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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Property:BrineConstituents | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BrineConstituents BrineConstituents Jump to: navigation, search Property Name BrineConstituents Property Type String Description Describes major elements, compounds in geothermal brine This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: V Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Pages using the property "BrineConstituents" Showing 2 pages using this property. N North Brawley Geothermal Area + Chlorine, sodium, potassium, and calcium. Silica concentrations are 527 mg/l and total dissolved solids measure 82,900 mg/l. + S Salt Wells Geothermal Area + Cl, Na, SO4, SiO2, HCO3, and minor Ca, K + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:BrineConstituents&oldid=598832#SMWResults" Category: Properties

2

Learning From Snapshot Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examples are a powerful tool for teaching both humans and computers.In order to learn from examples, however, a student must first extractthe examples from its stream of perception. Snapshot learning is ageneral approach ...

Beal, Jacob

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

3

RMOTC - Library - Example Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Forms RMOTC will make every effort to provide the most current and correct information available. Please be aware that example forms are provided for informational purposes...

4

" Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy"...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

from feedstocks and raw material inputs" "used by the petroleum refining industry. The energy content of these products is included" "in 'Other' to account for their...

5

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Organization Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization Examples Organization Examples Example 8 4.0 PROJECT ORGANIZATION Chapter 4.0 describes the principle project organizations, including their responsibilities and relationships. Other organizations, that have an interest in the project, also are described. 4.1 Principal Project Organizations and Responsibilities The management organization for the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project represents a partnership between four principal project organizations responsible for the project. The four project organizations and their associated summary responsibilities are described in the following paragraphs. 4.1.1 U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters (HQ) The DOE-HQ Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) is primarily responsible for policy and budget decisions

6

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Execution Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Execution Example Project Execution Example Example 73 6.3 Project Approach The overall schedule strategy for the PFP project includes ongoing minimum safe activities, combined with stabilization of materials followed by materials disposition, and subsequent transition of the PFP complex to a decommissioned state. The PFP material stabilization baseline was developed using a functionally-based work WBS. The WBS defines all activities required to take each material stream from their current location/conditions through stabilization (as required), and disposition the stabilized material as solid waste for shipment to WIPP or as product material for shipment to SRS. Initially, workshops were held with subject matter experts, project managers, schedulers, and support personnel (experts in the

7

Challenge Home Certificate Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These certificates are printed from RESNET Accredited Software, examples from REM/Rate and from EnergyGauge.

8

Nucleic Acid Standards - Sugar and Phosphate Constituents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar and Phosphate Constituents Sugar and Phosphate Constituents The following tables contain the complete references for the structures used in a statistical survey of well-refined mononucleoside, mononucleotide, dinucleoside monophosphate, and trinucleoside diphosphate crystal structures found in the Cambridge Structural Database and the Nucleic Acid Database that appeared in The Journal of the American Chemical Society (Anke Gelbin, Bohdan Schneider, Lester Clowney, Shu-Hsin Hsieh, Wilma K. Olson, and Helen M. Berman. "Geometric Parameters in Nucleic Acids: Sugar Phosphate Constituents" (1996) 118, 519-529.) Table 1: References for Mononucleoside and Mononucleotide Structures Table 2: References for Dinucleoside Monophosphate and Trinucleoside Diphosphate Structures The following tables are summaries of the bond lengths, angles, and torsion

9

Volatile constituents in a wood pyrolysis oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science VOLATILE CONSTITUTENTS IN A WOOD PYROLYSIS OIL A Thesis SHIH-CHIEN LIN Appro d as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Head of epa tmen (Member Member Nay 1978 442936 ABSTRACT Volatile Constituents in a Wood Pyrolysis Oil.../120 Supelcoport. Other trace constituents of volatile acid were also 'dentifi="' by trap- ping the substances from the C. C. column into i: n;- 0-sh ped capillary tube and subjecting to mass spectrometry. The corrosivity of pyrolysis oil and it, volati'e acids...

Lin, Shih-Chien

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Batch Script Examples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Script Examples Batch Script Examples Batch Script Examples My First Script This is a simple example that you can use to make sure that your settings are correct before submitting more complicated jobs. First, copy the contents of hello.sh into a file. genepool% cat hello.sh #!/bin/bash sleep 120 echo "Hello World" Then submit your job with the qsub command genepool% qsub hello.sh Monitor your job with the qstat command: genepool% qstat -u You can also get more detailed information about your job using: genepool% qstat -j The job id can be found using the qstat -u command. Basic Batch Script Here is an example of a basic script that specifies the working directory, the shell and the queue. The #$ must be used to specify the grid engine

11

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prioritization of Facility Hazards Examples Prioritization of Facility Hazards Examples Example 20 7.7 PRELIMINARY HAZARD ANALYSIS Table 7-1 Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA) Overview for 779 Cluster's Decommissioning and Dismantlement Major Work Task Hazard Cause Preventive Measures Perform building walkdowns to identify Integrated Work Control Package (IWCP) work steps. Tripping, falling, exposure to chemicals, hazardous substances and / or radioactive materials. Also exposure to noise hazards. No planning, lack of communicating between work groups, improper use of Radiological Work Permits (RWPs), not following room or building instructions.  Develop Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA).  Conduct effective pre-evolution briefings.

12

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts The default number of cores per node on Edison is 16, and the default "mppnppn" setting is 16. However, if you run with hyperthreading (HT), Edison compute nodes have 32 cores per node, and the mppnppn value needs to be set to 32. In addition, the "-j 2" option needs to be added to the "aprun" command. In most of the following example batch scripts, the default number of 16 cores per node is used. Basic Scripts Sample Job script This script uses the default 16 cores per node. This job will run on 64 nodes, with 1024 cores. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=1024 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 #PBS -N my_job #PBS -j oe #PBS -V cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 1024 ./my_executable Sample job script to run with Hyperthreading (HT)

13

PDSF Batch Job Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Batch Job Example PDSF Batch Job Example PDSF Batch Job Example On this page we show an example of how to run a simple batch job, monitor it, check its output, and look at the SGE accounting information about it. We start with a simple script named hello.csh, which just sleeps a bit and then writes some output: pdsf4 72% cat hello.csh #!/bin/csh sleep 600 echo "Hello, World" The simplest way to submit it is to just use qsub without any options: pdsf4 74% qsub hello.csh Your job 1787239 ("hello.csh") has been submitted We can check on its status with qstat. Use the -u option to get only your jobs: pdsf4 75% qstat -u hjort job-ID prior name user state submit/start at queue slots ja-task-ID -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

14

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Edison has 24 cores (physical cores) per node, so the default "mppnppn" value is set to 24 for all queues. If you run with hyperthreading (HT), Edison has 48 logical cores per node, and the mppnppn value can be set to 48. However, this is not required. The "-j 2" option of the "aprun" command allows you to use all 48 logical cores on the nodes. In most of the following example batch scripts, we assume that jobs are run without Hyperthreading unless explicitly mentioned, therefore the default mppnppn value, 24, is used. Basic Scripts Sample Job script This script uses the default 24 cores per node. This job will run on 64 nodes, with 1536 cores. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=1536 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00

15

Hybrid States from Constituent Glue Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hybrid meson is one of the most interesting new hadron specie beyond the naive quark model. It acquire a great attention both from the theoretical and experimental efforts. Many good candidates have been claimed to be observed, but there is no absolute confirmation about existence of hybrid mesons. In the present work we propose new calculations of the masses and decay widths of the hybrid mesons in the context of constituent gluon model.

F. Iddir; L. Semlala

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Authorization Basis Evaluation Examples Authorization Basis Evaluation Examples Example 15 9.0 AUTHORIZATION BASIS 9.1 CURRENT STATUS The 9206 Complex (Buildings 9206, 9616-4, 9720-17, 9767-2, 9768, 9723-23, 9770-6 and -7, 9770-07, and 9510-02) is categorized as Hazard Classification; Moderate Hazard/Category 11 Facility with sponsorship of Y-12 Defense Programs. DOE communicates the approved authorization basis to LMES Y-12 Site and approves all modifications to the basis set. LMES submits modifications to the authorization basis through the Y-12 DOE Site Office. The following documents comprise the approved authorization basis for 9206 Complex in its current status of warm standby, in- process storage: Y/MA-6290 Final Safety Analysis Report for Y-12 Chemical Processing Systems, Building

17

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Approach to Meeting Requirements Examples Approach to Meeting Requirements Examples Example 26 9.2 HEALTH AND SAFETY STRATEGY B Plant has integrated safety into its management, planning and work practices in order to protect the public, the environment and facility workers against nuclear and non-nuclear hazards associated with facility transition. Based upon the principles of DNFSB Recommendation 95-2, the Plant's approach to safety management includes:  Applicable. standards and requirements specifically identified and implemented  Safety integrated into baseline and detailed planning  Workers and trained safety professionals use a team approach in hazard identification, analysis and control  Graded approach used to tailor controls based upon hazard type and severity

18

C Example MUMPS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MUMPS MUMPS C Example MUMPS /* * file c_example.c * This file is part of MUMPS 4.10.0 * To run: aprun -n 2 ./dsimpletest < input_simpletest_real */ /* Example program using the C interface to the * double real arithmetic version of MUMPS, dmumps_c. * We solve the system A x = RHS with * A = diag(1 2) and RHS = [1 4]^T * Solution is [1 2]^T */ #include #include #include "mpi.h" #include "dmumps_c.h" #define JOB_INIT -1 #define JOB_END -2 #define USE_COMM_WORLD -987654 int main(int argc, char ** argv) { DMUMPS_STRUC_C id; int n = 2; int nz = 2; int irn[] = {1,2}; int jcn[] = {1,2}; double a[2]; double rhs[2]; int myid, ierr; ierr = MPI_Init(&argc, &argv); ierr = MPI_Comm_rank(MPI_COMM_WORLD, &myid); /* Define A and rhs */

19

Data Transfer Examples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Data Transfer Examples » Data Transfer Examples Data Transfer Examples Moving data to Projectb Projectb is where data should be written from jobs running on the cluster or Gpints. There are intermediate files or bad results from a run that didn't work out that don't need to be saved. By running these jobs in the SCRATCH areas, these files will be deleted for you by the puge. If you run in the SANDBOX, you will have to clean up after yourselves. Batch Scheduled Transfers Use any queues to schedule jobs that move data to Projectb. A basic transfer script is here: kmfagnan@genepool12 ~ $ cat data_to_projb.sh #!/bin/bash -l #$ -N data2projb /projectb/scratch// kmfagnan@genepool12 ~ $ qsub data_to_projb.sh

20

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Safety Management Examples Integrated Safety Management Examples Example 10 8.2 PFP INTEGRATED SAFETY STRATEGY The following discussion identifies the process that will be used by the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project to ensure that the safety of the worker, public, and the environment are adequately addressed during the project. The primary activities involved in the process include the following:  Implementation of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS),  Identification, control, or mitigation of worker safety-related issues for stabilization and deactivation/dismantlement activities,  Facility/chemical vulnerability assessment and management,  Use of the DOE-approved authorization basis and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process to determine if the PFP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

LibSci Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LibSci » LibSci Example LibSci » LibSci Example LibSci Example ! Matrix-Matrix Multiply, AB = C using LibSci ScaLAPACK ! filename: test_scalapack.f90 ! compile: ftn -fast -o test_scalapack test_scalapack.f90 ! input: ABCp.dat ! prow number of rows in proc grid ! pcol number of columns in proc grid ! n number of rows/columns in matrix A ! nb matrix distribution block size ! oputput: fort.u, where u=10+processor number, and stdout implicit none integer :: n, nb ! problem size and block size integer :: myunit ! local output unit number integer :: myArows, myAcols ! size of local subset of global array integer :: i,j, igrid,jgrid, iproc,jproc, myi,myj, p real*8, dimension(:,:), allocatable :: myA,myB,myC

22

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water More Documents & Publications Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale

23

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water More Documents & Publications Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico

24

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Detailed End Points - Development of Detailed End Points - End Point Document Examples Example 28 7.0 ENDPOINTS Chapter 7.0 describes the endpoint development principles and methodology, administration, closure, and turnover package for the 324 and 327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project. 7.1 Background The endpoint method for the 324 and 327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project will follow the EM-60 guidance, published in DOE/EM-0318, Rev. 0, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management Facility Deactivation, Methods and Practice Handbook, Emphasizing End Points (sic) Implementation . The methods of defining endpoints for facility stabilization and deactivation were proven extremely effective at the PUREX and B-Plant facilities for planning work and interacting with the

25

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Baselines - Baselines - Performance Baseline Examples Example 34 6.0 PROJECT BASELINE This section presents a summary of the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project baseline, which was prepared by an inter- contractor team to support an accelerated planning case for the project. The project schedules and associated cost profiles presented in this section are compared to the currently approved project baseline, as contained in the Facility Stabilization Project Fiscal Year 1999 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) for WBS 1.4 (FDH 1998). These cost and schedule details will provide the basis for a baseline change request that will be processed to revise the MYWP, consistent with the accelerated project plan presented below. 6.1 Project Baseline Overview This section of the IPMP presents the PFP baseline cost and schedule summary. The currently approved PFP Stabilization and

26

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Radioactive Material Hazardous and Radioactive Material Evaluations Examples Example 18 6.03.08 Removal of Chemicals Bulk chemicals that are usable in other facilities will be relocated. Transportation of chemicals to other facilities will be performed in accordance with applicable administrative requirements. Chemicals in good condition that have not been in radiological areas or that can be cleared by RCO will be listed on OSR 1-118. The form will be signed by the Lead Environmental Coordinator and the Chemical Coordinator and submitted to the Site Chemical Commodity Center (CCMC). Usable chemicals from radiological areas that are not needed at other SFSD facilities will be advertised to other divisions. Unusable chemicals will be reviewed by waste Subject

27

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

End Point Closeout Examples Example 77 7.5 Endpoint Closure The endpoint documents have grouped the building spaces and systems into a number of manageable areas. The areas are closely related to the engineering work plans that guide completion of many of the endpoints. Endpoint closure methods and practices are provided in the attachment of this PMP. On completion of an endpoint, a BWHC field representative will initial complete on the field copy of the endpoint document. A BHI field representative will verify acceptable completion of the applicable activity. Verification may be performed by reviewing documents, letters, photos, work packages, or work plans, or by visual inspection. When all the endpoints for a specific area of the building have been completed and verified, designated BWHC and BHI management will sign for completion and acceptance of that

28

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification and Management of Standards Identification and Management of Standards and Requirements Examples Example 22 8.1 STANDARDS / REQUIREMENT IDENTIFICATION DOCUMENT Current Status Present 9206 operations are governed by the Y-12 Site Standards/Requirement Identification Document (S/RID), Y-12 Site-level Standards/Requirements Identification Document. (NOTE: The engineering design and construction work is governed by a set of Work Smart Standards, whose maintenance is handled in a similar manner as the Y-12 S/RIDs.) The Y-12 S/RID lists the necessary and sufficient set of ES&H standards and requirements to be implemented at the Y-12 Site. The Y-12 S/RID is a living document. The Standards Management Information System (SMIS) contains the official set of S/RIDs. Deactivation Strategy

29

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Integration - Safety Integration - Implementation of Controls Examples Example 24 5 Health & Safety This section describes the work controls associated with the 771/774 Closure Project. As prescribed in DOE Order 440.1, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees, the project must comply with the OSHA construction standards for Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, 29 CFR 1910.120 and 1926. Under these standards, a Building 771/774 Closure Project-Specific HASP has been prepared to address the safety and health hazards of each phase of operations. In addition, the DOE Order for Construction Project Safety and Health Management, 5480.9A, applies to this project. This order requires the preparation of JHAs to identify each task, the hazards associated with each task, and the precautions necessary to mitigate the

30

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identify and Evaluate Alternatives and End- Identify and Evaluate Alternatives and End- Points Examples Example 31 3.01 Deactivation Alternatives Evaluation Summary There are four alternatives for deactivation of the 400-D excess facilities: 1. Shut down systems and turn over the facilities "as-is" 2. Prepare the facility for an alternate use 3. Proceed immediately with final decommissioning 4. Place the facility into a passively safe, minimal S&M condition Option 1 was not chosen due to (1) An increased level of risk, primarily associated with maintaining and controlling the heavy water inventory and (2) The high cost of maintaining the facilities as-is. Option 2 was rejected because no alternative use for these facilities has been identified. Finally, no funding has been identified which would support final decommissioning, option 3.

31

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazard Identification and Characterization Hazard Identification and Characterization Examples Example 13 2.02.04 Hazard Baseline Documentation The following is a listing of the hazard baseline documentation for the facility:  DPSTSA-300-3A, Addendum 1, Revision 1.a, Justification for Continued Operation, April 1997.  Procedure 322-M of Manual 2Q2-4-M, 322-M Fire Control Preplan, April 30, 1995.  SSD-ALW-94-0609, Depleted Uranium Holdup in MBA M22, September 30, 1994.  RRD-RMT-940037, Final Report - Nuclear De-Inventory of 300-M Area Laboratories, October 31, 1994.  IOM C. J. Bearden to R. H. Ross, Building 322-M Exhaust Duct Inspection, July 11, 1990.  NMP-RMT-920299, Revision 0, Investigation of Uranium in M-Area Process Sewer, December 30, 1992. 6.01.01 Characterization and Hazards Identification

32

HPSS Usage Examples at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examples Advanced Usage Examples Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Once you have set up your automatic HPSS authentication you can access HPSS within batch scripts. Read More ...

33

Probability: Theory and examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some times the lights are shining on me. Other times I can barely see. Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip its been. Grateful Dead In 1989 when the first edition of the book was completed, my sons David and Greg were 3 and 1, and the cover picture showed the Dow Jones at 2650. The last twenty years have brought many changes but the song remains the same. The title of the book indicates that as we develop the theory, we will focus our attention on examples. Hoping that the book would be a useful reference for people who apply probability in their work, we have tried to emphasize the results that are important for applications, and illustrated their use with roughly 200 examples. Probability is not a spectator sport, so the book contains almost 450 exercises to challenge the reader and to deepen their understanding. The fourth edition has two major changes (in addition to a new publisher): (i) The book has been converted from TeX to LaTeX. The systematic use of labels should eventually eliminate problems with references to other points in the text. In

Rick Durrett

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mass as a form of Energy in a simple example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major consequence of special relativity, expressed in the relation $E_0 = m c^2$, is that the total energy content of an object at rest, including its thermal motion and binding energy among its constituents, is a measure of its inertia, i.e. its mass. This relation was first stated by Einstein. He showed that, in order to be consistent with the principles of special relativity, there must be a loss of inertia in a block that emits two pulses of electromagnetic radiation. A pedagogical difficulty with this example is that radiation is a purely relativistic phenomenon, and so the connection with the examples one learns in introductory Mechanics courses is not simple. Here we use a more familiar example of masses and springs, where the non-relativistic limit can be easily found and where the potential energy is clearly shown to be part of the mass of the bound system.

Dib, Claudio O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Event:Expanded Constituency Workshop for West Africa | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expanded Constituency Workshop for West Africa Expanded Constituency Workshop for West Africa Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Expanded Constituency Workshop for West Africa: on 2012/09/04 The Global Environment Facility (GEF) is holding an Expanded Constituency Workshop (ECW) for West Africa, as part of the GEF Country Support Programme, including participants from Benin, Cote D'Ivoire, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra leone, Guinea and Togo. The workshop will bring together representatives from civil society, the GEF Secretariat and GEF Agencies, with focal points of the biodiversity, desertification, climate change, and chemicals conventions to discuss activities with global environmental benefits. Civil society organizations are invited to register at the meeting website. Runs September 4 - 6

36

Ion Exchange for the Recycling of Wastewater Constituents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling or the constituents of wastewater requires efficient and cheap separation methods. Pollutants ... removed in a concentrated form to facilitate their recycling. Similarly, the raw water must be ... has a...

Brian Bolto; Lucjan Pawlowski

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Matlab Tutorial Practice by examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matlab Tutorial Practice by examples #12;i Summary 1. Introduction....................................................................................................................1 2. Introduction to Vectors in Matlab..............................................................................................5 3. Introduction to Matrices in Matlab

Dellandréa, Emmanuel

38

Matlab Tutorial Practice by examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matlab Tutorial Practice by examples i Summary 1. Introduction ................................................................ .............................1 2. Introduction to Vectors in Matlab................................................................ ...........5 3. Introduction to Matrices in Matlab

Dellandréa, Emmanuel

39

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Management Plan Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Plan Examples Management Plan Examples The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The elements table below should be used to navigate to the subject of interest. Elements of Deactivation Project Planning Deactivation Project Key Planning Elements Reference DOE O 430.1A Reference DOE G 430.1-3 DOE G 430.1- 3 Fig. 1 Link to Examples Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies Includes organizational responsibilities and structure, disposition path, future use of facility, S&S Reqs and plan, hazard elimination or mitigation, NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, HVAC/lighting service reqs, structural integrity reqs, etc. Sect. 6.e.7.a Sect. 4.1.1 Step 1 1. Example 1

40

HCP Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: HCP ExampleLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Correlated Knowledge Gradients: Example alternatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlated Knowledge Gradients: Example -4 -2 0 2 4 alternatives value 0 10 20 30 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0;Correlated Knowledge Gradients: Example -4 -2 0 2 4 alternatives value 0 10 20 30 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 num measurements log(KGfactor) 0 10 20 30 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 num measurements opportunitycost #12;Correlated Knowledge

Keinan, Alon

42

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Facility End State Decisions Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility End State Decisions Examples Facility End State Decisions Examples Example 3 3.0 POST DEACTIVATION END STATE VISION The Heavy Water Facility is scheduled to cease moderator operations and commence final shutdown of moderator processing and processing support systems. The Heavy Water Facility and supporting facilities will be declared excess. Deactivation will place the facilities into a passively safe, minimal cost, long term S&M mode. At the end of the deactivation period, the facilities will be categorized "Radiological" and "Other Industrial Use". The following deactivation end state is envisioned: Moderator Processing and Moderator Storage Buildings The deactivation of the moderator processing and storage buildings will remove the moderator storage drums

43

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Closeout - Final Report Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Example Final Report Example Example 79 4.6.2.2.4.2 Closeout Reports Completion documentation will be compiled for each of the identified worksets. A final Closeout Report will be prepared for the 771/774 Closure Project when work is completed and the analytical data has been received. The report will consist of a brief description of the work that was completed, including any modifications or variations from the original decision document. The report will also include analytical results, including the results of any confirmatory sampling taken to verify completion of the action to the specific performance standards. A discussion of the quantity and characteristics of the actual wastes produced and how the wastes were stored or disposed will also be provided.

44

Method for verification of constituents of a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method for validating a process stream for the presence or absence of a substance of interest such as a chemical warfare agent; that is, for verifying that a chemical warfare agent is present in an input line for feeding the agent into a reaction vessel for destruction, or, in a facility for producing commercial chemical products, that a constituent of the chemical warfare agent has not been substituted for the proper chemical compound. The method includes the steps of transmitting light through a sensor positioned in the feed line just before the chemical constituent in the input line enters the reaction vessel, measuring an optical spectrum of the chemical constituent from the light beam transmitted through it, and comparing the measured spectrum to a reference spectrum of the chemical agent and preferable also reference spectra of surrogates. A signal is given if the chemical agent is not entering a reaction vessel for destruction, or if a constituent of a chemical agent is added to a feed line in substitution of the proper chemical compound.

Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.; O`Rourke, P.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Release of Inorganic Constituents from Leached Biomass during Thermal Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of Inorganic Constituents from Leached Biomass during Thermal Conversion ... This suggests that while leaching reduces fuel nitrogen, it may also affect the nitrogen combustion chemistry in that a larger fraction of the fuel-bound nitrogen was converted to NO(g) during combustion of the leached samples compared to the unleached samples. ... Six biomasses with different chemical compositions ... ...

D. C. Dayton; B. M. Jenkins; S. Q. Turn; R. R. Bakker; R. B. Williams; D. Belle-Oudry; L. M. Hill

1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with a Meson Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results for the elastic nucleon form factors and the electromagnetic transition amplitudes to the Delta(1232) resonance, obtained with the Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with the inclusion of a meson cloud correction are briefly presented. The pion cloud effects are explicitly discussed.

D. Y. Chen; Y. B. Dong; M. M. Giannini; E. Santopinto

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

Examples of Cost Estimation Packages  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Estimates can be performed in a variety of ways. Some of these are for projects for an undefined scope, a conventional construction project, or where there is a level of effort required to complete the work. Examples of cost estimation packages for these types of projects are described in this appendix.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Red tide detection and tracing using MODIS fluorescence data: A regional example in SW Florida coastal waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red tide detection and tracing using MODIS fluorescence data: A regional example in SW Florida-time data from the MODIS satellite sensor was used to detect and trace a harmful algal bloom (HAB), or red to interferences of other water constituents. The red tide that formed from November to December 2004 off SW

49

Example Queries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Example Queries Example Queries Jump to: navigation, search Example Queries SEP Funding SEP Funding Alabama 55,570,000 Alaska 28,232,000 Arizona 55,447,000 Arkansas 39,416,000 California 226,093,000 Colorado 49,222,000 Connecticut 38,542,000 Delaware 24,231,000 Florida 126,089,000 Georgia 82,495,000 Hawaii 25,930,000 Idaho 28,572,000 Illinois 101,321,000 Indiana 68,621,000 Iowa 40,546,000 Kansas 38,284,000 Kentucky 52,533,000 Louisiana 71,694,000 Maine 27,305,000 Maryland 51,772,000 Massachusetts 54,911,000 Michigan 82,035,000 Minnesota 54,172,000 Mississippi 40,418,000 Missouri 57,393,000 Montana 25,855,000 Nebraska 30,910,000 Nevada 34,714,000 New Hampshire 25,827,000 New Jersey 73,643,000 New Mexico 31,821,000 New York 123,110,000 North Carolina 75,989,000 North Dakota 24,585,000

50

Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy...

51

Distributed Generation Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State governments can lead by example by promoting renewable energy programs and policies. Efforts to lead by example include using renewable energy resources (including alternative fuel for...

52

Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water, Sediment, and Biota of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water, Sediment, and Biota Data Series 658 #12;#12;Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water.J., 2012, Mercury species and other selected constituent concentrations in water, sediment, and biota

53

Structural Identification of the Monomeric Constituents of Petroleum Pitch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the molecular weight and structure of pitches are known to play a role in their suitability for a given application,(5, 9, 14) this understanding has been limited because of an inability to properly characterize the constituents of pitch. ... Monomer information about such pitches is needed to assist in the prediction of the molecular structures of the dimer and higher order oligomers present in petroleum pitch, because these oligomers serve as key precursors for the advanced carbon materials described above. ... However, because no prefractionation of the pitches was carried out, good resolution between the pitch components was not achieved. ...

W. A. Burgess; J. J. Pittman; R. K. Marcus; M. C. Thies

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

Asymptotic safety: a simple example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the Gross-Neveu model in 2safety scenario: despite being perturbatively nonrenormalizable, the model defines an interacting quantum field theory being valid to arbitrarily high momentum scales owing to the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point. Using the functional renormalization group, we study the UV behavior of the model in both the purely fermionic as well as a partially bosonized language. We show that asymptotic safety is realized at non-Gaussian fixed points in both formulations, the universal critical exponents of which we determine quantitatively. The partially bosonized formulation allows to make contact to the large-Nf expansion where the model is known to be renormalizable to all-orders. In this limit, the fixed-point action as well as all universal critical exponents can be computed analytically. As asymptotic safety has become an important scenario for quantizing gravity, our description of a well-understood model is meant to provide for an easily accessible and controllable example of modern nonperturbative quantum field theory.

Jens Braun; Holger Gies; Daniel D. Scherer

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Calculation of size for bound-state constituents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elements are given of a calculation that identifies the size of a proton in the Schroedinger equation for lepton-proton bound states, using the renormalization group procedure for effective particles (RGPEP) in quantum field theory, executed only up to the second order of expansion in powers of the coupling constant. Already in this crude approximation, the extraction of size of a proton from bound-state observables is found to depend on the lepton mass, so that the smaller the lepton mass the larger the proton size extracted from the same observable bound-state energy splitting. In comparison of Hydrogen and muon-proton bound-state dynamics, the crude calculation suggests that the difference between extracted proton sizes in these two cases can be a few percent. Such values would match the order of magnitude of currently discussed proton-size differences in leptonic atoms. Calculations using the RGPEP of higher order than second are required for a precise interpretation of the energy splittings in terms of the proton size in the Schroedinger equation. Such calculations should resolve the conceptual discrepancy between two conditions: that the renormalization group scale required for high accuracy calculations based on the Schroedinger equation is much smaller than the proton mass (on the order of a root of the product of reduced and average masses of constituents) and that the energy splittings due to the physical proton size can be interpreted ignoring corrections due to the effective nature of constituents in the Schr\\"odinger equation.

Stanislaw D. Glazek

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fundamental Mechanisms of Copper CMP Passivation Kinetics of Copper in CMP Slurry Constituents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tribochemical Mechanisms of Copper Chemical MechanicalE06-02 Fundamental Mechanisms of Copper CMP PassivationKinetics of Copper in CMP Slurry Constituents Shantanu

Tripathi, Shantanu; Doyle, F M; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Example Cost Codes for Construction Projects  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter provides an example outline of cost items and their corresponding cost codes that may be used for construction projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

58

Procurement Standards Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

59

Building Standards Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

60

Example BCP Template | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

BCP Template ExampleBCPTemplate02-14-12.docx More Documents & Publications Critical Decision 2 (CD-2) Approval Template Critical Decision 4 (CD-4) Approval Template Slide...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Energy Efficiency Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

62

Montana Produced Water General Permit - Example Authorization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water General Permit - Example Authorization Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: Montana...

63

The FPGA Hello World Example Martin Schoeberl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The FPGA Hello World Example Martin Schoeberl martin@jopdesign.com August 4, 2006 1 Introduction `Hello World' example. What is the `Hello World' program in hardware, in an FPGA? The smallest project entity. In our case hello world 3. In the next dialog box the VHDL source files can be added

Schoeberl, Martin

64

Category:LEDS Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Example Example Jump to: navigation, search This page displays examples of country-scale low emission development strategies Pages in category "LEDS Example" The following 12 pages are in this category, out of 12 total. B Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan Brazil National Plan on Climate Change (PNMC) C China's National Climate Change Programme E ESMAP-South Africa-Low Carbon Growth Strategy G Guyana's Low Carbon Development Strategy I India National Action Plan on Climate Change Indonesia National Action Plan Addressing Climate Change J Japan-Action Plan for Achieving a Low-Carbon Society M Mexico's Special Program on Climate Change S Singapore National Climate Change Strategy T Thailand-National Energy Policy and Development Plan U United Kingdom Low Carbon Transition Plan

65

Effect of Mineral and Organic Soil Constituents on Microbial Mineralization of Organic Compounds in a Natural Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remediation technology of in situ soil washing (10, 28). Most modern surfactants...Knaebel and Vestal (20). The surfactant-soil constituent complexes were added...small amount (100 mg) of the surfactant-soil constituent complex was mixed...

