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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

alternative is rock or other noncombustible material; avoid bark or wood chip mulch in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alternative is rock or other noncombustible material; avoid bark or wood chip mulch in this area. 6 needles and leaves to eliminate an ignition source for firebrands, especially during the hot, dry weather escape drill. Know where safety areas are within your subdivision. Meadows, rock outcrops, and wide roads

2

Foot-conditioned phonotactics and prosodic constituency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constituency by Ryan T. Bennett There has been a recurrentin LINGUISTICS by Ryan T. Bennett September 2012 TheDissertation of Ryan T. Bennett is approved: Professor Junko

Bennett, Ryan Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Apparatus and method for separating constituents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A centrifugal separator apparatus and method for improving the efficiency of the separation of constituents in a fluid stream. A cyclone separator includes an assembly for separately discharging both constituents through the same end of the separator housing. A rotary separator includes a rotary housing having a baffle disposed therein for minimizing the differential rotational velocities of the constituents in the housing, thereby decreasing turbulence, and increasing efficiency. The intensity of the centrifugal force and the time which the constituents reside within the housing can be independently controlled to improve efficiency of separation.

Maronde, Carl P. (McMurray, PA); Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Learning From Snapshot Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examples are a powerful tool for teaching both humans and computers.In order to learn from examples, however, a student must first extractthe examples from its stream of perception. Snapshot learning is ageneral approach ...

Beal, Jacob

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Probing the Constituent Structure of Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the cross section for scattering processes between graviton emitters on the near side of a Schwarzschild surface and absorbers on its far side, that is black hole constituents. We show that these scatterings allow to directly extract structural observables such as the momentum distribution of black hole constituents. For this we employ a quantum bound state description originally developed in quantum chromodynamics and recently applied to general relativity that allows to consider black holes in a relativistic Hartree like framework.

Lukas Gruending; Stefan Hofmann; Sophia Müller; Tehseen Rug

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

6

Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of Biomass Burning Aerosol. Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of Biomass Burning...

7

Challenge Home Certificate Examples  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These certificates are printed from RESNET Accredited Software, examples from REM/Rate and from EnergyGauge.

8

Volatile constituents in a wood pyrolysis oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science VOLATILE CONSTITUTENTS IN A WOOD PYROLYSIS OIL A Thesis SHIH-CHIEN LIN Appro d as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Head of epa tmen (Member Member Nay 1978 442936 ABSTRACT Volatile Constituents in a Wood Pyrolysis Oil.../120 Supelcoport. Other trace constituents of volatile acid were also 'dentifi="' by trap- ping the substances from the C. C. column into i: n;- 0-sh ped capillary tube and subjecting to mass spectrometry. The corrosivity of pyrolysis oil and it, volati'e acids...

Lin, Shih-Chien

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Apparatus for the field determination of concentration of radioactive constituents in a medium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The instant invention is an apparatus for determining the concentration of radioactive constituents in a test sample; such as surface soils, via rapid real-time analyses, and direct readout on location utilizing a probe made up of multiple layers of detection material used in combination with an analyzer and real-time readout unit. This is accomplished by comparing the signal received from the probe, which can discriminate between types of radiation and energies with stored patterns that are based upon experimental results. This comparison can be used in the calibration of a readout display that reads out in real-time the concentrations of constituents per given volume. For example, the concentration of constituents such as Cs-137, Sr-90, U-238 in the soil, and noble gas radionuclides such as Kr-85 in the atmosphere, can be measured in real-time, on location, without the need for laboratory analysis of samples. 14 figs.

Perkins, R.W.; Schilk, A.J.; Warner, R.A.; Wogman, N.A.

1995-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Baryon Spectroscopy and the Constituent Quark Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore further the idea that the lattice QCD data for hadron properties in the region m[^2][_pi] > 0.2GeV^2 can be described by the constituent quark model. This leads to a natural explanation of the fact that nucleon excited states are generally stable for pion masses greater than their physical excitation energies. Finally, we apply these same ideas to the problem of how pentaquarks might behave in lattice QCD, with interesting conclusions.

A.W. Thomas; R.D. Young

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

Hybrid States from Constituent Glue Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hybrid meson is one of the most interesting new hadron specie beyond the naive quark model. It acquire a great attention both from the theoretical and experimental efforts. Many good candidates have been claimed to be observed, but there is no absolute confirmation about existence of hybrid mesons. In the present work we propose new calculations of the masses and decay widths of the hybrid mesons in the context of constituent gluon model.

F. Iddir; L. Semlala

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

Snyder, Stuart C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jeffery, Charles L. (Blackfoot, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Instantons and Constituent Monopoles, nine years later Pierre van Baal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-called holon- omy) is non-trivial. They reveal more clearly the monopole constituent nature of these calorons

van Baal, Pierre

14

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles What determines their composition Whether or not particles deposit How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexingt

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin Film XRDEvan FelixExperimentsExample Batch Scripts

16

Example Hopper Batch Scripts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin Film XRDEvan FelixExperimentsExample Batch

17

Probability: Theory and examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some times the lights are shining on me. Other times I can barely see. Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip its been. Grateful Dead In 1989 when the first edition of the book was completed, my sons David and Greg were 3 and 1, and the cover picture showed the Dow Jones at 2650. The last twenty years have brought many changes but the song remains the same. The title of the book indicates that as we develop the theory, we will focus our attention on examples. Hoping that the book would be a useful reference for people who apply probability in their work, we have tried to emphasize the results that are important for applications, and illustrated their use with roughly 200 examples. Probability is not a spectator sport, so the book contains almost 450 exercises to challenge the reader and to deepen their understanding. The fourth edition has two major changes (in addition to a new publisher): (i) The book has been converted from TeX to LaTeX. The systematic use of labels should eventually eliminate problems with references to other points in the text. In

Rick Durrett

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Mass as a form of Energy in a simple example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A major consequence of special relativity, expressed in the relation $E_0 = m c^2$, is that the total energy content of an object at rest, including its thermal motion and binding energy among its constituents, is a measure of its inertia, i.e. its mass. This relation was first stated by Einstein. He showed that, in order to be consistent with the principles of special relativity, there must be a loss of inertia in a block that emits two pulses of electromagnetic radiation. A pedagogical difficulty with this example is that radiation is a purely relativistic phenomenon, and so the connection with the examples one learns in introductory Mechanics courses is not simple. Here we use a more familiar example of masses and springs, where the non-relativistic limit can be easily found and where the potential energy is clearly shown to be part of the mass of the bound system.

Dib, Claudio O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Matlab Tutorial Practice by examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matlab Tutorial Practice by examples #12;i Summary 1. Introduction....................................................................................................................1 2. Introduction to Vectors in Matlab..............................................................................................5 3. Introduction to Matrices in Matlab

Dellandréa, Emmanuel

20

Matlab Tutorial Practice by examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matlab Tutorial Practice by examples i Summary 1. Introduction ................................................................ .............................1 2. Introduction to Vectors in Matlab................................................................ ...........5 3. Introduction to Matrices in Matlab

Dellandréa, Emmanuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of using an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises contacting an adsorption medium with a feed stream comprising at least one constituent and removing the at least one constituent from the feed stream. The adsorption medium comprises a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) matrix and at least one metal hydroxide homogenously dispersed therein. The adsorption medium may comprise from approximately 15 wt % to approximately 90 wt % of the PAN and from approximately 10 wt % to approximately 85 wt % of the at least one metal hydroxide. The at least one metal hydroxide may be selected from the group consisting of ferric hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, lanthanum hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, titanium hydroxide, copper hydroxide, antimony hydroxide, and molybdenum hydroxide.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herbst, R. Scott (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Blackfoot, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

A Simple Mixture Theory for ? Newtonian and Generalized Newtonian Constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] based on the following notations L(?) = gradv?(x, t) D(?) = 1 2 ( L(?) + L T (?) ) q = ?? ?=1 q? Q = 1 ?m ?? ?=1 ??Q? ? = 1 ?m ?? ?=1 ????(x, t) pi = ?pi1 = pi2 (2.39) 13 In which q is heat flux, Q is heat supply, ? and ?? are entropy densities... of the mixture and the constituents. We begin with the entropy inequality ?m D? Dt + div (q ? ) ? ? Q ? ? 0 (2.40) We have assumed that entropy due to heat flux q? is q? ? where ? is the common temperature of the constituents and the entropy due to heat supply Q?...

Powell, Michael Joseph

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with a Meson Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results for the elastic nucleon form factors and the electromagnetic transition amplitudes to the Delta(1232) resonance, obtained with the Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with the inclusion of a meson cloud correction are briefly presented. The pion cloud effects are explicitly discussed.

D. Y. Chen; Y. B. Dong; M. M. Giannini; E. Santopinto

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

Method for verification of constituents of a process stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of a method for validating a process stream for the presence or absence of a substance of interest such as a chemical warfare agent; that is, for verifying that a chemical warfare agent is present in an input line for feeding the agent into a reaction vessel for destruction, or, in a facility for producing commercial chemical products, that a constituent of the chemical warfare agent has not been substituted for the proper chemical compound. The method includes the steps of transmitting light through a sensor positioned in the feed line just before the chemical constituent in the input line enters the reaction vessel, measuring an optical spectrum of the chemical constituent from the light beam transmitted through it, and comparing the measured spectrum to a reference spectrum of the chemical agent and preferable also reference spectra of surrogates. A signal is given if the chemical agent is not entering a reaction vessel for destruction, or if a constituent of a chemical agent is added to a feed line in substitution of the proper chemical compound.

Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.; O`Rourke, P.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Red tide detection and tracing using MODIS fluorescence data: A regional example in SW Florida coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Red tide detection and tracing using MODIS fluorescence data: A regional example in SW Florida-time data from the MODIS satellite sensor was used to detect and trace a harmful algal bloom (HAB), or red to interferences of other water constituents. The red tide that formed from November to December 2004 off SW

26

Examples of Cost Estimation Packages  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Estimates can be performed in a variety of ways. Some of these are for projects for an undefined scope, a conventional construction project, or where there is a level of effort required to complete the work. Examples of cost estimation packages for these types of projects are described in this appendix.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water, Sediment, and Biota of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water, Sediment, and Biota Data Series 658 #12;#12;Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water.J., 2012, Mercury species and other selected constituent concentrations in water, sediment, and biota

28

Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy...

29

Distributed Generation Lead-by-Example Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

State governments can lead by example by promoting renewable energy programs and policies. Efforts to lead by example include using renewable energy resources (including alternative fuel for...

30

Calculation of size for bound-state constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elements are given of a calculation that identifies the size of a proton in the Schroedinger equation for lepton-proton bound states, using the renormalization group procedure for effective particles (RGPEP) in quantum field theory, executed only up to the second order of expansion in powers of the coupling constant. Already in this crude approximation, the extraction of size of a proton from bound-state observables is found to depend on the lepton mass, so that the smaller the lepton mass the larger the proton size extracted from the same observable bound-state energy splitting. In comparison of Hydrogen and muon-proton bound-state dynamics, the crude calculation suggests that the difference between extracted proton sizes in these two cases can be a few percent. Such values would match the order of magnitude of currently discussed proton-size differences in leptonic atoms. Calculations using the RGPEP of higher order than second are required for a precise interpretation of the energy splittings in terms of the proton size in the Schroedinger equation. Such calculations should resolve the conceptual discrepancy between two conditions: that the renormalization group scale required for high accuracy calculations based on the Schroedinger equation is much smaller than the proton mass (on the order of a root of the product of reduced and average masses of constituents) and that the energy splittings due to the physical proton size can be interpreted ignoring corrections due to the effective nature of constituents in the Schr\\"odinger equation.

Stanislaw D. Glazek

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Asymptotic safety: a simple example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the Gross-Neveu model in 2safety scenario: despite being perturbatively nonrenormalizable, the model defines an interacting quantum field theory being valid to arbitrarily high momentum scales owing to the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point. Using the functional renormalization group, we study the UV behavior of the model in both the purely fermionic as well as a partially bosonized language. We show that asymptotic safety is realized at non-Gaussian fixed points in both formulations, the universal critical exponents of which we determine quantitatively. The partially bosonized formulation allows to make contact to the large-Nf expansion where the model is known to be renormalizable to all-orders. In this limit, the fixed-point action as well as all universal critical exponents can be computed analytically. As asymptotic safety has become an important scenario for quantizing gravity, our description of a well-understood model is meant to provide for an easily accessible and controllable example of modern nonperturbative quantum field theory.

Jens Braun; Holger Gies; Daniel D. Scherer

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

32

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical objectives of this project are: (a) To (1) define the partitioning of inorganic constituents associated with raw coal particles among products (including vapors, aerosols, and residual char/ash particles) formed under conditions representative of pulverized coal flames as a function of the specific (intrinsic and extrinsic) characteristics of the raw coal and the environment in which the transformations occur; and (2) to characterize the resultant spectrum of products in detail; (b) To elucidate and quantify the fundamental processes (involving basic principles of physics, chemistry, thermodynamics) by which transformations of the inorganic constituents occur; and (c) To develop, based on the information required in a. and b. above, a tractable process model capable of predicting the significant features of the transformation process, most importantly, the distribution and nature of products. This report represents work accomplished in the tenth quarter of performance on the contract. The authors specifically highlight work accomplished: at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) on developing and constructing a thermophoretic sampling probe, for submicron fume particle sampling; at MIT on (1) completion of the baseline ash particle size distribution measurements for seven program coals (five US and two Australian), and (2) analysis of the fragmentation model results in terms of a closed-form solution for a simplified case; at the University of Arizona, on obtaining detailed ash particle and submicron fume chemistry for four program coals; and at PSI Technology Company (PSIT) on concluding data analysis and describing mineral interaction trends observed during combustion of two program coals. Individual progress reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Boni, A.A.; Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (USA)); Flagan, R.C. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (USA)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA)); Sarofim, A.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 1, sections 1--5: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles? What determines their composition? Whether or not particles deposit? How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes? remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

Helble, J.J. [ed.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Examples of Wind Energy Curtailment Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses examples of wind energy curtailment practices internationally and in regions across the United States.

Rogers, J.; Fink, S.; Porter, K.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fundamental Mechanisms of Copper CMP – Passivation Kinetics of Copper in CMP Slurry Constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tribochemical Mechanisms of Copper Chemical MechanicalE06-02 Fundamental Mechanisms of Copper CMP – PassivationKinetics of Copper in CMP Slurry Constituents Shantanu

Tripathi, Shantanu; Doyle, F M; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

ENERGY CONSERVATION WITH NONSYMPLECTIC METHODS: EXAMPLES AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY CONSERVATION WITH NON­SYMPLECTIC METHODS: EXAMPLES AND COUNTER­EXAMPLES ERWAN FAOU 1 , ERNST. email: Ernst.Hairer@math.unige.ch, Truong­Linh.Pham@math.unige.ch Abstract. Energy conservation into energy conservation with non­ symplectic methods. Su#cient conditions and counter­examples are presented

Hairer, Ernst

37

1. Constituents of rainwater 2. pH and pKa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid Rain Outline: 1. Constituents of rainwater 2. pH and pKa 3. Sources of acid rain 4. Adverse e#11;ects of acid rain 5. Controls 1: Constituents of rainwater #15; Gases are soluble in water: Henry. Strong acids formed upon dissolving: H 2 SO 4 and H 2 SO 3 . #12; Chemistry of Acid Rain #15; NO 2

Schofield, Jeremy

38

Procurement Standards Lead-by-Example Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

39

Fortran MPI/OpenMP example output  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Getting Started Configuration Programming Running Jobs Overview Interactive Jobs Batch Jobs Example Batch Scripts Using aprun Queues and Policies Monitoring Jobs Using OpenMP with...

40

Energy Efficiency Lead-by-Example Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management brochure describes FEMP's services, namely financing and acquisition support, technical assistance and policy, and outreach and coordination.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Example Cost Codes for Construction Projects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter provides an example outline of cost items and their corresponding cost codes that may be used for construction projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

43

The FPGA Hello World Example Martin Schoeberl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The FPGA Hello World Example Martin Schoeberl martin@jopdesign.com August 4, 2006 1 Introduction `Hello World' example. What is the `Hello World' program in hardware, in an FPGA? The smallest project entity. In our case hello world 3. In the next dialog box the VHDL source files can be added

Schoeberl, Martin

44

Wild Algebras: Two Examples. Claus Michael Ringel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wild Algebras: Two Examples. Claus Michael Ringel Let k be a field and a finite-dimensional k sheer igno- rance concerning the possible behavior of wild algebras. The aim of this note is to exhibit two examples which answer questions mentioned in the paper. 1. Wild, Schur

Ringel, Claus Michael

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - active constituents isolated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

subsystems towards in- tegrated systems having numerous... . 2 12;2 Definition of Terms and Problem Statement A coupled model M consists of N constituent1... models--or...

46

Texas County Extension Agents Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Using Facebook to Communicate with Constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and perceptions using social media, Facebook in particular, to communicate with constituents. The participants in the study were a randomly selected group of Texas extension agents. A web-based questionnaire was used to measure the perceived level of confidence...

Lewis, Lacey

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

47

Method and apparatus for the removal of bioconversion of constituents of organic liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the removal or conversion of constituents from bulk organic liquids. A countercurrent biphasic bioreactor system is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the constituent. Two transient, high-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the constituent to produce a product which is then removed from the bioreactor in the aqueous phase or retained in the organic phase. The organic liquid, now free of the original constituents, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

Scott, Timothy (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Method and apparatus for the removal or bioconversion of constituents of organic liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the removal or conversion of constituents from bulk organic liquids. A countercurrent biphasic bioreactor system is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the constituent. Two transient, high-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the constituent to produce a product which is then removed from the bioreactor in the aqueous phase or retained in the organic phase. The organic liquid, now free of the original constituents, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 1 fig.

Scott, T.; Scott, C.D.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Example of Environmental Restoration Code of Accounts  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter describes the fundamental structure of an example remediation cost code system, lists and describes the Level 1 cost codes, and lists the Level 2 and Level 3 cost codes.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Client perceptions of university computing services from the faculty computing skills constituency perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in perceived effectiveness based on differences in computing skill constituencies. The other area of interest relative to this research was in the applied area of providing computing support. The data suggests that the providers of computing services need...CLIENT PERCEPTIONS OF UNIVERSII Y COMPUTING SERVICES FROM THE FACULTY COMPUTING SKILLS CONSTITUENCY PERSPECTIVE A Thesis C. KAY CLAYBOURN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8 M Universi!y in partia! fulfillment ot...

Claybourn, C. Kay

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

MATLAB Quick Guide Name Description Example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB Quick Guide Symbol/ Command Name Description Example help help Help menu for any command or symbol in MATLAB Help : Help sum % comment MATLAB comment symbol; MATLAB will skip any line beginning for multiplication a = 5 * 5 ; / divide Symbol for division b = 5 / 1 ; ; semi-colon (1) Tells MATLAB to suppress

Smith-Konter, Bridget

52

Example School Communications Email about Open Access   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is an example text for an email to be sent to the School of Mathematics as part of preparations for implementing Open Access requirements for the post-2014 REF. This is made available here as part of the Jisc-funded LOCH Project....

