U.S. Senate will approve the CTBT for ratification in the foreseeable future, but the NPT may not survive without it. Perhaps it is time to consider an interim measure, for the UN Security Council to declare that any future nuclear weapon test any time, anywhere is a 'threat to peace and security', in effect a violation of international law, which in today's world it clearly would be.

Graham, Thomas Jr. [7609 Glenbrook Rd., Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

167

Advanced turbine systems sensors and controls needs assessment study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed an assessment of the sensors and controls needs for land-based advanced gas turbines being designed as a part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program for both utility and industrial applications. The assessment included visits to five turbine manufacturers. During these visits, in-depth discussions were held with design and manufacturing staff to obtain their views regarding the need for new sensors and controls for their advanced turbine designs. The Unsteady Combustion Facilities at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center was visited to assess the need for new sensors for gas turbine combustion research. Finally, a workshop was conducted at the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center which provided a forum for industry, laboratory, and university engineers to discuss and prioritize sensor and control needs. The assessment identified more than 50 different measurement, control, and monitoring needs for advanced turbines that cannot currently be met from commercial sources. While all the identified needs are important, some are absolutely critical to the success of the ATS Program.

Anderson, R.L.; Fry, D.N.; McEvers, J.A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Organic tanks safety program waste aging studies. Final report, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive byproducts and contaminated process chemicals that are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of saltcakes, metal oxide sludges, and aqueous brine solutions. Tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes might be at risk for fuel-nitrate combustion accidents. This project started in fiscal year 1993 to provide information on the chemical fate of stored organic wastes. While historical records had identified the organic compounds originally purchased and potentially present in wastes, aging experiments were needed to identify the probable degradation products and evaluate the current hazard. The determination of the rates and pathways of degradation have facilitated prediction of how the hazard changes with time and altered storage conditions. Also, the work with aged simulated waste contributed to the development of analytical methods for characterizing actual wastes. Finally, the results for simulants provide a baseline for comparing and interpreting tank characterization data.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C. [and others

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Load Resource Study and Documentation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Load Resource Study (Study) represents the compilation of the load and contract obligations, contact purchases, and resource data necessary for developing BPA's wholesale power rates. The results of this Study are used to: (1) provide data to determine resource costs for the Revenue Requirement Study, WP-07-FS-BPA-02; (2) provide data to derive billing determinants for the revenue forecast in the Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS), WP-07-FS-BPA-05; (3) provide load and resource data for use in the Risk Analysis Study, WP-07-FS-BPA-04; and (4) provide regional hydro data for use in the secondary revenue forecast for the Market Price Forecast Study, WP-07-FS-BPA-03. This Study provides a synopsis of BPA's load resource analyses. This Study illustrates how each component is completed, how components relate to each other, and how each component fits into the rate development process. Details and results supporting this Study are contained in the Load Resource Study Documentation, WP-07-FS-BPA-01A.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Accelerator research studies. Final report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy is currently in the third year of its three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: Task A -- Study of the transport and longitudinal compression of intense, high-brightness beams; Task B -- Study of high-brightness beam generation in pseudospark devices; Task C -- Study of a gyroklystron high-power microwave source for linear colliders. The research for each task is detailed in this report.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

district heating concepts, and one school space heating study.Figures 1 and 2 show examples of direct applications of geothermal

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 -- issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 -- issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study -- drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Feasibility study of an AFBC power plant at Mae Moh. Final report. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mae Moh AFBC Feasibility Study investigates the addition of a lignite fueled Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) power generating plant to the Mae Moh complex. The study finds the AFBC plant to be technically feasible, environmentally acceptable, and economically attractive.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Microsoft Word - Final Private Wires Study 1-12-09clean .doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Study of the Effect of Private Wire Laws on Development of Combined Heat and Power Facilities Study of the Effect of Private Wire Laws on Development of Combined Heat and Power Facilities STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES Pursuant to Section 1308 of The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Navigant Consulting, Inc. Suite 500 1801 K Street, NW Washington, DC 20006 202.481.7534 www.navigantconsulting.com January 12, 2009 Study of the Effect of Private Wire Laws on Development of Combined Heat and Power Facilities Page i STATUTORY REQUIREMENT Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 SEC. 1308. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES.

176

Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

Studies of Particulates and Structural Transformations in Glass Using Synchrotron Radiation. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial study on nanoparticles of magnetite was carried out in an epoxy matrix. The formation of agglomerates of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied by mu-XRF, magnetic, TEM and SEM techniques. Because of the elevated viscosity of epoxy resin and its effect on particle agglomeration, this study was extended using less viscous polyvinyl alcohol and some sol gels as a matrix. Unlike the results found in epoxy resin, spherical agglomerates were found in a PVA matrix even at Fe3O4 concentration of up to 50%.

Thorpe, Arthur

2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

178

Dual fuel study for the Liepaja Thermal Power Plant. Final report. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study, conducted by Burns and Roe Company, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report presents the results of engineering studies performed for Latvenergo-the National Electric Utility of Latvia. The work performed is a supplement to a previous study, completed in January, 1994, that defined the basic plant design and site selection for the 300 MW coal-fired plant. The current study expands on the previous work in two main areas; the technical and economic feasibility of integrating natural gas firing technologies into the plant design, and aspects of additional plant site not previously considered. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Introduction; (2) Technical and Economic Aspects of Plant Design For Dual Capability; (3) Assessment of Natural Gas Supplies; (4) Evaluation of Candidate Sites. Appendices A-C follows.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

City of Vineland, New Jersey district heating/cooling feasibility study: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assesses the available heat load, determines the available heat from the heat sources, develops a distribution network, develops a system implementation plan, assesses the environmental impacts, addresses institutional issues, and analyzes the economics of the conceptual system.

Not Available

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

West Virginia Diesel Study, CRADA MC96-034, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global objective of the recently completed Phase 1 of the West Virginia Diesel Study, at West Virginia University, was to evaluate mass emission rates of exhaust emissions from diesel powered equipment specified by the West Virginia Diesel Equipment Commission. The experimental data generated in this study has been utilized by the West Virginia Diesel Equipment Commission to promulgate initial rules, requirements and standards governing the operation of diesel equipment in underground coal mines.

M. Gautam

1998-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Beam-Dynamics Studies and Advanced Accelerator Research at CTF-3 Compact Final Focus, Laser Compton Scattering, Plasmas, etc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preliminary investigations are summarized on the possible use of the CTF3 facility for extended beam-dynamics studies and advanced accelerator R&D, which would exploit its unique properties and beam availability. The key element of these considerations is the possible addition of a test beam-delivery system comprising a compact final focus and advanced collimation concepts, scaled from 3 TeV down to low energy and having a short total length. Operational experience, verification of critical questions (octupole tail folding, beam halo transport, etc.), diagnostics (e.g., rf BPMs) and stabilization could all be explored in such a facility, which would benefit not only the CLIC study, but all linear collider projects. Another interesting application would be the study of plasma-beam interaction, which may include plasma focusing, plasma acceleration, ion-channel radiation, and plasma wigglers.

Assmann, R W; Burkhardt, H; Corsini, R; Faus-Golfe, A; Gronberg, J; Redaelli, S; Schulte, Daniel; Velasco, M; Zimmermann, Frank

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Joint HVAC Transmission EMF Environmental Study : Final Report on Experiment 1.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the rationale, procedures, and results of a carefully controlled study conducted to establish whether chronic exposure of female (ewe) Suffolk lambs to the environment of a 500-kV 60-Hz transmission line would affect various characteristics of growth, endocrine function, and reproductive development. This experiment used identical housing and management schemes for control and line-exposed ewes, thus minimizing these factors as contributors to between-group experimental error. Further, throughout the 10-month duration of this study, changes in electric and magnetic fields, audible noise, and weather conditions were monitored continuously by a computerized system. Such measurements provided the opportunity to identify any relationship between environmental factors and biological responses. Because of reports in the literature that electric and magnetic fields alter concentrations of melatonin in laboratory animals, the primary objective of this study was to ascertain whether a similar effect occurs in lambs exposed to a 500-kV a-c line in a natural setting. In addition, onset of puberty, changes in body weight, wool growth, and behavior were monitored. To determine whether the environment of a 500-kV line caused stress in the study animals, serum levels of cortisol were measured. The study was conducted at Bonneville Power Administration`s Ostrander Substation near Estacada, Oregon.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Oregon Regional Primate Research Center

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Microsoft Word - Transcript_Pre-2009 Congestion Study_Oklahoma City_final.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18/2008 18/2008 Oklahoma City, OK Page 1 U.S. Department of Energy Pre-Congestion Study Regional Workshops for the 2009 National Electric Congestion Study Oklahoma City, OK June 18, 2008 1:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Transcript David Meyer: Well, good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to DOE's second workshop in relation to our upcoming 2009 congestion study. Before we get into the substance of the workshop, I'd like to turn the microphone over to Bob Anthony, Commissioner Bob Anthony from Oklahoma, who is our gracious host here today. He has some remarks. Bob Anthony: Thank you very much. Welcome to Oklahoma. We're glad the sun is shining, it's a great day, and we appreciate especially this important workshop being held here in Oklahoma City. It's book-ended against the Annual Meeting of the Mid-America Regulatory

184

Insider adversary study for the Office of Safeguards and Security: US Department of Energy. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides the Department of Energy (DOE) with a comprehensive description of insider adversary activity at its nuclear facilities and those nuclear facilities operated for DOE by its contractors. The description is based on DOE's violation records from 1965 to 1982. Files were reviewed and data were collected from DOE Headquarters, field offices, and selected laboratory and contractor records. The quality and completeness of the study's data are somewhat limited due to inconsistencies in the organization, content, and availability of Headquarters and field office case reports. File organization and retention periods as well as reporting standards vary among DOE offices, facilities, and contractors. The range of crime reviewed was extensive and included major as well as minor levels of crimes. The criterion used for inclusion of crimes in this study was that they were committed by an insider who exhibited wrongful intent in the commission of the crime.

Sutton, R.H.

1983-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Theoretical Studies of Low Frequency Instabilities in the Ionosphere. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the current project is to provide a theoretical basis for better understanding of numerous radar and rocket observations of density irregularities and related effects in the lower equatorial and high-latitude ionospheres. The research focused on: (1) continuing efforts to develop a theory of nonlinear saturation of the Farley-Buneman instability; (2) revision of the kinetic theory of electron-thermal instability at low altitudes; (3) studying the effects of strong anomalous electron heating in the high-latitude electrojet; (4) analytical and numerical studies of the combined Farley-Bunemadion-thermal instabilities in the E-region ionosphere; (5) studying the effect of dust charging in Polar Mesospheric Clouds. Revision of the kinetic theory of electron thermal instability at low altitudes.

Dimant, Y. S.

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

186

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Risk Analysis Study Documentation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RiskMod Model is comprised of a set of risk simulation models, collectively referred to as RiskSim; a set of computer programs that manages data referred to as Data Management Procedures; and RevSim, a model that calculates net revenues. RiskMod interacts with the AURORA Model, the RAM2007, and the ToolKit Model during the process of performing the Risk Analysis Study. AURORA is the computer model being used to perform the Market Price Forecast Study (see Market Price Forecast Study, WP-07-FS-BPA-03); the RAM2007 is the computer model being used to calculate rates (see Wholesale Power Rate Development Study, WP-07-FS-BPA-05); and the ToolKit is the computer model being used to develop the risk mitigation package that achieves BPA's 92.6 percent TPP standard (see Section 3 in the Risk Analysis Study, WP-07-FS-BPA-04). Variations in monthly loads, resources, natural gas prices, forward market electricity prices, transmission expenses, and aluminum smelter benefit payments are simulated in RiskSim. Monthly spot market electricity prices for the simulated loads, resources, and natural gas prices are estimated by the AURORA Model. Data Management Procedures facilitate the format and movement of data that flow to and/or from RiskSim, AURORA, and RevSim. RevSim estimates net revenues using risk data from RiskSim, spot market electricity prices from AURORA, loads and resources data from the Load Resource Study, WP-07-FS-BPA-01, various revenues from the Revenue Forecast component of the Wholesale Power Rate Development Study, WP-07-FSBPA-05, and rates and expenses from the RAM2007. Annual average surplus energy revenues, purchased power expenses, and section 4(h)(10)(C) credits calculated by RevSim are used in the Revenue Forecast and the RAM2007. Heavy Load Hour (HLH) and Light Load Hour (LLH) surplus and deficit energy values from RevSim are used in the Transmission Expense Risk Model. Net revenues estimated for each simulation by RevSim are input into the ToolKit Model to develop the risk mitigation package that achieves BPA's 92.6 percent TPP standard. The processes and interaction between each of the models and studies are depicted in Graph 1.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Study of Isospin Correlation in High Energy Heavy Ion Interactions with the RHIC PHENIX. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the research work performed under the support of the DOE research grant E-FG02-97ER4108. The work is composed of three parts: (1) Visual analysis and quality control of the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) of the PHENIX experiments carried out of Brookhaven National Laboratory. (2) Continuation of the data analysis of the EMU05/09/16 experiments for the study of the inclusive particle production spectra and multi-particle correlation. (3) Exploration of a new statistical means to study very high-multiplicity of nuclear-particle ensembles and its perspectives to apply to the higher energy experiments.

Takahashi, Y.

2003-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Unaccounted-for gas project. Measurement Task Force (orifice meter studies). Volume 2B. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. Activities and methods are described and results are presented for research conducted on orifice meter accuracy. The Measurement Task Force determined that orifice metering inaccuracies were the largest single contributor to 1987 UAF.

Godkin, B.J.; Robertson, J.D.; Wlasenko, R.G.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Institute for Fusion Studies, Final Technical Report, December 1, 1995 - February 29, 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 2001-2003 grant period, Institute for Fusion Studies (IFS) scientist made notable progress in a number of research areas. This report summarizes the work that has been accomplished in the following areas: (1) Magnetohydrodynamics; (2) Burning plasma and energetic particle physics; (3) Turbulent transport; (4) Computational physics; (5) Fundamental Theory; (6) Innovative confinement concepts; and (7) Plasma applications.

Dr. James Van Dam

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

Study of the feasibility and desirability of using motor fuel dyes and markers. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study includes a review of experience with the use of dyes and markers, an assessment of the benefits and costs associated with implementing a nationwide standard of motor fuel dyes and markers, and an evaluation of alternative means to achieve similar benefits in consumer fraud prevention and motor fuel tax enforcement.

NONE

1993-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

Inertial Fusion Energy reactor design studies: Prometheus-L, Prometheus-H. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a review of design studies for Inertial Confinement reactor. This second of three volumes discussions is some detail the following: Objectives, requirements, and assumptions; rationale for design option selection; key technical issues and R&D requirements; and conceptual design selection and description.

Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Lee, V.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Study of tau decays to four-hadron final states with kaons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rare tau lepton decays to four explicitly identified hadrons have been studied with the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring using (7.56 +/- 0.15) fb(-1) of data collected near root s=10.58 GeV. The first statistically significant...

Besson, David Zeke

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Molecular Beam and Surface Science Studies of Heterogeneous Reaction Kinetics Including Combustion Dynamics. Final Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program examined the heterogeneous reaction kinetics and reaction dynamics of surface chemical processes which are of direct relevance to efficient energy production, condensed phase reactions, and mateials growth including nanoscience objectives. We have had several notable scientific and technical successes. Illustrative highlights include: (1) a thorough study of how one can efficiently produce synthesis gas (SynGas) at relatively low Rh(111) catalyst temperatures via the reaction CH{sub4}+1/2 O{sub2} {r_arrow} CO+2H{sub2}. In these studies methane activation is accomplished utilizing high-kinetic energy reagents generated via supersonic molecular beams, (2) experiments which have incisively probed the partial oxidation chemistry of adsorbed 1- and 2- butene on Rh and ice, as well as partial oxidation of propene on Au; (3) investigation of structural changes which occur to the reconstructed (23x{radical}3)-Au(111) surface upon exposure to atomic oxygen, (4) a combined experimental and theoretical examination of the fundamental atomic-level rules which govern defect minimization during the formation of self-organizing stepped nanostructures, (5) the use of these relatively defect-free nanotemplates for growing silicon nanowires having atomically-dimensioned widths, (6) a combined scanning probe and atomic beam scattering study of how the presence of self-assembling organic overlayers interact with metallic supports substrates - this work hs led to revision of the currently held view of how such adsorbates reconfigure surface structure at the atomic level, (7) an inelastic He atom scattering study in which we examined the effect of chain length on the low-energy vibrations of alkanethiol striped phase self-assembled monolayers on Au(111), yielding information on the forces that govern interfacial self-assembly, (8) a study of the vibrational properties of disordered films of SF{sub6} adsorbed on Au(111), and (9) a study of the activated chemistry and photochemistry of NO on NiO/Ni. Innovative STM and molecular beam instrumentation has been fabricated to enable this program.

Sibener, S. J.

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

194

Validation studies of the DOE-2 Building Energy Simulation Program. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents many of the validation studies (Table 1) of the DOE-2 building energy analysis simulation program that have taken place since 1981. Results for several versions of the program are presented with the most recent study conducted in 1996 on version DOE-2.1E and the most distant study conducted in 1981 on version DOE-1.3. This work is part of an effort related to continued development of DOE-2, particularly in its use as a simulation engine for new specialized versions of the program such as the recently released RESFEN 3.1. RESFEN 3.1 is a program specifically dealing with analyzing the energy performance of windows in residential buildings. The intent in providing the results of these validation studies is to give potential users of the program a high degree of confidence in the calculated results. Validation studies in which calculated simulation data is compared to measured data have been conducted throughout the development of the DOE-2 program. Discrepancies discovered during the course of such work has resulted in improvements in the simulation algorithms. Table 2 provides a listing of additions and modifications that have been made to various versions of the program since version DOE-2.1A. One of the most significant recent changes in the program occurred with version DOE-2.1E. An improved algorithm for calculating the outside surface film coefficient was implemented. In addition, integration of the WINDOW 4 program was accomplished resulting in improved ability in analyzing window energy performance. Validation and verification of a program as sophisticated as DOE-2 must necessarily be limited because of the approximations inherent in the program. For example, the most accurate model of the heat transfer processes in a building would include a three-dimensional analysis. To justify such detailed algorithmic procedures would correspondingly require detailed information describing the building and/or HVAC system and energy plant parameters. Until building simulation programs can get this data directly from CAD programs, such detail would negate the usefulness of the program for the practicing engineers and architects who currently use the program. In addition, the validation studies discussed herein indicate that such detail is really unnecessary. The comparison of calculated and measured quantities have resulted in a satisfactory level of confidence that is sufficient for continued use of the DOE-2 program. However, additional validation is warranted, particularly at the component level, to further improve the program.

Sullivan, R.; Winkelmann, F.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Report of a workshop on nuclear forces and nonproliferation Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars, Washington, DC October 28, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars was held at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC, on October 28, 2010. The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review and the 2010 NPT Review Conference. The discussions reflected the importance of the NPR for defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21st century threats and providing guidance for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Department of Defense (DoD) programs and, for many but not all participants, highlighted its role in the successful outcome of the NPT RevCon. There was widespread support for the NPR and its role in developing the foundations for a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. However, some participants raised concerns about its implementation and its long-term effectiveness and sustainability.

Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

NMR and optical studies of piezoelectric polymers. Final performance report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The piezoelectric liquid crystal mixtures ZLI-2861, E7, and the copolymers of vinylidene fluoride are investigated with a variety of instrumental techniques including optical studies, nuclear magnetic resonance, and neutron scattering/diffraction. A unique AC thermal diffusivity apparatus was built to determine the specific heat and thermal conductivity of the liquid crystals. Included is an elastic and surface hypothesis for droplets of the liquid crystals. Statistical mechanics, such as the Monte Carlo method, determined that the electrically active polymers showed no percolation transition and that electrical forces play a dominant role in determining chain conformations. A molecular dynamics simulation of PVF{sub 2} studied vibration spectrum, relaxation, and response to a switching field.

Schmidt, V.H.; Tuthill, G.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics of ash deposition on utility boilers have been studied. A heated tube furnace system was used in the study. Areas of consideration in the deposition mechanics were: close space knowledge of chemical composition and distribution of inorganic constituents in coal, transformations and reactions of the inorganic constituents in the flame, ash transport mechanisms, initial adhesion of ash particles to heat transfer surfaces and subsequently to each other to form a deposit, and further interactions of the deposited ash to grow a strong deposit. Interactions of deposited ash that cause changes in physical and chemical properties in an aged deposit are due to processes such as sintering, chemical reactions, and melting. The degree of these changes increases as the deposit grows from the heat transfer surfaces where it forms. All of these changes during the deposit formation process are coal-specific and are strongly dependent on the boiler configuration and operating conditions. 18 refs., 55 figs., 42 tabs.

Austin, L.G.; Benson, S.; Rabinovich, A.; Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Schobert H.H.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Final report for the field-reversed configuration power plant critical-issue scoping study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research in which a team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed a scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis of deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core.

Santarius, John F.; Mogahed, Elsayed A.; Emmert, Gilbert A.; Khater, Hesham Y.; Nguyen, Canh N.; Ryzhkov, Sergei V.; Stubna, Michael D.; Steinhauer, Loren C.; Miley, George H.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNCs technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clarks Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clarks Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

Vaught, Douglas J.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

III-antimonide/nitride based semiconductors for optoelectronic materials and device studies : LDRD 26518 final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this LDRD was to investigate III-antimonide/nitride based materials for unique semiconductor properties and applications. Previous to this study, lack of basic information concerning these alloys restricted their use in semiconductor devices. Long wavelength emission on GaAs substrates is of critical importance to telecommunication applications for cost reduction and integration into microsystems. Currently InGaAsN, on a GaAs substrate, is being commercially pursued for the important 1.3 micrometer dispersion minima of silica-glass optical fiber; due, in large part, to previous research at Sandia National Laboratories. However, InGaAsN has not shown great promise for 1.55 micrometer emission which is the low-loss window of single mode optical fiber used in transatlantic fiber. Other important applications for the antimonide/nitride based materials include the base junction of an HBT to reduce the operating voltage which is important for wireless communication links, and for improving the efficiency of a multijunction solar cell. We have undertaken the first comprehensive theoretical, experimental and device study of this material with promising results. Theoretical modeling has identified GaAsSbN to be a similar or potentially superior candidate to InGaAsN for long wavelength emission on GaAs. We have confirmed these predictions by producing emission out to 1.66 micrometers and have achieved edge emitting and VCSEL electroluminescence at 1.3 micrometers. We have also done the first study of the transport properties of this material including mobility, electron/hole mass, and exciton reduced mass. This study has increased the understanding of the III-antimonide/nitride materials enough to warrant consideration for all of the target device applications.