David B. Knaebel; Thomas W. Federle; Drew C. McAvoy; J. Robie Vestal

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Software Quality Assurance Plan Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assurance Plan Example Software Quality Assurance Plan Example An example of a software quality assurance plan developed from an actual DOE project SQA plan based on DOE G...

67

Researches on the Chemistry of Coal. Part II. The Resinic Constituents and Coking Propensitie of Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 March 1922 research-article Researches on the Chemistry of Coal. Part II. The Resinic Constituents and Coking Propensitie of Coals William A. Bone A. R. Pearson E. Sinkinson W. E. Stockings The Royal Society is...

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - active constituents isolated Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

subsystems towards in- tegrated systems having numerous... . 2 12;2 Definition of Terms and Problem Statement A coupled model M consists of N constituent1... models--or...

69

Relative Contributions of Polyphenolic Constituents to the Antioxidant Status of Wines:? Development of a Predictive Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concentrations of 17 phenolic constituents in red wine were analyzed by a number of multiple regression models for their contribution to total antioxidant status (TAS). The best model discovered involved a stepwise selection process starting by ...

George J. Soleas; George Tomlinson; Eleftherios P. Diamandis; David M. Goldberg

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Method and apparatus for the removal of bioconversion of constituents of organic liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the removal or conversion of constituents from bulk organic liquids. A countercurrent biphasic bioreactor system is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the constituent. Two transient, high-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the constituent to produce a product which is then removed from the bioreactor in the aqueous phase or retained in the organic phase. The organic liquid, now free of the original constituents, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

Scott, Timothy (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Constituents of potential concern for human health risk assessment of petroleum fuel releases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...investigation in affected environmental media, such as soil, groundwater, surface...linkages between the affected environmental media and people living or working at or near...fuel constituent in each environmental medium (soil, soil gas or water) was assumed...

Richard L. Bowers; Jonathan W. N. Smith

72

Leading By Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading By Example Leading By Example Leading By Example November 3, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department’s headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department's headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department Brian Costlow Director, Office of Administration Brian Costlow has won several awards for his work recently, including the Federal Energy and Water Management Award and the Energy Department Energy Management Award for Exceptional Service for his efforts to make the Department's headquarter buildings models of sustainability. Every day, employees across the Energy Department work to make America more

73

Leading By Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading By Example Leading By Example Leading By Example November 3, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department’s headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department's headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department Brian Costlow Director, Office of Administration Brian Costlow has won several awards for his work recently, including the Federal Energy and Water Management Award and the Energy Department Energy Management Award for Exceptional Service for his efforts to make the Department's headquarter buildings models of sustainability. Every day, employees across the Energy Department work to make America more

74

MATLAB Quick Guide Name Description Example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MATLAB Quick Guide Symbol/ Command Name Description Example help help Help menu for any command or symbol in MATLAB Help : Help sum % comment MATLAB comment symbol; MATLAB will skip any line beginning for multiplication a = 5 * 5 ; / divide Symbol for division b = 5 / 1 ; ; semi-colon (1) Tells MATLAB to suppress

Smith-Konter, Bridget

75

Optimization Material Distribution methodology: Some electromagnetic examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

730 1 Optimization Material Distribution methodology: Some electromagnetic examples P. Boissoles, H. Ben Ahmed, M. Pierre, B. Multon Abstract--In this paper, a new approach towards Optimization Material to be highly adaptive to various kinds of electromagnetic actuator optimization approaches. Several optimal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

76

Emergent Behavior in Cybersecurity Example 2: Program VerificationExample 1: Cyber Epidemics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergent Behavior in Cybersecurity Example 2: Program VerificationExample 1: Cyber Epidemics Informal Definition and Implication Abstract We argue that emergent behavior is inherent to cybersecurity). Scenario: Illustration of cyber epidemics model (which is a specific kind of Cybersecurity Dynamics model

Xu, Shouhuai

77

Example Retro-Commissioning Statement of Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11.3 11.3 Example Retro-Cx Scope of Work Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work To Include Services As Part of Super ESPC Detailed Energy Survey Background Agency requests that ESCo perform retro-commissioning services 1 , as detailed herein, as a part of performing the Detailed Energy Survey (DES) for site. The incremental cost for these services will be covered as a part of the project development cost for the Super ESPC project, whether or not viable measures are identified and ultimately implemented. It is the intent of the Agency to expand the work that will be performed during the DES. Leveraging the DES to complete a thorough scoping of retro-commissioning opportunities will substantially enhance the value of the ESCO services by ensuring that

78

Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentration at regions of interest within the object.

Gold, Raymond (Richland, WA); McElroy, William N. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentrations at regions of interest within the object.

Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

1984-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fortran MPI/OpenMP example output  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Getting Started Getting Started Configuration Programming Running Jobs Overview Interactive Jobs Batch Jobs Example Batch Scripts Using aprun Queues and Policies Monitoring Jobs Using OpenMP with MPI Memory Considerations Runtime Tuning Options Running Large Scale Jobs Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Completed Jobs How Usage Is Charged File Storage and I/O Software and Tools Debugging and profiling Performance and Optimization Cray XE Documentation Cluster Compatibility Mode Carver PDSF Genepool Testbeds Retired Systems Data & File Systems Network Connections Queues and Scheduling Job Logs & Analytics Training & Tutorials Software Accounts & Allocations Policies Data Analytics & Visualization Data Management Policies Science Gateways User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Example 1.1 1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? 3 y z 3 y z ! ! R P R ; ; ; ; ; f f 0 0 09 @ @ @R Keywords: Example 1.1 Abstract 1 Introduction(s(x),y::z) y::first(x,z) first x 1 0 s(x) x 2 first x 1 x 2 first 0 x 2 first s x x 2 [] first s x y z y first, . Work partially supported by DFG (under grant Ha 2457/1­1) and Acci'on Integrada. DSIC, U.P. de Valencia

Lucas, Salvador

82

Example Measurement & Verification Plan for a Super ESPC Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Example Measurement & Verification Plan for a Super ESPC Project Example Measurement & Verification Plan for a Super ESPC Project Report features a comprehensive measurement and...

83

Responses in Milk Constituents to Intravascular Administration of Two Mixtures of Amino Acids to Dairy Cows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to inves- tigate the effects of intravascular infusions of AA mixtures on milk constituents. Cows were infusion, followed by a 5-djugular infusion of a mixture of AA. Two mixtures of AA were used in a crossover (total AA); this mixture was infused at 400 g of M d . The other mixture represented the essential AA

Bequette, Brian J.

84

Experimental Mathemataics: Examples, Methods andImplications  

SciTech Connect

Recent years have seen the flowering of ''experimental'' mathematics, namely the utilization of modern computer technology as an active tool in mathematical research. This development is not limited to a handful of researchers, nor to a handful of universities, nor is it limited to one particular field of mathematics. Instead, it involves hundreds of individuals, at many different institutions, who have turned to the remarkable new computational tools now available to assist in their research, whether it be in number theory, algebra, analysis, geometry or even topology. These tools are being used to work out specific examples, generate plots, perform various algebraic and calculus manipulations, test conjectures, and explore routes to formal proof. Using computer tools to test conjectures is by itself a major time saver for mathematicians, as it permits them to quickly rule out false notions.

Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

11 - Visualizing library space for constituents: a 3D representation of space changes in the Christopher Center Library at Valparaiso University  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Human beings are visual creatures, and the best way to initiate transformative change with ones constituents is to visually represent how library space might look both currently and in the future. 2D and 3D visualization are slowly but surely gaining traction and momentum on the Internet; the only thing holding back this digital-age leap is bandwidth. Library patrons have been playing online and proprietary games in 2D and 3D for over 15 years now, yet libraries still offer the majority of their resources in one dimension: text. It is no wonder that many of todays students and savvy Internet searchers often find library buildings boring and out of touch with their daily lives, yet there are opportunities to showcase your librarys future space by visually representing space changes through 2D and 3D visualization. This chapter illustrates one such example.

Bradford Lee Eden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Cost Share-Cost Reimbursement Invoice Format Example | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Share-Cost Reimbursement Invoice Format Example Effective Date: 102014 File (public): Cost Share-Cost...

87

Customer Messages for Specific Markets: Examples from JEA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents examples of various types of marketing materials and strategies used by Jacksonville, Florida.

88

The Photo-Chemistry of Some Minor Constituents of the Earth's Atmosphere (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Monthly Notices The Photo-Chemistry of Some Minor Constituents...the various forms of combustion taking place on the Earth...date from oil wells and coal mines appears to be less...Monthly Notices THE PHOTO-CHEMISTRY OF SOME MINOR CONSTITUENTS...date from oil wells and coal mines appears to be less......

D. R. Bates; Agnes E. Witherspoon

1952-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ecofys.com/com/publications/brochures_newsletters/documents/Report National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Screenshot References: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development[1] "Ecofys elaborated in several projects, concrete examples of NAMAs to understand the issues arising from this concept. This report summarizes the

90

ADVANTAGES OF INVESTIGATING CHEMICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL CONSTITUENTS SIMULTANEOUSLY IN SOIL AND GROUNDWATER  

SciTech Connect

At some sites both chemical and radiological investigation of soil and groundwater is required for overall site characterization. While the planning and execution of investigation activities is usually completed to fulfill regulatory (i.e., United States Environmental Protection Agency or United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission) requirements, coordination of chemical and radiological investigation programs may provide an opportunity for reducing the duration of investigation activities and reducing overall project costs. There are several similarities in the chemical and radiological investigation processes that one can take advantage of in program design and execution to efficiently plan and execute chemical and radiological investigations simultaneously. At sites where both chemical and radiological constituents are being investigated in soil and groundwater, various steps can be taken during the investigation processes to combine chemical and radiological investigation and characterization activities. With proper planning, investigating chemical and radiological constituents simultaneously in soil and groundwater can reduce the project schedule and provide cost savings for overall characterization of the site.

Downey, H.; Shephard, E.; Walter, N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

91

Separation and molecular characterization of the acidic constituents in a California biodegraded crude  

SciTech Connect

A detailed investigation into the acidic constituents of a California biodegraded crude was undertaken in order to better understand the complex chemical nature of these intractable components. Biodegraded crudes often possess high concentrations of acidic species, exceeding in some cases 3 wt%. Also, due to the fact that these crude oils are heavily biodegraded, a large proportion of the crude oil components are present as an unresolved complex mixture (UCM). This UCM effectively prohibits analysis of the discrete biological marker components of interest. The use of novel molecular sieving methods employing a high silica NaY molecular sieve, has proved successful in isolating individual molecular species from the complex methylated acidic fraction. Accurate identification of these isolated acidic constituents from a Midway Sunset crude has now been achieved through the combined use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-atomic emission spectrometry, and high resolution mass spectrometry techniques.

Ellis, L.; Haas, G.W.; Winans, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Constituent Quarks and Gluons, Polyakov loop and the Hadron Resonance Gas Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on first principle QCD arguments, it has been argued in arXiv:1204.2424[hep-ph] that the vacuum expectation value of the Polyakov loop can be represented in the hadron resonance gas model. We study this within the Polyakov-constituent quark model by implementing the quantum and local nature of the Polyakov loop hep-ph/0412308, hep-ph/0607338. The existence of exotic states in the spectrum is discussed.

E. Megias; E. Ruiz Arriola; L. L. Salcedo

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

93

Outline Introduction Types Examples Conclusion Intrusion Detection Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering - 2008 2 / 15 #12;Outline Introduction Types Examples Conclusion Overview History Need Computer Engineering Department, KFUPM Spring 2008 Ahmad Almulhem - Network Security Engineering - 2008 1 / 15 #12;Outline Introduction Types Examples Conclusion Outline 1 Introduction Overview History 2 Types

Almulhem, Ahmad

94

Integrated HCP/EA Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HCPEA Example Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Integrated HCPEA ExampleLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took...

95

Bureau of Land Management - Examples of FONSIs | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FONSIs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - Examples of FONSIs Abstract This web page contains examples of...

96

Devices and methods for managing noncombustible gasses in nuclear power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems passively eliminate noncondensable gasses from facilities susceptible to damage from combustion of built-up noncondensable gasses, such as H2 and O2 in nuclear power plants, without the need for external power and/or moving parts. Systems include catalyst plates installed in a lower header of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) condenser, a catalyst packing member, and/or a catalyst coating on an interior surface of a condensation tube of the PCCS condenser or an annular outlet of the PCCS condenser. Structures may have surfaces or hydrophobic elements that inhibit water formation and promote contact with the noncondensable gas. Noncondensable gasses in a nuclear power plant are eliminated by installing and using the systems individually or in combination. An operating pressure of the PCCS condenser may be increased to facilitate recombination of noncondensable gasses therein.

Marquino, Wayne; Moen, Stephan C; Wachowiak, Richard M; Gels, John L; Diaz-Quiroz, Jesus; Burns, Jr., John C

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Description and operation of a mobile wellhead analyzer for the determination of unstable constituents in oilfield waters  

SciTech Connect

A brine analyzer was designed which measures pH, Eh, O/sub 2/, conductivity, S/sup 2 -/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and CO/sub 2/ in oilfield water at the wellhead. When brine samples are collected in the field and transported to the laboratory for analysis, many of the unstable constituents change in concentration. The amount of change depends on the sampling method, sample storage, ambient conditions, and the level of the constituents in the original sample. Thus, a wellhead analysis is necessary if reliable data are to be obtained on unstable constituents in oilfield brines.

Hoke, S.H.; Collins, A.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Wide-Area Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Wide-Area Programming William Cook, Jayadev Misra, David Kitchin, Adrian Quark Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu #12;Overview Orc Notation Examples Outline Overview Orc Notation Examples #12;Overview Orc Notation

Misra, Jayadev

99

What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example Machine Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example Machine Learning DD2431 ¨Orjan Ekeberg Oct­Dec, 2008 What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example 1 What is Machine Learning? Definition A Hypothetical Project What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example 1 What is Machine Learning? Definition

Kjellström, Hedvig

100

What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example Machine Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example Machine Learning DD2431 ¨Orjan Ekeberg Oct­Dec, 2007 What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example 1 What is Machine Learning? Definition A Hypothetical Project What is Machine Learning? About the Course Example 1 What is Machine Learning? Definition

Kjellström, Hedvig

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Nucleon shape and electromagnetic form factors in the chiral constituent quark model  

SciTech Connect

The electromagnetic form factors are the most fundamental quantities to describe the internal structure of the nucleon and the shape of a spatially extended particle is determined by its intrinsic quadrupole moment which can be related to the charge radii. We have calculated the electromagnetic form factors, nucleon charge radii and the intrinsic quadrupole moment of the nucleon in the framework of chiral constituent quark model. The results obtained are comparable to the latest experimental studies and also show improvement over some theoretical interpretations.

Dahiya, Harleen; Sharma, Neetika [Department of Physics, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar, Punjab-144 011 (India)

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nucleon shape and electromagnetic form factors in the chiral constituent quark model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electromagnetic form factors are the most fundamental quantities to describe the internal structure of the nucleon and the shape of a spatially extended particle is determined by its intrinsic quadrupole moment which can be related to the charge radii. We have calculated the electromagnetic form factors, nucleon charge radii and the intrinsic quadrupole moment of the nucleon in the framework of chiral constituent quark model. The results obtained are comparable to the latest experimental studies and also show improvement over some theoretical interpretations.

Harleen Dahiya; Neetika Sharma

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Total Fatty Acids and Other Ether-Soluable Constituents of Feedstuffs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

586-914-10m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 169 SEPTEMBER, 19I4 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Total Fatty Acids and Other Ether-Soluble Constituents of Feedstuffs BY J. B. RATHER Assistant Chemist POSTOFFICE COLLEGE STATION... IS T .* In previous publications of this Experiment Station (Fraps and Bather, Bulletins Nos. 150 and 162) it has been shown that the un? saponifiable matter in the ether extract of hays and fodders averages about 58 per cent. Of the total extract, and is of much...

Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Examples of embedded defects (in particle physics and condensed matter)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a series of examples designed to clarify the formalism of the previous paper. After summarizing this formalism in a prescriptive sense, we run through several examples: first, deriving the embedded defect spectrum for the Weinberg-Salam theory, then discussing several examples designed to illustrate facets of the formalism. We then calculate the embedded defect spectrum for three physical grand unified theories and conclude with a discussion of vortices formed in the superfluid 3He-A phase transition.

Nathan F. Lepora and Anne-Christine Davis

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

106

CDOT - Permit Standard Provisions Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General: CDOT - Permit Standard Provisions Example Author Colorado Department of Transportation Published Colorado Department of Transportation, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for...

107

Project examples Install new HVAC, electrical, fire protection,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project examples Install new HVAC, electrical, fire protection, and plumbing systems in Mechanical. · Totransformthisspaceandincreaseaccessibility, anelevatorisrequired.Currently,Blakelydoesnot haveone. Replace HVAC and electrical system

Blanchette, Robert A.

108

Energy Data Management Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

109

Operations and Maintenance Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

110

Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Application Development over  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Application Development over Wide-Area Networks William of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu #12;Overview Orc Notation. - #12;Overview Orc Notation Examples Orchestrating Components (services) Acquire data from services

Misra, Jayadev

111

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE AND THE CREATION OF ``VIRTUAL'' EXAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE AND THE CREATION OF ``VIRTUAL'' EXAMPLES FOR RBF NETWORKS 1 Federico Girosi some prior knowledge on the learning target are available. Examples of prior knowledge are smoothness and/or space scale. Most of the existing learning schemes do not make use of prior knowledge

Poggio, Tomaso

112

Examples to Help Management Students to Love Mathematical Modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......demonstrate how this approach works, six of the examples used with the approach are presented, along...description of how the approach is applied. These examples...partly because some Management students have done no...students on the management science degree course are given......

P.N. FINLAY; M. KING

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Personal Photo Enhancement Using Example Images Microsoft Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 Personal Photo Enhancement Using Example Images NEEL JOSHI Microsoft Research WOJCIECH MATUSIK describe a framework for improving the quality of personal photos by using a person's favorite photographs "good" and "bad" photos such that properties of the good examples can be used to correct a bad photo

Jaffe, Jules

114

Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Examples 1 - 80 Examples 1 - 80 Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The descriptions below should be used to navigate to the subject of interest. Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies - Examples 1 & 2 - Includes organizational responsibilities and structure, disposition path, future use of facility, S&S Reqs and plan, hazard elimination or mitigation, NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, HVAC/lighting service reqs, structural integrity reqs, etc. Facility End State Decisions - Examples 3, 4 & 5 - Includes expected conditions at completion of the deactivation, DOE mission use, extended S&M, decommissioned and/or dismantled, etc.

115

A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy January 9, 2013 - 11:27am Addthis A Shining Example of Dr. King’s legacy Kathy Chambers Senior Science and Technical Information Specialist, OSTI Editor's Note: This blog was originally posted on OSTI's blog. As America celebrates Martin Luther King's birthday and focuses on how far this nation has come for all people, the Energy Department's .EDUconnections is pleased to honor Delaware State University (DSU). DSU is a shining example of Dr. King's extraordinary legacy of progress and education. Founded in 1891, DSU became one of the country's first land-grant educational institutions and is now a Historically Black College and University. DSU has a proud heritage of research, and today focuses on

116

Federal Government: Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government: Leading by Example Government: Leading by Example Federal Government: Leading by Example October 16, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis Photo of the outside of a building with large horizontal balconies on a sandy xeriscape landscape Renovations to Camp Pendleton barracks extend its life 30 years. The project was certified to meet LEED Silver certification and included a dryscape, a bio swell to collect water runoff before entering the storm drain, and solar-powered parking lot lights. The Federal government plays a vital role in leading by example in environmental, energy, and economic performance. President Obama stressed this importance on October 5, 2009, by stating: "As the largest consumer of energy in the U.S. economy, the Federal government can and should lead by example when it comes to creating

117

Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The descriptions below should be used to navigate to the subject of interest. Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies - Examples 1 & 2 - Includes organizational responsibilities and structure, disposition path, future use of facility, S&S Reqs and plan, hazard elimination or mitigation, NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, HVAC/lighting service reqs, structural integrity reqs, etc. Facility End State Decisions - Examples 3, 4 & 5 - Includes expected conditions at completion of the deactivation, DOE mission use, extended S&M, decommissioned and/or dismantled, etc.

118

The hypercentral Constituent Quark Model and its application to baryon properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hypercentral Constituent Quark Model (hCQM) for the baryon structure is reviewed and its applications are systematically discussed. The model is based on a simple form of the quark potential, which contains a Coulomb-like interaction and a confinement, both expressed in terms of a collective space coordinate, the hyperradius. The model has only three free parameters, determined in order to describe the baryon spectrum. Once the parameters have been fixed, the model, in its non relativistic version, is used to predict various quantities of physical interest, namely the elastic nucleon form factors, the photocouplings and the helicity amplitudes for the electromagnetic excitation of the baryon resonances. In particular, the $Q^2$ dependence of the helicity amplitude is quite well reproduced, thanks to the Coulomb-like interaction. The model is reformulated in a relativistic version by means of the Point Form hamilton dynamics. While the inclusion of relativity does not alter the results for the helicity amp...

Giannini, M M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metrics Examples Metrics Examples Example 42 5.1.4 Performance Measurement and Reporting The subproject manager will communicate subproject technical issues and accomplishments, schedule performance, cost and schedule issues, and corrective action plans, as appropriate, in the Project Directors' weekly 'Path Forward' meeting. However, the primary performance measurement for reporting subproject performance is provided by the performance measurement system. Within the new common database containing core information on Project Hanford, called HANDI 2000, the performance measurement system compares the resource-loaded schedules (budgeted cost of work scheduled [BCWS]), the actual cost of work

120

Lead by example | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead by example Lead by example Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Policies that specify the use of ENERGY STAR tools Campaigns and incentive programs that incorporate ENERGY STAR Lead by example Gather support Develop programs and policies Host a competition Use financing vehicles Promote energy efficiency Lead by example Are you encouraging your community to improve the energy efficiency of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Utility Cost Calculation Example? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Cost Calculation Example? Home > Groups > Utility Rate Allandaly's picture Submitted by Allandaly(24) Member 13 May, 2014 - 11:59 Hi again, Thank you for your help so far....

122

Advanced Semantic Search: The Medical World as an Example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be specific. · The example query "Which disease has the symptom of coughing?" brings a result set in hakia of coughing?" #12;20 4. Handling Concept Matching · Perhaps the most challenging functionality among all

Shamir, Ron

123

Field Examples of Axial Cracked Bearings in Wind Turbine Gearboxes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Examples of Axial Cracked Bearings in Wind Turbine Gearboxes Presented by Paul John Baker of FrontierPro Services at the Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar 2014. 141030 Axial...

124

Microsoft Word - Appendix B - Example Contact Record.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Example Contact Record This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Operations Guide July 2013 Doc. No. S03037-6.0 Page B-1 Rocky Flats Site...

125

Irreversible Thermodynamics and Smart Materials Systems Modelling. Example of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Irreversible Thermodynamics and Smart Materials Systems Modelling. Example of Magnetic Shape Memory mechanisms in smart materials. This procedure is applied to Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys actuators of complex active materials for smart systems. Keywords: Smart material systems, Actuator design

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

The Photo-Chemistry of Some Minor Constituents of the Earth's Atmosphere (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles The Photo-Chemistry of Some Minor Constituents of the Earth's...is estimated that the various forms of combustion taking place on the Earth would provide...The yield to date from oil wells and coal mines appears to be less than the amount......

D. R. Bates; Agnes E. Witherspoon

1952-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Management Plan Examples Property Management Plan Examples Example 68 6.03.11 Property Management Facility maintenance and E&I personnel tools located in 717-D will be redeployed in other facilities. Heavy water facility process and support system spare parts located in the 717-D tool crib will be redeployed or returned to Stores. Machines located in the 717-D machine shop are already registered with Property Management and will be left in place. The 501-D diesel generator, spare refrigeration system compressor, and Aeroflow breathing air systems will be registered with Property Management for potential reuse. Other remaining facility equipment will be abandoned in place. Personnel computers will be redeployed and responsibility for office furniture will be turned over to the Subcontract Services Department furniture warehouse for redistribution.

128

Club's Chairman Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Club's Chairman Leading by Example Club's Chairman Leading by Example Club's Chairman Leading by Example May 14, 2010 - 2:31pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Sierra Club was founded almost 120 years ago with the mission of protecting wildlife and habitats by advocating clean energy use and encouraging Americans to live eco-friendly lifestyles. Sierra Club Oregon Chairman Wes Kempfer is doing his part to further those goals by trying to make his home energy-efficient and wants to spread the word to his fellow members and all Oregonians. Clean Energy Works Portland provides the city's residents with energy assessments that will help them identify what changes in their homes could make the biggest impact toward saving energy and money. Through the program, people like Wes receive financing for energy-efficiency upgrades

129

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

H&S Plan Examples H&S Plan Examples Example 46 9.2 HEALTH AND SAFETY STRATEGY B Plant has integrated safety into its management, planning and work practices in order to protect the public, the environment and facility workers against nuclear and non-nuclear hazards associated with facility transition. Based upon the principles of DNFSB Recommendation 95-2, the Plant's approach to safety management includes:  Applicable. standards and requirements specifically identified and implemented  Safety integrated into baseline and detailed planning  Workers and trained safety professionals use a team approach in hazard identification, analysis and control  Graded approach used to tailor controls based upon hazard type and severity  Hazard control integrated into work processes

130

Earth Day: Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Day: Leading by Example Earth Day: Leading by Example Earth Day: Leading by Example April 20, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis Michael Dunn, Deputy Director of Facilities Management at Argonne National Laboratory, setup a program that encouraged employees to cut their energy use during peak summer months and resulted in more than $475,000 in savings. Here he stands next to an electrical vehicle fueling station that charges cars with solar energy. | Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Michael Dunn, Deputy Director of Facilities Management at Argonne National Laboratory, setup a program that encouraged employees to cut their energy use during peak summer months and resulted in more than $475,000 in savings. Here he stands next to an electrical vehicle fueling station that charges cars with solar energy. | Image courtesy of Argonne National

131

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Application of thermochronological techniques to major normal fault systems can resolve the timing of initiation and duration of extension, rates of motion on detachment faults, timing of ductile mylonite formation and passage of rocks through the crystal-plastic to brittle transition, and multiple events of extensional unroofing. Here we determine

132

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Examples Waste Management Examples Example 59 6.03.12 Environmental and Waste Management Deactivation activities will be performed in compliance with the requirements of WSRC 3Q, Environmental Compliance Manual. The deactivation of the 400-D excess facilities will not adversely affect the environment. An Environmental Evaluation Checklist (EEC) has been initiated to ensure that the general deactivation work scope receives the proper environmental review and approval. Certain deactivation activities, such as the discontinuation of building stack monitoring, requires additional (EPD and SCDHEC in this case) environmental approvals. Regulatory required records for the 420-D refrigeration system and the 772-D chiller will be transferred to FDD. The amount of waste generated by the facility is expected to increase during the deactivation period while the process and support

133

Earth Day: Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Day: Leading by Example Earth Day: Leading by Example Earth Day: Leading by Example April 20, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis Michael Dunn, Deputy Director of Facilities Management at Argonne National Laboratory, setup a program that encouraged employees to cut their energy use during peak summer months and resulted in more than $475,000 in savings. Here he stands next to an electrical vehicle fueling station that charges cars with solar energy. | Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Michael Dunn, Deputy Director of Facilities Management at Argonne National Laboratory, setup a program that encouraged employees to cut their energy use during peak summer months and resulted in more than $475,000 in savings. Here he stands next to an electrical vehicle fueling station that charges cars with solar energy. | Image courtesy of Argonne National

134

Example Measurement & Verification Plan for a Super ESPC Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6.1 6.1 Example M&V Plan Example Measurement & Verification Plan for a Super ESPC Project February 2007 Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy This document was developed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program by Nexant, Inc., and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This document is posted on FEMP's web site at www.eere.energy.gov/femp/financing/superespcs_mvresources.cfm. Comments should be sent to lwebster@nexant.com. 6.1 Example M&V Plan Contents 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY / M&V OVERVIEW AND PROPOSED SAVINGS CALCULATIONS ................................................................................................... 2 1.1

135

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Closure Plan Examples System Closure Plan Examples Example 61 7.5 Endpoint Closure The endpoint documents have grouped the building spaces and systems into a number of manageable areas. The areas are closely related to the engineering work plans that guide completion of many of the endpoints. Endpoint closure methods and practices are provided in the attachment of this PMP. On completion of an endpoint, a BWHC field representative will initial complete on the field copy of the endpoint document. A BHI field representative will verify acceptable completion of the applicable activity. Verification may be performed by reviewing documents, letters, photos, work packages, or work plans, or by visual inspection. When all the endpoints for a specific area of the building have been completed and verified, designated BWHC and BHI management will sign for completion and acceptance of that

136

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Control Examples Configuration Control Examples Example 38 7.05 Configuration Management Plan Configuration Management activities for this project will be carried out using a graded approach, consistent with the guidance in Reference #20. The CM Actions listed in Appendix B of Reference #20 will be carried out as follows: Action 1 - Develop System Boundaries This action will not be performed because the intended End State of 322-M is that all systems will be deactivated and all utility services that were connected to the systems in the facility will be disconnected by isolation at the facility boundary. This isolation will be reflected in Action 2. Action 2 - Develop and Update Drawings Revisions will be made only to those essential drawings that show the modifications made to the facility as part of executing the

137

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S&M Plan Examples S&M Plan Examples Example 44 5.0 SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE 5.01 Current S&M Requirements Currently, the heavy water facility is performing operational maintenance and surveillances as dictated by outside and inside facility operating rounds, facility operating procedures, facility maintenance procedures, facility alarm response procedures, and any additional surveillance and maintenance required by SFSD and SRS administrative programs and policies. As the facility progresses through deactivation, the operational S&M requirements will be retired. 5.02 Post Deactivation S&M Plan (Summary) An S&M plan, required by Ref. 1, will be developed and approved following deactivation of the 400-D excess facilities. Three types of S&M activities are envisioned. On a monthly basis, the outside of the excess facilities will be inspected for safety, security, and

138

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance Plan Examples Quality Assurance Plan Examples Example 64 8.3 QUALITY ASSURANCE This section describes policies and procedures that will be used to meet QA program objectives. This section also develops the strategies PFP will use to ensure the S&M of the PFP inventory, the material stabilization project, the deactivation project, and the dismantlement of the PFP Complex buildings and are completed in a high quality manner. 8.3.1 QA Program The QA program for the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project is implemented in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, (QA Rule) and HNF-PRO-260, Quality Assurance Program . The manner in which the requirements are implemented is specified in QA program plans and implementing procedures for the PFP Complex. The QA

139

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Controls/ALARA Examples Radiological Controls/ALARA Examples Example 57 8.4 RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL This section describes policies and procedures that will be used to meet radiological control program objectives. It also describes the key actions PFP will take to ensure the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project activities are completed safely, and that radioactive materials at the PFP are managed in a controlled and safe manner. 8.4.1 Radiological Control Program The Radiological Control program for the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project will be implemented in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection, and HSRCM-1, Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual . Implementing procedures are administrated as Hanford Procedures in accordance with the implementation strategy outlined in HNF-

140

Leading by Example: Better Buildings Challenge Partners Cut Energy Use |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading by Example: Better Buildings Challenge Partners Cut Energy Leading by Example: Better Buildings Challenge Partners Cut Energy Use Leading by Example: Better Buildings Challenge Partners Cut Energy Use May 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis New infographic breaks down the data companies submitted for the first year of the Better Buildings Challenge. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. New infographic breaks down the data companies submitted for the first year of the Better Buildings Challenge. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Maria Tikoff Vargas Director, Department of Energy Better Buildings Challenge What are the key facts? New data that Better Buildings Challenge partners submitted shows they improved their energy intensity by more than 2.5 percent a year on average. Those improvements equal about a savings of $58 million and 8.5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Assessment Examples Risk Assessment Examples Example 54 10.0 PROJECT RISK This section outlines a methodology which will be used to qualitatively/subjectively assess the project risk. The approach is modeled after project risk assessment processes outlined in standard project management texts and training courses but tailored to the unique risks encountered in the DOE projects. In the context of this section, project risk means risk to one of the project baselines (technical, cost, or schedule) and should not be confused with health and safety risks. However, health and safety issues are considered to the extent that they impact the risk to the project baselines. 10.1 RISK ASSESSMENT TOOLS The two primary tools that will be used to conduct the risk assessment are listed below.

