National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for noncombustible constituents examples

  1. Table 1.15 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels, 1980-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels, 1980-2011 Year Petroleum Products Natural Gas 4 Coal Total Percent of Total Energy Consumption Asphalt and Road Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1 Lubricants Petro- chemical Feedstocks 2 Petroleum Coke Special Naphthas Other 3 Total Physical Units 5<//td> 1980 145 230 58 253 14 [R] 37 58 795 [R] 639 2.4 [ – –] [ – –] 1981 125 229 56 216 15 [R] 27 54 722 [R] 518 [R] 2.1 [ – –] [ – –] 1982 125 256 51 157 15 [R] 25 48 678 [R] 448 [R] 1.4 [ – –] [

  2. " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",2.6

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " ,"Total" "Energy Source","First Use" ,"Total United States" "Coal ",1.2 "Natural Gas",1.8 "Net Electricity",2.2 " Purchases",2.1 " Transfers In",4.6 " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",2.6 " Sales and Transfers Offsite",0.3 "Coke and Breeze",0.6

  3. An itinerant antiferromagnetic metal without magnetic constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svanidze, E.; Wang, Jiakui K.; Besara, T.; Liu, L.; Huang, Q.; Siegrist, T.; Frandsen, B.; Lynn, J. W.; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.; Gamża, Monika B.; Aronson, M. C.; Uemura, Y. J.; Morosan, E.

    2015-07-13

    The origin of magnetism in metals has been traditionally discussed in two diametrically opposite limits: itinerant and local moments. Surprisingly, there are very few known examples of materials that are close to the itinerant limit, and their properties are not universally understood. In the case of the two such examples discovered several decades ago, the itinerant ferromagnets ZrZn2 and Sc3In, the understanding of their magnetic ground states draws on the existence of 3d electrons subject to strong spin fluctuations. Similarly, in Cr, an elemental itinerant antiferromagnet with a spin density wave ground state, its 3d electron character has been deemed crucial to it being magnetic. Here, we report evidence for an itinerant antiferromagnetic metal with no magnetic constituents: TiAu. Antiferromagnetic order occurs below a Néel temperature of 36 K, about an order of magnitude smaller than in Cr, rendering the spin fluctuations in TiAu more important at low temperatures. In conclusion, this itinerant antiferromagnet challenges the currently limited understanding of weak itinerant antiferromagnetism, while providing insights into the effects of spin fluctuations in itinerant–electron systems.

  4. An itinerant antiferromagnetic metal without magnetic constituents

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Svanidze, E.; Wang, Jiakui K.; Besara, T.; Liu, L.; Huang, Q.; Siegrist, T.; Frandsen, B.; Lynn, J. W.; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.; Gamża, Monika B.; et al

    2015-07-13

    The origin of magnetism in metals has been traditionally discussed in two diametrically opposite limits: itinerant and local moments. Surprisingly, there are very few known examples of materials that are close to the itinerant limit, and their properties are not universally understood. In the case of the two such examples discovered several decades ago, the itinerant ferromagnets ZrZn2 and Sc3In, the understanding of their magnetic ground states draws on the existence of 3d electrons subject to strong spin fluctuations. Similarly, in Cr, an elemental itinerant antiferromagnet with a spin density wave ground state, its 3d electron character has been deemedmore » crucial to it being magnetic. Here, we report evidence for an itinerant antiferromagnetic metal with no magnetic constituents: TiAu. Antiferromagnetic order occurs below a Néel temperature of 36 K, about an order of magnitude smaller than in Cr, rendering the spin fluctuations in TiAu more important at low temperatures. In conclusion, this itinerant antiferromagnet challenges the currently limited understanding of weak itinerant antiferromagnetism, while providing insights into the effects of spin fluctuations in itinerant–electron systems.« less

  5. Apparatus and method for separating constituents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A centrifugal separator apparatus and method for improving the efficiency of the separation of constituents in a fluid stream. A cyclone separator includes an assembly for separately discharging both constituents through the same end of the separator housing. A rotary separator includes a rotary housing having a baffle disposed therein for minimizing the differential rotational velocities of the constituents in the housing, thereby decreasing turbulence, and increasing efficiency. The intensity of the centrifugal force and the time which the constituents reside within the housing can be independently controlled to improve efficiency of separation.

  6. Advanced Usage Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Examples Advanced Usage Examples Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Once you have set up your automatic HPSS authentication you can access HPSS within batch scripts. Read More ...

  7. Data Transfer Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transfer Examples Data Transfer Examples Moving data to Projectb Projectb is where data should be written from jobs running on the cluster or Gpints. There are intermediate ...

  8. Hazardous constituent source term. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-17

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has several facilities that either generate and/or store transuranic (TRU)-waste from weapons program research and production. Much of this waste also contains hazardous waste constituents as regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Toxicity characteristic metals in the waste principally include lead, occurring in leaded rubber gloves and shielding. Other RCRA metals may occur as contaminants in pyrochemical salt, soil, debris, and sludge and solidified liquids, as well as in equipment resulting from decontamination and decommissioning activities. Volatile organic compounds (VOCS) contaminate many waste forms as a residue adsorbed on surfaces or occur in sludge and solidified liquids. Due to the presence of these hazardous constituents, applicable disposal regulations include land disposal restrictions established by Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The DOE plans to dispose of TRU-mixed waste from the weapons program in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by demonstrating no-migration of hazardous constituents. This paper documents the current technical basis for methodologies proposed to develop a post-closure RCRA hazardous constituent source term. For the purposes of demonstrating no-migration, the hazardous constituent source term is defined as the quantities of hazardous constituents that are available for transport after repository closure. Development of the source term is only one of several activities that will be involved in the no-migration demonstration. The demonstration will also include uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of contaminant transport.

  9. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Feedback Examples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Feedback Examples Example 74 8.2.3 Quality Improvement The focus of the quality improvement process is to reduce the variability of work processes that influence the quality of the products and services. Under the corrective action program, organizations have the authority to identify quality problems and to initiate, recommend, or provide solutions through designated channels. Management systems (e.g., root cause analysis, lessons learned) will be used to plan, implement, and evaluate

  10. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Execution Example

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Execution Example Example 73 6.3 Project Approach The overall schedule strategy for the PFP project includes ongoing minimum safe activities, combined with stabilization of materials followed by materials disposition, and subsequent transition of the PFP complex to a decommissioned state. The PFP material stabilization baseline was developed using a functionally-based work WBS. The WBS defines all activities required to take each material stream from their current location/conditions

  11. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Organization Examples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Organization Examples Example 8 4.0 PROJECT ORGANIZATION Chapter 4.0 describes the principle project organizations, including their responsibilities and relationships. Other organizations, that have an interest in the project, also are described. 4.1 Principal Project Organizations and Responsibilities The management organization for the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project represents a partnership between four principal project organizations responsible for the project. The four

  12. In-Situ, Real Time Measurement of Elemental Constituents | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In-Situ, Real Time Measurement of Elemental Constituents In-Situ, Real Time Measurement of Elemental Constituents New Laser System Provides Real-Time Measurements for Improved ...

  13. Fortran Example MUMPS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fortran Example MUMPS Fortran Example MUMPS C file dsimpletest.F C C This file is part of MUMPS 4.10.0 C To run: aprun -n 2 .dsimpletest < inputsimpletestreal C PROGRAM...

  14. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Therefore, only residual amounts of hydraulic oil, lubricating oils, saw coolants, and grease should remain in or on equipment. Example 14 4.4 Characterization Approach The 771774 ...

  15. Example Hopper Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    batch system must wait for the desired big memory nodes to become available. Running Hybrid MPIOpenMP Applications Hybrid MPIOpenMP Example: New Recommendations (recommended)...

  16. Apparatus for the field determination of concentration of radioactive constituents in a medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, R.W.; Schilk, A.J.; Warner, R.A.; Wogman, N.A.

    1995-08-15

    The instant invention is an apparatus for determining the concentration of radioactive constituents in a test sample; such as surface soils, via rapid real-time analyses, and direct readout on location utilizing a probe made up of multiple layers of detection material used in combination with an analyzer and real-time readout unit. This is accomplished by comparing the signal received from the probe, which can discriminate between types of radiation and energies with stored patterns that are based upon experimental results. This comparison can be used in the calibration of a readout display that reads out in real-time the concentrations of constituents per given volume. For example, the concentration of constituents such as Cs-137, Sr-90, U-238 in the soil, and noble gas radionuclides such as Kr-85 in the atmosphere, can be measured in real-time, on location, without the need for laboratory analysis of samples. 14 figs.

  17. Apparatus for the field determination of concentration of radioactive constituents in a medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard W.; Schilk, Alan J.; Warner, Ray A.; Wogman, Ned A.

    1995-01-01

    The instant invention is an apparatus for determining the concentration of radioactive constituents in a test sample; such as surface soils, via rapid real-time analyses, and direct readout on location utilizing a probe made up of multiple layers of detection material used in combination with an analyzer and real-time readout unit. This is accomplished by comparing the signal received from the probe, which can discriminate between types of radiation and energies with stored patterns that are based upon experimental results. This comparison can be used in the calibration of a readout display that reads out in real-time the concentrations of constituents per given volume. For example, the concentration of constituents such as Cs-137, Sr-90, U-238 in the soil, and noble gas radionuclides such as Kr-85 in the atmosphere, can be measured in real-time, on location, without the need for laboratory analysis of samples.

  18. Baryon Spectroscopy and the Constituent Quark Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.W. Thomas; R.D. Young

    2005-07-26

    We explore further the idea that the lattice QCD data for hadron properties in the region m[^2][_pi] > 0.2GeV^2 can be described by the constituent quark model. This leads to a natural explanation of the fact that nucleon excited states are generally stable for pion masses greater than their physical excitation energies. Finally, we apply these same ideas to the problem of how pentaquarks might behave in lattice QCD, with interesting conclusions.

  19. Example batch scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Example batch scripts Example batch scripts Access to the BurstBuffer resource is integrated with the Scheduler of the system (i.e. SLURM). The Scheduler provides the ability to provision the BurstBuffer resource to be shared by a set of users or jobs. Using the Burst Buffer on Cori Phase 1 can be as simple as adding a line to your slurm batch script. Here we give examples of how to use the Burst Buffer as a scratch space and as a persistent reservation, and how to stage data in and out of the

  20. Batch Script Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Batch Script Examples Batch Script Examples My First Script This is a simple example that you can use to make sure that your settings are correct before submitting more complicated jobs. First, copy the contents of hello.sh into a file. genepool% cat hello.sh #!/bin/bash sleep 120 echo "Hello World" Then submit your job with the qsub command genepool% qsub hello.sh Monitor your job with the qstat command: genepool% qs -u <username> You can also get more detailed information about

  1. C Example MUMPS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MUMPS C Example MUMPS /* * file c_example.c * This file is part of MUMPS 4.10.0 * To run: aprun -n 2 ./dsimpletest < input_simpletest_real */ /* Example program using the C interface to the * double real arithmetic version of MUMPS, dmumps_c. * We solve the system A x = RHS with * A = diag(1 2) and RHS = [1 4]^T * Solution is [1 2]^T */ #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #include "mpi.h" #include "dmumps_c.h" #define JOB_INIT -1 #define JOB_END -2 #define

  2. Monte Carlo Example Programs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-05-09

    The Monte Carlo example programs VARHATOM and DMCATOM are two small, simple FORTRAN programs that illustrate the use of the Monte Carlo Mathematical technique for calculating the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom.

  3. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Example 23 6.0 Project Execution 6.01 Work Specification and Planning with Safety ... All work will incorporate the core principles of Integrated Safety Management. 6.01.02 ...

  4. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Process Systems Evaluation Examples Example 17 Process Systems Evaluation This subject is an integral part of the hierarchical and checklist end points methods that are described elsewhere on this web site. In both cases there are steps to identify systems that must remain operational after a facility is deactivated, as well as spaces that must be accessible. These methods also address deciding which systems are no longer needed, and those considered for preservation for future decommissioning

  5. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Baselines - Performance Baseline Examples Example 34 6.0 PROJECT BASELINE This section presents a summary of the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project baseline, which was prepared by an inter- contractor team to support an accelerated planning case for the project. The project schedules and associated cost profiles presented in this section are compared to the currently approved project baseline, as contained in the Facility Stabilization Project Fiscal Year 1999 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP)

  6. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    End Point Closeout Examples Example 77 7.5 Endpoint Closure The endpoint documents have grouped the building spaces and systems into a number of manageable areas. The areas are closely related to the engineering work plans that guide completion of many of the endpoints. Endpoint closure methods and practices are provided in the attachment of this PMP. On completion of an endpoint, a BWHC field representative will initial complete on the field copy of the endpoint document. A BHI field

  7. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Stuart C.; Partin, Judy K.; Grandy, Jon D.; Jeffery, Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  8. Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Desert Arroyo Seepage Water | Department of Energy Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water (863.48 KB) More Documents &

  9. Principles and use of solidification/stabilization treatment for organic hazardous constituents in soil, sediment, and waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilk, C.M.

    2007-07-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) treatment involves mixing a binding reagent into contaminated media or waste. S/S treatment protects human health and the environment by immobilizing hazardous constituents within the treated material. S/S has been effective in treating a large variety of hazardous constituents in many different forms of waste and contaminated media. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified S/S as Best Demonstrated Available Treatment Technology (BDAT) for at least 50 commonly produced industrial hazardous wastes. EPA has selected S/S treatment for over 20% of its Superfund site source control remediation projects. Much of the published literature and actual treatment project experience has to do with treatment of inorganic hazardous constituents including radioactive materials. Radioactive wastes and environmental contaminants are often mixtures of inorganic and organic hazardous constituents. In recent years S/S is increasingly being used to address soil and sediment contaminated with organic hazardous constituents. Many of these remediation projects include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). The paper and presentation will discuss the chemical and physical mechanisms that can immobilize inorganic and organic hazardous constituents within S/S-treated material. The paper will also discuss examples of recent full-scale projects where S/S has been used to successfully treat organic hazardous constituent contaminated soil and sediment both in-situ and on excavated material. (authors)

  10. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Here are some sample job scripts that cover the most of the use cases on Edison. If you find anything that you need is missing, please let us know at consult at nersc dot gov. Note, Edison queue may still undergo configuration change as we gain more insight about how Slurm works with Edison workload. Basic Job Scripts #!/bin/bash -l #SBATCH -p regular #SBATCH -N 2 #SBATCH -t 04:00:00 #SBATCH -J my_job #SBATCH -o my_job.o%j #SBATCH -L SCRATCH,project

  11. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Sample Batch Scripts One of the most noted differences between the Hopper system and other NERSC systems is the number of cores per node is NOT a power of two. This means if you want to run a job on 32 cores, two nodes will be used and some cores will remain idle. Basic Batch Script This script uses the default 24 cores per node, (except on the remainder node when the number of cores requested is not a multiple of 24) #PBS -q debug #PBS -l

  12. LibSci Example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LibSci » LibSci Example LibSci Example ! Matrix-Matrix Multiply, AB = C using LibSci ScaLAPACK ! filename: test_scalapack.f90 ! compile: ftn -fast -o test_scalapack test_scalapack.f90 ! input: ABCp.dat ! prow number of rows in proc grid ! pcol number of columns in proc grid ! n number of rows/columns in matrix A ! nb matrix distribution block size ! oputput: fort.u, where u=10+processor number, and stdout implicit none integer :: n, nb ! problem size and block size integer :: myunit ! local

  13. Successes and failures of the constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Our approach considers the model as a possible bridge between QCD and the experimental data and examines its predictions to see where these succeed and where they fail. We also attempt to improve the model by looking for additional simple assumptions which give better fits to the experimental data. But we avoid complicated models with too many ad hoc assumptions and too many free parameters; these can fit everything but teach us nothing. We define our constituent quark model by analogy with the constituent electron model of the atom and the constituent nucleon model of the nucleus. In the same way that an atom is assumed to consist only of constituent electrons and a central Coulomb field and a nucleus is assumed to consist only of constituent nucleons hadrons are assumed to consist only of their constituent valence quarks with no bag, no glue, no ocean, nor other constituents. Although these constituent models are oversimplified and neglect other constituents we push them as far as we can. Atomic physics has photons and vacuum polarization as well as constituent electrons, but the constituent model is adequate for calculating most features of the spectrum when finer details like the Lamb shift are neglected. 54 references.