Kurtz, Steven Ross; Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Modine, Normand Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Jones, Eric Daniel; Cich, Michael Joseph; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Peake, Gregory Merwin

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Parametric sensitivity study for solar-assisted heat-pump systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sensitivity study is performed of the engineering and economic parameters affecting life-cycle costs for solar-assisted heat pump systems. The change in energy usage resulting from each engineering parameter varied has been developed from computer simulations, and is compared with results from a stand-alone heat pump system. Three geographical locations are considered: Washington, DC, Fort Worth, TX, and Madison, WI. Results indicate that most engineering changes to the systems studied do not provide significant energy savings. The most promising parameters to vary are the solar collector parameters tau ..cap alpha.. and U/sub L/ the heat pump capactiy at design point, and the minimum utilizable evaporator temperature. Costs associated with each change are estimated, and life-cycle costs computed for both engineering parameters and economic variations in interest rate, discount rate, tax credits, fuel unit costs and fuel inflation rates. Results indicate that none of the feasible engineering changes for the system configuration studied will make these systems economically competitive with the stand-alone heat pump without a considerable tax credit.

White, N.M.; Morehouse, J.H.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Inertial confinement fusion research and development studies. Final report, October 1979-August 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research and development studies were selected for structural, thermal, and vacuum pumping analyses in support of the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) concept development. An additional task provided an outlined program plan for an ICF Engineering Test Facility, using the HYLIFE concept as a model, although the plan is generally applicable to other ICF concepts. The HYLIFE is one promising type of ICF concept which features a falling array of liquid lithium jets. These jets surround the fusion reaction to protect the first structural wall (FSW) of the vacuum chamber by absorbing the fusion energy, and to act as the tritium breeder. The fusion energy source is a deuterium-tritium pellet injected into the chamber every second and driven by laser or heavy ion beams. The studies performed by Grumman have considered the capabilities of specific HYLIFE features to meet life requirements and the requirement to recover to preshot conditions prior to each subsequent shot. The components under investigation were the FSW which restrains the outward motion of the liquid lithium, the nozzle plate which forms the falling jet array, the graphite shield which is in direct top view of the fusion pellet, and the vacuum pumping system. The FSW studies included structural analysis, and definition of an experimental program to validate computer codes describing lithium motion and the resulting impact on the wall.

Bullis, R.; Finkelman, M.; Leng, J.; Luzzi, T.; Ojalvo, I.; Powell, E.; Sedgley, D.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Reduced gas pressure operation of sludge digesters: Expanded studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous investigations strongly suggested that the municipal anaerobic sludge digestion process could be enhanced by reactor operation with subatmospheric headspace pressures. Enhanced solids destruction and methane production along with increased process stability were observed in these earlier studies. However, due to the small scale of the anaerobic reactors used ( {approx}1.5 L), definitive steady-state measurements could not be obtained. These expanded studies were undertaken to verify and define the magnitude of the benefits that might be obtained with vacuum operation of sludge digesters. Four reactors ({approx}15.0 L) were fed municipal sludge at three different organic loading rates while being maintained with a 15-day solids retention time. One reactor had a constant headspace pressure of 1.02 atm; a second was maintained at 0.75 atm; and the remaining two reactors were operated for the majority of the day at 1.02 atm, and for part of the day with a 0.75 atm headspace pressure. Additional small-scale, batch experiments were performed to help identify controlling digestion mechanisms. The results of these expanded studies indicate that vacuum operation did not yield significant advantages over the organic loading range investigated (0.088 to 0.352 lb VSS/ft{sup 3}{center_dot}d).

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

UA/ORNL Collaboration: Neutron Scattering Studies of Antiferromagnetic Films, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported here was a collaborative project between the research groups of Dr. J.L. Robertson at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Dr. G.J. Mankey at the University of Alabama. The main thrust is developing neutron optical devices and materials for the study of magnetic thin films and interfaces. The project is particularly timely, since facility upgrades are currently underway at the High Flux Isotope Reactor. A new neutron optical device, a multicrystal analyzer, was designed and built to take maximum advantage of the increased flux that the upgraded beamlines at HFIR will provide. This will make possible detailed studies of the magnetic structure of thin films, multilayers, and interfaces that are not feasible at present. We performed studies of the antiferromagnetic order in thin films and crystals using neutron scattering, determined magnetic structures at interfaces with neutron reflectometry and measured order in magnetic dispersions using small angle neutron scattering. The collaboration has proved fruitful: generating eleven publications, contributing to the training of a postdoc who is now on staff at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and providing the primary support for two recent Ph.D. recipients. The collaboration is still vibrant, with anticipated implementation of the multicrystal analyzer on one of the new cold source beamlines at the High Flux Isotope Reactor.

Mankey, Gary J.

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

Water Conservation Study for Manastash Creek Water Users, Kittias County, Washington, Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manastash Creek is tributary of the Yakima River and is located southwest and across the Yakima River from the City of Ellensburg. The creek drains mountainous terrain that ranges in elevation from 2,000 feet to over 5,500 feet and is primarily snowmelt fed, with largest flows occurring in spring and early summer. The creek flows through a narrow canyon until reaching a large, open plain that slopes gently toward the Yakima River and enters the main stem of the Yakima River at river mile 154.5. This area, formed by the alluvial fan of the Creek as it leaves the canyon, is the subject of this study. The area is presently dominated by irrigated agriculture, but development pressures are evident as Ellensburg grows and develops as an urban center. Since the mid to late nineteenth century when irrigated agriculture was established in a significant manner in the Yakima River Basin, Manastash Creek has been used to supply irrigation water for farming in the area. Adjudicated water rights dating back to 1871 for 4,465 acres adjacent to Manastash Creek allow appropriation of up to 26,273 acre-feet of creek water for agricultural irrigation and stock water. The diversion of water from Manastash Creek for irrigation has created two main problems for fisheries. They are low flows or dewatered reaches of Manastash Creek and fish passage barriers at the irrigation diversion dams. The primary goal of this study, as expressed by Yakama Nation and BPA, is to reestablish safe access in tributaries of the Yakima River by removing physical barriers and unscreened diversions and by adding instream flow where needed for fisheries. The goal expressed by irrigators who would be affected by these projects is to support sustainable and profitable agricultural use of land that currently uses Manastash Creek water for irrigation. This study provides preliminary costs and recommendations for a range of alternative projects that will partially or fully meet the goal of establishing safe access for fisheries in Manastash Creek by reducing or eliminating diversions and eliminating fish passage barriers. Further study and design will be necessary to more fully develop the alternatives, evaluate their environmental benefits and impacts and determine the effect on Manastash Creek water users. Those studies will be needed to determine which alternative has the best combination of benefits and costs, and meets the goal of the Manastash Creek water users.

Montgomery Watson Harza (Firm)

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Two studies of nonlinear processes in irreversible thermodynamics. Final report, May 1, 1989--April 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigation dealt with two lines of research into two well-defined problems of engineering science: a study of two-phase flow and of nonelastic deformations in structural solids. Both topics fall into the broad field of nonlinear irreversible processes. The study of two-phase flow resulted in a complete topological analysis of the canonical mathematical model of one-dimensional flow of a mixture of two phases, now predominantly used in industry, especially the nuclear industry. The topological analysis is confronted with the practice of discretizing the analytic model for the purpose of formulating a numerical computer code. It is shown that in the presence of singular points in the phase space of the differential equations of the model there occur spurious numerical solutions. Such solutions may contain segments which are correct approximations to the exact trajectory, but always include branches which are totally false and misleading. The topological method allows the operator to formulate a subroutine which eliminates spurious solutions. The study of inelastic deformations, i.e., of irreversible processes in structural solids provided a consistent presentation of the local-state approximation erroneously called the method of local equilibrium in the literature. The key concept which impedes the correct use of thermodynamics in this field is the definition of a measurable entropy of a nonequilibrium state. The local state approximation solves this problem by assigning to a nonequilibrium state n the entropy of the accompanying equilibrium state e. The two states, n and e, are linked by having the same values of a specified set of extensive properties. The same principle settles the comparison between the intensive properties of n and e, which are different.

Kestin, J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

DOE plutonium disposition study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document Volume 2, provides a discussion of: Plutonium Fuel Cycle; Technology Needs; Regulatory Considerations; Cost and Schedule Estimates; and Deployment Strategy.

Not Available

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

STUDY OF THE STABILITY OF PARTICLE MOTION IN STORAGE RINGS. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this period, our research was concentrated on the study of beam-beam effects in large storage-ring colliders and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect in light sources. Our group was involved in and made significant contribution to several international accelerator projects such as the US-LHC project for the design of the LHC interaction regions, the luminosity upgrade of Tevatron and HERA, the design of eRHIC, and the U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) for the future LHC luminosity upgrade.

Jack J. Shi

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

210

Optimization and implementation study of plutonium disposition using existing CANDU Reactors. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since early 1994, the Department of Energy has been sponsoring studies aimed at evaluating the merits of disposing of surplus US weapons plutonium as Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in existing commercial Canadian Pressurized Heavy Water reactors, known as CANDU`s. The first report, submitted to DOE in July, 1994 (the 1994 Executive Summary is attached), identified practical and safe options for the consumption of 50 to 100 tons of plutonium in 25 years in some of the existing CANDU reactors operating the Bruce A generating station, on Lake Huron, about 300 km north east of Detroit. By designing the fuel and nuclear performance to operate within existing experience and operating/performance envelope, and by utilizing existing fuel fabrication and transportation facilities and methods, a low cost, low risk method for long term plutonium disposition was developed. In December, 1995, in response to evolving Mission Requirements, the DOE requested a further study of the CANDU option with emphasis on more rapid disposition of the plutonium, and retaining the early start and low risk features of the earlier work. This report is the result of that additional work.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games event study, 1996. Final report, July 1996--August 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atlanta metropolitan region was the location of one of the most ambitious Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) deployments in the United States. This deployment included several individual projects--a Central Transportation Management Center (TMC), six Traffic Control Centers (TCCs), one Transit Information Center (TIC), The Travel Information Showcase (TIS), and the extension of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) Rail network and the new high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-85 and I-75. The 1996 Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games and Paralympic Games created a focus for these projects. All of these systems were to be brought on-line in time for the Olympic Games. This report presents the findings of the 1996 Olympic and Paralympic Games Events Study--a compilation of findings of system performance, the benefits realized, and the lessons learned during their operations over the event period. The study assessed the performance of the various Travel Demand Management (TDM) plans employed for Olympic Games traffic management.

Amodei, R.; Bard, E.; Brong, B.; Cahoon, F.; Jasper, K.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Transient failure of zircaloy cladding: State-of-the-art study and model development: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A state of the art study of transient failure of zircaloy reveals that a wide range of failure models exist, and their use in fuel analysis depends upon the type of application. Licensing analyses, for example, employ highly simplified criteria that depict cladding rupture in terms of a single response variable, usually the nominal circumferential stress, as function of temperature; while fuel behavior analyses use more detailed models with varying levels of sophistication. Some of these models, however, are ill-suited for detailed fuel rod analysis computer codes because of their dependence on case-specific parameters; others are limited in their utility because of inherent deficiencies in their theoretical treatment of the phenomena involved. Based on this study, a new zircaloy transient failure model is developed that takes account of the important variables involved in transient phenomena, namely, heating rate, strain rate, temperature, true stress, true strain, and prior condition of the cladding material. The model is particularly suited for detailed fuel rod analysis and thus was implemented in the FREY code.

Rashid, Y.R.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

District Heating and Cooling feasibility study, Salt Lake City, Utah: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following is a general description of the Burns and Roe study of District Heating and Cooling Feasibility for Salt Lake City, Utah. The study assesses District Heating and Cooling (DHC) and develops a conceptual district system for Salt Lake City. In assessing District Heating and Cooling in Salt Lake City, the system conceived is evaluated to determine whether it is technically and economically viable. To determine technical viability, aspects such as implementation, pipe routing, and environmental restrictions are reviewed to foresee any technical problems that would arise as a result of DHC. To determine economic feasibility, the conceived system is priced to determine the capital cost to construct, and modeled in an economic analysis using anticipated operating and fuel costs to produce the required revenue necessary to run the system. Technical and Economic feasibility are predicated on many variables, including heating and cooling load, pipe routing, system implementation, and fuel costs. These variables have been investigated and demonstrate a substantial potential for DHC in Salt Lake City. Areas of consideration include the Downtown Area, Metropolitan Hall of Justice and surrounding area, and the Hotel District.

Not Available

1988-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

District Heating and Cooling Feasiblity Study, Salt Lake City, Utah: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following is a general description of the Burns and Roe study of District Heating and Cooling Feasibility for Salt Lake City, Utah. The study assesses District Heating and Cooling (DHC) and develops a conceptual district system for Salt Lake city. In assessing District Heating and Cooling in Salt Lake City, the system conceived is evaluated to determine whether it is technically and economically viable. To determine technical viability, aspects such as implementation, pipe routing, and environmental restrictions are reviewed to foresee any technical problems that would arise as a result of DHC. To determine economic feasibility, the conceived system is priced to determine the capital cost to construct, and modeled in an economic analysis using anticipated operating and fuel costs to produce the required revenue necessary to run the system. Technical and Economic feasibility are predicated on many variables, including heating and cooling load, pipe routing, system implementation, and fuel costs. These variables have been investigated and demonstrate a substantial potential for DHC in Salt Lake City. Areas of consideration include the Downtown Area, Metropolitan Hall of Justice and surrounding area, and the Hotel District.

Not Available

1988-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

216

FINAL_Comments on 2012 Congestion study filed w_DOE 1_30_2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

750 1 750 1 st St, NE Suite 1100 Washington, DC 20002 202.682.6294 Main 202.682.3050 Fax www.cleanskies.org January 30, 2012 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 Sent by email to: Congestionstudy2012@hq.doe.gov David.Meyer@hq.doe.gov RE: Preparation of the 2012 Congestion Study The American Clean Skies Foundation (ACSF) is a non-profit organization founded to advance America's energy security and promote a cleaner environment through the expanded use of natural gas, renewable energy and energy efficiency. ACSF appreciates the opportunity to submit these comments, which underscore the importance of taking into account the growing role of natural gas-fired electric generation in connection with transmission planning.

217

Microsoft Word - Feasibility_Study_Regulation_Reserves_fmr_mark final 2.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

90E 90E Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market A Feasibility Study F. Rubinstein, L. Xiaolei, D.S. Watson Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

218

Feasibility study for underground coal gasification at the Krabi Coal Mine site, Thailand. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study, conducted by Energy and Environmental Research Center, was funded by the U.S Trade and Development Agency. The report summarizes the accomplishments of field, analytical data evaluation and modeling activities focused on assessment of underground coal gasification (UCG) feasibility at Krabi over a two year period. The overall objective of the project was to determine the technical issues, environmental impact, and economic of developing and commercializing UCG at the site in Krabi. The report contains an Executive Summary followed by these chapters: (1) Project Overview; (2) Project Site Characterization; (3) Inorganic and Thermal Materials Characterization; (4) Technical and Economic Feasibility of UCG At the Krabi Site; (5) Conclusions and Recommendations; (6) Acknowledgments; (7) References.

Boysen, J.; Sole, J.; Schmit, C.R.; Harju, J.A.; Young, B.C.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

District heating/feasibility study for Jamestown, New York. Phase two. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details an investigation to implement district heating in Jamestown, New York. It is a technical and economic feasibility study of a hot-water district-heating system, using a municipal electric plant as the heat source and the downtown area as a source for customers. As a result of the project, the City of Jamestown built a district-heating system that was a service to four customers in 1984 and expanded to 14 customers in 1985. The City expects it to grow in 1986 and beyond. Customers are realizing a 20 to 30% savings in heating costs. The municipal electric plant burns coal and the system so far has displaced the equivalent of 1 million gallons of oil per year.

Oliker, I.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Phase 1 feasibility study of an integrated hydrogen PEM fuel cell system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluated in the report is the use of hydrogen fueled proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells for devices requiring less than 15 kW. Metal hydrides were specifically analyzed as a method of storing hydrogen. There is a business and technical part to the study that were developed with feedback from each other. The business potential of a small PEM product is reviewed by examining the markets, projected sales, and required investment. The major technical and cost hurdles to a product are also reviewed including: the membrane and electrode assembly (M and EA), water transport plate (WTP), and the metal hydrides. It was concluded that the best potential stationary market for hydrogen PEM fuel cell less than 15 kW is for backup power use in telecommunications applications.

Luczak, F.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Study of alkali- and sulfur-enhanced corrosion of advanced energy systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial stage of MHD anode corrosion process appears to be dominated by out-diffusion of metallic species into the powder deposit. In addition, K and S appear to diffuse into the native oxide and underlying metal substrate. The out-diffusion process clearly leads to a loss of metal species from either the native oxide or metal substrate, while in-diffusion leads to the formation of sulfides and possibly to the accumulation of K containing compounds which may ultimately flux the protective oxide scale. The results for MHD anodes may be compared with those from previous studies of alkali-sulfur enhanced corrosion of turbine alloys. Although the specific details of these studies differ, both agree that rapid or catastrophic corrosion is preceded by a variable length induction period. During this period, relatively small changes in weight are observed. However, the protective metal oxide scale is breached which establishes the condition for rapid direct attack by condensed corrosive deposits. Thus, the mechanisms and kinetics of processes associated with the induction period are of great interest in understanding the survivability of various alloys. In the corrosion modeling effort, it was found that a simple model which considered only the diffusion-limited corrosion of iron did not correctly predict the iron corrosion product species for iron-based alloys. This lack of agreement was due to the absence of the treatment of other metal constituents in the alloy which form corrosion products. A more detailed model which includes equilibrium and diffusion relations for all metal species is required for accurate modeling of the corrosion product composition. 14 refs.

Stinespring, C.; Annen, K.; Stewart, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Study of Wild Spring Chinook Salmon in the John Day River System, 1985 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of wild spring chinook salmon was conducted in the John Day River, Oregon: (1) recommend harvest regulations to achieve escapement goals in the John Day River; (2) recommend adtustments in timing of fish passage operations at Columbia River dams that will increase survival of John Day migrants; (3) recommend habitat or environmental improvements that will increase production of spring chinook salmon; (4) determine escapement goals for wild spring chinook salmon in the John Day River; and (5) recommend procedures for hatchery supplementation in the John Day River in the event it becomes necessary to artificially maintain the run of spring chinook salmon. Juveniles were captured as smolts during migration and as fingerlings during summer rearing. Juveniles were coded-wire tagged, and recoveries of tagged adults were used to assess contribution to ocean and Columbia River fisheries, timing of adult migrations through the Columbia River in relation to fishing seasons, and age and size of fish in fisheries. Scoop traps and seines were used to determine timing of smolt migrations through the John Day River. In addition, recoveries of tagged smolts at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Jones Beach were used to determine migration timing through the Columbia River. We examined freshwater life history of spring chinook salmon in the John Day River and related it to environmental factors. We looked at adult holding areas, spawning, incubation and emergence, fingerling rearing distribution, size and growth of juveniles and scales. Escapement goals fo the John Day River as well as reasons for declines in John Day stocks were determiend by using stock-recruitment analyses. Recommendations for hatchery supplementation in the John Day were based on results from other study objectives.

Lindsay, Robert B.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Advanced Turbine System (ATS): Task 1, System scoping and feasibility study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present GT(Gas Turbine) Systems are available to achieve 52% (LHV) thermal efficiencies, plants in construction will be capable of 54%, and the goal of this study is to identify incentives, technical issues, and resource requirements to develop natural gas-and coal-compatible ATS which would have a goal of 60% or greater based on LHV. The prime objective of this project task is to select a natural gas-fired ATS (Advanced Turbine System) that could be manufactured and marketed should development costs not be at issue with the goals of: (1) Coal of electricity 10% below 1991 vintage power plants in same market class and size. (2) Expected performance 60% efficiency and higher, (3) Emission levels, NO{sub x} < 10 ppM (0.15 lb/MW-h), CO < 20 ppM (0.30 lb/MW-h), and UHC < 20 ppM (0.30 lb/MW-h). ABB screening studies have identified the gas-fueled combined cycle as the most promising full scale solution to achieve the set goals for 1988--2002. This conclusion is based on ABB`s experience level, as well as the multi-step potential of the combined cycle process to improve in many component without introducing radical changes that might increase costs and lower RAM. The technical approach to achieve 60% or better thermal efficiency will include increased turbine inlet temperatures, compressor intercooling, as well a improvements in material, turbine cooling technology and the steam turbine. Use of improved component efficiencies will achieve gas-fired cycle performance of 61.78%. Conversion to coal-firing will result in system performance of 52.17%.

van der Linden, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Aging and Phase Stability Studies of Alloy 22 FY08 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of work done over the past ten years in support of phase stability studies of Alloy 22 for the Yucca Mountain Project and contains information previously published, reported, and referenced. Most sections are paraphrased here for the convenience of readers. Evaluation of the fabrication processes involved in the manufacture of waste containers is important as these processes can have an effect on the metallurgical structure of an alloy. Because material properties such as strength, toughness, aging kinetics and corrosion resistance are all dependent on the microstructure, it is important that prototypes be built and evaluated for processing effects on the performance of the material. Of particular importance are welds, which have an as-cast microstructure with chemical segregation and precipitation of complex phases resulting from the welding process. The work summarized in this report contains information on the effects of fabrication processes such as solution annealing, stress mitigation, heat-to-heat variability, and welding on the kinetics of precipitation, mechanical, and corrosion properties. For a waste package lifetime of thousands of years, it is impossible to test directly in the laboratory the behavior of Alloy 22 under expected repository conditions. The changes that may occur in these materials must be accelerated. For phase stability studies, this is achieved by accelerating the phase transformations by increasing test temperatures above those anticipated in the proposed repository. For these reasons, Alloy 22 characterization specimens were aged at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Aging Facilities for times from 1 hour up to 8 years at temperatures ranging from 200-750 C. These data as well as the data from specimens aged at 260 C, 343 C, and 427 C for 100,028 hours at Haynes International will be used for performance confirmation and model validation.