142

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Work Management Examples Work Management Examples Example 36 8.2.5 Work Processes Work associated with nuclear safety functions will be planned, authorized, and performed following approved technical standards, instructions, procedures, and other control documentation commensurate with the complexity and risk posed by the task. The calibration program governs the process that ensures quality of the calibration and maintenance of process monitoring equipment. Equipment found to be out of calibration is tagged and not used until re-calibrated. HNF-PRO that implement DOE-Order 5480.19, and HNF-PRO-233, -298, and others determined applicable, will be evaluated and necessary facility specific procedures developed to complement them for implementation. 10.2 Personnel Safety

143

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Plan Examples Environmental Plan Examples Example 51 8.1 ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY A significant part of the strategy for maintaining compliance with environmental regulatory requirements during the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project is to apply the process described in the Tri-Party Agreement, Section 8.0, "Facility Decommissioning Process." The Section 8.0 process will allow the DOE to develop agreements with the State and Federal regulatory agencies facilitating timely stabilization of the PFP inventory of plutonium-bearing materials, deactivation of the PFP Complex, and perhaps elimination of all above ground hazards at the PFP Complex through dismantlement of the buildings and structures. The Section 8.0 process also provides the means for DOE to ensure the public and stakeholders get an opportunity

144

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training and Qualification Plan Examples Training and Qualification Plan Examples Example 66 8.2.2 Personnel Training and Qualification The Personnel Training and Qualification program is being established as defined by laws, DOE Orders, and company directives to ensure that personnel are trained and qualified to perform assigned tasks. The training and qualification program develops personnel proficiency commensurate with the scope, complexity, and nature of an assigned activity. Management is responsible for developing staff position requirements based on education and experience necessary to perform tasks. Building managers and suppliers that provide personnel to support building operations are responsible for ensuring that personnel are sufficiently trained to perform assigned tasks in a manner that minimizes risk to personnel performing a task, co-workers, and

145

Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Constituent quark model for nuclear stopping in high energy nuclear collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study nuclear stopping in high energy nuclear collisions using the constituent quark model. It is assumed that wounded nucleons with a different number of interacted quarks hadronize in different ways. The probabilities of having such wounded nucleons are evaluated for proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions. After examining our model in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions and fixing the hadronization functions, it is extended to nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is used to calculate the rapidity distribution and the rapidity shift of final-state protons in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data on 32S+32S at Elab=200A GeV and 208Pb+208Pb at Elab=160A GeV. Theoretical predictions are also given for proton rapidity distribution in 197Au+197Au at s=200A GeV (BNL-RHIC). We predict that the nearly baryon-free region will appear in the midrapidity region and the rapidity shift is ??y?=2.24.

T. K. Choi; M. Maruyama; F. Takagi

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The hypercentral Constituent Quark Model and its application to baryon properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hypercentral Constituent Quark Model (hCQM) for the baryon structure is reviewed and its applications are systematically discussed. The model is based on a simple form of the quark potential, which contains a Coulomb-like interaction and a confinement, both expressed in terms of a collective space coordinate, the hyperradius. The model has only three free parameters, determined in order to describe the baryon spectrum. Once the parameters have been fixed, the model, in its non relativistic version, is used to predict various quantities of physical interest, namely the elastic nucleon form factors, the photocouplings and the helicity amplitudes for the electromagnetic excitation of the baryon resonances. In particular, the $Q^2$ dependence of the helicity amplitude is quite well reproduced, thanks to the Coulomb-like interaction. The model is reformulated in a relativistic version by means of the Point Form hamilton dynamics. While the inclusion of relativity does not alter the results for the helicity amplitudes, a good description of the nucleon elastic form factors is obtained.

M. M. Giannini; E. Santopinto

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication and Stakeholder Involvement Communication and Stakeholder Involvement Plan Examples Example 49 10.0 COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT The transition of B Plant is a critical element in Hanford's mission of environmental management. The B Plant Transition Project Management Team have made a commitment to open communications throughout transition because effective communications and public involvement are critical success factors for the project. Communications must be living and dynamic, responding to accomplishments and emerging issues or activities. A communications plan will be developed to define specific actions for disseminating information regarding project objectives, strategies, problems/issues, and status, and for developing strategies for soliciting input/involvement throughout the deactivation

149

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Baseline Development and Control Technical Baseline Development and Control Examples Example 40 5.0 PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL The Project Management and Control section provides an overview of the project management and control systems that will be used to manage the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project, addressing the following key elements of project management and control:  Project Management Control System (PMCS) - Work breakdown structure - Baseline development/update - Scheduling - Performance measurement and reporting - Change control  Information and reporting - Project status report - Project manager's monthly report - FDH/RL project status review - DOE-HQ project management reviews - Special reviews

150

Cost Type Examples Salary costs for staff working  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Type Examples Salary costs for staff working on the grant Fellows, research assistants by the technician can be supported by a verifiable audit trail. Specialist consultancy fees Recruitment costs Staff recruitment and advertising costs, including interviewee travel. Materials & consumables Laboratory chemicals

Rambaut, Andrew

151

Control of Microfluidic Systems: Two Examples, Results, and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Control of Microfluidic Systems: Two Examples, Results, and Challenges Micheal Armani, Satej results and challenges in feedback control of microfluidic systems. Results are provided for two Integration of Micro- and Nano-Scale Systems' organized by the author. 2. Introduction Microfluidics refers

Shapiro, Benjamin

152

Structured Wide-Area Programming: Orc Programming Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structured Wide-Area Programming: Orc Programming Examples Jayadev Misra Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu #12;Some Algorithms · Enumeration;Corresponding Orc program val (x, y) = (Ref(0), Ref(0)) def f1() = Ift(x?

Misra, Jayadev

153

Face Photo Retrieval by Sketch Example Hamed Kiani Galoogahi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Face Photo Retrieval by Sketch Example Hamed Kiani Galoogahi School of Computing National University of Singapore Singapore, 117417 tsim@comp.nus.edu.sg ABSTRACT Face photo-sketch matching has of matching face photo and sketch is difference of visual characteristics between face photo and sketch which

Sim, Terence

154

PH-315 Portland State University Arduino PID Example Lab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PH-315 Portland State University Arduino PID Example Lab Bret Comnes & A. La Rosa 1. Introduction Arduino Libraries Writing our own PID control loop isn't that hard, but there are a lot of details to take to start with an Arduino library is the libraries documentation. (Beauregard, PIDLibrary, 2013). This page

155

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for RCRA Constituent Analysis of Solidified Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents distributes test samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals in solid matrices. Each distribution of test samples is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department. The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the RCRA PDP. Participating laboratories demonstrate acceptable performance by successfully analyzing single- blind performance evaluation samples (subsequently referred to as PDP samples) according to the criteria established in this plan. PDP samples are used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). The concentrations of analytes in the PDP samples address levels of regulatory concern and encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in waste characterization samples. The WIPP requires analyses of homogeneous solid wastes to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples. Participating laboratories must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Groundwater transport modeling of constituents originating from the Burial Grounds Complex  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS), operates a number of sites for the land disposal of various leachable radionuclide, organic, and inorganic wastes. Located within the General Separations Area (GSA) of SRS are the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) and the Old Burial Ground (OBG). A portion of the LLRWDF has been designated as the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF). The OBG began receiving waste in 1952 and was closed in 1974. Various wastes, including transuranic, intermediate and low level beta-gamma, and solvents, were received during this period of operation. In 1969, prior to the closing of the OBG, a portion of the MWMF/LLRWDF (the MWMF) began receiving waste. GeoTrans, Inc. was contracted by WSRC to conduct a numerical modeling study to assess groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vicinity of the MWMF in support of an Alternate Concentration Limits demonstration for the Part B permit. The project was divided into two phases: development of a groundwater flow model of the hydrogeologic system underlying the MWMF which includes the entire GSA, and development of a solute transport model to assess migration of 19 designated constituents of concern (COCs) over a period 30 years into the future. The first phase was completed in May of 1992 and the results documented in GeoTrans (1992). That report serves as the companion volume to the present contaminant transport modeling report. The transport study is intended to develop predictions of concentration and mass flux of the 19 COCs at downgradient exposure points over the 30 year period of interest. These results are to be used in human health and ecological risk assessments which are also being performed in support of the Part B permit.

Andersen, P.F.; Shupe, M.G.; Spalding, C.P. [GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (US)

1992-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies Examples 1 & 2 Example 1 1.0 Summary The 322-M Metallurgical Laboratory is currently categorized as a Radiological Facility. It is inactive with no future DOE mission. In May of 1998 it was ranked Number 45 in the Inactive Facilities Risk Ranking database which the Facilities Decommissioning Division maintains. A short-term surveillance and maintenance program is in-place while the facility awaits final deactivation. Completion of the end points described in this deactivation project plan will place the 322-M facility into an End State that can be described as "cold and dark". The facility will be made passively safe requiring minimal surveillance and no scheduled maintenance.

158

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare and Issue Project Plan Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Issue Project Plan Documents and Issue Project Plan Documents Example Example 70 5.2 Information and Reporting Management reporting provides timely and accurate data to apprise BWHC, FDH, and DOE management of current and projected project conditions. Information contained in these reports is obtained from the same database that supports day-to-day management by BWHC. 5.2.1 Project Status Report Reporting for the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project is incorporated in the monthly PSR, prepared by BWHC for FDH and RL. The PSR summarizes performance and compares it with the technical, schedule, and cost baselines contained in the MYWP. The report provides the data required by the DOE-HQ process. 5.2.2 Project Manager's Monthly Report

159

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation to Decommissioning Transition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Decommissioning Transition to Decommissioning Transition Example Example 80 1.5 OPERATIONAL TRANSITION AND DEACTIVATION STRATEGY According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), the life cycle of a facility makes several transitions over the course of it's existence. The typical stages or phases include operation, (standby), deactivation, S&M, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The life cycle phases may occur as a straight through process or with long interim periods. In Fig. 1.4, "Facility Disposition Scenarios and Associated Hazard Profiles" (Ref. DOE-STD-1120-98), Scenario 2 demonstrates the life cycle phasing that most closely represents that of the 9206 Complex. Since the ultimate disposition of Building 9206 (and associated buildings and operations) is not known, a decision was made to

160

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation Plan Project Scope and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan Project Scope and Plan Project Scope and Objectives Examples Example 6 2.3 MISSION OBJECTIVES Stabilization of plutonium-bearing materials and deactivation/dismantlement of the PFP Complex will result in the virtual elimination of the hazards and risks associated with the facility and will greatly reduce the costs of safe, secure S&M. Using the lessons learned from deactivation projects across the DOE Complex, further improvement on previously applied deactivation methods is anticipated. The major mission objectives for the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project are as follows:  Maintain inventory of plutonium-bearing material in safe and highly secure storage pending shipment offsite;  Maintain the PFP facilities, systems, and residual radioactive and chemical contamination in a safe,

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161

The plucked string: an example of non-normal dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motion of a single Fourier mode of the plucked string is an example of transient, free decay of coupled, damped oscillators. It shares the rarely discussed features of the generic case, e.g., possessing a complete set of non-orthogonal eigenvectors and no normal modes, but it can be analyzed and solved analytically by hand in an approximation that is appropriate to musical instruments' plucked strings.

Politzer, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids II. Imidazolium cations.  

SciTech Connect

In part 1 of this study, radiolytic degradation of constituent anions in ionic liquids (ILs) was examined. The present study continues the themes addressed in part 1 and examines the radiation chemistry of 1,3-dialkyl substituted imidazolium cations, which currently comprise the most practically important and versatile class of ionic liquid cations. For comparison, we also examined 1,3-dimethoxy- and 2-methyl-substituted imidazolium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations. In addition to identification of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and selective deuterium substitution, we analyzed stable radiolytic products using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal rich chemistry initiated through 'ionization of the ions': oxidation and the formation of radical dications in the aliphatic arms of the parent cations (leading to deprotonation and the formation of alkyl radicals in these arms) and reduction of the parent cation, yielding 2-imidazolyl radicals. The subsequent reactions of these radicals depend on the nature of the IL. If the cation is 2-substituted, the resulting 2-imidazolyl radical is relatively stable. If there is no substitution at C(2), the radical then either is protonated or reacts with the parent cation forming a C(2)-C(2) {sigma}{sigma}*-bound dimer radical cation. In addition to these reactions, when methoxy or C{sub {alpha}}-substituted alkyl groups occupy the N(1,3) positions, their elimination is observed. The elimination of methyl groups from N(1,3) was not observed. Product analyses of imidazolium liquids irradiated in the very-high-dose regime (6.7 MGy) reveal several detrimental processes, including volatilization, acidification, and oligomerization. The latter yields a polymer with m/z of 650 {+-} 300 whose radiolytic yield increases with dose (0.23 monomer units per 100 eV for 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium trifluorosulfonate). Gradual generation of this polymer accounts for the steady increase in the viscosity of the ILs upon irradiation. Previous studies at lower dose have missed this species due to its wide mass distribution (stretching out to m/z 1600) and broad NMR lines, which make it harder to detect at lower concentrations. Among other observed changes is the formation of water immiscible fractions in hydrophilic ILs and water miscible fractions in hydrophobic ILs. The latter is due to anion fragmentation. The import of these observations for use of ILs as extraction solvents in nuclear cycle separations is discussed.

Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T. W.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Hatcher, J.; Wishart, J. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (BNL)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Method for separating constituents from solution employing a recyclable Lewis acid metal-hydroxy gel  

SciTech Connect

This invention permits radionuclides, heavy metals, and organics to be extracted from solution by scavenging them with an amorphous gel. In the preferred embodiment, a contaminated solution (e.g. from soil washing, decontamination, or groundwater pumping) is transferred to a reaction vessel. The contaminated solution is contacted by the sequestering reagent which might contain for example, aluminate and EDTA anions in a 2.5 M NaOH solution. The pH of the reagent bearing solution is lowered on contact with the contaminated solution, or for example by bubbling carbon dioxide through it, causing an aluminum hydroxide gel to precipitate as the solution drops below the range of 1.8 to 2.5 molar NaOH (less than pH 14). This precipitating gel scavenges waste contaminants as it settles through solution leaving a clean supernatant which is then separated from the gel residue by physical means such as centrifugation, or simple settling. The gel residue containing concentrated contaminants is then redissolved releasing contaminants for separations and processing. This is a critical point: the stabilized gel used in this invention is readily re-dissolved by merely increasing the pH above the gels phase transition to aqueous anions. Thus, concentrated contaminants trapped in the gel can be released for convenient separation from the sequestering reagent, and said reagent can then be recycled.

Alexander, D.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Examination of a simple example of gravitational wave memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine a simple example of gravitational wave memory due to the decay of a point particle into two point particles. In the case where one of the decay products is null, there are two types of memory: a null memory due to the null particle and an ordinary memory due to the recoiling timelike particle. In the case where both decay products are timelike, there is only ordinary memory. However, this ordinary memory can mimic the null memory in the limit where one of the decay products has a large velocity.

Tolish, Alexander; Garfinkle, David; Wald, Robert M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Examination of a simple example of gravitational wave memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine a simple example of gravitational wave memory due to the decay of a point particle into two point particles. In the case where one of the decay products is null, there are two types of memory: a null memory due to the null particle and an ordinary memory due to the recoiling timelike particle. In the case where both decay products are timelike, there is only ordinary memory. However, this ordinary memory can mimic the null memory in the limit where one of the decay products has a large velocity.

Alexander Tolish; Lydia Bieri; David Garfinkle; Robert M. Wald

2014-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

166

Examples involving shrinking conditions of fixed point theorems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 'NCE December i&70 Major SubDect: M, ther. atics 0 S E z EXP~LES INVOLVI'. &G SHPINEIIlG COEDITIOIJS OP 1 IZED POIl'I I TEEOREi'!S a z lg o o Pi Vl W Sl 5 0 A Thesis by DOUGLAS ANJHZW SJIAPP Approved as to style and content, oy... fash? on. However, shall focus our . i. nterest on the inability of one condition to oe deri ved from another. 'dhen this ' s the case, an example will show the point o " impasse. ACKI1GWLZDG~PJ&TH I wish to thank the following people...

Sharp, Douglas Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced application examples Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

application examples Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced application examples Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 SFU ONLINE CASH ADVA...

168

File:Wind rough example.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Wind rough example.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Wind rough example.pdf Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 196 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:03, 2 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 18:03, 2 January 2014 1,650 × 1,275, 2 pages (196 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools Elementary School Curricula

169

September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Appendix D Example Standard Operating Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Appendix D ­ Example Standard Operating Procedures UW Environmental Health and Safety Page D-1 Appendix D - Example Standard Operating Procedures A. EXAMPLE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs) Current example SOPs are on-line at http

Wilcock, William

170

Lessons & Examples for Establishing Partnerships Between Grantees & Financial Institutions (Text Version)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Transcript of the webinar, "Lessons & Examples for Establishing Partnerships Between Grantees & Financial Institutions."

171

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench water from a slagging, fixed-bed coal-gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

This study is part of an effort to assess the efficiency of activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot-plant quench waters. A sample of raw-gas quench water was obtained from the Grand Forks Energy and Technology Center's pilot plant, which employs the slagging, fixed-bed gasification process. The quench water generated in the processing of Indian Head lignite was pretreated to reduce ammonia and alkalinity, and then diluted and subjected to long-term biological treatment, followed by detailed characterization and analysis of organic constituents. The pretreated (influent) and treated (effluent) samples were extracted using a methylene chloride, pH-fractionation method to obtain acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Over 99% of the total extractable and chromatographable organic material in the influent acid fraction was composed of phenol and alkylated phenols. Biological treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Major components of the influent base fraction were alkylated pyridines, anilines, aminopyrroles, imidazoles and/or pyrazoles, diazines, and quinolines. Removal efficiency of these compounds ranged between 90 and 100%. The influent neutral fraction was composed mainly of cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, naphthalene, indole, acetophenone, and benzonitrile. Alkylated benzenes were generally absent. Removal efficiencies of these compounds were generally very good, except for certain alkylated cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes. Results are compared with those of a similar study on HYGAS coal-gasification quench water.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

An Example of Uniform Approximation near a Caustic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the region inside a caustic having two rays through each point ray acoustics approximates a sound field due to a point harmonic source of frequency ? by e?Im(T1)[A1ei?T 1+A2e(i?T 2+ir/2) ]. When the caustic is smooth Ludwig approximates the field everywhere by a constant times e i?? [B 1 Ai (?? 2 3 ?)?i? ? 1 2 B 2 Ai ?(?? 1 2 ?)] where Ai is the usual Airy function. An example of Ludwig's approximation is presented in parameterless form for the unbounded layered medium having speed c(z)?=?z ? 1 2 . This approximation of course agrees with ray theory on the source side of the caustic rises to a large but finite value near the caustic and exhibits exponential decay on the other side of the caustic. For the record the results are expressed in horizontal range x and depth z with the source at x = 0 z = z 0: T n ?=?( 2 3 )[??+?(???1) n ?] 1 2 [????(??1?) n ?/2] where ? = z + z 0 and r2 = 4zz0 ? x2; An ?2 = 2r(? + (? 1) n ?); 2? = ? ? R where R 2 = (z ? z 0)2 + x 2 3? 1 2 ?=???+?R ; B 1 2 ?=?2?? 1 3 /(rR 2 ) and B 2 ?=?? ? 1 2 /R .

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Conversion of the Common Food Constituent 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural into a Mutagenic and Carcinogenic Sulfuric Acid Ester in the Mouse in Vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conversion of the Common Food Constituent 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural into a Mutagenic and Carcinogenic Sulfuric Acid Ester in the Mouse in Vivo ... 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), formed by acid-catalyzed dehydration and in the Maillard reaction from reducing sugars, is found at high levels in numerous foods. ... Hydroxymethylfurfural, A Versatile Platform Chemical Made from Renewable Resources ...

Bernhard H. Monien; Heinz Frank; Albrecht Seidel; Hansruedi Glatt

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recovery, transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products. 7 figs.

Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.; Mansure, A.J.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

175

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal mircrobalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recover transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products.

Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Text-Alternative Version: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative

178

Incremental Learning from Positive Examples Grazia Bombini, Nicola Di Mauro, Floriana Esposito, and Stefano Ferilli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incremental Learning from Positive Examples Grazia Bombini, Nicola Di Mauro, Floriana Esposito Bombini, Nicola Di Mauro, Floriana Esposito, and Stefano Ferilli evidence for the class ci

Di Mauro, Nicola

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - alluvial sedimentation examples Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Willapa River basin, Washington State, indicate that the drainage Summary: in local sediment supply such as in the South Fork Willapa River example. The channels that had...

180

Prevalence estimation under heterogeneity in the example of bovine trypanosomosis in Uganda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prevalence estimation under heterogeneity in the example of bovine trypanosomosis in Uganda Dankmar of bovine trypanosomosis in Mukono County, Uganda. Fifty farms (referred to as clusters), were sampled

Boehning, Dankmar

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Image examples of marketing claims to accompany Smoking Revolution". A Content Analysis of Electronic Cigarette Retail Websites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Image examples of marketing claims to accompany SmokingImage examples of marketing claims to accompany Smokingdriven and reinforced by marketing, it is important to

Grana, Rachel A.; Ling, Pamela M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A review on pyrolysis of biomass constituents: Mechanisms and composition of the products obtained from the conversion of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The conversion of biomass by thermochemical means is very promising for the substitution of fossil materials in many energy applications. Given the complexity of biomass the main challenge in its use is to obtain products with high yield and purity. For a better understanding of biomass thermochemical conversion, many authors have studied in TG analyzer or at bed scale the individual pyrolysis of its main constituents (i.e. cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin). Based on these studies, this original work synthesizes the main steps of conversion and the composition of the products obtained from each constituent. Pyrolysis conversion can be described as the superposition of three main pathways (char formation, depolymerization and fragmentation) and secondary reactions. Lignin, which is composed of many benzene rings, gives the highest char yield and its depolymerization leads to various phenols. The depolymerization of the polysaccharides is a source of anhydro-saccharides and furan compounds. The fragmentation of the different constituents and the secondary reactions produce CO, CO2 and small chain compounds. For temperature higher than 500C, the residues obtained from the different constituents present a similar structure, which evolves towards a more condensed polyaromatic form by releasing CH4, CO and H2. As the aromatic rings and their substituent composition have a critical influence on the reactivity of pyrolysis products, a particular attention has been given to their formation. Some mechanisms are proposed to explain the formation of the main products. From the results of this study it is possible to predict the reactivity and energy content of the pyrolysis products and evaluate their potential use as biofuels in renewable applications.

Franois-Xavier Collard; Jol Blin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Propositional, First-Order And Higher-Order Logics: Basic Definitions, Rules of Inference, and Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Examples Stuart C. Shapiro Department of Computer Science and Engineering University at Buffalo, The State, and Examples. In Lucja M. Iwa´nska & Stuart C. Shapiro, Eds., Natural Language Processing and Knowledge University of New York 226 Bell Hall Buffalo, NY 14260-2000 shapiro@cse.buffalo.edu 1 What is Logic? Logic

Shapiro, Stuart C.

184

What is a model? Mathematical modelling Examples Conclusions What is Mathematical Modelling?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is a model? Mathematical modelling Examples Conclusions What is Mathematical Modelling? John 21, 2014 What is a Model? 1/33 #12;What is a model? Mathematical modelling Examples Conclusions Outline 1 What is a model? Disciplinary differences 2 Mathematical modelling Definition Quotes Modelling

Stockie, John

185

Design Examples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We will finally treat mirror objectives by considering the third order aberrations of two-mirror systems, as in the work of Schwarzschild [1].

Chris Velzel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

GSL Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALTD Math Libraries ACML FFTW GNU Science Library (GSL) LAPACK LibSci Math Kernel Library (MKL) NAG PETSc PSPLINE ScaLAPACK SLEPc SPRNG TPSL Trilinos Math Libraries List NCARNCL...

187

Teaching Example  

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Scenario Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario Reference Student Pages At the end of the school year, several teachers were discussing possible projects for the next year. One teacher mentioned about a program called EnergyNet that should help connect the science curriculum to a real-world situation. During the summer, a team of teachers and students attended training offered at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. The authentic orientation of this energy-consumption investigation gave teachers the opportunity to expand the initial program into an interdisciplinary unit integrating technology. Although the EnergyNet program supplied the data collection activities, Internet access and collaboration with support personnel, resources available through Illinois

188

In-Situ, Real-Time Measurement of Melt Constituents in the Aluminum, Glass, and Steel Industries  

SciTech Connect

Energy Research Company (ERCo), with support from DOEs Industrial Technologies Program, Sensors and Automation has developed a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) probe to measure, in real time and in-situ, the composition of an aluminum melt in a furnace at an industrial plant. The compositional data is provided to the operator continuously allowing the operator to adjust the melt composition, saving energy, increasing production, and maintaining tighter compositional tolerances than has been previously possible. The overall objectives of this project were to: -- design, develop, fabricate, test and project future costs of the LIBS probe on bench-size experiments; - test the unit in a pilot-scaled aluminum furnace under varying operating conditions of temperature and melt constituents; -- determine the instruments needed for use in industrial environment; -- compare LIBS Probe data to readings traditionally taken on the furnace; -- get full-scale data to resolve if, and how, the LIBS Probe design should be modified for operator acceptance. Extensive laboratory tests have proven the concept feasibility. Elemental concentrations below 0.1% wt. have been accurately measured. Further, the LIBS system has now been installed and is operating at a Commonwealth Aluminum plant in Ohio. The technology is crosscutting as it can be used in a wide variety of applications. In the Sensors and Automation Program the application was for the secondary aluminum industry. However, this project spawned a number of other applications, which are also reported here for completeness. The project was effective in that two commercial systems are now operating; one at Commonwealth Aluminum and another at a PPG fiberglass plant. Other commercial installations are being negotiated as of this writing. This project led to the following conclusions: 1. The LIBS System has been developed for industrial applications. This is the first time this has been accomplished. In addition, two commercial installations have been completed; one at Commonwealth and another at PPG. 2. The system is easy to operate and requires no operator training. Calibration is not required. It is certified as eye safe. 3. The system is crosscutting and ERCo is evaluating seven applications, as reported in this report, and other applications to be reported later. 4. A business plan is being completed for each of the near term markets. ERCo is committed to achieving continued commercial success with the LIBS System. 5. A world wide patent has been issued. 6. The energy savings is substantial. The annual energy savings, by 2010, for each industry is estimated as follows: o Secondary Aluminum 1.44 trillion Btus o Glass 17 to 45 trillion Btus o Steel Up to 26 trillion Btus

Robert De Saro

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

Example Program and Makefile for BG/P | Argonne Leadership Computing  

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Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System Overview Data Transfer Data Storage & File Systems Compiling and Linking Example Program and Makefile for BG/P FAQs Compiling and Linking Queueing and Running Jobs Debugging and Profiling Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Example Program and Makefile for BG/P Program Example Here's an example of compiling a simple MPI program on ALCF Blue Gene/P systems: > cat pi.c #include "mpi.h" #include #include int main(int argc, char** argv)

190

Calling all great examples of open government data | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calling all great examples of open government data Calling all great examples of open government data Developer Data Web Services Source Code Challenges Semantic Web Blogs Let's Talk Developers You are here Data.gov » Communities » Developers » Forums Calling all great examples of open government data Submitted by Jeanne Holm on Mon, 11/15/2010 - 5:49am Log in to vote 5 There are so many great examples of open government data being published. We've linked to some of them at http://www.data.gov/community, but so many more exist. What sites do you know of? Which countries are making their data more open and their operations more transparent? Add new comment Open Government Best Practices Permalink Submitted by Aftab Datta on Mon, 11/15/2010 - 11:28am. New Zealand representative at the IOGDC gave a success story on open

191

Examples Galleries Generated by Interactive Genetic Algorithms Dimitri Masson, Alexandre Demeure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for tools for supporting both the production and exploration of examples.. We describe a running prototype product, and creative process. This the design goals and constraints are incomplete, imprecise and evolve along the design process. This ill

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

192

Contrasting styles of swell-driven coastal erosion: examples from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...impacts on an embayed, high-energy coastline: examples from...Africa. Workshop on Ocean Energy, Centre for Renewable and Sustainable Energy Studies, Stellenbosch...ICS 2004 (Proceedings) Brazil. ShortA. D. 1999. Handbook...