  14. EMN Framework Examples

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EMN Framework Examples Palo Alto, CA April 15, 2016 Neha Rustagi Technology Manager Fuel Cell Technologies Office | 2 New Material Innovations for Clean Energy 2X Faster and 2X Cheaper Predictive Simulation Across Scales Synthesis & Characterization Rapid Screening End Use Performance Process Scalability Process Control Real-time Characterization Reliability Validation Data Management & Informatics Coordinated resource network with a suite of capabilities for advanced materials R&D

  15. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. ); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. ); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. ); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexingt

    1992-11-01

    The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles What determines their composition Whether or not particles deposit How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

  16. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  17. Electromagnetic form factors and the hypercentral constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanctis, M. De; Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.

    2007-12-15

    We present new results concerning the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon using a relativistic version of the hypercentral constituent quark model and a relativistic current.

  18. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.

    2003-02-11

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with inorganic nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. The potential of the system will be illustrated and demonstrated by the example of biopolymer production on oil recovery.

  19. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Management Plan Examples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management Plan Examples The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The elements table below ...

  20. "Non-spectroscopic Method of Determining Gas Constituents through

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rotation; 13-2808-1, Optimization of Efficiency of Internal Combustion Engines via Using Spinning Gas ..--.. Inventors Nathaniel Fisch, Vasily Geyko | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Non-spectroscopic Method of Determining Gas Constituents through Rotation; 13-2808-1, Optimization of Efficiency of Internal Combustion Engines via Using Spinning Gas ..--.. Inventors Nathaniel Fisch, Vasily Geyko Method of determining gas constituents through rotation is based on different response of different

  1. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  2. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Closeout - Final Report Example

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Report Example Example 79 4.6.2.2.4.2 Closeout Reports Completion documentation will be compiled for each of the identified worksets. A final Closeout Report will be prepared for the 771/774 Closure Project when work is completed and the analytical data has been received. The report will consist of a brief description of the work that was completed, including any modifications or variations from the original decision document. The report will also include analytical results, including the

  3. Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J.; Herbst, R. Scott; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.

    2011-10-25

    Methods of using an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises contacting an adsorption medium with a feed stream comprising at least one constituent and removing the at least one constituent from the feed stream. The adsorption medium comprises a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) matrix and at least one metal hydroxide homogenously dispersed therein. The adsorption medium may comprise from approximately 15 wt % to approximately 90 wt % of the PAN and from approximately 10 wt % to approximately 85 wt % of the at least one metal hydroxide. The at least one metal hydroxide may be selected from the group consisting of ferric hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, lanthanum hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, titanium hydroxide, copper hydroxide, antimony hydroxide, and molybdenum hydroxide.

  4. HCP Example | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: HCP ExampleLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for...

  5. Project Management Plan Examples | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Examples Project Management Plan Examples Examples From Project Management Plans The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which ...

  6. Fortran MPI/OpenMP example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Retired Systems Hopper Running Jobs Using OpenMP with MPI Fortran MPIOpenMP example Fortran MPIOpenMP example Fortran MPIOpenMP Example program...

  7. Safety System Oversight Staffing Analysis - Example | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Staffing Analysis - Example Safety System Oversight Staffing Analysis - Example SSO Alternate Staffing Analysis - Example Filled Spreadsheet. (23 KB) More Documents & Publications ...

  8. Dynamics of pentaquarks in constituent quark models: recent developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancu, Fl.

    2005-06-14

    Some recent developments in the study of light and heavy pentaquarks are reviewed, mainly within constituent quark models. Emphasis is made on results obtained in the flavor-spin model where a nearly ideal octet-antidecuplet mixing is obtained. The charmed antisextet is reviewed in the context of an SU(4) classification.

  9. Method for verification of constituents of a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a method for validating a process stream for the presence or absence of a substance of interest such as a chemical warfare agent; that is, for verifying that a chemical warfare agent is present in an input line for feeding the agent into a reaction vessel for destruction, or, in a facility for producing commercial chemical products, that a constituent of the chemical warfare agent has not been substituted for the proper chemical compound. The method includes the steps of transmitting light through a sensor positioned in the feed line just before the chemical constituent in the input line enters the reaction vessel, measuring an optical spectrum of the chemical constituent from the light beam transmitted through it, and comparing the measured spectrum to a reference spectrum of the chemical agent and preferable also reference spectra of surrogates. A signal is given if the chemical agent is not entering a reaction vessel for destruction, or if a constituent of a chemical agent is added to a feed line in substitution of the proper chemical compound.

  10. Earth Day: Leading by Example

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We’re not just interested in talking the talk at the Energy Department, it’s important to us to walk the walk. To do that, we’re working every day across the country to make our operations more sustainable and efficient. Take these employees, for example.

  11. Examples of Cost Estimation Packages

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Estimates can be performed in a variety of ways. Some of these are for projects for an undefined scope, a conventional construction project, or where there is a level of effort required to complete the work. Examples of cost estimation packages for these types of projects are described in this appendix.

  12. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. ); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Beer, J.M. ); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. ); Shah, N.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P. )

    1991-09-01

    The technical objectives of this project are: (1) To define the partitioning of inorganic constituents associated with raw coal particles among products (including vapors, aerosols, and residual char/ash particles) formed under conditions representative of pulverized coal flames as a function of the specific (intrinsic and extrinsic) characteristics of the raw coal and the environment in which the transformations occur; and to characterize the resultant spectrum of products in detail. (2) To elucidate and quantify the fundamental processes (involving basic principles of physics, chemistry, thermodynamics) by which transformations of the inorganic constituents occur; and (3) to develop, based on the information required in (1) and (2), a tractable process'' model capable of predicting the significant features of the transformation process, most importantly, the nature and distribution of products. 26 refs., 151 figs., 51 tabs.

  13. The Effects of EGR and Its Constituents on the Autoignition of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EGR and Its Constituents on the Autoignition of Single- and Two-Stage Fuels The Effects of EGR and Its Constituents on the Autoignition of Single- and Two-Stage Fuels Presentation ...

  14. End Point Implementation Examples | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon End Point Implementation Examples More Documents & Publications Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 ...

  15. Distributed Generation Lead-by-Example Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State governments can lead by example by promoting renewable energy programs and policies. Efforts to lead by example include using renewable energy resources (including alternative fuel for...

  16. Analytical methods for removing radiological constituents prior to organic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakonson, K.; Monagle, M.; Cournoyer, M.

    1997-12-31

    Within the Department of Energy (DOE), there is a need to analyze mixed waste materials (i.e. materials that are contaminated with both radiological and hazardous components). As part of the technical support the Organic Analysis Group provides for programs within Los Alamos National Laboratory, methods are under development for radiologically contaminated oil samples being tested for polychlorinated biphenyls and other semivolatile constituents. Radionuclides are removed from oil samples by filtering the samples through a commercials available solid phase extraction cartridge. An aliquot of the eluent is then analyzed to quantitate the residual radioactivity.

  17. Microstructural analysis of martensite constituents in quenching and partitioning steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Petrov, R.H.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2014-06-01

    A methodology to distinguish martensite formed in the first quench (M1) from martensite formed in the second quench (M2) of the Quenching and Partitioning process is presented, enabling the study of the structural characteristics of both microstructural constituents. Investigations show that M1 displays larger block size and less lattice imperfections than M2, differences that can be related to their respective carbon contents. - Highlights: • An approach to distinguish “old” from “new” martensite in Q and P steels is presented • Methodology allows separate characterization of microstructure and crystallography “Old” martensite has larger block size and more perfect lattice than the “new” one • The differences between the old and new martensite depend on their carbon contents.

  18. Kinetic calculations of explosives with slow-burning constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, W.M.; Souers, P.C.; Pried, L.E.

    1997-07-01

    The equilibrium thermochemical code CHEETAH V 1.40 has been modified to detonate part of the explosive and binder. An Einstein thermal description of the unreacted constituents is used, and the Einstein temperature may be increased to reduce heat absorption. We study the effect of the reactivity and thermal transport on the detonation velocity. Hydroxy-terminated-polybutadiene binders have low energy and density and would degrade the detonation velocity if they burned. Runs with unburned binder are closer to the measured values. Aluminum and ammonium Perchlorate are also largely unburned within the sonic reaction zone that determines the detonation velocity. All three materials appear not to fully absorb heat as well. The normal assumption of total reaction in a thermochemical code is clearly not true for these special cases, where the detonation velocities have widely different values for different combinations of processes.

  19. Examples of Wind Energy Curtailment Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.; Fink, S.; Porter, K.

    2010-07-01

    This report addresses examples of wind energy curtailment practices internationally and in regions across the United States.

  20. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 1, sections 1--5: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A.; Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M.; Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A.

    1992-11-01

    The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles? What determines their composition? Whether or not particles deposit? How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes? remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

  1. IRC Budget Proposal spreadsheet example | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IRC Budget Proposal spreadsheet example IRC Budget Proposal spreadsheet example An example budget proposal for NEUP Integrated Research Project. Example Budget spreadsheet ...

  2. Constituent quark scaling violation due to baryon number transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlop J. C.; Lisa, M.A., Sorensen, P.

    2011-10-31

    In ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx} 200 GeV, the azimuthal emission anisotropy of hadrons with low and intermediate transverse momentum (p{sub T} {approx}< 4 GeV/c) displays an intriguing scaling. In particular, the baryon (meson) emission patterns are consistent with a scenario in which a bulk medium of flowing quarks coalesces into three-quark (two-quark) 'bags.' While a full understanding of this number-of-constituent-quark (NCQ) scaling remains elusive, it is suggestive of a thermalized bulk system characterized by colored dynamical degrees of freedom - a quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In this scenario, one expects the scaling to break down as the central energy density is reduced below the QGP formation threshold; for this reason, NCQ-scaling violation searches are of interest in the energy scan program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. However, as {radical}s{sub NN} is reduced, it is not only the initial energy density that changes; there is also an increase in the net baryon number at midrapidity, as stopping transports entrance-channel partons to midrapidity. This phenomenon can result in violations of simple NCQ scaling. Still in the context of the quark coalescence model, we describe a specific pattern for the breakdown of the scaling that includes different flow strengths for particles and their antipartners. Related complications in the search for recently suggested exotic phenomena are also discussed.

  3. Templates and Examples — Preparing Test Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities.

  4. Templates and Examples — Recruiting Participants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities.

  5. Templates and Examples — Analysis and Reporting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities.

  6. Templates and Examples - Preparing Test Materials | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. Facilitator script - Includes introductory script, pre- and...

  7. Example Cost Codes for Construction Projects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides an example outline of cost items and their corresponding cost codes that may be used for construction projects.

  8. Templates and Examples — Planning Your Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities.

  9. S-wave QQqq state in the constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Youchang; Deng Chengrong; Ping Jialun; Goldman, T.

    2009-12-01

    Many proposals have been put forward to explore four-quark states QQqq (Q=s, c, b; q=u, d) by experiment, so a systematic study of QQqq spectrum with different constituent quark models by a high precision, few-body method, the Gaussian expression method, is useful. Three quark models: the Bhaduri, Cohler, Nogami quark model, the chiral quark model (ChQM), and the quark delocalization color screening model are all employed for a systematic calculation of the S-wave QQqq spectrum with different color structures, using the Gaussian expression method. The results show that only the bbqq state with (I,J)=(0,1) is bound in different color structures within the different quark models. The binding energy varies from several MeV for a di-meson structure to over 100 MeV for a diquark-antidiquark structure. For the ccqq system, the state with (I,J)=(0,1) is bound in a di-meson structure, and also bound in a diquark-antidiquark structure if pseudoscalar meson exchanges are accounted for. All are weakly bound states. The mixture of diquark-antidiquark and molecular structures is discussed in the framework of quark models for the first time; ccqq with (I,J)=(0,1) is below the threshold in addition to bbqq in both the ChQM and the Bhaduri, Cohler, Nogami quark model. In the same channel, ssqq is also a possible bound state with mass around 1.4 GeV in ChQM.

  10. Templates and Examples — Survey Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  11. Templates and Examples — Tree Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  12. Templates and Examples — Measurable Goals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  13. Example of Environmental Restoration Code of Accounts

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter describes the fundamental structure of an example remediation cost code system, lists and describes the Level 1 cost codes, and lists the Level 2 and Level 3 cost codes.

  14. Leading By Example | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    By Example Leading By Example November 3, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department’s headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department's headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department Brian Costlow Director, Office of Administration Brian Costlow has won several awards for his work recently,

  15. Method and apparatus for the removal of bioconversion of constituents of organic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Timothy; Scott, Charles D.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the removal or conversion of constituents from bulk organic liquids. A countercurrent biphasic bioreactor system is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the constituent. Two transient, high-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the constituent to produce a product which is then removed from the bioreactor in the aqueous phase or retained in the organic phase. The organic liquid, now free of the original constituents, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

  16. Method and apparatus for the removal or bioconversion of constituents of organic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.; Scott, C.D.

    1994-10-25

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the removal or conversion of constituents from bulk organic liquids. A countercurrent biphasic bioreactor system is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the constituent. Two transient, high-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the constituent to produce a product which is then removed from the bioreactor in the aqueous phase or retained in the organic phase. The organic liquid, now free of the original constituents, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 1 fig.

  17. Program Evaluation: Examples of Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources » Program Evaluation: Examples of Results Program Evaluation: Examples of Results EERE offices have a history of doing evaluation studies. This page highlights selected examples of evaluation results from EERE reviews and studies. Eleven examples are provided for the following three types of evaluations. In-progress peer review example Example 1: Hydrogen program peer review Baseline assessment example Example 2: Hydrogen program completed a 2004 hydrogen baseline

  18. Tutorial examples for uncertainty quantification methods.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Bord, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    This report details the work accomplished during my 2015 SULI summer internship at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. During this internship, I worked on multiple tasks with the common goal of making uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods more accessible to the general scientific community. As part of my work, I created a comprehensive numerical integration example to incorporate into the user manual of a UQ software package. Further, I developed examples involving heat transfer through a window to incorporate into tutorial lectures that serve as an introduction to UQ methods.

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF LEACHXS/ORCHESTRA CAPABILITIES BY SIMULATING CONSTITUENT RELEASE FROM A CEMENTITIOUS WASTE FORM IN A REINFORCED CONCRETE VAULT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Meeussen, J.; Sloot, H.

    2010-03-31

    The objective of the work described in this report is to demonstrate the capabilities of the current version of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for simulating chemical behavior and constituent release processes in a range of applications that are relevant to the CBP. This report illustrates the use of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for the following applications: (1) Comparing model and experimental results for leaching tests for a range of cementitious materials including cement mortars, grout, stabilized waste, and concrete. The leaching test data includes liquid-solid partitioning as a function of pH and release rates based on laboratory column, monolith, and field testing. (2) Modeling chemical speciation of constituents in cementitious materials, including liquid-solid partitioning and release rates. (3) Evaluating uncertainty in model predictions based on uncertainty in underlying composition, thermodynamic, and transport characteristics. (4) Generating predominance diagrams to evaluate predicted chemical changes as a result of material aging using the example of exposure to atmospheric conditions. (5) Modeling coupled geochemical speciation and diffusion in a three layer system consisting of a layer of Saltstone, a concrete barrier, and a layer of soil in contact with air. The simulations show developing concentration fronts over a time period of 1000 years. (6) Modeling sulfate attack and cracking due to ettringite formation. A detailed example for this case is provided in a separate article by the authors (Sarkar et al. 2010). Finally, based on the computed results, the sensitive input parameters for this type of modeling are identified and discussed. The chemical speciation behavior of substances is calculated for a batch system and also in combination with transport and within a three layer system. This includes release from a barrier to the surrounding soil as a function of time. As input for the simulations, the physical and chemical properties of the

  20. Methods of removing a constituent from a feed stream using adsorption media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J.; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.; Herbst, Ronald S.