Tate, Dominic

2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Optimization Material Distribution methodology: Some electromagnetic examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

730 1 Optimization Material Distribution methodology: Some electromagnetic examples P. Boissoles, H. Ben Ahmed, M. Pierre, B. Multon Abstract--In this paper, a new approach towards Optimization Material to be highly adaptive to various kinds of electromagnetic actuator optimization approaches. Several optimal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

54

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set III)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ES2A7 - Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set III) Question 1 10610 40031.8 -- Ă?=Ă?= Ă? Ă? == APN RT d Question 2: Type of Fluid #12;Consider 2 identical vertical tubes are filled with the same height of fluid: A Newtonian fluid is used with tube X whereas a non-Newtonian fluid

Thomas, Peter J.

55

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set III)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ES2A7 - Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set III) Question 1: Distance between.mol- = - Perfect Gas constant: 1 1 R 8.31J.K .mol- - = Question 2: Type of Fluid Consider 2 identical vertical are filled with the same height of fluid: A Newtonian fluid is used with tube X whereas a non-Newtonian fluid

Thomas, Peter J.

56

Emergent Behavior in Cybersecurity Example 2: Program VerificationExample 1: Cyber Epidemics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emergent Behavior in Cybersecurity Example 2: Program VerificationExample 1: Cyber Epidemics Informal Definition and Implication Abstract We argue that emergent behavior is inherent to cybersecurity). Scenario: Illustration of cyber epidemics model (which is a specific kind of Cybersecurity Dynamics model

Xu, Shouhuai

57

Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentration at regions of interest within the object.

Gold, Raymond (Richland, WA); McElroy, William N. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentrations at regions of interest within the object.

Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

1984-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

Elastic free-energy of the edge of an open lipid bilayer based on the interactions of its constituent molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lipid-bilayers are the fundamental constituents of the walls of most living cells and lipid vesicles, giving them shape and compartment. The formation and growing of pores in a lipid bilayer have attracted considerable attention from an energetic point of view in recent years. Such pores permit targeted delivery of drugs and genes to the cell, and regulate the concentration of various molecules within the cell. The formation of such pores is caused by various reasons such as changes in cell environment, mechanical stress or thermal fluctuations. Understanding the energy and elastic behaviour of a lipid-bilayer edge is crucial for controlling the formation and growth of such pores. In the present work, the interactions in the molecular level are used to obtain the free energy of the edge of an open lipid bilayer. The resulted free-energy density includes terms associated with flexural and torsional energies of the edge, in addition to a line-tension contribution. The line tension, elastic moduli, and spontaneous normal and geodesic curvatures of the edge are obtained as functions of molecular distribution, molecular dimensions, cutoff distance, and the interaction strength. These parameters are further analyzed by implementing a soft-core interaction potential in the microphysical model. The dependence of the elastic free-energy of the edge to the size of the pore is reinvestigated through an illustrative example, and the results are found to be in agreement with the previous observations.

Meisam Asgari; Aisa Biria

2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

Constituent quark masses obtained from hadron masses with contributions of Fermi-Breit and Glozman-Riska hyperfine interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use the color-spin and flavor-spin interaction Hamiltonians with SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking to obtain meson and baryon mass formulas. Adjusting these masses with experimental masses we determine the constituent quark masses. We discuss the constituent quark masses obtained from meson and baryon mass fits. The results for constituent quark masses are very similar in the case of two different phenomenological models: Fermi-Breit and Glozman-Riska hyperfine interactions.

Borka Jovanovic, V.; Borka, D. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Ignjatovic, S. R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Banja Luka, Mladena Stojanovica 2, 78000 Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Jovanovic, P. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Constituent Particle Break-up during Hot Rolling of AA 5182 Nicolas Moulin(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constituent Particle Break-up during Hot Rolling of AA 5182 Nicolas Moulin(1) , Estelle Parra hot reversible rolling of AA5182 alloy sheets has been analysed. The sizes and shapes of intermetallic particles in as-cast and industrially hot rolled AA5182 alloys sheets were characterized by 3D X ray

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

62

Chemical Constituents of the New Endophytic Fungus Mycosphaerella sp. nov. and Their Anti-Parasitic Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Constituents of the New Endophytic Fungus Mycosphaerella sp. nov. and Their Anti of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 Abstract Chemical investigation of a new endophytic fungus­6 were not active in these assays at a concentration of 10 g/mL. Keywords Endophytic fungus

Coley, Phyllis

63

Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result, or materials. Before 1200 AD · Air pollution results from wood burning, tanning, decaying trash, smelting with carbon PbO + C -> Pb + CO Pollutants Produced: CO, SO2 ·Hong, et al., Greenland ice evidence

Weber, Rodney

64

Responses in Milk Constituents to Intravascular Administration of Two Mixtures of Amino Acids to Dairy Cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to inves- tigate the effects of intravascular infusions of AA mixtures on milk constituents. Cows were infusion, followed by a 5-djugular infusion of a mixture of AA. Two mixtures of AA were used in a crossover (total AA); this mixture was infused at 400 g of M d . The other mixture represented the essential AA

Bequette, Brian J.

65

Example 1.1 1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? 3 y z 3 y z ! ! R P R ; ; ; ; ; f f 0 0 09 @ @ @R Keywords: Example 1.1 Abstract 1 Introduction(s(x),y::z) y::first(x,z) first x 1 0 s(x) x 2 first x 1 x 2 first 0 x 2 first s x x 2 [] first s x y z y first, . Work partially supported by DFG (under grant Ha 2457/1­1) and Acci'on Integrada. DSIC, U.P. de Valencia

Lucas, Salvador

66

Symmetry examples in open quantum dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dependent symmetries, a new kind of symmetry of the open quantum dynamics of a subsystem, symmetries that depend on the situation of the subsystem in a larger closed system, are explored by looking at simple examples. Each symmetry implies a particular form for the results of the open dynamics. The forms exhibit the symmetries very simply. It is shown directly, without assuming anything about the symmetry, that the dynamics produces the form, but knowing the symmetry and the form it implies can reduce what needs to be done to work out the dynamics; pieces can be deduced from the symmetry rather that calculated from the dynamics. Symmetries can be related to constants of the motion in new ways. A quantity might be a dependent constant of the motion, constant only for particular situations of the subsystem in the larger system. In particular, a generator of dependent symmetries could represent a quantity that is a dependent constant of the motion for the same situations as for the symmetries. The examples present a variety of possibilities. Sometimes a generator of dependent symmetries does represent a dependent constant of the motion. Sometimes it does not. Sometimes no quantity is a dependent constant of the motion. Sometimes every quantity is.

Thomas F. Jordan; San Ha Seo

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

67

Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water and the three constituent binary systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for methanol + ethanol + water and its three constituent binary systems methanol + ethanol, ethanol + water, and methanol + water were measured at 101.3 kPa using a liquid-vapor ebullition-type equilibrium still. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system methanol + ethanol + water was predicted by means of the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Nakamichi, Mikiyoshi; Kojima, Kazuo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Constituent Quarks and Gluons, Polyakov loop and the Hadron Resonance Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on first principle QCD arguments, it has been argued in arXiv:1204.2424[hep-ph] that the vacuum expectation value of the Polyakov loop can be represented in the hadron resonance gas model. We study this within the Polyakov-constituent quark model by implementing the quantum and local nature of the Polyakov loop hep-ph/0412308, hep-ph/0607338. The existence of exotic states in the spectrum is discussed.

E. Megias; E. Ruiz Arriola; L. L. Salcedo

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

Supporting Nepal’s Peace Process: From Conflict to Constituent Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting Nepal’s Peace Process: From Conflict to Constituent Assembly a special evening talk by Ian Martin chaired by Professor Surya Subedi, OBE 7-9pm, room B102 at SOAS Thursday, 18 March, 2010 Nepal’s political... FOCUSED MISSION: NOT SO LIMITED DURATION 4 complicated by persistent delays of the election as well as ambivalence surrounding the extent to which Nepali in- terlocutors required the technical assistance that UNMIN provided. Like UNMIN’s office of civil...

Martin, Ian

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

Initial eccentricity and constituent quark number scaling of elliptic flow in ideal and viscous dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Israel-Stewart's theory of dissipative hydrodynamics, we study the scaling properties elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions. Initial energy density of the fluid was fixed to reproduce STAR data on $\\phi$ meson multiplicity in 0-5% Au+Au collisions, such that irrespective of fluid viscosity, entropy at the freeze-out is similar in ideal or in viscous evolution. Initial eccentricity or constituent quark number scaling is only approximate in ideal or minimally viscous ($\\eta/s=1/4\\pi$) fluid. Eccentricity scaling become nearly exact in more viscous fluid ($\\eta/s \\geq$0.12). However, in more viscous fluid, constituent quark number scaled elliptic flow for mesons and baryons split into separate scaling functions. Simulated flows also do not exhibit 'universal scaling' i.e. elliptic flow scaled by the constituent quark number and charged particles $v_2$ is not a single function of transverse kinetic energy scaled by the quark number. From a study of violation of universal scaling, we obtain an estimate of QGP viscosity, $\\eta/s=0.12 \\pm 0.03$.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

Integral quantizations with two basic examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper concerns integral quantization, a procedure based on operator-valued measure and resolution of the identity. We insist on covariance properties in the important case where group representation theory is involved. We also insist on the inherent probabilistic aspects of this classical–quantum map. The approach includes and generalizes coherent state quantization. Two applications based on group representation are carried out. The first one concerns the Weyl–Heisenberg group and the euclidean plane viewed as the corresponding phase space. We show that a world of quantizations exist, which yield the canonical commutation rule and the usual quantum spectrum of the harmonic oscillator. The second one concerns the affine group of the real line and gives rise to an interesting regularization of the dilation origin in the half-plane viewed as the corresponding phase space. -- Highlights: •Original approach to quantization based on (positive) operator-valued measures. •Includes Berezin–Klauder–Toeplitz and Weyl–Wigner quantizations. •Infinitely many such quantizations produce canonical commutation rule. •Set of objects to be quantized is enlarged in order to include singular functions or distributions. •Are given illuminating examples like quantum angle and affine or wavelet quantization.

Bergeron, H., E-mail: herve.bergeron@u-psud.fr [Univ Paris-Sud, ISMO, UMR 8214, 91405 Orsay (France); Gazeau, J.P., E-mail: gazeau@apc.univ-paris7.fr [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); APC, UMR 7164, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75205 Paris (France)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Effects of fine particulate matter and its constituents on low birth weight among full-term infants in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relationships between prenatal exposure to fine particles (PM{sub 2.5}) and birth weight have been observed previously. Few studies have investigated specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, which may identify sources and major contributors of risk. We examined the effects of trimester and full gestational prenatal exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and 23 PM{sub 2.5} constituents on birth weight among 646,296 term births in California between 2000 and 2006. We used linear and logistic regression models to assess associations between exposures and birth weight and risk of low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g), respectively. Models were adjusted for individual demographic characteristics, apparent temperature, month and year of birth, region, and socioeconomic indicators. Higher full gestational exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and several PM{sub 2.5} constituents were significantly associated with reductions in term birth weight. The largest reductions in birth weight were associated with exposure to vanadium, sulfur, sulfate, iron, elemental carbon, titanium, manganese, bromine, ammonium, zinc, and copper. Several of these PM{sub 2.5} constituents were associated with increased risk of term LBW. Reductions in birth weight were generally larger among younger mothers and varied by race/ethnicity. Exposure to specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, especially traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals, were associated with decreased birth weight in California. -- Highlights: • Examine full gestational and trimester fine particle and its constituents on term birth weight. • Fine particles and several of its constituents associated with birth weight reductions. • Largest reductions for traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals. • Greater birth weight reductions for younger mothers, and varied by race/ethnicity.

Basu, Rupa, E-mail: Rupa.Basu@oehha.ca.gov [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Pollution Epidemiology Section, Oakland, CA (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Pollution Epidemiology Section, Oakland, CA (United States); Harris, Maria [School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States)] [School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Sie, Lillian [School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Malig, Brian; Broadwin, Rachel; Green, Rochelle [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Pollution Epidemiology Section, Oakland, CA (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Pollution Epidemiology Section, Oakland, CA (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Wide-Area Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Wide-Area Programming William Cook, Jayadev Misra, David Kitchin, Adrian Quark Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu #12;Overview Orc Notation Examples Outline Overview Orc Notation Examples #12;Overview Orc Notation

Misra, Jayadev

74

Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for benzene + cyclohexane + 1-propanol and for three constituent binary systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system of benzene + cyclohexane + 1-propanol and its constituent binary systems of benzene + cyclohexane, cyclohexane + 1-propanol, and benzene + 1-propanol at 323.15 and 333.15 K, using the apparatus proposed in a previous study. The experimental binary data were correlated using the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters. The average absolute percent deviations between the predicted and experimental ternary total pressures are 0.5% at 323.15 K and 0.4% at 333.15 K.

Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Uchiyama, Masanori; Kojima, Kazuo [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry] [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Nucleon shape and electromagnetic form factors in the chiral constituent quark model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electromagnetic form factors are the most fundamental quantities to describe the internal structure of the nucleon and the shape of a spatially extended particle is determined by its intrinsic quadrupole moment which can be related to the charge radii. We have calculated the electromagnetic form factors, nucleon charge radii and the intrinsic quadrupole moment of the nucleon in the framework of chiral constituent quark model. The results obtained are comparable to the latest experimental studies and also show improvement over some theoretical interpretations.

Dahiya, Harleen; Sharma, Neetika [Department of Physics, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar, Punjab-144 011 (India)

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

Nucleon shape and electromagnetic form factors in the chiral constituent quark model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electromagnetic form factors are the most fundamental quantities to describe the internal structure of the nucleon and the shape of a spatially extended particle is determined by its intrinsic quadrupole moment which can be related to the charge radii. We have calculated the electromagnetic form factors, nucleon charge radii and the intrinsic quadrupole moment of the nucleon in the framework of chiral constituent quark model. The results obtained are comparable to the latest experimental studies and also show improvement over some theoretical interpretations.

Harleen Dahiya; Neetika Sharma

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

Devices and methods for managing noncombustible gasses in nuclear power plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems passively eliminate noncondensable gasses from facilities susceptible to damage from combustion of built-up noncondensable gasses, such as H2 and O2 in nuclear power plants, without the need for external power and/or moving parts. Systems include catalyst plates installed in a lower header of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) condenser, a catalyst packing member, and/or a catalyst coating on an interior surface of a condensation tube of the PCCS condenser or an annular outlet of the PCCS condenser. Structures may have surfaces or hydrophobic elements that inhibit water formation and promote contact with the noncondensable gas. Noncondensable gasses in a nuclear power plant are eliminated by installing and using the systems individually or in combination. An operating pressure of the PCCS condenser may be increased to facilitate recombination of noncondensable gasses therein.

Marquino, Wayne; Moen, Stephan C; Wachowiak, Richard M; Gels, John L; Diaz-Quiroz, Jesus; Burns, Jr., John C

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

" Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",2.6  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49. Total22" ".5 Relative

79

Project examples Install new HVAC, electrical, fire protection,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project examples Install new HVAC, electrical, fire protection, and plumbing systems in Mechanical. · Totransformthisspaceandincreaseaccessibility, anelevatorisrequired.Currently,Blakelydoesnot haveone. Replace HVAC and electrical system

Blanchette, Robert A.

80

Energy Data Management Lead-by-Example Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Statistical Origin of Constituent-Quark Scaling in the QGP hadronization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonextensive statistics in a Blast-Wave model (TBW) is implemented to describe the identified hadron production in relativistic p+p and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Incorporating the core and corona components within the TBW formalism allows us to describe simultaneously some of the major observations in hadronic observables at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC): the Number of Constituent Quark Scaling (NCQ), the large radial and elliptic flow, the effect of gluon saturation and the suppression of hadron production at high transverse momentum (pT) due to jet quenching. In this formalism, the NCQ scaling at RHIC appears as a consequence of non-equilibrium process. Our study also provides concise reference distributions with a least chi2 fit of the available experimental data for future experiments and models.

Zebo Tang; Li Yi; Lijuan Ruan; Ming Shao; Hongfang Chen; Cheng Li; Bedangadas Mohanty; Paul Sorensen; Aihong Tang; Zhangbu Xu

2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

The hypercentral Constituent Quark Model and its application to baryon properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hypercentral Constituent Quark Model (hCQM) for the baryon structure is reviewed and its applications are systematically discussed. The model is based on a simple form of the quark potential, which contains a Coulomb-like interaction and a confinement, both expressed in terms of a collective space coordinate, the hyperradius. The model has only three free parameters, determined in order to describe the baryon spectrum. Once the parameters have been fixed, the model, in its non relativistic version, is used to predict various quantities of physical interest, namely the elastic nucleon form factors, the photocouplings and the helicity amplitudes for the electromagnetic excitation of the baryon resonances. In particular, the $Q^2$ dependence of the helicity amplitude is quite well reproduced, thanks to the Coulomb-like interaction. The model is reformulated in a relativistic version by means of the Point Form hamilton dynamics. While the inclusion of relativity does not alter the results for the helicity amp...

Giannini, M M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Optical methods and systems for detecting a constituent in a gas containing oxygen in harsh environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for detecting a gas phase constituent such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen, or hydrocarbons in a gas comprising oxygen such as air, includes providing a sensing material or film having a metal embedded in a catalytically active matrix such as gold embedded in a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix. The method may include annealing the sensing material at about 900.degree. C., exposing the sensing material and gas to a temperature above 400.degree. C., projecting light onto the sensing material, and detecting a change in the absorption spectrum of the sensing material due to the exposure of the sensing material to the gas in air at the temperature which causes a chemical reaction in the sensing material compared to the absorption spectrum of the sensing material in the absence of the gas. Systems employing such a method are also disclosed.

Carpenter, Michael A. (Scotia, NY); Sirinakis, George (Bronx, NY)

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

85

Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Application Development over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Application Development over Wide-Area Networks William of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu #12;Overview Orc Notation. - #12;Overview Orc Notation Examples Orchestrating Components (services) Acquire data from services

Misra, Jayadev

86

Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for water + 2-aminoethanol + dimethyl sulfoxide and its constituent three binary systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system water + 2-aminoethanol + dimethyl sulfoxide and its three constituent binary mixtures at 363.15 K. The apparatus used was a modified Rogalski-Malanoski equilibrium still. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

Tochigi, Katsumi; Akimoto, Kentarou; Ochi, Kenji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry] [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry; Liu, Fangyhi; Kawase, Yasuhito [Nippon Refine Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Nippon Refine Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

COMPARISON OF MATLAB, OCTAVE, AND PYLAB EXAMPLES (FOR MATH 694)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the general purpose language Python has developed to have Matlab- like functionality. The ipython interactive Python examples type run ortho.py or run hello.py at the ipython prompt or python ortho.py, python hello

Bueler, Ed

88

Field Examples of Axial Cracked Bearings in Wind Turbine Gearboxes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Examples of Axial Cracked Bearings in Wind Turbine Gearboxes Presented by Paul John Baker of FrontierPro Services at the Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar 2014. 141030 Axial...

89

Examples of integral domains inside power series rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... would like to thank the National Science Foundation and the National Security ...... piR. ? are n distinct prime ideals. For example, we could take pi = y ? xi. Let.