A. M. SMITH; A. A. MATHER; S. C. BUNDY; J. A. G. COOPER; L. A. GUASTELLA; P. J. RAMSAY; A. THERON

193

Promise and challenge of high-performance computing, with examples from molecular modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Issue New science from high-performance computing organized by Richard Catlow...Promise and challenge of high-performance computing, with examples from molecular...the benefits offered by high-performance computing. The task will not be...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The influence of a source term, an example: chemically reacting hypersonic flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of a source term, an example: chemically reacting hypersonic flow M. Fey, 1 R singularity. We consider hypersonic Euler flow of N chemically reacting species around a blunt body in two

195

Learning from one example in machine vision by sharing probability densities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human beings exhibit rapid learning when presented with a small number of images of a new object. A person can identify an object under a wide variety of visual conditions after having seen only a single example of that ...

Miller, Erik G. (Erik Gundersen)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Company Summary Comment Example RPI NYS Walmart Rice 1 Line Pitch Explain your venture in 140  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company Summary Comment Example RPI NYS Walmart Rice 1 Line Pitch Explain your venture in 140 Members Advisors Previous Investors Elevator Pitch 60 second pitch. Do this at the end. Contact Name x x x

Linhardt, Robert J.

197

Assessment of ocean waste disposal. Task 5. Human-health impacts of waste constituents. 2. Pathogens and antibiotic- and heavy-metal-resistant bacteria. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of wastes in the ocean has been practiced by coastal nations for many decades. All areas of the ocean have been subject to disposal use, including estuaries, nearshore, open shelf, and deep ocean sites. Until recently, it was believed that pathogenic bacteria did not survive for any significant period of time in estuarine and marine environments. Scientists and public-health workers never bothered to ask the question could viable, virulent pathogens be present in water samples even though they could not be detected by conventional plating methods. This laboratory answered this question in the affirmative for several bacterial pathogens, and this is discussed in detail. What follows in the report is a description of potentially harmful constituents of wastes, ways in which those constituents could reach humans, known incidents of human disease contracted from wastes, detection of waste-borne disease agents, management technologies, and monitoring and predictive technologies. Since the report is not just a review of the literature, not all known literature has been discussed. However, every attempt is made to include very relevant material, regardless of its age. What follows then is both a literature review and a position paper.

Grimes, D.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal system has been widely studied and reported by scientists through the past several years, but there is still a considerable divergence of opinion regarding the structural setting, origin, and internal structure of this energy resource. Because of accelerating exploration and development drilling that is taking place, there is a need for a reservoir model that is consistent with the limited geologic facts available regarding the area. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Durbin, W.F.

199

How a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example How a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example January 25, 2011 - 1:18pm Addthis Watercolor print of the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC) with new facilities. Watercolor print of the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC) with new facilities. Luke Gomes Project Officer, Golden Field Office Aldo Leopold is considered by many to be the father of wildlife ecology. Now, thanks to funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Wisconsin nature center that bears his name will be at the forefront in demonstrating the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to thousands of visitors every year. The Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC), located near Madison, Wisconsin is using a $500,000 sub-grant from the State of Wisconsin's Energy

200

NEEA Study: Examples of Deep Energy Savings in Existing Buildings | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEEA Study: Examples of Deep Energy Savings in Existing Buildings NEEA Study: Examples of Deep Energy Savings in Existing Buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Examples of liftings of Nichols algebras over racks # Nicolas Andruskiewitsch and Matas Grana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examples of liftings of Nichols algebras over racks # Nicol??as Andruskiewitsch and Mat??�as Gra to racks. We discuss pointed Hopf algebras whose infinitesimal Yetter­Drinfeld module is a realization of the rack of transpositions in Sn with constant cocycle -1. 2000 AMS Subject Classification: 16W30 Keywords

Graña, Matías

202

AN EXAMPLE OF A NICE VARIETY WHOSE RING OF GLOBAL SECTIONS IS NOT FINITELY GENERATED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generated. Now let X be the total space of the vector bundle N P over E. Then the ring of global sectionsAN EXAMPLE OF A NICE VARIETY WHOSE RING OF GLOBAL SECTIONS IS NOT FINITELY GENERATED RAVI VAKIL 1 ring of global sections. I certainly thought this. Brian Osserman asked about this in the introductory

Vakil, Ravi

203

Priority Setting for Government Investment in Forestry Conservation Schemes-An Example from New Zealand1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's international reputation for its technically advanced approaches to conservation and protection of soilPriority Setting for Government Investment in Forestry Conservation Schemes-An Example from New Zealand1 Colin L. 0'Loughlin2 Abstract: In New Zealand responsibilityfor funding flood protection

Standiford, Richard B.

204

A Network of Complementary SMEs for a Global Infrastructure for Services: the Example of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, département G2I/OMSI, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint Etienne Cedex2, France Abstract. High-technology SMEsA Network of Complementary SMEs for a Global Infrastructure for Services: the Example much need the diversity and the dynamics of SMEs to provide service packages within a global

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

205

Discussion of methods in building and validating a model: example of amino acid metabolism in ruminants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discussion of methods in building and validating a model: example of amino acid metabolism with these phenomena is to build a more mechanistic model of the amino acid fluxes in the intermediary metabolism to build and to validate a mechanistic model and of some problems encountered during this model development

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

206

Linear demultiple solution based on bottom-multiple generator (BMG) approximation: subsalt example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

convolution of bpa with a0 ......................................... 29 3.7 An illustration of free-surface multiples not predicted in the two steps of the BMG demultiple technique. Note that these types of free-surface multiples are usually............................ 42 4.8 An example of the field of predicted free-surface multiples obtained from the multidimensional convolution of bpa with a 0...

Oladeinde, Abiola Omobolaji

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Measuring uncertainty in estimates of biodiversity loss: The example of biodiversity intactness variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of practical indices to monitor rates of biodiversity change in terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystemsMeasuring uncertainty in estimates of biodiversity loss: The example of biodiversity intactness online 17 March 2008 Keywords: Biodiversity Indicator Uncertainty Variance A B S T R A C T Developing

Jackson, Robert B.

208

Deformation-induced inverted metamorphic eld gradients: an example from the southeastern Canadian Cordillera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deformation-induced inverted metamorphic ®eld gradients: an example from the southeastern Canadian allochthon and Monashee complex, exhibits an inverted metamorphic ®eld gradient. New data presented preserving evidence of strongly diachronous deformation and an apparent inverted metamorphism. # 1999

Gibson, Dan

209

Safety Analysis of an Airbag System using Probabilistic FMEA and Probabilistic Counter Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety Analysis of an Airbag System using Probabilistic FMEA and Probabilistic Counter Examples Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a technique to reason about possible system hazards that result from system or system component failures. Traditionally, FMEA does not take the probabilities

Leue, Stefan

210

This time is different: An example of a giant, wildly speculative, and successful investment mania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This time is different: An example of a giant, wildly speculative, and successful investment mania@umn.edu http://www.dtc.umn.edu/odlyzko Revised version, June 21, 2010 Abstract. The collapse of an investment, there is at least one counterexample to this cautious view, a giant and wildly speculative investment episode

Odlyzko, Andrew M.

211

A Multimedia Example (Please Click on Icons Visit: http://www.ieee-uffc.org/tr/)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1078 A Multimedia Example (Please Click on Icons ­ Visit: http://www.ieee-uffc.org/tr/) Abstract on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Con- trol (TUFFC). Authors may use the icon link to include a color: Please click on the movie icon to see a movie. The two movies below give you an idea on the file size

Lu, Jian-yu

212

A Simple Toy Example of a Distributed System: On the Design of a Connecting Switch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Simple Toy Example of a Distributed System: On the Design of a Connecting Switch Thomas F Munchen 2 (Germany) Abstract In this paper the development life-cycle of a design method for distributed the design method more transparent. 1. Introduction A distributed system consists of a family of components

213

Is a New Conception of Territorial Intervention Possible? An Example: "Brittany Green Transport Plan1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is a New Conception of Territorial Intervention Possible? An Example: "Brittany Green Transport and explaining an analysis method of the activity and its dynamics, which we have applied to the Brittany Green compréhension du territoire. Keywords: competency, activity analysis, car industry, carbon-free mobility chain

Boyer, Edmond

214

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data Table G.1 gives data) power plants constructed in USA. It is required to predict the capital cost involved in the construction of further LWR power plants. The notation used in Table G.1 is explained in Table G.2. The final 6 lines

Reid, Nancy

215

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data Table G.1 gives reactor (LWR) power plants constructed in USA. It is required to predict the capital cost involved in the construction of further LWR power plants. The notation used in Table G.1 is explained in Table G.2. The final 6

Reid, Nancy

216

Photodissociation of acetaldehyde as a second example of the roaming mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with reference to this structure. For example, an SN2 reaction is defined by the transient 5-center carbon atom% of the reaction flux proceeds via another pathway that produces low CO rotational and translational energy, very (reaction coordinate) between reac- tants and products. Reaction mechanisms are often described

Houston, Paul L.

217

Learning transformation rules from transformation examples: An approach based on Relational Concept Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learning transformation rules from transformation examples: An approach based on Relational Concept), model transformations are basic and primordial entities, thus easing their design and implementation is an important issue. A quite recently proposed way to create model transformations consists in deducing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

METROLOGICAL STAKES IN THE MONITORING OF AIR QUALITY : PAH EXAMPLE IN FRANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METROLOGICAL STAKES IN THE MONITORING OF AIR QUALITY : PAH EXAMPLE IN FRANCE Eva LEOZ for improving air quality has to take into account the European and wider international dimensions. The European air quality in order to avoid, prevent or reduce harmful effects for human health and the environment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

219

DEVELOPMENT AND EXAMPLE APPLICATION OF A SIMULATION MODEL OF THE NORTHERN ANCHOVY FISHERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT AND EXAMPLE APPLICATION OF A SIMULATION MODEL OF THE NORTHERN ANCHOVY FISHERY MICHAEL F. TILLMANl AND DONALD STADELMAN2 ABSTRACT A computer simulation model of the reduction fishery for northern simulation model has been developed which pro- vides the means for evaluating the biological and economic

220

Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

502 502 August 2010 Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Link to Accompanying Zipped Data Files (938 KB) Technical Report Example Procedures for NREL/TP-550-47502 Developing Acceptance-Range August 2010 Criteria for BESTEST-EX Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Prepared under Task No. ARRB.1000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Apps for Vehicles: What are some examples of vehicle data applications? |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apps for Vehicles: What are some examples of vehicle data applications? Apps for Vehicles: What are some examples of vehicle data applications? Home > Groups > Developer Submitted by JessicaLyman on 7 December, 2012 - 09:08 1 answer Points: 1 * Insurance companies offering cheaper products by directly measuring driving behavior * Smart phone navigation systems are optimizing routes based on how commute-schedules compares to actual traffic and weather changes * Helping consumers understand the cost and overall potential of electric drive vehicles * Enhanced security with real-time notification of a vehicle security breach. * Informing parents of teen-driving behavior * Greater visibility around vehicle maintenance needs - new tires, oil changes, transmission flushes, windshield wiper fluid refills. JessicaLyman on 7 December, 2012 - 09:09

222

Impact Evaluation Framework for Technology Deployment Programs: An Overview and Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Overview and Example John H. Reed Innovologie LLC Gretchen Jordan Sandia National Laboratories Edward Vine Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July 2007 IMPACT EVALUATION FRAMEWORK FOR TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAMS An ap pro ach fo r q u anti fyi ng ret ro sp ect ive en erg y savin gs, cl ean en erg y ad van ces, an d m ark et eff ect s Introduction and Background The document briefly describes a framework for evaluating the "ret- rospective" impact of technology deployment programs and provides an example of its use. The framework was developed for the US Depart- ment of Energy's (US DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renew- able Energy (EERE) but potentially can be applied to most deployment programs. 1 This walk through of the seven-step impact framework proc-

223

A field example of a gas orifice meter with debris-ridden liquid in mist flow  

SciTech Connect

A field example of debris-ridden liquids in an orifice meter is presented in this paper. Flow conditions in gas pipelines containing hydrocarbon liquids and particulate matter are discussed. Known effects on measurement of the presence of these materials in orifice meters is presented. By definition, gas measurement is accurate if performed on a clean and dry flow stream. This paper demonstrates the importance of removing as much liquid and debris as possible prior to measurement.

Chisholm, J.L.; Mooney, C.V. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States); Datta-Barua, L.; Feldmann, R.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

An Example of an INPRO Assessment of an INS in the Area of Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

Following a resolution of the General Conference of the IAEA in the year 2000 the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles, referred to as INPRO, was initiated. INPRO has defined requirements organized in a hierarchy of Basic Principles, User Requirements and Criteria (consisting of an indicator and an acceptance limit) to be met by innovative nuclear reactor systems (INS) in six areas, namely: economics, safety, waste management, environment, proliferation resistance, and infrastructure. If an INS meets all requirements in all areas it represents a sustainable system for the supply of energy, capable of making a significant contribution to meeting the energy needs of the 21. century. Draft manuals have been developed, for each INPRO area, to provide guidance for performing an assessment of whether an INS meets the INPRO requirements in a given area. The manuals set out the information that needs to be assembled to perform an assessment and provide guidance on selecting the acceptance limits and, for a given INS, for determining the value of the indicators for comparison with the associated acceptance limits. Each manual also includes an example of a specific assessment to illustrate the guidance. This paper discusses the example presented in the manual for performing an INPRO assessment in the area of waste management. The example, chosen solely for the purpose of illustrating the INPRO methodology, describes an assessment of an INS based on the DUPIC fuel cycle. It is assumed that uranium is mined, milled, converted, enriched, and fabricated into LWR fuel in Canada. The LWR fuel is assumed to be leased to a utility in the USA. The spent LWR fuel is assumed to be returned to Canada where it is processed into CANDU DUPIC fuel, which is then burned in CANDU reactors. The assessment steps and the results are presented in detail in the paper. The example illustrates an assessment performed for an INS at an early stage of development. (authors)

Allan, C.; Busurin, Y.; Depisch, F. [International Atomic Energy Agency, P.O. Box 100, Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

226

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnsite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnäsite at Mountain Pass, CA, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnäsite, a rare-earth Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/02 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth

227

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805

228

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth fluocarbonate mineral, was mined and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed

229

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth fluocarbonate mineral, was mined.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5

230

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth/31/96 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

231

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth/31/98 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

232

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite at Mountain Pass, CA, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/01 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth

233

Inverse scattering series for multiple attenuation: An example with surface and internal multiples  

SciTech Connect

A multiple attenuation method derived from an inverse scattering series is described. The inversion series approach allows a separation of multiple attenuation subseries from the full series. The surface multiple attenuation subseries was described and illustrated in Carvalho et al. (1991, 1992). The internal multiple attenuation method consists of selecting the parts of the odd terms that are associated with removing only multiply reflected energy. The method, for both types of multiples, is multidimensional and does not rely on periodicity or differential moveout, nor does it require a model of the reflectors generating the multiples. An example with internal and surface multiples will be presented.

Araujo, F.V. [PPPG/Federal Univ. of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil); Weglein, A.B. [Schlumberger Cambridge Research (United Kingdom); Carvalho, P.M. [Petrobras SA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Stolt, R.H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Anisotropic Power-law Inflation: A counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is widely believed that anisotropy in the expansion of the universe will decay exponentially fast during inflation. This is often referred to as the cosmic no-hair conjecture. However, we find a counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture in the context of supergravity. As a demonstration, we present an exact anisotropic power-law inflationary solution which is an attractor in the phase space. We emphasize that anisotropic inflation is quite generic in the presence of anisotropic sources which couple with an inflaton.

Jiro Soda

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Examples of liftings of Nichols algebras over racks * Nicol'as Andruskiewitsch and Mat'ias Gra"na  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examples of liftings of Nichols algebras over racks Abstract We review known examples of finite-dimensional Nichols algebras associa* *ted to racks of the rack of transpositions in Sn with constant cocycle -1. 2000 AMS Subject Classification: 16W30

Graña, Matías

236

Propositional, First-Order And Higher-Order Logics: Basic De nitions, Rules of Inference, and Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Examples #3; Stuart C. Shapiro Department of Computer Science and Engineering University at Bu#11;alo of Stuart C. Shapiro, Propositional, First-Order And Higher-Order Logics: Basic De#12;nitions, Rules of Inference, and Examples. In Lucja M. Iwa#19;nska & Stuart C. Shapiro, Eds., Natural Language Processing

Shapiro, Stuart C.

237

AUDIO SEGMENT RETRIEVAL USING A SHORT DURATION EXAMPLE QUERY Atulya Velivelli, ChengXiang Zhai, and Thomas S. Huang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUDIO SEGMENT RETRIEVAL USING A SHORT DURATION EXAMPLE QUERY Atulya Velivelli, ChengXiang Zhai propose a general approach to audio segment re- trieval using a synthesized HMM. The approach allows a user to query audio data by an example audio segment of a short dura- tion and find similar segments

Zhai, ChengXiang

238

Evaluation of fracture treatments using a layered-reservoir description: Field examples  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a practical analysis technique to determine actual fracture geometry and proppant profile using a three-dimensional (3D) hydraulic-fracturing simulator. The hydraulic-fracturing model used in this study considers the variation of in-situ stress, Young`s modulus, Poisson`s ratio, and net pay thickness in the productive interval. When the method is applied, the results from the fracture propagation model conform well with the results the authors obtain from pressure-buildup and production-data analyses. This study analyzed hydraulic-fracturing treatments from several wells in the Vicksburg formation of the McAllen Ranch area in south Texas. The authors have provided guidelines to properly describe the treatment interval, how to use this information in the analysis of such fracture treatments, and how to confirm the results using pressure-transient tests and production-data analyses. This paper presents examples illustrating that a detailed description of the reservoir layers is essential to properly evaluate hydraulic-fracture treatments. For the example wells presented in this paper, post-fracture-production and pressure-transient data were available. The authors have analyzed production and pressure-transient data to estimate permeability and fracture half-length. The values of fracture half-length used to analyze the production data matched closely with those predicted by the fracture model.

Rahim, Z.; Holditch, S.A.; Zuber, M.D. [Holditch and Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Buehring, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

DOE-HDBK-1201-97; Guide to Good Practices Evaluation Instrument Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-97 1-97 January 1997 Supersedes DOE-STD-1006-92 July 1992 DOE HANDBOOK GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES EVALUATION INSTRUMENT EXAMPLES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE97000784 DOE-HDBK-1201-97 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is approved for use by all DOE Components and their contractors. The Handbook incorporates editorial changes to DOE-

240

Questions and Answers - What is one example of indirect evidence that  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How do I make amodel of an atom? How do I make a<br>model of an atom? Previous Question (How do I make a model of an atom?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is an element? How many elements are there?) What is an element? Howmany elements are there? What is one example of indirect evidence that scientists use to study an atom? Pretty much everything we know about atoms is indirect evidence. One can't really see atoms. We do see enough of their effects that we can, with confidence, describe the nature of atoms. Here at Jefferson Lab we have quite a few instruments to measure the properties and behavior of atoms. We use a few simple tricks to measure atoms. The most common method is to shoot the atoms through an easy-to-ionize gas or liquid. Argon is the most

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Science and the Energy Security Challenge: The Example of Solid-State Lighting  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Securing a viable, carbon neutral energy future for humankind will require an effort of gargantuan proportions. As outlined clearly in a series of workshops sponsored by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html), fundamental advances in scientific understanding are needed to broadly implement many of the technologies that are held out as promising options to meet future energy needs, ranging from solar energy, to nuclear energy, to approaches to clean combustion. Using solid state lighting based on inorganic materials as an example, I will discuss some recent results and new directions, emphasizing the multidisciplinary, team nature of the endeavor. I will also offer some thoughts about how to encourage translation of the science into attractive, widely available products ? a significant challenge that cannot be ignored. This case study offers insight into approaches that are likely to be beneficial for addressing other aspects of the energy security challenge.

Julia Phillips

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

A relativistic constituent quark model  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the predictive power of a relativistic quark model formulated on the light-front. The nucleon electromagnetic form factors, the semileptonic weak decays of the hyperons and the magnetic moments of both baryon octet and decuplet are calculated and found to be in excellent agreement with experiment.

Schlumpf, F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

THE ORGANIC CONSTITUENTS OF SOILS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as pure clays and sands. In all other cases...you the results of a phase of this investigation...and alcohols, carbo-hydrates, hexone bases, pyrimidine...these com-pounds in its behavior when nitrates are present...addition. Nor is this behavior of nitrate in influ-encing...

Oswald Schreiner

1912-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Effects of crossing and environmental factors on production and some constituents of milk in Ossimi and Saidi sheep and their crosses with Chios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Milk production and milk constituents were studied in 95 ewes of two purebred groups, Ossimi (O) and Saidi (S), and two F1 crosses with Chios (C) (CO and CS) from September 1991 to April 1993 at the Experimental Animal Farm, Faculty of Agriculture, Minia University, Egypt. Breed of ewe had an effect (P < 0.01) on total and average daily milk yield and length of lactation. CO ewes had the highest average daily milk yield (574 g), followed by CS ewes (554 g), while O ewes had the lowest (459 g). CS ewes had the highest lactation (86.2 kg in 149 days), followed by CO ewes (85.4 kg in 146 days); S ewes produced 64.7 kg in 135 days, and O ewes produced 55.7 kg in 119 days. Ewes rearing twins produced more milk than those suckling singles, but the differences were not significant. The effect of age of ewe within breed was non-significant on total and average daily milk yield, although ewes aged 34 years showed relatively higher milk yields than younger or older ewes. The effect of year of lambing was not significant on daily milk yield, but was significant on both total milk yield and length of lactation. Milk fat (F), total solids (TS) and total solids not fat (SNF) were not significantly influenced by breed, type of rearing, year of lambing or age of ewe/breed. Fat percentage averaged 5.54, 5.82, 5.82 and 5.89 for O, S, CS and CO ewes, respectively. TS ranged between 17.66 and 18.16%, and SNF between 11.95 and 12.34%. For O, S, CO and CS, milk yield reached its peak at 3, 5, 7 and 5 weeks postpartum, respectively, with a corresponding daily milk yield of 615, 609, 832 and 803 g, respectively. Lactation period lasted for 21, 25, 27 and 27 weeks, respectively. Curves for F, TS and SNF percentages indicated a decline during the first 23 weeks of lactation, followed by an increase. F, TS and SNF showed a similar pattern in the four breeds, reaching a peak at the end of the lactation period. The figures ranged from 4.2 to 10.4%, from 15.4 to 23.6% and from 11.5 to 13.2% for F, TS and SNF, respectively. Significant and negative linear and quadratic regressions were fitted for daily milk yield on week of lactation; these were (for 2 weeks): O, ?49.1 g and ?5.2 g; S, ?39.9 g and ?4.6 g; CO, ?50.8 g and ?4.6 g; CS, ?49.3 g and ?3.8 g. Linear regression coefficients of milk constituents on week of lactation were all positive and significant, while the corresponding quadratic regressions were negligible.

H.A. Hassan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Procedures to identify Energy Conservation Opportunities applied to HVAC system: example of VSD of chilled water pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedures to identify Energy Conservation Opportunities applied to HVAC system: example of VSD of HVAC equipment using variable speed drive (VSD) is an Energy Conservation Opportunity (ECO) which can

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

246

Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frequency and duration of Yolo Bypass flooding to at leastRiver to pass through the Yolo Bypass. The increase inthe proposed action. For the Yolo Bypass example, three

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

New Ulm field: an example of Cretaceous shelf-slope instability in east Texas  

SciTech Connect

The New Ulm field in Austin County, Texas, is an example of the structural and stratigraphic complexity above the Cretaceous Edwards shelf margin of east Texas. Deep wells and improved seismic data provide documentation of structural patterns and deepwater facies not previously considered in the Gulf Coast reservoir play modeling. Study of the data implies the Late Cretaceous to Eocene section was deposited along a shelf-slope break. Late Cretaceous, pre-Midway sedimentation was affected by structurally induced slope instability, and consequent gravity faulting and slumping resulted in an irregular sea-floor surface. Paleocene Midway sands were carried onto this surface by storm-generated density currents where the uneven topography caused deposition in constructional channels. Continued deposition of the fluvio-deltaic Wilcox on this surface caused faulting and folding by differential compaction. The folds are minor and the faults small and steep, not like the typical large growth faults of the Gulf Coast. Upper Wilcox sediments were progressively less disturbed as the region stabilized. New Ulm field production includes gas from the Midway Formation and oil and gas from the Wilcox Group. Midway reservoirs are stratigraphic, consisting of fluvio-deltaic sandstones within faulted anticlines. This study adds evidence to data describing shelf-slope geology along the Edwards margin. The setting can be a new type of hydrocarbon play in the Gulf Coast.

Pinero, E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The economic impact of strategic risk on petroleum ventures: Examples from West Africa  

SciTech Connect

Strategic risks attend any and all business ventures. They arise from the nature of the particular business being pursued and the environment in which that business is being conducted. In the petroleum industry, considerable attention is devoted to quantifying technical risks, i.e., the risk of finding and producing hydrocarbons. However, strategic risks often impact economic viability more than technical asks. Accordingly, strategic risk analysis is critical to, realistically evaluating petroleum ventures in today`s turbulent business environment. While difficult to assess and quantify, strategic risks must be accorded equal status with technical risks. Competitor activity, contract terms, environmental sensitivity, political stability and market forces are typical strategic risks. A strategic risk system correlates a company`s capabilities with the quality of possible ventures. Internal strengths and weaknesses are thus matched against external opportunities and threats. This is known in the business literature as a SWOT analysis. The degree of strategic risk is then proportional to the mismatch between the SWOT elements. Such a mismatch was not recognized during exploration of the West Africa Aptian Salt Basins play in the 1980s. Angola, Congo and Gabon all contain examples where failure to consider strategic risk ultimately resulted in {open_quotes}Gambler`s Ruin{close_quotes}.

Ethetton, L.K.; Brumbaugh, W.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Classical Logical versus Quantum Conceptual Thought: Examples in Economics, Decision theory and Concept Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspired by a quantum mechanical formalism to model concepts and their disjunctions and conjunctions, we put forward in this paper a specific hypothesis. Namely that within human thought two superposed layers can be distinguished: (i) a layer given form by an underlying classical deterministic process, incorporating essentially logical thought and its indeterministic version modeled by classical probability theory; (ii) a layer given form under influence of the totality of the surrounding conceptual landscape, where the different concepts figure as individual entities rather than (logical) combinations of others, with measurable quantities such as 'typicality', 'membership', 'representativeness', 'similarity', 'applicability', 'preference' or 'utility' carrying the influences. We call the process in this second layer 'quantum conceptual thought', which is indeterministic in essence, and contains holistic aspects, but is equally well, although very differently, organized than logical thought. A substantial part of the 'quantum conceptual thought process' can be modeled by quantum mechanical probabilistic and mathematical structures. We consider examples of three specific domains of research where the effects of the presence of quantum conceptual thought and its deviations from classical logical thought have been noticed and studied, i.e. economics, decision theory, and concept theories and which provide experimental evidence for our hypothesis.

Diederik Aerts; Bart D'Hooghe

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

Computational implementation of a systems prioritization methodology for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: A preliminary example  

SciTech Connect

A systems prioritization methodology (SPM) is under development to provide guidance to the US DOE on experimental programs and design modifications to be supported in the development of a successful licensing application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. The purpose of the SPM is to determine the probabilities that the implementation of different combinations of experimental programs and design modifications, referred to as activity sets, will lead to compliance. Appropriate tradeoffs between compliance probability, implementation cost and implementation time can then be made in the selection of the activity set to be supported in the development of a licensing application. Descriptions are given for the conceptual structure of the SPM and the manner in which this structure determines the computational implementation of an example SPM application. Due to the sophisticated structure of the SPM and the computational demands of many of its components, the overall computational structure must be organized carefully to provide the compliance probabilities for the large number of activity sets under consideration at an acceptable computational cost. Conceptually, the determination of each compliance probability is equivalent to a large numerical integration problem. 96 refs., 31 figs., 36 tabs.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Anderson, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). WIPP Performance Assessments Departments; Baker, B.L. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

On monogamy of non-locality and macroscopic averages: examples and preliminary results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a connection between monogamy of non-locality and a weak macroscopic locality condition: the locality of the average behaviour. These are revealed by our analysis as being two sides of the same coin. Moreover, we exhibit a structural reason for both in the case of Bell-type multipartite scenarios, shedding light on but also generalising the results in the literature [Ramanathan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 060405 (2001); Pawlowski & Brukner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 030403 (2009)]. More specifically, we show that, provided the number of particles in each site is large enough compared to the number of allowed measurement settings, and whatever the microscopic state of the system, the macroscopic average behaviour is local realistic, or equivalently, general multipartite monogamy relations hold. This result relies on a classical mathematical theorem by Vorob'ev [Theory Probab. Appl. 7(2), 147-163 (1962)] about extending compatible families of probability distributions defined on the faces of a simplicial complex in the language of the sheaf-theoretic framework of Abramsky & Brandenburger [New J. Phys. 13, 113036 (2011)], such families correspond to no-signalling empirical models, and the existence of an extension corresponds to locality or non-contextuality. Since Vorob'ev's theorem depends solely on the structure of the simplicial complex, which encodes the compatibility of the measurements, and not on the specific probability distributions (i.e. the empirical models), our result about monogamy relations and locality of macroscopic averages holds not just for quantum theory, but for any empirical model satisfying the no-signalling condition. In this extended abstract, we illustrate our approach by working out a couple of examples, which convey the intuition behind our analysis while keeping the discussion at an elementary level.

Rui Soares Barbosa

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

MARSAME Illustrative Examples 8 ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

establishes zero net activity as the lower bound of the gray region (LBGR) and applies MARSAME processes establishing gross activity action levels based on normalized effective dose equivalents. Calculations

253

Crystallography -Teacher's Notes Crystallography is a technique employed in all of the major scientific disciplines, so there are examples of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and green technology for a clean environment. Examples include studies of: · hydrogen absorption in new. It is owned and operated by the Science and Technology Facilities Council. ISIS produces beams of neutrons for areas as varied as energy, nanotechnology, materials processing, drug design and pharmaceuticals, bio-technology

Zharkova, Valentina V.

254

ON THE USE OF SPRAY SYSTEMS: AN EXAMPLE OF R&D WORK IN HYDROGEN SAFETY FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurred since the Three Mile Island nuclear accident in 1979 through experimental programs1 ON THE USE OF SPRAY SYSTEMS: AN EXAMPLE OF R&D WORK IN HYDROGEN SAFETY FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS, igniters and spray systems have been designed and installed in modern nuclear power plants. Mitigation

Boyer, Edmond

255

Magnetic compass orientation is well established in night-migrating songbirds (for example reviews, see Wiltschko and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic compass orientation is well established in night- migrating songbirds (for example reviews hypotheses have been proposed, and both are supported by some experimental evidence. Magnetic fields may of the bird (Leask, 1977; Ritz et al., 2000; Wiltschko et al., 2002) and/or magnetic fields may be sensed via

Anderson, David J.