    2011-05-24

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  1. Fortran MPI/OpenMP example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting Started Configuration Programming Running Jobs Overview Interactive Jobs Batch Jobs Example Batch Scripts Using aprun Queues and Policies Monitoring Jobs Using OpenMP with MPI Memory Considerations Runtime Tuning Options Running Large Scale Jobs Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Completed Jobs How Usage Is Charged File Storage and I/O Software and Tools Debugging and profiling Performance and Optimization Cray XE Documentation Cluster Compatibility Mode Hopper, Cray XE6 Carver Jesup

  2. DYNA3D example problem manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovejoy, S.C.; Whirley, R.G.

    1990-10-10

    This manual describes in detail the solution of ten example problems using the explicit nonlinear finite element code DYNA3D. The sample problems include solid, shell, and beam element types, and a variety of linear and nonlinear material models. For each example, there is first an engineering description of the physical problem to be studied. Next, the analytical techniques incorporated in the model are discussed and key features of DYNA3D are highlighted. INGRID commands used to generate the mesh are listed, and sample plots from the DYNA3D analysis are given. Finally, there is a description of the TAURUS post-processing commands used to generate the plots of the solution. This set of example problems is useful in verifying the installation of DYNA3D on a new computer system. In addition, these documented analyses illustrate the application of DYNA3D to a variety of engineering problems, and thus this manual should be helpful to new analysts getting started with DYNA3D. 7 refs., 56 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Modeling of constituent redistribution in U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G. L.; Hayes, S. L.; Yacout, A. M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; INL

    2006-12-01

    A computer model was developed to analyze constituent redistribution in U-Pu-Zr metallic nuclear fuels. Diffusion and thermochemical properties were parametrically determined to fit the postirradiation data from a fuel test performed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The computer model was used to estimate redistribution profiles of fuels proposed for the conceptual designs of small modular fast reactors. The model results showed that the level of redistribution of the fuel constituents of the designs was similar to the measured data from EBR-II.

  4. Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

    1984-02-22

    A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentrations at regions of interest within the object.

  5. Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gold, Raymond; McElroy, William N.

    1986-01-01

    A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentration at regions of interest within the object.

  6. 2010-05 "Interim Measure for Volatile Organic Constituent Contaminant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Source Removal in MAD-L and MDA-G" | Department of Energy 5 "Interim Measure for Volatile Organic Constituent Contaminant Source Removal in MAD-L and MDA-G" 2010-05 "Interim Measure for Volatile Organic Constituent Contaminant Source Removal in MAD-L and MDA-G" The intent of this recommendation is to remove large volumes of liquid waste VOCs from the ground and to prevent these contaminants from moving into the groundwater or to the atmosphere. The NNMCAB recognizes

  7. Devices and methods for managing noncombustible gasses in nuclear power plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marquino, Wayne; Moen, Stephan C; Wachowiak, Richard M; Gels, John L; Diaz-Quiroz, Jesus; Burns, Jr., John C

    2014-12-23

    Systems passively eliminate noncondensable gasses from facilities susceptible to damage from combustion of built-up noncondensable gasses, such as H2 and O2 in nuclear power plants, without the need for external power and/or moving parts. Systems include catalyst plates installed in a lower header of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) condenser, a catalyst packing member, and/or a catalyst coating on an interior surface of a condensation tube of the PCCS condenser or an annular outlet of the PCCS condenser. Structures may have surfaces or hydrophobic elements that inhibit water formation and promote contact with the noncondensable gas. Noncondensable gasses in a nuclear power plant are eliminated by installing and using the systems individually or in combination. An operating pressure of the PCCS condenser may be increased to facilitate recombination of noncondensable gasses therein.

  8. Energy Efficiency Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lead-by-Example Resources Energy Efficiency Lead-by-Example Resources State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations. Find energy efficiency lead-by-example resources below. DOE Resource Federal Energy Management Program Publications. Other Resources Environmental Protection Agency: Lead by Example in Government Operations ACEEE's Lead By Example Initiatives National Governors

  9. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technical Baseline Development and Control Examples Example 40 5.0 PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL The Project Management and Control section provides an overview of the project ...

  10. Property:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExample | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    issionDevelopmentStrategiesExample Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExample&oldid326472...

  11. Property:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExamples | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sionDevelopmentStrategiesExamples Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExamples&oldid323715...

  12. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Examples Example 59 6.03.12 Environmental and Waste Management Deactivation activities will be performed in compliance with the requirements of WSRC 3Q, ...

  13. User:Nlangle/Migration Example | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Migration Example < User:Nlangle Jump to: navigation, search Example code for using a categorization technique to migrate pages when Special:ReplaceText exceeds maximum (1000...

  14. Building Standards Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standards Lead-by-Example Resources Building Standards Lead-by-Example Resources State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations. Find building standards lead-by-example resources below. DOE Resource National Best Practices Manual For Building High Performance Schools. Other Resource Roadmap to Green Government Buildings

  15. Customer Messages for Specific Markets: Examples from JEA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents examples of various types of marketing materials and strategies used by Jacksonville, Florida.

  16. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Program Progress with Examples Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples Better Buildings Residential Network: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples (544.53 KB) More Documents & Publications Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides Optional Residential

  17. Effects of Constituent Properties on Performance Improvement of a Quenching and Partitioning Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Taylor, Mark D.; De Moor, Emmanuel; Speer, John; Matlock, David K.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of material parameters of the constituent phases on the macroscopic tensile behavior of Q&P steel and then to do a computational materials design approach for its performance improvement. For this purpose, a model Q&P steel is first produced and various experiments are then performed to characterize the steel. Actual microstructure-based model is generated based on the information from EBSD, SEM and nano-indentation test, and the material properties for the constituent phases are determined based on the initial constituents’ properties from HEXRD test and the subsequent calibration of model prediction to tensile test results. Influence of various material parameters of the constituents on the macroscopic behaviors is then investigated by separately adjusting them by small amount. Based on the observation on the respective influence of constituents’ material parameters, a new set of material parameters are devised, which results in better performance in ductility. The results indicate that various material parameters may need to be concurrently adjusted in a cohesive way in order to improve the performance of Q&P steel. In summary, higher austenite stability, less strength difference between the phases, higher hardening exponents of the phases are generally beneficial for the performance improvement. The information from this study can be used to devise new Q&P heat-treating parameters to produce the Q&P steels with better performance.

  18. Simple Example of Backtest Overfitting (SEBO)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-01-06

    In the field of mathematical finance, a "backtest" is the usage of historical market data to assess the performance of a proposed trading strategy. It is a relatively simple matter for a present-day computer system to explore thousands, millions or even billions of variations of a proposed strategy, and pick the best performing variant as the "optimal" strategy "in sample" (i.e., on the input dataset). Unfortunately, such an "optimal" strategy often performs very poorly "outmore » of sample" (i.e. on another dataset), because the parameters of the invest strategy have been oversit to the in-sample data, a situation known as "backtest overfitting". While the mathematics of backtest overfitting has been examined in several recent theoretical studies, here we pursue a more tangible analysis of this problem, in the form of an online simulator tool. Given a input random walk time series, the tool develops an "optimal" variant of a simple strategy by exhaustively exploring all integer parameter values among a handful of parameters. That "optimal" strategy is overfit, since by definition a random walk is unpredictable. Then the tool tests the resulting "optimal" strategy on a second random walk time series. In most runs using our online tool, the "optimal" strategy derived from the first time series performs poorly on the second time series, demonstrating how hard it is not to overfit a backtest. We offer this online tool, "Simple Example of Backtest Overfitting (SEBO)", to facilitate further research in this area.« less

  19. Integral quantizations with two basic examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, H.; Gazeau, J.P.

    2014-05-15

    The paper concerns integral quantization, a procedure based on operator-valued measure and resolution of the identity. We insist on covariance properties in the important case where group representation theory is involved. We also insist on the inherent probabilistic aspects of this classicalquantum map. The approach includes and generalizes coherent state quantization. Two applications based on group representation are carried out. The first one concerns the WeylHeisenberg group and the euclidean plane viewed as the corresponding phase space. We show that a world of quantizations exist, which yield the canonical commutation rule and the usual quantum spectrum of the harmonic oscillator. The second one concerns the affine group of the real line and gives rise to an interesting regularization of the dilation origin in the half-plane viewed as the corresponding phase space. -- Highlights: Original approach to quantization based on (positive) operator-valued measures. Includes BerezinKlauderToeplitz and WeylWigner quantizations. Infinitely many such quantizations produce canonical commutation rule. Set of objects to be quantized is enlarged in order to include singular functions or distributions. Are given illuminating examples like quantum angle and affine or wavelet quantization.

  20. Effects of fine particulate matter and its constituents on low birth weight among full-term infants in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Rupa; Harris, Maria; Sie, Lillian; Malig, Brian; Broadwin, Rachel; Green, Rochelle

    2014-01-15

    Relationships between prenatal exposure to fine particles (PM{sub 2.5}) and birth weight have been observed previously. Few studies have investigated specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, which may identify sources and major contributors of risk. We examined the effects of trimester and full gestational prenatal exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and 23 PM{sub 2.5} constituents on birth weight among 646,296 term births in California between 2000 and 2006. We used linear and logistic regression models to assess associations between exposures and birth weight and risk of low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g), respectively. Models were adjusted for individual demographic characteristics, apparent temperature, month and year of birth, region, and socioeconomic indicators. Higher full gestational exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and several PM{sub 2.5} constituents were significantly associated with reductions in term birth weight. The largest reductions in birth weight were associated with exposure to vanadium, sulfur, sulfate, iron, elemental carbon, titanium, manganese, bromine, ammonium, zinc, and copper. Several of these PM{sub 2.5} constituents were associated with increased risk of term LBW. Reductions in birth weight were generally larger among younger mothers and varied by race/ethnicity. Exposure to specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, especially traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals, were associated with decreased birth weight in California. -- Highlights: Examine full gestational and trimester fine particle and its constituents on term birth weight. Fine particles and several of its constituents associated with birth weight reductions. Largest reductions for traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals. Greater birth weight reductions for younger mothers, and varied by race/ethnicity.

  1. An Alternative Treatment of Trace Chemical Constituents in Calculated Chemical Source Terms for Hanford Tank Farms Safety Analsyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, James L.

    2006-09-26

    Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank accident analyses require chemical waste toxicity source terms to assess potential accident consequences. Recent reviews of the current methodology used to generate source terms and the need to periodically update the sources terms has brought scrutiny to the manner in which trace waste constituents are included in the source terms. This report examines the importance of trace constituents to the chemical waste source terms, which are calculated as sums of fractions (SOFs), and recommends three changes to the manner in which trace constituents are included in the calculation SOFs.

  2. Bureau of Land Management - Examples of FONSIs | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FONSIs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - Examples of FONSIs Abstract This web page contains examples of...

  3. User Experience Research Templates and Examples | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Templates and Examples User Experience Research Templates and Examples The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable (EERE) has custom templates and specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities for EERE websites and applications. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them. For more information on the usability techniques associated with these templates, see EERE's Usability and Analysis

  4. Retrofit Program Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retrofit Program Lead-by-Example Resources Retrofit Program Lead-by-Example Resources State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations. Find retrofit program lead-by-example resources below. Local Government Climate and Energy Strategy Series: Energy Efficiency in Local Government Operations: A Guide to Developing and Implementing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Programs ACEEE: Comprehensive

  5. Procurement Standards Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procurement Standards Lead-by-Example Resources Procurement Standards Lead-by-Example Resources State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations. Find procurement standards lead-by-example resources below. DOE Resource Energy-Efficient Product Procurement. Other Resources ENERGY STAR®: All Certified Products New York State Energy Research and Development Authority: Procurement

  6. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  7. Shock temperature as a criterion for the detonability of LNG/LPG constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michels, H.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology); Rashidi, F. )

    1992-12-01

    Detonation limit data obtained at ambient conditions for some aliphatic LNG/LNG constituents with oxygen and nitrogen (air) have been analyzed in search of a single critical parameter for detonation propagation. It was established the shock, rather than C-J reaction temperatures, provides a firm basis for marginal detonability prediction and that, furthermore, classical reaction mechanisms and relatively simple calculation methods can be used for their reliable evaluation. In this paper the result is used to formulate a criterion, for predicting composition limits to detonation. For the systems investigated, this criterion is accurate to within approximately 0.2% for fuel-lean and around 1% for fuel-rich mixtures.

  8. Study in use and management of de/anti-icing constituents with regard to new storm water legislation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, D.P.; Willing, B.L.

    1992-09-01

    This research identified management practices of airfield and aircraft de/anti-icing constituents which may be implemented to deal with new storm water legislation. Storm water regulations require that deicing operations obtain a NPDES permit for discharges into storm water runoff which may mandate the use of Best Management Practices. An FAA civilian airport survey and a USAF survey were used, with a literature search, to identify practices of de/anti-icing constituents. Four major constituents are used-glycol, urea, calcium magnesium acetate, and sodium formate. Concerns of uncontrolled release of the constituents include high BOD rates, nitrate and nitrite enrichment, impaired aesthetic water quality, ammonia formation from the degradation of urea, and the toxicity of such chemicals to aquatic life. Several options that exist for managing the runoff of de/anti-icing constituents include alternative constituents such as potassium acetate; alternative application procedures such as centralized facilities and greater use of anti-icing operations; collection alternatives using porous surface materials, drainage systems, and holding tanks; and treatment alternatives such as a mobile recovery unit to recycle deicing fluids for re-use.... Aircraft, Runways, Deicing systems, Deicing materials, Runoff, Water pollution, Urea, Glycols, Biochemical oxygen demand.

  9. User Experience Research Templates and Examples: Card Sorting | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy User Experience Research Templates and Examples: Card Sorting User Experience Research Templates and Examples: Card Sorting User experience research templates and examples for card sorting. Card list for an EERE office remote sort (15.78 KB) Card list (11.2 KB) More Documents & Publications Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint References AIRMaster+ Software Tool Brochure MotorMaster+ Software Tool Brochure

  10. Zero Energy Ready Home Certificate Examples | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certificate Examples Zero Energy Ready Home Certificate Examples These certificates are printed from RESNET Accredited Software, examples from REM/Rate and from EnergyGauge. Remrate Cert.pdf (138.35 KB) More Documents & Publications 2016 U.S. Department of Energy Race to Zero Student Design Competition Guide Review of Selected Home Energy Auditing Tools Overview of Existing Home Energy Labels

  11. Example USFS Preliminary Section 4(e) Report | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4(e) Report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Personal Communication: Example USFS Preliminary Section 4(e) Report Abstract This letter...

  12. LOPP Formal Request for Development Example | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Material Abstract Example LOPP Formal Request for Development letter. Author Bureau of Reclamation Published Department of Interior, 2014 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  13. LOPP Federal Register Example Document | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GuidanceSupplemental Material Abstract Example LOPP federal register notice. Author Bureau of Reclamation Published Department of Interior, 2015 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  14. Design example: wedge stepping motor. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design example: wedge stepping motor. No ... presentation at the Sandia MEMS Advanced Design Short Course held July 19, 2008 in ...