Torres, S G

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

225

Studies of participants in nuclear tests. Final report, 1 September 1978-31 October 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of mortality, by cause of death, was done on a cohort of 46,186 participants in one or more of five test series. The series studied were UPSHOT-KNOTHOLE (1953) and PLUMBBOB (1957) at the Nevada Test Site, and GREENHOUSE (1951), CASTLE (1954), and REDWING (1956) which were conducted at the Pacific Proving Ground at Enewetak and Bikini. The participants were traced individually by the use of Veterans Administration records. For the participants in each series, the number of deaths attributed to particular causes was compared with the number expected to occur at US cause- and age-specific mortality rates. A total of 5113 deaths from all causes was ascertained; this was 11.1% of the number of participants. The number was, however, only 83.5% of the number expected at US mortality rates. Mortality from leukemia among the 3554 participants at SMOKY - 10 deaths below age 85 - were 2.5 times the expected number. When the leukemia deaths are compared to other deaths in all six data sets, the differences among the series are not significant. No cancer other than leukemia was ascertained to have occurred in significant excess among SMOKY participants and the number of deaths from other cancers (67) was less than the number expected at population rates (83.8). The total body of evidence cannot convincingly either affirm or deny that the higher than statistically expected incidence of leukemia among SMOKY participants (or of prostate cancer among REDWING participants) is the result of radiation exposure incident to the tests. 19 refs., 27 tabs.

Robinette, C.D.; Jablon, S.; Preston, T.L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective action alternatives to the 'no-action' alternative, as the basis for the Draft Corrective Action Decision for the site. The history and nature of the contamination and previous investigations are summarized in Section 2. Also included in Section 2 is an evaluation of human and environmental targets and potential exposure pathways. Section 3 describes the corrective action goals and applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs). Section 4 describes four alternatives, Section 5 analyzes the alternatives in detail, and Section 6 compares the alternatives. Section 6 also includes a summary and a recommended corrective action.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

A study of colloid-enhanced ultrafiltration. Final report, March 1984--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past nine years of funding by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the authors have developed a whole family of methods under the umbrella of colloid-enhanced ultrafiltration techniques. These methods can be used for removal of either dissolved organics or multivalent ions from water or both simultaneously. They have gone from very fundamental studies of the ultrafiltration process to a field test using actual polluted groundwater. The orientation of this research has been the ultimate development of a workable, economical process. To do this, the authors have tried to understand the underlying fundamental phenomena involved in the separation and in potential solutions to technological bottlenecks and developed new scientific knowledge in the process. However, the thrust of the investigations have been focused on bringing the technology to a successful adoption by industry. This report summarizes the following: micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration; polyelectrolyte-enhanced ultrafiltration; ion-expulsion ultrafiltration; ligand-modified micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration; polyelectrolyte/surfactant-enhanced ultrafiltration, supporting research, and relation to energy. 61 refs.

Scamehorn, J.F.; Christian, S.D.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Feasibility study of utilization of degummed soybean oil as a substitute for diesel fuel. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to determine the economic and technological feasibility of producing a diesel oil substitute or extender from soybean oil. Existing technology was reviewed, to determine the minimum modification necessary for production of an acceptable fuel product. Current methods of oil extraction and refining were considered, as well as the products of those processes. The information developed indicated that the degummed soybean oil produced by existing processing plants is theoretically suitable for use as a diesel fuel extender. No modification of process design or equipment is required. This situation is very favorable to early commercialization of degummed soybean oil as a diesel fuel extender during the 1980's. Moreover, a large energy gain is realized when the soybean oil is utilized as fuel. Its heat of combustion is reported as 16,920 Btu per pound, or 130,000 Btu per gallon. Production of soybean oil consumes between 3000 and 5000 Btu per pound or 23,000 and 39,000 Btu per gallon. A resource availability study disclosed that the southeastern region of the United States produces approximately 260 million bushels of soybeans per year. In the same general area, fourteen extraction plants are operating, with a combined annual capacity of approximately 200 million bushels. Thus, regional production is sufficient to support the extraction capacity. Using an average figure of 1.5 gallons of oil per bushel of soybeans gives annual regional oil production of approximately 300 million gallons.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Environmental study of the National Aerospace Plane. Final report, 1 December 1991-30 December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the United States (US) National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) Program is to develop hypersonic technologies required for future military and Civilian aerospace plane systems to reduce payload cost to orbit and provide for flexible-responsive space operations. If successful, the NASP Program will be the stimulus for developing a whole new class of airbreathing hypersonic aircraft powered by clean-burning scramjet engines using liquid hydrogen as the primary fuel. As part of this development, the potential to cause environmental impacts from these type of vehicles must be considered and analyzed. This process has been initiated using the NASP Program's proposed X-30 flight research vehicle and flight test program as a basis for analysis. Environmental issues addressed include noise and sonic booms, stratospheric ozone depletion, public health and safety, hazardous materials/waste, air quality, biological and cultural resources, geology and soils, and water use. Although this study is not yet complete, preliminary analysis has determined that the X-30 vehicle and flight test program would have minimal environmental impact.

Brown, C.; Wierzbanowski, T.; Reda, H.; Duecker, G.T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A feasibility study of space-charge neutralized ion induction linacs: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Applications for high current (> 1 kA) ion beams are increasing. They include hardening of material surfaces, transmutation of radioactive waste, cancer treatment, and possibly driving fusion reactions to create energy. The space-charge of ions limits the current that can be accelerated in a conventional ion linear accelerator (linac). Furthermore, the accelerating electric field must be kept low enough to avoid the generation and acceleration of counter-streaming electrons. These limitations have resulted in ion accelerator designs that employ long beam lines and would be expensive to build. Space-charge neutralization and magnetic insulation of the acceleration gaps could substantially reduce these two limitations, but at the expense of increasing the complexity of the beam physics. We present theory and experiments to determine the degree of charge-neutralization that can be achieved in various environments found in ion accelerators. Our results suggest that, for high current applications, space-charge neutralization could be used to improve on the conventional ion accelerator technology. There are two basic magnetic field geometries that can be used to insulate the accelerating gaps, a radial field or a cusp field. We will present studies related to both of these geometries. We shall also present numerical simulations of {open_quotes}multicusp{close_quotes} accelerator that would deliver potassium ions at 400 MeV with a total beam power of approximately 40 TW. Such an accelerator could be used to drive fusion.

Slutz, S.A.; Primm, P.; Renk, T.; Johnson, D.J. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

FBC feasibility study. Volume 2. Task 4, Final report. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the study recommended that new circulating fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boilers with new fabric filters are the best technical and economical solution for replacement/revitalization of the existing Unit I and II pulverized coal boilers and electrofilters at TE-TOL's cogeneration station. Based on that recommendation, a conceptual design was performed for the new circulating FBC boiler case to provide definition of new plant systems, refinement of capital costs, determine plant integration requirements, and development of a milestone schedule. The conceptual design consists of two new circulating FBC boilers and auxiliaries, new fabric filters, new ID Fans, new limestone system, modified coal system, new fly ash silo, and new ash handling systems. Due to the difficult low grade fuels being burnt at the TE-TOL Plant, circulating FBC boilers offer the opportunity for increasing the longevity of the boilers while providing a reliable, safe and economical combustion process that is capable of meeting new Yugoslavian environmental standards while maintaining high efficiencies and availabilities.

Not Available

1989-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

232

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, that can help achieve national energy conservation goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. A study of trends reveals that the need for DSG monitoring and control equipment by 1990 to 2000 will be great, measured in tens of thousands. Criteria for assessing DSG integration have been defined and indicate that economic and institutional as well as technical and other factors must be included. The principal emphasis in this report is on the functional requirements for DSG monitoring and control in six major categories. Twenty-four functional requirements have been prepared under these six categories and serve to indicate how to integrate the DSGs with the distribution and other portions of the electric utility system. The results indicate that there are no fundamental technical obstacles to prevent the connection of dispersed storage and generation to the distribution system. However, a communication system of some sophistication will be required to integrate the distribution system and the dispersed generation sources for effective control. The large-size span of generators from 10 kW to 30 MW means that a variety of remote monitoring and control may be required. The results show that an increased effort is required to develop demonstration equipment to perform the DSG monitoring and control functions and to acquire experience with this equipment in the utility distribution environment.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Final Report: Laboratory Studies of Spontaneous Reconnection and Intermittent Plasma Objects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of the collisionless magnetic reconnection constituted the primary work carried out under this grant. The investigations utilized two magnetic configurations with distinct boundary conditions. Both configurations were based upon the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and the MIT Physics Department. The NSF/DOE award No. 0613734, supported two graduate students (now Drs. W. Fox and N. Katz) and material expenses. The grant enabled these students to operate the VTF basic plasma physics experiment on magnetic reconnection. The first configuration was characterized by open boundary conditions where the magnetic field lines interface directly with the vacuum vessel walls. The reconnection dynamics for this configuration has been methodically characterized and it has been shown that kinetic effects related to trapped electron trajectories are responsible for the high rates of reconnection observed. This type of reconnection has not been investigated before. Nevertheless, the results are directly relevant to observations by the Wind spacecraft of fast reconnection deep in the Earth magnetotail. The second configuration was developed to be relevant to specifically to numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, allowing the magnetic field-lines to be contained inside the device. The configuration is compatible with the presence of large current sheets in the reconnection region and reconnection is observed in fast powerful bursts. These reconnection events facilitate the first experimental investigations of the physics governing the spontaneous onset of fast reconnection. In the Report we review the general motivation of this work and provide an overview of our experimental and theoretical results enabled by the support through the awards.

Egedal-Pedersen, Jan [Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Porkolab, Miklos [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA{sup {minus}} + nH{sup +}), driven by both the pH gradient and membrane voltage. Such a symport should be highly accumulative, however, with a lipophilic weak acid such as IAA, net diffusive efflux of IAAH whenever IAAHI{sub i} > IAAH{sub o} would constitute a leak. (3) A third model sees a pH change driven IAA uptake and saturable symport enhanced by internal binding sites. Following pH gradient-driven accumulation of IAA, the anion may bind to an intravesicular site, permitting further uptake of IAA. NPA, by blocking anion efflux, enhances this binding. We have reported that membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues are a good system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin.

Goldsmith, M.H.M.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

BNL Building 650 lead decontamination and treatment feasibility study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead has been used extensively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for radiation shielding in numerous reactor, accelerator and other research programs. A large inventory of excess lead (estimated at 410,000 kg) in many shapes and sizes is currently being stored. Due to it`s toxicity, lead and soluble lead compounds are considered hazardous waste by the Environmental Protection Agency. Through use at BNL, some of the lead has become radioactive, either by contamination of the surface or through activation by neutrons or deuterons. This study was conducted at BNL`s Environmental and Waste Technology Center for the BNL Safety and Environmental Protection Division to evaluate feasibility of various treatment options for excess lead currently being stored. The objectives of this effort included investigating potential treatment methods by conducting a review of the literature, developing a means of screening lead waste to determine the radioactive characteristics, examining the feasibility of chemical and physical decontamination technologies, and demonstrating BNL polyethylene macro-encapsulation as a means of treating hazardous or mixed waste lead for disposal. A review and evaluation of the literature indicated that a number of physical and chemical methods are available for decontamination of lead. Many of these techniques have been applied for this purpose with varying degrees of success. Methods that apply mechanical techniques are more appropriate for lead bricks and sheet which contain large smooth surfaces amenable to physical abrasion. Lead wool, turnings, and small irregularly shaped pieces would be treated more effectively by chemical decontamination techniques. Either dry abrasion or wet chemical methods result in production of a secondary mixed waste stream that requires treatment prior to disposal.

Kalb, P.D.; Cowgill, M.G.; Milian, L.W. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy conserving site design: Greenbrier case study, Chesapeake, Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A specific case study of project planning for energy conservation for a major planned unit development at the 3000-acre Greenbrier development site in Chesapeake, Virginia, is summarized. The research suggests that very considerable reductions in energy conservation can be achieved within the confines of private-sector land development and residential construction with increased incremental costs of $200.00 to $3150.00 per dwelling unit. It is hypothesized that energy consumption at Greenbrier can be reduced by one-half with an average annual savings of 21,275 kWh per residential unit, using state-of-the-art technology with careful planning and control. This represents an annual savings $750.00 per unit at the current utility rate of 3.5 cents per kWh. These savings can be achieved through reduction in heating and cooling loads and application of more-efficient heating and cooling of the remaining loads. The reduction in loads are achieved by redesign of the land plan to include a higher percentage of south-facing lots, use of vegetation to modify microclimate, decreases in air infiltration, the use of 2 x 6 framing, better insulation, and the use of an insulated slab-on-grade foundation. Further energy savings can be expected by increased efficiencies in mechanical systems used for space heating and cooling and domestic hot water. When applied to the single-family portion of Greenbrier, containing 541 dwelling units, these options reduce the total end-use energy consumption 54.7%. This reduction represents an annual savings of $432,800.00 for an initial capital investment of $1.7 million.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Final Report: Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion and Geochemical Surface Reactions: A Study Across Scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational chemistry was used to help provide a molecular level description of the interactions of Gram-negative microbial membranes with subsurface materials. The goal is to develop a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in microbial metal binding, microbial attachment to mineral surfaces, and, eventually, oxidation/reduction reactions (electron transfer) that can occur at these surfaces and are mediated by the bacterial exterior surface. The project focused on the interaction of the outer microbial membrane, which is dominated by an exterior lipopolysaccharide (LPS) portion, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the mineral goethite and with solvated ions in the environment. This was originally a collaborative project with T.P. Straatsma and B. Lowery of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The University of Alabama effort used electronic structure calculations to predict the molecular behavior of ions in solution and the behavior of the sugars which form a critical part of the LPS. The interactions of the sugars with metal ions are expected to dominate much of the microscopic structure and transport phenomena in the LPS. This work, in combination with the molecular dynamics simulations of Straatsma and the experimental electrochemistry and microscopy measurements of Lowry, both at PNNL, is providing new insights into the detailed molecular behavior of these membranes in geochemical environments. The effort at The University of Alabama has three components: solvation energies and structures of ions in solution, prediction of the acidity of the critical groups in the sugars in the LPS, and binding of metal ions to the sugar anions. An important aspect of the structure of the LPS membrane as well as ion transport in the LPS is the ability of the sugar side groups such as the carboxylic acids and the phosphates to bind positively charged ions. We are studying the acidity of the acidic side groups in order to better understand the ability of these groups to bind metal ions. We need to understand the solvation properties of the metal ions in solution and their ability to bind not only to the sugars but to proteins and to other anions. Our goal is then to be able to predict the ability of the side groups to bind metal ions. One result from the earlier molecular dynamics simulations is the exclusion of water from the inner hydrophobic part of the membrane. We thus need to investigate the binding of the cations in media with different dielectric constants.

Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

238

Feasibility study report: Area of Contamination (AOC) 43J. (Fort Devens, Groups 2 and 7 sites). Final feasibility study report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Environmental Center directed ABB Environmental Services, Inc. (ABB-ES), under Contract No. DAAA15-91-D-0008, to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) to address the contamination of soil and groundwater at Area of Contamination (AOC) 43J at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. This FS Report is prepared as part of the FS process in accordance with the 1988 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidance document entitled Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA. The purpose of the FS Report is to initially identify and screen potentially feasible alternatives to control human health and environmental risks at AOC 43J. Following this screening, the FS Report presents a detailed analysis and comparative analysis of the retained alternatives.

NONE

1996-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

Final Report: Monte Carlo Track-Structure Simulations for Low-LET Selected-Cell Radiation Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final report contains an executive summary, listings of accomplishments and students supported and a complete bibliography of papers and posters presented during the grant period.

Wilson, W. E.; Miller. J. H.; Lynch, D. J.

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Final Reminder:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Please save your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 imporant files by 4/30/12 April 27, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) Franklin batch system is drained, and all batch queues are stopped as of 4/26 23:59pm. This is the final reminder that please make sure to save important files on your Franklin $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2. ALL FILES THERE WILL BE DELETED, and there will be no mechanisms to recover any of the files after May 1. Mon Apr 30: Last day to retrieve files from Franklin scratch file systems Mon Apr 30, 23:59: User logins are disabled If you need help or have any concerns, please contact "consult at nersc dot gov". Post your comment You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here. Comments No one has commented on this page yet.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This the final report for the project "Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems," for the work in the group of the co-PI George Biros.

Biros, George

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

242

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

243

Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Final Report to Improved Reservoir Access Through Refracture Treatments in Tight Gas Sands and Gas Shales 07122-41.FINAL June 2013 PI Mukul M. Sharma The University of Texas at Austin 200 E. Dean Keeton St. Stop C0300 Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471---3257 msharma@mail.utexas.edu LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by The University of Texas at Austin as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT, OR THAT THE

244

Aurora final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Technical report detailing the work done by Nuvera and its partners to fulfill the goals of the program "Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks" (a.k.a. AURORA)

Robert, Dross; Amedeo, Conti

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

245

Final Technical Report, Grant DE-FG02-87ER13714, "Fundamental Studies of Metastable Liquids"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grant DE-FG02-87ER13714 supported fundamental work on the physical properties of metastable liquids from 6/1/87 to 4/30/08. Renewal proposals were submitted every three years (1990, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005), and included, in every case, a detailed Final Technical Report on the previous three years. Accordingly, the bulk of this report covers the final 2-year period 5/1/06 to 4/30/08 of this grant, which is not covered in any of the previous Final Technical Reports. This is preceded by a brief overview of the main research objectives and principal accomplishments during these very fruitful and productive 21 years of DOE-funded research.

Pablo G. Debenedetti

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

246

Test of QED to fourth order by study of four-lepton final states in e(+)e(?) interactions at 29 GeV with the HRS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data taken with the High Resolution Spectrometer detector at the SLAC storage ring PEP were used to test QED to fourth order in the coupling constant ?. The experiment studied four-lepton final states produced at high Q(2) in e(+)e(?) interactions...

Baringer, Philip S.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Studies of beauty baryon decays to D[superscript 0]ph[superscript -] and ?[+ over c]h[superscript -] final states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decays of beauty baryons to the D[superscript 0]ph[superscript ?] and ?[+ over c]h[superscript ?] final states (where h indicates a pion or a kaon) are studied using a data sample of pp collisions, corresponding to an ...

Ilten, Philip James

248

FINAL REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FINAL REPORT AEC-ERDA Research Contract AT (11-1) 2174 Columbia University's Nevis Laboratories "Research in Neutron Velocity Spectroscopy" James RainwatGr DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

249

Stopping the emergence of nuclear weapon states in the Third World: An examination of the Iraq weapons inspection program. Study project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Gulf War and the implementation of United Nation (UN) resolutions uncovered an Iraqi multi-billion dollar nuclear weapons program. Iraq's ability to pursue this clandestine program for more than a decade, despite periodic inspections, suggest that the myriad of treaties and agreements designed to curb proliferation may be inadequate. Clearly more must be done to deter and counter the spread of these deadly weapon. The UN weapons inspections in Iraq provide insight into possible solutions to the proliferation of nuclear weapons technology in the developing world. This study examines the policy and operational aspects associated with an intrusive United Nations inspection program. In its final analysis, this paper suggests that an effective challenge inspection program is a necessary element in countering the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Further, it suggests that the UN, as the only internationally accepted enforcement organization, be fully engaged in nonproliferation issues and support the challenge inspection program.

Block, D.A.

1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power - generating capability and one without.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

GEOHYDROLOGICAL STUDIES FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION -- Vol. I: Executive Summary; Vol. II: Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

long-term feasibility study conducted by Rockwell's Basalt Waste Isolation Program for the National Waste Terminal Storagelong-term feasibility study conducted by Rockwell's Basalt Waste Isolation Program for the National Was~e Terminal Storage

Apps, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

NASA [National Aeronautics and Space Administration] low power DIPS [Dynamic Isotope Power System] conceptual design study; Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the conceptual design and integration of a low power (0.5 to 1.0 kWe) Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) Low Power (LPD) with the Mariner Mark II (MMII) spacecraft for use on interplanetary and space exploration missions as an alternative to RTGs. A detailed MMII/LPD system description is provided that discusses, among other things, the design requirements, design point selection, system layout and spacecraft integration, mechanical design, electrical system design, interface assessments, reliability, and safety. Performance characteristics are given for the reference 500 We LPD using a peak cycle temperature of 1100 K. Parametrics are provided giving the LPD performance characteristics at power levels up to 1.0 kWe and peak cycle temperatures as high as 1300 K. A side-by-side comparison of the LPD performance with the RTG performance is provided. Finally, program plans, costs, and schedules are provided giving the overall plan for design, development, fabrication, qualification, and acceptance of the LPD system.

Otting, W.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

SWERA_Final_Report  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopian Rural Energy Development Ethiopian Rural Energy Development and Promotion Center Final Report Country background information Solar and Wind Energy Utilization and Project Development Scenarios October 2007 Ethio Resource Group with Partners i Table of Contents Executive Summary..................................................................................... ii 1 Introduction.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1 Overview.....................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Objective of the study .................................................................................1-1

254

Aerial Neutron Detection: Neutron Signatures for Nonproliferation and Emergency Response Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 2007 to the present, the Remote Sensing Laboratory has been conducting a series of studies designed to expand our fundamental understanding of aerial neutron detection with the goal of designing an enhanced sensitivity detection system for long range neutron detection. Over 35 hours of aerial measurements in a helicopter were conducted for a variety of neutron emitters such as neutron point sources, a commercial nuclear power reactor, nuclear reactor spent fuel in dry cask storage, depleted uranium hexafluoride and depleted uranium metal. The goals of the project were to increase the detection sensitivity of our instruments such that a 5.4 104 neutron/second source could be detected at 100 feet above ground level at a speed of 70 knots and to enhance the long-range detection sensitivity for larger neutron sources, i.e., detection ranges above 1000 feet. In order to increase the sensitivity of aerial neutron detection instruments, it is important to understand the dynamics of the neutron background as a function of altitude. For aerial neutron detection, studies have shown that the neutron background primarily originates from above the aircraft, being produced in the upper atmosphere by galactic cosmic-ray interactions with air molecules. These interactions produce energetic neutrons and charged particles that cascade to the earths surface, producing additional neutrons in secondary collisions. Hence, the neutron background increases as a function of altitude which is an impediment to long-range neutron detection. In order to increase the sensitivity for long range detection, it is necessary to maintain a low neutron background as a function of altitude. Initial investigations show the variation in the neutron background can be decreased with the application of a cosmic-ray shield. The results of the studies along with a representative data set are presented.