1910-31-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Advanced Semantic Search: The Medical World as an Example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be specific. · The example query "Which disease has the symptom of coughing?" brings a result set in hakia of coughing?" #12;20 4. Handling Concept Matching · Perhaps the most challenging functionality among all

Shamir, Ron

91

Specific Examples of Global Activities Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park works syner- gistically with the Office competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park worksSpecific Examples of Global Activities · Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan · Study abroad

92

Irreversible Thermodynamics and Smart Materials Systems Modelling. Example of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irreversible Thermodynamics and Smart Materials Systems Modelling. Example of Magnetic Shape Memory mechanisms in smart materials. This procedure is applied to Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys actuators of complex active materials for smart systems. Keywords: Smart material systems, Actuator design

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

93

Higher twists in polarized DIS and the size of the constituent quark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry implies the presence of a short-distance scale in the QCD vacuum, which phenomenologically may be associated with the ''size'' of the constituent quark, rho {approx} 0.3 fm. We discuss the role of this scale in the matrix elements of the twist-4 and 3 quark-gluon operators determining the leading power (1/Q{sup 2}-) corrections to the moments of the nucleon spin structure functions. We argue that the flavor-nonsinglet twist-4 matrix element, f{sub 2}{sup u-d}, has a sizable negative value of the order rho{sup -2}, due to the presence of sea quarks with virtualities {approx} rho{sup -2} in the proton wave function. The twist-3 matrix element, d{sub 2}, is not related to the scale rho{sup -2}. Our arguments support the results of previous calculations of the matrix elements in the instanton vacuum model. We show that this qualitative picture is in agreement with the phenomenological higher-twist correction extracted from an NLO QCD fit to the world data on g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup n}, which include recent data from the Jefferson Lab Hall A and COMPASS experiments. We comment on the implications of the short-distance scale rho for quark-hadron duality and the x-dependence of higher-twist contributions.

Alexander Sidorov; Christian Weiss

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

The hypercentral Constituent Quark Model and its application to baryon properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hypercentral Constituent Quark Model (hCQM) for the baryon structure is reviewed and its applications are systematically discussed. The model is based on a simple form of the quark potential, which contains a Coulomb-like interaction and a confinement, both expressed in terms of a collective space coordinate, the hyperradius. The model has only three free parameters, determined in order to describe the baryon spectrum. Once the parameters have been fixed, the model, in its non relativistic version, is used to predict various quantities of physical interest, namely the elastic nucleon form factors, the photocouplings and the helicity amplitudes for the electromagnetic excitation of the baryon resonances. In particular, the $Q^2$ dependence of the helicity amplitude is quite well reproduced, thanks to the Coulomb-like interaction. The model is reformulated in a relativistic version by means of the Point Form hamilton dynamics. While the inclusion of relativity does not alter the results for the helicity amplitudes, a good description of the nucleon elastic form factors is obtained.

M. M. Giannini; E. Santopinto

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for RCRA Constituent Analysis of Solidified Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents distributes test samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals in solid matrices. Each distribution of test samples is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department. The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the RCRA PDP. Participating laboratories demonstrate acceptable performance by successfully analyzing single- blind performance evaluation samples (subsequently referred to as PDP samples) according to the criteria established in this plan. PDP samples are used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). The concentrations of analytes in the PDP samples address levels of regulatory concern and encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in waste characterization samples. The WIPP requires analyses of homogeneous solid wastes to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples. Participating laboratories must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

Stability of SiC-Matrix Microencapsulated Fuel Constituents at Relevant LWR Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses certain key feasibility issues facing the application of SiC-matrix microencapsulated fuels for light water reactor application. Issues addressed are the irradiation stability of the SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix under LWR-relevant irradiation conditions, the presence or extent of reaction of the SiC matrix with zirconium-based cladding, the stability of the inner and outer pyrolytic graphite layers of the microencapsulated (TRISO) particle at this uncharacteristically low irradiation temperature, and the state of the particle-matrix interface following irradiation which could possibly effect thermal transport. In the process of determining these feasibility issues microstructural evolution and change in dimension and thermal conductivity was studied. As a general finding the SiC matrix was found to be quite stable with behavior similar to that of CVD SiC. In magnitude the irradiation-induced swelling of the matrix material was slightly higher and irradiation-degraded thermal conductivity was slightly lower as compared to CVD SiC. No significant reaction of this SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix material with Zircaloy was observed. Irradiation of the TRISO in the 320-360 C range to a maximum dose of 7.7 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) did not have significant negative impact on the constituent layers of the TRISO fuel. At the highest dose studied layer structure and interface integrity remained essentially unchanged with good apparent thermal transport through the microsphere to the surrounding matrix.

Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL] [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL] [ORNL; Perez-Bergquist, Alex G [ORNL] [ORNL; Silva, Chinthaka M [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Geodesic Motion on Closed Spaces: Two Numerical Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The geodesic structure is very closely related to the trace of the Laplace operator, involved in the calculation of the expectation value of the energy momentum tensor in Universes with non trivial topology. The purpose of this work is to provide concrete numerical examples of geodesic flows. Two manifolds with genus $g=0$ are given. In one the chaotic regions, form sets of negligible or zero measure. In the second example the geodesic flow, shows the presence of measurable chaotic regions. The approach is "experimental", numerical, and there is no attempt to an analytical calculation.

Daniel Muller

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Regional Examples of Geological Settings for Nuclear Waste Disposal in Deep Boreholes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report develops and exercises broad-area site selection criteria for deep boreholes suitable for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and/or its separated constituents. Three candidates are examined: a regional site in the ...

Sapiie, B.

100

Effect of humic constituents on the transformation of chlorinated phenols and anilines in the presence of oxidoreductive enzymes or birnessite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorinated phenols and anilines are transformed and detoxified in soil through oxidative coupling reactions mediated by enzymes or metal oxides. The reactions may be influences by humic constituents, such as syringaldehyde or catechol, that originate from lignin decomposition and are also subject to oxidative coupling. In this study, the effect of humic constituents on xenobiotic transformation was evaluated in vitro based on the determination of unreacted chlorophenols and chloroanilines. In experiments with peroxidase, laccase, and birnessite, the transformation of most chlorophenols was considerably enhanced by the addition of syringaldehyde. Less enhancement was observed using 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and the addition of catechol resulted in a reduction of most transformations. The opposite was observed in experiments with tyrosinase, in which case catechol caused considerable enhancement of chlorophenol transformation. The varying effect of catechol can be explained by different transformation mechanisms involving either o-quinone coupling or free radical coupling. Regardless of the agent used to mediate the reactions, chloroanilines seemed to undergo nucleophilic addition to quinone oligomers, which resulted from coupling of the humic constituents. Catechol, which readily forms quinones and quinone oligomers, was most efficient in enhancing these reactions.

Park, J.W.; Dec, J.; Bollag, J.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)); Kim, J.E. (Kyngpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Agricultural Chemistry)

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Termination Checking: Comparing Structural Recursion and Sized Types by Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Termination Checking: Comparing Structural Recursion and Sized Types by Examples David Thibodeau Decemer 3, 2011 Abstract Termination is an important property for programs and is necessary for formal proofs to make sense. In order to make sure that a program using recursion is terminating, one can use

Abel, Andreas

102

Examples of CSATS Projects Center for Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examples of CSATS Projects Center for Science and the Schools The Pennsylvania State University 182-5901; Tel 814- CSATS-Hosted Outreach Saturday Science Workshops for Teachers Research Experiences for Urban Science Teachers Penn State STEM Outreach Database STEM Research Grants Research and Education on Buruli

Maroncelli, Mark

103

PH-315 Portland State University Arduino PID Example Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PH-315 Portland State University Arduino PID Example Lab Bret Comnes & A. La Rosa 1. Introduction to PID PID (Proportional, Integral, Differential) is a control algorithm that tries to compensate for characteristics in your system. There are three primary components to think about in a PID control loop. Each

104

Structured Wide-Area Programming: Orc Programming Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structured Wide-Area Programming: Orc Programming Examples Jayadev Misra Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu #12;Some Algorithms · Enumeration;Corresponding Orc program val (x, y) = (Ref(0), Ref(0)) def f1() = Ift(x?

Misra, Jayadev

105

Theme Types of programs and initiatives Princeton examples Outreach and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Theme Types of programs and initiatives Princeton examples Outreach and recruitment Develop. Take full advantage of the Target of Opportunity (ToO) program to hire promising faculty members or interdisciplinary area. Princeton has had a ToO program since 2001. Diversity Best Practices Faculty Members

106

Theme Types of programs and initiatives Princeton examples Recruitment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Theme Types of programs and initiatives Princeton examples Recruitment initiatives Develop summer research programs to bring promising non-Princeton undergraduates to campus to build their research. These students conduct original research on which they receive detailed feedback. Students in these programs

107

Control of Microfluidic Systems: Two Examples, Results, and Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Control of Microfluidic Systems: Two Examples, Results, and Challenges Micheal Armani, Satej results and challenges in feedback control of microfluidic systems. Results are provided for two Integration of Micro- and Nano-Scale Systems' organized by the author. 2. Introduction Microfluidics refers

Shapiro, Benjamin

108

Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids II. Imidazolium cations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In part 1 of this study, radiolytic degradation of constituent anions in ionic liquids (ILs) was examined. The present study continues the themes addressed in part 1 and examines the radiation chemistry of 1,3-dialkyl substituted imidazolium cations, which currently comprise the most practically important and versatile class of ionic liquid cations. For comparison, we also examined 1,3-dimethoxy- and 2-methyl-substituted imidazolium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations. In addition to identification of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and selective deuterium substitution, we analyzed stable radiolytic products using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal rich chemistry initiated through 'ionization of the ions': oxidation and the formation of radical dications in the aliphatic arms of the parent cations (leading to deprotonation and the formation of alkyl radicals in these arms) and reduction of the parent cation, yielding 2-imidazolyl radicals. The subsequent reactions of these radicals depend on the nature of the IL. If the cation is 2-substituted, the resulting 2-imidazolyl radical is relatively stable. If there is no substitution at C(2), the radical then either is protonated or reacts with the parent cation forming a C(2)-C(2) {sigma}{sigma}*-bound dimer radical cation. In addition to these reactions, when methoxy or C{sub {alpha}}-substituted alkyl groups occupy the N(1,3) positions, their elimination is observed. The elimination of methyl groups from N(1,3) was not observed. Product analyses of imidazolium liquids irradiated in the very-high-dose regime (6.7 MGy) reveal several detrimental processes, including volatilization, acidification, and oligomerization. The latter yields a polymer with m/z of 650 {+-} 300 whose radiolytic yield increases with dose (0.23 monomer units per 100 eV for 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium trifluorosulfonate). Gradual generation of this polymer accounts for the steady increase in the viscosity of the ILs upon irradiation. Previous studies at lower dose have missed this species due to its wide mass distribution (stretching out to m/z 1600) and broad NMR lines, which make it harder to detect at lower concentrations. Among other observed changes is the formation of water immiscible fractions in hydrophilic ILs and water miscible fractions in hydrophobic ILs. The latter is due to anion fragmentation. The import of these observations for use of ILs as extraction solvents in nuclear cycle separations is discussed.

Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T. W.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Hatcher, J.; Wishart, J. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (BNL)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

109

Method for separating constituents from solution employing a recyclable Lewis acid metal-hydroxy gel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention permits radionuclides, heavy metals, and organics to be extracted from solution by scavenging them with an amorphous gel. In the preferred embodiment, a contaminated solution (e.g. from soil washing, decontamination, or groundwater pumping) is transferred to a reaction vessel. The contaminated solution is contacted by the sequestering reagent which might contain for example, aluminate and EDTA anions in a 2.5 M NaOH solution. The pH of the reagent bearing solution is lowered on contact with the contaminated solution, or for example by bubbling carbon dioxide through it, causing an aluminum hydroxide gel to precipitate as the solution drops below the range of 1.8 to 2.5 molar NaOH (less than pH 14). This precipitating gel scavenges waste contaminants as it settles through solution leaving a clean supernatant which is then separated from the gel residue by physical means such as centrifugation, or simple settling. The gel residue containing concentrated contaminants is then redissolved releasing contaminants for separations and processing. This is a critical point: the stabilized gel used in this invention is readily re-dissolved by merely increasing the pH above the gels phase transition to aqueous anions. Thus, concentrated contaminants trapped in the gel can be released for convenient separation from the sequestering reagent, and said reagent can then be recycled.

Alexander, D.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Gauge invariant composite fields out of connections, with examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we put forward a systematic and unifying approach to construct gauge invariant composite fields out of connections. It relies on the existence in the theory of a group valued field with a prescribed gauge transformation. As an illustration, we detail some examples. Two of them are based on known results: the first one provides a reinterpretation of the symmetry breaking mechanism of the electroweak part of the Standard Model of particle physics; the second one is an application to Einstein's theory of gravity described as a gauge theory in terms of Cartan connections. The last example depicts a new situation: starting with a gauge field theory on Atiyah Lie algebroids, the gauge invariant composite fields describe massive vector fields. Some mathematical and physical discussions illustrate and highlight the relevance and the generality of this approach.

Cédric Fournel; Jordan François; Serge Lazzarini; Thierry Masson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Dynamics of a relativistic Rankine vortex for a two-constituent superfluid in a weak perturbation of cylindrical symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From a recent study of a stationary cylindrical solution for a relativistic two-constituent superfluid at low temperature limit, we propose to specify this solution under the form of a relativistic generalisation of a Rankine vortex (Potential vortex whose the core has a solid body rotation).Then we establish the dynamics of the central line of this vortex by supposing that the deviation from the cylindrical configuration is weak in the neighbourhood of the core of the vortex. In "stiff" material the Nambu-Goto equations are obtained.

B. Boisseau

1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

Microsoft Word - Appendix B - Example Contact Record.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North - t8 OLF OctoberExample

114

Zero Energy Ready Home Certificate Examples | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf TheViolations |Join theZ:\ENROLL\H1.ENRLenderCertificate Examples

115

Software Quality Assurance Plan Example | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on Energy andDepartment ofAnShare your opinions andAn example

116

Examples of OSUR Assisted Projects | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin Film XRDEvan FelixExperimentsExample Batch Auburn

117

File:Wind rough example.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Planrough example.pdf Jump

118

Examples involving shrinking conditions of fixed point theorems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 'NCE December i&70 Major SubDect: M, ther. atics 0 S E z EXP~LES INVOLVI'. &G SHPINEIIlG COEDITIOIJS OP 1 IZED POIl'I I TEEOREi'!S a z lg o o Pi Vl W Sl 5 0 A Thesis by DOUGLAS ANJHZW SJIAPP Approved as to style and content, oy... fash? on. However, shall focus our . i. nterest on the inability of one condition to oe deri ved from another. 'dhen this ' s the case, an example will show the point o " impasse. ACKI1GWLZDG~PJ&TH I wish to thank the following people...

Sharp, Douglas Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

119

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench water from a slagging, fixed-bed coal-gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is part of an effort to assess the efficiency of activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot-plant quench waters. A sample of raw-gas quench water was obtained from the Grand Forks Energy and Technology Center's pilot plant, which employs the slagging, fixed-bed gasification process. The quench water generated in the processing of Indian Head lignite was pretreated to reduce ammonia and alkalinity, and then diluted and subjected to long-term biological treatment, followed by detailed characterization and analysis of organic constituents. The pretreated (influent) and treated (effluent) samples were extracted using a methylene chloride, pH-fractionation method to obtain acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Over 99% of the total extractable and chromatographable organic material in the influent acid fraction was composed of phenol and alkylated phenols. Biological treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Major components of the influent base fraction were alkylated pyridines, anilines, aminopyrroles, imidazoles and/or pyrazoles, diazines, and quinolines. Removal efficiency of these compounds ranged between 90 and 100%. The influent neutral fraction was composed mainly of cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, naphthalene, indole, acetophenone, and benzonitrile. Alkylated benzenes were generally absent. Removal efficiencies of these compounds were generally very good, except for certain alkylated cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes. Results are compared with those of a similar study on HYGAS coal-gasification quench water.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Imaging laser analysis of building materials - practical examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laser induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is supplement and extension of standard chemical methods and SEM- or Micro-RFA-applications for the evaluation of building materials. As a laboratory method LIBS is used to gain color coded images representing composition, distribution of characteristic ions and/or ingress characteristic of damaging substances. To create a depth profile of element concentration a core has to be taken and split along the core axis. LIBS was proven to be able to detect all important elements in concrete, e. g. Chlorine, Sodium or Sulfur, which are responsible for certain degradation mechanisms and also light elements like lithium or hydrogen. Practical examples are given and a mobile system for on-site measurements is presented.

Wilsch, G.; Schaurich, D.; Wiggenhauser, H. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany)

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Evaluation of integrated data sets: four examples. [Uranium deposits (exploration)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several large data sets have been integrated and utilized for rapid evaluation on a reconnaissance scale for the Montrose 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Colorado. The data sets include Landsat imagery, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment analyses, airborne geophysical data, known mineral occurrences, and a geologic map. All data sets were registered to a 179 x 119 rectangular grid and projected onto Universal Transverse Mercator coordinates. A grid resolution of 1 km was used. All possible combinations of three, for most data sets, were examined for general geologic correlations by utilizing a color microfilm output. In addition, gray-level pictures of statistical output, e.g., factor analysis, have been employed to aid evaluations. Examples for the data sets dysprosium-calcium, lead-copper-zinc, and equivalent uranium-uranium in water-uranium in sediment are described with respect to geologic applications, base-metal regimes, and geochemical associations.

Bolivar, S.L.; Freeman, S.B.; Weaver, T.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Appendix D Example Standard Operating Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Appendix D ­ Example Standard Operating Procedures UW Environmental Health and Safety Page D-1 Appendix D - Example Standard Operating Procedures A. EXAMPLE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs) Current example SOPs are on-line at http

Wilcock, William

123

Lessons & Examples for Establishing Partnerships Between Grantees & Financial Institutions (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transcript of the webinar, "Lessons & Examples for Establishing Partnerships Between Grantees & Financial Institutions."

124

Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

Huber, Heinz J.

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

125

Future waste treatment and energy systems – examples of joint scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Approach for use of scenarios dealing with both waste management and energy issues. • Overall scenarios for the common project and sub-scenarios in parts of the project. • Combining different types of scenarios to the tools of different disciplines. • Use of explorative external scenarios based on marginals for consequential LCA. - Abstract: Development and use of scenarios for large interdisciplinary projects is a complicated task. This article provides practical examples of how it has been carried out in two projects addressing waste management and energy issues respectively. Based on experiences from the two projects, recommendations are made for an approach concerning development of scenarios in projects dealing with both waste management and energy issues. Recommendations are given to develop and use overall scenarios for the project and leave room for sub-scenarios in parts of the project. Combining different types of scenarios is recommended, too, in order to adapt to the methods and tools of different disciplines, such as developing predictive scenarios with general equilibrium tools and analysing explorative scenarios with energy system analysis tools. Furthermore, as marginals identified in differing future background systems determine the outcomes of consequential life cycle assessments (LCAs), it is considered advisable to develop and use explorative external scenarios based on possible marginals as a framework for consequential LCAs. This approach is illustrated using an on-going Danish research project.