  15. Design example : torsional micromirror. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design example : torsional micromirror. No ... presentation at the Sandia MEMS Advanced Design Short Course held July 19, 2005 in ...

  16. Example Cleanup: Removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Hillside...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Example Cleanup Removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Hillside 140 Removing the source is one of three defenses in depth, as illustrated at the PCB removal from Hillside 140. ...

  17. Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Scoping Reports | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Scoping ReportsPermittingRegulatory GuidanceSupplemental Material...

  18. Montana Sand and Gravel Operations General Permit - Example Authorizat...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: Montana Sand and Gravel Operations General Permit - Example AuthorizationPermitting...

  19. Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Decision Records | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BLM, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Decision Records Citation BLM....

  20. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples (544.53 KB) More Documents & Publications Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress ...

  1. Optical methods and systems for detecting a constituent in a gas containing oxygen in harsh environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Michael A.; Sirinakis, George

    2011-01-04

    A method for detecting a gas phase constituent such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen, or hydrocarbons in a gas comprising oxygen such as air, includes providing a sensing material or film having a metal embedded in a catalytically active matrix such as gold embedded in a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix. The method may include annealing the sensing material at about 900.degree. C., exposing the sensing material and gas to a temperature above 400.degree. C., projecting light onto the sensing material, and detecting a change in the absorption spectrum of the sensing material due to the exposure of the sensing material to the gas in air at the temperature which causes a chemical reaction in the sensing material compared to the absorption spectrum of the sensing material in the absence of the gas. Systems employing such a method are also disclosed.

  2. Templates and Examples — Customer Profiles and Personas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  3. Templates and Examples — Statistics and Search Log Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  4. Templates and Examples — Interviews and Focus Groups

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  5. Method and apparatus for maintaining condensable constituents of a gas in a vapor phase during sample transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2010-05-18

    A system for fluid transport at elevated temperatures having a conduit having a fluid inlet end and a fluid outlet end and at least one heating element disposed within the conduit providing direct heating of a fluid flowing through the conduit. The system is particularly suited for preventing condensable constituents of a high temperature fluid from condensing out of the fluid prior to analysis of the fluid. In addition, operation of the system so as to prevent the condensable constituents from condensing out of the fluid surprisingly does not alter the composition of the fluid.

  6. Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services as Part of an ESPC Investment-Grade Audit Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC Investment-Grade Audit Document offers a ...

  7. Utility Cost Calculation Example? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utility Rate Allandaly's picture Submitted by Allandaly(24) Member 13 May, 2014 - 10:59 Hi again, Thank you for your help so far. Do you have an example function that you can post...

  8. Integrated HCP/EA Example | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Integrated HCPEA ExampleLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2104 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online...

  9. Microsoft Word - Appendix B - Example Contact Record.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Example Contact Record This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Operations Guide July 2013 Doc. No. S03037-6.0 Page B-1 Rocky Flats Site...

  10. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation Plan Project Scope and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plan Project Scope and Objectives Examples Example 6 2.3 MISSION OBJECTIVES Stabilization of plutonium-bearing materials and deactivation/dismantlement of the PFP Complex will result in the virtual elimination of the hazards and risks associated with the facility and will greatly reduce the costs of safe, secure S&M. Using the lessons learned from deactivation projects across the DOE Complex, further improvement on previously applied deactivation methods is anticipated. The major mission

  11. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation to Decommissioning Transition

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Decommissioning Transition Example Example 80 1.5 OPERATIONAL TRANSITION AND DEACTIVATION STRATEGY According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), the life cycle of a facility makes several transitions over the course of it's existence. The typical stages or phases include operation, (standby), deactivation, S&M, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The life cycle phases may occur as a straight through process or with long

  12. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Configuration Control Examples Example 38 7.05 Configuration Management Plan Configuration Management activities for this project will be carried out using a graded approach, consistent with the guidance in Reference #20. The CM Actions listed in Appendix B of Reference #20 will be carried out as follows: Action 1 - Develop System Boundaries This action will not be performed because the intended End State of 322-M is that all systems will be deactivated and all utility services that were

  13. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Metrics Examples Example 42 5.1.4 Performance Measurement and Reporting The subproject manager will communicate subproject technical issues and accomplishments, schedule performance, cost and schedule issues, and corrective action plans, as appropriate, in the Project Directors' weekly 'Path Forward' meeting. However, the primary performance measurement for reporting subproject performance is provided by the performance measurement system. Within the new common database containing core

  14. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    S&M Plan Examples Example 44 5.0 SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE 5.01 Current S&M Requirements Currently, the heavy water facility is performing operational maintenance and surveillances as dictated by outside and inside facility operating rounds, facility operating procedures, facility maintenance procedures, facility alarm response procedures, and any additional surveillance and maintenance required by SFSD and SRS administrative programs and policies. As the facility progresses through

  15. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Communication and Stakeholder Involvement Plan Examples Example 49 10.0 COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT The transition of B Plant is a critical element in Hanford's mission of environmental management. The B Plant Transition Project Management Team have made a commitment to open communications throughout transition because effective communications and public involvement are critical success factors for the project. Communications must be living and dynamic, responding to accomplishments

  16. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Training and Qualification Plan Examples Example 66 8.2.2 Personnel Training and Qualification The Personnel Training and Qualification program is being established as defined by laws, DOE Orders, and company directives to ensure that personnel are trained and qualified to perform assigned tasks. The training and qualification program develops personnel proficiency commensurate with the scope, complexity, and nature of an assigned activity. Management is responsible for developing staff position

  17. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare and Issue Project Plan Documents

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Issue Project Plan Documents Example Example 70 5.2 Information and Reporting Management reporting provides timely and accurate data to apprise BWHC, FDH, and DOE management of current and projected project conditions. Information contained in these reports is obtained from the same database that supports day-to-day management by BWHC. 5.2.1 Project Status Report Reporting for the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project is incorporated in the monthly PSR, prepared by BWHC for

  18. Supporting Leadership by Example in States | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    » Competitive Financial Assistance » Supporting Leadership by Example in States Supporting Leadership by Example in States In the fall of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competitively awarded $7.9 million through its State Energy Program to help states launch projects intended to serve as exemplary programs leading the way to energy savings. Under this initiative, 13 states (Arizona, Hawaii, Iowa, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, New

  19. Method for verification of constituents of a process stream just as they go through an inlet of a reaction vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, Lewis C.; Buchanan, Bruce R.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1995-01-01

    A method for validating a process stream for the presence or absence of a substance of interest such as a chemical warfare agent; that is, for verifying that a chemical warfare agent is present in an input line for feeding the agent into a reaction vessel for destruction, or, in a facility for producing commercial chemical products, that a constituent of the chemical warfare agent has not been substituted for the proper chemical compound. The method includes the steps of transmitting light through a sensor positioned in the feed line just before the chemical constituent in the input line enters the reaction vessel, measuring an optical spectrum of the chemical constituent from the light beam transmitted through it, and comparing the measured spectrum to a reference spectrum of the chemical agent and preferably also reference spectra of surrogates. A signal is given if the chemical agent is not entering a reaction vessel for destruction, or if a constituent of a chemical agent is added to a feed line in substitution of the proper chemical compound.

  20. Autoignition response of n-butanol and its blend with primary reference fuel constituents of gasoline.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumar, Kamal; Zhang, Yu; Sung, Chi -Jen; Pitz, William J.

    2015-04-13

    We study the influence of blending n-butanol on the ignition delay times of n-heptane and iso-octane, the primary reference fuels for gasoline. The ignition delay times are measured using a rapid compression machine, with an emphasis on the low-to-intermediate temperature conditions. The experiments are conducted at equivalence ratios of 0.4 and 1.0, for a compressed pressure of 20 bar, with the temperatures at the end of compression ranging from 613 K to 979 K. The effect of n-butanol addition on the development of the two-stage ignition characteristics for the two primary reference fuels is also examined. The experimental results aremore » compared to predictions obtained using a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism, which has been obtained by a systematic merger of previously reported base models for the combustion of the individual fuel constituents. In conclusion, a sensitivity analysis on the base, and the merged models, is also performed to understand the dependence of autoignition delay times on the model parameters.« less

  1. Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

  2. Terrestrial fate of coal-liquid constituents: behavior of alkyl anilines in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felice, L.J.; Zachara, J.M.; Rogers, J.E.

    1982-07-01

    The low molecular weight aromatic amines (anilines) are important water soluble constituents of coal liquids. The impact of anilines released to the terrestrial environment will largely depend on their mobility and persistence. Studies were conducted to investigate those processes governing the mobility and persistence of the alkylanilines, namely, soil sorption and chemical/microbial degradation. Soil sorption measurements were conducted on aniline and several methyl substituted anilines on A and B horizons of a soil profile collected from Davies County, Kentucky. The magnitude of sorption was large in all horizons. Sorption in the B horizons was larger than in the A horizon for many of the anilines studied, indicating the importance of both the mineral matrix and organic carbon content of the soil in determining the magnitude of sorption. Results of these measurements indicate that movement of the anilines through the soil would be significantly attenuated by sorption reactions. Aniline sorption measurement in the A horizon after removal of the organic matter and in the B/sub 22/ horizon after removal of amorphous iron oxides and crystalline iron oxides indicate that organic matter largely controls aniline sorption in the A horizon, while crystalline iron oxides and phyllosilicates are important in the B horizons. The effects of pH on aniline sorption was also examined and shown to have significant effects on the magnitude of sorption in both A and B horizons. Soil degradation studies using /sup 14/C-3-methylaniline as a model for alkyl aniline degradation show that 3-methylaniline is readily metabolized by soil microorganisms during the 32-day period examined.

  3. Stability of SiC-Matrix Microencapsulated Fuel Constituents at Relevant LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt A; Katoh, Yutai; Leonard, Keith J; Perez-Bergquist, Alex G; Silva, Chinthaka M; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses certain key feasibility issues facing the application of SiC-matrix microencapsulated fuels for light water reactor application. Issues addressed are the irradiation stability of the SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix under LWR-relevant irradiation conditions, the presence or extent of reaction of the SiC matrix with zirconium-based cladding, the stability of the inner and outer pyrolytic graphite layers of the microencapsulated (TRISO) particle at this uncharacteristically low irradiation temperature, and the state of the particle-matrix interface following irradiation which could possibly effect thermal transport. In the process of determining these feasibility issues microstructural evolution and change in dimension and thermal conductivity was studied. As a general finding the SiC matrix was found to be quite stable with behavior similar to that of CVD SiC. In magnitude the irradiation-induced swelling of the matrix material was slightly higher and irradiation-degraded thermal conductivity was slightly lower as compared to CVD SiC. No significant reaction of this SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix material with Zircaloy was observed. Irradiation of the TRISO in the 320-360 C range to a maximum dose of 7.7 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) did not have significant negative impact on the constituent layers of the TRISO fuel. At the highest dose studied layer structure and interface integrity remained essentially unchanged with good apparent thermal transport through the microsphere to the surrounding matrix.

  4. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Quality Assurance Plan Examples Example 64 8.3 QUALITY ASSURANCE This section describes policies and procedures that will be used to meet QA program objectives. This section also develops the strategies PFP will use to ensure the S&M of the PFP inventory, the material stabilization project, the deactivation project, and the dismantlement of the PFP Complex buildings and are completed in a high quality manner. 8.3.1 QA Program The QA program for the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project

  5. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  6. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  7. Examples of OSUR Assisted Projects | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Auburn University California State at San Marcos Columbia University Prairie View A&M University Texas A&M University U. of West Virginia Contact OSUR Program Organization Contact Us Science Education Outreach Efforts Graduate Programs Off Site University Research (OSUR) Purpose PPPL Scientific and Engineering Capabilities Examples of OSUR Assisted Projects Auburn University California State at San Marcos Columbia University Prairie View A&M University Texas A&M University U. of

  8. Example Cleanup: Removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Hillside 140

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Example Cleanup Removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Hillside 140 Removing the source is one of three defenses in depth, as illustrated at the PCB removal from Hillside 140. August 1, 2013 Men vacuuming PCB contamination from Hillside 140 using large pipes and pullies Vacuuming PCB contamination from Hillside 140 Water and sediment is sampled periodically for contaminants. If PCB waste is present, it is shipped to licensed disposal facilities. Two cleanups of radioactive materials were

  9. Caused? A Monsoon Example: India Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    issue: What is a Monsoon? How are Monsoons Caused? A Monsoon Example: India Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment Definitions Activity About ARM: The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a U.S. Department of Energy scientific user facility for the study of global climate change. As part of its outreach program, ARM provides education resources for students, teachers, and communities. www.arm.gov EDUCATION NEWS Monsoons: Bring on the Rain Imagine weeks of hot, dry heat,

  10. Alteration of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash focusing on the evolution of iron-rich constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Yunmei; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Takahashi, Fumitake

    2011-09-15

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash contains a considerable amount of Fe-rich constituents. The behaviors of these constituents, such as dissolution and precipitation, are quite important as they regulate the distribution of a series of ions between the liquid (percolated fluid) and solid (ash deposit) phases. This paper studied both fresh and weathered MSWI bottom ash from the mineralogical and geochemical viewpoint by utilizing optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX), and powder X-ray diffraction. The analysis results revealed that for the fresh bottom ash, iron preferentially existed in the chemical forms of spinel group (mainly Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and a series of Al- or Ti- substituted varieties), metallic inclusions (including Fe-P, Fe-S, Fe-Cu-Pb), hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and unburned iron pieces. In the 1-20 years weathered bottom ash collected from a landfill site, interconversions among these Fe-rich constituents were identified. Consequently, numerous secondary products were developed, including goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH), hematite, magnetite, wustite (FeO), Fe-Si-rich gel phase. Of all these transformation products, hydrous iron oxides were the most common secondary minerals. Quantitative chemical analysis of these secondary products by SEM/EDX disclosed a strong association between the newly formed hydrous iron oxides and heavy metals (e.g. Pb, Zn, Ni, and Cu). The results of this study suggest that the processes of natural weathering and secondary mineralization contribute to reduction of the potential risks of heavy metals to the surrounding environments.

  11. Modeling Constituent Redistribution in U-Pu-Zr Metallic Fuel Using the Advanced Fuel Performance Code BISON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Porter; Steve Hayes; Various

    2014-06-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) metallic fuels currently being tested have higher zirconium and plutonium concentrations than those tested in the past in EBR reactors. Current metal fuel performance codes have limitations and deficiencies in predicting AFC fuel performance, particularly in the modeling of constituent distribution. No fully validated code exists due to sparse data and unknown modeling parameters. Our primary objective is to develop an initial analysis tool by incorporating state-of-the-art knowledge, constitutive models and properties of AFC metal fuels into the MOOSE/BISON (1) framework in order to analyze AFC metallic fuel tests.

  12. High Q{sup 2} behavior of the electromagnetic form factors in the relativistic hypercentral constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.; Giannini, M. M.; De Sanctis, M.

    2010-12-15

    The ratio R{sub p} between the electric and magnetic proton form factors has been recently measured at Jefferson Lab up to Q{sup 2}=8.5 GeV{sup 2}. We have extended the calculation of the nucleon form factors with the hypercentral constituent quark model and compared them with the data on R{sub p} and on the Q{sup 2} behavior of the ratio Q{sup 2}F{sub 2}/F{sub 1}. In both cases, the theoretical curves agree with the experimental points.

  13. Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector Better Buildings Neighborhood...

  14. Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector Better Buildings Neighborhood ...

  15. Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, S.; Goff, F.

    1997-04-01

    The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.