256

Extended Example: Distributed Train In this chapter I present a computational study of an auctionbased method for decentral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 9 Extended Example: Distributed Train Scheduling In this chapter I present a computational study of an auction­based method for decentral­ ized train scheduling. 1 Auction methods are well suited, with an au­ tonomous dispatch agent responsible for the flow of trains over each territory. Each train

Chen, Yiling

257

Confronting Workplace Exposure to Chemicals with LCA:? Examples of Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene in Metal Degreasing and Dry Cleaning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Confronting Workplace Exposure to Chemicals with LCA:? Examples of Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene in Metal Degreasing and Dry Cleaning ... Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) aims to assess all environmental impacts from cradle to grave. ... We therefore conclude that occupational health effects need to be considered in LCA to prevent overlooking key environmental-health impacts in LCA. ...

Stefanie Hellweg; Evangelia Demou; Martin Scheringer; Thomas E. McKone; Konrad Hungerbhler

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

23. Gray{Scott equations Patterns are everywhere in nature. Examples include spots on butter ies, stripes on zebras, tri-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23. Gray{Scott equations Patterns are everywhere in nature. Examples include spots on butter ies variety. The Gray{Scott equations were formulated originally by Gray and Scott in 1983; we shall advantage of this principle. References P. Gray and S. K. Scott, papers in Chem. Eng. Sci. 38 (1983), 29

Trefethen, Nick

259

Efficient Exploitation of Kernel Access to Infiniband: a Software DSM Example Liran Liss, Yitzhak Birk and Assaf Schuster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Efficient Exploitation of Kernel Access to Infiniband: a Software DSM Example Liran Liss, Yitzhak of these services. We assess this approach using a sequential-consistency Distributed Shared Memory (DSM) system the primitives to form a kernel DSM protocol. The approach is evaluated using our full-fledged Linux kernel DSM

260

Diagnosing the uncertainty and detectability of emission reductions for REDD + under current capabilities: an example for Panama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capabilities: an example for Panama This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see for Panama Johanne Pelletier1,4 , Navin Ramankutty2 and Catherine Potvin1,3 1 Department of Biology, Apartado 2072, Balboa, Panama E-mail: johannepelletier@gmail.com Received 20 December 2010 Accepted

Potvin, Catherine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

AutoJoin: Generalizing an Example into an EDM query Jack Mostow and Bao Hong (Lucas) Tan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AutoJoin: Generalizing an Example into an EDM query Jack Mostow and Bao Hong (Lucas) Tan mostow to match by accident. The Session Browser [1] shown in Figure 1 is an EDM tool to view data retrieved' */ AND mcq.end_time = se.step_start_time /* '20090331103359' (03/31/2009 10:33:59 AM) */ AND mcq.machine

Mostow, Jack

262

14 Applications of the Maximum Principle We discuss the terminal conditions of the maximum principle and further examples of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the variable t. We then have the augmented variables x x t a a 1 0 . We keep the same definition (13.2 Example: monopolist Miss Prout holds the entire remaining stock of Cambridge elderberry wine for the vintage year 1959. If she releases it at rate u (in continuous time) she realises a unit price p(u) = (1

Weber, Richard

263

DOE FTCP Supplemental Competencies - Human Factors Engineering Functional Area Qualification Competency Examples for DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FTCP FTCP SUPPLEMENTAL COMPETENCIES HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION COMPETENCY EXAMPLES For DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is responsible for reviewing and approving qualification standards and competencies for Department-wide application. Approval of this set of competency statements by the Federal Technical Capability Panel is indicated by signature below. ?fuv-~ Karen L. Boardman, Chairperson ~·/Cf I Federal Technical Capability Panel * '2._ 3/19/12 I luman Factors Engineering compc1cncics U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

264

A REVISED METHOD FOR ESTIMATING OXIDE BASICITY PER THE SMITH SCALE WITH EXAMPLE APPLICATION TO GLASS DURABILITY  

SciTech Connect

Previous researchers have developed correlations between oxide electronegativity and oxide basicity. The present paper revises those correlations using a newer method of calculating electronegativity of the oxygen anion. Basicity is expressed using the Smith {alpha} parameter scale. A linear relation was found between the oxide electronegativity and the Smith {alpha} parameter, with an R{sup 2} of 0.92. An example application of this new correlation to the durability of high-level nuclear waste glass is demonstrated. The durability of waste glass was found to be directly proportional to the quantity and basicity of the oxides of tetrahedrally coordinated network forming ions.

REYNOLDS JG

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

265

Wildlife Management: The Case of Bucks Only Hunting The model in Figure 1 is adapted from an example in Ken Watt's (1968) text on Ecology and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an example in Ken Watt's (1968) text on Ecology and Resource Management. It distinguishes between bucks that this population will grow, despite the aggressive hunting of the adult bucks. This diagram is adapted from Watt's description of a theoretical deer herd (Watt 1968, p. 127). He uses the numerical example to argue against

Ford, Andrew

266

Figure 1. The dataset for the running example is excerpted at left, arranged in the typical manner for MVPA. The boxes at right introduce the dataset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1. The dataset for the running example is excerpted at left, arranged in the typical manner for MVPA. The boxes at right introduce the dataset representation used in later figures. In these boxes the "dataset-wise" scheme, the examples are relabeled prior to conducting the cross- validation, while

267

Introduction Betti groupoid De Rham groupoid Dolbeault Groupoid for rank 1 bundle Examples A moduli space of Higgs bundles and a character  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Betti groupoid De Rham groupoid Dolbeault Groupoid for rank 1 bundle Examples A moduli Institute for Advanced Study January 11, 2010 #12;Introduction Betti groupoid De Rham groupoid Dolbeault. Explicit examples about the geometry of moduli spaces. #12;Introduction Betti groupoid De Rham groupoid

Kwak, Do Young

268

Proj. Plan Example SEM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Plan Project Plan December 1997 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of the Chief Information Officer and Headquarters Collaboration Group Change Control Page The change control page will be used to record information for controlling and tracking modifications made to this document. Revision Date: 12/15/97 Author: Brian Field a. Section(s): 2.3 Page Number(s): 2-2 through 2-4 Summary of Change(s): Updated roles and responsibilities chart to include known resources. b. Section(s): 3.6 & 3.7 Page Number(s): 3-8 through 3-10 Summary of Change(s): Modified Resource Loading Chart to reflect current estimates. Modified Project/Deliverable Schedule to reflect current status of project. c. Section(s): Page Number(s): Summary of Change(s):

269

Title Slide Examples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measures * Multi-fuel, performance based * Total energy use performance period * Target EUI vs. actual * Piloting in deep retrofit program * 6 projects in pilot Construction...

270

Examples of vibration measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed treatment of the vibration measurement techniques, applied in various fields of engineering ... only some of the most widely used modern measurement methods will be briefly presented, as well...

Gheorghe Buzdugan; Elena Mih?ilescu; Mircea Rade?

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the hierarchical and checklist end points methods that are described elsewhere on this web site. In both cases there are steps to identify systems that must remain operational...

272

Title Slide Examples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 17, 2012 Home Energy Reports: Three Year Review Puget Sound Energy Joel Smith and Bobbi Wilhelm Facilitated by Summer Goodwin, BPA July 2012 Puget Sound Energy Joel Smith and...

273

Model-Based Development of Distributed Embedded Systems by the Example of the Scicos/SynDEx Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The embedded systems engineering industry faces increasing demands for more functionality, rapidly evolving components, and shrinking schedules. Abilities to quickly adapt to changes, develop products with safe design, minimize project costs, and deliver timely are needed. Model-based development (MBD) follows a separation of concerns by abstracting systems with an appropriate intensity. MBD promises higher comprehension by modeling on several abstraction-levels, formal verification, and automated code generation. This thesis demonstrates MBD with the Scicos/SynDEx framework on a distributed embedded system. Scicos is a modeling and simulation environment for hybrid systems. SynDEx is a rapid prototyping integrated development environment for distributed systems. Performed examples implement well-known control algorithms on a target system containing several networked microcontrollers, sensors, and actuators. The addressed research question tackles the feasibility of MBD for medium-sized embedded systems. In ...

Fischer, Bernhard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A "Hybrid" Approach for Synthesizing Optimal Controllers of Hybrid Systems: A Case Study of the Oil Pump Industrial Example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose an approach to reduce the optimal controller synthesis problem of hybrid systems to quantifier elimination; furthermore, we also show how to combine quantifier elimination with numerical computation in order to make it more scalable but at the same time, keep arising errors due to discretization manageable and within bounds. A major advantage of our approach is not only that it avoids errors due to numerical computation, but it also gives a better optimal controller. In order to illustrate our approach, we use the real industrial example of an oil pump provided by the German company HYDAC within the European project Quasimodo as a case study throughout this paper, and show that our method improves (up to 7.5%) the results reported in [3] based on game theory and model checking.

Zhao, Hengjun; Kapur, Deepak; Larsen, Kim G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Confirmative laboratory tests and one example of forensic application of the probabilistic approach to the area of convergence in BPA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most important results in Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA) is the determination of the area of convergence of blood-drop trajectories. This area is directly related to the point of origin of the projections and is often indicative of the point where the main action of a crime has occurred. One of us has recently proposed a method to statistically characterize this area by mean of a probabilistic approach based on the uncertainties of the angles of impact of the stains in the pattern. In our work we present some laboratory tests that confirm the validity of the method, returning good agreement between the empirical and the theoretical data. By comparing the results of different operators, we also show the robustness of the method, in that the results are independent of the analytical approach of the single experimenter. Finally, we describe an example of application to a real forensic case.

Camana, Francesco; Gravina, Nicola; Quintarelli, Marco

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Shape resonances in ground-state diatomic molecules: General trends and the example of RbCs  

SciTech Connect

The presence of shape resonances due to tunneling through the centrifugal barrier modifies strongly the dynamics of cold atom scattering. As shown on the example of the ground and lowest triplet electronic states of the {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule, the crucial parameter is, as usual for cold collisions, the scattering length. A general description of shape resonances of diatomic molecules is given from three simple single channel asymptotic models, whose respective performances are discussed. The first model, which consists of a R{sup -6} potential limited at short range by a repulsive wall, positioned to reproduce the s-wave scattering length, accounts satisfactorily for the main system-independent properties of shape resonances. Introduction in the model of energy- and angular-momentum-dependent nodal lines specific to the inner part of the potential greatly improves its efficiency. When the energy and angular momentum dependence of the nodal lines cannot be deduced from full potential calculations or from experiment, a rough, but universal, estimate of these properties is obtained by extending the R{sup -6} behavior of the potential up to the origin.

Londono, B. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 67 No. 53-108, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Batiment 505, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mahecha, J. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 67 No. 53-108, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Luc-Koenig, E.; Crubellier, A. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Batiment 505, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Textbook Example of a Bow Shock in the Merging Galaxy Cluster 1E0657-56  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Chandra image of the merging, hot galaxy cluster 1E0657-56 reveals a bow shock propagating in front of a bullet-like gas cloud just exiting the disrupted cluster core. This is the first clear example of a shock front in a cluster. From the jumps in the gas density and temperature at the shock, the Mach number of the bullet-like cloud is 2-3. This corresponds to a velocity of 3000-4000 km/s relative to the main cluster, which means that the cloud traversed the core just 0.1-0.2 Gyr ago. The 6-7 keV "bullet" appears to be a remnant of a dense cooling flow region once located at the center of a merging subcluster whose outer gas has been stripped by ram pressure. The bullet's shape indicates that it is near the final stage of being destroyed by ram pressure and gas dynamic instabilities, as the subcluster galaxies move well ahead of the cool gas. The unique simplicity of the shock front and bullet geometry in 1E0657-56 may allow a number of interesting future measurements. The cluster's average temperature is 14-15 keV but shows large spatial variations. The hottest gas (T>20 keV) lies in the region of the radio halo enhancement and extensive merging activity involving subclusters other than the bullet.

M. Markevitch; A. H. Gonzalez; L. David; A. Vikhlinin; S. Murray; W. Forman; C. Jones; W. Tucker

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Influence of depositional sand quality and diagenesis on porosity and permeability: Examples from Brent Group reservoirs, northern North Sea  

SciTech Connect

Multivariate statistical analysis was applied to examine correlations between reservoir quality and petrology in two data sets from the Middle Jurassic Brent Group. One of the data sets is from relatively shallow depth and has been little affected by chemical diagenesis (Statfjord Nord and Ost Fields; 2.3--2.6 km below the sea floor), while the second data set is from a more deeply buried reservoir having an advanced degree of diagenesis (Huldra Field; 3.6--3.9 km). Much of the total variation in porosity and permeability within each data set (0.02 mD to > 7 D in both sets) can be accounted for by laboratory measurements of parameters mainly related to depositional sand quality, including shaliness (represented by bulk-rock alumina/silica ratio), early carbonate cement, feldspar content, and grain size. Despite major differences in the proportions of different sedimentary facies in the two data sets, they have similar ranges of depositional sand quality and therefore probably had similar reservoir quality early in their burial history. Deeper burial diagenesis at Huldra Field has shifted the average of both porosity and permeability to lower values and produced a bimodal permeability distribution, apparently reflecting preferential preservation of permeability in the cleaner sandstones. On the basis of these examples, the author outlines an approach for unmixing the diagenetic and lithologic components of variation in regional compilations of sandstone porosity-permeability data. The procedure and its consequences are illustrated using a regional compilation of core data from the Brent Group of the northern North Sea.

Ehrenberg, S.N. [Statoil, Harstad (Norway)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Influence of depositional sand quality of porosity and permeability: Examples from Brent Group Reservoirs in the northern North Sea  

SciTech Connect

Multivariate statistical analysis was applied to examine correlation between reservoir quality and petrology in two data sets from the Middle Jurassic Brent Group. One of the data sets is from relatively shallow depth an has been little affected by chemical diagenesis (Staffjord Nord & Ost Fields 2.3-2.6 km below the sea floor), while the second data set is from a more deeply buried reservoir having an advanced degree of diagenesis (Huldra Field 3.6-3.9 km). Much of the total variation in porosity and permeability (0.02 mD to >7 D in both sets) can be accounted for by laboratory measurements of parameters mainly related to depositional sand quality, including {open_quotes}shaliness{close_quotes} (represented by bulk-rock alumina content), earl carbonate cement, feldspar content, and grain size. Despite major differences in the proportions of different sedimentary facies in the two data sets, they have similar ranges of depositional sand quality and therefore probably had similar reservoir quality early in their burial history. Deeper burial diagenesis at Huldra Field has shifted the average porosity and permeability lower and produced a bimodal permeability distribution, apparently reflecting preferential preservation of permeability in the cleaner sandstones. Based on these examples, a method is outlined for {open_quotes}unmixing{close_quotes} the diagenetic and lithologic components of variation in regional compilations of sandstone porosity-permeability data. The procedure and its consequences are illustrated using a regional compilation of core data from the Brent Group of northern North Sea.

Ehrenberg, S.N.; Bjorkum, P.A.; Naddeau, P.H. [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

UNSAT-H Version 3.0: Unsaturated Soil Water and Heat Flow Model Theory, User Manual, and Examples  

SciTech Connect

The UNSAT-H model was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the water dynamics of arid sites and, in particular, estimate recharge fluxes for scenarios pertinent to waste disposal facilities. During the last 4 years, the UNSAT-H model received support from the Immobilized Waste Program (IWP) of the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This program is designing and assessing the performance of on-site disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site (LMHC 1999). The IWP is interested in estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the vadose zone disposal of tank wastes. Simulation modeling with UNSAT-H is one of the methods being used to provide those estimates (e.g., Rockhold et al. 1995; Fayer et al. 1999). To achieve the above goals for assessing water dynamics and estimating recharge rates, the UNSAT-H model addresses soil water infiltration, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, deep drainage, and soil heat flow as one-dimensional processes. The UNSAT-H model simulates liquid water flow using Richards' equation (Richards 1931), water vapor diffusion using Fick's law, and sensible heat flow using the Fourier equation. This report documents UNSAT-H .Version 3.0. The report includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plants, and the code manual. Version 3.0 is an, enhanced-capability update of UNSAT-H Version 2.0 (Fayer and Jones 1990). New features include hysteresis, an iterative solution of head and temperature, an energy balance check, the modified Picard solution technique, additional hydraulic functions, multiple-year simulation capability, and general enhancements.

MJ Fayer

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

282

Enzymatic solubilization of nitrogenous constituents of carrots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of enzyme concentration upon nitrogen so1ubi 1i zed in carrot tops ( 10g dry weight) . Conditions of assay: pH = 3. 5, i ncubati on time = 20 hr, incubation temperature = 45'C. 24 hydrolysis. These data confirm earlier reports that -. 01% is the pro... roots and tops, a concentration of 1. 0% A-12-C at pH 3. 5 provided the maximum increase in soluble ni trogenous consti tuents . For car~ot roots, a concentration of 1. 0/ ficin at pH 4, 5 provided the maximum increase in soluble nitrogen. With carrot...

Curry, James Cannon

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Dependence of corrosion resistance of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} artificial passivation films on crystal structure and chemical state of constituent elements of the films  

SciTech Connect

Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} artificial passivation films were formed on Pt substrates by low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique using iron(III) acetylacetonate [Fe(O{sub 2}C{sub 5}H{sub 7}){sub 3}] and chromium(III) acetylacetonate [Cr(O{sub 2}C{sub 5}H{sub 7}){sub 3}] as precursors at substrate temperatures on 150--350 C. Relationships between the crystal structure, and also the chemical state of constituent elements, and the corrosion resistance were examined on the films in acid solutions. The films deposited above 300 C had crystalline structures, and those deposited below 250 C had amorphous structures. The films deposited above 250 C had a high amount of M-O-type chemical bonds, and those deposited below 200 C had a high amount of M-OH-type chemical bonds. The films deposited above 300 C hardly dissolved in 1.0 M HCl and those deposited below 250 C, however, easily dissolved in the solution. The dissolution rate of the films in the solution increased with decreasing substrate temperature. Passive and transpassive current densities of the films in 1.0 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} were dependent on the substrate temperature and increased with decreasing the temperature. When polarized cathodically in 1.0 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.5 M HCl, the films deposited below 250 C dissolved due to the reduction of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} component in the films. The reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} component was, however, suppressed on the films deposited above 300 C. Therefore, with increasing crystallinity and amount of M-O-type chemical bonds, the corrosion resistance of the films increases in HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions.

Kim, Hyunsoo; Hara, Nobuyoshi; Sugimoto, Katsuhisa

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Assessing National Employment Impacts of Investment in Residential and Commercial Sector Energy Efficiency: Review and Example Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) modeled the employment impacts of a major national initiative to accelerate energy efficiency trends at one of two levels: 15 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, efficiency activities save about 15 percent of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Reference Case electricity consumption by 2030. It is assumed that additional energy savings in both the residential and commercial sectors begin in 2015 at zero, and then increase in an S-shaped market penetration curve, with the level of savings equal to about 7.0 percent of the AEO 2014 U.S. national residential and commercial electricity consumption saved by 2020, 14.8 percent by 2025, and 15 percent by 2030. 10 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, additional savings begin at zero in 2015, increase to 3.8 percent in 2020, 9.8 percent by 2025, and 10 percent of the AEO reference case value by 2030. The analysis of the 15 percent case indicates that by 2030 more than 300,000 new jobs would likely result from such policies, including an annual average of more than 60,000 jobs directly supporting the installation and maintenance of energy efficiency measures and practices. These are new jobs resulting initially from the investment associated with the construction of more energy-efficient new buildings or the retrofit of existing buildings and would be sustained for as long as the investment continues. Based on what is known about the current level of building-sector energy efficiency jobs, this would represent an increase of more than 10 percent from the current estimated level of over 450,000 such jobs. The more significant and longer-lasting effect comes from the redirection of energy bill savings toward the purchase of other goods and services in the general economy, with its attendant influence on increasing the total number of jobs. This example analysis utilized PNNLs ImSET model, a modeling framework that PNNL has used over the past two decades to assess the economic impacts of the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) energy efficiency programs in the buildings sector.

Anderson, David M.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.

2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

285

Red tide is an example of a Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB), which results from higher than normal growth of a tiny single-celled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red tide is an example of a Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB), which results from higher than normal growth of a tiny single-celled dinoflagellate algae. Worldwide there are several algal species that can cause red, yellow, brown, and even green tide events. The species typically responsible for red tide blooms off

Watson, Craig A.

286

Comparison of Petrophysical Rock Types from Core and Well-logs using Post-stack 3D Seismic Data: Field Example from Maracaibo-Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Field Example from Maracaibo-Venezuela Francisco Cheng* and Kumar Ramachandran, The University of Tulsa in an area located on the West side of Lake Maracaibo-Venezuela. The calculated petrophysical rock types were Description The study area is located on the West side of Lake Maracaibo-Venezuela, in shallow, transition

Ramachandran, Kumar

287

CS 4700 Programming Languages Review Sheet For specific examples of how the material may be tested, see the homework and first two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CS 4700 Programming Languages Review Sheet For specific examples of how the material may be tested the grammar 4.5 Elimination of left recursion, left factoring 4.5 syntax diagram 5 Basic Semantics 5 and Variation on WHILE 7.4 The GOTO Controversy 7.5 Exception Handling 7.6 Binding times: language definition

Allan, Vicki H.

288

A Distributed Object Component-based Approach to Large-scale Engineering Systems and an Example Component Using Motion Planning Techniques for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but robust enough to be truly useful for engineering- specific services. This paper introduces a distributedA Distributed Object Component-based Approach to Large-scale Engineering Systems and an Example. Kunz2 , Kincho H. Law3 Abstract This paper introduces a large-scale engineering systems distributed

Stanford University

289

A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production: a distillation tower, which  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of feedstock; and a blender unit which blends feedstock and gasoline stock (at no loss). (Note that "ONA blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production in feedstock (maximum 200,000 bbl/day) and produces gasoline stock with 98 ON at a rate of .5 bbl per bbl

Galvin, David

290

Johnson-Laird, ). So, for example, to satisfy the concept (`to be an apple. . .'\\), a thing must exhibit roundness, edibility, redness, fruitiness, and so on. Such theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;? Johnson-Laird, ). So, for example, to satisfy the concept (`to be an apple. . .'\\), a thing of concepts. For instance, apples resemble re engines by sharing the characteristic of redness, they resemble lost much of its popularity, largely because apples, although most o en red, are not necessarily so

Bucci, David J.

291

Chinas international trade and air pollution in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...specified in section 1.4.3. For industrial non-combustion processes, emission factors are...factories with lower emission factors in the non-combustion processes (see section 1.4.3 and Table S5). In the...

Jintai Lin; Da Pan; Steven J. Davis; Qiang Zhang; Kebin He; Can Wang; David G. Streets; Donald J. Wuebbles; Dabo Guan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Simulation Test for Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Mike Kennedy Mike D. Kennedy, Inc. Link to Accompanying Zipped Data Files (3.9 MB) This document is intended for use with the following documents: Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), NREL/TP-550-47427 Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX, NREL/TP-550-47502 Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52414 August 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy

293

Software Engineering Model Schedule -(with CS 1131) example only; actual schedule may vary; see your academic dept. Includes 3 units of co-curricular activities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software Engineering Model Schedule - (with CS 1131) example only; actual schedule may vary; see FALL SPRING FALL SPRING CS 1000 1 CS 2321 3 CS 1141 2 CS 3141 3 CS 1131 5 MA 2160 4 CS 2311 3 CS 3421 4 Activity (1) Total 17 Total 15 Total 14-15 Total 16-17 3rd Year 4th Year FALL SPRING FALL SPRING CS 3311 3

294

Software Engineering Model Schedule -(Starting with CS 1121) example only; actual schedule may vary; see your academic dept. Includes 3 units of co-curricular activities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software Engineering Model Schedule - (Starting with CS 1121) example only; actual schedule may Year 2nd Year FALL SPRING FALL SPRING CS 1000 1 CS 1122 3 CS 1141 2 CS 2311 3 CS 1121 3 MA 2160 4 CS Cocurricular Activity (1) Total 15 Total 15 Total 14-15 Total 16-17 3rd Year 4th Year FALL SPRING FALL SPRING

295

The GLOBE Sustainability Toolbox is a "starter kit" that provides you with sector-specific examples of simple and low-cost improvements that you, as a social housing provider, can make to increase the efficiency of your operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sustainability SECTION 1 SUSTAINABILITY: AN OVERVIEW SECTION 2 YOUR BUILDING AS A SYSTEM SECTION 3 THE GREEN in Sustainability Simple Payback: A Real Life Example Government and Utility Incentives SECTION 2 YOUR BUILDINGThe GLOBE Sustainability Toolbox is a "starter kit" that provides you with sector-specific examples

Keinan, Alon

296

A Generalization of Deutsch's Example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum parallelism is the main feature of quantum computation. In 1985 D. Deutsch showed that a single quantum computation may be sufficient to state whether a two-valued function of a two-valued variable is constant or not. Though the generalized problem with unconstrained domain and range size admits no deterministic quantum solution, a fully probabilistic quantum algorithm is presented in which quantum parallelism is harnessed to achieve a quicker exploration of the domain with respect to the classical ``sampling'' strategy.

Giovanni Costantini; Fabrizio Smeraldi

1997-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Junior Example Engineering Robert Garcia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office Suite, Adobe Creative Suite, Google SketchUp. Languages: Spanish (intermediate), German (beginner

298

Unparticle Example in 2D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

Howard Georgi and Yevgeny Kats

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

299

Transportation Policies: Examples and Lessons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The approaches to formulating sustainable transportation policies have been applied in a case study in Guangzhou, Peoples Republic of China, which is described in Chapter 7. To provide a foundation for the wo...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Hamiltonian dynamics in extended phase space for gravity and its consistency with Lagrangian formalism: a generalized spherically symmetric model as an example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among theoretical issues in General Relativity the problem of constructing its Hamiltonian formulation is still of interest. The most of attempts to quantize Gravity are based upon Dirac generalization of Hamiltonian dynamics for system with constraints. At the same time there exists another way to formulate Hamiltonian dynamics for constrained systems guided by the idea of extended phase space. We have already considered some features of this approach in the previous MG12 Meeting by the example of a simple isotropic model. Now we apply the approach to a generalized spherically symmetric model which imitates the structure of General Relativity much better. In particular, making use of a global BRST symmetry and the Noether theorem, we construct the BRST charge that generates correct gauge transformations for all gravitational degrees of freedom.

T. P. Shestakova

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Quantification of margins and uncertainties: Example analyses from reactor safety and radioactive waste disposal involving the separation of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2001, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with the national security laboratories (i.e., Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories) initiated development of a process designated quantification of margins and uncertainties (QMU) for the use of risk assessment methodologies in the certification of the reliability and safety of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. A previous presentation, Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties: Conceptual and Computational Basis, describes the basic ideas that underlie QMU and illustrates these ideas with two notional examples. The basic ideas and challenges that underlie NNSA's mandate for QMU are present, and have been successfully addressed, in a number of past analyses for complex systems. To provide perspective on the implementation of a requirement for QMU in the analysis of a complex system, three past analyses are presented as examples: (i) the probabilistic risk assessment carried out for the Surry Nuclear Power Station as part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) reassessment of the risk from commercial nuclear power in the United States (i.e., the NUREG-1150 study), (ii) the performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant carried out by the DOE in support of a successful compliance certification application to the U.S. Environmental Agency, and (iii) the performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, carried out by the DOE in support of a license application to the NRC. Each of the preceding analyses involved a detailed treatment of uncertainty and produced results used to establish compliance with specific numerical requirements on the performance of the system under study. As a result, these studies illustrate the determination of both margins and the uncertainty in margins in real analyses.

Jon C. Helton; Jay D. Johnson; Cdric J. Sallaberry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Theory of low energy excitations in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for rare-earth systems: Yb compounds as typical examples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical predictions are given for low energy excitations, such as crystal field excitations and Kondo resonance excitations, to be detected by high-resolution measurements of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) of rare-earth materials with Yb compounds as typical examples. Crystal field excitations in the Yb 3d RIXS of a Yb3+ ion in the cubic crystal field are formulated, and the calculation of RIXS spectra for YbN is done. Kondo resonance excitations revealed in the Yb 3d RIXS spectra are calculated for mixed-valence Yb compounds, Yb1-xLuxAl3, in the leading term approximation of the 1/Nf expansion method with a single impurity Anderson model. It is emphasized that the high-resolution RIXS with polarization dependence is a powerful tool to study the crystal field levels together with their symmetry and also the Kondo bound state in rare-earth compounds. Some in-depth discussions are given on the polarization effects of RIXS, including 4d and 2p RIXS spectra, the coherence effect of the Kondo bound states, and the importance of the high-resolution RIXS spectra for condensed matter physics under extreme conditions.