Münster, M., E-mail: maem@dtu.dk [System Analysis Division, DTU Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Finnveden, G. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Department of Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research – fms, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Wenzel, H. [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Allé 1, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Notional Examples and Benchmark Aspects Of a Resilient Control System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital control system technology has pervaded most industries, leading to improvements in the efficiency and reliability of the associated operations. However, the ease of distributing and connecting related control systems for the purposes of increasing performance has resulted in interdependencies that can lead to unexpected conditions. Even with less complex designs, operators and engineers alike are often left with competing goals that are difficult to resolve. A fundamental reason for this dichotomy is that responsibilities lie with different disciplines, and operations are hosted on separate control systems. In addition, with the rising awareness of cyber security and diverse human interactions with control systems, an understanding of human actions from a malicious and benevolent standpoint is necessary. Resilience considers the multiple facets of requirements that drive the performance of control systems in a holistic fashion, whether they are security or stability, stability or efficiency, human interactions or complex interdependencies. As will be shown by example, current research philosophies lack the depth or the focus on the control system application to satisfy these requirements, such as graceful degradation of hierarchical control while under cyber attack. A resilient control system promises to purposefully consider these diverse requirements, developing an adaptive capacity to complex events that can lead to failure of traditional control system designs.

Craig. G. Rieger

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A connectionist framework for reasoning: Reasoning with examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a connectionist architecture that supports almost instantaneous deductive and abductive reasoning. The deduction algorithm responds in few steps for single rule queries and in general, takes time that is linear with the number of rules in the query. The abduction algorithm produces an explanation in few steps and the best explanation in time linear with the size of the assumption set. The size of the network is polynomially related to the size of other representations of the domain, and may even be smaller. We base our connectionist model on Valiant`s Neuroidal model (Val94) and thus make minimal assumptions about the computing elements, which are assumed to be classical threshold elements with states. Within this model we develop a reasoning framework that utilizes a model-based approach to reasoning (KKS93; KR94b). In particular, we suggest to interpret the connectionist architecture as encoding examples of the domain we reason about and show how to perform various reasoning tasks with this interpretation. We then show that the representations used can be acquired efficiently from interactions with the environment and discuss how this learning process influences the reasoning performance of the network.

Roth, D. [Weizmann Inst. of Science (Israel)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Background and Motivation Literature The Model Examples Summary Sustainable Supply Chain Network Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Motivation Literature The Model Examples Summary Photos of oil spill crisis in Gulf of Mexico, May 2010 Anna pollution. For example, free trade may shift pollution-intensive manufacturing processes from countries

Nagurney, Anna

129

Thermodynamic data bases for multivalent elements: An example for ruthenium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A careful consideration and understanding of fundamental chemistry, thermodynamics, and kinetics is absolutely essential when modeling predominance regions and solubility behavior of elements that exhibit a wide range of valence states. Examples of this are given using the ruthenium-water system at 298.15 K, for which a critically assessed thermochemical data base is available. Ruthenium exhibits the widest range of known aqueous solution valence states. Known solid anhydrous binary oxides of ruthenium are crystalline RuO/sub 2/, RuO/sub 4/, and possibly RuO/sub 3/ (thin film), and known hydroxides/hydrated oxides (all amorphous) are Ru(OH)/sub 3/ . H/sub 2/O, RuO/sub 2/ . 2H/sub 2/O, RuO/sub 2/ . H/sub 2/O, and a poorly characterized Ru(V) hydrous oxide. Although the other oxides, hydroxides, and hydrous oxides are generally obtained as precipitates from aqueous solutions, they are thermodynamically unstable with regard to RuO/sub 2/(cr) formation. Characterized aqueous species of ruthenium include RuO/sub 4/ (which slowly oxidizes water and which dissociates as a weak acid), RuO/sub 4//sup -/ and RuO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ (which probably contain lesser amounts of RuO/sub 3/(OH)/sub 2//sup -/ and RuO/sub 3/(OH)/sub 2//sup 2 -/, respectively, and other species), Ru(OH)/sub 2//sup 2 +/, Ru/sub 4/(OH)/sub 12//sup 4 +/, Ru(OH)/sub 4/, Ru/sup 3 +/, Ru(OH)/sup 2 +/, Ru(OH)/sub 2//sup +/, Ru/sup 2 +/, and some hydroxytetramers with formal ruthenium valences of 3.75 greater than or equal to Z greater than or equal to 2.0. Potential pH diagrams of the predominance regions change significantly with concentration due to polymerization/depolymerization reactions. Failure to consider the known chemistry of ruthenium can yield large differences in predicted solubilities.

Rard, J.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Model Transformation By-Example: A Survey of the First Wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this problem, model transformation by-example (MTBE) approaches [45,47] have been proposed which follow

131

Compilation of data to estimate groundwater migration potential for constituents in active liquid discharges at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary characterization of the constituents present in the 33 liquid waste streams at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has been completed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. In addition, Westinghouse Hanford has summarized the soil characteristics based on drill logs collected at each site that receives these liquid wastes. Literature searches were conducted and available Hanford-specific data were tabulated and reviewed. General literature on organic chemicals present in the liquid waste streams was also reviewed. Using all of this information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a best estimate of the transport characteristics (water solubility and soil adsorption properties) for those radionuclides and inorganic and organic chemicals identified in the various waste streams. We assume that the potential for transport is qualified through the four geochemical parameters: solubility, distribution coefficient, persistence (radiogenic or biochemical half-life), and volatility. Summary tables of these parameters are presented for more than 50 inorganic and radioactive species and more than 50 organic compounds identified in the liquid waste streams. Brief descriptions of the chemical characteristics of Hanford sediments, solubility, and adsorption processes, and of how geochemical parameters are used to estimate migration in groundwater-sediment environments are also presented. Groundwater monitoring data are tabulated for wells neighboring the facilities that receive the liquid wastes. 91 refs., 16 figs., 23 tabs.

Ames, L.L.; Serne, R.J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Mineralogical and physical considerations related to the separation and recovery of constituents from aluminum smelter by-products and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several by-products and waste products of aluminum smelting were characterized mineralogically and physically, in order to evaluate the potential for their decontamination or separation and recovery into valuable products using mineral processing techniques. The test samples were selected from among Bayer process red mud, bath-alumina mixture, cleaned anode butts, anode recycle residues, spent potlining, saltcake and fluorogypsum. Several of these materials were shown to be composed either of highly liberated, potentially separable mineral phases, or of locked minerals which could be partially liberated by grinding to smaller but practical particle sizes. An analysis of specific physical properties of the liberated constituent mineral phases was accompanied by preliminary experimental evaluation of their separability. An assessment was made of potential mineral processing techniques including size and form differentiation, gravitational and magnetic field separation, flotation, separation based on surface charging phenomena or work function, and pneumatic tabling. The results confirmed the suitability of low-cost physical separation techniques for the treatment of some by-products and wastes. This paper presents results of a preliminary evaluation of two smelter products. The conference paper will analyze and discuss in more detail the potential for the mineral processing of these and other smelter by-products and wastes.

Plumpton, A.J.; Wilhelmy, J.F.; Blackburn, D.; Caouette, J.L. [Centre de Recherches Minerales, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recovery, transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products. 7 figs.

Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.; Mansure, A.J.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal mircrobalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recover transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products.

Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Vapor-liquid equilibria of n-hexane + cyclohexane + n-heptane and the three constituent binary systems at 101. 0 kPa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the title ternary system and the three constituent binary systems have been measured at 101.0 kPa by using a dynamic equilibrium still. The binary data were tested for thermodynamic consistency and were correlated by the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC equations. Predictions for the ternary system by these equations have been compared with the experimental data.

Jan, D.S.; Shiau, H.Y.; Tsai, F.N. (National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - alluvial sedimentation examples Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Willapa River basin, Washington State, indicate that the drainage Summary: in local sediment supply such as in the South Fork Willapa River example. The channels that had...

138

Prevalence estimation under heterogeneity in the example of bovine trypanosomosis in Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prevalence estimation under heterogeneity in the example of bovine trypanosomosis in Uganda Dankmar of bovine trypanosomosis in Mukono County, Uganda. Fifty farms (referred to as clusters), were sampled

Boehning, Dankmar

139

In-Situ, Real-Time Measurement of Melt Constituents in the Aluminum, Glass, and Steel Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Research Company (ERCo), with support from DOE’s Industrial Technologies Program, Sensors and Automation has developed a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) probe to measure, in real time and in-situ, the composition of an aluminum melt in a furnace at an industrial plant. The compositional data is provided to the operator continuously allowing the operator to adjust the melt composition, saving energy, increasing production, and maintaining tighter compositional tolerances than has been previously possible. The overall objectives of this project were to: -- design, develop, fabricate, test and project future costs of the LIBS probe on bench-size experiments; - test the unit in a pilot-scaled aluminum furnace under varying operating conditions of temperature and melt constituents; -- determine the instruments needed for use in industrial environment; -- compare LIBS Probe data to readings traditionally taken on the furnace; -- get full-scale data to resolve if, and how, the LIBS Probe design should be modified for operator acceptance. Extensive laboratory tests have proven the concept feasibility. Elemental concentrations below 0.1% wt. have been accurately measured. Further, the LIBS system has now been installed and is operating at a Commonwealth Aluminum plant in Ohio. The technology is crosscutting as it can be used in a wide variety of applications. In the Sensors and Automation Program the application was for the secondary aluminum industry. However, this project spawned a number of other applications, which are also reported here for completeness. The project was effective in that two commercial systems are now operating; one at Commonwealth Aluminum and another at a PPG fiberglass plant. Other commercial installations are being negotiated as of this writing. This project led to the following conclusions: 1. The LIBS System has been developed for industrial applications. This is the first time this has been accomplished. In addition, two commercial installations have been completed; one at Commonwealth and another at PPG. 2. The system is easy to operate and requires no operator training. Calibration is not required. It is certified as eye safe. 3. The system is crosscutting and ERCo is evaluating seven applications, as reported in this report, and other applications to be reported later. 4. A business plan is being completed for each of the near term markets. ERCo is committed to achieving continued commercial success with the LIBS System. 5. A world wide patent has been issued. 6. The energy savings is substantial. The annual energy savings, by 2010, for each industry is estimated as follows: o Secondary Aluminum – 1.44 trillion Btu’s o Glass – 17 to 45 trillion Btu’s o Steel – Up to 26 trillion Btu’s

Robert De Saro

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

140

Introduction Running JAGS PLA2 Example Conclusions Introduction to Just Another Gibbs Sampler (JAGS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Running JAGS PLA2 Example Conclusions Introduction to Just Another Gibbs Sampler (JAGS Rebecca Steorts Introduction to Just Another Gibbs Sampler (JAGS) #12;Introduction Running JAGS PLA2 2 Running JAGS 3 PLA2 Example Setup Diagnostics Analysis 4 Conclusions Rebecca Steorts Introduction

Steorts, Rebecca C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis Number systems of different lengths,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis Number systems of Mathematics University of Bristol April 21, 2008 Richard.Pettigrew@bris.ac.uk Natural number systems and infinitesimal analysis #12;EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis

Forster, T.E.

142

TCMS Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BPA - Firm NT BPA Direct Connect Load Figure 2 BPA - Secondary NT BPA Figure 3 3 rd Party - Firm PTP BPA - NT (Firm or Secondary) BPA 3 rd Party Transferor Transfer Load Figure 5...

143

TCMS Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign Object DamageSystemsU.S. TALKS BPA - Firm NT BPA

144

GSL Example  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-DRMR LSU/CAMD ALTD Math Libraries

145

ACML Example  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011A FirstEMSLAEMSL341AACEii ABSTRACT

146

Fiji examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified Forces |SuperlatticesUS FederalFiji

147

36Cl as a tracer in geothermal systems- Example from Valles Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cl as a tracer in geothermal systems- Example from Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 36Cl as a tracer...

148

The influence of a source term, an example: chemically reacting hypersonic flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of a source term, an example: chemically reacting hypersonic flow M. Fey, 1 R singularity. We consider hypersonic Euler flow of N chemically reacting species around a blunt body in two

149

Reliability in Comparative and Ethnographic Observations: The Example of High Inference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability in Comparative and Ethnographic Observations: The Example of High Inference Father 92697 ABSTRACT: The theory of reliability and reliability estimates, nearly a century old, has rarely the reliabilities of composite measurement scales combining multiple measures, of individual independent

White, Douglas R.

150

Learning Model Transformations from Examples using FCA: One for All or All for One?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these transformations consists in completely or partially learning them. MTBE (Model Transformation By in model driven en- gineering. An innovative approach called Model Transformation By Example (MTBE) [12

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

151

Use of uranium^thorium dating to determine C reservoir eects in lakes: examples from Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of uranium^thorium dating to determine past 14 C reservoir e¡ects in lakes: examples from of dissolved `dead' carbon or to slow air^water exchange. Here we use the TIMS uranium^thorium disequilibrium

Henderson, Gideon

152

Examples Galleries Generated by Interactive Genetic Algorithms Dimitri Masson, Alexandre Demeure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for tools for supporting both the production and exploration of examples.. We describe a running prototype product, and creative process. This the design goals and constraints are incomplete, imprecise and evolve along the design process. This ill

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

153

An example of a PID which is not a Euclidean R. A. Wilson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An example of a PID which is not a Euclidean domain R. A. Wilson 11th March 2011 Some people have asked for an example of a PID which is not a Euclidean domain. It turns out that R = Z[1 2 (1 + -19 is a PID. We imitate the proof that a Euclidean domain is a PID, but we have to generalise it a little bit

Wilson, Robert A.

154

From Physics to Economics: An Econometric Example Using Maximum Relative Entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Econophysics, is based on the premise that some ideas and methods from physics can be applied to economic situations. We intend to show in this paper how a physics concept such as entropy can be applied to an economic problem. In so doing, we demonstrate how information in the form of observable data and moment constraints are introduced into the method of Maximum relative Entropy (MrE). A general example of updating with data and moments is shown. Two specific econometric examples are solved in detail which can then be used as templates for real world problems. A numerical example is compared to a large deviation solution which illustrates some of the advantages of the MrE method.

Giffin, Adom

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Motivations Blind Equalisation Main Results Example Conclusions Blind Equalisation of High-Order QAM Channels Using a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivations Blind Equalisation Main Results Example Conclusions Blind Equalisation of High International Conference on Automation & Computing, 2009 #12;Motivations Blind Equalisation Main Results Example Conclusions Outline 1 Motivations Blind Equalisation of QAM System Our Contribution 2 Blind Equalisation

Chen, Sheng

156

476 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON EDUCATION, VOL. 51, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2008 Classification and Evaluation of Examples for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering edu- cation, learning, probability, statistics. I. INTRODUCTION TWO aspects of examples used of Examples for Teaching Probability to Electrical Engineering Students George Nagy, Life Fellow, IEEE and science. This study reviews various characteristics of examples intended for a course on probability

Nagy, George

157

Using Pooled Funds to Benefit Minnesota: Best Practices and Successful Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-icing Application Rates · Snow and Ice Control Environmental Best Management Practices Manual · Identifying Optimization · Developing a Training Video and Manual for Best Practices and Techniques in Clearing DifferentUsing Pooled Funds to Benefit Minnesota: Best Practices and Successful Examples Clear Roads Winter

Minnesota, University of

158

Kirchhoff vs. Competitive Electricity Markets: A Few Examples Carlos E. Murillo-%nchez Ray D. Zimmerman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kirchhoff vs. Competitive Electricity Markets: A Few Examples Carlos E. Murillo-%nchez Ray D, have undergone radical transforma- tions to insure that an open market structure exists. Electricity as well as the general op- eration of the market that determines prices within that zone. Electric power

159

Deformation-induced inverted metamorphic eld gradients: an example from the southeastern Canadian Cordillera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deformation-induced inverted metamorphic ®eld gradients: an example from the southeastern Canadian allochthon and Monashee complex, exhibits an inverted metamorphic ®eld gradient. New data presented preserving evidence of strongly diachronous deformation and an apparent inverted metamorphism. # 1999

Gibson, Dan

160

result of alkaloid toxins that the endophytes This example is not generally representa-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result of alkaloid toxins that the endophytes produce. This example is not generally representa and dynamics of hori- zontally transmitted endophytes, or other mutualistic microbes, is less clear5 . Given that endophytes use their hosts' resources, they must entail some cost to the plant.If the costs outweigh

Arnold, A. Elizabeth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

THE JACQUET-LANGLANDS CORRESPONDENCE FOR GL2 1. Local statement and examples 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE JACQUET-LANGLANDS CORRESPONDENCE FOR GL2 Contents 1. Local statement and examples 1 2. Global X(F) = F Ă? FĂ? , viewed as the space of semisimple conjugacy classes in GL2(F) via GL2(F) XD/F mean reduced trace and norm. For regular semisimple GL2(F) and DĂ? , we write if they have

Conrad, Brian

162

Adiabatic approximation, Gell-Mann and Low theorem and degeneracies: A pedagogical example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adiabatic approximation, Gell-Mann and Low theorem and degeneracies: A pedagogical example if the evolution operator has no limit for adiabatic switchings, the Gell-Mann and Low formula allows to follow approximation (obtained by two different limiting procedures) is either useless or wrong, and the Gell

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

163

EXAMPLE FOR COMPLETE MANUSCRIPT STRATEGIC KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN SME BASED ON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXAMPLE FOR COMPLETE MANUSCRIPT STRATEGIC KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN SME BASED ON INNOVATION TRANSFER University of Technology Cottbus, Germany ABSTRACT Added value for SME can be determine as knowledge question: whether a given algorithm that enables capital intellectual in SME index and implemented

164

Crisis, education to sustainable development and eco-citizenship behaviours : example of ecological mobility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crisis, education to sustainable development and eco-citizenship behaviours : example of ecological l'Université de Provence, 04000 Digne The contribution deals with topic 1 « sustainable development of sustainable development in territories: change in problematic or contextual hiccup. Summary: Nowadays

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

165

An Example in Kleisli: Codon Usage Extraction Made Easy Jiren Wang and Limsoon Wong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Example in Kleisli: Codon Usage Extraction Made Easy Jiren Wang and Limsoon Wong Bio,limsoong@krdl.org.sg 19 March 1999 Codon usage information was useful to many molecular biologists in designing from public DNA sequence databases and could com­ pute their codon usage. Second, we wanted

Wong, Limsoon

166

Feasibility Study for the Automation of Commercial Vehicles on the Example of a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production of commercial vehicles. The joint project AMoBa (Autonomer Mobiler Bagger, Autonomous Mobile of mobile machines autonomous guidance systems for agricultural vehicles are already available on the marketFeasibility Study for the Automation of Commercial Vehicles on the Example of a Mobile Excavator

Berns, Karsten

167

SALD 18A: JMP examples for one-sample t-test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SALD 18A: JMP examples for one-sample t-test #12;Introduction Notes #12;DO NOT COPY Copyright calculation in JMP To perform a one-sample t-test, select from the data table main menu Analyze 18A-8 To perform a one-sample t-test in JMP, first perform a distribution analysis Under Select

Morgan, Stephen L.