  16. COLLOQUIUM: Extreme Global Warming: Examples from the Past | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab April 16, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Extreme Global Warming: Examples from the Past Professor Mark Pagani Yale University Earth's climate 50 million years ago was the warmest time of the Cenozoic and characterized by expansive high-latitude warmth and low meridional temperature gradients. Starting at about 55 million years ago, a series of rapid and extreme carbon-induced global warming events, known as hyperthermals, are evident. This presentation

  17. Public Private R&D Partnerships Examples

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public-Private R&D Partnerships Examples Pete Devlin DOE Hydrogen Program Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy July 14, 2005 Washington, DC 2 Public/Private R&D Partnerships * DoD ManTech * SemaTech * Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) * FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership * Photovoltaic (PV) Manufacturing 3 4 SECA: Making Fuels Cells a Reality 2011 - 2015 * SECA fuel cells available for FutureGen 2020 * MW-Scale SECA fuel cells for Advanced Coal Power Plants

  18. Work plan for preliminary investigation of organic constituents in ground water at the New Rifle site, Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    A special study screening for Appendix 9 (40 CFR Part 264) analytes identified the New Rifle site as a target for additional screening for organic constituents. Because of this recommendation and the findings in a recent independent technical review, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) perform a preliminary investigation of the potential presence of organic compounds in the ground water at the New Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, Rifle, Colorado. From 1958 to 1972, organic chemicals were used in large quantities during ore processing at the New Rifle site, and it is possible that some fraction was released to the environment. Therefore, the primary objective of this investigation is to determine whether organic chemicals used at the milling facility are present in the ground water. The purpose of this document is to describe the work that will be performed and the procedures that will be followed during installation of ground water well points at the New Rifle site. The selection of analytes and the procedures for collecting ground water samples for analysis of organic constituents are also described.

  19. Peer Exchange Call Series: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples.

  20. Lessons & Examples for Establishing Partnerships Between Grantees & Financial Institutions (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript of the webinar, "Lessons & Examples for Establishing Partnerships Between Grantees & Financial Institutions."

  1. Energy Data Management Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Management Lead-by-Example Resources Energy Data Management Lead-by-Example Resources State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations. Find energy data management lead-by-example resources below. State and Local Solution Center: Energy Data Management and Evaluation

  2. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  3. Several organic parameters on underlying hazardous constituents list can not be measured at the universal treatment standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, H.C.

    1998-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has several permitted treatment, storage and disposal facilities. The INEEL Sample Management Office (SMO) conducts all analysis subcontracting activities for Department of Energy Environmental Management programs at the INEEL. In this role, the INEEL SMO has had the opportunity to subcontract the analyses of various wastes (including ash from an interim status incinerator) requesting a target analyte list equivalent to the constituents listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations. These analyses are required to ensure that treated wastes do not contain underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) at concentrations greater than the universal treatment standards (UTS) prior to land disposal. The INEEL SMO has conducted a good-faith effort by negotiating with several commercial laboratories to identify the lowest possible quantitation and detection limits that can be achieved for the organic UHC analytes. The results of this negotiating effort has been the discovery that no single laboratory (currently under subcontract with the INEEL SMO) can achieve a detection level that is within an order of magnitude of the UTS for all organic parameters on a clean sample matrix (e.g., sand). This does not mean that there is no laboratory that can achieve the order of magnitude requirements for all organic UHCs on a clean sample matrix. The negotiations held to date indicate that it is likely that no laboratory can achieve the order of magnitude requirements for a difficult sample matrix (e.g., an incinerator ash). The authors suggest that the regulation needs to be revised to address the disparity between what is achievable in the laboratory and the regulatory levels required by the UTS.

  4. Notional Examples and Benchmark Aspects Of a Resilient Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig. G. Rieger

    2010-08-01

    Digital control system technology has pervaded most industries, leading to improvements in the efficiency and reliability of the associated operations. However, the ease of distributing and connecting related control systems for the purposes of increasing performance has resulted in interdependencies that can lead to unexpected conditions. Even with less complex designs, operators and engineers alike are often left with competing goals that are difficult to resolve. A fundamental reason for this dichotomy is that responsibilities lie with different disciplines, and operations are hosted on separate control systems. In addition, with the rising awareness of cyber security and diverse human interactions with control systems, an understanding of human actions from a malicious and benevolent standpoint is necessary. Resilience considers the multiple facets of requirements that drive the performance of control systems in a holistic fashion, whether they are security or stability, stability or efficiency, human interactions or complex interdependencies. As will be shown by example, current research philosophies lack the depth or the focus on the control system application to satisfy these requirements, such as graceful degradation of hierarchical control while under cyber attack. A resilient control system promises to purposefully consider these diverse requirements, developing an adaptive capacity to complex events that can lead to failure of traditional control system designs.

  5. UTIS as one example of standardization of subsea intervention systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugen, F.G.

    1995-12-31

    The number of diverless subsea interventions has increased dramatically during the last few years. A number of types of tools and equipment have been designed and used. A typical procedure has been to develop new intervention tools under each new contract based on experience from the previous project. This is not at all optimal with regard to project cost and risk, and is no longer acceptable as the oil industry now calls for cost savings within all areas of field development. One answer to the problem will be to develop universal intervention systems with the capability to perform a range of related tasks, with only minor, planned modifications of the system. This philosophy will dramatically reduce planning, engineering, construction and interface work related to the intervention operation as the main work will be only to locate a standardized landing facility on the subsea structure. The operating procedures can be taken ``off the shelf``. To adapt to this philosophy within the tie-in area, KOS decided to standardize on a Universal Tie-In System (UTIS), which will be included in a Tool Pool for rental world-wide. This paper describes UTIS as a typical example of standardization of subsea intervention systems. 16 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Example Work Domain Analysis for a Reference Sodium Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugo, Jacques; Oxstrand, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear industry is currently designing and building a new generation of reactors that will include different structural, functional, and environmental aspects, all of which are likely to have a significant impact on the way these plants are operated. In order to meet economic and safety objectives, these new reactors will all use advanced technologies to some extent, including new materials and advanced digital instrumentation and control systems. New technologies will affect not only operational strategies, but will also require a new approach to how functions are allocated to humans or machines to ensure optimal performance. Uncertainty about the effect of large scale changes in plant design will remain until sound technical bases are developed for new operational concepts and strategies. Up-to-date models and guidance are required for the development of operational concepts for complex socio-technical systems. This report describes how the classical Work Domain Analysis method was adapted to develop operational concept frameworks for new plants. This adaptation of the method is better able to deal with the uncertainty and incomplete information typical of first-of-a-kind designs. Practical examples are provided of the systematic application of the method in the operational analysis of sodium-cooled reactors. Insights from this application and its utility are reviewed and arguments for the formal adoption of Work Domain Analysis as a value-added part of the Systems Engineering process are presented.

  7. Seismic expressions of Monterey Formation diagenesis: examples from offshore California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, M.B.

    1988-03-01

    Diagenesis of the diatomaceous rocks in the Monterey Formation in California coastal and offshore basins involves changes from amorphous biogenic silica to a stable crystalline quartz facies. In the intermediate stage, the transformation undergoes passage from the Opal-A to the Opal-CT phase. Associated with this diagenetic process is a marked increase in bulk densities between the different silica phases, owing to loss of porosity from compaction and solution recrystallization caused by increase in burial load and other physical factors. The sharp density contrast between the silica phases is manifested by an acoustic impedance boundary that may be expressed on seismic records. This seismic event can be distinct and independent of structural configuration, and in many places cuts through stratigraphic boundaries. Several examples of seismic records from offshore California demonstrate the diagenetically caused reflection cutting through Monterey and post-Monterey formations. Current and future exploration efforts in offshore California will continue to center on the widespread Monterey Formation. In addition to being the main source rock, the Monterey is also the reservoir rock. Recent discoveries indicate that oil production is mainly from the highly permeable, fractured, silica-rich sections. It is therefore important to recognize the diagenetic boundaries on seismic records and to delineate the more brittle quartz-rich facies where the reservoir quality is expected to be better than the intermediate Opal-A or Opal-CT facies. Furthermore, these boundaries could also provide good diagenetic traps off the flanks of structures where updip unaltered impermeable rocks hinder fluid migration.

  8. Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, Marcus Bianchi

    2010-08-01

    This document provides an example procedure for establishing acceptance-range criteria to assess results from software undergoing BESTEST-EX. This example method for BESTEST-EX is a modified version of the method described in HERS BESTEST.

  9. Operations and Maintenance Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operations and Maintenance Lead-by-Example Resources Operations and Maintenance Lead-by-Example Resources State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations. Find operations and maintenance lead-by-example resources below. DOE Resource Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency Other Resource School Operations and Maintenance: Best Practices

  10. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.; Mansure, A.J.

    1997-08-26

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recovery, transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products. 7 figs.

  11. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spates, James J.; Martin, Stephen J.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal mircrobalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recover transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products.

  12. Compilation of data to estimate groundwater migration potential for constituents in active liquid discharges at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, L.L.; Serne, R.J.

    1991-03-01

    A preliminary characterization of the constituents present in the 33 liquid waste streams at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has been completed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. In addition, Westinghouse Hanford has summarized the soil characteristics based on drill logs collected at each site that receives these liquid wastes. Literature searches were conducted and available Hanford-specific data were tabulated and reviewed. General literature on organic chemicals present in the liquid waste streams was also reviewed. Using all of this information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a best estimate of the transport characteristics (water solubility and soil adsorption properties) for those radionuclides and inorganic and organic chemicals identified in the various waste streams. We assume that the potential for transport is qualified through the four geochemical parameters: solubility, distribution coefficient, persistence (radiogenic or biochemical half-life), and volatility. Summary tables of these parameters are presented for more than 50 inorganic and radioactive species and more than 50 organic compounds identified in the liquid waste streams. Brief descriptions of the chemical characteristics of Hanford sediments, solubility, and adsorption processes, and of how geochemical parameters are used to estimate migration in groundwater-sediment environments are also presented. Groundwater monitoring data are tabulated for wells neighboring the facilities that receive the liquid wastes. 91 refs., 16 figs., 23 tabs.

  13. Reconstruction of the constituent distribution and trends in the Antarctic polar vortex from ER-2 flight observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoeberl, M.R.; Lait, L.R. ); Newman, P.A.; Martin, R.L. ); Proffitt, M.H. ); Hartmann, D.L. ); Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J.; Strahan, S.E.; Chan, K.R. ); Anderson, J. ); Gary, B. )

    1989-11-30

    Ozone, chlorine monoxide, and nitrous oxide concentrations have been measured in the south polar region. These measurements have been analyzed using conservative coordinate transformations to potential temperature-N{sub 2}O and potential temperature-potential vorticity space. The latter transformation is equivalent to interpreting trace species observations within the modified Lagrangian mean (MLM) coordinate system. The analysis shows that the MLM transformed ozone concentration decreases at about 0.06 ppmv (parts per million by volume) per day between 20 and 16 km altitude inside the polar vortex during the mid-August to mid-September period. These ozone changes must be chemical in origin; they are also collocated with the region of high CIO. Outside the CPR (chemically perturbed region) at the highest aircraft altitudes, ozone systematically increases, suggesting a diabatic cooling of the order of 0.3-0.6 K/d. Within the CPR the cooling rate appears to be less than 0.2 K/d. The MLM analysis technique creates a picture of the general chemical structure of the Austral polar vortex which shows that air deep within the chemically perturbed region has subsided substantially in relation to the air outside. However, there is also a tongue of high ozone air which extends from mid-latitudes downward along the stratospheric jet at 65{degree}W and 60{degree}S. An examination of the last three flight days, September 20-22, 1987, shows that during this period the polar vortex shifts systematically equatorward along the Antarctic Peninsula. Apparent changes in the constituents measured over this period result from sampling air progressively further into the vortex.

  14. UML and SOA Overview with Example Applications to the xLPR V.2 Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Hilda B; Williams, Paul T; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2013-09-01

    This document presents an overview of the Unified Modeling Language and the Service Oriented Architecture with real examples from the xLPR V2.0 project.

  15. In-Situ, Real-Time Measurement of Melt Constituents in the Aluminum, Glass, and Steel Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert De Saro

    2006-05-18

    Energy Research Company (ERCo), with support from DOE’s Industrial Technologies Program, Sensors and Automation has developed a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) probe to measure, in real time and in-situ, the composition of an aluminum melt in a furnace at an industrial plant. The compositional data is provided to the operator continuously allowing the operator to adjust the melt composition, saving energy, increasing production, and maintaining tighter compositional tolerances than has been previously possible. The overall objectives of this project were to: -- design, develop, fabricate, test and project future costs of the LIBS probe on bench-size experiments; - test the unit in a pilot-scaled aluminum furnace under varying operating conditions of temperature and melt constituents; -- determine the instruments needed for use in industrial environment; -- compare LIBS Probe data to readings traditionally taken on the furnace; -- get full-scale data to resolve if, and how, the LIBS Probe design should be modified for operator acceptance. Extensive laboratory tests have proven the concept feasibility. Elemental concentrations below 0.1% wt. have been accurately measured. Further, the LIBS system has now been installed and is operating at a Commonwealth Aluminum plant in Ohio. The technology is crosscutting as it can be used in a wide variety of applications. In the Sensors and Automation Program the application was for the secondary aluminum industry. However, this project spawned a number of other applications, which are also reported here for completeness. The project was effective in that two commercial systems are now operating; one at Commonwealth Aluminum and another at a PPG fiberglass plant. Other commercial installations are being negotiated as of this writing. This project led to the following conclusions: 1. The LIBS System has been developed for industrial applications. This is the first time this has been accomplished. In addition, two

  16. Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector, May 10, 2012: A discussion of business models and case examples for working with the real estate sector. Call Slides and Discussion Summary, May 10, 2012.

  17. ACML Example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    totPEs, ierr ) allocate(dpset(totPEs)) C all processors working from the same random sequence, same seed seed(1) 1234 call drandinitialize(naggen,1,seed,1,state1,statesize,info)...

  18. TCMS Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BPA - Firm NT BPA Direct Connect Load Figure 2 BPA - Secondary NT BPA Figure 3 3 rd Party - Firm PTP BPA - NT (Firm or Secondary) BPA 3 rd Party Transferor Transfer Load Figure 5...

  19. GSL Example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Need Help? Out-of-hours Status and Password help Call operations: 1-800-66-NERSC, option 1 ...

  20. Example Viewgraph

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U N C L A S S I F I E D Approved for Unlimited Release LA-UR-07-2575 1 JSB APR 2007 Overview of the LANL Verification and Validation Program Salishan Conference on High-Speed Computing - April 2007 Jerry S. Brock, Ph.D. Code & Calculation Verification Project Leader (jsbrock@lanl.gov) Scott W. Doebling, Ph.D. Verification & Validation Program Manager (doebling@lanl.gov) U N C L A S S I F I E D U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA 2 JSB

  1. Leading by Example on Climate Change: Our New Federal Sustainability Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy by Example on Climate Change: Our New Federal Sustainability Plan Leading by Example on Climate Change: Our New Federal Sustainability Plan March 19, 2015 - 3:15pm Addthis Leading by Example on Climate Change: Our New Federal Sustainability Plan Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Gina McCarthy Gina McCarthy Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Denise Turner Roth Denise Turner Roth Acting Administrator of the U.S. General Services

  2. From Lab to Market: Examples of Clean Energy R&D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    From Lab to Market: Examples of Clean Energy R&D From Lab to Market: Examples of Clean Energy R&D From Lab to Market: Examples of Clean Energy R&D Research and development (R&D) is the unsung hero of American innovation. Government-funded R&D spurs new industries, creates jobs and helps us tackle our greatest challenges. Decades ago, that challenge was the space race; today, it is climate change. Clean energy has never been cheaper. That's a direct result of technological

  3. Apps for Vehicles: What are some examples of vehicle data applications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps for Vehicles: What are some examples of vehicle data applications? Home > Groups > Developer Submitted by JessicaLyman on 7 December, 2012 - 09:08 1 answer Points: 1 *...