A. Kotani

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

Process sedimentology and reservoir quality of deep-marine bottom-current reworked sands (sandy contourites): An example from the Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Deep-marine bottom-current reworked sands (sandy contourites) have been recognized in hydrocarbon-bearing sands of the Gulf of Mexico. A distinctive attribute of these sands is their traction bed forms, which occur in discrete units. Common sedimentary features of traction currents include cross-bedding, current ripples, horizontal lamination, sharp upper contacts, and inverse size grading. These sands also exhibit internal erosional surfaces and mud offshoots, indicating oscillating current energy conditions. THe Pliocene-Pleistocene sequence cored in the Ewing Bank Block 826 field in the Gulf of Mexico provides an example of sand distribution and reservoir quality of deep-marine bottom-current reworked sands. Presumably, the Loop Current, a strong wind-driven surface current in the Gulf of Mexico, impinged on the sea bottom, as it does today, and resulted in bottom-current reworked sands. A depositional model based on the integration of well (core and log) and three-dimensional seismic data suggests that the reworked sediment package may be thick and continuous, but individual sand layers within the package may be thin and discontinuous. This unconventional model, which depicts the distribution of bottom-current reworked sands in interchannel slope areas as a distinctly different facies from channel-levee facies, has the potential for general application to other slope plays outside the study area. In the Ewing Bank Block 826 field, the type I (L-1) reservoir with 80% sand exhibits higher permeability values (100-1800 md) than the type 2 (N-1) reservoir with 26% sand (50-800 md). The increased permeability in the type I sand has been attributed to high sand content, vigorous reworking, and microfractures. The clean, porous, and well-sorted type 1 sands with good communication between sand layers have produced at higher rates and recovery efficiencies than the type 2 sands with numerous interbedded mud layers. 50 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

Shanmugam, G. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)); Spalding, T.D.; Rofheart, D.H. (Mobil New Business Development, Dallas, TX (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The fault-controlled skarn WMo polymetallic mineralization during the main IndiaEurasia collision: Example from Hahaigang deposit of Gangdese metallogenic belt of Tibet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Hahaigang WMo polymetallic skarn deposit is located in the central-eastern part of Gangdese tectono-magmatic belt in Lhasa terrane, Tibet. The deposit was discovered in 2007 with currently proven 46milliontons of WO3 ores, 12milliontons of Mo ores, and 1.31milliontons of combined CuPbZn ores, at an average grade of 0.20% WO3, 0.07% Mo, 0.026% Cu, 0.49% Pb, and 3.1% Zn. Ore bodies occur in veins or disseminations, and are confined within the NE-striking Dalong fault zone which is hosted by the Lower-Permian Pangna Group of dominantly quartz sandstone and slate. Several granitic plutons are exposed in the area or known from drill-holes. Ages of these granitic plutons are determined by using zircon UPb LAICPMS method. For example, the biotite monzogranite yields a 206Pb/238U207Pb/238U concordia age of 58.660.90Ma and a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 57.020.42Ma. The granite porphyry yields a 206Pb/238U207Pb/238U concordia age of 109.18.9Ma and a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 114.02.6Ma. The biotite monzogranite yields a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 56.11.1Ma. ReOs isochron age of 63.23.2Ma from 5 molybdenite samples collected from the WMo skarn ores is also obtained in this study. The zircon UPb and molybdenite ReOs geochronological data suggest that the WMo mineralization was not temporally associated with any of the dated igneous plutons. However, the molybdenite ReOs age of 63.23.2Ma indicates that the WMo mineralization might have occurred during the main IndiaEurasia collision that was initiated around 65Ma. Microprobe analysis of ilvaite that occurs in two generations in the WMo skarn ores reveals a close relationship to CaFeF-rich hydrothermal fluids, which were probably derived from deeply-seated magmas. We suggest that ascent of the fluids was strictly controlled by the ore-controlling Dalong fault zone, and that chemical interaction and metasomatism between the fluids and the Lower-Permian Pangna quartz-feldspathic host rocks produced the ilvaite and the WMo polymetallic skarn deposit during the main IndiaEurasia collision. Although the majority of the polymetallic deposits in the Gangdese belt are reported to be either pre- or post-main collision, it is evident from this study that the main collision also produced WMo polymetallic mineralization within the belt.

Xiaofeng Li; Chunzeng Wang; Wei Mao; Qinghong Xu; Yaohui Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Linking Education R&D Institutes and IndustryLinking Education, R&D Institutes and Industry l ifi E b l AR)(examples are more specific to Egypt , but many apply to AR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Industry l ifi E b l AR)(examples are more specific to Egypt , but many apply to AR) Mohamed A. Abdou goals. The overall assessment indicates that: Egypt's current S&T system has failed to substantially impactEgypt s current S&T system has failed to substantially impact socio-economic development which

Abdou, Mohamed

306

Water Resources Management Degree Program Examples The tables below show some of the ways in which a student can tailor the Water Resources Management curriculum to fit their interests and needs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Resources Management Degree Program Examples The tables below show some of the ways in which a student can tailor the Water Resources Management curriculum to fit their interests and needs. Each Hydrogeology Category B - Water Resources Institutions and Public Decision Making Processes Journalism 315

Sheridan, Jennifer

307

Interactive Visualization of Modeled Atmospheric Trace Constituents Carmen M. Benkovitz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effects of the emissions of Popocatepetl volcano, located near Mexico City. The effects of stronger of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Chemical Transport Model (CTM) of sulfate in the atmosphere. The visualization on climate. Anthropogenic activities affect the aerosol content of the atmosphere. Anthropogenic emissions

308

Determination of Phenolic Constituents of Cigarette Smoke by Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......one week under these atmospheric conditions. Preparation...created when 35 ml of water drains from a buret...Low- temperature condensation effec- tively removed...condensables, in- cluding water. Provided reasonable...of gas chromatography recoveries found for the other......

Richard H. Crouse; John W. Garner; Hugh J. O'Neill

1963-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Lithium Isotope Analyses of Inorganic Constituents from the Murchison Meteorite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aqueous processes were important modifiers of solid matter during the early stages of solar system history. Lithium isotopes are sensitive indicators of such solid-liquid interactions because 7Li passes preferentially into solution and 6Li remains behind in the solid phase. Lithium isotope ratios of inorganic phases in the Murchison meteorite reveal that the value for the whole rock is simply the average of individual components with widely different isotopic compositions. 7Li content increases from chondrules to phyllosilicate-rich matrices to carbonates, as would be expected from the relative duration each component has spent during aqueous alteration on the parent asteroid.

Mark A. Sephton; Rachael H. James; Philip A. Bland

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Attributive And Referential Uses Of Basic Syntactic Constituents 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Donnellan's distinction between attributive and referential uses of definite descriptions is extended to include Lewis' basic categories. The distinction as applied to sentences is brought out by investigating the consequences ...

Godden, Kurt

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Linear to nonlinear rheology of bread dough and its constituents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many practical reasons for studying the deformational behavior or rheological properties of a dough system. The mass production of bread has led to a need of machines that are able to handle and process large ...

Ng, Shen Kuan (Trevor Shen Kuan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The standard model and the constituents of leptons and quarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A complete set of postulates of the standard model of the electroweak interaction and mass generation is formulated and confirmed deriving the Lagrangian for the standard model. A massive fermion is formed by a right-handed and a left-handed elementary massless fermion, exchanging a scalar doublet. The elementary massless fermions forming leptons belong to an approximate SU(3) octet. The charges are quantised due to this symmetry.

Walter Schmidt-Parzefall

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

313

Recovery of constituent spectra using non-negative matrix factorization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, mineral exploration, vegetation mapping, hazardous material remediation, and water quality control. #12 to produce spectra across a large number of wavelengths/bands (> 30 bands). Typical wavelength ranges

Parra, Lucas C.

314

Variance in trace constituents following the final stratospheric warming  

SciTech Connect

Temporal variances in the concentration of trace species are examined within the northern hemisphere stratosphere following the final warming. Variances are computed utilizing an annual cycle run of a tracer transport model and stratospheric balloon observations. The model uses winds generated with a general circulation model to transport N{sub 2}O. Regions of significant N{sub 2}O variance are produced immediately following the modeled final warming as zonally inhomogeneous N{sub 2}O anomalies are created during the warming, then advected passively about the pole by easterly winds. Diffusion rapidly dissipates these anomalies and decreases the associated stratospheric tracer variance to very low levels by June. On monthly timescales the 10 day normal mode explains up to 50% of the modeled variance of N{sub 2}O during summer. On these timescales potential temperature exhibits less variability than N{sub 2}O, as horizontal parcel displacements are relatively ineffective at inducing potential temperature variability. An examination of balloon observations of N{sub 2}O and other long lived trace species, between 40{degree} and 50{degree}N, indicates that the primary component of the tracer variance during June is on an interannual time scale. The authors attribute this interannual variability to stratospheric variability during the winter and early spring months imprinted onto the distributions of long lived tracers. Potential temperatures does not exhibit much interannual variability because it does not retain a memory of the previous winters circulation.

Hess, P. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

1990-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

315

Antileishmanial Constituents of the Panamanian Endophytic Fungus Edenia sp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Científicas Avanzadas y Servicios de Alta Tecnología, Clayton, Edificio 175, PO Box 7250, Panama, Panama Chemistry, Faculty of Natural, Exact Sciences and Technology, Apartado 0824-00159, University of Panama, Panama City, Republic of Panama. Abstract Bioassay-directed fractionation of extracts from

Coley, Phyllis

316

Mechanical Properties of K Basin Sludge Constituents and Their Surrogates  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the technical literature was performed to summarize the mechanical properties of inorganic components in K Basins sludge. The components included gibbsite, ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite and goethite, hematite, quartz, anorthite, calcite, basalt, Zircaloy, aluminum, and, in particular, irradiated uranium metal and uranium dioxide. Review of the technical literature showed that information on the hardness of uranium metal at irradiation exposures similar to those experienced by the N Reactor fuel present in the K Basins (typically up to 3000 MWd/t) were not available. Measurements therefore were performed to determine the hardness of coupons taken from three irradiated N Reactor uranium metal fuel elements taken from K Basins. Hardness values averaged 30 {+-} 8 Rockwell C units, similar to values previously reported for uranium irradiated to {approx}1200 MWd/t. The physical properties of candidate uranium metal and uranium dioxide surrogates were gathered and compared. Surrogates having properties closest to those of irradiated uranium metal appear to be alloys of tungsten. The surrogate for uranium dioxide, present both as particles and agglomerates in actual K Basin sludge, likely requires two materials. Cerium oxide, CeO2, was identified as a surrogate of the smaller UO2 particles while steel grit was identified for the UO2 agglomerates.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the computer codes developed for the coal combustion project. In Subsection B.1 the FORTRAN code developed for the percolative fragmentation model (or the discrete model, since a char is expressed as a collection of discrete elements in a discrete space) is presented. In Subsection B.2 the code for the continuum model (thus named because mineral inclusions are distributed in a continuum space) is presented. A stereological model code developed to obtain the pore size distribution from a two-dimensional data is presented in Subsection B.3.

Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shim-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

Results from an experimental investigation of the mechanisms governing the ash aerosol size segregated composition resulting from the combustion of pulverized coal in a laboratory scale down-flow combustor are described. The results of modeling activities used to interpret the results of the experiments conducted under his subtask are also described in this section. Although results from the entire program are included, Phase II studies which emphasized: (1) alkali behavior, including a study of the interrelationship between potassium vaporization and sodium vaporization; and (2) iron behavior, including an examination of the extent of iron-aluminosilicate interactions, are highlighted. Idealized combustion determination of ash particle formation and surface stickiness are also described.

Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexingt

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

MILLIMETER AND SUBMILLIMETER WAVE ABSORPTION BY ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTANTS AND CONSTITUENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tion due to the Doppler effect becomes significant. At theDoppler broadening. If the broadening due to collisional effects

Kolbe, W.F.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Measuring Constituent Policy Preferences in Congress, State Legislatures, and Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Little is known about the American publics policy preferences at the level of Congressional districts, state legislative districts, and local municipalities. In this article, we overcome the limited sample sizes that have ...

Tausanovitch, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The environmental fate of chlorophenolic constituents of bleachery effluents  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a set of interacting chemical, biological, and microbiological procedures which can be used to assess the impact of organic chemicals discharged into the aquatic environment. The authors have applied this set of procedures to chloroguaiacols, chlorocatechols, and chlorovanillins-components of bleachery effluents. In this analysis, biodegradation is distinguished from biotransformation. Metabolic transformations may result in the synthesis of compounds not necessarily less toxic nor more readily degradable than their precursors. Anaerobic microbial reactions are important, since substantial amounts of chlorophenolic compounds can be recovered from contaminated anaerobic sediments. These compounds can become bound to natural matrices-particularly sediments-but there are inherent problems on the bioavailability of the compounds. In a valid assessment of environmental hazard, all of these factors should be taken into account.

Neilson, A.H.; Allard, A.S.; Hynning, P.A.; Remberger, M.; Viktor, T. (Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Box 21060, S-100 31 Stockholm (SE))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Ultraviolet attenuation by dissolved and particulate constituents of ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rimouski, 310 Alle des Ursulines, Rimouski, Qubec G5L 3A1, Canada. Sophia C. ..... vent direct solar radiation from entering the water column through the...

1910-00-90T23:59:59.000Z

323

Advanced PBS Workflow Example Bill Brouwer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temp in this case) #PBS -q lionga-seminar #move to the working directory cd /gpfs/home/wjb19/work/ti_ml_project has the liberty to use regular bash scripting constructs in a PBS submission script for performing='scf' restart_mode='from_scratch', prefix='anatase_tmp', pseudo_dir = '/gpfs/home/wjb19/work/ti_ml_project

Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

324

Arid Lands Green Infrastructure Regional Examples + Tour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Stormwater Management July 12, 2012 Erin English, PE LEED AP Biohabitats/Natural Systems International #12 erosion and sediment transport Treat stormwater close to the source Use pervious areas for stormwater · Extensive rainwater harvesting ­ above and below ground. #12;#12;· 75,000 gallons of underground storage

325

Representativeness models of systems: smart grid example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the great emphasis being placed on energy efficiency in contemporary society, in which the smart grid plays a prominent role, this is an opportune time to explore methodologies for appropriately representing system attributes. We suggest this is ... Keywords: Smart grid, System representativeness

Norman Schneidewind

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Conforming Secondary Markets Models, Examples | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

secondarymarketmodelsexamples.pdf More Documents & Publications Creating Liquidity for Energy Efficiency Loans in Secondary Markets EECBG Creating Liquidity for Energy...

327

Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

million in funding from DOE for an integrated renewable energy deployment plan using a biogas generation facility and solar photovoltaics (PV) to provide heating, cooling, and...

328

1.1 An Example 1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characters PREPRINT April 27, 1998-- To appear at SIGGRAPH '98 Michael Gleicher Autodesk Vision Technology Center gleicher@cs.cmu.edu http://www.gleicher.com/mike Autodesk VTC, 2465 Latham St, Mountain View, CA

Pang, Alex

329

Fig. 1. Example System phase loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@ieee.org Abstract Shipboard Power Systems (SPS) are geographically spread all along the ship. It consists of various interconnected with each other and located at various places (decks) on the ship. Geographical information the effect of battle damage on the shipboard power systems so that failure assessment and restoration can

330

Distributed generation - the fuel processing example  

SciTech Connect

The increased costs of transportation and distribution are leading many commercial and industrial firms to consider the on-site generation for energy and other commodities used in their facilities. This trend has been accelerated by the development of compact, efficient processes for converting basic raw materials into finished services at the distributed sites. Distributed generation with the PC25{trademark} fuel cell power plant is providing a new cost effective technology to meet building electric and thermal needs. Small compact on-site separator systems are providing nitrogen and oxygen to many industrial users of these gases. The adaptation of the fuel processing section of the PC25 power plant for on-site hydrogen generation at industrial sites extends distributed generation benefits to the users of industrial hydrogen.

Victor, R.A. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Farris, P.J.; Maston, V. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Public Private R&D Partnerships Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Fuel Partnership Technology Vision Fuel Economy Gain Long-Term Vision Mid-Term Hydrogen Infrastructure Emission Reduction Zero emissions H 2 Fuel Cell T o d a y Hybrid Electric...

332

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MULTIPOLE CONFINEMENT (Examples)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delphia APS meeting in November 1973. All cases are for neutral H 2 background. The excitation energy loss energy, so that little ionization occurs. As a result, the density builds steadily to a maximum at late at ionizing the neutrals. This ionization raises the charged particle density and thus lowers the heating rate

Sprott, Julien Clinton

333

Representativeness models of systems: smart grid example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the great emphasis being placed on energy efficiency in contemporary society, in which the smart grid plays a prominent role, this is an...

Norman Schneidewind

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Architecture and the movies : two examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a speculative inquiry into the relationship between movies and architecture, both of which are forms of expression simultaneously particular to the artist who created them and general, illustrative of a ...

Meagher, Mary Elizabeth

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

National Climate Assessment Indicators: Background, Development, & Examples  

SciTech Connect

Indicators are usually thought of as measurements or calculations that represent important features of the status, trend, or performance of a system of interest (e.g. the economy, agriculture, air quality). They are often used for the most practical of reasons one cannot measure everything important about systems of interest, so there is a practical need to identify major features that can be reported periodically and used to guide both research and decisions (NRC 2000).

Janetos, Anthony C.; Chen, Robert; Arndt, Deke; Kenney, Melissa A.; Abbasi, Daniel; Armstrong, Tom; Bartuska, Ann; Blair, Maria; Buizer, Jim; Dietz, Tom; Easterling, Dave; Kaye, Jack; Kolian, Michael; McGeehin, Michael; O'Connor, Robert; Pulwarty, Roger; Running, Steve; Schmalensee, Dick; Webb, Robert; Weltzin, Jake; Baptista, Sandra; Enquist, Carolyn A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Chen, Robert; Arndt, Deke; Hatfield, Jerry; Hayes, Mark L.; Jones, K. Burce; McNutt, Chad; Meier, Wayne R.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Svoboda, Mark

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

336

Learning dependency transduction models from unannotated examples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...re-estimation during the alignment-optimization process. (b) Optimal hierarchical alignments...domain translation application. In 35th A. Mtg of the Association for Computational Linguistics...spontaneous speech transcription. In Proc. Fall Mtg of the Acoustical Society of Japan, Shimane...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Examples of Matlab in Engineering Education  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mathematical hypermedia enables creation of mathematical virtual reality on a computer where mathematics can be studied with aid of hypertext, graphics, animation, digitised videos etc. In this environment the st...

S. Pohjolainen; J. Multisilta; K. Antchev

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Regenerative Medicine: Learning from Past Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regenerative medicine products have characteristically shown great therapeutic potential, but limited market success. Learning from the past attempts at capturing value is critical for new and emerging regenerative medicine ...

Couto, Daniela S.

339

Subspaces of R. H. Bing's example G  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction 1. G 2. K page 1 13 15 20 20 21 4. 24 5. X 6. A 27 28 9. D 29 30 10. E 11. H 1 . I 13. J 14. L 15. M 16. Remarks BIBLIOGRAPHY page 30 31 33 33 34 36 VITA 3B CHAPTER 0 0. 3ackground In 1951p R. H. J3ing (27... family C (0 ja eA} there exists a collection of a open sets U = (U )cmA) such that for each aeA, C LU and a a ? ~ U fjU = p if a p p. If such a collection of open sets exists for Q f3 each discrete collection of points in X, then X is said...

Lewis, Ira Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Query Generation From Multiple Media Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ren,R. Jose,J.M. the 7th International Workshop on Content-Based Multimedia Indexing pp 138-143 IEEE Computer Society Press

Ren, R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Example Retro-Commissioning Statement of Work  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

steps. Review Existing Systems & Documentation o Attending meetings through out the process including a retro-commissioning kick-off meeting in preparation for the site...

342

An Example is Worth a Thousand Words: Composite Operation Modeling By-Example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retschitzegger3 , and Wieland Schwinger2 1 Business Informatics Group, Vienna University of Technology, Austria

Hochreiter, Sepp

343

Examples of spectacular software failure The last three examples from Software Engineering, by Hans Van Vliet.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a software bug in an energy management system sold by General Electric, according to a story on SecurityFocus. The bug meant that a computerized alarm that should have been triggered never went o#, hindering FirstEnergy Kruskal's Algorithm must compute a (i) spanning tree of (ii) minimal cost. Clarity refers to the overall

Soltys, Michael

344

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set II)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of msvp = 2 -1 . Calculate the mean model wind tunnel speed if the model is made to 1/10 scale. Assume in a wind tunnel. The airspeed range to be investigated is at the docking end of its range, a maximum -=-=-= --- Question 4: Sliding Board #12;A board with an area slides down an inclined ramp as is schematically

Thomas, Peter J.

345

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set II)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

end of its range, a maximum of msvp = 2 -1 . Calculate the mean model wind tunnel speed if the model = 20 m needs to be studied in a wind tunnel. The airspeed range to be investigated is at the docking an inclined ramp as is schematically illustrated in Figure 3. The ramp is inclined at an angle . The weight

Thomas, Peter J.

346

LNG to CNG refueling stations  

SciTech Connect

While the fleet operator is concerned about the environment, he or she is going to make the choice based primarily on economics. Which fuel provides the lowest total operating cost? The calculation of this costing must include the price-per-gallon of the fuel delivered, as well as the tangible and intangible components of fuel delivery, such as downtime for vehicles during the refueling process, idle time for drivers during refueling, emissions costings resulting from compressor oil blow-by, inclusion of non-combustible constituents in the CNG, and energy consumption during the refueling process. Also, the upfront capital requirement of similar delivery capabilities must be compared. The use of LNG as the base resource for the delivered CNG, in conjunction with the utilization of a fully temperature-compressed LNG/CNG refueling system, eliminates many of the perceived shortfalls of CNG. An LNG/CNG refueling center designed to match the capabilities of the compressor-based station will have approximately the same initial capital requirement. However, because it derives its CNG sales product from the {minus}260 F LNG base product, thus availing itself of the natural physical properties of the cryogenic product, all other economic elements of the system favor the LNG/CNG product.

Branson, J.D. [ECOGAS Corp., Austin, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Molten Salt Oxidation of mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) can be characterized as a simple noncombustion process; the basic concept is to introduce air and wastes into a bed of molten salt, oxidize the organic wastes in the molten salt, use the heat of oxidation to keep the salt molten and remove the salt for disposal or processing and recycling. The process has been developed through bench-scale and pilot-scale testing, with successful destruction demonstration of a wide variety of hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes including chemical warfare agents, combustible solids, halogenated solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls, plutonium-contaminated solids, uranium-contaminated solvents and fission product-contaminated oil. The MSO destruction efficiency of the hazardous organic constituents in the wastes exceeds 99.9999%. Radioactive species, such as actinides and rare earth fission products, are retained in the salt bath. These elements can be recovered from the spent salt using conventional chemical processes, such as ion exchange, to render the salt as nonradioactive and nonhazardous. This paper reviews the principles and capabilities of MSO, previous mixed waste studies, and a new US Department of Energy program to demonstrate the process for the treatment of mixed wastes.

Gay, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.; Newman, C. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Action Bank: A High-Level Representation of Activity in Video Sreemanananth Sadanand and Jason J. Corso  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of semantics from the constituent action detectors to the bank classifier. 1. Introduction Human motion discriminative power for larger, more com- plex data sets. For example, on the 50-class UCF50 data set [1

Corso, Jason J.

349

Measurement of number, mass and size distribution of particles in the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...combustion in energy production 10% commercial and residential combustion 7% industrial combustion 6% non-combustion processes 13% road transport 60% Figure 2. Pie chart illustrating the sources of PM0 :1 emissions in the UK in 1996...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A model for determining the fate of hazardous constituents in waste during in-vessel composting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composting is one of the techniques that has evolved as a safe disposal and predisposal alternative to the stringent regulations on hazardous waste disposal. The implementation of this technique needs careful evaluation of the processes a hazardous...

Bollineni, Prasanthi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Algal Biomass Constituent Analysis: Method Uncertainties and Investigation of the Underlying Measuring Chemistries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States ... There are many advantages to algal biomass-based biofuels but also a lot of challenges associated with rendering the process economical, most of which have been part of recent reviews of the literature. ... Placing microalgae on the biofuels priority list: a review of the technological challenges ...

Lieve M. L. Laurens; Thomas A. Dempster; Howland D. T. Jones; Edward J. Wolfrum; Stefanie Van Wychen; Jordan S. P. McAllister; Michelle Rencenberger; Kylea J. Parchert; Lindsey M. Gloe

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Constituents of potential concern for human health risk assessment of petroleum fuel releases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...local legislative or market requirements. To ensure...TPHCWG 1998). For diesel, more recent data presented...possible, however, at the market or site-specific scale...of gasoline/petrol, diesel/gas oil and kerosene...formulations could be brought to market that require different...

Richard L. Bowers; Jonathan W. N. Smith

353

Chemical Constituents of the New Endophytic Fungus Mycosphaerella sp. nov. and Their Anti-Parasitic Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Exact Sciences and Technology, University of Panama, Republic of Panama b of Knowledge, Republic of Panama dSchool of Plant Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA e) in Panama, resulted in the isolation of cercosporin (1) and a new cercosporin analogue (3) as the major

Coley, Phyllis

354

CONSTITUENTS OF Hiraea reclinataAND THEIRANTI-HIVACTIVITY AHMED A. HUSSEIN1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project in Panama funded by ICBG (International Co- operative Biodiversity Group, NIH). The ge- nus Hiraea forests. Hiraea reclinata Jacq. (Malpighiaceae) is distributed from Mexico to Panama, Colom- bia Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Box 2072, Panama, Republic of Panama. 3 Department of Biology

Coley, Phyllis

355

Impact of Solar Resource and Atmospheric Constituents on Energy Yield Models for Concentrated Photovoltaic Systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Global economic trends suggest that there is a need to generate sustainable renewable energy to meet growing global energy demands. Solar energy harnessed by concentrated (more)

Mohammed, Jafaru

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Gaseous Constituents in the Plume from Eruptions of Mount St. Helens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...C., and in the National Weather Service and Satellite Serv-ice...reservoir-and has an electrical heater attached to it. The temperature...the thermal conduction to the cold reservoir. The presence of...hygrometer designedfor aircraft operation was included in the complement...

EDWARD C. Y. INN; JAMES F. VEDDER; ESTELLE P. CONDON; DEAN O'HARA

1981-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Embodied Energy Calculation: Method and Guidelines for a Building and its Constituent Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sum of all energy embedded in products and processes used in constructing a building is known as embodied energy. According to the literature, the current state of embodied energy research suffers from three major issues. First, there is little...

Dixit, Manish Kumar

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

A retrieval of coastal water constituent concentrations by least-squares inversion of a radiance model  

SciTech Connect

A three-component model of water color including phytoplankton pigment, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and suspended sediments has been developed and applied to coastal waters. A feature of the model is the possibility of varying the parameters describing the spectral backscatter of sediment and the spectral absorption of DOM when inverting the water-leaving radiance model. A linear least-squares technique is used to retrieve optical properties from the water-leaving radiance model. The radiance model is inverted to obtain the optical properties for each set of the parameter values. The set providing the minimum standard error of least squares inversion is taken as the final solution. An analysis of sensitivity of the solution to random radiance measurement errors was carried out. The application of the approach to coastal waters subject to tidal resuspension is discussed.

Vasilkov, A.P. [Management Unit of the Mathematical Models of the North Sea and Scheldt Estuary, Brussels (Belgium)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Criterion Five: Engagement and Service As called for by its mission, IUPUI identifies its constituencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, IUPUI completed a "Self Study on Civic Engagement" as part of the institutional re- accreditation. The campus has articulated a clear vision for the work, strategically convened stakeholders, set concrete Compact, etc.), and allocated campus resources to support the campus mission of civic engagement. IUPUI

Zhou, Yaoqi

360

A study of the changes occurring in the nitrogenous constituents of cottonseed meats during cooking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'Loni It is !:news that large quantitios of soluble oarbobydrates r~y interfere with oomplote sstraotion of the fatai One hundred Crwns of tho dr! od meats are entraotod progressively with petroleum others ashy~ nous ethyl others aaotoneq bonsone absolute alcohol... 2 ~ Goa'to Cooko4 o, t 222 2 ~ "'oats Cooks4 at 293 ce etaatoo ;e of Day 00 of Gsaio Latraot ", . Of Day Roots ", ~ Of Hx tfast &~of D itof Boats Rats'ast 0 20 40 6o 60 LCO 120 120 (ooko) 0000069 0 066199 6 000108 O. OO140 5...

Adams, Robert Solomon

1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Water-soluble garlic constituents inhibit breast cancer growth in vitro and in vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Toxicant Yields to Blood-Level Exposure in Water Pipe Tobacco Smokers Alan L. Shihadeh...global increase in tobacco smoking with a water pipe (hookah, narghile, or shisha...carcinogens and other toxicants present in water pipe smoke. To do so, the toxicant yield...

Leslie Gapter; Lawrence Ng; Gowsala Sivam; Howard Hosick

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Chemical Constituents in Sediment in Lake Pontchartrain and in Street Mud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Burkhardt, Kent A. Elrick, Barbara J. Mahler, James J. Smith, and Steven D. Zaugg National Water-USGS World Wide Web: http://www.usgs.gov/ Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive ...................................................................................................................4 Chlorinated Hydrocarbons and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons ........................4 Urban

363

APPLICATION OF PYROLYSIS-GC/MS TO THE STUDY OF BIOMASS AND BIOMASS CONSTITUENTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fast pyrolysis, the rapid thermal decomposition of organic material in the absence of oxygen, is a process that can be used to convert biomass into (more)

Ware, Anne E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Solution structures of beta peptide and its constituent fragments: relation to amyloid deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rinsed in dilute HCQ and HF. 19. The effects of...cal-culated from individual laser fusion ofseven grains is 1...output from an Ar-ion laser with defocused beam. Laser power output, pneumatically...deprotected in anhydrous HF and then purified by...

CJ Barrow; MG Zagorski

1991-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Honey constituents up-regulate detoxification and immunity genes in the western honey bee Apis mellifera  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a resinous material gathered and processed by bees to line wax cells. RNA-seq analysis (massively parallel RNA sequencing...synthesis kit (version 3) and analyzed with Casava1.8 (pipeline 1.9). TopHat was used to align RNA-Seq reads to the A...

Wenfu Mao; Mary A. Schuler; May R. Berenbaum

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Mineralogical characterization of Sasol feed coals and corresponding gasification ash constituents  

SciTech Connect

Feed coal and coarse ash particles (heated rock fragments and clinkers), produced from Sasol-Lurgi gasifier tests under different operating conditions, have been characterized by quantitative X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, and associated chemical techniques, as a basis for better understanding of the relations between the mineralogical and physical properties of the ash particles. Crystalline phases in the ashes include quartz particles inherited directly from the feed coal, as well as anorthite, mullite, and diopside, derived from solid-state reactions or crystallization of a silicate melt during the gasification process. Glass, cooled from the melt, is also abundant in the ash materials. The abundance of large particles of hard minerals in the coal or the ash, such as quartz, anorthite, pyrite, and diopside, has been correlated with a laboratory-determined abrasion index and may contribute significantly to wear on mechanical equipment during coal- or ash-handling operations. 21 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

Aivo B. Hlatshwayo; Ratale H. Matjie; Zhongsheng Li; Colin R. Ward [Sasol Technology (Proprietary) Limited, Sasolburg (South Africa)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Characterization and modeling of toxic fly ash constituents in the environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal fly ash is a by-product of coal combustion that has drawn renewed public scrutiny due to the negative environmental impacts from accidental release of (more)

Zhu, Zhenwei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Certain constituents in the developing bovine fetus and associated tissues and fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oe090 Oe~ 196 19e95 13e41 2e95 2e66 Oe031 Oe 060 Oe 009 210 20e55 13e79 3e(A 3e19 Oe029 Oe04. 9 Oe010 224 20o26 19o46 3ell 2e48 Oe174 Oe(AO Oe006 239 23e25 252 20e 50 259 21 78 270 28e17 lee% 2e14 3e36 Oe037 Oe104 Oe014. 16e05 2e31 2e96 Oe005...

Crawford, Wid Philips

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

369

Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of Biomass Burning Aerosol  

SciTech Connect

Natural and prescribed biomass fires are a major source of atmospheric aerosols that can persist in the atmosphere for long periods of time. Biomass burning aerosols (BBA) can be associated with long range transport of water soluble N?, S?, P?, and metal?containing species. In this study, BBA samples were collected using a particle?into?liquid sampler (PILS) from laboratory burns of vegetation collected on military bases in the southeastern and southwestern United States. The samples were then analyzed using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/HR?MS) that enabled accurate mass measurements for hundreds of species with m/z values between 70 and 1000 and assignment of probable elemental formulae. Mg, Al, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Ba?containing organometallic species were identified. The results suggest that the biomass may have accumulated metal?containing species that were reemitted during biomass burning. Further research into the sources, persistence, and dispersion of metal?containing aerosols as well as their environmental effects is needed.