168

Example 1 -LIFE SCIENCES/SCIENCES DE LA VIE Biology A Gene, Cell, Molecular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Immunology Host-cell interactions, Immune response, antigens, antibodies) LS9 Microbiology (Microbial ecology/behavioural and cognitive neuroscience (Behavioural neuroscience ­ learning, reward, mot., Sensory systems and perception;Example 1 - LIFE SCIENCES/SCIENCES DE LA VIE Biology C - Ecology LS18 General Ecology (Physiological

Reid, Nancy

169

Priority Setting for Government Investment in Forestry Conservation Schemes-An Example from New Zealand1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's international reputation for its technically advanced approaches to conservation and protection of soilPriority Setting for Government Investment in Forestry Conservation Schemes-An Example from New Zealand1 Colin L. 0'Loughlin2 Abstract: In New Zealand responsibilityfor funding flood protection

Standiford, Richard B.

170

Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas), minerals, and water. Our need. For example, oil and gas tend to con- centrate near the top of natural underground domal struc- tures. So Computer Science and 2 Electrical & Computer Eng. Univ. of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79968, USA contact

Kreinovich, Vladik

171

Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas), minerals, and water. Our need. For example, oil and gas tend to con­ centrate near the top of natural underground domal struc­ tures. So Computer Science and 2 Electrical & Computer Eng. Univ. of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79968, USA contact

Kreinovich, Vladik

172

A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples Gwenn E; published 12 November 2002. [1] Basal hydrology is acknowledged as a fundamental control on glacier dynamics of existing basal hydrology models is the treatment of the glacier bed as an isolated system. We present

Flowers, Gwenn

173

A Network of Complementary SMEs for a Global Infrastructure for Services: the Example of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, département G2I/OMSI, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint Etienne Cedex2, France Abstract. High-technology SMEsA Network of Complementary SMEs for a Global Infrastructure for Services: the Example much need the diversity and the dynamics of SMEs to provide service packages within a global

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

174

Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be the primary energy source for life in this geothermal sys- tem, the main organisms identified by phylotype energy source that drives primary productivity in this and potentially other geothermal ecosystemsDiversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example

175

Industrial Solid-State Energy Harvesting: Mechanisms and Examples Matthew Kocoloski, Carnegie Mellon University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

harvested energy from streams and wind for manufacturing and transportation. In the early 1700's, ThomasIndustrial Solid-State Energy Harvesting: Mechanisms and Examples Matthew Kocoloski, Carnegie Mellon University Carl Eger, City of Cleveland Robin McCarty, Kevin Hallinan, and Kelly Kissock

Kissock, Kelly

176

Applying Model Transformation By-Example on Business Process Modeling Languages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By Example (MTBE) approaches have been proposed as user-friendly alternative that simplifies the definition of model transformations. Up to now, MTBE ap- proaches have been applied to structural models, only. In this work we apply MTBE to the domain of business process modeling languages, i.e., Event-driven Process

177

Nonlinear Control Via PDC: The TORA System Example Hua Wang and Jing Li  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear Control Via PDC: The TORA System Example Hua Wang and Jing Li Dept. of Electrical the stabilty of the system. The PDC controller design is to derive each control rule for each linear model­S model, we can analyze or design the PDC controller. In this paper, our main focus is on a nonlinear

178

Anti-keylogging measures for secure Internet login: an example of the law of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anti-keylogging measures for secure Internet login: an example of the law of unintended: 27 June 2006 Revised: February 2007 Submitted to: Computers & Security #12;Anti-keylogging measures detail of implementation can, if flawed, effectively entirely negate the anti-keylogging measures; thus

Jones, Antonia J.

179

Sensitivity of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models to the Coupling Method : Example of Tropical Cyclone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensitivity of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models to the Coupling Method : Example of Tropical Cyclone and propagation of tropical cyclone Erica. Sensitiv- ity tests to the coupling method are carried out-sea feedbacks. Separate integrations of the Corresponding author. Phone: +33 (0)4 76 51 48 60 Fax: +33 (0)4 76

180

A Brief Tutorial On Recursive Estimation With Examples From Intelligent Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Brief Tutorial On Recursive Estimation With Examples From Intelligent Vehicle Applications (Part intelligent vehicle applications. In this article, we focus rather on a "local" issue, i.e. the system model estimation, state, system model, Kalman filter (KF), intelligent vehicles 1 Introduction This article follows

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

AN EXAMPLE OF A NICE VARIETY WHOSE RING OF GLOBAL SECTIONS IS NOT FINITELY GENERATED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated. Now let X be the total space of the vector bundle N P over E. Then the ring of global sectionsAN EXAMPLE OF A NICE VARIETY WHOSE RING OF GLOBAL SECTIONS IS NOT FINITELY GENERATED RAVI VAKIL 1 ring of global sections. I certainly thought this. Brian Osserman asked about this in the introductory

Vakil, Ravi

182

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data Table G.1 gives reactor (LWR) power plants constructed in USA. It is required to predict the capital cost involved in the construction of further LWR power plants. The notation used in Table G.1 is explained in Table G.2. The final 6

Reid, Nancy

183

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data Table G.1 gives data) power plants constructed in USA. It is required to predict the capital cost involved in the construction of further LWR power plants. The notation used in Table G.1 is explained in Table G.2. The final 6 lines

Reid, Nancy

184

Learning transformation rules from transformation examples: An approach based on Relational Concept Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning transformation rules from transformation examples: An approach based on Relational Concept), model transformations are basic and primordial entities, thus easing their design and implementation is an important issue. A quite recently proposed way to create model transformations consists in deducing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

DEVELOPMENT AND EXAMPLE APPLICATION OF A SIMULATION MODEL OF THE NORTHERN ANCHOVY FISHERY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT AND EXAMPLE APPLICATION OF A SIMULATION MODEL OF THE NORTHERN ANCHOVY FISHERY MICHAEL F. TILLMANl AND DONALD STADELMAN2 ABSTRACT A computer simulation model of the reduction fishery for northern simulation model has been developed which pro- vides the means for evaluating the biological and economic

186

Safety Analysis of an Airbag System using Probabilistic FMEA and Probabilistic Counter Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Analysis of an Airbag System using Probabilistic FMEA and Probabilistic Counter Examples Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a technique to reason about possible system hazards that result from system or system component failures. Traditionally, FMEA does not take the probabilities

Leue, Stefan

187

Non-normal parameter blowout bifurcation: an example in a truncated mean field dynamo model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine global dynamics and bifurcations occurring in a truncated model of a stellar mean field dynamo. This model has symmetry-forced invariant subspaces for the dynamics and we find examples of transient type I intermittency and blowout bifurcations to transient on-off intermittency, involving laminar phases in the invariant submanifold. In particular, our model provides examples of blowout bifurcations that occur on varying a non-normal parameter; that is, the parameter varies the dynamics within the invariant subspace at the same time as the dynamics normal to it. As a consequence of this we find that the Lyapunov exponents do not vary smoothly and the blowout bifurcation occurs over a range of parameter values rather than a point in the parameter space.

Eurico Covas; Peter Ashwin; Reza Tavakol

1997-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Accelerated commercialization program for materials and components. Solar sheet glass: an example of materials commercialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SERI Accelerated Commercialization Program for Materials and Components is designed to serve as a catalyst in promoting technological change through the introduction of new materials into solar technologies. This report focuses on technological diffusion of advances in materials technology from the developer to the manufacturers of solar equipment. It provides an overview and understanding of the problems encountered in the private sector in trying to advance technological change and discusses a program designed to facilitate this change. Using as example of solar sheet glass, this report describes the process by which sample quantities of new materials are sent to solar equipment manufacturers for appliations testing. It also describes other materials that might undergo testing in a similar way. The entire program is an example of how government and industry can work together to accomplish common goals.

Livingston, R.; Butler, B.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CommRE) program, which is a more than $20 million effort funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, to promote investment in clean energy solutions and provide real-life examples for other local governments, campuses, and small utilities to replicate. Five community-based renewable energy projects received funding from DOE through the CommRE and their progress is detailed.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Inequivalence of unitarity and self-adjointness: An example in quantum cosmology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An example of a quantum cosmological model is presented whose dynamics is unitary although the time-dependent Hamiltonian operator fails to be self-adjoint (because it is not defined) for a particular value of {ital t}. The model is shown to be singular, and this disproves a conjecture put forward by Gotay and Demaret to the effect that unitary quantum dynamics in a slow-time'' gauge is always nonsingular.

Lemos, N.A. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24020 Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil (BR))

1990-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

ENGI 3423 Conditional Probability and Independence Page 5-01 Example 5.01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equally likely sample points, four of which also fall inside E1 . Therefore P[E1 | E2 ] = 4/6 = 2/3 . Also Probability and Independence Page 5-03 Example 5.03 A bag contains two red, three blue and four yellow marbles. Three marbles are taken at random from the bag, (a) without replacement; (b) with replacement. In each

George, Glyn

192

A field example of a gas orifice meter with debris-ridden liquid in mist flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field example of debris-ridden liquids in an orifice meter is presented in this paper. Flow conditions in gas pipelines containing hydrocarbon liquids and particulate matter are discussed. Known effects on measurement of the presence of these materials in orifice meters is presented. By definition, gas measurement is accurate if performed on a clean and dry flow stream. This paper demonstrates the importance of removing as much liquid and debris as possible prior to measurement.

Chisholm, J.L.; Mooney, C.V. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States); Datta-Barua, L.; Feldmann, R.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

194

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnsite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnäsite at Mountain Pass, CA, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnäsite, a rare-earth Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/02 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth

195

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805

196

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth fluocarbonate mineral, was mined and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed

197

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth fluocarbonate mineral, was mined.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5

198

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth/31/96 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

199

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth/31/98 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

200

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite at Mountain Pass, CA, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/01 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A model of reduced oxidation kinetics using constituents and species: Iso-octane and its mixtures with n-pentane, iso-hexane and n-heptane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previously described methodology for deriving a reduced kinetic mechanism for alkane oxidation and tested for n-heptane is here shown to be valid, in a slightly modified version, for iso-octane and its mixtures with n-pentane, iso-hexane and n-heptane. The model is still based on partitioning the species into lights, defined as those having a carbon number smaller than 3, and heavies, which are the complement in the species ensemble, and mathematically decomposing the heavy species into constituents which are radicals. For the same similarity variable found from examining the n-heptane LLNL mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II, the appropriately scaled total constituent molar density still exhibits a self-similar behavior over a very wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures in the cold ignition regime. When extended to larger initial temperatures than for cold ignition, the self-similar behavior becomes initial temperature dependent, which indicates that rather than using functional fits for the enthalpy generation due to the heavy species' oxidation, an ideal model based on tabular information extracted from the complete LLNL kinetics should be used instead. Similarly to n-heptane, the oxygen and water molar densities are shown to display a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the similarity variable, but here their slope variation is no longer fitted and instead, their rate equations are used with the ideal model to calculate them. As in the original model, the light species ensemble is partitioned into quasi-steady and unsteady species; the quasi-steady light species mole fractions are computed using the ideal model and the unsteady species are calculated as progress variables using rates extracted from the ideal model. Results are presented comparing the performance of the model with that of the LLNL mechanism using CHEMKIN II. The model reproduces excellently the temperature and species evolution versus time or versus the similarity variable, with the exception of very rich mixtures, where the predictions are still very good but the multivalued aspect of these functions at the end of oxidation is not captured in the reduction. The ignition time is predicted within percentages of the LLNL values over a wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures. (author)

Harstad, Kenneth; Bellan, Josette [California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, M/S 125-109, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Light hadron spectra in the constituent quark model with the Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa-'t Hooft effective U {sub A} (1) symmetry breaking interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We make a critical comparison of several versions of instanton-induced interactions present in the literature, all based on ITEP group's extension to three colours and flavours of 't Hooft's effective lagrangian, with the predictions of the phenomenological Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa (KKM) chiral quark lagrangian. We analyze the effects of all versions of the effective U {sub A} (1) symmetry breaking interactions on light hadron spectra in the non-relativistic constituent quark model. We show that the KKMT force, when used as a residual hyperfine interaction reproduces the correct ordering of pseudoscalar and vector mesons even without explicitly taking chiral symmetry into account. Moreover, the nucleon spectra are also correctly reproduced, only the Roper resonance remains too high, albeit lower than usual, at 1660 MeV. The latter's lower than expected mass is not due to a small excitation energy, as in the Glozman-Riska (GR) model, but to a combination of colour, flavour, and spatial wave function properties that enhance the relevant matrix elements. The KKMT interaction explicitly depends on flavour and spin of the quarks, but unlike the GR flavour-spin one it has a firm footing in QCD. In the process we provide several technical advances, in particular we show the first explicit derivation of the three-body Fierz transformation and apply it to the KKM interaction. We also discuss the ambiguities associated with the colour degree of freedom.

Dmitrasinovic, V. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro) and Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)]. E-mail: dmitrasin@yahoo.com; Toki, H. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Comprehensive Report For Proposed Elevated Temperature Elastic Perfectly Plastic (EPP) Code Cases Representative Example Problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The current rules in the nuclear section of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code , Section III, Subsection NH for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above 1200F (650C)1. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (E-PP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures. The proposed rules for strain limits and creep-fatigue evaluation were initially documented in the technical literature 2, 3, and have been recently revised to incorporate comments and simplify their application. The revised code cases have been developed. Task Objectives: The goal of the Sample Problem task is to exercise these code cases through example problems to demonstrate their feasibility and, also, to identify potential corrections and improvements should problems be encountered. This will provide input to the development of technical background documents for consideration by the applicable B&PV committees considering these code cases for approval. This task has been performed by Hollinger and Pease of Becht Engineering Co., Inc., Nuclear Services Division and a report detailing the results of the E-PP analyses conducted on example problems per the procedures of the E-PP strain limits and creep-fatigue draft code cases is enclosed as Enclosure 1. Conclusions: The feasibility of the application of the E-PP code cases has been demonstrated through example problems that consist of realistic geometry (a nozzle attached to a semi-hemispheric shell with a circumferential weld) and load (pressure; pipe reaction load applied at the end of the nozzle, including axial and shear forces, bending and torsional moments; through-wall transient temperature gradient) and design and operating conditions (Levels A, B and C).

Greg L. Hollinger

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Example process hazard analysis of a Department of Energy water chlorination process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On February 24, 1992, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released a revised version of Section 29 Code of Federal Regulations CFR Part 1910 that added Section 1910.119, entitled ``Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (the PSM Rule). Because US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 5480.4 and 5483.1A prescribe OSHA 29 CFR 1910 as a standard in DOE, the PSM Rule is mandatory in the DOE complex. A major element in the PSM Rule is the process hazard analysis (PrHA), which is required for all chemical processes covered by the PSM Rule. The PrHA element of the PSM Rule requires the selection and application of appropriate hazard analysis methods to systematically identify hazards and potential accident scenarios associated with processes involving highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs). The analysis in this report is an example PrHA performed to meet the requirements of the PSM Rule. The PrHA method used in this example is the hazard and operability (HAZOP) study, and the process studied is the new Hanford 300-Area Water Treatment Facility chlorination process, which is currently in the design stage. The HAZOP study was conducted on May 18--21, 1993, by a team from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Battelle-Columbus, the DOE, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The chlorination process was chosen as the example process because it is common to many DOE sites, and because quantities of chlorine at those sites generally exceed the OSHA threshold quantities (TQs).

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Research Support Facility Data Center: An Example of Best Practices Implementation (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brochure details the design and operations of the Research Support Facility (RSF) data center. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world-renowned for its commitment to green building construction. To further this commitment to green building and leading by example, NREL included an ultra-energy-efficient data center in the laboratory's new Research Support Facility (RSF), which recently received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design{reg_sign} (LEED) Platinum designation from the U.S. Green Building Council.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Inverse scattering series for multiple attenuation: An example with surface and internal multiples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multiple attenuation method derived from an inverse scattering series is described. The inversion series approach allows a separation of multiple attenuation subseries from the full series. The surface multiple attenuation subseries was described and illustrated in Carvalho et al. (1991, 1992). The internal multiple attenuation method consists of selecting the parts of the odd terms that are associated with removing only multiply reflected energy. The method, for both types of multiples, is multidimensional and does not rely on periodicity or differential moveout, nor does it require a model of the reflectors generating the multiples. An example with internal and surface multiples will be presented.

Araujo, F.V. [PPPG/Federal Univ. of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil); Weglein, A.B. [Schlumberger Cambridge Research (United Kingdom); Carvalho, P.M. [Petrobras SA, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Stolt, R.H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

The example of the IPCC does not vindicate the Value Free Ideal: a reply to Gregor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, consider the controversy over the Fourth Assessment Report’s mistaken projection for melting of Himalayan ice caps, which arose from reliance on non-peer-reviewed sources (Pearce, 2010). 10 The following example relies heavily on O’Reilly, Oreskes... the assumption that the Ice Sheet would be stable in the short term and predictions about its longer term behaviour. This data did not, however, show that the WAIS was more stable than previously assumed, but that it was already melting. However, articles which...

John, Stephen

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Answer to Question 55: Are there pictorial examples that distinguish covariant and contravariant vectors?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present pictorial means of distinguishing contravariant vectors (or simply vectors) from covariant vectors (or linear forms). When one depicts vector as the directed segment, then the pictorial image of a linear form is a family of equidistant parallel planes with an arrow joining the neighbouring planes and showing the direction of increase of the form. First of these planes is the linear subspace of dimension two on which the linear form gives value zero. Several examples of physical quantities are given which are naturally vectors, and others which are naturally linear forms.

Bernard Jancewicz

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

209

Example Program and Makefile for BG/Q | Argonne Leadership Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100 tonusing ARMEvenFlames.Exposed toExample

210

Anisotropic Power-law Inflation: A counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is widely believed that anisotropy in the expansion of the universe will decay exponentially fast during inflation. This is often referred to as the cosmic no-hair conjecture. However, we find a counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture in the context of supergravity. As a demonstration, we present an exact anisotropic power-law inflationary solution which is an attractor in the phase space. We emphasize that anisotropic inflation is quite generic in the presence of anisotropic sources which couple with an inflaton.

Jiro Soda

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Evidence for serpentinite fluid in convergent margin systems: The example of El Salvador (Central America) arc lavas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence for serpentinite fluid in convergent margin systems: The example of El Salvador (Central isotopes, has been carried out on El Salvador subduction-related lavas. The rocks have arc), Evidence for serpentinite fluid in convergent margin systems: The example of El Salvador (Central America

Doglioni, Carlo

212

Example: the Mediterranean basin Statistical Model Estimation Hypothesis testing Estimation and joint testing of temporal and spatial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and joint testing of temporal and spatial patterns in Climate Change Jean-Marc Azaïs, Aurélien Ribes, Journées climat, Orsay 28 et 29 Janvier 2010 #12;Example: the Mediterranean basin Statistical ModelExample: the Mediterranean basin Statistical Model Estimation Hypothesis testing Estimation

213

A relativistic constituent quark model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the predictive power of a relativistic quark model formulated on the light-front. The nucleon electromagnetic form factors, the semileptonic weak decays of the hyperons and the magnetic moments of both baryon octet and decuplet are calculated and found to be in excellent agreement with experiment.