Maurer, Richard J.; Stampahar, Thomas G.; Smith, Ethan X.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Rourke, Timothy J.; LeDonne, Jeffrey P.; Avaro, Emanuele; Butler, D. Andre; Borders, Kevin L.; Stampahar, Jezabel; Schuck, William H.; Selfridge, Thomas L.; McKissack, Thomas M.; Duncan, William W.; Hendricks, Thane J.

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

255

Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Shale Group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Illinois State Geological Survey is conducting geological and geochemical investigations to evaluate the potential of New Albany Group shales as a source of hydrocarbons, particularly natural gas. Geological studies include stratigraphy and structure, mineralogic and petrographic characterization; analyses of physical properties; and development of a computer-based resources evaluation system. Geochemical studies include organic carbon content and trace elements; hydrocarbon content and composition; and adsorption/desorption studies of gas through shales. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each task reported.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Accelerator for the Final Acceleration Stage of the International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) has recently completed its Interim Design Report (IDR), which presents our current baseline design of the neutrino factory. To increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of acceleration, the IDR design uses a linear non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG) for its final acceleration stage. We present the current lattice design of that FFAG, including the main ring plus its injection and extraction systems. We describe parameters for the main ring magnets, kickers, and septa, as well as the power supplies for the kickers. We present a first pass at an engineering layout for the ring and its subsystems.

Berg, J.S.; Aslaninejad, M.; Pasternak, J.; Witte, H.; Bliss, N. Cordwell M.; Jones, T.; Muir, A., Kelliher, D.; Machida, S.

2011-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

258

Study of hadronic event-shape variables in multijet final states in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Event-shape variables, which are sensitive to perturbative and nonperturbative aspects of quantum chromodynamic (QCD) interactions, are studied in multijet events recorded in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV. Events ...

Apyan, Aram

259

District heating and cooling feasibility study for Dover, Delaware: Final report (September 2, 1986-May 31, 1988)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following is a general description of the Burns and Roe study for Dover, Delaware. The study assesses the feasibility of district heating in Dover, Delaware, and develops a conceptual district heating system. The system would use the McKee Run Station, and a new boiler plant as the heat source, and the area surrounding the plant and the legislative areas as the heat load. The study assesses the available heat load for the city, determines the available heat from the McKee Run Station, and develops a conceptual distribution network and system implementation plan. The study analyzes the environmental impacts, institutional issues, and project economics of the conceptual system. 24 figs., 26 tabs.

Not Available

1988-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress over the course of the grant period was excellent. We went from 3-D test codes to full 3-D production codes. We studied several SNe Ia. Most of the support has gone for the 3 years of support of OU graduate student Brian Friesen, who is now mature in his fourth year of research. It is unfortunate that there will be no further DOE support to see him through to the completion of his PhD.

Baron, Edward [Univ. of Oklahoma] [Univ. of Oklahoma

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Screening study for evaluation of the potential for system 80+ to consume excess plutonium - Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. effort to evaluate technologies offering solutions for the safe disposal or utilization of surplus nuclear materials, the fiscal year 1993 Energy and Water Appropriations legislation provided the Department of Energy (DOE) the necessary funds to conduct multi-phased studies to determine the technical feasibility of using reactor technologies for the triple mission of burning weapons grade plutonium, producing tritium for the existing smaller weapons stockpile, and generating commercial electricity. DOE limited the studies to five advanced reactor designs. Among the technologies selected is the ABB-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) System 80+. The DOE study, currently in Phase ID, is proceeding with a more detailed evaluation of the design`s capability for plutonium disposition.

Not Available

1994-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 4. Saudi Engineering Solar Energy Applications System Design Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Literature summarizing a study on the Saudi Arabian solar controlled environment agriculture system is presented. Specifications and performance requirements for the system components are revealed. Detailed performance and cost analyses are used to determine the optimum design. A preliminary design of an engineering field test is included. Some weather data are provided for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to mount the passive samplers in a house. designed describedhouses screened for study List of Figures A.l A.2 A.3 A.4 PassivePassive Sampler Sampler Girman/Allen Girman/Allen Wednesday 16 November Test house (

Grimsrud, David T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G. 1973. Historical Evolution of International Safeguards.In International Safeguards and Nuclear Industry, edited by1998. The Evolution of IAEA Safeguards. Vienna, Austria: The

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production and continued as the petrochemical industry began to offer replacements for natural rubber

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Weapons In a nuclear power plant, a nuclear reactionused for fuel in a nuclear power plant (Barnaby 1993). Theon converting nuclear power plants to fighting malaria with

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Tomoko Yasaka. 2007. Iraq Profile: Nuclear Overview [webe_research/profiles/Iraq/Nuclear/index.html. Findlay,Intelligence, verification and Iraq's WMDs. In Verification

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weapons Reductions and Nuclear Security Cooperation. Sarov,of Foreign Nuclear Installations: National Security Archive.Past: Nuclear Proliferation and American Security Policy.

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Satellite Imagery, 1969-1999 [electronic briefing book]. National Securitysatellite as having resolution of 25-30 feet (Lindgren The National Security

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designs. For example, CANDU-type nuclear reactors are morenegotiations with Canada for a CANDU reactor and with Franceearlier acquisition of a CANDU reactor, did the US become

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Analysis of the Newphew/Spore model for determining costs of coal mining in Appalachia. Computer model study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was primarily to determine whether a computer program developed to determine the costs of coal surface mining and reclamation in Appalachia was capable of being responsive to the needs of the Office of Surface Mining for projecting the extraction costs of coal in support of the Small Operator Assistance Program. The study analysis validated the model and adapted it to specific small operator needs in terms of user flexibility. It found that the model as originally programmed was subject to a number of limitations and functional constraints. Although a substantial loosening of these constraints was not feasible within the current scope of work, it did establish an approach to reprogram the model to take into account dynamically certain previously static aspects of the model. The approach was implemented in order to made the model more useful and to establish a baseline for future development.

Nephew, E.A.; Spore, R.L.

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

272

Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project combines outcrop-scale heterogeneity characterization, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations. The study is designed to test whether established dispersion theory accurately predicts the behavior of solute transport through heterogeneous media and to investigate the relationship between heterogeneity and the parameters that populate these models. The dispersion theory tested by this work is based upon the fractional advection-dispersion equation (fADE) model. Unlike most dispersion studies that develop a solute transport model by fitting the solute transport breakthrough curve, this project will explore the nature of the heterogeneous media to better understand the connection between the model parameters and the aquifer heterogeneity. Our work at the Colorado School of Mines was focused on the following questions: 1) What are the effects of multi-scale geologic variability on transport of conservative and reactive solutes? 2) Can those transport effects be accounted for by classical methods, and if not, can the nonlocal fractional-order equations provide better predictions? 3) Can the fractional-order equations be parameterized through a link to some simple observable geologic features? 4) Are the classical equations of transport and reaction sufficient? 5) What is the effect of anomalous transport on chemical reaction in groundwater systems? The work is predicated on the observation that upscaled transport is defined by loss of information, or spatio-temporal averaging. This averaging tends to make the transport laws such as Fick's 2nd-order diffusion equation similar to central limit theory. The fractional-order advection-dispersion equations rely on limit theory for heavy-tailed random motion that has some diverging moments. The equations predict larger tails of a plume in space and/or time than those predicted by the classical 2nd-order advection-dispersion equation. The heavy tails are often seen in plumes at field sites.

David A. Benson

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, South Bay of Flathead Lake, Volume III, 1983-1987 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study assessed the effects of Kerr Dam operation on the fisheries of the lower Flathead ecosystem. South Bay, the southern most lobe of Flathead Lake, is the most extensive area of shallow water, and therefore, most effected by changes in lake levels. This study began in January of 1984 and was completed in early 1987. Vegetative and structural cover are relatively limited in South Bay, a condition which could contribute to lower recruitment for some fish species. Our data show that the study area contained 0.04% structural and 5.4% vegetative cover in June at full pool. Both figures are less than 1.0% at minimum pool. Structural complexity mediates the ecological interactions between littoral zone fish and their prey, and can affect local productivity and growth in fish. Structural complexity may also be important to overwinter survival of young perch in Flathead Lake. Winter conditions, including ice cover and fall drawdown, seasonally eliminate the vegetative portion of most rooted macrophytes in South Bay. This results in substantial loss of what little structural cover exists, depriving the perch population of habitat which has been occupied all summer. The loss of cover from draw-down concentrates and probably exposes perch to greater predation, including cannibalism, than would occur if structural complexity were greater. 33 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Cross, David; Waite, Ian

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Study to determine the possible hazard of methylmercury in seafood to the fetus in utero. Final report, 1980-1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the possible hazards of methylmercury (MeHg) in seafood to the fetus in utero. Hair and blood samples of pregnant women in New Bedford, MA, Manta, Ecuador, and Mancora, Peru (all areas of high seafood consumption) were examined. These samples were collected and studied at various stages of gestation and during pre- and post-natal periods. In some cases, blood and hair samples of some of the infants born to these women were also examined. The women of Manta and Mancora showed higher levels of MeHg than the women in New Bedford. However, no health hazards could be linked to any of the infants from the ingestion of MeHg in marine fish. Although no human data exist, experimental evidence suggests marine fish may contain elements that reduce the toxicity of MeHg and it's possible that selenium contributes to the protective effect of fish vs. grain diets. Tables of MeHg levels in the study groups are attached to the report.

Marsh, D.O.; Turner, M.D.; Smith, J.C.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Velocity and concentration studies of flowing suspensions by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Final report, October 7, 1994--October 6, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques were developed to study concentrated suspension flows. The tasks completed were: (1) materials selection for imaging of both particle and fluid components, (2) pipe flow measurements, and (3) flows in complex geometries. The partially completed task is the development of rapid imaging techniques by analog compensation of eddy currents, generated by the gradient pulses, and real-time image reconstruction from the data. The best combination of materials found is pharmaceutical beads in silicon oil. Their relaxation times T{sub 1} are sufficiently different to permit imaging the two components separately. The pipe flow experiment used 3 mm, neutrally buoyant, plastic particles, up to 40% by volume, in 80--90W transmission oil flowing in a 5 cm diameter pipe. Distances ranging from 60 cm to 6 m downstream from a commercial mixer was studied. The flow is fully developed at 6 m and the concentration and velocity profiles agree with earlier lower resolution experiments. The eddy current compensation scheme works well for two channels and is being extended to eight channels. The authors have also built a rapid reconstruction hardware that processes and displays images in a fraction of a second. They studied the flow of neutrally buoyant concentrated suspension past a step expansion and contraction in a cylindrical pipe. Interesting transition is observed at the expansion whereby the high fluids-fraction outer layer spreads to become the outer layer in the larger pipe.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to quantify organic aerosol precursor concentrations in an urban environment and to measure suitable organic photoproduct species that can act as tracers of photochemical processing to identify the occurrence and rate of secondary organic aerosol formation. Field measurements were made as part of the ASR field program Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in June 2010. What is new in our approach is the measurement for the total concentration of long chain alkanes (>C10) and heavier alkyl substituted aromatics associated with diesel exhaust gas phase organic compound emissions. A method to measure these so called intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) was developed by modifying a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer instrument to perform both volatile organic compound (VOC) and IVOC analysis by thermal desorption from a Tenax adsorbent trap (TD-PTR-MS). Lab and field results show that the TD-PTR-MS technique can measure long chain alkanes associated with diesel engine emissions and thus provide a novel means to measure these compounds to better understand the impact of vehicle emissions on secondary organic aerosol formation.

None

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal carbides have recently attracted a great deal of interest due to their potential to replace noble metal catalysts in a variety of reactions. To date, attempts to develop commercial applications with bulk metal carbides have been unsuccessful, however, the catalytic behavior of nanometer-sized carbide particles are reported to be sufficiently different from the bulk materials that new research in this area is warranted. In this report, Mo/W carbides were synthesized using carbon nanotubes both as carbon source and as a catalyst support. These carbon nanotubes (FIBRIL[TM] Nanotubes) are composed of parallel layers of trigonal carbon, but in the form of a series of concentric tubes disposed about the longitudinal axis of the fibrils with diameter of 8{approx}10 nm. The special dimensions of nanotubes stabilize fine dispersion of catalytic entities as only particles with limited sizes, ca <8nm, could be supported on this nanoscale substrate. Two types of catalysts have been prepared in this manner. First, highly dispersed Mo carbide particles were generated on the carbon nanotube surface with average particle size of 3{approx}10 nm. Furthermore, stoichiometric Mo carbide was also obtained in the form of highly porous assemblages of nanorods by careful control of the reaction conditions. The prepared Mo and W carbide catalysts were tested in several industrial reactions with significant energy savings. Results from these studies demonstrated the ''poor man's platinum'' hypothesis as well as many great potentials associated with these novel catalysts in chemical and refinery industries.

Ma, Jun; Hoch, Robert

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A revolutionary rotatable electron energy analyzer for advanced high-resolution spin-polarized photoemission studies. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the construction and testing of a unique analyzer for spin-polarized photoemission studies of magnetic materials. This report details the progress of this project for the period from 9/1/96 through 8/31/99. Progress can be divided into two distinct areas. These are the fabrication, construction, and initial testing of the instrumentation, and the concurrent program of preliminary investigations into materials and experiments appropriate for future studies using the instrumentation developed. The analyzer complete with special input electron optics and Mott detector has been assembled in a special design UHV chamber equipped with all the capabilities needed to perform the described programs of research. These include a sophisticated five motorized axis sample manipulator with low and high temperature capability and rapid temperature cycling (acquired in collaboration with Dr. J.G. Tobin of LLNL), vacuum leak detection and gauging, in situ thin film growth instrumentation, and sample cleaning and magnetizing capabilities, The initial testing of the analyzer has been completed with successful data acquisition using both the multichannel detector mode, and spin-dependent using the Mott detector channeltrons. The data collected using the Mott detector were not truly spin dependent (see below), but demonstrate the operation of the lens and detector design. Acquisition of truly spin-dependent data await use of the EPU. Preliminary indications suggest that the analyzer performs at or above the original design parameters. In the second area of progress, we have conducted a number of preliminary studies toward the ends of identifying appropriate initial systems for investigation, and to further explore new experiments that the new instrumentation will help to pioneer. More detailed descriptions of all of these advances are given.

Waddill, G. D.; Willis, R. F.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fundamental studies of stress distributions and stress relaxation in oxide scales on high temperature alloys. [Final progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a three-year study of stresses arising in the oxide scale and underlying metal during high temperature oxidation and of scale cracking. In-situ XRD was developed to measure strains during oxidation over 1000{degrees}C on pure metals. Acoustic emission was used to observe scale fracture during isothermal oxidation and cooling, and statistical analysis was used to infer mechanical aspects of cracking. A microscratch technique was used to measure the fracture toughness of scale/metal interface. A theoretical model was evaluated for the development and relaxation of stresses in scale and metal substrate during oxidation.

Shores, D.A.; Stout, J.H.; Gerberich, W.W.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Study of integration issues to realize the market potential of OTEC energy in the aluminum industry. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The various integration issues are studied which must be considered to realize the market potential for the use of OTEC by the aluminum industry. The chloride reduction process has been identified as an attractive candidate for use with OTEC systems, and drained-cathode Hall cells and two alternative chloride reduction processes are considered. OTEC power system and plantships for the different processes are described. Aluminum industry characteristics important for OTEC considerations are given, including economic models and case history analyses. Appended are supporting cost estimates and energy bridge concepts for getting OTEC energy to shore. (LEW)

Jones, Jr., M. S.; Thiagarajan, V.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Markel, A. L.; Snyder, III, J. E.; Sprouse, A. M.; Leshaw, D.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in the study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Revised final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in this study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Subchronic Toxicity of Sulfur Mustard (HD) In Rats Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occupational health standards have not been established for sulfur mustard [bis(2- chlorethyl)-sulfide], a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic properties. Seventytwo Sprague-Dawley rats of each sex, 6-7 weeks old, were divided into six groups (12/group/ sex) and gavaged with either 0, 0.003 , 0.01 , 0.03 , 0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg of sulfur mustard in sesame oil 5 days/week for 13 weeks. No dose-related mortality was observed. A significant decrease (P ( 0.05) in body weight was observed in both sexes of rats only in the 0.3 mg/kg group. Hematological evaluations and clinical chemistry measurements found no consistent treatment-related effects at the doses studied. The only treatment-related lesion associated with gavage exposure upon histopathologic evaluation was epithelial hyperplasia of the forestomach of both sexes at 0.3 mg/kg and males at 0.1 mg/kg. The hyperplastic change was minimal and characterized by cellular disorganization of the basilar layer, an apparent increase in mitotic activity of the basilar epithelial cells, and thickening of the epithelial layer due to the apparent increase in cellularity. The estimated NOEL for HD in this 90-day study is 0.1 mg/kg/day when administered orally.

Sasser, L. B.; Miller, R. A.; Kalkwarf, D, R.; Buschbom, R. L.; Cushing, J. A.

1989-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Laboratory study to determine physical characteristics of heavy oil after CO/sub 2/ saturation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an on-going research program for enhanced oil recovery, the Bartlesville (Oklahoma) Energy Technology Center (BETC), US Department of Energy is performing research and development of recovery techniques for heavy oils. These techniques are being studied and developed to ultimately aid production from shallow, low productivity, heavy oil sand deposits in southeastern Kansas, southwestern Missouri, and northeastern Oklahoma. Four heavy oil samples ranging, from 10/sup 0/ to 20/sup 0/ API gravity, were tested to determine their physical characteristics before and after CO/sub 2/ saturation. The experimentation was conducted using a modified PVT apparatus designed and constructed at BETC. Viscosity, density, solubility, and swelling factor were determined at temperatures of 75/sup 0/, 140/sup 0/, and 200/sup 0/F and at 11 pressures ranging from 200 to 5000 psi at each temperature. The physical property changes of heavy oils due to CO/sub 2/ saturation appear to be crude-oil dependent. Future studies should include more types of crude oils and probably higher temperatures. 14 references, 31 figures, 19 tables.

Miller, J.S.; Jones, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

In situ heat exchanger tube fouling thickness measurements using ultrasonics. Final report on a laboratory feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth of fouling layers on heat exchanger surfaces and the corrosion of heat exchanger materials exposed to seawater have been recognized since the beginning of OTEC research as basic problems which could render the concept uneconomical. Consequently, a significant effort has been directed toward predicting, measuring, identifying, explaining and solving potential biofouling and corrosion phenomena. To address this problem, the feasibility of establishing a practical microacoustic technique to measure fouling film thickness in situ on typical OTEC heat exchanger tasks was studied. Seven techniques were studied for this application, including velocity measurements, acoustic diffraction, acoustic interferometer, Doppler flow velocity, pulse echo, critical angle, and surface (shear) wave effects. Of these, the latter five were laboratory tested using conventional microacoustic system components in various configuratons. Only the pulse echo technique yielded promising results. On fouled aluminum plates, thin film layers of 40 ..mu..m and greater were measured using a focused 30 MHz ceramic transducer operated at 25 MHz; this represents a resolution of about 2/3 wavelength. Measurements made on the inside of fouled 1'' aluminum pipes yielded film thicknesses of 75 to 125 ..mu..m. The thinnest layer resolved was approximately 1-1/4 wavelength. The resolution of slime layer thicknesses in the magnitudes of OTEC interest (5 to 30 ..mu..m) using pulse echo microacoustics will require transducer development. In particular, a higher operating frequency (150 to 200 MHz) and advanced material construction is recommended for further research.

Hirshman, J; Munier, R S.C.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better distribution of TiO2 particles on the activated carbon surface. A method for pore volume impregnation using microwave irradiation was also developed. A commercial microwave oven (800 W) was used as the microwave source. Under 2450 MHz microwave irradiation, TTIP was quickly hydrolyzed and anatase TiO2 was formed in a short time (< 20 minutes). Due to the volumetric heating and selective heating of microwave, the solvent and by-products were quickly removed which reduced energy consumption and processing time. Activated carbon and TiO{sub 2}/AC were also tested for the removal of hydrogen sulfide, which was chosen as the representative total reduced sulfur (TRS) species. The BioNuchar AC support itself was a good H{sub 2}S remover. After coating TiO{sub 2} by dry impregnation, H{sub 2}S removal efficiency of TiO{sub 2}/AC decreased compared with the virgin AC due to the change of surface pH. Under UV light irradiation, H{sub 2}S removal efficiency of TiO{sub 2}/AC composite doubled, and its sulfate conversion efficiency was higher than that of AC. The formation of sulfate is preferred since the sulfate can be removed from the composite by rising with water. A pilot-scale fluidized bed reactor was designed to test the efficiency of methanol oxidation with TiO{sub 2}/AC in the presence of UV light. TiO{sub 2}/AC was prepared using the spray desiccation method. The TiO{sub 2}/AC was pre-loaded with (1) methanol (equivalent to about 2%wt) and (2) methanol and water. When the TiO{sub 2}/AC loaded with methanol only was exposed to UV light for one hour in the reactor, most of the methanol remained in the carbon pores and, thus, was not oxidized. The TiO{sub 2}/AC loaded with methanol and water desorbed about 2/3 of the methanol from its pores during fluidization, however, only a small portion of this desorbed methanol was oxidized. A biofilter system employing biological activated carbon was developed for methanol removal. The biofilter contained a mixed packing with Westvaco BioNuchar granular activated carbon, perlite, Osmocote slow release ammonium nitrate pellets, and

David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

290

FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excellent progress was made in standardizing three complementary methods: Magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray micro CT, and MALDI imaging linear ion trap mass spectroscopy to image biomass and chemical, anatomical and functional changes that occur during pretreatment and hydrolysis. Magnetic resonance microscopy provides excellent images with as low as 5 uM resolution with hydrated biomass samples. We visualized dramatic changes in signal associated with the hydrolysis of the carbohydrates by strong acids. Quantitative diffusion approaches were used to probe more subtle structural changes in biomass. Diffusion tensor calculations reflect diffusion anisotropy and fractional anisotropy maps clearly show the longer range diffusion within the vessels compared to within the fiber cells. The diffusion is increased along the cell walls of the vessels. Suggesting that further research with NMR imaging should be pursued. X-ray CT provides excellent images at as low as 3.5 uM resolution from dried biomass. Small increases in surface area, and decreases in local density have been quantified in with wood after mild pretreatments; these changes are expected to be underestimates of the hydrated wood, due to the ~12% shrinkage that occurs upon drying untreated wood. MALDI-MS spectra show high ion intensities at most mass to charge ratios in untreated and pretreated woody material. MALDI-MSn is required to improve specificity and reduce background for imaging. MALDI-TOF is not specific enough for carbohydrate identification. Using MALDI-LIT/MSn we can readily identify oligomeric glucans and xylans and their fragmentation patterns as well as those of the glucuronic acid side chains of birch 4-O-methyl glucuronxylan. Imaging of glucan and xylan oligomers show that many contain isobaric ions with different distributions, indicating again that MSn is needed for accurate imaging of lignocellulosic materials. We are now starting to integrate the three imaging methods by using the same set of biomass samples imaged with all three methods, and using common analytical software to quantify parameters from the three dimensional images. In addition to the proposed experiments, we conducted imaging studies with a novel TOF-SIMS instrument available through collaborations with the AMOLF goup led by Ron Heeren at the FOM Institute in Amersterdam, Netherlands. ToF-SIMS was used to image intact cross sections of Populus stems with high spatial resolution, chemically selectivity. ToF-SIMS images were correlated with fluorescence microscopy which allowed for more positive ion identification.