Chang-Graham, Alexandra L.; Profeta, Luisa Tm; Johnson, Timothy J.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Toward the Fingerprinting of Wines:? Cultivar-Related Patterns of Polyphenolic Constituents in Ontario Wines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Foremost is their role as antioxidants, manifested by their ability to act as free radical scavengers (Yutin et al., 1990; Salah et al., 1995), to prevent oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) (Frankel et al., 1993, 1995; Teissedre et al., 1996), to protect cells against oxidative stress (Nakayama, 1994; Subirade et al., 1995), and to elevate total blood antioxidant activity after oral administration (Maxwell et al., 1994; Whitehead et al., 1995). ... The eluate was collected in a centrifuge tube previously spiked with fisetin as internal standard at 1.0 mg/L. ...

George J. Soleas; Judy Dam; Michelle Carey; David M. Goldberg

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1840: The Steam Engine ­ Denis Papin (1647-1712), Thomas Savery (1650-1715), Thomas Newcomen (1663-1729), James Watt (1736-1819) ­ Steam engine -> large centralized energy source -> factory replaces artisan shop, Railway Clauses Consolidated Act - railway engine's must consume their own smoke) ­ Emission classes past

Weber, Rodney

372

Transfer Learning for Constituency-Based Grammars Yuan Zhang, Regina Barzilay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The standard solution to this bottleneck has re- lied on manually crafted transformation rules that map readily these transformation rules is a major un- dertaking which requires multiple correction cy- cles and a deep manually-crafted transformation rules, this approach relies on a small amount of annotations in the target

Barzilay, Regina

373

Performance demonstration program plan for RCRA constituent analysis of solidified wastes  

SciTech Connect

Performance Demonstration Programs (PDPS) are designed to help ensure compliance with the Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The PDPs are intended for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) to assess and approve the laboratories and other measurement facilities supplying services for the characterization of WIPP TRU waste. The PDPs may also be used by CAO in qualifying laboratories proposing to supply additional analytical services that are required for other than waste characterization, such as WIPP site operations. The purpose of this PDP is to test laboratory performance for the analysis of solidified waste samples for TRU waste characterization. This performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated, solidified TRU waste according to the criteria established in this plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will address levels of regulatory concern and will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization samples. Analyses that are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in the PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples for the balance of this document.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Intrinsically disordered proteins as crucial constituents of cellular aqueous two phase systems and coacervates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Here, we hypothesize that intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) serve as important drivers of the intracellular liquidliquid phase separations that generate various membrane-less organelles. This hypothesis is supported by the overwhelming abundance of \\{IDPs\\} in these organelles. Assembly and disassembly of these organelles are controlled by changes in the concentrations of IDPs, their posttranslational modifications, binding of specific partners, and changes in the pH and/or temperature of the solution. Each resulting phase provides a distinct solvent environment for other solutes leading to their unequal distribution within phases. The specificity and efficiency of such partitioning is determined by the nature of the IDP(s) and defines targeted enrichment of specific molecules in the resulting membrane-less organelles that determines their specific activities.

Vladimir N. Uversky; Irina M. Kuznetsova; Konstantin K. Turoverov; Boris Zaslavsky

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The effect of some dissolved constituents on the redox potential of water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4Laa&Xs?4 esSygea ~ashS?tgasa, Xaa&41&t&Iy' b&fes? e&als1- Lag ths ieaLN~ Swa a?&mt&4 aa4 ih& yg aa4 ssLXXLeali s?&4Laga?eea ebs&La&4 fecss ih& So&be?a a?tee, The ebsyeeok to ih& esssyle bobble eaa i&&b&L Tb&eeqysa Li &&a fLXX&4 &a4 yose4it&4 ic... R IAI IS D o Ial 0 Sl Sl NUMERICAL VALUES INDICATE pH 0 Zg0 300 400 SOO 800 700 Eh, mv. 50 The s44itiea of tbe ferrio iea to the se4i~ ohlori4e solatiea iaoreases tbo re4cec yoteatial of the solntiea. At a yU valse of 7, 00 the re4oa...

Wales, Robert David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Digestibility by Chickens of the Constituents of the Nitrogen-Free Extract of Feeds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Polysac- charosea 100.0 94.7 97.4 85.3 92.3 94.3 88.1 87.8 97.5 94.8 97.8 74.5 70.1 88.2 93.8 50.0 71.9 95.2 97.8 100.0 98.5 98.8 98.3 92.1 92.1 96.3 97.3 98.7 99.3 96.0 99.3 93.6 98.9 100.0 99.6 97.3 of Reducing....4 100.0 9.1 67.4 93.5 87.0 89.7 72.1 65.1 84.2 93.9 78.9 80.4 95.2 72.2 58.9 76.7 85.5 81.9 88.3 83.0 for chick Polysac- charoses 98.6 88.2 93.4 91.6 92.3 92.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 97.8 97.9 97.9 100.0 100.0 100...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effect of various pollutants and soil-like constituents on laccase from Cerrena unicolor  

SciTech Connect

Laccase from Cerrena unicolor catalyses the oxidation of a wide range of aromatic compounds, either xenobiotic or naturally occurring phenols, leading to the formation of polymeric products. These are characterized by their low solubility and often may form precipitates or aggregates. The oxidizing efficiency of the enzyme is strictly dependent on the number of hydroxyl groups and the position of substituents on the phenolic molecules. During the reaction with some substrates, the enzyme is inactivated, because of possible adsorption of laccase molecules on newly formed polyphenols. By contrast, the oxidation of humic precursors (i.e., resorcinol, gallic acid, and pyrogallol) does not influence greatly the residual laccase activity. The triazinic herbicides, triazine and prometryn (2,4-bis(isopropylamino)-6-methylthio-s-triazine), are not substrates of laccase. They, however, inhibit laccase activity assayed with 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) or catechol as substrates. The reduction of substrate oxidation rates is usually accompanied by the retention of higher levels of residual enzymatic activity. These results, together with the slight recovery in laccase activity following dialysis of the assay mixture, provide further evidence that the enzyme may be incorporated into or adsorbed onto polyphenolic products, with a consequent reduction in the concentration of active forms of laccase.

Filazzola, M.T.; Sannino, F.; Rao, M.A.; Gianfreda, L.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ROLE OF CONSTITUENT ELEMENTS IN PROPANE OXIDATION OVER MIXED METAL OXIDES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recently discovered multi-component Mo-V-Te-Nb-O catalysts contain so-called M1 and M2 phases with orthorhombic and hexagonal structures, respectively, proposed to be active and selective in propane (more)

BHANDARI, RISHABH

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Tidal constituent database. West Coast of the United States and Eastern North pacific ocean. Technical note  

SciTech Connect

This technical note describes a database of tidal elevation boundary condition information generated in support of the `Long-Term Fate of Dredged Material Disposed in Open Water` research of the Dredging Research Program (DRP), being conducted at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. The database, described in detail by Hench and others (1994), allows the user to manually generate time series of tidal elevations or to use a program to access the full database to generate time series of both tidal elevations and currents for any location along the West Coast of the United States and Eastern North Pacific Ocean, extending from Seal Cape on Unimak Island, Alaska, in the North to Punta Parada, Peru, in the South. The land boundary includes the Pacific shorelines of Alaska, Canada, mainland United States, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Columbia, and Northern Peru. Although the capability to generate these time series was developed to provide input to the Long-Term Fate and Stability Model (LTFATE), the generated time series can be used for any application requiring tidal forcing data.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Data for First Responder Use of Photoionization Detectors for Vapor Chemical Constituents  

SciTech Connect

First responders need appropriate measurement technologies for evaluating incident scenes. This report provides information about photoionization detectors (PIDs), obtained from manufacturers and independent laboratory tests, and the use of PIDs by first responders, obtained from incident commanders in the United States and Canada. PIDs are valued for their relatively low cost, light weight, rapid detection response, and ease of use. However, it is clear that further efforts are needed to provide suitable instruments and decision tools to incident commanders and first responders for assessing potential hazardous chemical releases. Information provided in this report indicates that PIDs should always be part of a decision-making context in which other qualitative and more definitive tests and instruments are used to confirm a finding. Possible amelioratory actions ranging from quick and relatively easy fixes to those requiring significant additional effort are outlined in the report.

Keith A. Daum; Matthew G. Watrous; M. Dean Neptune; Daniel I. Michael; Kevin J. Hull; Joseph D. Evans

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Phenolic and Short-Chained Aliphatic Organic Acid Constituents of Wild Oat (Avena fatua L.) Seeds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following this after-ripening period, seeds were sown in Sun-Gro Sunshine Mix #1 (SunGro Horticulture, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) in pots measuring 10 10 35 cm (Stuewe & Sons, Inc., Tangent, OR). ... Repeated measurements of the temperature and light conditions associated with each population cluster indicated that there were no significant differences in growth conditions among the clusters (data not shown). ... Natural lighting was supplemented with two 400 W high pressure sodium lamps set to a 16 h photoperiod. ...

R. S. Gallagher; R. Ananth; K. Granger; B. Bradley; J.V. Anderson; E. P. Fuerst

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

382

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 3, Appendices: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the computer codes developed for the coal combustion project. In Subsection B.1 the FORTRAN code developed for the percolative fragmentation model (or the discrete model, since a char is expressed as a collection of discrete elements in a discrete space) is presented. In Subsection B.2 the code for the continuum model (thus named because mineral inclusions are distributed in a continuum space) is presented. A stereological model code developed to obtain the pore size distribution from a two-dimensional data is presented in Subsection B.3.

Helble, J.J. [ed.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Kang, Shim-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 2, Sections 6 and 7: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results from an experimental investigation of the mechanisms governing the ash aerosol size segregated composition resulting from the combustion of pulverized coal in a laboratory scale down-flow combustor are described. The results of modeling activities used to interpret the results of the experiments conducted under his subtask are also described in this section. Although results from the entire program are included, Phase II studies which emphasized: (1) alkali behavior, including a study of the interrelationship between potassium vaporization and sodium vaporization; and (2) iron behavior, including an examination of the extent of iron-aluminosilicate interactions, are highlighted. Idealized combustion determination of ash particle formation and surface stickiness are also described.

Helble, J.J. [ed.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Analysis of Major Constituents in Fructus aurantiiMagnolia Bark Decoction by UPLC-PDA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Wei-Jun Peng 1 2 Wei Huang 1 2 3 * Xi Huang 1 2 3 Wei-ping Liu 1 2 * Author to whom correspondence...Publishing House. 1628-1630. 3 Jin B.L. , Xu J.F. Clinical observation...1-45. 5 Lu Z.Y. , Lu Z.X., Jin H.L., Wu X.Z. Study of nursing......

Zhi-hua Xing; Wei-Jun Peng; Wei Huang; Xi Huang; Wei-ping Liu

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

THE TOXICITIES OF COALTAR CREOSOTE, CREOSOTE DIS-TILLATES, AND INDIVIDUAL CONSTITUENTS FOR THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..... . ... . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Sea-water extracts....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 Solid hydrocarbons of creosote are not likely to furnish a basis for generalizations respecting a form. that lives in sea water: Nor

386

Honey constituents up-regulate detoxification and immunity genes in the western honey bee Apis mellifera  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to analyze their element composition and to acquire information...investigation of the chemical composition of beebread . Food Chem 115 : 1056...T Whatley FR ( 1990 ) The composition and plant origins of propolis...High levels of miticides and agrochemicals in North American apiaries...

Wenfu Mao; Mary A. Schuler; May R. Berenbaum

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Mercury, Methylmercury, and Other Constituents in Sediment and Water from Seasonal and Permanent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wetlands in the Cache Creek Settling Basin and Yolo Bypass, Yolo County, California, 2005-06 Open File Creek Settling Basin and Yolo Bypass, Yolo County, California, 2005-06 By Mark Marvin and permanent wetlands in the Cache Creek Settling Basin and Yolo Bypass, Yolo County, California, 2005-06: U

388

Stepwise Crystallization: Illustrative Examples of the Use of Metalloligands [Cu6(mna)6]6 and [Ag6(Hmna)2(mna)4]4 (H2mna = 2-Mercapto Nicotinic Acid) in the Formation of Heterometallic Two- and Three-Dimensional Assemblies with brucite, pcu, and sql Topologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stepwise Crystallization: Illustrative Examples of the Use of Metalloligands [Cu6(mna)6]6 and [Ag6(Hmna)2(mna)4]4 (H2mna = 2-Mercapto Nicotinic Acid) in the Formation of Heterometallic Two- and Three-Dimensional Assemblies with brucite, pcu, and sql Topologies ... The connectivity between [Cu6(mna)6]6 cluster units and Mn2+ ions gives rise to a brucite related layer in 1 and a pcu-net in 2. ... (22) A close examination of the layers reveal that the layer is similar to that observed in brucite, Mg(OH)2, and other layered double hydroxides. ...

Tanaya Kundu; Ajay Kumar Jana; Srinivasan Natarajan

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

know. Like, for example, professor Jack Lockwood putting UNH on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

," says John Aber, UNH vice president for research and public service and JOHN MACRI, Space Science Center for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space · A University of New Hampshire Research Institute · Morse Hall) and Jack Lockwood in 1962. Photo courtesy of University of New Hampshire Archives. Space Science at Fifty

390

Examples of Tensor Properties Using Matrix Fundamentals (A Physical Property)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Properties of single crystals in particular often differ with different crystal directions as a consequence of constraints imposed by atomic packing and arrangements as well as the placement of substitutional ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Supporting Leadership by Example in States | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Showcase Project: Documenting at least one whole-building retrofit that proves the energy efficiency measures and approaches emphasized in the award. These success stories will be...

392

Anomalous partially hyperbolic diffeomorphisms I: dynamically coherent examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

splits into three one-dimensional1 Df-invariant continuous bundles TM = Ess Ec Euu such that there exists > 0 such that for every x M: Df |Ess(x) is partially hyperbolic and there exists Ess(x)

393

COLLOQUIUM: Extreme Global Warming: Examples from the Past |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum -which is considered an analog for future increases in atmospheric CO2. An evaluation of triggers, carbon sources, and implications for climate...

394

10 DOMAIN-APPROPRIATE DEVICES * For a video example, see  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of drawing as its application area, and a process control system in a power plant has the domain of that power plant and its functions as its application area. However, most interactive systems use a lot of work into creating "meta- phors" in which the virtual, on-screen world resembles items

Borchers, Jan

395

Identifying Provider Counseling Practices Using Natural Language Processing: Gout Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

National guidelines for a number of health conditions recommend that practitioners assess and reinforce patient's adherence to specific diet and lifestyle modifications. Counseling intervention has shown to have a long-term positive effect on patient ... Keywords: NLP, information extraction, patient education

Olga V. Patterson; Gail S. Kerr; J. Steuart Richards; Carl A. Nunziato; David D. Maron; Richard L. Amdur; Scott L. DuVall

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

INTEGRATION OF SYSTEM COMPONENTS AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS - HANFORD EXAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

{sm_bullet} Deterministic 'One Off' analyses as basis for evaluating sensitivity and uncertainty relative to reference case {sm_bullet} Spatial coverage identical to reference case {sm_bullet} Two types of analysis assumptions - Minimax parameter values around reference case conditions - 'What If' cases that change reference case condition and associated parameter values {sm_bullet} No conclusions about likelihood of estimated result other than' qualitative expectation that actual outcome should tend toward reference case estimate

WOOD MI

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

397

The attention operating characteristic: examples from visual search  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subject's attention operating char-acteristic (AOC) for this task (10). In this task, the AOC is approximately a straight line with slope of...independently of each other. In-sofar as the AOC lies inside the inde-pendence point, it represents...

G Sperling; MJ Melchner

1978-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

Examples of the Zeroth Theorem of the History of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development of Schumann resonances, Radio Science 42 RS2S02delta function ?(x); the Schumann resonances of the earth-else could they be? IV. SCHUMANN RESONANCES OF THE EARTH-

Jackson, J.D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

EXAMPLES OF CONTEMPORARY TOPICS Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the potential for ecosystem service markets in Tennessee and how might they affect forest management? 20. What analysis as a tool for bioenergy/biorefinery evaluation 2) What is the best bioenergy crop for the US-scale bioenergy crop development on wildlife and fisheries habitat 7) Top technologies for biomass conversion 8

Gray, Matthew

400

Examples of OSUR Assisted Projects | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University California State at San Marcos Columbia University Prairie View A&M University Texas A&M University U. of West Virginia Contact OSUR Program Organization Contact Us...

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Examples from the atlas of major Appalachian Gas Plays  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this contract are to produce a panted atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays and to compile a machine-readable database of reservoir data. The Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC or the Consortium), a partnership of the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, and the departments of Geology and Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering at West Virginia University (WVU), agrees with the need to classify gas reservoirs by geologic plays. During meetings with industry representatives, the small independents in the basin emphasized that one of their prime needs was to place each producing reservoir within a stratigraphic framework subdivided by environment of deposition to enable them to develop exploration and development strategies. The text for eight of the 31 play descriptions has been completed, drafting of illustrations for these plays is underway (or complete for some plays), and the review process is ongoing.

Patchen, D.G.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Nuttall, B.C.; Smosna, R.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Public Private R&D Partnerships Examples | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Roadmap Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress The...

403

Photovoltaics in the Czech Republic: example of a distorted market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysing the development of "sustainable energy" incentives in the Czech Republic over the last five years and drawing on experience from other countries, the study discovers that the "environmental friendliness" of the so-called "renewable sources", ... Keywords: electricity, energy industry, energy security, environment, investment bubble, photovoltaics, political decisions, renewable sources, wind turbines

Lubo Smr?ka

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Threatened groundwater resources in rural India : an example of monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in rural areas. Therefore, quality and quantity aspects of groundwater management constitute acute issues the villages, and pollution plumes downgradient of the main inhabited areas. The absence of sewage or solid waste collection and treatment facilities threatens groundwater quality by increasing its chloride

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

405

COUNTER-EXAMPLES TO THE "JACOBIAN CONJECTURE AT INFINITY"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a smooth analytic surface and l #26; U a smooth compact (i.e. isomorphic to CP 1 ) curve of self, holomorphic on U nl, is extendable to the whole C 2 by the theorem of removing compact singularities. Moreover concretely formulated) was posed to me by A.G. Vitushkin when I was his graduate student. Typeset by A M S

Orevkov, Stepan

406

Environmental movements in Russia (An example from the Baikal region).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis presents the analysis of environmental movements in Russia. Through a collective memory and discourse framework, this study reviews the overlap and disparity (more)

Dampilon, Zhargal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Towards a Query-by-Example System for Knowledge Graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We witness an unprecedented proliferation of knowledge graphs that record millions of heterogeneous entities and their diverse relationships. While knowledge graphs are structure-flexible and content-rich, it is difficult to query them. The challenge ...

Nandish Jayaram; Arijit Khan; Chengkai Li; Xifeng Yan; Ramez Elmasri

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices evaluation instrument examples  

SciTech Connect

Training evaluation determines a training program`s effectiveness in meeting its intended purpose: producing competent employees. Evaluation is the quality assurance component of a systematic approach to training program. This guide provides information on evaluation instruments used to gather employee, supervisor, and instructor feedback to identify strengths and weaknesses of training programs at DOE facilities. It should be used in conjunction with ``DOE Training Program Handbook: A Systematic Approach to Training`` and ``DOE Handbook, Alternative Systematic Approaches to Training.``

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The dynamics of phosphorus in turbid estuarine systems: Example ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Suspended particles and surface waters were collected in the Gironde estuary (southwestern France) along the salinity gradient. Dissolved...

410

Excellence in Energy Awards: Military Academies Leading by Example  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Federal Energy Management Program honors military academies with DOE Excellence in Energy Award for innovative capstone engineering design projects.

411

Computational provenance in hydrologic science: a snow mapping example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Naval Postgraduate School grant N00244-07-1-0013...properly documenting computer-based scientific...Donald Bren School of Environmental...Non-P.H.S. | Computer Simulation Database...Software User-Computer Interface

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Sampling and Statistical Quality Control with an Example from Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; percentage of defective units needs methods to monitor quality in a reliable way even if it cannot check. Even the seemingly uncomplicated task of counting the number of defective units in a large batch in Finland who have never owned a car, our population is equal to the population of Finland. Or if we wish

Pedicini, Marco

413

Folk Theorems on Transmission Access: Proofs and Counter Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12;[11] S. Stoft, \\On the meaning of transmission prices." Private Communication, 18 October 1994

California at Berkeley. University of

414

Adsorption on surfaces Example: H2/H/Pd(210)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= (x, y, z) Image potential of a hydrogen atom in front of a metal surface: Vim = - e2 2 1 |2R| + 1 |2R interaction Taylor expansion of image force in |r|/|R|: Vim = - e2 8Z3 x2 + y2 2 + z2 + 3e2 16Z4 z 2 (x2 + y2-order correction defines dynamical image plane at Z0 Vim(Z) = - Cv Z3 - 3CvZ0 Z4 + O(Z-5 ) = - Cv (Z - Z0)3 + O(Z-5

Pfeifer, Holger

415

System reliability: An example of nuclear reactor system analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the three reliability investigations of a 900 \\{MWe\\} reactor residual heat removal system. Following a description of the system and its functions, the main procedures used in operational reliability analysis, based on the analysis of occurence records, are covered. The second part of the investigations covers predicted reliability, involving the use of the Markov method. It will be noted that the two types of analysis are in good agreement, the probability of system loss after two months' operation being of the order of 10?1. Additional investigation data are also given.

R. Coudray; J.M. Mattei

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

BJT Differential Amplifier Example R P x y,( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, . G me1 2.9975 10 3 = r ic1 r 0 R P r' e1 R te1, 1 R te1 . r' e1 R te1 r ic1 2.9416 10 5 = Voltage

Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

417

User:Nlangle/Migration Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pages when Special:ReplaceText exceeds maximum (1000 pages). Add code to a template to help build a "glossary" that allows Special:ReplaceText to perform the operation on a...

418

An extreme example of a radio relic in Abell 4038  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......published by Maccacaro et al. (1977), Chincarini, Tarenghi & Bettis (1978), Green, Godwin & Peach (1988) and Lucey & Carter...San Francisco, p. 341 Chincarini G., Tarenghi M., Bettis C., 1978, ApJ, 221, 34 Deiss B. M., Reich W., Lesch......

O. B. Slee; A. L. Roy

1998-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

419

APPLICATION EXAMPLES OF ADVANCED DIGITAL CONTROL IN WIRE INDUSTRY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In wire and cable industry, mass production is done for enamel wire production and foamed insulated cable for telephone line. This paper presents applications of multivariable control to these production processes. The control systems are designed based on state space approach using the computer aided design package. The temperature distribution control of enamelling oven is presented first, and in the second, the simultaneous control of the capacitance and diameter of the foamed insulated cable is discribed. Both control systems are now practically used with satisfactory results. Keywords. Multivariable control; Enamelling oven; Temperature distribution control foamed insulated cable.

K. Furuta; M. Sampei; Y. Nakamura; K. Asaka

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Efficient Energy Use and Well-Being: The Swedish Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coun-tries. Although oil for home heating has...comparable to U.S. oil prices) the large amounts...requirements for energy production, and generally raising...publications derive from the cumulative efforts of in-vestigators...who have worked in this field for many years, concern...

Lee Schipper; Allan J. Lichtenberg

1976-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

MARSAME Appendix C C. EXAMPLES OF COMMON RADIONUCLIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ra and progeny Depleted uranium collimators Metal Foundry 40 K 60 Co 137 Cs Thorium series control devices) 226 Ra and progeny Depleted uranium January 2009 C-1 NUREG-1575, Supp. 1 #12;Appendix C-thorium alloys Nickel-thorium alloys 147 Pm (lighted dials and gauges) 226 Ra and progeny (radium dials) Depleted

422

Lean Automation: Combining Lean with Industrial Robotics in Real Examples.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this report is to analyze whether we can have a better automation manufacturing using lean solutions. First, this report is started (more)

Delkhosh, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Bayesian heuristic approach to global optimization and examples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The traditional numerical analysis considers optimization algorithms which guarantee some accuracy for all functions to be optimized. This includes the exact algorithms. Limiting the maximal error requires a computational effort that in many cases ...

Jonas Mockus

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Example minor programs in Civil Engineering 1) Structural Engineering focus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Q Accessing Architecture through Drawing (A,W) 4 CEE 100 Managing Sustainable Building Projects (S and Management focus CEE 100 Managing Sustainable Building Projects (A) 4 CEE 102 Legal Aspects of Engineering Buildings (W; w/lab) 4 4) Sustainability focus CEE 31Q Accessing Architecture through Drawing (A,W; prereq

Prinz, Friedrich B.

425

Example minor programs in Environmental Engineering 1) Energy focus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; for breadth) 3 CEE 173A Energy Resources (A) 5 CEE 176A Energy Efficient Buildings (W; w/lab) 4 CEE 176B to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions (S) 3 2) Sustainability focus CEE 64 Air Pollution: Urban Smog to Global a Student Workforce for Sustainability (W) 3 CEE 142A Creating Sustainable Development (W) 3 CEE 173A Energy

Prinz, Friedrich B.

426

Tutorial Counting and Tracking -Useful Examples from Digital Image Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jakob Søndergaard Jensen, DTU, Lyngby 45 15 16 -17 Optimal Reactor Concepts for Plantwide Process -17 Quo Vadis EAM 30 00 17 -19 Dinner 00 45 19 -19 Multi-scale Optimization for Integrated Design 30 00 15 -16 Coffee Break Focal Topic IV Optimization of Periodic Structures Carolin Körner, E

Sanderson, Yasmine

427

Review: Inside Relational Databases with Examples in Access  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Essays in Advanced Computer Technology and the Law Curtis Karnow Artech...One theme is that in advanced technology the legal system is unable...Engineering Wolverhampton University Intranet Security ?? Intranet Security John Vacca International......

Mike Jackson

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Global Optimization: Examples, Methods and July 5, 2011 1 --5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy E0 n(r) Matrices generation Ak = Bk = 40% time usage Generalized, next to Aachen University main building. More information can be found here: http://www.aices.rwth-aachen.de/find-us Initialization: non-interacting spherical V0(r) Calculation of full-potential V (r)[n] usage Charge

429

Efficient Energy Use and Well-Being: The Swedish Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Swedish all-electric homes are two-thirds...Swedish thermal power plants shows...29 percent as electric-ity (21...offset by the high demand for heat and...requirements for electric drive and lights...the projected curves ofMeyers et al...of oil through refineries indicate 1...

Lee Schipper; Allan J. Lichtenberg

1976-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fractional Factorial Design Reactor Example i BHH kap. 12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ CDE AC + BDE AD + BCE AE + BCD BC + ADE BD + ACE BE + ACD CD + ABE CE + ABD DE + ABC Data Display Row;Factorial Fit: Y versus A; B; C; D; E Estimated Effects and Coefficients for Y (coded units) Term Effect for Y (coded units) Source DF Seq SS Adj SS Adj MS F P Main Effects 5 2453,5 2453,5 490,70 * * 2-Way

Langseth, Helge

431

Engineering This presentation brings examples from two materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and technologies for micro-power sources, enzymatic bio-fuel cells, sensor systems design and integration of micro electrocatalyst powders with varied chemical structure and desired morphology for fuel cell and related was a project leader in fuel cell electrocatalysts development that resulted in introduction of spray pyrolysis

Reisslein, Martin

432

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Detailed Work Packages...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Importance to Safety, Safeguards and Security, Magnitude of Hazards, Life Cycle of Facility, Program Mission of Facility, Facility Characteristics, ...

433

Example Performance Targets and Efficiency Packages Greensburg, Kansas (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation shows the energy performance targets and efficiency packages for residential buildings in Greensburg, Kansas.

Anderson, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

GDI and VB 6.0 Drawing Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Before I get into the inner workings of GDI+, I want to spend some time in the existing world of GDI. This chapter will give you an appreciation of the complexities of the GDI and VB 6.0 drawing to...

Nick Symmonds

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hybrid user interfaces : design guidelines and implementation examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hybrid user interface is a new type of computer user interface that achieves high usability by combining features of graphical user interfaces and command line interfaces. The main goal of a hybrid user interface is to ...

Ahn, Sehyun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Object-oriented biological system integration: a SARS coronavirus example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......were obtained through an auto-mated pipeline, GeneAtlas, implemented by Accelrys, Inc. (Kitson et al., 2002). This pipeline can efficiently identify the function...the mammalian cell cycle control and DNA repair systems. Mol. Biol. Cell, 10, 27032734......

Daniel Shegogue; W. Jim Zheng

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Geothermal Development and Changes in Surficial Features: Examples...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

between such surficial changes and contributing factors. Author Michael L. Sorey Conference World Geothermal Congress; Kyushu-Tohoku, Japan; 05282000 Published World...

438

LHC Accelerator Design Studies on the Example of Passive Absorbers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accelerators / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (PART 3) / Radiation Protection

M. Brugger; F. Cerutti; A. Ferrari; L. Lari; M. Mauri; S. Roesler; L. Sarchiapone; V. Vlachoudis

439

Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments relative to traditional natural gas fired systems affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive/thermo-chemical attack mechanisms; (iv) developing a mechanics-based analysis of the driving forces for crack growth and delamination, based on molten phase infiltration, misfit upon cooling, and loss of compliance; (v) understanding changes in TGO growth mechanisms associated with these emerging combustion product streams; and (vi) identifying degradation resistant alternative materials (including new compositions or bi-layer concepts) for use in mitigating the observed degradation modes. To address the materials stability concerns, this program integrated research thrusts aimed at: (1) Conducting tests in simulated syngas and HHC environments to evaluate materials evolution and degradation mechanisms; assessing thermally grown oxide development unique to HHC environmental exposures; carrying out high-resolution imaging and microanalysis to elucidate the evolution of surface deposits (molten phase formation and infiltration); exploring thermo-chemical instabilities; assessing thermo-mechanical drivers and thermal gradient effects on degradation; and quantitatively measuring stress evolution due to enhanced sintering and thermo-chemical instabilities induced in the coating. (2) Executing experiments to study the melting and infiltration of simulated ash deposits, and identifying reaction products and evolving phases associated with molten phase corrosion mechanisms; utilizing thermal spray techniques to fabricate test coupons with controlled microstructures to study mechanisms of instability and degradation; facilitating thermal gradient testing; and developing new materials systems for laboratory testing; (3) Correlating information on the resulting combustion environments to properly assess materials exposure conditions and guide the development of lab-scale simulations of material exposures; specification of representative syngas and high-hydrogen fuels with realistic levels of impurities and contaminants, to explore differences in heat transfer, surface degradation, and deposit formation; and facilitating combustion rig testing of materials test coupons.