Schlumpf, F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Evaluation of fracture treatments using a layered-reservoir description: Field examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a practical analysis technique to determine actual fracture geometry and proppant profile using a three-dimensional (3D) hydraulic-fracturing simulator. The hydraulic-fracturing model used in this study considers the variation of in-situ stress, Young`s modulus, Poisson`s ratio, and net pay thickness in the productive interval. When the method is applied, the results from the fracture propagation model conform well with the results the authors obtain from pressure-buildup and production-data analyses. This study analyzed hydraulic-fracturing treatments from several wells in the Vicksburg formation of the McAllen Ranch area in south Texas. The authors have provided guidelines to properly describe the treatment interval, how to use this information in the analysis of such fracture treatments, and how to confirm the results using pressure-transient tests and production-data analyses. This paper presents examples illustrating that a detailed description of the reservoir layers is essential to properly evaluate hydraulic-fracture treatments. For the example wells presented in this paper, post-fracture-production and pressure-transient data were available. The authors have analyzed production and pressure-transient data to estimate permeability and fracture half-length. The values of fracture half-length used to analyze the production data matched closely with those predicted by the fracture model.

Rahim, Z.; Holditch, S.A.; Zuber, M.D. [Holditch and Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Buehring, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Justification for Selecting Level A vs. Level B Personal Protective Equipment to Remediate a Room Containing Concentrated Acids, Bases and Radiological Constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selecting the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is based on providing an adequate level of employee protection relative to the task-specific conditions and hazards. PPE is categorized into four ensembles, based on the degree of protection afforded; e.g., Levels A (most restrictive), B, C, and D (least restrictive). What is often overlooked in preparing an ensemble is that the PPE itself can create significant worker hazards; i.e., the greater the level of PPE, the greater the associated risks. Furthermore, there is confusion as to whether a more ''conservative approach'' should always be taken since Level B provides the same level of respiratory protection as Level A but less skin protection. This paper summarizes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations addressing Level A versus Level B, and provides justification for selecting Level B over Level A without under-protecting the employee during a particular remediation scenario. The scenario consisted of an entry team performing (1) an initial entry into a room containing concentrated acids (e.g., hydrofluoric acid), bases, and radiological constituents; (2) sampling and characterizing container contents; and (3) retrieving characterized containers. The invasive nature of the hydrofluoric acid sampling and characterization scenario created a high potential for splash, immersion, and exposure to hazardous vapors, requiring additional skin protection. The hazards associated with this scenario and the chemical nature of hydrofluoric acid provided qualitative evidence to justify Level A. Once the hydrofluoric acid was removed from the room, PPE performance was evaluated against the remaining chemical inventory. If chemical breakthrough from direct contact was not expected to occur and instrument readings confirmed the absence of any hazardous vapors, additional skin protection afforded by wearing a vapor-tight, totally-encapsulated suit was not required. Therefore, PPE performance and instrument data provided quantitative evidence to justify Level B.

Hylko, J. M.; Thompson, A. L.; Walter, J. F.; Deecke, T. A.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

User's manual for heat-pump seasonal-performance model (SPM) with selected parametric examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seasonal Performance Model (SPM) was developed to provide an accurate source of seasonal energy consumption and cost predictions for the evaluation of heat pump design options. The program uses steady state heat pump performance data obtained from manufacturers' or Computer Simulation Model runs. The SPM was originally developed in two forms - a cooling model for central air conditioners and heat pumps and a heating model for heat pumps. The original models have undergone many modifications, which are described, to improve the accuracy of predictions and to increase flexibility for use in parametric evaluations. Insights are provided into the theory and construction of the major options, and into the use of the available options and output variables. Specific investigations provide examples of the possible applications of the model. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Guidelines, processes and tools for coastal ecosystem restoration, with examples from the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a systematic approach to coastal restoration projects in five phases: planning, implementation, performance assessment, adaptive management, and dissemination of results. Twenty features of the iterative planning process are synthesized. The planning process starts with a vision, a description of the ecosystem and landscape, and goals. A conceptual model and planning objectives are developed, a site is selected using prioritization techniques, and numerical models contribute to preliminary designs as needed. Performance criteria and reference sites are selected and the monitoring program is designed. The monitoring program is emphasized as a tool to assess project performance and identify problems affecting progression toward project goals, in an adaptive management framework. Key approaches to aspects of the monitoring program are reviewed and detailed with project examples. Within the planning process, cost analysis involves budgeting, scheduling, and financing. Finally, documentation is peer reviewed prior to making construction plans and final costing.

Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Adkins, Jeffery E.; Judd, Chaeli; Anderson, Michael G.; Buenau, Kate E.; Borde, Amy B.; Johnson, Gary E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Science and the Energy Security Challenge: The Example of Solid-State Lighting  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Securing a viable, carbon neutral energy future for humankind will require an effort of gargantuan proportions. As outlined clearly in a series of workshops sponsored by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html), fundamental advances in scientific understanding are needed to broadly implement many of the technologies that are held out as promising options to meet future energy needs, ranging from solar energy, to nuclear energy, to approaches to clean combustion. Using solid state lighting based on inorganic materials as an example, I will discuss some recent results and new directions, emphasizing the multidisciplinary, team nature of the endeavor. I will also offer some thoughts about how to encourage translation of the science into attractive, widely available products ? a significant challenge that cannot be ignored. This case study offers insight into approaches that are likely to be beneficial for addressing other aspects of the energy security challenge.

Julia Phillips

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

THE CONCEPT OF THE "CLIOS PROCESS": INTEGRATING THE STUDY OF PHYSICAL AND POLICY SYSTEMS USING MEXICO CITY AS AN EXAMPLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEXICO CITY AS AN EXAMPLE Rebecca S. Dodder* Doctoral Candidate, Technology, Management and Policy-55-1054-0568 E-mail address: dodder@mit.edu (R.S. Dodder) March 5, 2004 #12;ABSTRACT Complex, large

Entekhabi, Dara

220

Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment Indices Link Importance Numerical Examples Summary a Environmental Impact Assessment of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examples Summary a Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links Environmental Impact Assessment Indices #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment is gratefully acknowledged. Anna Nagurney, Qiang Qiang,, Ladimer S. Nagurney Environmental Impact Assessment

Nagurney, Anna

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment Indices Link Importance Numerical Examples Summary Environmental Impact Assessment of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examples Summary Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links in an Era S. Nagurney Environmental Impact Assessment Indices #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Networks. This support is gratefully acknowledged. Anna Nagurney, Qiang Qiang, Ladimer S. Nagurney Environmental Impact

Nagurney, Anna

222

Procedures to identify Energy Conservation Opportunities applied to HVAC system: example of VSD of chilled water pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures to identify Energy Conservation Opportunities applied to HVAC system: example of VSD of HVAC equipment using variable speed drive (VSD) is an Energy Conservation Opportunity (ECO) which can

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

223

Design of cooperative mobile robot system: a low-cost test-bed and an example application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementation of cooperative robot systems in search, exploration, or delivery tasks can potentially provide advantages over a single robot system. For example, better performance, fault tolerance through agent redundancy, and lower individual...

Na, Youngchul

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequency and duration of Yolo Bypass flooding to at leastRiver to pass through the Yolo Bypass. The increase inthe proposed action. For the Yolo Bypass example, three

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Large-Scale Urban Decontamination; Developments, Historical Examples and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent terrorist threats and actual events have lead to a renewed interest in the technical field of large scale, urban environment decontamination. One of the driving forces for this interest is the real potential for the cleanup and removal of radioactive dispersal device (RDD or “dirty bomb”) residues. In response the U. S. Government has spent many millions of dollars investigating RDD contamination and novel decontamination methodologies. Interest in chemical and biological (CB) cleanup has also peaked with the threat of terrorist action like the anthrax attack at the Hart Senate Office Building and with catastrophic natural events such as Hurricane Katrina. The efficiency of cleanup response will be improved with these new developments and a better understanding of the “old reliable” methodologies. Perhaps the most interesting area of investigation for large area decontamination is that of the RDD. While primarily an economic and psychological weapon, the need to cleanup and return valuable or culturally significant resources to the public is nonetheless valid. Several private companies, universities and National Laboratories are currently developing novel RDD cleanup technologies. Because of its longstanding association with radioactive facilities, the U. S. Department of Energy National Laboratories are at the forefront in developing and testing new RDD decontamination methods. However, such cleanup technologies are likely to be fairly task specific; while many different contamination mechanisms, substrate and environmental conditions will make actual application more complicated. Some major efforts have also been made to model potential contamination, to evaluate both old and new decontamination techniques and to assess their readiness for use. Non-radioactive, CB threats each have unique decontamination challenges and recent events have provided some examples. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as lead agency for these emergency cleanup responses, has a sound approach for decontamination decision-making that has been applied several times. The anthrax contamination at the U. S. Hart Senate Office Building and numerous U. S. Post Office facilities are examples of employing novel technical responses. Decontamination of the Hart Office building required development of a new approach for high level decontamination of biological contamination as well as techniques for evaluating the technology effectiveness. The World Trade Center destruction also demonstrated the need for, and successful implementation of, appropriate cleanup methodologies. There are a number of significant lessons that can be gained from a look at previous large scale cleanup projects. Too often we are quick to apply a costly “package and dispose” method when sound technological cleaning approaches are available. Understanding historical perspectives, advanced planning and constant technology improvement are essential to successful decontamination.

Rick Demmer

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Intra- and inter-unit variation in fly ash petrography: Examples from a western Kentucky power station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fly ash was collected from eight mechanical and ten baghouse hoppers at each of twin 150-MW wall-fired units in a western Kentucky power station. The fuel burned at that time was a blend of low-sulfur, high volatile bituminous Central Appalachian coals. The baghouse ash showed less variation between units than the mechanical units. The coarser mechanical fly ash showed significant differences in the amount of total carbon and in the ratio of isotropic coke to both total carbons and total coke; the latter excluding inertinite and other unburned, uncoked coal. There was no significant variation in ratios of inorganic fly ash constituents. The inter-unit differences in the amount and forms of mechanical fly ash carbon appear to be related to differences in pulverizer efficiency, leading to greater amounts of coarse coal, therefore unburned carbon, in one of the units.

Hower, J.C.; Rathbone, R.F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Goodman, J. [Prestonburg High School, KY (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

High spin states in {sup 175}Ta: An acute example of delayed crossing frequency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High spin states in {sup 175}Ta are populated by the {sup 160}Gd ({sup 19}F,4{ital n}) {sup 175}Ta reaction. This experiment, carried out at the HI-13 tandem accelerator at the China Institute of Atomic Energy which measured the {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences, gives rise to a new level scheme. Two important new features are embedded in this scheme. First, the seven decay sequences built on 1/2 [541], 7/2 [404], 5/2 [402], and 9/2 [514] proton Nilsson configurations are significantly extended to higher spins. For example, for the 1/2 [541] band, the levels have extended from 33/2{sup {minus}} to 61/2{sup {minus}} and, for the 7/2 [404] band, from 21/2{sup {minus}} to 41/2{sup {minus}}. Second, compared to the neighboring even-even nuclides, the neutron {ital AB} crossing frequency built on the {ital h}{sub 9/2} proton Nilsson state 1/2 [541] is significantly larger, which according to the conventional cranking shell model (CSM) is an anomaly. In this paper, this large crossing frequency is also discussed within the framework of the projected shell model. It is shown that this anomaly found in CSM can be satisfactorily explained, thus suggesting an alternative understanding. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Wen, S.; Zheng, H.; Li, S.; Li, G.; Yuan, G.; Hua, P.; Weng, P.; Zhang, L.; Yu, P.; Yang, C. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275, Beijing 102413, People`s Republic of (China)] [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275, Beijing 102413, People`s Republic of (China); Sun, H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. [Department of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130023, People`s Republic of (China)] [Department of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130023, People`s Republic of (China); Sun, Y.; Feng, D.H. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Margin of Safety Definition and Examples Used in Safety Basis Documents and the USQ Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Safety Management final rule, 10 CFR 830, provides an undefined term, margin of safety (MOS). Safe harbors listed in 10 CFR 830, Table 2, such as DOE?STD?3009 use but do not define the term. This lack of definition has created the need for the definition. This paper provides a definition of MOS and documents examples of MOS as applied in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved safety basis for an existing nuclear facility. If we understand what MOS looks like regarding Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) parameters, then it helps us compare against other parameters that do not involve a MOS. This paper also documents parameters that are not MOS. These criteria could be used to determine if an MOS exists in safety basis documents. This paper helps DOE, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and its contractors responsible for the safety basis improve safety basis documents and the unreviewed safety question (USQ) process with respect to MOS.

Beaulieu, R. A.

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

229

The OGLE-II event sc5_2859 -- An example of disk-disk microlensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new long-duration parallax event from the OGLE-II database, sc5_2859, which has the second longest time-scale ever identified (tE = 547.6{+22.6}{-7.8} days). We argue that both the lens and source reside in the Galactic disk, making event sc5_2859 one of the first confirmed examples of so-called disk-disk microlensing. We find that the source star is most probably located at a distance of D_S ~ 2 kpc, and from this we conclude that the lens is unlikely to be a main-sequence star due to the strict limits that can be placed on the lens brightness. A simple likelihood analysis is carried out on the lens mass, which indicates that the lens could be another candidate stellar mass black hole. We recommend that spectroscopic observations of the source be carried out in order to constrain the source distance, since this is the main source of uncertainty in our analysis. In addition, we briefly discuss whether there appears to be an excess of long duration microlensing events in the OGLE-II catalogue.

M. C. Smith

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

Origin of alkali-feldspar granites: An example from the Poimena Granite, northeastern Tasmania, Australia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lottah Granite is a composite pluton of tin mineralized strongly peraluminous alkali-feldspar granite which intrudes the Poimena Granite, a major component of the mid-Devonian Blue Tier Batholith of northeastern Tasmania. Earlier workers interpreted the Lottah Granite as a metasomatised differentiate of the Poimena Granite. The Poimena Granite is a slightly peraluminous, felsic, I-type biotite granite which contains restite minerals and shows linear trends on Harker plots, both consistent with restite separation. The mineralogy, chemical variation, and isotopic characteristics of the Lottah Granite are consistent with origin as a magma genetically unrelated to the host granite. The Lottah Granite contains sanidine, albite, topaz, zinnwaldite and other minerals consistent with crystallization from a melt. Furthermore, Rb-Sr isotopic dating indicates that the Lottah Granite was emplaced about 10 Ma after the Poimena Granite, and initial Sr and Nd isotope ratios indicate that the Lottah Granite was derived from a higher-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, higher-{epsilon}Nd source composition. Chemical and mineralogical evolution of the Lottah Granite conform to the experimental behavior of Li-F-rich melts, and indicate a possible crystallization temperature range as extreme as 750-430{degree}C. Many other examples of alkali-feldspar granite, and much of the associated mineralization, are probably also of essentially primary magmatic origin rather than of metasomatic or hydrothermal origin as commonly interpreted. They may also be genetically unrelated to granites with which they are associated.

Mackenzie, D.E.; Black, L.P.; Sun, Shensu (Bureau of Mineral Resources, Canberra (Australia))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Engineering Manhattan style: Sandia Laboratories as an example of postwar engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A great deal has been written about the history of science in America since World War II. Much of that work has explored the government`s research and development establishment, focusing on the scientific community immediately after the war. It is generally argued that the apparent triumphs of the huge and expensive wartime research and development projects gave rise to a belief that scientific resources should be nurtured and kept on hand - ready to provide service in an emergency. The Cold War drive for more and better weapons further fed this belief, leading to a massive system of national laboratories, military laboratories, and defense industries. The science of this complex is built on extensive financial support, the central strategy of which is that by steadily, and occasionally even lavishly funding large research programs, you will have a constant stream of scientific ideas that can be applied to national security purposes. What is true of science, is also true, in slightly modified form, of postwar engineering. The story I want to tell you today is, I think, an example of the way Cold War engineering r&d for national security worked. This report describes aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Computational implementation of a systems prioritization methodology for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: A preliminary example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systems prioritization methodology (SPM) is under development to provide guidance to the US DOE on experimental programs and design modifications to be supported in the development of a successful licensing application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. The purpose of the SPM is to determine the probabilities that the implementation of different combinations of experimental programs and design modifications, referred to as activity sets, will lead to compliance. Appropriate tradeoffs between compliance probability, implementation cost and implementation time can then be made in the selection of the activity set to be supported in the development of a licensing application. Descriptions are given for the conceptual structure of the SPM and the manner in which this structure determines the computational implementation of an example SPM application. Due to the sophisticated structure of the SPM and the computational demands of many of its components, the overall computational structure must be organized carefully to provide the compliance probabilities for the large number of activity sets under consideration at an acceptable computational cost. Conceptually, the determination of each compliance probability is equivalent to a large numerical integration problem. 96 refs., 31 figs., 36 tabs.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Anderson, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). WIPP Performance Assessments Departments; Baker, B.L. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Determining sand-body geometries for waterflood reservoirs: Examples from Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflood projects require an accurate knowledge of reservoir geometry and well-to-well continuity. However, sandstones with thin, multiple-pay zones can be extremely difficult to correlate with confidence. Two case studies of Pennsylvanian sandstones in Oklahoma illustrate how a model for the depositional history of such reservoirs can be an effective tool for determining reservoir continuity. In contrast, correlation criteria such as similar wireline log signatures and relative sand-body thicknesses are not reliable in many situations. In Southwest Logan field (Beaver County), 5 to 15-ft thick reservoir sands formed as shallow marine sand ridges. Their dimensions were approximated from height-to-width ratios of modern sand ridges. Then the reservoir sands were mapped using wireline logs and core data. Individual reservoir sands were approximately 1-2 km wide and stacked en echelon vertically. Thus, a line-drive waterflood pattern oriented parallel to the axes of the ridges is recommended. Tatums field (Carter County) consists of 5 to 50-ft thick sandstones deposited in various deltaic environments. Distributary channel sands have good continuity downdip, but are narrow and lenticular across depositional strike. Crevasse splay and other bay-fill sands were deposited marginal to the channels and are extremely discontinuous. This depositional model can be used to improve flood patterns for these sands, leading to improved sweep efficiency. In both examples, for effective mapping, the depositional facies models have been used to register reservoir quality and wireline log signatures.

Kreisa, R.D.; Pinero, E. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (USA))

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Examples of MC and A systems to meet prompt accountability specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed regulations for NRC licensees authorized to possess and process formula quantities of strategic special nuclear material (SSNM) would require each licensee to implement a material control and accounting (MC and A) system capable of prompt loss detection and alarm resolution. In support of the loss detection and alarm response activities an overcheck program would also be implemented. This program would include personnel qualification and training, quality control, inventory verification and shipper-receiver transaction verification. However, the frequeny of physical inventory verification would be about once per year rather than once every two months. In addition MC and A activities would include procedures for the prevention and detection of data falsification and other forms of deceit that might undermine the performance of the loss detection and response systems. This report provides examples of prompt accountability systems for four plants: mixed oxide fuel fabrication, uranium hexafluoride conversion, high enriched uranium fuel fabrication, and high enriched uranium scrap recovery. Purpose of this report is to provide guidance to the MC and A system designer and evaluator on how the proposed requirements might be met.