PETER, GARY F. [UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA] [UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Microsoft Word - Comments to DOE from MoPSC on 2009 Trans Congestion Study_FINAL.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COMMENTS OF THE MISSOURI PUBLIC SERVICE MISSOURI COMMISSION COMMENTS OF THE MISSOURI PUBLIC SERVICE MISSOURI COMMISSION REGARDING THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S 2009 TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY AND THE DESIGNATION OF NATIONAL INTEREST ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION CORRIDORS I. Introduction A. Major Concern of the Missouri Public Service Missouri Commission At the outset, the Missouri Public Service Commission (Missouri Commission) wants to thank the Department of Energy (DOE) for the opportunity to provide input on its process for establishing National Interest Electricity Transmission Corridors (NIETCs). While cost allocation is not within the purview of the DOE under the 2005 Energy Policy Act, it is important for DOE to understand that the Missouri Commission's major concern is being allocated cost without commensurate benefits for the citizens of Missouri. The Missouri

292

Electron-atom collision studies using optically state-selected beams. Final report, May 15, 1991--May 14, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As stated in the original proposal, the goal of the project has been to perform electron-scattering experiments on a few model systems with emphasis on resolving all the quantum-state variables possible. The purpose of these experimental studies has been to provide a set of measurements of unprecedented accuracy and completeness that can be used as benchmarks for comparison with theoretical calculations. During the period covered by this report, the work has concentrated on measuring low-energy electron scattering from sodium and chromium. Sodium provides an ideal one-electron test case, since it has a single loosely bound valence electron, making it approachable by even the most complex electron scattering calculations. In addition, the atom has a strong optical transition from the 3{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ground state to the 3{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} excited state whose wavelength (589 nm) matches the peak output of the laser dye rhodamine 6G. Thus optical pumping techniques can be readily applied in the laboratory, leading to either a population of ground state atoms in which the spin of the valence electron is oriented either up or down in the laboratory, or a spin polarized pure angular momentum state of the excited 3{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state. Such an excited state makes possible superelastic scattering, where the internal energy of the atom is transferred to the electron during the collision. This turns out to be a very efficient way to study the inelastic scattering process. Unlike sodium, chromium provides an extremely exacting test for theoretical methods because of its very complex electronic structure, not because it is simple. With a valence configuration consisting of five electrons in a half-filled 3d shell, plus another electron in a 4s shell, this atom provides a test case that can challenge even the simplest approximations.

Kelley, M.H.; McClelland, J.J.

1998-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Mechanistic Studies of Charge Injection from Metallic Electrodes into Organic Semiconductors Mediated by Ionic Functionalities: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-organic semiconductor interfaces are important because of their ubiquitous role in determining the performance of modern electronics such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), fuel cells, batteries, field effect transistors (FETs), and organic solar cells. Interfaces between metal electrodes required for external wiring to the device and underlying organic structures directly affect the charge carrier injection/collection efficiency in organic-based electronic devices primarily due to the mismatch between energy levels in the metal and organic semiconductor. Environmentally stable and cost-effective electrode materials, such as aluminum and gold typically exhibit high potential barriers for charge carriers injection into organic devices leading to increased operational voltages in OLEDs and FETs and reduced charge extraction in photovoltaic devices. This leads to increased power consumption by the device, reduced overall efficiency, and decreased operational lifetime. These factors represent a significant obstacle for development of next generation of cheap and energy-efficient components based on organic semiconductors. It has been noticed that introduction of organic materials with conjugated backbone and ionic pendant groups known as conjugated poly- and oligoelectrolytes (CPEs and COEs), enables one to reduce the potential barriers at the metal-organic interface and achieve more efficient operation of a device, however exact mechanisms of the phenomenon have not been understood. The goal of this project was to delineate the function of organic semiconductors with ionic groups as electron injection layers. The research incorporated a multidisciplinary approach that encompassed the creation of new materials, novel processing techniques, examination of fundamental electronic properties and the incorporation of the resulting knowledgebase into development of novel organic electronic devices with increased efficiency, environmental stability, and reduced cost. During the execution of the project, main efforts were focused on the synthesis of new charge-bearing organic materials, such as CPEs and COEs, and block copolymers with neutral and ionic segments, studies of mechanisms responsible for the charge injection modulation in devices with ionic interlayers, and use of naturally occurring charged molecules for creation of enhanced devices. The studies allowed PIs to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed approach for the improvement of operational parameters in model OLED and FET systems resulting in increased efficiency, decreased contact resistance, and possibility to use stable metals for fabrication of device electrodes. The successful proof-of-the-principle results potentially promise development of light-weight, low fabrication cost devices which can be used in consumer applications such as displays, solar cells, and printed electronic devices. Fundamental mechanisms responsible for the phenomena observed have been identified thus advancing the fundamental knowledgebase.

Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen [UCSB; Bazan, Guillermo [UCSB; Mikhailovsky, Alexander [UCSB

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Final purification of synthetic olive oil mill wastewater treated by chemical oxidation using ion exchange: Study of operating parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this research work, ion exchange (IE) is presented as a suitable option for purification of olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) previously treated by means of a secondary treatment (OMWST). This pretreatment consisted in Fenton-like oxidation process, followed by coagulationflocculation and filtration through olive stones. The parametric requirements for drinking water production or at least for public waterways discharge were achieved using a combination of two IE columns working in series at bench scale. The IE resins used in this study were Dowex Marathon C and Amberlite IRA-67. The effect of contact time, operating temperature and flow rate on simultaneous removal of sodium, total iron, chloride and phenols (the major pollutant species in OMWST) were investigated. Removal percentages of sodium, chloride and total iron increased with incrementing the contact time. Equilibrium was obtained in about 30min for all ions and ion concentrations values determined were lower than the maximum levels for drinking water standards. On the other hand, adsorption efficiencies of sodium, total iron and chloride ions were found to be not considerably affected by the operating temperature. The highest phenols removal percentage (around 100%) was obtained in the first minutes for 298K and 10L/h.

M.D. Vctor-Ortega; J.M. Ochando-Pulido; G. Hodaifa; A. Martinez-Ferez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Town of Hague landfill reclamation study: Research ways to increase waste heating value and reduce waste volume. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitored composing was studied as a method for reducing the quantity of waste requiring disposed from a landfill reclamation project. After each of two re-screening steps, composted {open_quotes}soil{close_quotes} from a single long windrow of varying depths and moisture content was subjected to analytical testing to determine its suitability to remain as backfill in a reclaimed landfill site. The remaining uncomposted waste was combusted at a waste-to-energy facility to determine if Btu values were improved. Results indicate that a full-scale composting operation could result in a net decrease of approximately 11 percent in disposal costs. The Btu value of the reclaimed waste was calculated to be 4,500 to 5,000 Btu/lb. The feasibility of composting reclaimed waste at other landfill reclamation projects will depend upon site-specific technical and economic factors, including size and nature of the organic fraction of the waste mass, local processing costs, and the cost of waste disposal alternatives.

Salerni, E. [SSB Environmental Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Study of vinyl chloride formation at landfill sites in California. Final report, 16 July 1985-15 January 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine if vinyl chloride (VC) detected in air above California landfills is produced in situ. Experiments were performed with N and S California landfill samples and anaerobic-digestor sewage sludge. Test materials were incubated with various chlorocarbons and with /sup 13/C-trichloroethylene (TCE) to confirm biological production of /sup 13/C-VC. These experiments confirmed the biological dechlorination of chloroethylenes as the most likely route for VC emission from landfills, rather than chemical or photochemical routes, or PVC degradation. Leaching from PVC could be a minor source of VC, though there was less than 0.1% (estimated) plastic in the landfill samples, containing at most 330 ppm of VC monomer. A landfill sample known to produce VC was used to start an anaerobic chemostat using methanol as sole carbon source. The enriched culture resulting was homogeneous, and when incubated with /sup 13/C-TCE, produced (13)C-VC, confirmed by GC/MS.

Molton, P.M.; Hallen, R.T.; Payne, J.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Coordinated study of the Devonian black shale in the Illinois Basin: Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the resource potential of the Devonian shales, called the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) was begun. A study of the stratigraphy, structure, composition, and gas content of the Devonian shale in the Illinois Basin was undertaken by the State Geological Surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, under contract to the U.S. DOE as a part of the EGSP. Certain additional data were also developed by other research organizations (including Monsanto Research Corporation-Mound Facility and Battelle-Columbus Laboratory) on cores taken from the Illinois Basin. This report, an overview of geological data on the Illinois basin and interpretations of this data resulting from the EGSP, highlights areas of potential interest as exploration targets for possible natural gas resources in the Devonian shale of the basin. The information in this report was compiled during the EGSP from open file data available at the three State Geological surveys and from new data developed on cores taken by the DOE from the basin specifically for the EGSP. The organically richest shale is found in southeastern Illinois and in most of the Indiana and Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky. Natural fractures in the shale may aid in collecting gas from a large volume of shale. These fractures may be more abundant and interconnected to a greater degree in the vicinity of major faults. Major faults along the Rough Creek Lineament and Wabash Valley Fault System cross the deeper part of the basin.

Lineback, J.A.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten, the Proctor Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites, for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A separate Appendix provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. 26 figs., 121 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy in conjunction with supersonic molecular beam gas-surface scattering to significantly enhance our understanding of chemical processes occurring on well-characterized interfaces. One program focus was on the spatially-resolved emergent behavior of complex reaction systems as a function of the local geometry and density of adsorbate-substrate systems under reaction conditions. Another focus was on elucidating the emergent electronic and related reactivity characteristics of intentionally constructed single and multicomponent atom- and nanoparticle-based materials. We also examined emergent chirality and self-organization in adsorbed molecular systems where collective interactions between adsorbates and the supporting interface lead to spatial symmetry breaking. In many of these studies we combined the advantages of scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) imaging, scanning tunneling local electronic spectroscopy (STS), and reactive supersonic molecular beams to elucidate precise details of interfacial reactivity that had not been observed by more traditional surface science methods. Using these methods, it was possible to examine, for example, the differential reactivity of molecules adsorbed at different bonding sites in conjunction with how reactivity is modified by the local configuration of nearby adsorbates. At the core of this effort was the goal of significantly extending our understanding of interfacial atomic-scale interactions to create, with intent, molecular assemblies and materials with advanced chemical and physical properties. This ambitious program addressed several key topics in DOE Grand Challenge Science, including emergent chemical and physical properties in condensed phase systems, novel uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon management. These activities directly benefitted national science objectives in the areas of chemical energy production and advanced materials development.

Sibener, Steven J. [University of Chicago, IL (United States)] [University of Chicago, IL (United States)

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

300

Close-coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies. Final report, [October 1, 1988--July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a four year and ten month contract starting on October 1, 1988 to July 31, 1993 with the US Department of Energy to study and improve Close-Coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Direct Liquefaction of coal by producing high yields of distillate with improved quality at lower capital and production costs in comparison to existing technologies. Laboratory, Bench and PDU scale studies on sub-bituminous and bituminous coals are summarized and referenced in this volume. Details are presented in the three topical reports of this contract; CTSL Process Bench Studies and PDU Scale-Up with Sub-Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-1, CTSL Process Bench Studies with Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-2, and CTSL Process Laboratory Scale Studies, Modelling and Technical Assessment-DE-88818-TOP-3. Results are summarized on experiments and studies covering several process configurations, cleaned coals, solid separation methods, additives and catalysts both dispersed and supported. Laboratory microautoclave scale experiments, economic analysis and modelling studies are also included along with the PDU-Scale-Up of the CTSL processing of sub-bituminous Black Thunder Mine Wyoming coal. During this DOE/HRI effort, high distillate yields were maintained at higher throughput rates while quality was markedly improved using on-line hydrotreating and cleaned coals. Solid separations options of filtration and delayed coking were evaluated on a Bench-Scale with filtration successfully scaled to a PDU demonstration. Directions for future direct coal liquefaction related work are outlined herein based on the results from this and previous programs.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Final DOE Areas Feasibility Study  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the area California Office of Historic Preservation, Northwest Information Center, Lee Jordan, Coordinator June 26, 1998 and April 12, 2000 Historical and Cultural Resources...

302

FINAL REPORT TUCSON INTERSECTION STUDY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stedman University of Denver Department of Chemistry Denver, CO 80208 Phone: (303)871-2580 Fax: 303 871

Denver, University of

303

Low-to-moderate temperature geothermal resource assessment for Nevada: Area specific studies, final report for the period June 1, 1980-August 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hawthorne study area is located in Mineral County, Nevada and surrounds the municipality of the same name. It encompasses an area of approximately 310 sq. km (120 sq. mi), and most of the land belongs to the US Army Ammunition Plant. The energy needs of the military combined with those of the area population (over 5,000 residents) are substantial. The area is classified as having a high potential for direct applications using the evaluation scheme described in Trexler and others (1979). A variety of scientific techniques was employed during area-wide resource assessment. General geologic studies demonstrate the lithologic diversity in the area; these studies also indicate possible sources for dissolved fluid constituents. Geophysical investigations include aeromagnetic and gravity surveys which aid in defining the nature of regional, and to a lesser extent, local variations in subsurface configurations. Surface and near-surface structural features are determined using various types of photo imagery including low sun-angle photography. An extensive shallow depth temperature probe survey indicates two zones of elevated temperature on opposite sides of the Walker Lake basin. Temperature-depth profiles from several wells in the study area indicate significant thermal fluid-bearing aquifers. Fluid chemical studies suggest a wide spatial distribution for the resource, and also suggest a meteoric recharge source in the Wassuk Range. Finally, a soil-mercury survey was not a useful technique in this study area. Two test holes were drilled to conclude the area resource assessment, and thermal fluids were encountered in both wells. The western well has measured temperatures as high as 90 C (194 F) within 150 meters (500 ft) of the surface. Temperature profiles in this well indicate a negative temperature gradient below 180 meters (590 ft). The eastern hole had a bottom hole temperature of 61 C (142 F) at a depth of only 120 meters (395 ft). A positive gradient is observed to a total depth in the well.

Trexler, Dennis T.; Koeing, Brian A.; Flynn, Thomas; Bruce, James L.; Ghusn, George Jr.

1981-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

A study of the effects of enhanced oil recovery agents on the quality of Strategic Petroleum Reserves crude oil. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project was initiated on September 1, 1990. The objective of the project was to carry out a literature search to estimate the types and extents of long time interactions of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agents, such as surfactants, caustics and polymers, with crude oil. This information is necessary to make recommendations about mixing EOR crude oil with crude oils from primary and secondary recovery processes in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Data were sought on both adverse and beneficial effects of EOR agents that would impact handling, transportation and refining of crude oil. An extensive literature search has been completed, and the following informations has been compiled: (1) a listing of existing EOR test and field projects; (2) a listing of currently used EOR agents; and (3) evidence of short and long term physical and chemical interactions of these EOR-agents with hydrocarbons, and their effects on the quality of crude oil at long times. This information is presented in this report. Finally some conclusions are derived and recommendations are made. Although the conclusions are based mostly on extrapolations because of lack of specific data, it is recommended that the enhancement of the rates of biodegradation of oil catalyzed by the EOR agents needs to be further studied. There is no evidence of substantial long term effects on crude oil because of other interactions. Some recommendations are also made regarding the types of studies that would be necessary to determine the effect of certain EOR agents on the rates of biodegradation of crude oil.

Kabadi, V.N.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Current developments in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for use in geology, forensics, and nuclear nonproliferation research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation focused on new applications of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The diverse fields that were investigated show the versatility of the technique. In Chapter 2, LA-ICP-MS was used to investigate the rare earth element (REE) profiles of garnets from the Broken Hill Deposit in New South Wales, Australia. The normalized REE profiles helped to shed new light on the formation of deposits of sulfide ores. This information may be helpful in identifying the location of sulfide ore deposits in other locations. New sources of metals such as Pg, Zn, and Ag, produced from these ores, are needed to sustain our current technological society. The application of LA-ICP-MS presented in Chapter 3 is the forensics analysis of automotive putty and caulking. The elemental analysis of these materials was combined with the use of Principal Components Analysis (PCA). The PCA comparison was able to differentiate the automotive putty samples by manufacturer and lot number. The analysis of caulk was able to show a differentiation based on manufacturer, but no clear differentiation was shown by lot number. This differentiation may allow matching of evidence in the future. This will require many more analyses and the construction of a database made up of many different samples. The 4th chapter was a study of the capabilities of LA-ICP-MS for fast and precise analysis of particle ensembles for nuclear nonproliferation applications. Laser ablation has the ability to spatially resolve particle ensembles which may contain uranium or other actinides from other particles present in a sample. This is of importance in samples obtained from air on filter media. The particle ensembles of interest may be mixed in amongst dust and other particulates. A problem arises when ablating these particle ensembles directly from the filter media. Dust particles other than ones of interest may be accidentally entrained in the aerosol of the ablated particle ensemble. This would cause the analysis to be skewed. The use of a gelatin substrate allows the ablation a particle ensemble without disturbing other particles or the gelatin surface. A method to trap and ablate particles on filter paper using collodion was also investigated. The laser was used to dig through the collodion layer and into the particle ensemble. Both of these methods fix particles to allow spatial resolution of the particle ensembles. The use of vanillic acid as a possible enhancement to ablation was also studied. A vanillic acid coating of the particles fixed on top of the gelatin substrate was not found to have any positive effect on either signal intensity or precision. The mixing of vanillic acid in the collodion solution used to coat the filter paper increased ablation signal intensity by a factor of 4 to 5. There was little effect on precision, though. The collodion on filter paper method and the gelatin method of resolving particles have shown themselves to be possible tools in fighting proliferation of nuclear weapons and material. Future applications of LA-ICP-MS are only limited by the imagination of the investigator. Any material that can be ablated and aerosolized is a potential material for analysis by LA-ICP-MS. Improvements in aerosol transport, ablation chamber design, and laser focusing can make possible the ablation and analysis of very small amounts of material. This may perhaps lead to more possible uses in forensics. A similar method to the one used in Chapter 3 could perhaps be used to match drug residue to the place of origin. Perhaps a link could be made based on the elements leached from the soil by plants used to make drugs. This may have a specific pattern based on where the plant was grown. Synthetic drugs are produced in clandestine laboratories that are often times very dirty. The dust, debris, and unique materials in the lab environment could create enough variance to perhaps match drugs produced there to samples obtained off the street. Even if the match was not strong enough to be evidence, the knowledge that many sa

Messerly, Joshua D.

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

306

Measurement of ww + wz production cross section and study of the dijet mass spectrum in the lnu + jets final state at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the measurement of the WW and WZ production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, in a final state consisting of an electron or muon, neutrino and jets. The data analyzed were collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider and correspond to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The analysis uses a fit to the dijet mass distribution to extract the diboson contribution. We observe 1582 {+-} 275(stat.) {+-} 107(syst.) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section of {sigma}{sub WW/WZ} = 18.1 {+-} 3.3(stat.) {+-} 2.5(syst.) pb, consistent with the Standard Model prediction of 15.9 {+-} 0.9 pb. The best fit to the dijet mass of the known components shows a good agreement with the data except for the [120, 160] GeV/c{sup 2} mass range, where an excess is observed. We perform detailed checks of our background model and study the significance of the excess, assuming an additional gaussian component with a width compatible with the expected dijet mass resolution. A standard {Delta}{sub {chi}}{sup 2} test of the presence of the additional component, returns a p-value of 4.2 x 10{sup -4} when standard sources of systematics are considered, corresponding to a significance of 3.3{sigma}.

Cavaliere, Viviana; /Siena U.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

UHV-STEM studies of materials. A final report submitted to the Department of Energy on grant No. DE-FG02-87ER45322  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report reviews the research themes and accompanying publications (as listed on the 46-item publication list) carried out with a UHV-STEM at Cornell University from 1987 to 2000.

Silcox, J.

2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

308

NIF Final Optics Assemblies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NIF Final Optics Assemblies The Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) are the last element of the main laser system and the first of the target area systems. Each FOA contains four...

309

Clean Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

3 3 V e h i c l e M a i n t e n a n c e a n d D u r a b i l i t y FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsor- ship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report. The District or

310

Clean Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

2 2 P r o j e c t D e s i g n a n d I m p l e m e n t a t i o n FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report.

311

FINAL REPORT CANYON AND SLOPE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the influence of canyons on slope cur- rents ; f) identification of communities which may be affected by oil#12;FINAL REPORT CANYON AND SLOPE PROCESSES STUDY VOLUME I EXECUTIVE S(2@lARY Prepared for United and provides diverse habi- tats for biological communities. In the Mid- and North Atlantic Region, canyons have

Mathis, Wayne N.

312

National Science Bowl Finals  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

314

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

315

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

316

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

317

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census...

318

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

319

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

320

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census...

322

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

323

DOE Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report contains a summary of work accomplished in the establishment of a Climate Data Center at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Hinzman, Larry D.; Long, James; Newby, Greg B.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

324

Final Meeting Summary ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health, Safety, and Environmental Protection Committee November 8, 2012 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD HEALTH SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION COMMITTEE November...

325

Final_Report.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Energy, Offi ce of Fossil Energy. Ormat: Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Generation Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final Report for the...