  4. Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Non-LUP Prep Plan or...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Non-LUP Prep Plan or EIS Prep Plan Abstract This page links to...

  5. Example Program and Makefile for BG/Q | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Overview of How to Compile and Link Example Program and Makefile for BG/Q How to Manage Threading bgclang Compiler Compiling and Linking FAQ Queueing & Running Jobs Data Transfer Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Software & Libraries IBM References Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Example Program and Makefile for BG/Q

  6. July 27 Webinar to Explore Tribal Project Development Path and Examples |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy July 27 Webinar to Explore Tribal Project Development Path and Examples July 27 Webinar to Explore Tribal Project Development Path and Examples July 22, 2016 - 9:28am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy, in partnership with Western Area Power Administration, is pleased to present a webinar titled "Project Development for Long Term Tribal Energy" on Wednesday, July 27, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. This

  7. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility-scale PV Solar Market | Department of Energy Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market February 9, 2015 - 12:01am Addthis In 2011, LPO issued loan guarantees to the first 5 PV projects larger than 100 MW in the U.S. An additional 17 projects have been financed since without loan guarantees. In 2011, LPO issued loan

  8. Selected heavy metals and other constituents in soil and stormwater runoff at the Interstate 95 interchange near Atlee, Virginia, April 1993--May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speiran, G.K.

    1998-12-31

    Concentrations of the heavy metals copper, lead, and zinc, and other constituents, were measured in soil and runoff before and after construction of a stormwater detention basin at the Interstate 95-State Route 656 interchange near Atlee, VA, from April 1993 through May 1997. The spatial and vertical distribution of heavy metals in soil indicate that the paved traffic lanes of the interstate highway are a source of the metals. Concentrations of the metals in soil decrease with increasing soil depth below the ground surface and with increasing distance from the highway lanes. Of the three metals for which samples were analyzed, lead was generally present at the greatest concentration, and copper was at the lowest concentration in the soil.

  9. Identification of nevadensin as an important herb-based constituent inhibiting estragole bioactivation and physiology-based biokinetic modeling of its possible in vivo effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alhusainy, W.; Paini, A.; Punt, A.; Louisse, J.; Spenkelink, A.; Vervoort, J.; Delatour, T.; Scholz, G.; Schilter, B.; Adams, T.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2010-06-01

    Estragole is a natural constituent of several herbs and spices including sweet basil. In rodent bioassays, estragole induces hepatomas, an effect ascribed to estragole bioactivation to 1'-sulfooxyestragole resulting in DNA adduct formation. The present paper identifies nevadensin as a basil constituent able to inhibit DNA adduct formation in rat hepatocytes exposed to the proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole and nevadensin. This inhibition occurs at the level of sulfotransferase (SULT)-mediated bioactivation of 1'-hydroxyestragole. The Ki for SULT inhibition by nevadensin was 4 nM in male rat and human liver fractions. Furthermore, nevadensin up to 20 {mu}M did not inhibit 1'-hydroxyestragole detoxification by glucuronidation and oxidation. The inhibition of SULT by nevadensin was incorporated into the recently developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) rat and human models for estragole bioactivation and detoxification. The results predict that co-administration of estragole at a level inducing hepatic tumors in vivo (50 mg/kg bw) with nevadensin at a molar ratio of 0.06, representing the ratio of their occurrence in basil, results in almost 100% inhibition of the ultimate carcinogen 1'-sulfooxyestragole when assuming 100% uptake of nevadensin. Assuming 1% uptake, inhibition would still amount to more than 83%. Altogether these data point at a nevadensin-mediated inhibition of the formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of estragole, without reducing the capacity to detoxify 1'-hydroxyestragole via glucuronidation or oxidation. These data also point at a potential reduction of the cancer risk when estragole exposure occurs within a food matrix containing SULT inhibitors compared to what is observed upon exposure to pure estragole.

  10. Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CommRE) program, which is a more than $20 million effort funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, to promote investment in clean energy solutions and provide real-life examples for other local governments, campuses, and small utilities to replicate. Five community-based renewable energy projects received funding from DOE through the CommRE and their progress is detailed.

  11. Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Guide for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Benchmarking Residential Program Progress with Examples Current State of Affairs  Each program makes independent decisions on how to collect, transfer, store and analyze program data.  Regulatory and organizational oversight also specify what data to track and measure.  The intended purpose is achieved  Aggregating program results within a state, region or nation is difficult because of different:  Definitions  Data collection and transfer efforts  Program costs

  12. Chapter 9: Enabling Capabilities for Science and Energy | Examples and Case Studies Supplemental Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Examples and Case Studies Chapter 9: Enabling Capabilities for Science and Energy Introduction Basic science expands our understanding of the natural world and provides the foundational knowledge upon which the energy technologies of the future are based. In some instances, a scientific discovery can obviate technical hurdles to broader implementation of existing technologies; in others, it can be the catalyst for a completely new suite of technologies. The scientific discoveries described in

  13. Largest Ever Wind Power Commitments Sets Clean Energy Example for Nation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'Largest Ever' Wind Power Commitments Sets Clean Energy Example for Nation NEWS MEDIA CONTACTS: Christopher Powers, DOE, 303-275-4742 Media Relations, Public Service Co., 303-294-8900 Denver, Colo., Apr. 27, 2000 - In a ceremony today attended by several hundred Federal government employees, Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson announced the largest ever commitment to purchase electricity generated by the wind. Federal government agencies along the Colorado Front Range have committed to the

  14. Seismic expression of structural features on Landsat lineaments: an example from Denver basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.; Jenkins, J.T. Jr.; Likarish, D.M.

    1985-02-01

    Lineaments interpreted from Landsat images mark the location and trend of basement faults observed on seismic lines in the eastern Denver basin. Linear features mapped as tone and texture patterns on multispectral scanner images in northeastern Colorado and southwestern Nebraska are used to interpret regional lineaments. Individual linear features up to 25 mi (40 km) long and visible on both bands 5 and 7 define a grid of regional lineaments trending northeast and northwest. Comparisons of lineaments with aeromagnetic and gravity maps and with interpretations of basement geology suggest that lineaments are the boundaries of basement blocks with areas of about 1000 mi/sup 2/ (2590 km/sup 2/). Constituent linear features within the lineament zone probably mark boundaries of smaller blocks of about 50 mi/sup 2/ (130 km/sup 2/). Seismic lines in northeastern Sedgwick County in extreme northeastern Colorado cross linear features that are components of a broad regional lineament that trends northeast and parallels the South Platte River. Seismic data consist of a grid of about 100 mi (160 km) of multifold Vibroseis lines. Basement faults, generally with offsets of less than 100 ft (30 m), are observed in seismic lines that cross some individual linear features. Monoclines and faults are present in Pennsylvanian to Tertiary strata that overlie basement. A time-structure map on the Precambrian and an isochron map of Wolfcamp (Lower Permian) to Precambrian show that the lineament is a 7-mi (11-km) wide zone of small, downdropped basement blocks. Thickening of Permian-Pennsylvanian strata on the downthrown side of faults suggests tectonic activity. Further tectonic activity is indicated by listric faulting in the Cretaceous Niobrara Formation.

  15. Light hadron spectra in the constituent quark model with the Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa-'t Hooft effective U {sub A} (1) symmetry breaking interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dmitrasinovic, V. . E-mail: dmitrasin@yahoo.com; Toki, H.

    2006-02-15

    We make a critical comparison of several versions of instanton-induced interactions present in the literature, all based on ITEP group's extension to three colours and flavours of 't Hooft's effective lagrangian, with the predictions of the phenomenological Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa (KKM) chiral quark lagrangian. We analyze the effects of all versions of the effective U {sub A} (1) symmetry breaking interactions on light hadron spectra in the non-relativistic constituent quark model. We show that the KKMT force, when used as a residual hyperfine interaction reproduces the correct ordering of pseudoscalar and vector mesons even without explicitly taking chiral symmetry into account. Moreover, the nucleon spectra are also correctly reproduced, only the Roper resonance remains too high, albeit lower than usual, at 1660 MeV. The latter's lower than expected mass is not due to a small excitation energy, as in the Glozman-Riska (GR) model, but to a combination of colour, flavour, and spatial wave function properties that enhance the relevant matrix elements. The KKMT interaction explicitly depends on flavour and spin of the quarks, but unlike the GR flavour-spin one it has a firm footing in QCD. In the process we provide several technical advances, in particular we show the first explicit derivation of the three-body Fierz transformation and apply it to the KKM interaction. We also discuss the ambiguities associated with the colour degree of freedom.

  16. Example process hazard analysis of a Department of Energy water chlorination process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    On February 24, 1992, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released a revised version of Section 29 Code of Federal Regulations CFR Part 1910 that added Section 1910.119, entitled ``Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (the PSM Rule). Because US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 5480.4 and 5483.1A prescribe OSHA 29 CFR 1910 as a standard in DOE, the PSM Rule is mandatory in the DOE complex. A major element in the PSM Rule is the process hazard analysis (PrHA), which is required for all chemical processes covered by the PSM Rule. The PrHA element of the PSM Rule requires the selection and application of appropriate hazard analysis methods to systematically identify hazards and potential accident scenarios associated with processes involving highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs). The analysis in this report is an example PrHA performed to meet the requirements of the PSM Rule. The PrHA method used in this example is the hazard and operability (HAZOP) study, and the process studied is the new Hanford 300-Area Water Treatment Facility chlorination process, which is currently in the design stage. The HAZOP study was conducted on May 18--21, 1993, by a team from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Battelle-Columbus, the DOE, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The chlorination process was chosen as the example process because it is common to many DOE sites, and because quantities of chlorine at those sites generally exceed the OSHA threshold quantities (TQs).

  17. Comprehensive Report For Proposed Elevated Temperature Elastic Perfectly Plastic (EPP) Code Cases Representative Example Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg L. Hollinger

    2014-06-01

    Background: The current rules in the nuclear section of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code , Section III, Subsection NH for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above 1200F (650C)1. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (E-PP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures. The proposed rules for strain limits and creep-fatigue evaluation were initially documented in the technical literature 2, 3, and have been recently revised to incorporate comments and simplify their application. The revised code cases have been developed. Task Objectives: The goal of the Sample Problem task is to exercise these code cases through example problems to demonstrate their feasibility and, also, to identify potential corrections and improvements should problems be encountered. This will provide input to the development of technical background documents for consideration by the applicable B&PV committees considering these code cases for approval. This task has been performed by Hollinger and Pease of Becht Engineering Co., Inc., Nuclear Services Division and a report detailing the results of the E-PP analyses conducted on example problems per the procedures of the E-PP strain limits and creep-fatigue draft code cases is enclosed as Enclosure 1. Conclusions: The feasibility of the application of the E-PP code cases has been demonstrated through example problems that consist of realistic geometry (a nozzle attached to a semi-hemispheric shell with a circumferential weld) and load (pressure; pipe reaction load applied at the end of the nozzle, including axial and shear forces, bending and torsional moments; through-wall transient temperature gradient) and design and operating conditions (Levels A, B and C).

  18. Research Support Facility Data Center: An Example of Best Practices Implementation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure details the design and operations of the Research Support Facility (RSF) data center. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world-renowned for its commitment to green building construction. To further this commitment to green building and leading by example, NREL included an ultra-energy-efficient data center in the laboratory's new Research Support Facility (RSF), which recently received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design{reg_sign} (LEED) Platinum designation from the U.S. Green Building Council.

  19. Impact Evaluation Framework for Technology Deployment Programs: An Overview and Example

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Overview and Example John H. Reed Innovologie LLC Gretchen Jordan Sandia National Laboratories Edward Vine Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July 2007 IMPACT EVALUATION FRAMEWORK FOR TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAMS An ap pro ach fo r q u anti fyi ng ret ro sp ect ive en erg y savin gs, cl ean en erg y ad van ces, an d m ark et eff ect s Introduction and Background The document briefly describes a framework for evaluating the "ret- rospective" impact of technology deployment

  20. Solvable Examples of Drift and Diffusion of Ions in Non-uniform Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahn, Robert; Cahn, Robert N.; Jackson, John David

    2008-05-30

    The drift and diffusion of a cloud of ions in a fluid are distorted by an inhomogeneous electric field. If the electric field carries the center of the distribution in a straight line and the field configuration is suitably symmetric, the distortion can be calculated analytically. We examine the specific examples of fields with cylindrical and spherical symmetry in detail assuming the ion distributions to be of a generally Gaussian form. The effects of differing diffusion coefficients in the transverse and longitudinal directions are included.

  1. A relativistic constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlumpf, F.

    1993-08-01

    We investigate the predictive power of a relativistic quark model formulated on the light-front. The nucleon electromagnetic form factors, the semileptonic weak decays of the hyperons and the magnetic moments of both baryon octet and decuplet are calculated and found to be in excellent agreement with experiment.

  2. Remarkable waxing, waning, and wandering of populations of Mimulus guttatus: An unexpected example of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickery, R.K. Jr.

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the dynamics of a meta-population of Mimulus guttatus. Changes in size and location of 16 original populations and the new populations established in their vicinities in Big Cottonwood Canyon, Salt Lake county, Utah, were observed for 25 yr. Twenty-three new populations appeared. Seven original populations and 13 new populations had become extinct by the end of the observation period in 1996. Many populations died out and were reestablished, often repeatedly, during the observation period. Altogether there were 54 population disappearances and 34 reappearances. Many populations changed size as much as 100-fold or more from year to year. There were spectacular examples of populations expanding to fill newly available, large habitats. Frequent extinctions were due overwhelmingly to the canyon drying trend, which led to the drying up of most Mill D North drainage springs, creeks, and ponds. Precipitation and minimum temperatures increased moderately during the observation period. The growing season lengthened almost 50%, a typical consequence of global warming. The drying trend, lengthened growing season, and disappearance of Mimulus populations in Big Cottonwood Canyon appear to be a clear, local example of global warming.

  3. Market leadership by example: Government sector energy efficiency in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Harris, Jeffrey; Breceda, Miguel; Campbell, Stephanie; Sachu, Constantine; della Cava, Mirka; Gonzalez Martinez, Jose; Meyer, Sarah; Romo, Ana Margarita

    2002-05-20

    Government facilities and services are often the largest energy users and major purchasers of energy-using equipment within a country. In developing as well as industrial countries, government ''leadership by example'' can be a powerful force to shift the market toward energy efficiency, complementing other elements of a national energy efficiency strategy. Benefits from more efficient energy management in government facilities and operations include lower government energy bills, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, less demand on electric utility systems, and in many cases reduced dependence on imported oil. Even more significantly, the government sector's buying power and example to others can generate broader demand for energy-efficient products and services, creating entry markets for domestic suppliers and stimulating competition in providing high-efficiency products and services. Despite these benefits, with the exception of a few countries government sector actions have often lagged behind other energy efficiency policies. This is especially true in developing countries and transition economies - even though energy used by public agencies in these countries may represent at least as large a share of total energy use as the public sector in industrial economies. This paper summarizes work in progress to inventory current programs and policies for government sector energy efficiency in developing countries, and describes successful case studies from Mexico's implementation of energy management in the public sector. We show how these policies in Mexico, begun at the federal level, have more recently been extended to state and local agencies, and consider the applicability of this model to other developing countries.