Eggers, R F; Brouns, R J; Bryant, J L; Davenport, L C; Brite, D W; Kinnison, R R; Fager, J E; Williams, R C; Wilson, R L

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Large batch dimensional metrology demonstrated in the example of a LIGA fabricated spring.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep x-ray lithography in combination with electroforming is capable of producing high precision metal parts in small lot series. This study deals with a high aspect ratio structure with overall dimensions on the order of 10 mm x 7 mm x 1.5 mm, with the smallest line width being 150 {micro}m. The lateral deviation from the design is to be kept to a minimum, preferably below 5 {micro}m. To ensure adequate quality control, a semi-automated metrology technique has been established to measure all parts. While the paper will give a brief overview of all involved techniques, it focuses on the method to measure the top and bottom of the parts and the top of geometries following the process. The instrument used is a View Engineering Voyager V6x12 microscope, which is fully programmable. The microscope allows direct measurement of geometries but also is capable of saving all captured data as point clouds. These point clouds play a central role when evaluating part geometry. After measuring the part, the point cloud is compared to the computer aided design (CAD) contour of the part, using a commercially available software package. The challenge of proper edge lighting on a nickel alloy part is evaluated by varying lighting conditions systematically. Results of two conditions are presented along with a set of optimized parameters. With the introduced set of tools, process flow can be monitored by measuring geometries, e.g. linewidths in every step of the process line. An example for such analysis is given. After delivery of a large batch of parts, extensive numbers of datasets were available allowing the evaluation of the variation of part geometries. Discussed in detail is the deviation from part top to part bottom geometries indicating swelling of the PMMA mold in the electroplating bath.

Aigeldinger, Georg; Skala, Dawn M.; Ceremuga, Joseph T.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

On monogamy of non-locality and macroscopic averages: examples and preliminary results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore a connection between monogamy of non-locality and a weak macroscopic locality condition: the locality of the average behaviour. These are revealed by our analysis as being two sides of the same coin. Moreover, we exhibit a structural reason for both in the case of Bell-type multipartite scenarios, shedding light on but also generalising the results in the literature [Ramanathan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 060405 (2001); Pawlowski & Brukner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 030403 (2009)]. More specifically, we show that, provided the number of particles in each site is large enough compared to the number of allowed measurement settings, and whatever the microscopic state of the system, the macroscopic average behaviour is local realistic, or equivalently, general multipartite monogamy relations hold. This result relies on a classical mathematical theorem by Vorob'ev [Theory Probab. Appl. 7(2), 147-163 (1962)] about extending compatible families of probability distributions defined on the faces of a simplicial complex – in the language of the sheaf-theoretic framework of Abramsky & Brandenburger [New J. Phys. 13, 113036 (2011)], such families correspond to no-signalling empirical models, and the existence of an extension corresponds to locality or non-contextuality. Since Vorob'ev's theorem depends solely on the structure of the simplicial complex, which encodes the compatibility of the measurements, and not on the specific probability distributions (i.e. the empirical models), our result about monogamy relations and locality of macroscopic averages holds not just for quantum theory, but for any empirical model satisfying the no-signalling condition. In this extended abstract, we illustrate our approach by working out a couple of examples, which convey the intuition behind our analysis while keeping the discussion at an elementary level.

Rui Soares Barbosa

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

MARSAME Illustrative Examples 8 ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

establishes zero net activity as the lower bound of the gray region (LBGR) and applies MARSAME processes establishing gross activity action levels based on normalized effective dose equivalents. Calculations

238

Building a Network of SME for a Global PSS Infrastructure in Complex High-Tech Systems: Example of Urban Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building a Network of SME for a Global PSS Infrastructure in Complex High-Tech Systems: Example is then applied to the case of urban PSS. Keywords: Network of SME, PSS Organization, Machine and facilitating maintenance. Dynamic high-technology Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) propose innovative

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

239

23. Gray{Scott equations Patterns are everywhere in nature. Examples include spots on butter ies, stripes on zebras, tri-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23. Gray{Scott equations Patterns are everywhere in nature. Examples include spots on butter ies variety. The Gray{Scott equations were formulated originally by Gray and Scott in 1983; we shall advantage of this principle. References P. Gray and S. K. Scott, papers in Chem. Eng. Sci. 38 (1983), 29

Trefethen, Nick

240

Outline Introduction Literature Review Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S., electric power generation accounts for significant portions of fuel demands 30% of the natural gas demand (over 50% in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand #12;OutlineOutline Introduction Literature Review Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions

Nagurney, Anna

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

50% in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand. #12;Introduction, the wholesale electricity price in New England decreased by 38% mainly because the delivered natural gas priceIntroduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples

Nagurney, Anna

242

Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fuel demands 30% of the natural gas demand (over 50% in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand. #12;Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply ChainsIntroduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples

Nagurney, Anna

243

Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand. #12;Introduction LiteratureIntroduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling

Nagurney, Anna

244

ON THE USE OF SPRAY SYSTEMS: AN EXAMPLE OF R&D WORK IN HYDROGEN SAFETY FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurred since the Three Mile Island nuclear accident in 1979 through experimental programs1 ON THE USE OF SPRAY SYSTEMS: AN EXAMPLE OF R&D WORK IN HYDROGEN SAFETY FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS, igniters and spray systems have been designed and installed in modern nuclear power plants. Mitigation

Boyer, Edmond

245

The design of lightweight composite structures, for example airframe structures, relies on extensive testing, coupled to a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is also researching ceramic matrix "hot" structures, nano-composites, and multi-material structuresSEMTE abstract The design of lightweight composite structures, for example airframe structures will be highlighted. Finite element models developed for laminated composites that can be used in ICME and "digital

Reisslein, Martin

246

Presentation 2.9: Economic and environmental implications of woodfuel production and competition with other uses: Europe as an example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presentation 2.9: Economic and environmental implications of woodfuel production and competition in the field of renewable energies could serve as an example of the possible environmental and economic impacts · the most obvious economic impact is the increased level of income of forest owners and managers · another

247

CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND-SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE BOISE HYDROGEOPHYSICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND- SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM Crosswell seismic data contain first-arrival information for velocity inversion and reflec- tions for seismic stratigraphic analysis. Seismic velocity information is useful for directly com- paring to

Barrash, Warren

248

Patent analysis, detection of new markets for employment Example of technologies related to the aging of population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Patent analysis, detection of new markets for employment Example of technologies related normes : complémentarités et conflits, Tours : France (2013)" #12;2 Patent analysis, detection of new Patent Analysis). The world patent database from the EPO (the European Patent Office), covers more than

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

249

A Double-Deletion Method to Quantifying Incremental Binding Energies in Proteins from Experiment: Example of a Destabilizing Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Double-Deletion Method to Quantifying Incremental Binding Energies in Proteins from Experiment: Example of a Destabilizing Hydrogen Bonding Pair Luis A. Campos,*y Santiago Cuesta-Lo´pez,*z Jon Lo of a specific hydrogen bond in apoflavodoxin to protein stability is investigated by combining theory

Sancho, Javier

250

Crystallography -Teacher's Notes Crystallography is a technique employed in all of the major scientific disciplines, so there are examples of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and green technology for a clean environment. Examples include studies of: · hydrogen absorption in new. It is owned and operated by the Science and Technology Facilities Council. ISIS produces beams of neutrons for areas as varied as energy, nanotechnology, materials processing, drug design and pharmaceuticals, bio-technology

Zharkova, Valentina V.

251

Extended Example: Distributed Train In this chapter I present a computational study of an auctionbased method for decentral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 9 Extended Example: Distributed Train Scheduling In this chapter I present a computational study of an auction­based method for decentral­ ized train scheduling. 1 Auction methods are well suited, with an au­ tonomous dispatch agent responsible for the flow of trains over each territory. Each train

Chen, Yiling

252

Examples of cooler reflective streets for urban heat-island mitigation : Portland cement concrete and chip seals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part of the urban heat island effect can be attributed to dark pavements that are commonly used on streets and parking lots. In this paper we consider two light colored, hence cooler, alternative paving materials that are in actual use in cities today. These are Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and chip seals. We report measurements of the albedos of some PCC and chip sealed pavements in the San Francisco Bay Area. The albedos of the PCC pavements ranged from about 0.18 to 0.35. The temperatures of some PCC pavements are also measured and calculated. We then consider how the albedos of the constituent materials of the PCC (stone, sand and cement) contribute to the albedos of the resulting finished concrete. The albedos of a set of chip sealed pavements in San Jose, CA, were measured and correlated with the times of their placement. It is found that the albedos decrease with age (and use) but remain higher than that of standard asphalt concrete (AC) for about five years. After t hat, the albedos of the chip seals are about 0.12, similar to aged AC. The fact that many PCC pavements have albedos at least twice as high as aged AC suggests that it is possible to have pavement albedos that remain high for many years.

Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chang, S.-C.; Levinson, R.; Pon, B.

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation. Volume 2, Detailed description of first example flowsheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level tank wastes at the Hanford Site is currently envisioned to divide the waste between two principal waste forms: glass for the high-level waste (HLW) and grout for the low-level waste (LLW). The draft flow diagram shown in Figure 1.1 was developed as part of the current planning process for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), which is evaluating options for tank cleanup. The TWRS has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to safely manage the Hanford tank wastes. It includes tank safety and waste disposal issues, as well as the waste pretreatment and waste minimization issues that are involved in the ``clean option`` discussed in this report. This report describes the results of a study led by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine if a more aggressive separations scheme could be devised which could mitigate concerns over the quantity of the HLW and the toxicity of the LLW produced by the reference system. This aggressive scheme, which would meet NRC Class A restrictions (10 CFR 61), would fit within the overall concept depicted in Figure 1.1; it would perform additional and/or modified operations in the areas identified as interim storage, pretreatment, and LLW concentration. Additional benefits of this scheme might result from using HLW and LLW disposal forms other than glass and grout, but such departures from the reference case are not included at this time. The evaluation of this aggressive separations scheme addressed institutional issues such as: radioactivity remaining in the Hanford Site LLW grout, volume of HLW glass that must be shipped offsite, and disposition of appropriate waste constituents to nonwaste forms.

Swanson, J.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Figure 1. The dataset for the running example is excerpted at left, arranged in the typical manner for MVPA. The boxes at right introduce the dataset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. The dataset for the running example is excerpted at left, arranged in the typical manner for MVPA. The boxes at right introduce the dataset representation used in later figures. In these boxes the "dataset-wise" scheme, the examples are relabeled prior to conducting the cross- validation, while

255

RADIO SCIENCE, VOL. 49, 3643, doi:10.1002/2013RS005288, 2014 Rare examples of early VLF events observed in association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Earth's global electric circuit [Cummer et al., 2009]. The first GJs were observed from the groundRADIO SCIENCE, VOL. 49, 36­43, doi:10.1002/2013RS005288, 2014 Rare examples of early VLF events., T. Adachi, R.-R. Hsu, and A. B. Chen (2014), Rare examples of early VLF events observed

256

Title Slide Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

June 19, 2013 Behavior Based Energy Efficiency - Lessons Learned from Fort Collins Utilities John Phelan, P.E., Energy Services Manager, Fort Collins Utilities Facilitated by...

257

Examples of seismic modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Findings of a few recent asteroseismic studies of the main-sequence pulsating stars, as performed in Wojciech Dziembowski's group in Warsaw and in Michel Breger's group in Vienna, are briefly presented and discussed. The selected objects are three hybrid pulsators Nu Eridani, 12 Lacertae and Gamma Pegasi, which show both Beta Cephei and SPB type modes, and the Delta Scuti type star 44 Tauri.

A. A. Pamyatnykh

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

258

Title Slide Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 17, 2012 Home Energy Reports: Three Year Review Puget Sound Energy Joel Smith and Bobbi Wilhelm Facilitated by Summer Goodwin, BPA July 2012 Puget Sound Energy Joel Smith and...

259

R Examples - Reading images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 2011 Publicationsand Allocation ForQuiz:R

260

RMOTC - Library - Example Forms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001Data sets Notice:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Proj. Plan Example SEM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket |21,-CommitteeItems at6A photoEnergy

262

Data Transfer Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is aID Service First DOIData Transfer»

263

Batch Script Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ UBasicsQueues andBatch

264

C Example HYPRE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science, and technologyVisitors ReportBuying0HYPRE C

265

C Example MUMPS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science, and technologyVisitors ReportBuying0HYPRE

266

LibSci Example  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser TheLessons Learned from aLiane

267

Science Gateways : Quickstart Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for USMaterialstheterahertzonExploreStudies »Demos Science

268

Title Slide Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe1A:decisional. 1 B O N NUnlocking OfficeVisible

269

Title Slide Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe1A:decisional. 1 B O N NUnlocking OfficeVisible

270

Confirmative laboratory tests and one example of forensic application of the probabilistic approach to the area of convergence in BPA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important results in Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA) is the determination of the area of convergence of blood-drop trajectories. This area is directly related to the point of origin of the projections and is often indicative of the point where the main action of a crime has occurred. One of us has recently proposed a method to statistically characterize this area by mean of a probabilistic approach based on the uncertainties of the angles of impact of the stains in the pattern. In our work we present some laboratory tests that confirm the validity of the method, returning good agreement between the empirical and the theoretical data. By comparing the results of different operators, we also show the robustness of the method, in that the results are independent of the analytical approach of the single experimenter. Finally, we describe an example of application to a real forensic case.

Camana, Francesco; Gravina, Nicola; Quintarelli, Marco

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

An Example Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for Reactive Transport at the Horonobe Site for Performance Assessment Calculations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given pre-existing Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) models of the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at both the regional and site scales, this work performs an example uncertainty analysis for performance assessment (PA) applications. After a general overview of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques, the existing GMS site-scale model is converted to a PA model of the steady-state conditions expected after URL closure. This is done to examine the impact of uncertainty in site-specific data in conjunction with conceptual model uncertainty regarding the location of the Oomagari Fault. A heterogeneous stochastic model is developed and corresponding flow fields and particle tracks are calculated. In addition, a quantitative analysis of the ratio of dispersive to advective forces, the F-ratio, is performed for stochastic realizations of each conceptual model. Finally, a one-dimensional transport abstraction is modeled based on the particle path lengths and the materials through which each particle passes to yield breakthrough curves at the model boundary. All analyses indicate that accurate characterization of the Oomagari Fault with respect to both location and hydraulic conductivity is critical to PA calculations. This work defines and outlines typical uncertainty and sensitivity analysis procedures and demonstrates them with example PA calculations relevant to the Horonobe URL. Acknowledgement: This project was funded by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). This work was conducted jointly between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and JNC under a joint JNC/U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) work agreement. Performance assessment calculations were conducted and analyzed at SNL based on a preliminary model by Kashima, Quintessa, and JNC and include significant input from JNC to make sure the results are relevant for the Japanese nuclear waste program.

James, Scott; Cohan, Alexander [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production: a distillation tower, which  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production **" means "**% octane".) Once crude oil enters the system, it goes fully through the process. The refinery

Galvin, David

273

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Advanced Fingerprint Analysis Project Fingerprint Constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report was focused on generating fundamental data on fingerprint components which will be used to develop advanced forensic techniques to enhance fluorescent detection, and visualization of latent fingerprints. Chemical components of sweat gland secretions are well documented in the medical literature and many chemical techniques are available to develop latent prints, but there have been no systematic forensic studies of fingerprint sweat components or of the chemical and physical changes these substances undergo over time.

GM Mong; CE Petersen; TRW Clauss

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

275

TAXONOMIC POTENTIAL OF THE CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GINEBREDA * Departamento de Quimica Orgánica Bio16gica (C. l. D., C.S.I. C.), . J. Girona Salgado 18, 08034 Barcelona, Spain ' ** Passeig Bonanova 75, 08017 Barcelona, Spain *** Secci6n de Quimica Cubntica

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

Enzymatic solubilization of nitrogenous constituents of carrots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of enzyme concentration upon nitrogen so1ubi 1i zed in carrot tops ( 10g dry weight) . Conditions of assay: pH = 3. 5, i ncubati on time = 20 hr, incubation temperature = 45'C. 24 hydrolysis. These data confirm earlier reports that -. 01% is the pro... roots and tops, a concentration of 1. 0% A-12-C at pH 3. 5 provided the maximum increase in soluble ni trogenous consti tuents . For car~ot roots, a concentration of 1. 0/ ficin at pH 4, 5 provided the maximum increase in soluble nitrogen. With carrot...

Curry, James Cannon

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program is directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal is to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work is underway. Microbial cultures have been isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters with cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Field pilot studies are underway.

D. O. Hitzman; A. K. Stepp; D. M. Dennis; L. R. Graumann

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

279

INNOVATIVE MIOR PROCESS UTILIZING INDIGENOUS RESERVOIR CONSTITUENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions and technologies for improving oil production. The goal was to identify and utilize indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work in model sandpack cores was conducted using microbial cultures isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters using cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Increased oil recovery in multiple model sandpack systems was achieved and the technology and results were verified by successful field studies. Direct application of the research results has lead to the development of a feasible, practical, successful, and cost-effective technology which increases oil recovery. This technology is now being commercialized and applied in numerous field projects to increase oil recovery. Two field applications of the developed technology reported production increases of 21% and 24% in oil recovery.

D.O. Hitzman; A.K. Stepp; D.M. Dennis; L.R. Graumann

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with inorganic nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Property:BrineConstituents | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthor JumpBoundingCoordinatesSW Jump

282

Foramol carbonate shelves as depositional site and source area: Recent and ancient examples from the Mediterranean region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent environments, only limited carbonate depositional areas are dominated by coral reefs. Such platforms frequently develop rimmed margins and are characterized by chlorozoan facies with large contributions of nonskeletal grains. They are practically limited to warm tropical seas. In temperate seas as well as anomalous tropical zones, large areas of the middle-outer shelf are covered by skeletal debris with variable amounts of mollusks, foraminifers, coralline algae, bryozoans, etc (foramol facies). Apart from the skeletal fragments derived from the shallow inner shelf and the contribution from local endobiota and epibiota, the source of the bioclastic sediments may be found in limited and scattered areas supporting active carbonate-producing assemblages. Fossil counterparts of similar deposits are present in the Mediterranean region (e.g., Spain, Italy, Malta, Libya), locally showing good reservoir properties. Examples are described from the Miocene of the Southern Apennines (Italy) where a variety rich in encrusting coralline algae is present, as well as from the Upper Cretaceous of the Southern Apennines and northwest Sardinia (Italy) where scattered rudistid buildups are associated with bioclastic sediments rich in coralline algae and bryozoans.

Carannante, G.; Simone, L.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

AquaFuel: An example of the emerging new energies and the new methods for their scientific study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we initiate studies of the emerging new forms of energy by using as a representative example the new combustible gas called AquaFuel, discovered and patented by William H. Richardson, jr., whose rights are now owned by Toups Technology Licensing, Inc. (TTL), of Largo, Florida. In essence, AquaFuel is a new energy converter capable of transforming Carbon and water into a new combustible gas via an electric discharge. We show that AquaFuel can be produced easily, safely and rapidly in large amounts, and exhibits greatly reduced emission pollutants as compared to fossil fuels of current use. Despite its simplicity, the chemical and physical characteristics of AquaFuel are largely unknown at this writing. We then review nine basic experimental measurements which are necessary for a scientific appraisal of AquaFuel. We outline the limitations of quantum mechanics and chemistry for the treatment of {\\it new} forms of energy, namely, energies which by definition should be {\\it beyond} said theories. We finally point out the availability of broader theories specifically constructed for the study of new energies and point out available applications.