326

Final Meeting Summary ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Issue Manager Report-Out on Tank Closure and Waste Management Final Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM FEIS) Groundwater and Vadose Zone Modeling (JOINT...

327

Final Report to DOE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the accomplished goals and provide a list of the publications and presentations made during the project. The goals of the project were accomplished through the various publications submitted to Journals and presentations done at the DOE and international meetings and conferences. The 8 journal articles related to the goals of this project were accepted or submitted. The 23 presentations related to goals of the project were presented at the meetings. There were some minor changes regarding to project goals because of issues encountered during the analysis of the data. For example, a total water probe sensor mounted on the Convair-580 that can be used for defining mixed phase conditions and parameterization, had some problems to estimate magnitude of total water mass, and this resulted in issues providing an accurate parameterization for cloud fraction. Variability related aerosol number concentrations and their composition for direct and indirect effects were studied and published. Results were given to explain aerosol and ice microphysical effects on climate change studies. It is suggested that developed parameterizations should consider the variability in aerosol and ice parameters over the Arctic regions.

Ismail Gultepe

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Final Draft ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the anticipated completion of the Constellation Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement in June 2008Final Draft ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION, MODIFICATION, AND OPERATION OF THREE CENTER, FL 32899 February 2007 #12;THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK #12;FINAL DRAFT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL

Waliser, Duane E.

329

Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

330

Use of open source information and commercial satellite imagery for nuclear nonproliferation regime compliance verification by a community of academics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this study, the availability and use of commercial satellite imagery systems, commercial computer codes for satellite imagery analysis, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)verification International Monitoring System (IMS), publicly available information...

Solodov, Alexander

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 2013 January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office JANUARY 2013 DOE/EA-1923 iv January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office January 2013 DOE/EA-1923 v January 2013 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Final Environmental Assessment for the Green Energy School Wind Project (DOE/EA-1923) CONTACT: For additional copies or more information on this final Environmental Assessment (EA),

332

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

333

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

334

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

335

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

336

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2"...

337

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space...

338

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

339

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More...

340

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Final Beamline Design Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Beamline Design Report Final Beamline Design Report Guidelines and Review Criteria (SCD 1.20.95) 6.0 Final Beamline Design Report (FDR) Overview The Final Beamline Design Report is part of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline review process and should be planned for when approximately 90% of the total beamline design has been completed. Fifteen copies of the FDR are to be submitted to the APS Users Office. Approval of the Collaborative Access Team's (CAT) designs described in the report is required prior to installation of beamline components in the APS Experiment Hall. Components that have a long lead time for design or procurement can be reviewed separately from the remainder of the beamline, but enough information must be provided so that the reviewer can understand the

342

A new type of Neutrino Detector for Sterile Neutrino Search at Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a new detector, called NuLat, to study electron anti-neutrinos a few meters from a nuclear reactor, and search for anomalous neutrino oscillations. Such oscillations could be caused by sterile neutrinos, and might explain the "Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly". NuLat, is made possible by a natural synergy between the miniTimeCube and mini-LENS programs described in this paper. It features a "Raghavan Optical Lattice" (ROL) consisting of 3375 boron or $^6$Li loaded plastic scintillator cubical cells 6.3\\,cm (2.500") on a side. Cell boundaries have a 0.127\\,mm (0.005") air gap, resulting in total internal reflection guiding most of the light down the 3 cardinal directions. The ROL detector technology for NuLat gives excellent spatial and energy resolution and allows for in-depth event topology studies. These features allow us to discern inverse beta decay (IBD) signals and the putative oscillation pattern, even in the presence of other backgrounds. We discuss here test venues, efficiency, sensitivity an...

Lane, C; Blackmon, J; Rasco, C; Mumm, H P; Markoff, D; Jocher, G R; Dorrill, R; Duvall, M; Learned, J G; Li, V; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Milincic, R; Negrashov, S; Sakai, M; Rosen, M; Varner, G; Huber, P; Pitt, M L; Rountree, S D; Vogelaar, R B; Wright, T; Yokley, Z

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

NSF final project report planning and implementation of the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conducted planning and implementation of ocean carbon dioxide hydrographic surveys ocean process studies, time-series studies of Bermuda and Hawaii, and sponsored scientific workshops for those activities.

Livingston, Hugh D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Laboratory studies of the sensitivity of tropospheric ozone to the chemistry of sea salt aerosol. Final report, September 15, 1993--September 14, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ozone plays a critical role in both the chemistry and radiation balance of the troposphere. Understanding the factors controlling tropospheric ozone levels is critical to our understanding of a variety of issues in global chemistry and climate change. Chlorine atoms have the potential to contribute significantly to the ozone balance in the free troposphere. They can react directly with ozone or alternately, with organics and may actually lead to the formation of ozone in the presence of sufficient NO. Reactions of alkali halides in sea salt particles are a potential source of atomic chlorine, hence reactions of these alkali halides, especially those producing precursors to atomic chlorine, are of great interest. Finally, the mechanisms, intermediates and products of the Cl-biogenic reactions are unknown; these could serve as unique markers of chlorine atom chemistry in the troposphere, and hence are important to define.

Finlayson-Pitts, B.J.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Experimental studies on the group ignition of a cloud of coal particles. Volume 1, Experimental results: Final report, August 15, 1988--October 15, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objectives of this work are to formulate a model to simulate transient coal pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a cloud of coal particles and to compare results of the program with those reported in the literature elsewhere. The present work is reported in the following order. An introduction to group combustion is given followed by a review of earlier works. Next, the relevance of the present work to practical application and spray combustion modeling is discussed. A group combustion model is then presented for a spherical cloud of coal particles along with a set of dimensional and nondimensional equations. Finally, nonsteady results are generated for pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a cloud of coal particles. (VC)

Annamalai, K.; Ruiz, M.; Vadakkath, A.; Gopalakrishnan, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

final_report.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Scientific/Technical Report Final Scientific/Technical Report October 1, 2008 - December 31, 2011 Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle Submitted by: The University of Chicago 5801 S. Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 Principal Author: David Archer Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 10, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle Final Scientific/Technical Report submitted by David Archer 1 and Bruce Buffett 2 Submitted 4-10-2012 1 Department of the Geophysical Sciences University of Chicago Chicago IL 60637 2 University of California, Berkeley Earth & Planetary Science 383 McCone Hall Berkeley, CA 94720-5800 Agency Award Number: DE-NT0006558 Award Dates 1/1/08 to 12/31/11

347

June 28, 2013 Final Independent External Peer Review Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 28, 2013 Final Independent External Peer Review Report Upper Des Plaines River and Tributaries Des Plaines Phase II Study IEPR Final IEPR Report #12;Upper Des Plaines IEPR Final IEPR Report Review Report Upper Des Plaines River and Tributaries, Illinois and Wisconsin Feasibility Study (Phase II

US Army Corps of Engineers

348

Assessment for Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community Tourism Assessment for Lindstrom, Minnesota Final Report May 2008 Prepared for of the University of Minnesota Extension and College of Food, Agricultural & Natural Resource Sciences #12; INTRODUCTION 1 DATA USED IN THE TOURISM ASSESSMENT 2 TOURISM-RELATED DATA FOR LINDSTROM 2 REFERENCES TO TOURISM

Amin, S. Massoud

349

Final Report Sustainability at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Final Report Sustainability at Oregon State University Prepared by The Institute for Natural Resources Oregon State University June 2009 #12;2 Sustainability at Oregon State University June 2009 The Institute for Natural Resources Created by the Oregon Legislature through the 2001 Oregon Sustainability Act

Escher, Christine

350

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project, ?Capital Investment to Fund Equipment Purchases and Facility Modifications to Create a Sustainable Future for EnergyXchange? served to replace landfill gas energy with alternative energy resources, primarily solar and wood waste. This is the final project closeout report.

Gilbert, Chris [Altamont Environmental, Inc.] [Altamont Environmental, Inc.

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOENNSA Participates in Large-Scale CTBT On-Site Inspection Exercise in Jordan Experts from U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories, including Sandia...

352

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Related News DOENNSA Participates in Large-Scale CTBT On-Site Inspection Exercise in Jordan NIS receives two NAGC awards Charles E. Messick receives the Administrator's Gold...

353

Relaxation Seen in Nonproliferation Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The authors feel that OPEC has been as much the bearer...Oil prices are high and OPEC is important because energy...write, adding that if OPEC were abolished and its...little effect on world oil production and prices. As for how...Arab oil em-bargo of 1973.-LUTHER J. CARTER...

LUTHER J. CARTER

1979-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

354

Science Office Grows, Nonproliferation Stalls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...role that science plays in national security, adds Michael Lubell, a lobbyist for the American Physical Society in...role that science plays in national security, adds Michael Lubell, a lobbyist for the American Physical Society in Washington...

David Malakoff; Robert Koenig

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project: Final report to Congress, Addendum. Davis: University of California, Centers for Water and Wildland Resources, 1996. Lake Tahoe Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

City, NV INTRODUCTION The Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project (SNEP) selected the Lake Tahoe Basin as one of California, Centers for Water and Wildland Resources, 1996. 7 Lake Tahoe Case Study DEBORAH L. ELLIOTT University of California, Davis, CA CHARLES R. GOLDMAN Division of Environmental Studies University

Stephens, Scott L.

356

Study of utility boilers for a coal-water-slurry demonstration test. Final report. [Selection of oil-fired boiler design for testing; CWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercialization of coal-water slurry (CWS) is within reach, but utilities still require evidence that they can fire CWS in full-scale boilers over the long term. This study lays the groundwork for a one-year CWS demonstration, outlining a test program and calculating retrofit and operating costs for seven typical oil-fired boilers. This report summarizes the work performed by Burns and Roe, Inc., with assistance from Combustion Engineering, Inc., Babcock and Wilcox Co., Foster Wheeler Corp., and Riley Stoker Corp., to assess the extent, performance effects, and costs of utility power plant modifications for a one-year CWS demonstration test. Eighteen utilities participated in this study. They offered 42 boilers ranging in size from 40 to 850 MW. The study was performed in two phases. In the first phase all boilers were preliminarily analyzed to determine the required derating for CWS firing. Seven case study units representative of the population of oil-design boilers were selected for detailed analysis in the second phase. For the seven case study units boilers performance analyses were conducted using common ground rules agreed to by the four major utility boiler manufacturers. Conceptual design for balance of plant systems were developed and the costs for plant modifications were estimated. An outline test plan and schedule was developed to identify test and fuel requirements. The total costs for conducting a one-year CWS utility boiler test at each of the seven case study units was calculated. Although specific boilers were used for the detailed cases studies, the study was directed to providing information in a generally applicable form that can be applied by all study participants or potential utility users. 62 tabs., 63 figs.

Kemeny, P.; Fontana, G.; Lagomarsino, J.; Pinson, M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Computer model study: An analysis of the Nephew/Spore model for determining costs of cost of coal mining in Appalachia. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study determined whether the model developed to study Costs of Coal Surface Mining and Reclamation in Appalachia was capable of being responsive to the needs of the Office of Surface Mining for projecting the extraction costs of coal in support of the Small Operator Assistance Program. The study analysis validated the model and adapted the model to specific small operator needs in terms of user flexibility. Based on the analysis and model enhancements approach used by the study, three primary recommendations are made: Validate the model with live cost and performance data to determine potential viability for small operator assistance; Enhance the model to provide greater flexibility and ease of user support; and field test the model through regional offices of the Small Operator Assistance Program.

Nephew, E.A.; Spore, R.L.

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

358

Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Analysis of Michigan's demand-side electricity resources in the residential sector: Volume 3, End-use studies: Revised final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the ''Analysis of Michigan's Demand-Side Electricity Resources in the Residential Sector'' contains end-use studies on various household appliances including: refrigerators, freezers, lighting systems, water heaters, air conditioners, space heaters, and heat pumps. (JEF)

Krause, F.; Brown, J.; Connell, D.; DuPont, P.; Greely, K.; Meal, M.; Meier, A.; Mills, E.; Nordman, B.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Infrared and visible laser double resonance studies of vibrational energy transfer processes in polyatomic molecules. Final report, June 15, 1988--June 14, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the spectroscopy of chromyl chloride (CrO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}?) in dilute solutions has been initiated. A discussion is given of its spectra and emission bands. 17 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab. (DLC)

Bhatnagar, R. [Texas Southern Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report for the formation of faculty and education establishing Colorado State's Smart Grid Integration Center

Troxell, W; Batchelor, A

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 4 Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC & WM EIS) (joint with PIC) ......

363

RPSEA Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RPSEA RPSEA Final Report 08122-36.Final Produced Water Pretreatment for Water Recovery and Salt Production 08122-36 January 26, 2012 Principal Investigator: James M. Silva Senior Chemical Engineer General Electric Global Research Center 1 Research Circle Niskayuna, NY 12309 ii Legal Notice This report was prepared by General Electric Global Research as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA, members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION

364

Final Notice of Violation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8,2011 8,2011 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Mr. Jolm J. Grossenbacher Director, Idaho National Laboratory and President, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC P. O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-3695 SEA-2011-01 Dear Mr. Grossenbacher: Pursuant to section 234B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, (the Act), and the Department of Energy's (DOE) regulations at 10 C.F.R . §§ 824.4(a)(3) and 824.7(b), DOE is issuing this Final Notice of Violation (FNOV) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) for multiple violations of classified information security requirements. The FNOV is based upon the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement May 11, 2010, Investigation Report and an evaluation of the evidence presented to DOE by BEA, including BEA's final

365

Final Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Design Review Module Final Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 [This Rev Design Re O 0 view Module w eview of the OR OFFICE OF C CD-1 was used to dev R U 233 Dispo F ENVIRO Standard R Fin Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M velop the Revie osition Project ONMENTAL Review Plan al Design view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 ew Plan for 90% in 2009. Lesso Module.] L MANAGE n (SRP) n e pplicability D-3 % Design Revi ons learned hav EMENT CD-4 iew of SWPF i ve been incorpo Post Ope in 2008 and for orated in the R eration r 60% Review Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively.

366

Sage Final EA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FINAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Environmental Assessment for DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR SAGE ELECTROCHROMICS SAGEGLASS® HIGH VOLUME MANUFACTURING (HVM) FACILITY IN FARIBAULT, MN U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 July 2009 DOE/EA-1645 Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Sage Electrochromics SageGlass® High Volume Manufacturing Facility in Faribault, MN DOE/EA-1645 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS iii Executive Summary 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 2 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2 2.1 Description of Proposed Action 2 2.2 Alternatives Considered but Eliminated 7 2.3 No Action Alternative 8 3.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS 9

367

Final - Gasbuggy S  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasbuggy S Gasbuggy S i t e Environmental Management End State Vision - January 2005 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Gasbuggy Site ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT END STATE VISION Final Final - Gasbuggy Site Environmental Management End State Vhion - fanuaty 2005 Executive Summary The Environmental Management End State Vision is to be used as the primary tool for communicating the individual site end state to the involved parties (e.g., U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], regulators, public stakeholders, Tribal Nations). The end state document is not a decisional document. If the DOE decides to seek changes to the current compliance agreements, decisions, or statutoqdregulatory requirements, those changes will be made in accordance with applicable requirements (DOEIEM, 2003).

368

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Sustainable energy Examen Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable energy Examen Final 24 mai 2013 Consignes ­ Vous disposez de 2 heures 30. ­ N'oubliez pas de r´epondre `a chaque question sur des feuilles s´epar´ees et d'indiquer votre nom sur chaque feuille. ­ La r´eponse `a la question huit doit se faire en anglais et sur la derni`ere feuille de l

Ernst, Damien

370

Sustainable energy Examen Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable energy Examen Final 30 mai 2014 Consignes -- Vous disposez de 2 heures 30. -- N'oubliez pas de r´epondre `a chaque question sur des feuilles s´epar´ees et d'indiquer votre nom, pr´enom et institution (ULg, Gramme) sur chaque feuille. -- Les r´eponses aux diff´erentes sous-questions doivent ^etre

Ernst, Damien

371

Results of the feasibility studies awarded under PL 96-126 and PL 96-304 for alcohol fuel production. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results from the feasibility study grants are summarized. The grants were to allow assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of construction and operation of commercial-scale alcohol fuel production facilities. Summarized are the process designs, financial and economic analyses, marketing analyses, and the environmental assessments. Use of current technology was declared to be adequate; no patents evolved from the studies. Suitable sites, served by transportation and utilities were located. Feedstock, energy sources, and raw materials were determined to be available. Environmental guidelines were found to be attainable and socioeconomic impacts and public acceptance of the projects were reported. Most of the proposed plants were declared to be economically feasible with profitability increasing with plant size. Financing was reported constrained by premium interest rates, an insecure ethanol market, and financial institution requirements for loan guarantees or high-equality loans.

Hosking, R.W.; Anderson, J.V.; Jones, K.W.; Plaster, D.S.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

TOKOPS: Tokamak Reactor Operations Study: The influence of reactor operations on the design and performance of tokamaks with solid-breeder blankets: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactor system operation and procedures have a profound impact on the conception and design of power plants. These issues are studied here using a model tokamak system employing a solid-breeder blanket. The model blanket is one which has evolved from the STARFIRE and BCSS studies. The reactor parameters are similar to those characterizing near-term fusion engineering reactors such as INTOR or NET (Next European Tokamak). Plasma startup, burn analysis, and methods for operation at various levels of output power are studied. A critical, and complicating, element is found to be the self-consistent electromagnetic response of the system, including the presence of the blanket and the resulting forces and loadings. Fractional power operation, and the strategy for burn control, is found to vary depending on the scaling law for energy confinement, and an extensive study is reported. Full-power reactor operation is at a neutron wall loading pf 5 MW/m/sup 2/ and a surface heat flux of 1 MW/m/sup 2/. The blanket is a pressurized steel module with bare beryllium rods and low-activation HT-9-(9-C-) clad LiAlO/sub 2/ rods. The helium coolant pressure is 5 MPa, entering the module at 297/sup 0/C and exiting at 550/sup 0/C. The system power output is rated at 1000 MW(e). In this report, we present our findings on various operational scenarios and their impact on system design. We first start with the salient aspects of operational physics. Time-dependent analyses of the blanket and balance of plant are then presented. Separate abstracts are included for each chapter.

Conn, R.W.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Firestone, M.A. (eds.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Comparative study of the reactions of metal oxides and carbonates with H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project had been the investigation of the effects of pore structure on the capacity of porous metal oxides for removal of gaseous pollutants from flue gases of power plants (SO{sub 2}) and hot coal gas (primarily H{sub 2}S). Porous calcines obtained from natural precursors (limestones and dolomites) and sorbents based on zinc oxide were used as model systems in our experimental studies, which included reactivity evolution experiments and pore structure characterization using a variety of methods. The key idea behind this project was to appropriately exploit the differences of the sulfidation and sulfation reactions (for instance, different molar volumes of solid products) to elucidate the dependence of the sorptive capacity of a porous sorbent on its physical microstructure. In order to be able to proceed faster and more productively on the analysis of the above defined problem, it was decided to employ in our studies solids whose reaction with SO{sub 2} (limestone calcines) or H{sub 2}S (sorbents based on zinc oxide) had been investigated in detail in past studies by our research group. Reactivity vs time or conversion vs time studies were conducted using thermogravimetry and fixed-bed and fluidized-bed reactors. The pore structure of partially reacted samples collected at selected time instants or conversion levels was analyzed by gas adsorption and mercury porosimetry. For better characterization of the pore structure of the solid samples, we also carried out intraparticle diffusivity measurements by the peak-broadening (chromatographic) method, using a system developed for this purpose in our laboratory. In the context of this part of the project, we also conducted a detailed theoretical investigation of the measurement of effective diffusivities in porous solids using the diffusion-cell method.

Sotirchos, S.V.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Four leptons final states from $??$ fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present a systematic study of all possible four leptons final states from $\\gamma\\gamma$ collisions. It is given a detailed account of fermion masses effects which are sizable since several collinear and $t$ channel enancements occur. The effects of angular cuts on the final charged leptons are also discussed. To perform the computation I have used the recently developed ALPHA algorithm (and the resulting code) for the automatic computation of scattering amplitudes.

Mauro Moretti

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study. Final report, 1 March, 1990--May 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to ``above-average`` radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject`s presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. [New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine; Stark, A.; Ju, C. [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Final Regulatory Impact Review/ Final Environmental Assessment/Initial Regulatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final Regulatory Impact Review/ Final Environmental Assessment/Initial Regulatory Flexibility................................................................................................. 1 2 REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW................................................................. 2 2 Analysis Amendment 97 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands

378

Final Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

95 95 :&,, ' - , i . -- Final Environmental Assessment for Device Assembly - Facility Operations f 3: >fi - , - , ' , 7 - . ' ' , , . I 8 ' , :-<:- L , a . ' ' ' -L. -1 , , ~ e m - . - I ! - , - # 8 , r I I , , , - , . .-- - ' - I S - . ! - , - , Y 2 L - . . 8 : L.-- , r Nevada ' f e s t ~ h e , Nye county, Nevada U. S. Department Of Energy - , 8 - - . 8 - I,, ' - 8 - - , , 8 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for DEVICE ASSEMBLY FACIUTY OPERATIONS MAY 1995 TABLE OF CONTENTS LISTOFFIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv USTOFTABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv A. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8. PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B.1 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

379

Accumulations Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Final Report Date: July 15, 2013 Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2013 NETL Manager: Skip Pratt Principal Investigators: Matthew Reagan (LBNL), Philip W. Jones (LLNL) 1. Goal of this report This report will summarize previously reported or published results concerning the behavior of hydrates subjected to warming, highlighting contributing and mitigating factors relating to the possibility of rapid climate feedbacks. We will thus assess various scenarios and possibilities for the relationship between climate and hydrates: i.e., the likelihood of a "clathrate

380

Final Report and Strategic Plan on the Feasibility Study to Assess Geothermal Potential on Warm Springs Reservation Lands. Report No. DOE/GO/15177  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005 the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Tribal Council authorized an evaluation of the geothermal development potential on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises obtained a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct a geological assessment and development estimate. Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises utilized a team of expert consultants to conduct the study and develop a strategic plan. The resource assessment work was completed in 2006 by GeothermEx Inc., a consulting company specializing in geothermal resource assessments worldwide. The GeothermEx report indicates there is a 90% probability that a commercial geothermal resource exists on tribal lands in the Mt. Jefferson area. The geothermal resource assessment and other cost, risk and constraints information has been incorporated into the strategic plan.