  4. Interplay between parity-time symmetry, supersymmetry, and nonlinearity: An analytically tractable case example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Cuevas–Maraver, Jesús; Saxena, Avadh; Cooper, Fred; Khare, Avinash

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, we combine the notion of parity-time (PT) symmetry with that of supersymmetry (SUSY) for a prototypical case example with a complex potential that is related by SUSY to the so-called Pöschl-Teller potential which is real. Not only are we able to identify and numerically confirm the eigenvalues of the relevant problem, but we also show that the corresponding nonlinear problem, in the presence of an arbitrary power-law nonlinearity, has an exact bright soliton solution that can be analytically identified and has intriguing stability properties, such as an oscillatory instability, which is absent for the corresponding solution of the regular nonlinear Schrödinger equation with arbitrary power-law nonlinearity. The spectral properties and dynamical implications of this instability are examined. Furthermore, we believe that these findings may pave the way toward initiating a fruitful interplay between the notions of PT symmetry, supersymmetric partner potentials, and nonlinear interactions.

  5. Science and the Energy Security Challenge: The Example of Solid-State Lighting

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Philips, Julia [Sandia

    2010-01-08

    Securing a viable, carbon neutral energy future for humankind will require an effort of gargantuan proportions. As outlined clearly in a series of workshops sponsored by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html), fundamental advances in scientific understanding are needed to broadly implement many of the technologies that are held out as promising options to meet future energy needs, ranging from solar energy, to nuclear energy, to approaches to clean combustion. Using solid state lighting based on inorganic materials as an example, I will discuss some recent results and new directions, emphasizing the multidisciplinary, team nature of the endeavor. I will also offer some thoughts about how to encourage translation of the science into attractive, widely available products ? a significant challenge that cannot be ignored. This case study offers insight into approaches that are likely to be beneficial for addressing other aspects of the energy security challenge.

  6. Methodology, capabilities, and an example: Employment impacts of the Climate Change Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, J.M.; Anderson, D.M.; Schultz, R.W.

    1995-09-01

    A software package, Sectoral Energy/Employment Analysis and Data System (SEADS-PC), that can translate policy changes into employment and energy impacts is described. The core data for this tool include input-output (I/O) tables for 1977, 1982, 1987, and 2005 in 1982 dollars, and I/O tables for 1987 and 1990 in 1987 dollars. For each of the I/O tables there are corresponding final demand vectors and employment intensities. For a but the 2005 table there are energy intensities as well. The final demands and the intensities can be changed to reflect alternative policies. A final demand vector that reflects a specific policy, for example, can be created, based on an existing final demand vector. This vector can then be premultiplied by the appropriate I/O table to yield industry output, which in turn can be multiplied by energy or employment intensities to yield employment or energy resulting from the policy scenario. These policy results can then be compared with a base case and the differences reported. The report is in four sections. The first section is an introduction. The second section provides the accounting framework for the tool and describes the data provided. The third section serves as a user`s guide to the software, describing the functionality of the program and what results can be expected. The fourth section uses the President`s Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) as an example policy for which employment impacts can be calculated. The results of the CCAP exercise suggest that this program will result in about 60,000 new jobs (about 115 million additional hours of work) for the year 2000. In the year 2000, the CCAP final demands are greater than the base case final demands by $192.8 million (1990 dollars). The additional jobs are created as a result of both the shifts among final demand categories and a slight increase in economic activity.

  7. Large-Scale Urban Decontamination; Developments, Historical Examples and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Demmer

    2007-02-01

    Recent terrorist threats and actual events have lead to a renewed interest in the technical field of large scale, urban environment decontamination. One of the driving forces for this interest is the real potential for the cleanup and removal of radioactive dispersal device (RDD or dirty bomb) residues. In response the U. S. Government has spent many millions of dollars investigating RDD contamination and novel decontamination methodologies. Interest in chemical and biological (CB) cleanup has also peaked with the threat of terrorist action like the anthrax attack at the Hart Senate Office Building and with catastrophic natural events such as Hurricane Katrina. The efficiency of cleanup response will be improved with these new developments and a better understanding of the old reliable methodologies. Perhaps the most interesting area of investigation for large area decontamination is that of the RDD. While primarily an economic and psychological weapon, the need to cleanup and return valuable or culturally significant resources to the public is nonetheless valid. Several private companies, universities and National Laboratories are currently developing novel RDD cleanup technologies. Because of its longstanding association with radioactive facilities, the U. S. Department of Energy National Laboratories are at the forefront in developing and testing new RDD decontamination methods. However, such cleanup technologies are likely to be fairly task specific; while many different contamination mechanisms, substrate and environmental conditions will make actual application more complicated. Some major efforts have also been made to model potential contamination, to evaluate both old and new decontamination techniques and to assess their readiness for use. Non-radioactive, CB threats each have unique decontamination challenges and recent events have provided some examples. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as lead agency for these emergency cleanup

  8. Determining sand-body geometries for waterflood reservoirs: Examples from Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreisa, R.D.; Pinero, E. )

    1987-02-01

    Waterflood projects require an accurate knowledge of reservoir geometry and well-to-well continuity. However, sandstones with thin, multiple-pay zones can be extremely difficult to correlate with confidence. Two case studies of Pennsylvanian sandstones in Oklahoma illustrate how a model for the depositional history of such reservoirs can be an effective tool for determining reservoir continuity. In contrast, correlation criteria such as similar wireline log signatures and relative sand-body thicknesses are not reliable in many situations. In Southwest Logan field (Beaver County), 5 to 15-ft thick reservoir sands formed as shallow marine sand ridges. Their dimensions were approximated from height-to-width ratios of modern sand ridges. Then the reservoir sands were mapped using wireline logs and core data. Individual reservoir sands were approximately 1-2 km wide and stacked en echelon vertically. Thus, a line-drive waterflood pattern oriented parallel to the axes of the ridges is recommended. Tatums field (Carter County) consists of 5 to 50-ft thick sandstones deposited in various deltaic environments. Distributary channel sands have good continuity downdip, but are narrow and lenticular across depositional strike. Crevasse splay and other bay-fill sands were deposited marginal to the channels and are extremely discontinuous. This depositional model can be used to improve flood patterns for these sands, leading to improved sweep efficiency. In both examples, for effective mapping, the depositional facies models have been used to register reservoir quality and wireline log signatures.

  9. Interplay between parity-time symmetry, supersymmetry, and nonlinearity: An analytically tractable case example

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Cuevas–Maraver, Jesús; Saxena, Avadh; Cooper, Fred; Khare, Avinash

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, we combine the notion of parity-time (PT) symmetry with that of supersymmetry (SUSY) for a prototypical case example with a complex potential that is related by SUSY to the so-called Pöschl-Teller potential which is real. Not only are we able to identify and numerically confirm the eigenvalues of the relevant problem, but we also show that the corresponding nonlinear problem, in the presence of an arbitrary power-law nonlinearity, has an exact bright soliton solution that can be analytically identified and has intriguing stability properties, such as an oscillatory instability, which is absent for the corresponding solutionmore » of the regular nonlinear Schrödinger equation with arbitrary power-law nonlinearity. The spectral properties and dynamical implications of this instability are examined. Furthermore, we believe that these findings may pave the way toward initiating a fruitful interplay between the notions of PT symmetry, supersymmetric partner potentials, and nonlinear interactions.« less

  10. Margin of Safety Definition and Examples Used in Safety Basis Documents and the USQ Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R. A.

    2013-10-03

    The Nuclear Safety Management final rule, 10 CFR 830, provides an undefined term, margin of safety (MOS). Safe harbors listed in 10 CFR 830, Table 2, such as DOE-STD-3009 use but do not define the term. This lack of definition has created the need for the definition. This paper provides a definition of MOS and documents examples of MOS as applied in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved safety basis for an existing nuclear facility. If we understand what MOS looks like regarding Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) parameters, then it helps us compare against other parameters that do not involve a MOS. This paper also documents parameters that are not MOS. These criteria could be used to determine if an MOS exists in safety basis documents. This paper helps DOE, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and its contractors responsible for the safety basis improve safety basis documents and the unreviewed safety question (USQ) process with respect to MOS.

  11. Qualification of data obtained during a severe accident. Illustrative examples from TMI-2 evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, Joy L.; Knudson, Darrell L.

    2015-02-01

    The accidents at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) provide unique opportunities to evaluate instrumentation exposed to severe accident conditions. Conditions associated with the release of coolant and the hydrogen burn that occurred during the TMI-2 accident exposed instrumentation to harsh conditions, including direct radiation, radioactive contamination, and high humidity with elevated temperatures and pressures. Post-TMI-2 instrumentation evaluation programs focused on data required by TMI-2 operators to assess the condition of the reactor and containment and the effect of mitigating actions taken by these operators. Prior efforts also focused on sensors providing data required for subsequent forensic evaluations and accident simulations. This paper provides additional details related to the formal process used to develop a qualified TMI-2 data base and presents data qualification details for three parameters: reactor coolant system (RCS) pressure; containment building temperature; and containment pressure. These selected examples illustrate the types of activities completed in the TMI-2 data qualification process and the importance of such a qualification effort. These details are described to facilitate implementation of a similar process using data and examinations at the Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 reactors so that BWR-specific benefits can be obtained.

  12. Lessons Learned from the Development of an Example Precision Information Environment for International Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Henry, Michael J.; Burtner, IV, E. R.; Doehle, J. R.; Hampton, S. D.; La Mothe, R. R.; Nordquist, P. L.; Zarzhitsky, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is interested in increasing capabilities of IAEA safeguards inspectors to access information that would improve their situational awareness on the job. A mobile information platform could potentially provide access to information, analytics, and technical and logistical support to inspectors in the field, as well as providing regular updates to analysts at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna or at satellite offices. To demonstrate the potential capability of such a system, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) implemented a number of example capabilities within a PNNL-developed precision information environment (PIE), and using a tablet as a mobile information platform. PNNL’s safeguards proof-of-concept PIE intends to; demonstrate novel applications of mobile information platforms to international safeguards use cases; demonstrate proof-of-principle capability implementation; and provide “vision” for capabilities that could be implemented. This report documents the lessons learned from this two-year development activity for the Precision Information Environment for International Safeguards (PIE-IS), describing the developed capabilities, technical challenges, and considerations for future development, so that developers working to develop a similar system for the IAEA or other safeguards agencies might benefit from our work.

  13. An example of neutronic penalizations in reactivity transient analysis using 3D coupled chain HEMERA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubois, F.; Normand, B.; Sargeni, A.

    2012-07-01

    HEMERA (Highly Evolutionary Methods for Extensive Reactor Analyses), is a fully coupled 3D computational chain developed jointly by IRSN and CEA. It is composed of CRONOS2 (core neutronics, cross sections library from APOLLO2), FLICA4 (core thermal-hydraulics) and the system code CATHARE. Multi-level and multi-dimensional models are developed to account for neutronics, core thermal-hydraulics, fuel thermal analysis and system thermal-hydraulics, dedicated to best-estimate, conservative simulations and sensitivity analysis. In IRSN, the HEMERA chain is widely used to study several types of reactivity accidents and for sensitivity studies. Just as an example of the HEMERA possibilities, we present here two types of neutronic penalizations and their impact on a power transient due to a REA (Rod Ejection Accident): in the first one, we studied a bum-up distribution modification and in the second one, a delayed-neutron fraction modification. Both modifications are applied to the whole core or localized in a few assemblies. Results show that it is possible to use global or local changes but 1) in case of bum-up modification, the total core power can increase when assembly peak power decrease so, care has to be taken if the goal is to maximize a local power peak and 2) for delayed-neutron fraction, a local modification can have the same effect as the one on the whole core, provided that it is large enough. (authors)

  14. Computational implementation of a systems prioritization methodology for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: A preliminary example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C.; Anderson, D.R.; Baker, B.L.

    1996-04-01

    A systems prioritization methodology (SPM) is under development to provide guidance to the US DOE on experimental programs and design modifications to be supported in the development of a successful licensing application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. The purpose of the SPM is to determine the probabilities that the implementation of different combinations of experimental programs and design modifications, referred to as activity sets, will lead to compliance. Appropriate tradeoffs between compliance probability, implementation cost and implementation time can then be made in the selection of the activity set to be supported in the development of a licensing application. Descriptions are given for the conceptual structure of the SPM and the manner in which this structure determines the computational implementation of an example SPM application. Due to the sophisticated structure of the SPM and the computational demands of many of its components, the overall computational structure must be organized carefully to provide the compliance probabilities for the large number of activity sets under consideration at an acceptable computational cost. Conceptually, the determination of each compliance probability is equivalent to a large numerical integration problem. 96 refs., 31 figs., 36 tabs.

  15. Seismic acquisition and processing methodologies in overthrust areas: Some examples from Latin America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilander, N.G.; Mitchel, R..

    1996-08-01

    Overthrust areas represent some of the last frontiers in petroleum exploration today. Billion barrel discoveries in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and the Monagas fold-thrust belt of Venezuela during the past decade have highlighted the potential rewards for overthrust exploration. However the seismic data recorded in many overthrust areas is disappointingly poor. Challenges such as rough topography, complex subsurface structure, presence of high-velocity rocks at the surface, back-scattered energy and severe migration wavefronting continue to lower data quality and reduce interpretability. Lack of well/velocity control also reduces the reliability of depth estimations and migrated images. Failure to obtain satisfactory pre-drill structural images can easily result in costly wildcat failures. Advances in the methodologies used by Chevron for data acquisition, processing and interpretation have produced significant improvements in seismic data quality in Bolivia, Colombia and Trinidad. In this paper, seismic test results showing various swath geometries will be presented. We will also show recent examples of processing methods which have led to improved structural imaging. Rather than focusing on {open_quotes}black box{close_quotes} methodology, we will emphasize the cumulative effect of step-by-step improvements. Finally, the critical significance and interrelation of velocity measurements, modeling and depth migration will be explored. Pre-drill interpretations must ultimately encompass a variety of model solutions, and error bars should be established which realistically reflect the uncertainties in the data.

  16. Porosity formation in deep-burial environment: overview, with examples, from Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Harris, P.M.

    1989-03-01

    Porosity formation accompanying deep burial is ubiquitous and widespread in the Permian basin, particularly but not exclusively in offshore platform and resedimented basinal carbonates of Pennsylvanian and Permian age. Hydrocarbon reservoirs in such platform carbonate examples locally contain evidence of subaerial exposure and meteoric diagenesis. Commonly, much of the porosity formed during exposure is ultimately reduced by compaction and cementation during early burial. By contrast, no evidence of meteoric diagenesis is observed in associated basinal carbonates, although compaction and cementation accompanying progressive burial are readily evident. In both cases, however, such early diagenesis is overprinted by late burial dissolution, sometimes coincident with hydrocarbon emplacement, creating rocks of high porosity. The formation of porosity by cement dissolution may exhume occluded pores or enhance relict pores that formed in the eogenetic zone, the result being a preponderance of interparticle and moldic pores and residual cements that mimic vadose and phreatic products. In other cases, nonfabric selective dissolution, locally associated with fractures or stylolites, creates vuggy porosity which may resemble that formed during eodiagenesis. Multiple phases of deep-burial dissolution and partial cementation or replacement (by calcite or dolomite) are indicated for many of these diagenetic systems and result in a complex suite of different pore types.