Mumm, Daniel

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Method and apparatus for using hazardous waste form non-hazardous aggregate  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an apparatus for converting hazardous waste into non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregate, the apparatus. It comprises: a source of particulate solid materials, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products; oxidizing means comprising at least one refractory-lined, water-cooled, metal-walled vessel; means for introducing the particulate solid material, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products to the oxidizing means; means for inducing combustion in the oxidizing means, the heat of combustion forming molten slag and noncombustible fines from noncombustible material; means for accumulating the slag; means for introducing the noncombustible fines to the molten slag; means for removing the mixture from the apparatus; and means for cooling the mixture to form the non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregates.

Kent, J.M.; Robards, H.L. Jr.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fouling of ceramic filters and thin-film composite reverse osmosis membranes by inorganic and bacteriological constituents  

SciTech Connect

Two significant problems have been identified during the first three years of operating the Savannah River Site Effluent Treatment Facility. These problems encompass two of the facility`s major processing areas: the microfiltration and reverse osmosis steps. The microfilters (crossflow ceramic filters {minus}0.2{mu} nominal pore size) have been prone to pluggage problems. The presence of bacteria and bacteria byproducts in the microfilter feed, along with small quantities of colloidal iron, silica, and aluminum, results in a filter foulant that rapidly deteriorates filter performance and is difficult to remove by chemical cleaning. Processing rates through the filters have dropped from the design flow rate of 300 gpm after cleaning to 60 gpm within minutes. The combination of bacteria (from internal sources) and low concentrations of inorganic species resulted in substantial reductions in the reverse osmosis system performance. The salt rejection has been found to decrease from 99+% to 97%, along with a 50% loss in throughput, within a few hours of cleaning. Experimental work has led to implementation of several changes to plant operation and to planned upgrades of existing equipment. It has been shown that biological control in the influent is necessary to achieve design flowrates. Experiments have also shown that the filter performance can be optimized by the use of efficient filter backpulsing and the addition of aluminum nitrate (15 to 30 mg/L Al{sup 3+}) to the filter feed. The aluminum nitrate assists by controlling adsorption of colloidal inorganic precipitates and biological contaminants. In addition, improved cleaning procedures have been identified for the reverse osmosis units. This paper provides a summary of the plant problems and the experimental work that has been completed to understand and correct these problems.

Siler, J.L.; Poirier, M.R.; McCabe, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Fouling of ceramic filters and thin-film composite reverse osmosis membranes by inorganic and bacteriological constituents  

SciTech Connect

Two significant problems have been identified during the first three years of operating the Savannah River Site Effluent Treatment Facility. These problems encompass two of the facility's major processing areas: the microfiltration and reverse osmosis steps. The microfilters (crossflow ceramic filters {minus}0.2{mu} nominal pore size) have been prone to pluggage problems. The presence of bacteria and bacteria byproducts in the microfilter feed, along with small quantities of colloidal iron, silica, and aluminum, results in a filter foulant that rapidly deteriorates filter performance and is difficult to remove by chemical cleaning. Processing rates through the filters have dropped from the design flow rate of 300 gpm after cleaning to 60 gpm within minutes. The combination of bacteria (from internal sources) and low concentrations of inorganic species resulted in substantial reductions in the reverse osmosis system performance. The salt rejection has been found to decrease from 99+% to 97%, along with a 50% loss in throughput, within a few hours of cleaning. Experimental work has led to implementation of several changes to plant operation and to planned upgrades of existing equipment. It has been shown that biological control in the influent is necessary to achieve design flowrates. Experiments have also shown that the filter performance can be optimized by the use of efficient filter backpulsing and the addition of aluminum nitrate (15 to 30 mg/L Al{sup 3+}) to the filter feed. The aluminum nitrate assists by controlling adsorption of colloidal inorganic precipitates and biological contaminants. In addition, improved cleaning procedures have been identified for the reverse osmosis units. This paper provides a summary of the plant problems and the experimental work that has been completed to understand and correct these problems.

Siler, J.L.; Poirier, M.R.; McCabe, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Effects of EGR and Its Constituents on the Autoignition of Single- and Two-Stage Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

444

14-3-3 Proteins Are Constituents of the Insoluble Glycoprotein Framework of the Chlamydomonas Cell Wall  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fraction by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight...examined by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight...chemical deglycosylation with HF/pyridine and isolated by preparative...b-galactosidase:14-3-3 fusion protein (anti-b-Gal/14-3-3...

Jürgen Voigt; Ronald Frank

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Biochemical studies concerning the relationship of various blood and urine constituents to rate of gain in young beef animals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gain in beef animals~ it seeesg XogLoal thai the Xoeele af aortain nutrient blocaL ocaayoneccte shouM be ~sureiL in tbe Xabesatory in this search for a gsoeth incLm, eLnoe these bloog eaterials sores as tbe buUcLing stones fcn groeth anc...LNaLLeae NLe14eLLeal eeelyreLe eae ayykh4 Le eD data ebLaLee4 La %a abeea 4eLeeaLIaaLeae La aa aeLeeLA ee ~L? aey et 4h~ btee4 eeaeLL|eeaLe eLLb eaLe et NsLa et ebe ~i StcaKes bass been oocduotcd oonoercdng possible correlations between rate of gain in bsof...

Ware, James Harold

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

446

Quantitative Analysis of Constituents in Heavy Fuel Oil by 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy and Multivariate Data Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This applies in particular to the shipping industry. ... The fuel oil samples were collected during the bunkering of the oil in various ports around the world and sent to Lloyds Registers Fuel Oil Bunker Analysis and Advisory Service (FOBAS) for detailed physicochemical characterization. ... The mixture of two incompatible fuels leads to extensive formation of solid material, with devastating effects in the case where the precipitation takes place in the engine or tank of a HFO-powered ship or power plant. ...

Katrine Ellemann Nielsen; Jens Dittmer; Anders Malmendal; Niels Chr. Nielsen

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

447

Antifungal and cytotoxicity activities of the fresh xylem sap of Hymenaea courbaril L. and its major constituent fisetin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fresh xylem sap of H. courbaril...was filtered resulting in an insoluble brown color precipitate and was identified as fisetin. In the filtrate was identified the mixture...trans-fustin and taxifolin, which w...

Maysa Paula da Costa

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

\\THE WEAKNESS OF THE STRONG FORCE" The constituents of the nucleus of every atom, protons and neutrons, are not elementary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can be naively visualised as a rubber band stretched between them. As the rubber band is stretched, i; s . Thus, the rate for quark and gluon production is directly sensitive to the value of #11 of jet production as a function o

449

The Effect of Roentgen Radiation on the Incorporation of Radiophosphorus into Nucleic Acids and Other Constituents of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...total-body radiation administered by other workers. Furthermore, 4,500 r causes...Na,HPO4 on allocation from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Trial experiments...radiation ad ministered by other workers. Furthermore, 4,500 r causes...

Halvor Vermund; Cyrus P. Barnum; Robert A. Huseby; and Karl W. Stenstrom

1953-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Method and apparatus for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

Farthing, William Earl (Pinson, AL) [Pinson, AL; Felix, Larry Gordon (Pelham, AL) [Pelham, AL; Snyder, Todd Robert (Birmingham, AL) [Birmingham, AL

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

451

Method and apparatus maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

Farthing, William Earl (Pinson, AL); Felix, Larry Gordon (Pelham, AL); Snyder, Todd Robert (Birmingham, AL)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Structural and functional insights into an archaeal L-asparaginase obtained through the linker-less assembly of constituent domains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A conjoined archeal L-asparaginase obtained by assembly of the individual domains in the absence of covalent linker displayed structural similarity and functional superiority than the parent protein. A new mechanism of action has been proposed from the crystal structure of the substrate-bound conjoined enzyme.

Tomar, R.

2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

453

AB 811 enables you to tailor a program that makes sense for your community and constituents. You determine the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For complete documentation of the Energy Independence Program please visit: www.cityofpalmdesert.org For more information please contact: City of Palm Desert Office of Energy Management 73-710 Fred Waring Drive, Suite Team Thank you for your interest in the Energy Independence Program! A Pathway to Energy Independence

Kammen, Daniel M.

454

Improving Energy Efficiency and Cost-Effectiveness of Batch Distillation for Separating Wide Boiling Constituents. 1. Vapor Recompression Column  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the direct vapor recompression column (VRC) has been known for its application in continuous distillation since the 1960s, the research on vapor recompressed batch distillation (VRBD) started a couple of years ago. In this contribution, a batch ...

Md. Malik Nawaz Khan; G. Uday Bhaskar Babu; Amiya K. Jana

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

455

Groupe de travail "Ecomateriaux" Amac/Mecamat, Lyon, 30.06.11 PHOTODEGRADATION DE COMPOSITES CONSTITUES DE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

délignifiée qui passe par un procédé Organosolve avec de l'éthanol jusqu'à un nombre de Kappa de 84 (11% de un procédé Organosolve avec de la monoethanolamine (MEA). Le groupe CMEA contient 5% de lignine, qui est également obtenue en utilisant le procédé organosolve avec MEA. Tous les matériaux ont été séchés

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

456

The Organised Science Series: (1) First Stage Physiograhy (Section I) Science Handbooks for Laboratory and Classroom: Elementary Physics (Third Year) Examples in Physics Advanced Examples in Physics Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE stream of physics text-books continues to flow. The large number of institutions in which this subject ... name. It is a mystery why one part of chemistry added to two parts of physics should produce physiography,"but of course Dr. Stewart is not responsible for this. ...

1906-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Analysis, manufacture and characterization of Ni/Cu functionally graded structures Wilfredo Montealegre Rubio a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

base material. For example, by combining metal/ceramic constituents, one can design a thermal barrier on one side, which has the thermal properties of ceramic materials and, a metallic material interfaces offers other interesting local features: (i) local reduction of residual thermal stress, and (ii

Paulino, Glaucio H.

458

Ground states of two-dimensional polyampholytes Eilon Brenner and Yacov Kantor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurrence of polymers in biological systems, for ex- ample, proteins. Random polymers are also good examples of disordered systems, sharing common features with other physical systems exhibiting randomness or frustration of positively and negatively charged monomers 6 . Certain properties of proteins, some of whose constituents

Kantor, Yacov

459

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C1, supplement au no I, Tome 45, janvier 1984 page Cl-111  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'une importance centrale. LeS trois projets appeles "Large Coil Task - IEA", TI5 (tokamak) et MFTF-B constituent development is a major task. Large scale examples are the IEA-"Large Coil Task", the T15-tokamak and the MFTF to be discussed in this review. It might also be a desir- able goal of these developments to reduce finally

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

460

"Table A42. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Noncombustible Energy Sources",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Combustible Energy Sources" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Solids",,,,,,,,,,"Gases",,,,,,,,,"Liquids" " "," ",," "," ",,,,," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",,,"Wood","Wood Residues",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," " " "," ",,"Electricity","Electricity","Electricity","Steam","Steam","Steam","Industrial",," ","Bituminous and"," ",," ",,,"Harvested","and Byproducts","Wood and",,"Natural Gas",,,,,,,"Total Diesel Fuel",,,,,"Motor Gasoline",,,,," "

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Though no material is "fire proof," the proper use and assembly of fire-rated building materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been done on the toxicity of fumes released by this melted material. Fire-resistive materials The same · Wood panels and boards Material Class is categorized by composition, or resistance to fire (combustible or noncombustible). Class A has the highest resistance; class C has the least resistance. However, Class A materials

462

BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. With this prior permission, students will be able to light candles or incense in a location established use the type clearly marked as made of noncombustible material. Do not use light strings on a metal tree; it may become charged and dangerous as a shock hazard. Support all trees firmly. Keep away from

Suzuki, Masatsugu

463

PERFORMANCE-BASED SOFTWARE AUDIT OQAP-BSC-03-07; Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

|No.|Area/Product|Issue |No.|Area/Product|Issue #s|%Cmp|Adq.|Imp|Eff.|Comments||||Organization||||||||DAA||Quality Assurance Program|DAA-2-1|100|Y|Y|Y|DAA-2-1, Resolved||Design ControlProcurement Document ControlInstruction, Procedures and DrawingsDocument ControlControl of Purchased Items and ServicesIdentification and Control of ItemsControl of Special ProcessesInspectionTest ControlControl of Measuring & Test EquipmentDRRHandling Storage and

464

This is an Example Paper Title: Energy Efficiency and Market Transformation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Institute for Market Transformation Institute for Market Transformation 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, Suite 815 Washington, DC 20036 Comments of the Institute for Market Transformation on the Dept. of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Standards for New Federal Buildings: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Docket No. EE-RM/STD-02-112 Sept. 1, 2010 The Institute for Market Transformation respectfully submits these comments on the Department of Energy's notice of proposed rulemaking on Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Standards for New Federal Buildings. Benchmarking the energy performance of new and existing buildings is an important tool that

465

Cost-Effective Methods for Accurate Determination of Sea Level Rise Vulnerability: A Solomon Islands Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne-...

Simon Albert; Kirsten Abernethy; Badin Gibbes; Alistair Grinham; Nixon Tooler; Shankar Aswani

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

An Outcrop Example of Large-scale Conglomeratic Intrusions Sourced from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Cartwright, eds., Sand injectites: Implications for hydrocarbon exploration and production: AAPG Memoir 87, p, it is probable that the highly energetic process in- volved gas charging of the source body and, potentially remobilization of clastic material through injection processes adds complexity to both facies dis- tribution

467

Lung Cancer: A Classic Example of Tumor Escape and Progression While Providing Opportunities for Immunological Intervention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of lung cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 4, no. 7,pathogenesis of lung cancer, Annual Review of Physiology,immunoreac- tivity in lung cancer: yet another player in the

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Decommissioning of Large Components as an Example of Steam Generator from PWR Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the procedure for the qualification of large components (Steam Generators) as an IP-2 package, the ship transport abroad to Sweden and the external treatment of this components to disburden the Nuclear Power Plant from this task, to assure an accelerated the deconstruction phase and to minimize the amount of waste. In conclusion: The transport of large components to an external treatment facility is linked with many advantages for a Nuclear Power Plant: - Disburden of the Nuclear Power Plant from the treatment of such components, - no timely influence on the deconstruction phase of the power reactor and therewith an accelerated deconstruction phase and - minimization of the waste to be returned and therewith less demand of required waste storage capacity. (authors)

Beverungen, M. [GNS Gesellschaft fur Nuklear-Service mbH, Hollestrabe 7A (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Example of a Risk-Based Disposal Approval: Solidification of Hanford Site Transuranic Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site requested, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 approved, a Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (TSCA) risk-based disposal approval (RBDA) for solidifying approximately four cubic meters of waste from a specific area of one of the K East Basin: the North Loadout Pit (NLOP). The NLOP waste is a highly radioactive sludge that contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated under TSCA. The prescribed disposal method for liquid PCB waste under TSCA regulations is either thermal treatment or decontamination. Due to the radioactive nature of the waste, however, neither thermal treatment nor decontamination was a viable option. As a result, the proposed treatment consisted of solidifying the material to comply with waste acceptance criteria at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, or possibly the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at the Hanford Site, depending on the resulting transuranic (TRU) content of the stabilized waste. The RBDA evaluated environmental risks associated with potential airborne PCBs. In addition, the RBDA made use of waste management controls already in place at the treatment unit. The treatment unit, the T Plant Complex, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA)-permitted facility used for storing and treating radioactive waste. The EPA found that the proposed activities did not pose an unreasonable risk to human health or the environment. Treatment took place from October 26, 2005 to June 9, 2006, and 332 208-liter (55-gallon) containers of solidified waste were produced. All treated drums assayed to date are TRU and will be disposed at WIPP. (authors)

Barnes, B.M.; Hyatt, J.E.; Martin, P.W.; Prignano, A.L. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Ball-in-Tube Linearization Example Lab 5: Nonlinear Control for a Flexible Joint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this simple case). Of course, the point-mass and lift-coefficient approximations may be overly na-in-tubes experiment. In it, there are four tubes that each have a ball riding in them that is pushed up and down a lift-coefficient hypothesis, assume that the thrust is proportional to the square of the voltage

471

Semantics for Accurate Conflict Detection in SMoVer: Specification, Detection and Presentation by Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In collaborative software development, the utilization of Version Control Systems VCSs is a must. For this, a multitude of pessimistic as well as optimistic VCSs for model artifacts emerged. Pessimistic approaches follow the lock-edit-unlock paradigm ... Keywords: Conflict Detection, Model Comparison, Model Consistency, Model Evolution, Model-Driven Engineering, Parallel Software Development, Version Control System VCS

Kerstin Altmanninger, Wieland Schwinger, Gabriele Kotsis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Model Transformation By-Example: A Survey of the First Wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

|wimmer}@big.tuwien.ac.at 2 Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria {langer|retschitzegger|schwinger}@jku.at Abstract. Model

Hochreiter, Sepp

473

Model Transformation By-Example: A Survey of the First Wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retschitzegger2 , Wieland Schwinger2 , and Manuel Wimmer1 1 Vienna University of Technology, Austria {gerti,wimmer}@big.tuwien.ac.at 2 Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria {langer,retschitzegger,schwinger}@jku.at Abstract. Model

474

FORMATION OF THE ARIZONA RIPARIAN COUNCIL: AN EXAMPLE OF LASTING PUBLIC INTEREST IN RIPARIAN RESOURCES1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Center for Environmental Studies, Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz.; present address second author. These conferences result in a short term exchange of ideas and a proceed- ings that is useful to those working, or degradation of those riparian areas would increase. It is estimated that only 10 to 15 percent of the lower

Standiford, Richard B.

475

Flexible Coal: An Example Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-first century power systems, with higher penetration levels of low-carbon energy, smart grids, and other emerging technologies, will favor resources that have low marginal costs and provide system flexibility (e.g., the ability to cycle on and off to follow changes in variable renewable energy plant output). Questions remain about both the fate of coal plants in this scenario and whether they can cost-effectively continue to operate if they cycle routinely. The experience from the CGS plant demonstrates that coal plants can become flexible resources. This flexibility - namely the ability to cycle on and off and run at lower output (below 40% of capacity) - requires limited hardware modifications but extensive modifications to operational practice. Cycling does damage the plant and impact its life expectancy compared to baseload operations. Nevertheless, strategic modifications, proactive inspections and training programs, among other operational changes to accommodate cycling, can minimize the extent of damage and optimize the cost of maintenance. CGS's cycling, but not necessarily the associated price tag, is replicable. Context - namely, power market opportunities and composition of the generation fleet - will help determine for other coal plants the optimal balance between the level of cycling-related forced outages and the level of capital investment required to minimize those outages. Replicating CGS's experience elsewhere will likely require a higher acceptance of forced outages than regulators and plant operators are accustomed to; however, an increase in strategic maintenance can minimize the impact on outage rates.

Cochran, J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Flexible Coal: An Example Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-first century power systems, with higher penetration levels of low-carbon energy, smart grids, and other emerging technologies, will favor resources that have low marginal costs and provide system flexibility (e.g., the ability to cycle on and off to follow changes in variable renewable energy plant output). Questions remain about both the fate of coal plants in this scenario and whether they can cost-effectively continue to operate if they cycle routinely. The experience from the CGS plant demonstrates that coal plants can become flexible resources. This flexibility - namely the ability to cycle on and off and run at lower output (below 40% of capacity) - requires limited hardware modifications but extensive modifications to operational practice. Cycling does damage the plant and impact its life expectancy compared to baseload operations. Nevertheless, strategic modifications, proactive inspections and training programs, among other operational changes to accommodate cycling, can minimize the extent of damage and optimize the cost of maintenance. CGS's cycling, but not necessarily the associated price tag, is replicable. Context - namely, power market opportunities and composition of the generation fleet - will help determine for other coal plants the optimal balance between the level of cycling-related forced outages and the level of capital investment required to minimize those outages. Replicating CGS's experience elsewhere will likely require a higher acceptance of forced outages than regulators and plant operators are accustomed to; however, an increase in strategic maintenance can minimize the impact on outage rates.

Cochran, J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Policy Implications and Implementation of Environmental ICTPs in Developing States: Examples from Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

status of forest resources in Bangladesh (GOB, 1992). Tablestatus of forest resources in Bangladesh Area in million ha4. Dhaka, Bangladesh: Water Resources Planning Organization.

Alam, Mahbubul; Rashid, A.Z.M. Manzoor; Furukawa, Yasushi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Financial system loss as an example of high consequence, high frequency events  

SciTech Connect

Much work has been devoted to high consequence events with low frequency of occurrence. Characteristic of these events are bridge failure (such as that of the Tacoma Narrows), building failure (such as the collapse of a walkway at a Kansas City hotel), or compromise of a major chemical containment system (such as at Bhopal, India). Such events, although rare, have an extreme personal, societal, and financial impact. An interesting variation is demonstrated by financial losses due to fraud and abuse in the money management system. The impact can be huge, entailing very high aggregate costs, but these are a result of the contribution of many small attacks and not the result of a single (or few) massive events. Public awareness is raised through publicized events such as the junk bond fraud perpetrated by Milikin or gross mismanagement in the failure of the Barings Bank through unsupervised trading activities by Leeson in Singapore. These event,s although seemingly large (financial losses may be on the order of several billion dollars), are but small contributors to the estimated $114 billion loss to all types of financial fraud in 1993. This paper explores the magnitude of financial system losses and identifies new areas for analysis of high consequence events including the potential effect of malevolent intent.

McGovern, D.E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

An example of using oil-production induced microseismicity in characterizing a naturally fractured reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Microseismic monitoring was conducted using downhole geophone tools deployed in the Seventy-Six oil field, Clinton County, Kentucky. Over a 7-month monitoring period, 3237 microearthquakes were detected during primary oil production; no injection operations were conducted. Gross changes in production rate correlate with microearthquake event rate with event rate lagging production-rate changes by about 2 weeks. Hypocenters and first-motion data have revealed low-angle, thrust fracture zones above and below the currently drained depth interval. Production history, well logs and drill tests indicate the seismically-active fractures are previously drained intervals that have subsequently recovered to hydrostatic pressure via brine invasion. The microseismic data have revealed, for the first time, the importance of the low-angle fractures in the storage and production of oil in the study area. The seismic behavior is consistent with poroelastic models that predict slight increases in compressive stress above and below currently drained volumes.

Rutledge, J.T.; Phillips, W.S. [Nambe Geophysical, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States); Schuessler, B.K.; Anderson, D.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Field data do not support a textbook example of convergent character displacement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...teleost shes. InThe behaviourof teleost shes (ed. T. J. Pitcher), pp. 275^293. New York: Chapman & Hall. Convergent...ed. D. R. Strong, D. Simberlo , L. G. Abele & A. B. Thistle), pp. 234^253. Princeton University Press. Slatkin...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

An example of a jump from chaos to integrability for magnetic geodesic flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proved that the motion of a charge particle on a hyperbolic oriented two-dimensional surface in a magnetic field given by the volume form of the hyperbolic metric is completely integrable on the energy levels E 1/2 are Anosov flows

I. A. Taimanov

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

For considerations on the Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande detectors, see for example Ref. [3].  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 14.60.Pq; 26.65.#t; 29.40.Mc Keywords: Solar neutrino detectors; High-energy particles; Spectroscopy, to include the pp #ux, and good energy resolution. The main obstacle in achieving these goals 0168-threshold, real-time solar neutrino detectors G. Gratta, Y.F. Wang* Department of Physics, Stanford University

Gratta, Giorgio

483

Stream-channel response to floods, with examples from central Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...excess of 2 0 0 yr. Yet, localized channel widening by b a n k scouring w a s the only m a j o r modif ica t ion caused by the floods...significance of cataclysmic debris flows in al luvial-fan systems. Wool ley (1946) described instances of m a j o r channel erosion...

484

Policy Implications and Implementation of Environmental ICTPs in Developing States: Examples from Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, Vienna. 31in the Case of a Nuclear Accident of Radiological Emergency,

Alam, Mahbubul; Rashid, A.Z.M. Manzoor; Furukawa, Yasushi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

MU is accessible, affordable and accountable to citizens. Here are examples of our progress.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, occupational therapy, physical therapy, respiratory therapy, and radiologic science. MU students have high pass.5% of its students for their sophomore year, and has a higher graduation rate than other colleges. MIZZOU 70.0%70.0%SIX-YEAR RATE STATE 53.9%53.9% AVERAGE SIX-YEAR RATE NATIONAL MIZZOU STATE NATIONAL 56.6%56.6% AVERAGE

Taylor, Jerry

486

Classification and regression trees for epidemiologic research: an air pollution example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regression trees can be used to hypothesize about joint effects of exposure mixtures and may be particularly useful in the field of air pollution epidemiology for gaining a better understanding of...

Katherine Gass; Mitch Klein; Howard H Chang; W Dana Flanders

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

CP violation in the two-Higgs-doublet model: An example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a general two-scalar-doublet model without fermions, there is a unique source of CP violation, J1, in the gauge interactions of the scalars. It arises in the mixing of the three neutral physical scalars X1, X2, and X3. $CP violation may be observed via different decay rates for X1?H+W- and X1?H-W+ (or, alternatively, for H+?X1W+ and H-?X1W-, depending on which decays are kinematically allowed). I compute the part of those CP-violating decay-rate differences which is proportional to J1. The CP-invariant phase is provided by the absorptive parts of the one-loop diagrams. I check the gauge invariance of the whole calculation.

L. Lavoura

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Scottish Landform Example No. 35 Subglacial Landforms of the Tweed Palaeo-Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVEREST, TOM BRADWELL & NICK GOLLEDGE British Geological Survey, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3LA established in the literature, such as the Irish Sea (Knight et al., 1999), Strathmore (Linton, 1959; Merritt et al., 2003), and Moray Firth (Merritt et al., 1995) ice streams. Others are less well established

489

The Dundonald deposit; an example of volcanic-type nickel-sulfide mineralization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...197I): Archeannickel sulphide depositsin Canada: their classification, geologicalsetting and genesiswith somesugggs-iions as to exploration./n Symposium on Ar-cheanRocks(J.E. Glover, ed.), Geol,Soc,Aust. Spec,Publ. g, 2AL'226...

J. E. Muir; C. D. A. Comba

490

Structural algorithm to reservoir reconstruction using passive seismic data (synthetic example)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using of passive seismic observations to detect a reservoir is a new direction of prospecting and exploration of hydrocarbons. In order to identify thin reservoir model we applied the modification of Gaussian elimination method in conditions of incomplete synthetic data. Because of the singularity of a matrix conventional method does not work. Therefore structural algorithm has been developed by analyzing the given model as a complex model. Numerical results demonstrate of its advantage compared with usual way of solution. We conclude that the gas reservoir is reconstructed by retrieving of the image of encasing shale beneath it.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Comparison of concepts for thermal biomass utilization, with the example of the Netherlands  

SciTech Connect

Biomass and waste, which are the focus of the activities at the Thermal Power Engineering section of the TU Delft, are the most important renewable energies today. They will maintain their role in the future. There are different ways to convert biomass and waste to power and heat. The combustion of biomass can be considered state-of-the-art technology and plants ranging in capacity from a few kW up to several MW are available on the market. The selection of the combustion technology is dependent on the scale and the kind of biomass. Power can be produced by means of a steam turbine, which is attractive in units above 1 MW. Gasification, in contrast, is a technology that has yet to find a wide use. But, in combination with gas engines, gas turbines or fuel cells, gasification has the advantage of a high electrical efficiency. Direct co-combustion of biomass in coal-fired steam power plants is the most economic choice and it is widely applied in the Netherlands. By an additional pyrolysis or gasification step, it is possible to separately remove and utilize the ashes of coal and biomass, and expected operational problems, such as corrosion, can possibly be avoided. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Spliethoff, H. [Technical University, Delft (Netherlands). Thermal Power Engineering Section

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

The U.S.-Russian HEU Agreement: A Modern Day Example of Swords Into Plowshares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On June 23, 1995, 24 metric tons of low enriched uranium arrived at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) facility in Portsmouth, Ohio. This was ... a $12 billion, 20-year contract between USEC, serving...

Philip G. Sewell

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

E-Print Network 3.0 - animals selected examples Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Animals in Research 5.94 Research-General Principles (See Also Chapter 3 for Ethics and Conduct Summary: Regarding Use of Animals in Research Page 2 of 2 primary work...

494

Acceptable examples of courses at CSUF that meet the ecology and quantitative methods ENST Program prerequisites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of change in response to environmental factors; population and community ecology; energy and material flow and pesticides, climate change, forestry and fishing, endangered species, and appropriate development. SOCIOLOGY interaction with the earth, including environmental ethics, public policy and technology. SOCIOLOGY 303

de Lijser, Peter

495

Activation of the cyclic AMP cascade as an ocoggenic mechanism: The thyroid example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three cascades activate thyroid cell proliferation: the EGF-protein tyrosine kinase pathway, the phorbol ester-protein kinase C pathway and the thyrotropin-cyclic AMP pathway. While the first cascades converge early, they remain distinct from the cyclic AMP cascade until very late in G1. The cyclic AMP cascade us characterized by an early and transient expression of c-myc, which may explain why it induces proliferation and differentiation expression. Constitutive activation of this cascade causes growth and hyperfunction, ie, hyperfunctioning adenomas. The various possible defects that could lead to such a constitutive activation are discussed.

C. Maenhaut; P.P. Roger; S. Reuse; J.E. Dumont

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency: Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at realistic annual penetration rates. The total energy usean available market portion penetration rate of 10% per yearper year market penetration rate for emerging technologies

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Describes the DOE Community Renewable Energy Deployment program, which used funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to promote investment in clean energy solutions and...

498

The Development of a Global Example- Our Headquarters are becoming a "Green Building"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Deutsche Bank towers in Frankfurt-am- Main, headquarters and emblem of one of Germany's largest banks are being converted into one of the world's most environmentally friendly high-rise buildings. This comprehensive modernization is turning...

Hagge, H.

499

3D compression: from A to Zip: a first complete example THOMAS LEWINER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the design of compression schemes adapted to specific class of models. The recent launch of Google Sketch'up

Lewiner, Thomas (Thomas Lewiner)

500

High Resolution Segmentation with a Time-of-Flight 3D-Camera using the Example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to film the blackboard, the drawings can be rendered as a crisp image with the usual video compression arises because we have two ar- eas of the screen competing for the viewer's eye: the video window showing the instructor and the board window (for a detailed explanation of this psychological issue see [18]). In order

Rojas, Raúl