James Manion, Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises; David McClain, McClain & Associates

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Spectroscopic Studies of Photosynthetic Systems and Their Application in Photovoltaic Devices - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-175  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral hole-burning (SHB) and single photosynthetic complex spectroscopy (SPCS) will be used to study the excitonic structure and excitation energy transfer (EET) processes of several photosynthetic protein complexes at low temperatures. The combination of SHB on bulk samples and SPCS is a powerful frequency domain approach for obtaining data that will address a number of issues that are key to understanding excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics. The long-term goal is to reach a better understanding of the ultrafast solar energy driven primary events of photosynthesis as they occur in higher plants, cyanobacteria, purple bacteria, and green algae. A better understanding of the EET and charge separation (CS) processes taking place in photosynthetic complexes is of great interest, since photosynthetic complexes might offer attractive architectures for a future generation of circuitry in which proteins are crystallized.

Seibert, M.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Process development studies in coal gasification. Volume II. Reaction of aromatic compounds with steam. Final report, August 1, 1979-November 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research has been to explore and define the potential of steam reforming to produce light gases from coal-derived liquids. This was achieved through a study of the reaction of a model aromatic compound and of a coal-derived liquid with steam over an alumina supported nickel catalyst. The reaction of steam with benzene and SRC-II liquids over an alumina supported nickel catalyst has been investigated in a plug flow reactor. The primary process variables investigated were reactor pressure and temperature, contact time, and steam/carbon ratio. A proposed reaction network was also developed to explain the data obtained in this study. The effect of process variables on the conversion and product distribution when steam reforming the SRC-II coal-derived liquid was similar to that observed for benzene-steam reforming. The results indicated that a high yield of methane is favored at high pressures, low temperatures, and low steam-to-carbon ratios; and that a high yield of hydrogen is favored at low pressures and high steam-to-carbon ratios. The empirical rate equation for the benzene steam reforming reaction at 973 K, 300 psig, and a steam/carbon ratio of approximately 3 was r/sub C/sub 6/H/sub 6// = 1.92 x 10/sup -3/ P/sub C/sub 6/H/sub 6//. The activation energy was 88 KJ/mol, or 21 kcal/mol in the temperature range 748-973 K. A correlation was developed to predict product yields and hydrocarbon conversion over the range of process variables investigated. A second correlation was developed to predict the yields and conversion beyond the range of variables investigated. A reaction network for aromatic steam reforming was proposed. 87 refs., 47 figs., 3 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.

1984-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

383

DOE plutonium disposition study: Analysis of existing ABB-CE Light Water Reactors for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core reactivity and basic fuel management calculations were conducted on the selected reactors (with emphasis on the System 80 units as being the most desirable choice). Methods used were identical to those reported in the Evolutionary Reactor Report. From these calculations, the basic mission capability was assessed. The selected reactors were studied for modification, such as the addition of control rod nozzles to increase rod worth, and internals and control system modifications that might also be needed. Other system modifications studied included the use of enriched boric acid as soluble poison, and examination of the fuel pool capacities. The basic geometry and mechanical characteristics, materials and fabrication techniques of the fuel assemblies for the selected existing reactors are the same as for System 80+. There will be some differences in plutonium loading, according to the ability of the reactors to load MOX fuel. These differences are not expected to affect licensability or EPA requirements. Therefore, the fuel technology and fuel qualification sections provided in the Evolutionary Reactor Report apply to the existing reactors. An additional factor, in that the existing reactor availability presupposes the use of that reactor for the irradiation of Lead Test Assemblies, is discussed. The reactor operating and facility licenses for the operating plants were reviewed. Licensing strategies for each selected reactor were identified. The spent fuel pool for the selected reactors (Palo Verde) was reviewed for capacity and upgrade requirements. Reactor waste streams were identified and assessed in comparison to uranium fuel operations. Cost assessments and schedules for converting to plutonium disposition were estimated for some of the major modification items. Economic factors (incremental costs associated with using weapons plutonium) were listed and where possible under the scope of work, estimates were made.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves, NOSR-2, Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant and authorized a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. The US owns 100% of the mineral rights and about 60% of the surface rights in NOSR-2. The Ute Indian Tribe owns the other 40% of the surface. This 88,890-acre tract was set aside as an oil shale reserve for the US Navy by an Executive Order of President Wilson in 1916. Management of NOSR-2 is the responsibility of DOE. No drilling for oil and gas has occurred on the property and no production has been established. No reserves are present, although the area is hypothesized to overlay gas resources. Mapping by the US Geological Survey and others has resulted in speculative seismic leads for structures that may or may not hold conventional oil and gas. All of the mineral rights (including oil shale) must be considered exploratory and the mineral rights must be valued accordingly. The opinion recommended to maximize value to the US is Option 4, sale of the interest of the US of all or part of NOSR-2. Evaluation of this option results in an estimated value which is more than three times greater than the next highest estimated value, for Option 2, transfer to the Department of the Interior for leasing.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

High and ultra high magnetic field studies of newly synthesized organic superconductors. Final report, 30 September 1992-29 September 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To understand the nature of the superconducting state, the authors studied the new organic superconductor (BETS)2GaCl4, that was synthesized by their collaborator L. K. Montgomery. The BETS donor molecule is a variant of the BEDT molecule where four of the inner sulfur atoms are replaced with selenium atoms. The larger selenium atoms produce a larger overlap of the orbitals in the conducting sheets of the crystals and hence produce wider electronic bands. The authors used RF penetration depth measurements at 24 MHz initially to map out the H{sub c2} diagram of (BETS)2GaCl4. The measurements were much more successful than they expected yielding many details about the superconducting state and the vortex lattice. As an example, the authors were able to measure the pinning force potential, often called the Labush parameter, as a function of temperature from 100 mK to 4.5 K. Knowing this parameter enabled them to calculate a critical current at zero temperature of 2 x 10(exp 4) A/sq cm for this material.

Agosta, C.C.

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

New vision solar system exploration missions study: Analysis of the use of biomodal space nuclear power systems to support outer solar system exploration missions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis of the capability of nuclear bimodal systems to perform outer solar system exploration missions. Missions of interest include orbiter mission s to Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. An initial technology baseline consisting of a NEBA 10 kWe, 1000 N thrust, 850 s, 1500 kg bimodal system was selected, and its performance examined against a data base for trajectories to outer solar system planetary destinations to select optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectories for study. A conceptual design for a common bimodal spacecraft capable of performing missions to all the planetary destinations was developed and made the basis of end to end mission designs for orbiter missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. Concepts for microspacecraft capable of probing Jupiter`s atmosphere and exploring Titan were also developed. All mission designs considered use the Atlas 2AS for launch. It is shown that the bimodal nuclear power and propulsion system offers many attractive option for planetary missions, including both conventional planetary missions in which all instruments are carried by a single primary orbiting spacecraft, and unconventional missions in which the primary spacecraft acts as a carrier, relay, and mother ship for a fleet of micro spacecraft deployed at the planetary destination.

NONE

1995-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

387

Final Report for DoE Grant DE-FG02-06ER54878, Laboratory Studies of Reconnection in Magnetically Confined Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of the collisionless magnetic reconnection constituted the primary work carried out under this grant. The investigations utilized two magnetic configurations with distinct boundary conditions. Both configurations were based upon the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF). The first configuration is characterized by open boundary conditions where the magnetic field lines interface directly with the vacuum vessel walls. The reconnection dynamics for this configuration has been methodically characterized and it has been shown that kinetic effects related to trapped electron trajectories are responsible for the high rates of reconnection observed. This type of reconnection has not been investigated before. Nevertheless, the results are directly relevant to observations by the Wind spacecraft of fast reconnection deep in the Earth magnetotail. The second configuration was developed to be specifically relevant to numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, allowing the magnetic field-lines to be contained inside the device. The configuration is compatible with the presence of large current sheets in the reconnection region and reconnection is observed in fast powerful bursts. These reconnection events facilitate the first experimental investigations of the physics governing the spontaneous onset of fast reconnection. In this Report we review the general motivation of this work, the experimental set-up, and the main physics results.

Jan Egedal-Pedersen

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for studying in-cylinder processes in a DI diesel engine. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 micron sec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color W imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

Rhee, K.T.

1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

Final Scientific/Technical Report for DE-FG02-07ER64500 Study of Lignocellulosic Material Degradation with CARS Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program of research undertaken by our Harvard group, in collaboration with Dr. Ding at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, CO, seeks to introduce, validate and apply a new analytical technique to study the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol. This conversion process has been the subject of intense interest over the past few years because of its potential to provide a clean, renewable source of energy to meet increasing global demand. During the funding period, we have clearly demonstrated visualization of lignin and cellulose using intrinsic vibrational contrast with simulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, developed at Harvard. Our approach offers high spatial resolution and time resolution that is sufficient to capture the kinetics of a pre?treatment process. This is reflected by the publications listed below, as well as the use of SRS microscopy at NREL as a routine analysis tool for research on lignocellulosic biomass. In our original proposal, we envisioned moving to near?field CARS imaging in order to perform chemical mapping at the nanoscale. However, given the dramatic progress made by our group in SRS imaging, we concentrated our efforts on using multi?component SRS (lignin, cellulose, lipid, water, protein, deuterated metabolites, etc.) to quantitatively understand the spatially dispersed kinetics in a variety of plant samples under a variety of conditions. In addition, we built a next generation laser system based on fiber laser technology that allowed rugged and portable instrumentation for SRS microscopy. We also pursued new imaging approaches to improve the acquisition speed of SRS imaging of lignocellulose without sacrificing signal?to?noise ratio. This allowed us to image larger volumes of tissue with higher time resolution to get a more comprehensive picture of the heterogeneity of this chemical process from the submicron up to the centimeter scale.

Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Ding, Shi-You

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Report on the research conducted under the funding of the Sloan foundation postdoctoral fellowship in Computational Molecular Biology [Systematic study of protein-protein complexes] Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A central question in molecular biology is what structural features are common at protein-protein interfaces and what energetic factors define the affinity and specificity of protein-protein association. Analysis of structural and mutational data on protein-protein interfaces revealed that protein-protein interfaces of different functional classes contain many more energetically important charged and polar residues than was previously thought. Since, in the context of protein folding studies, polar interactions are believed to destabilize the folded proteins, this observation raised the question as to the forces that determine the stability of protein complexes. To investigate this issue in detail, the authors developed a number of partitioning schemes that allowed them to investigate the role of selected residues, ion pairs, and networks of polar interactions in protein-protein association. The methods developed were applied to the analysis of four different protein-protein interfaces: the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar, the human growth hormone and its receptor, subtype N9 influenze virus neuraminidase and NC41 antibody, and the Ras Binding Domain of kinase cRaf and a Ras homologue Rap1A. The calculations revealed a surprising variability in how polar interactions affect the stability of different complexes. The finding that positions of charged and polar residues on protein-protein interfaces are optimized with respect to electrostatic interactions suggests that this property can be employed for the discrimination between native conformations and trial complexes generated by a docking algorithm. Analysis indicated the presence of SH2 domains in Janus family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases.

Sheinerman, Felix

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Simulations of neutralized final focus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result of too little plasma density near focus where n b > nof a plasma- neutralized solenoidal final focus. A Ne+ beamto NDC, beam-plasma instability growth and final focus in a

Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

NTSF Spring 2010 Final Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Final Agenda for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Transportation Stakeholder Forum taking place in Chicago, Illinois.

393

Campus Climate Project Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus Climate Project Final Report Oregon State University January 2005 #12;Rankin & Associates, Consulting OSU Campus Climate Assessment Project Final Report January 2005 1 Table of Contents Executive Campus Climate Assessment Project Final Report January 2005 i Executive Summary Resistance begins

Escher, Christine

394

NETL Final Report Outline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Transmission Pipeline Remote Leak Detection Final Report December 2002 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas J. Kulp Diagnostics and Remote Sensing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969, MS 9056 Livermore, CA 94551 and Wayne Einfeld Environmental Monitoring and Characterization Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0755 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy 2 Abstract The pipeline industry would benefit considerably from the development of systems that could provide early warning capabilities for major pipeline integrity and safety issues caused by leaks.

395

Final Report.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Production Enhancement, Mocane-Laverne Field, Oklahoma Final Report October, 2000 - September 30, 2003 Scott Reeves Advanced Resources International 9801 Westhemier, Suite 805 Houston, Texas 77042 and Buckley Walsh Oneok Resources 100 West Fifth Street Tulsa, OK 74103-0871 September, 2002 U.S. Department of Energy DE-FG26-00NT40789 i Disclaimers U.S. Department of Energy This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United Sates Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

396

Final_Report.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Energy, Offi ce of Fossil Energy Technology International Inc.: Seismic While Drilling Project Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final Report for the period of June 11-14, 2008 Completed February 2009 This document may contain protected Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) information and is not to be further disclosed for a period of 5 years from the date it was produced except as expressly provided for in the CRADA. DISCLAIMER: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors or their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied,

397

Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' 6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' w V' - > DOE/EIS--00 96-F-Vol.1 //C^ DE84 0 0 1 4 4 6 Final Environmental Impact Statement Remedial Actions at the Former Vitro Rare Metals Plant Site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania United States Department of Energy July 1983 Volume I r NOTICE } IPORTIONS OF THIS REPORT ARE ILLEGIBLE.' / It has been reproduced from the besi ' available copy to permit the broadest possible availability. This document is PUBLICLY RELEASABLl Authorizmg OfFtciai Date: Z P l ^ o " ? isTWBUTim ef T H I S m\jM] IS mm\m DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

398

NETL Final Report Outline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensor Evaluation for a Robotic In Line Inspection Vehicle for Sensor Evaluation for a Robotic In Line Inspection Vehicle for Detection of Natural Gas Pipeline Defects and Leaks Final Report February 2003 Submitted by Michael Hassard and Gerald Stoker Advanced Diagnostics and Production Testing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0555 And Mark Vaughn and Bob Bickerstaff Mobile Robotics Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS1125 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, Natural Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy ABSTRACT When examining the condition of a pipeline, In-Line Inspection (ILI) utilizing various Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods is an essential tool and a significant factor in establishing a quality management

399

FINAL CEf VED  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOElEA 1147 DOElEA 1147 FINAL CEf VED 6 I 3 I996 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME ~ ~ O S T I for the LOW ENERGY DEMONSTRATION ACCELERATOR TECHNICAL AREA 53 LUS ALAMUS NATFUNAL LABORATORY LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO . . - . - . I Date Prepared: April 1, 1996 ~ Prepared for: Office of Defense Programs US Department of Energy Los Alamos Area Q S c e DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any

400

AIPM Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final AIPM project report consists of six sections. Each section includes information on the original AIPM project and extension work on the high temperature design. The first section (1) provides an overview of the program and highlights the significant targets to meet at the end of the program. The next section (2) summarizes the significant technical accomplishments by the SEMIKRON AIPM team during the course of the project. Greater technical details are provided in a collection of all the quarterly reports which can be found in the appendix. Section three (3) presents some the more significant technical data collected from technology demonstrators. Section four (4) analyzes the manufacturing cost or economic aspects of producing 100,000 units/yr. Section five (5) describes the commercialization efforts of the AIPM technology into the automotive market. The last section (6) recommends follow on work that will build on the efforts and achievements of the AIPM program.

John Mookken

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

FINAL/ SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Chattanooga fuel cell demonstrations project was to develop and demonstrate a prototype 5-kW grid-parallel, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system that co-produces hydrogen, based on Ion Americas technology. The commercial viability of the 5kW SOFC system was tested by transporting, installing and commissioning the SOFC system at the Alternative Energy Laboratory at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga. The system also demonstrated the efficiency and the reliability of the system running on natural gas. This project successfully contributed to the achievement of DOE technology validation milestones from the Technology Validation section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. Results of the project can be found in the final technical report.

McDonald, Henry; Singh, Suminderpal

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilitiesInternational Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden)Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis VlachoudisWorkshop Assistant: Graldine Jean

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

403

NETL Final Report Outline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrument for Airborne Remote Sensing of Transmission Instrument for Airborne Remote Sensing of Transmission Pipeline Leaks Final Report August 2004 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas J. Kulp Diagnostics and Remote Sensing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969, MS 9056 Livermore, CA 94551 and Wayne Einfeld Environmental Monitoring and Characterization Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0755 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas, Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy Abstract The pipeline industry would benefit considerably from the development of systems that could provide early warning capabilities for major pipeline integrity and safety issues indicated by

404

Blackout Final Implementation Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy September 2006 Final Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force September 2006 Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy Acknowledgments This document was prepared by staff of Natural Resources Canada and the U.S. Department of Energy. The principal contributors are listed in Annex 1. The staff wish to acknowledge the contributions of the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Ontario Ministry of Energy. The staff also wish to acknowl- edge the support and cooperation of the North American Electric Reliability Council and, in particular, of Mr. David Nevius, Senior Vice President and Direc- tor of Reliability Assessment & Performance

405

DE-NT0005667 Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Report Final Report October 2008 - September 2012 ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFIL- TER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 14, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary 3 Publications Arising 4 Chapter 1: Methanotrophy in Microbial Mats 6 Chapter 2: Pelagic Methanotrophy: Studies from the Pacific Ocean 32 Chapter 3: Pelagic Methanotrophy: Studies from the Gulf of Mexico 72 Concluding Remarks 91 Acknowledgment 93 Disclaimer 93 LIST OF FIGURES

406

Oahu Wind Integration Study Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to disruptions in supply. Further, the volatility in oil prices translates into volatility in electricity prices. As oil prices increase, Hawaii consumers face increases in energy prices as well as the price of most was approximately 13% of the Gross State Product. Most of the imported oil is used for transportation fuel

407

LER Data Mining Pilot Study Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LERs consist of a one page standard form with a standard header and free text data, followed by additional continuation pages of free text data. Currently this LER data is analyzed by first inputting the heading and text data manually into a categorical relational database. The data is then evaluated by enumeration of data in various categories and supplemented by review of individual LERs. This is labor intensive and makes it difficult to relate specific descriptive text to enumerated results. State of the art data mining and visualization technology exists that can eliminate the need for manual categorization, maintain the text relationships within each report, produce the same enumerated results currently available, and provide a tool to support potentially useful additional analysis of the informational content of LERs in a more timely and cost effective manner.

Young, Jonathan; Zentner, Michael D.; McQuerry, Dennis L.

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Co-combustion feasibility study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigates the technical and economic feasibility of co-combusting municipal sewage sludge produced by the Saratoga County Sewer District No. 1 with paper mill sludge produced by the Cottrell Paper Company, Encore Paper Company, International Paper Company, Mohawk Paper Mills, and TAGSONS Papers at the Saratoga County Sewer District No. 1`s secondary wastewater treatment plant and recovering any available energy products. The co-combustion facility would consist of sludge and wood chip storage and conveying systems, belt filter presses, screw presses, fluidized-bed incinerators, venturi scrubbers and tray cooling systems, ash dewatering facilities, heat recovery steam generators, gas-fired steam superheaters, and a back-pressure steam turbine system. Clean waste wood chips would be used as an auxiliary fuel in the fluidized-bed incinerators. It is recommended that the ash produced by the proposed facility be beneficially used, potentially as a raw material in the manufacture of cement and/or as an interim barrier layer in landfills.

Handcock, D.J. [Clough, Harbour and Associates, Albany, NY (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Key valves prioritization study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key valves, installed in nuclear power plants, are those valves in which a malfunction can result in a shut down, in a reduction in power generation level, or in the extension of planned outages. Over two thousand Licensee Event Reports (LERs) are evaluated to identify the valve failure events which affected nuclear plant availability. Other data reporting systems are used to supplement the information collected for each event. A data base is established comprising 102 key valve failure events that are identified as the principal case of lost plant availability.

Riddington, J.W.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Keystone feasibility study. Final report. Vol. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume four of the Keystone coal-to-methanol project includes the following: (1) project management; (2) economic and financial analyses; (3) market analysis; (4) process licensing and agreements; and (5) appendices. 24 figures, 27 tables.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE project DE-FC36-04GO14052 ''Plasma Pilot Plant Test for Treating VOC Emissions from Wood Products Plants'' was conducted by Drexel University in cooperation with Georgia-Pacific (G-P) and Kurchatov Institute (KI). The objective of this project was to test the Plasma Pilot Plant capabilities in wood industry. The final goal of the project was to replace the current state-of-the-art, regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology by Low-Temperature Plasma Technology (LTPT) in paper and wood industry for Volatile Organic Components (VOC) destruction in High Volume Low Concentration (HVLC) vent emissions. MetPro Corporation joined the team as an industrial partner from the environmental control business and a potential leader for commercialization. Concurrent Technology Corporation (CTC) has a separate contract with DOE for this technology evaluation. They prepared questionnaires for comparison of this technology and RTO, and made this comparison. These data are presented in this report along with the description of the technology itself. Experiments with the pilot plant were performed with average plasma power up to 3.6 kW. Different design of the laboratory and pilot plant pulsed coronas, as well as different analytical methods revealed many new peculiarities of the VOC abatement process. The work reported herein describes the experimental results for the VOCs removal efficiency with respect to energy consumption, residence time, water effect and initial concentration.

Alexander Fridman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

CCSTF - Final Report | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CCSTF - Final Report CCSTF - Final Report Carbon Capture and Storage Task Force - Final Report More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Energy -- House Science,...

413

FINAL REPORT EXPOSURE SCENARIOS FOR USE IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL REPORT EXPOSURE SCENARIOS FOR USE IN ESTIMATING RADIATION DOSES TO THE PUBLIC FROM HISTORICAL for use in the estimation of doses to reference individuals due to atmospheric releases of radionuclides). This report was prepared in response to Task 3 of the INEL dose reconstruction study commissioned

414

FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics and optical fiber processing methods for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrologyall specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

415

FY 2008 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the duration of the NNSA Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22) Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors lifecycle project, our research team focused on developing solutions to the fabrication bottleneck that has inhibited development and deployment of wide-angle optically interrogated chemical and radiological remote sensing technology. Our team advanced the concept of step-index clad retroreflectors to approximate an optimized, but yet unrealized spherical gradient index design. An intensive numerical simulation effort was undertaken that resulted in optimized step-index optical designs for mid-infrared applications. Geometric optics ray trace modeling was performed to better understand the geometrical dependencies of the miniature spherical retroreflector application. We adopted and advanced the concept of optical cross section, a metric that provides relative performance comparisons between different retroreflector designs and our cross-section analysis demonstrated that our step-index design provided 90% of the range capacity of the ideal spherical index design.

Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Rodriguez, Carmen P.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Final Report to the U  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Development of a Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Prepared By: E. Dendy Sloan, Director and Weaver Chair Center for Hydrate Research Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado 80401 esloan@mines.edu For: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Under Contract DE-AF26-067Nt00440 Development of a Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Table of Contents Preface............................................................................................................................................. 2 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 3 1.1 OBJECTIVES OF THE DATABASE AND GHML DEVELOPMENT EFFORT

417

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

June 5, 2013 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT & COMMUNICATION COMMITTEE June 5, 2013 Richland, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Opening...

418

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 11, 2012 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION COMMITTEE October 11, 2012 Richland, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary...

419

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

August 9, 2012 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION COMMITTEE August 9, 2012 Richland, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Opening...

420

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2014 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD RIVER AND PLATEAU COMMITTEE October 7, 2014 Richland, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Opening ......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 5, 2014 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT COMMITEE March 5, 2014 Kennewick, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Welcome and Introduction...

422

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 3, 2014 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT COMMITTEE September 3, 2014 Pasco, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Welcome ......

423

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 8, 2014 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD TANK WASTE COMMITTEE October 8, 2014 Richland, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Opening ......

424

LIVE_NSB_final.wmv  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 6, 2013 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD RIVER AND PLATEAU COMMITTEE March 6, 2013 Richland, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Opening ......

426

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

meeting (May), but to meet Ecology's submittal timeline, the committee agreed to review the summary and adopt it via email. Ecology will include the final meeting summary...

427

NNSA NEWS DRAFT October final edits 19 2009  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 0 National Nuclear Security Administration Monthly News (continued on page 2) On May 5, NNSA Administrator Thomas P. D'Agostino briefed more than 250 reporters and international nongovernmental organizations on how the U.S. is meeting its Article VI requirements under the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Administrator D'Agostino spoke alongside Ellen Tauscher, undersecretary of State for Arms Control and International Security, Dr. Michael Nacht, assistant secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs and Ambassador Susan Burk, the President's Special Representative for Nonproliferation. D'Agostino's presentation included the historic release of current and past U.S. stockpile numbers. The U.S. also disclosed the number of operationally deployed

428

ASEDRA Evaluation Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of the Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm (ASEDRA) was evaluated by performing a blind test of 29 sets of gamma-ray spectra that were provided by DNDO. ASEDRA is a post-processing algorithm developed at the Florida Institute of Nuclear Detection and Security at the University of Florida (UF/FINDS) that extracts char-acteristic peaks in gamma-ray spectra. The QuickID algorithm, also developed at UF/FINDS, was then used to identify nuclides based on the characteristic peaks generated by ASEDRA that are inferred from the spectra. The ASEDRA/QuickID analysis results were evaluated with respect to the performance of the DHSIsotopeID algorithm, which is a mature analysis tool that is part of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS). Data that were used for the blind test were intended to be challenging, and the radiation sources included thick shields around the radioactive materials as well as cargo containing naturally occurring radio-active materials, which masked emission from special nuclear materials and industrial isotopes. Evaluation of the analysis results with respect to the ground truth information (which was provided after the analyses were finalized) showed that neither ASEDRA/QuickID nor GADRAS could identify all of the radiation sources correctly. Overall, the purpose of this effort was primarily to evaluate ASEDRA, and GADRAS was used as a standard against which ASEDRA was compared. Although GADRAS was somewhat more accurate on average, the performance of ASEDRA exceeded that of GADRAS for some of the unknowns. The fact that GADRAS also failed to identify many of the radiation sources attests to the difficulty of analyzing the blind-test data that were used as a basis for the evaluation. This evaluation identified strengths and weaknesses of the two analysis approaches. The importance of good calibration data was also clear because the performance of both analysis methods was impeded by the inability to define the energy calibration accurately. Acronyms ACHIP adaptive chi-processed ASEDRA Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm DNDO Domestic Nuclear Detection Office DRFs Detector Response Functions FINDS Florida Institute of Nuclear Detection and Security FWHM full-width half-maximum GADRAS Gamma Detector Response Analysis Software GUI graphical user interface HEU highly enriched uranium HPGe high purity germanium ID identification NaI Sodium iodide NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration NORM Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials ppm parts per million SNL Sandia National Laboratories UF University of Florida WGPu weapons-grade plutonium

Mitchell, Dean James; Detwiler, Dr. Rebecca; Sjoden, Dr, Glenn E.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

FINAL MEETING SUMMARIES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

M-16-14-02 279 Letter to Jane Hedges & Dennis Faulk from Ray Corey dated 101714 re: Remedial InvestigationFeasibility Study for the 100-Dr-1, 100-DR-2, 100-HR-1, 100-HR-2 &...

430

TEF Summary Deck (FINAL)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Fuels 3 Outline * Approach a nd m oStudy c onclusions r egarding t ransporta

431

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this grant was to purchase equipment for biotechnology studies and courses at Saint Peters College (SPC). Equipment was used for courses such as Genetics and Biochemistry. The equipment helped SPC update its labs so as to create a better learning environment for our students.

Richard Petriello; Frederick Bonato

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

432

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant provided the basic funding that enabled me to carry out a detailed characterization of the proteins used by the aerobic soil bacterium, Thermobifida fusca, to degrade cellulose and to study the mechanisms used by T. fusca to regulate cellulase synthesis. This work resulted in 53 publications and led to the decision by The DOE Joint Genome Institute to sequence the T. fusca genome. T. fusca is now recognized as one of the best studied cellulolytic microorganisms and our work led to the discovery of a novel class of cellulases, processive endoglucanases, which are found in many cellulolytic bacteria including both aerobes and anaerobes. In addition, we were able to determine the mechanism by which Cel9A caused processive hydrolysis of cellulose. This research also helped to explain why many cellulolytic microorganisms produce two different exocellulases, as we showed that these enzymes have different specificities, with one attacking the reducing end of a cellulose chain and the other attacking the nonreducing end. Our work also provided additional evidence for the importance of a cellulose binding domain (carbohydrate binding module) [CBM] in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

David B. Wilson

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

433

Clean Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

1 1 S u m m a r y December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report. The District or Commission has not approved or disapproved this report, nor has the District or

434

FINAL Submitted to NREL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Submitted to NREL Submitted to NREL 10-21-11 City of Naperville Case Study 1 An example of an automated switch used in Naperville's distribution automation systems. At the Forefront of the Smart Grid: Empowering Consumers in Naperville, Illinois Naperville, Illinois, is a suburban community located outside of Chicago. Typical in many ways, Naperville is the fifth largest city in Illnois and an active, engaged citizenry that is environmentally conscious and technically savvy. In fact, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's recent assessment of leading utility green power programs ranks Naperville as No. 5 in the nation in percentage of customer participation. 1 Additionally, about one-quarter of Naperville's electricity customers pay their

435

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We adapted and refined a synthesis of gold nanoparticles of type, Au101(PPh3)21Cl5 (Au101). In our hands, this method routinely gave fairly high yields of Au101 NPs. These NPs were characterized using several techniques, including TEM, AFM/STM and various NMR measurements, including solid state methods. We also used a simpler citrate-based preparation of Au NPs. We immobilized the Au NPs on carbon and characterized their electrochemical behavior. In addition, we prepared and characterized tin oxide NPs that were capped with phosphonic acid capping ligands. Our goal in this part of the project was to expand the NMR methods available to study ligand complexation in non-metallic NP materials that may be of interest as electrochemical materials. The use of tin oxide as a host material for tin metal that could be used to alloy of Li in battery anodes was the motivation for our interest in these types of materials.

Buttry, Daniel A

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the contract period, our experimental activities concentrated on ion-surface collision studies, gas phase collisions, the effects of adsorbates on field emission, and the origin of H3O+ in mass spectroscopy. In the area of ion-surface collisions we have measured sputtering yields for negative ions and electrons arising from collisions of ions and photons with a variety of metallic substrates upon which is known amount of adsorbate, which drastically alters the emission characteristics. Kinetic energy distributions of the ejected anions and electrons have also been determined. We have developed a theoretical model which, to a large degree, describes the process and elucidates the role of the adsorbate in the emission processes. In the category of gas-phase collisions, we reported work on proton transfer and ion-molecule reactions for reactants involving H3+ and D3+, measured absolute cross sections for a variety inelastic channels for reactants involving CH4+ and CF4, and measured electron detachment and decomposition cross sections for collisions of SF6- with N2. Additionally, we reported absolute cross sections for various reactive collisions involving collisional decomposition of SF6- and the reactants CF3+ and CHF3. The idea here was to use these measured cross sections to model and understand the salient features of the popular gaseous dielectric, SF6 , and the etching discharge which utilizes CHF3. A somewhat different set of experiments explored the role of adsorbates on the process of electron field emission and the nature and origin of the anomalous cation signal often seen at mass 19 amu in mass spectroscopy. The laboratory collision energies for these experiments ranged from a few electron volts up to 500 eV. The goal of all the studies was to develop an understanding of the collisional dynamics and pathways for systems which are both intellectually interesting and of some potential importance to various areas of applied physics.

R. L. Champion

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

Phase I Final Technical Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Report to Final Report to Phase I Final Technical Report 10121.4302.01.Final1 Ultra-High Conductivity Umbilicals: Polymer Nanotube Umbilicals (PNUs) 10121-4302-01 June 24, 2013 Christopher A. Dyke Principal Investigator NanoRidge Materials, Inc. 15850 Vickery Drive Houston, Texas 77032 LEGAL NOTICE THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED BY NANORIDGE MATERIALS, INC. AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED BY THE RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP TO SECURE ENERGY FOR AMERICA, RPSEA. NEITHER RPSEA MEMBERS OF RPSEA, THE NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY, THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NOR ANY PERSON ACTING ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THE ENTITIES: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION

438

Danish Energy Authority Final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Danish Energy Authority Final report Kaliningrad Regional District Heating Network 2004 - 2006 2006 #12;Kaliningrad District Heating Network Project 2004 - 2006 2 Table of content The report........................................................................................................... 7 1.4.1 District heating in the Region

439

Final Report: Axion "Roadmap" Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report for "Vistas in Axion Physics: A Roadmap for Theoretical and Experimental Axion Physics through 2025", which was held at the University of Washington, INT, from April 23 - 26, 2012.

Rosenberg, Leslie J

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

440

Reactor physics project final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the final report in an experimental and theoretical program to develop and apply single- and few-element methods for the determination of reactor lattice parameters. The period covered by the report is January 1, ...

Driscoll, Michael J.

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nonproliferation final study" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that all summaries are posted to the HAB website once finalized and HAB members can review draft summaries on the SharePoint site. Announcements Liz said a public meeting was...

442

Technical Report: Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to develop catalyzed nanoporous materials that have superior hydrogen uptake between 300K and 400K and moderate pressures. Platinum nanoparticles were introduced to both activated carbons (ACs) and microporous metal organic frameworks (MMOFs) in order to dissociate molecular hydrogen into an active hydrogen species that diffuses from the catalyst to weakly chemisorbs to the AC/MMOF support; this combined sequence is referred to as the hydrogen spillover mechanism. For all materials studied, maximum excess hydrogen uptake was 1-1.4 wt% (excess) at 300K, falling short of DOE storage goals (5.5 wt% by 2015). Select Pt/AC materials (after in situ catalyst activation) had high uptake (up to 1.4 wt%) at low pressure which significantly exceeded that expected for physisorption. The uptake was not correlated to size of Pt catalyst, but appeared to be associated with high surface activity of the AC support and the methodology of catalyst doping. Multiple techniques were explored to introduce Pt nanoparticles into MMOFs, but most led to significant structural degradation. Ultimately, a pre-bridge (PB) technique was used to introduce Pt/AC catalysts into MMOFs, as the PB technique led to virtually non-detectable changes in structure. At high pressure, hydrogen spillover of ~1 wt% (excess) to a PB-MMOF was very slow (i.e. >80 hours at 70-80 bar), which can be attributed to high diffusion barriers in a complex three-surface domain material (Pt, AC, MMOF) as well as unexpected evidence for mechanical instability of the undoped MMOF precursor. In a low-pressure comparison study of three PB-MMOFs, we found evidence that the doping technique may introduce defects which may contribute to enhanced adsorption at 300K. However, we could not rule out the effect of active Pt sites, as common predictors of adsorption generally favored the materials without Pt. Furthermore, spectroscopic evidence provided definitive evidence of weak hydrogen chemisorption to two MMOFs and AC, and was found only for materials containing Pt catalyst. Overall, high uptake via hydrogen spillover requires high catalytic activity and an energy neutral surface landscape for ready diffusion, with little to no correlation to the size of the Pt nanoparticle or textural properties (i.e. surface area or porosity) of the AC or MMOF support.

Lueking, Angela D.; Wang, Cheng-Yu

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

ICCK Conference Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT??s Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics, since those two communities do not meet very often (it had been 6 years since the last time this conference had been held). The conference at MIT was so successful that European scientists decided to organize a similar conference (it will be held in Seville, Spain in July 2013). Almost 200 scientists participated, with more than 100 oral presentations and many poster presentations. A complete list of the presentations and their abstracts are given in the attachment. The conference led to many peer-reviewed papers published in several Special Issues of the International Journal of Chemical Kinetics in early 2012.

Green, William H. [MIT

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past decades, considerable theoretical efforts have been devoted to studying the electronic and geometric structures and related properties of surfaces. Such efforts are particularly important for systems like the actinides for which experimental work is relatively difficult to perform due to material problems and toxicity. The actinides are characterized by a gradual filling of the 5f-electron shell with the degree of localization increasing with the atomic number Z along the last series of the periodic table. The open shell of the 5f electrons determines the atomic, molecular, and solid state properties of the actinide elements and their compounds and understanding the quantum mechanics of the 5f electrons is the defining issue in the chemistry and physics of actinide elements. These elements are also characterized by the increasing prominence of relativistic effects and their studies can, in fact, help us understand the role of relativity throughout the periodic table. However, the electronic and geometric structures of the actinides, specifically the trans-uranium actinides and the roles of the 5f electrons in chemical bonding are still not well understood. This is crucial not only for our understanding of the actinides but also for the fact that the actinides constitute 'the missing link' between the d transition elements and the lanthanides. The 5f orbitals have properties intermediate between those of localized 4f and delocalized 3d orbitals. Thus, a proper understanding of the actinides will help us understand the behavior of the lanthanides and transition metals as well. In fact, there is an urgent need for continued extensive and detailed theoretical research in this area to provide significant and deep understandings of the electronic and geometric structures of the actinides. In this work, we have performed electronic structure studies for plutonium (Pu), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) surfaces, and molecular adsorptions on Pu and Am surfaces. In particular, the region at the boundary of Pu and Am, is widely believed to be the crossover region between d-like itinerant and f-like localized behavior The eventual goal is a complete understanding of the surface chemistry and physics processes of all actinide surfaces, defining the chemistry and physics of such heavy elements. Among the actinides, plutonium, with five 5f electrons in the solid state, is arguably the most complex, fascinating, and enigmatic element known to mankind and has attracted extraordinary scientific and technological interests because of its unique properties, generating a significant body of research in diverse areas, including superconductivity. Pu has, at least, six stable allotropes between room temperature and melting at atmospheric pressure, indicating that the valence electrons can hybridize into a number of complex bonding arrangements. Central and critical questions relate to the electronic structure, localization of the 5f electrons and the magnetism of Pu. For the light-actinides, from Th to Pu, the 5f electrons are believed to be delocalized, hybridizing with the 6d and 7s electrons. For the heavier actinides, Am and beyond, the 5f electrons are localized with the 5f orbitals progressively lower in energy relative to the 6d configuration. Hence, Pu is in a position where the 5f electronic behavior changes from itinerant to localized. As far as magnetism is concerned, a majority of the theoretical calculations continues to claim the existence of magnetism while almost all the experimental results do not find any support for such claims. The second element of interest to us, namely americium, occupies a central position in the actinide series with respect to the involvement of 5f electrons in metallic bonding. It is widely believed that the 5f electrons in Am are localized and that Am undergoes a series of crystallographic phase changes with pressure. Fully-relativistic all electron surface studies of the different phases of Am, initially for the dhcp and the fcc surfaces, can and have provided us with valuable informa

Dr. Asok K. Ray

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

445

Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project pursued innovations to improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in commercial and residential buildings. For commercial buildings, the project developed a testbed for intelligent nested environmental systems technologies (iNEST), which monitor and control energy flows and IEQ across a cascade of spaces from individuals desktops to office suites to floors to whole buildings. An iNEST testbed was constructed at Syracuse University and was used to assess the use of devices such as personal badges and CO2 sensors to study how reduced energy use and improved IEQ could be achieved. For residential buildings, resources were targeted in support of DoEs Builders Challenge Program and to recruit Syracuse, NY builders. Three homes in Syracuses Near Westside neighborhood were also registered under the program by Syracuse University team, with an additional home registered by one of the builders. Findings from the work at the iNEST testbed facility, and results from other related projects were disseminated through Syracuse Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems (SyracuseCoE) 2008 Annual Symposium, the 9th International Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference & Exhibition, and through SyracuseCoEs website and eNewsletters to inform the broader community of researchers, designers and builders. These public communication activities helped enhance the understanding of high performance buildings and facilitate further market acceptance.

Bogucz, E A

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

446

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research effort was directed towards the development of a novel cold-setting adhesive for the manufacture of laminated veneer lumber, LVL. The adhesives studied were isocyanate-reactive polyurethanes that cure at room temperature and bond to high moisture content veneer (12%). The elimination of hot-pressing and the reduction in veneer drying is expected to provide substantial energy savings and decreases in VOC emissions. Furthermore, the use of higher moisture content veneer was expected to reduce or eliminate the tendency for veneer over drying, and the related reduction in wood surface energy. The effort produced a novel emulsion polymer isocyanate (EPI) adhesive that performed better than the standard phenol-formaldehyde adhesive. This performance comparison/evaluation suggested that the new adhesive could perhaps meet the original project goals, stated above. However, this effort was not translated into technological practice, nor evaluated on a larger pilot scale, because the participating companies experienced personnel changes that altered outlook for this technology.

Charles E. Frazier

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

Advanced Distillation Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Distillation project was concluded on December 31, 2009. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded project was completed successfully and within budget during a timeline approved by DOE project managers, which included a one year extension to the initial ending date. The subject technology, Microchannel Process Technology (MPT) distillation, was expected to provide both capital and operating cost savings compared to conventional distillation technology. With efforts from Velocys and its project partners, MPT distillation was successfully demonstrated at a laboratory scale and its energy savings potential was calculated. While many objectives established at the beginning of the project were met, the project was only partially successful. At the conclusion, it appears that MPT distillation is not a good fit for the targeted separation of ethane and ethylene in large-scale ethylene production facilities, as greater advantages were seen for smaller scale distillations. Early in the project, work involved flowsheet analyses to discern the economic viability of ethane-ethylene MPT distillation and develop strategies for maximizing its impact on the economics of the process. This study confirmed that through modification to standard operating processes, MPT can enable net energy savings in excess of 20%. This advantage was used by ABB Lumus to determine the potential impact of MPT distillation on the ethane-ethylene market. The study indicated that a substantial market exists if the energy saving could be realized and if installed capital cost of MPT distillation was on par or less than conventional technology. Unfortunately, it was determined that the large number of MPT distillation units needed to perform ethane-ethylene separation for world-scale ethylene facilities, makes the targeted separation a poor fit for the technology in this application at the current state of manufacturing costs. Over the course of the project, distillation experiments were performed with the targeted mixture, ethane-ethylene, as well as with analogous low relative volatility systems: cyclohexane-hexane and cyclopentane-pentane. Devices and test stands were specifically designed for these efforts. Development progressed from experiments and models considering sections of a full scale device to the design, fabrication, and operation of a single-channel distillation unit with integrated heat transfer. Throughout the project, analytical and numerical models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were validated with experiments in the process of developing this platform technology. Experimental trials demonstrated steady and controllable distillation for a variety of process conditions. Values of Height-to-an-Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) ranging from less than 0.5 inch to a few inches were experimentally proven, demonstrating a ten-fold performance enhancement relative to conventional distillation. This improvement, while substantial, is not sufficient for MPT distillation to displace very large scale distillation trains. Fortunately, parallel efforts in the area of business development have yielded other applications for MPT distillation, including smaller scale separations that benefit from the flowsheet flexibility offered by the technology. Talks with multiple potential partners are underway. Their outcome will also help determine the path ahead for MPT distillation.

Maddalena Fanelli; Ravi Arora; Annalee Tonkovich; Jennifer Marco; Ed Rode

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

448

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following: ? Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre. ? Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties. ? Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare. ? Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years. ? Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland ? The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass. ? Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development can be done in such a way that also maximizes or improves upon conservation and other environmental goals (in some cases even when compared to idled land). ? Switchgrass and big bluestem work well together in simple mixture plots where big bluestem fills in around the switchgrass which alone grows in bunches and leaves patches of bare soil open and susceptible to erosion. ? Longer-term studies in the northern plains may also find that every other year harvest schemes produce as much biomass averaged over the years as annual harvests ? Grasses can be grown for between $23 and $54/ton in the northern plains at production rates between 3 and 5 tons/acre. ? Land costs, yields, and harvest frequency are the largest determining factors in the farm scale economics. Without any land rent offset or incentive for production, and with annual harvesting, grass production is likely to be around $35/ton in the northern plains (farm gate). ? Average transportation costs range from $3 to $10/ton delivered to the plant gate. Average distance from the plant is the biggest factor - $3/ton at 10 miles, $10/ton at 50 miles. ? There is a substantial penalty paid on a per unit of energy produced basis when one converts grasses to bio-oil, but the bio-oil can then compete in higher priced fuel markets whereas grasses alone compete directly with relatively cheap coal. ? Bio oil or modified bio-oil (without the HA or other chemical fraction) is a suitable fuel for boiler and combustion turbines that would otherwise use residual fuel oil or number 2 diesel. ? Ensyn has already commercialized the use of HA in smokey flavorants for the food industry but that market is rather small. HA, however, is also found to be a suitable replacement for the much larger US market for ethanolamines and ethalyne oxides that are used as dispersants. ? Unless crude oil prices rise, the highest and best use of grass based bio-oil is primarily as a direct fuel. As prices rise, HA, phenol and other chemical fractions may become more attractive ? Although we were

Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

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