  17. An example of mixing-zone dolomite, Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation, Floridan aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cander, H.S. )

    1994-07-01

    A late-formed dolomite cement in a core of the Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation, peninsular Florida, provides an example of dolomite cement from a mixing zone and illustrates how dolomite textural alteration and stabilization can occur at earth-surface conditions. The Avon Park Formation is a pervasively dolomitized peritidal platform carbonate 400 m thick in the Florida aquifer system. Typical Avon Park dolomite is inclusion-rich, fine-grained (< 40 mm), noncathodoluminescent, highly porous (average, 20%), and formed during the Eocene by normal to hypersaline seawater ([delta][sup 18]O = + 3.7[per thousand] PDB; [delta][sup 13]C = + 2.0[per thousand]; [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr = 0.70778; Sr = 167 ppm). In a 20 m interval in a core from southwest Florida, inclusion-free, cathodoluminescent dolomite overgrows the early-formed noncathodoluminescent marine dolomite. The cathodoluminescent dolomite cement profoundly alters the texture of Avon Park dolomite from typical Cenozoic-like porous, poorly crystalline dolomite to hard, dense, low-porosity, highly crystalline Paleozoic-like dolomite. The dolomite cement is not a replacement of limestone but an overgrowth of early-formed marine dolomite and pore-occluding cement. This study demonstrates that: (1) dolomite precipitated from a 75% seawater mixing-zone fluid that was both calcite saturated and sulfate-rich, and (2) dramatic textural maturation and stabilization in dolomite can occur in the near surface environment, without elevated temperature and burial conditions.

  18. Example-Based Automatic Music-Driven Conventional Dance Motion Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Songhua; Fan, Rukun; Geng, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for synthesizing dance motions that follow the emotions and contents of a piece of music. Our method employs a learning-based approach to model the music to motion mapping relationship embodied in example dance motions along with those motions' accompanying background music. A key step in our method is to train a music to motion matching quality rating function through learning the music to motion mapping relationship exhibited in synchronized music and dance motion data, which were captured from professional human dance performance. To generate an optimal sequence of dance motion segments to match with a piece of music, we introduce a constraint-based dynamic programming procedure. This procedure considers both music to motion matching quality and visual smoothness of a resultant dance motion sequence. We also introduce a two-way evaluation strategy, coupled with a GPU-based implementation, through which we can execute the dynamic programming process in parallel, resulting in significant speedup. To evaluate the effectiveness of our method, we quantitatively compare the dance motions synthesized by our method with motion synthesis results by several peer methods using the motions captured from professional human dancers' performance as the gold standard. We also conducted several medium-scale user studies to explore how perceptually our dance motion synthesis method can outperform existing methods in synthesizing dance motions to match with a piece of music. These user studies produced very positive results on our music-driven dance motion synthesis experiments for several Asian dance genres, confirming the advantages of our method.

  19. Long term energy planning and security of supply under new market conditions: Czech power industry example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrba, M.

    1998-07-01

    Relevant issues concerned with primary energy resources availability or accessibility is only one perception of the term security of energy supply. The second one is the wide range of issues concerned with reliability of the electric power system. Interconnection between control areas were traditionally developed so as to increase reliability, reduce the reserve margin, facilitate least-variable costs of generation meeting demand. More recently transmission is also perceived as an infrastructure for enhanced electricity trade. But, liberalization and introduction of a competitive electricity market is a reality. In a liberalized and open competitive market the demand for a reliable, secure and functional market place is the key issue. Innovative market tools, the growing number of market participants probably bring more difficulties to manage them. For example, take-or-pay contracts and/or purchase of capacity without predetermined utilization will bring forward problems to the system operator and increasing demand, esp. for regulation power and reserve capacity respectively. The changes bring new challenges not only for industry players and customers, but will be extremely demanding for newly established or only re-established system operators. The system operator has to define and introduce efficient neutral mechanism that will enhance competition without jeopardizing system security and reliability. Modeling of the power system operation hour-per-hour, using a Monte-Carlo simulation for random forced outages of units and merit order based commitment and dispatch provides results for ancillary services standard evaluation. This approach also allows modeling of dissimilar behavior of industry players under changed market conditions and test the stability and sensitivity of ancillary services standards for quite different market development scenarios and conditions.

  20. Dependance of TWRS FSAR X/Qs on distance and example doses at Highway 240 with stationary and moving receptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himes, D.A.

    1996-09-23

    A discussion of the reasons for the dependance of X/Q on receptor distance and compass sector is presented. In addition, X/Qs are calculated for three receptor scenarios on Highway 240 including a moving receptor. Example radiological doses and toxicological exposures at Highway 240 are calculated for two accidents already analyzed in the TWRS FSAR.

  1. Examples of cooler reflective streets for urban heat-island mitigation : Portland cement concrete and chip seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chang, S.-C.; Levinson, R.; Pon, B.

    2003-04-30

    Part of the urban heat island effect can be attributed to dark pavements that are commonly used on streets and parking lots. In this paper we consider two light colored, hence cooler, alternative paving materials that are in actual use in cities today. These are Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and chip seals. We report measurements of the albedos of some PCC and chip sealed pavements in the San Francisco Bay Area. The albedos of the PCC pavements ranged from about 0.18 to 0.35. The temperatures of some PCC pavements are also measured and calculated. We then consider how the albedos of the constituent materials of the PCC (stone, sand and cement) contribute to the albedos of the resulting finished concrete. The albedos of a set of chip sealed pavements in San Jose, CA, were measured and correlated with the times of their placement. It is found that the albedos decrease with age (and use) but remain higher than that of standard asphalt concrete (AC) for about five years. After t hat, the albedos of the chip seals are about 0.12, similar to aged AC. The fact that many PCC pavements have albedos at least twice as high as aged AC suggests that it is possible to have pavement albedos that remain high for many years.

  2. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector, May 10, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 10, 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Financing Peer Exchange Call: Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance  Is your program currently working with real estate sector (or are you thinking about doing so), and if so, how? * Program Experience and Lessons:  Cynthia Gunn, DOE  San Diego, CA: Jeremy Hutman, CCSE * Discussion:  What are some key strategies for engaging this sector?  How can the value

  3. Breaking of the number-of-constituent-quark scaling for identified-particle elliptic flow as a signal of phase change in low-energy data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, J.; Jin, F.; Zhang, S.; Chen, J. H.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Ma, G. L.; Zhong, C.

    2009-06-15

    We argue that measurements of identified-particle elliptic flow in a wide energy range could shed light on the possible phase change in high-energy heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). When the hadronization process is dominated by quark coalescence, the number-of-constituent-quark (NCQ) scaling for the identified-particle elliptic flow can serve as a probe for studying the strong interacting partonic matter. In the upcoming RHIC low-energy runs, the NCQ scaling behavior may be broken because of the change of the effective degrees of freedom of the hot dense matter, which corresponds to the transition from the dominant partonic phase to the dominant hadronic phase. A multiphase transport model is used to present the dependence of NCQ scaling behavior on the different hadronization mechanisms.

  4. Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation. Volume 2, Detailed description of first example flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Disposal of high-level tank wastes at the Hanford Site is currently envisioned to divide the waste between two principal waste forms: glass for the high-level waste (HLW) and grout for the low-level waste (LLW). The draft flow diagram shown in Figure 1.1 was developed as part of the current planning process for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), which is evaluating options for tank cleanup. The TWRS has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to safely manage the Hanford tank wastes. It includes tank safety and waste disposal issues, as well as the waste pretreatment and waste minimization issues that are involved in the ``clean option`` discussed in this report. This report describes the results of a study led by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine if a more aggressive separations scheme could be devised which could mitigate concerns over the quantity of the HLW and the toxicity of the LLW produced by the reference system. This aggressive scheme, which would meet NRC Class A restrictions (10 CFR 61), would fit within the overall concept depicted in Figure 1.1; it would perform additional and/or modified operations in the areas identified as interim storage, pretreatment, and LLW concentration. Additional benefits of this scheme might result from using HLW and LLW disposal forms other than glass and grout, but such departures from the reference case are not included at this time. The evaluation of this aggressive separations scheme addressed institutional issues such as: radioactivity remaining in the Hanford Site LLW grout, volume of HLW glass that must be shipped offsite, and disposition of appropriate waste constituents to nonwaste forms.

  5. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... as deemed necessary, and decommissioning to include dismantlement and ... No additional equipment would be removed unless the present safe shutdown status of the ...

  6. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... DISMANTLEMENT AND DECOMMISSIONING PHASE Major Work Task Hazard Cause Preventive Measures ... Lockouttagout (LOTO) not used properly, all workers not informed of LOTO status. ...

  7. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Job Steps and Dependencies There is a qsub option -W dependdependencylist or a Torque Keyword PBS -W dependdependencylist for job dependencies. The most commonly used ...

  8. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... from one deactivated component to another; remove fissile material; perform NDA measurements on the equipment; ensure the form of the material cannot change; and ...

  9. Fortran Example MUMPS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forrestal Watch Office Forrestal Watch Office The Forrestal Watch Office (located at the Department of Energy/NNSA headquarters) provides the 24-hour single point-of-contact for collecting, processing and disseminating time-sensitive emergency notifications whenever needed. It performs initial notifications, and coordinates management, logistics and mobilization actions during periods of national emergencies, natural and man-made disasters, acts of terrorism, or other extraordinary situations

  10. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Fire Metal fines from grinding and lathe operations were a Class D fire concern during ... the building and terminating the connections to the building at the 352-4M transformer. ...

  11. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Examining Future Global Transportation Energy Demand For EIA Energy Conference July 11, 2016 | Washington, DC By John Maples Outline * Model overview - Passenger travel - Freight travel - Energy consumption for 16 regions: * USA, Canada, Mexico/Chile, OECD Europe, Japan, S. Korea, Australia/New Zealand * Russia, Non-OECD Europe/Eurasia, China, India, Non-OECD Asia, Middle East, Africa, Brazil, Other South/Central * IEO2016 Reference case transportation projections * Preliminary scenario results

  12. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... SNM hold up evaluation. Sample oil lubricants for radioactive contamination. Sample water ... Lubricating oils are present on components and equipment reservoirs. Room 146A contains ...

  13. Letter of Interest Example

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sample letter of interest describes the FEMP Call for Technical Services for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds.

  14. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... water from B Plant and low-risk cooling water from the ... waste transfers, solid waste generation and disposal, management of gaseous effluents, management of liquid effluents, ...

  15. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Document (SRID) management system provides a ... 1 The minimal analysis (Level 1 - low riskconsequence) will ... There are many waste management and ...

  16. C Example HYPRE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    By the Numbers: 2015 at the Department of Energy By the Numbers: 2015 at the Department of Energy Addthis The Energy Department was hard at work in 2015, and we've got the numbers to prove it. This year we were involved in two major international agreements: the historic nuclear deal that blocks Iran's four pathways to a nuclear bomb, and the COP21 agreement -- a major milestone in the fight against climate change. Our carbon capture and storage projects removed their 10 millionth metric ton of

  17. Title Slide Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5,444 228 Suspended Reports Per Household Measured Savings 208.1 12.0 Per Household Joint Rebate Program Savings 0.5 1.0 Per Household Joint Upstream Savings 43.3 na Per Household...

  18. Scientific poster example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-000 Analysis of the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Spectrum in Single and Two-Phase Bubbly Flows in Different Geometries Based on Direct Numerical Simulation Results Cameron S. Brown Igor A. Bolotnov North Carolina State University CASL-U-2015-0242-000 Analysis of the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Spectrum in Single and Two-Phase Bubbly Flows in Different Geometries Based on Direct Numerical Simulation Results Cameron S. Brown, Igor A. Bolotnov Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State

  19. Issue Development sheet Example

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISSUE DEVELOPMENT SHEET INFORMATION ONLY The information provided below indicates that a potential concern for finding has been identified. Please provide any objective evidence you may have that could either alleviate the concern or eliminate the finding. If no objective evidence is available/can be provided by the end of this audit (at the scheduled end of field work), this information will be included in the audit report and reported as a concern or an audit finding as appropriate.

  20. Proj. Plan Example SEM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOE) CUSTOMER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) SUPPORT SYSTEM (CITSS) Project Plan December 1997 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of the Chief Information Officer and Headquarters Collaboration Group Change Control Page The change control page will be used to record information for controlling and tracking modifications made to this document. Revision Date: 12/15/97 Author: Brian Field a. Section(s): 2.3 Page Number(s): 2-2 through 2-4 Summary of Change(s): Updated roles and responsibilities chart

  1. Title Slide Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 19, 2013 Behavior Based Energy Efficiency - Lessons Learned from Fort Collins Utilities John Phelan, P.E., Energy Services Manager, Fort Collins Utilities Facilitated by...

  2. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... The second function is to identify those activities that warrant a more detailed review by a technical or functional area specialist (i.e., Environmental, Safety, Radiological ...

  3. A Qualitative Assessment of Diversion Scenarios for an Example Sodium Fast Reactor Using the GEN IV PR&PP Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Therios, Ike

    2012-01-20

    FAST REACTORS;NUCLEAR ENERGY;NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT;PROLIFERATION;SAFEGUARDS;THEFT; A working group was created in 2002 by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the purpose of developing an internationally accepted methodology for assessing the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear energy system (NES) and its individual elements. A two year case study is being performed by the experts group using this methodology to assess the proliferation resistance of a hypothetical NES called the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR). This work demonstrates how the PR and PP methodology can be used to provide important information at various levels of details to NES designers, safeguard administrators and decision makers. The study analyzes the response of the complete ESFR nuclear energy system to different proliferation and theft strategies. The challenges considered include concealed diversion, concealed misuse and 'break out' strategies. This paper describes the work done in performing a qualitative assessment of concealed diversion scenarios from the ESFR.

  4. Molecular Characterization of S- and N-containing Organic Constituents in Ambient Aerosols by negative ion mode High-Resolution Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Surratt, Jason D.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-11-27

    Samples of ambient aerosols from the 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field study were analyzed using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (nano-DESI/MS). Four samples per day were collected in Bakersfield, CA on June 20-24 with a collection time of 6 hours per sample. Four characteristic groups of organic constituents were identified in the samples: compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen only (CHO), sulfur- (CHOS), nitrogen-(CHON), and both nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organics (CHONS). Within the groups, organonitrates, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates were assigned based on accurate mass measurements and elemental ratio comparisons. Changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol samples were observed throughout the day. The number of observed CHO compounds increased in the afternoon samples, suggesting regional photochemical processing as a source. The average number of CHOS compounds had the smallest changes throughout the day, consistent with a more broadly distributed source. Both of the nitrogen-containing groups (CHON and CHONS) had greater numbers of compounds in the night and morning samples, indicating that nitrate radical chemistry was likely a source for those compounds. Most of the compounds were found in submicron particles. The size distribution of CHON compounds was bimodal. We conclude that the majority of the compounds observed were secondary in nature with both biogenic and anthropogenic sources.

  5. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  6. Thermal denitration and mineralization of waste constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenni, J.A.; Boardman, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    In order to produce a quality grout from LLW using hydraulic cements, proper conditioning of the waste is essential for complete cement curing. Several technologies were investigated as options for conditions. Since the LLW is dilute, removal of all, or most, of the water will significantly reduce the final waste volume. Neutralization of the LLW is also desirable since acidic liquids to not allow cement to cure properly. The nitrate compounds are very soluble and easily leached from solid waste forms; therefore, denitration is desirable. Thermal and chemical denitration technologies have the advantages of water removal, neutralization, and denitration. The inclusion of additives during thermal treatment were investigated as a method of forming insoluable waste conditions.

  7. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

    2003-02-11

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

  8. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. O. Hitzman; A. K. Stepp; D. M. Dennis; L. R. Graumann

    2003-03-31

    This research program is directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal is to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work is underway. Microbial cultures have been isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters with cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Field pilot studies are underway.

  9. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF CONSTITUENTS OF ORES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCullough, R.F.

    1959-05-01

    A process for U recovery from leached zone material is described. Calcination with alkali metal carbonate at 600 to 2000 deg F followed by digestion with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and filtration forms the basis of the process. (T.R.H.)

  10. Property:BrineConstituents | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chloride type brine, "The content of potassium and calcium are high, while that of lithium, boron and sulfate is very low", See table 1 of Izquierdo et al. (2006). + Chena...