Ruggero Maria Santilli

1998-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Shape resonances in ground-state diatomic molecules: General trends and the example of RbCs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of shape resonances due to tunneling through the centrifugal barrier modifies strongly the dynamics of cold atom scattering. As shown on the example of the ground and lowest triplet electronic states of the {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule, the crucial parameter is, as usual for cold collisions, the scattering length. A general description of shape resonances of diatomic molecules is given from three simple single channel asymptotic models, whose respective performances are discussed. The first model, which consists of a R{sup -6} potential limited at short range by a repulsive wall, positioned to reproduce the s-wave scattering length, accounts satisfactorily for the main system-independent properties of shape resonances. Introduction in the model of energy- and angular-momentum-dependent nodal lines specific to the inner part of the potential greatly improves its efficiency. When the energy and angular momentum dependence of the nodal lines cannot be deduced from full potential calculations or from experiment, a rough, but universal, estimate of these properties is obtained by extending the R{sup -6} behavior of the potential up to the origin.

Londono, B. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 67 No. 53-108, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Batiment 505, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mahecha, J. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 67 No. 53-108, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Luc-Koenig, E.; Crubellier, A. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Batiment 505, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Assessing National Employment Impacts of Investment in Residential and Commercial Sector Energy Efficiency: Review and Example Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) modeled the employment impacts of a major national initiative to accelerate energy efficiency trends at one of two levels: • 15 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, efficiency activities save about 15 percent of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Reference Case electricity consumption by 2030. It is assumed that additional energy savings in both the residential and commercial sectors begin in 2015 at zero, and then increase in an S-shaped market penetration curve, with the level of savings equal to about 7.0 percent of the AEO 2014 U.S. national residential and commercial electricity consumption saved by 2020, 14.8 percent by 2025, and 15 percent by 2030. • 10 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, additional savings begin at zero in 2015, increase to 3.8 percent in 2020, 9.8 percent by 2025, and 10 percent of the AEO reference case value by 2030. The analysis of the 15 percent case indicates that by 2030 more than 300,000 new jobs would likely result from such policies, including an annual average of more than 60,000 jobs directly supporting the installation and maintenance of energy efficiency measures and practices. These are new jobs resulting initially from the investment associated with the construction of more energy-efficient new buildings or the retrofit of existing buildings and would be sustained for as long as the investment continues. Based on what is known about the current level of building-sector energy efficiency jobs, this would represent an increase of more than 10 percent from the current estimated level of over 450,000 such jobs. The more significant and longer-lasting effect comes from the redirection of energy bill savings toward the purchase of other goods and services in the general economy, with its attendant influence on increasing the total number of jobs. This example analysis utilized PNNL’s ImSET model, a modeling framework that PNNL has used over the past two decades to assess the economic impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) energy efficiency programs in the buildings sector.

Anderson, David M.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.

2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Distributed Object Component-based Approach to Large-scale Engineering Systems and an Example Component Using Motion Planning Techniques for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but robust enough to be truly useful for engineering- specific services. This paper introduces a distributedA Distributed Object Component-based Approach to Large-scale Engineering Systems and an Example. Kunz2 , Kincho H. Law3 Abstract This paper introduces a large-scale engineering systems distributed

Stanford University

287

ICSE6 Paris -August 27-31, 2012 Herrier, Berger, Bonelli The Friant-Kern canal : a forgotten example of lime-treated structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: a forgotten example of lime-treated structure in hydraulic conditions Gontran HERRIER1 , Eric BERGER2 in the paper. The treated clay was replaced and compacted by a sheep- foot roller, to achieve a typical in the 70's . Despite the fact that the lime-treated soil has been in constant direct contact

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

288

Processes controlling a volcaniclastic turbiditic system during the last climatic cycle: Example of the Cilaos deep-sea fan, offshore La Runion Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., 2009]). insu-00771704,version1-10Jan2013 #12;3 The conventional sequence stratigraphy model for clastic sequence stratigraphy54 concepts. Covault and Graham (2010) showed that deep-sea deposition occurs at all1 Processes controlling a volcaniclastic turbiditic system during the last climatic cycle: Example

289

Johnson-Laird, ). So, for example, to satisfy the concept (`to be an apple. . .'\\), a thing must exhibit roundness, edibility, redness, fruitiness, and so on. Such theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;? Johnson-Laird, ). So, for example, to satisfy the concept (`to be an apple. . .'\\), a thing of concepts. For instance, apples resemble re engines by sharing the characteristic of redness, they resemble lost much of its popularity, largely because apples, although most o en red, are not necessarily so

Bucci, David J.

290

Comparison of Petrophysical Rock Types from Core and Well-logs using Post-stack 3D Seismic Data: Field Example from Maracaibo-Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Field Example from Maracaibo-Venezuela Francisco Cheng* and Kumar Ramachandran, The University of Tulsa in an area located on the West side of Lake Maracaibo-Venezuela. The calculated petrophysical rock types were Description The study area is located on the West side of Lake Maracaibo-Venezuela, in shallow, transition

Ramachandran, Kumar

291

Impact of mine closure and access facilities on gas emissions from old mine workings to surface: examples of French iron and coal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: examples of French iron and coal Lorraine basins C. Lagny, R. Salmon, Z. Pokryszka and S. Lafortune (INERIS of mine shafts located in the iron Lorraine basin, in the Lorraine and in North-East coal basins are quite in mine workings but gas entrance and exit are allowed. Coal shafts are secured and can be equipped

Boyer, Edmond

292

Textural criteria for the discrimination of water-laid and wind-laid barrier island sands: a North Padre Island, Texas example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Laid Barrier Island Sands: A North Padre Island, Texas Example (August 1985) David Cunningham, B. S. ; The University of Texas at Austin Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James M. Mazzullo The grain size and grain shape characteristics of 63, 200 quartz... sand grains were analyzed from 158 samples systematically collected along three transects across North Padre Island. Sampled subenviron- ments included the forebeach, backbeach, foredune ridge, eolian flat, back-island dunes, and wind-tidal flats...

Cunningham, David

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

ENGI 4421 Conditional Probability and Independence Page 4-01 Example 4.01 [Navidi Section 2.3; Devore Sections 2.4-2.5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sample points, four of which also fall inside B . Therefore P[ B | A ] = 4/6 = 2/3 . Compare this to P[ B and Independence Page 4-04 Example 4.03 A bag contains two red, three blue and four yellow marbles. Three marbles the probability that the colours of the three marbles are all different. Let "E" represent the desired event

George, Glyn

294

U.S. EPA State Clean Energy and Climate Program (2009). Clean Energy Lead by Example Guide: Strategies, Resources, and Action Steps for State Programs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State governments can achieve substantial energy cost savings across their facilities, operations, and fleets through clean energy Lead by Example (LBE) programs. They can also demonstrate energy and environmental leadership, raise public awareness of the benefits of clean energy technologies, improve air quality, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, improve energy supply and reliability, and foster markets for environmentally preferable products. The LBE Guide provides information to assist state governments as they develop and implement effective LBE programs to achieve their clean energy goals. It presents strategies, resources, and tools state decision makers can use throughout the process. EPA and other organizations recognize leading by example as a key policy option for states seeking to achieve their clean energy goals. For example, the importance of LBE programs is documented in the the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency “Vision for 2025 ” report. The Vision identifies LBE as a critical component of achieving the long-term goal of all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Goal Six of the Vision’s ten implementation goals is to develop state policies such as LBE for pursuing robust energy efficiency practices. DocUmEnt maP ChAPtER onE introduction ChAPtER two Potential lBE activities and measures ChAPtER thREE

Prepared Joanna Pratt; Joe Donahue; Niko Dietsch

295

The GLOBE Sustainability Toolbox is a "starter kit" that provides you with sector-specific examples of simple and low-cost improvements that you, as a social housing provider, can make to increase the efficiency of your operations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainability SECTION 1 SUSTAINABILITY: AN OVERVIEW SECTION 2 YOUR BUILDING AS A SYSTEM SECTION 3 THE GREEN in Sustainability Simple Payback: A Real Life Example Government and Utility Incentives SECTION 2 YOUR BUILDINGThe GLOBE Sustainability Toolbox is a "starter kit" that provides you with sector-specific examples

Keinan, Alon

296

Reference: De Vleeschouwer, M. & Gueudet, G. (2011, fvrier). Secondary-tertiary transition and evolution of didactic contract : the example of duality in linear algebra. In Pytlak, M., Rowland, T., Swoboda, E. Proceedings of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and evolution of didactic contract : the example of duality in linear algebra. In Pytlak, M., Rowland, T-TERTIARY TRANSITION AND EVOLUTIONS OF DIDACTIC CONTRACT: THE EXAMPLE OF DUALITY IN LINEAR ALGEBRA Martine De, and a didactic contract perspective we argue that some of the novice students' difficulties can result from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

297

Junior Example Engineering Robert Garcia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Office Suite, Adobe Creative Suite, Google SketchUp. Languages: Spanish (intermediate), German (beginner

298

A Generalization of Deutsch's Example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum parallelism is the main feature of quantum computation. In 1985 D. Deutsch showed that a single quantum computation may be sufficient to state whether a two-valued function of a two-valued variable is constant or not. Though the generalized problem with unconstrained domain and range size admits no deterministic quantum solution, a fully probabilistic quantum algorithm is presented in which quantum parallelism is harnessed to achieve a quicker exploration of the domain with respect to the classical ``sampling'' strategy.

Giovanni Costantini; Fabrizio Smeraldi

1997-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

HPSS Usage Examples at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuided Self-Assembly of GoldHAWCHIGS flux4-00nHPSS

300

HCP Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer County is a countyon State Highways | OpenD -HCE LLC Jump to:HCL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

example | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats GeothermalElectricsecretary Homeexample Home

302

OpenEI Community - example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahomast, 2012Coastfred <divmeasures signed into

303

Example Queries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformationexplains a4Evendale, Ohio:Fieldblog/2781

304

Influence of coal quality parameters on utilization of high-sulfur coals: Examples from Springfield (western Kentucky No. 9) coal bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Springfield (Western Kentucky No. 9) coal bed is the most important energy resource in the Western Kentucky coalfield (Eastern Interior coalfield), accounting for over 30 million tons of annual production from remaining resources of over 9 billion tons. For many coal quality parameters, the quality of the coal bed is relatively consistent throughout the region. For example, the Springfield has about 80-85% vitrinite, 10% ash, and 3.5-4.5% total sulfur at most sites in the coalfield. However, coal quality variation is more than just the changes in ash and sulfur. As demonstrated by the Springfield coal bed, it is a complex interaction of related and unrelated variables many of which directly affect utilization of the coal. Significant, though generally predictable, changes are observed in other parameters. Comparison of data from the Millport (Muhlenberg and Hopkins Countries), Providence (Hopkins and Webster Counties), and Waverly (Union County) 7{1/2} Quadrangles illustrated such variations.

Griswold, T.B.; Hower, J.C.; Cobb, J.C. (Kentucky Energy Cabinet, Lexington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hamiltonian dynamics in extended phase space for gravity and its consistency with Lagrangian formalism: a generalized spherically symmetric model as an example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among theoretical issues in General Relativity the problem of constructing its Hamiltonian formulation is still of interest. The most of attempts to quantize Gravity are based upon Dirac generalization of Hamiltonian dynamics for system with constraints. At the same time there exists another way to formulate Hamiltonian dynamics for constrained systems guided by the idea of extended phase space. We have already considered some features of this approach in the previous MG12 Meeting by the example of a simple isotropic model. Now we apply the approach to a generalized spherically symmetric model which imitates the structure of General Relativity much better. In particular, making use of a global BRST symmetry and the Noether theorem, we construct the BRST charge that generates correct gauge transformations for all gravitational degrees of freedom.

T. P. Shestakova

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

306

THE NEED FOR A PARADIGM SHIFT IN OPTICAL ASTRONOMY: A SOLUTION GIVEN BY LIQUID MIRRORS AND EXAMPLES OF THEIR APPLICATIONS TO COSMOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I argue that there is a crisis in optical Astronomy due to a paucity of telescopes and thus the need for a paradigm shift in telescope technology. Large increases in collecting areas and observing time/astronomer are only possible if we forgo the fully steerable multipurpose telescope with a glass primary mirror that has dominated astronomical research. Only by adopting entirely novel technologies that allow one to build large and inexpensive telescopes can we achieve truly large improvements. This may come at the expense of versatility and may entail changes in the observing strategies astronomers are now accustomed to. I build my case around a new technology, liquid mirrors, that although in its infancy has achieved credibility. I argue that forthcoming technological improvements will make Liquid Mirror Telescopes (LMTs) nearly as versatile as conventional telescopes. I address the issue of the fields accessible to LMTs equipped with novel optical correctors. Optical design work and exploratory laboratory work indicate that a single LMT should be able to access, with excellent images, subregions anywhere inside fields as large as 45 degrees. As a practical example of what an LMT can do with the present technology, I examine the expected performance of a 5-m liquid mirror telescope, presently under construction, dedicated to a cosmological survey. It is rather impressive, due to the fact that the instrument works full-time on a four-year survey: Spectrophotometry reaches B=24 with a signal to noise ratio of 10 within a 200\\AA bandpass for all objects within 300 square degrees and wide-band photometry reaches about B=27. I give three examples of cosmological projects that can be done with the data.

E. F. Borra

1995-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

307

Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

308

Reply to N. C. Higgins' comment on origin of alkali-feldspar granites: An example from the Poimena Granite, northeastern Tasmania, Australia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper acts as a rebuttal to comments made by other scientists regarding the origin of the Poimena Granite as discussed in an earlier paper by these authors. The Lottah Granite and the enclosing Poimena Granite of northeastern Tasmania represent one of the best documented and most intensely Li-F-rich alkali-feldspar granite and its much more voluminous biotite granite host. The issue under debate is which of the two most generally supported models for the origin of Li-F-Sn granites-magmatic or metasomatic-hydrothermal-best explains the data obtained from the Lottah and Poimena Granites It is not the authors intent to imply that alkali-feldspar granites cannot be generated from granites similar to the Poimena Granite by fractional crystallization: the St. Austell Granite is an excellent example of such a relationship. Nor do the authors intend to imply that metasomatic and hydrothermal processes have not operated at all in the Lottah Granite. They seek rather to demonstrate that magmatic processes alone are capable of generating alkali-feldspar granites enriched in Sn, Li, Rb, F etc. and that such granites need not be genetically linked to spatially associated normal granites. Some of the arguments and data are subsequently presented in this paper.

MacKenzie, D.E.; Sun, S.S.; Black, L.P. (Bureau of Mineral Resources, Canberra (Australia))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Process sedimentology and reservoir quality of deep-marine bottom-current reworked sands (sandy contourites): An example from the Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep-marine bottom-current reworked sands (sandy contourites) have been recognized in hydrocarbon-bearing sands of the Gulf of Mexico. A distinctive attribute of these sands is their traction bed forms, which occur in discrete units. Common sedimentary features of traction currents include cross-bedding, current ripples, horizontal lamination, sharp upper contacts, and inverse size grading. These sands also exhibit internal erosional surfaces and mud offshoots, indicating oscillating current energy conditions. THe Pliocene-Pleistocene sequence cored in the Ewing Bank Block 826 field in the Gulf of Mexico provides an example of sand distribution and reservoir quality of deep-marine bottom-current reworked sands. Presumably, the Loop Current, a strong wind-driven surface current in the Gulf of Mexico, impinged on the sea bottom, as it does today, and resulted in bottom-current reworked sands. A depositional model based on the integration of well (core and log) and three-dimensional seismic data suggests that the reworked sediment package may be thick and continuous, but individual sand layers within the package may be thin and discontinuous. This unconventional model, which depicts the distribution of bottom-current reworked sands in interchannel slope areas as a distinctly different facies from channel-levee facies, has the potential for general application to other slope plays outside the study area. In the Ewing Bank Block 826 field, the type I (L-1) reservoir with 80% sand exhibits higher permeability values (100-1800 md) than the type 2 (N-1) reservoir with 26% sand (50-800 md). The increased permeability in the type I sand has been attributed to high sand content, vigorous reworking, and microfractures. The clean, porous, and well-sorted type 1 sands with good communication between sand layers have produced at higher rates and recovery efficiencies than the type 2 sands with numerous interbedded mud layers. 50 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

Shanmugam, G. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)); Spalding, T.D.; Rofheart, D.H. (Mobil New Business Development, Dallas, TX (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Macroalgues Les fonds rocheux littoraux constituent le principal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ou poissons appartiennent à la catégorie des filtreurs ou des carnivores mobiles. Forêt de kelp de Californie (Mexique) se développent des forêts sous-marines de kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) qui

311

The standard model and the constituents of leptons and quarks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A complete set of postulates of the standard model of the electroweak interaction and mass generation is formulated and confirmed deriving the Lagrangian for the standard model. A massive fermion is formed by a right-handed and a left-handed elementary massless fermion, exchanging a scalar doublet. The elementary massless fermions forming leptons belong to an approximate SU(3) octet. The charges are quantised due to this symmetry.

Walter Schmidt-Parzefall

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

312

Recovery of constituent spectra using non-negative matrix factorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, mineral exploration, vegetation mapping, hazardous material remediation, and water quality control. #12 to produce spectra across a large number of wavelengths/bands (> 30 bands). Typical wavelength ranges

Parra, Lucas C.

313

Scission of Diblock Copolymers into Their Constituent Blocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

component polymer or the underlying substrate or both. A key problem with UV degradation is that its for the growth of oriented inorganic or metal nanostructures, and sensors. Currently, chemical etching and UV degradation are the methods that are commonly used for the removal of minor components to create the nanopores

314

Digestion des constituants paritaux et activit fermentaire ccale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in cecal contents were measured in growing rabbits. Increasing the level of CW from dehydrated lucerne (LD; Fibre digestion and cecal fermentation in the growing rabbit: effect of incorporation rate and degree

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Investigation into mechanical properties of bone and its main constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during the progression of osteoporosis will help to clarifyfor prevention and cure of osteoporosis in the future.D, Rosen, CJ. (Eds. ), Osteoporosis, 3rd ed. Elsevier, Inc,

Evdokimenko, Ekaterina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Nature and Chlorine Reactivity of Organic Constituents from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are removed during the first 3 m of vertical infiltration in the recharge basin. Groundwater age dating with 3 and receiving groundwater and potential disinfection hazards. Previous studies on rapid infiltration disposal be transported considerable distances (> 10 km) and persist for long periods of time (> 50 yr). The primary

317

Constituents without citizenship? : immigrant political incorporation in new destinations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation explores the role of native activists in the incorporation of new immigrants. Motivated by concerns that this process would be limited in countries with no tradition of immigration, it focuses on Spain, ...

Dobbs, Erica Rose

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Interactive Visualization of Modeled Atmospheric Trace Constituents Carmen M. Benkovitz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of the emissions of Popocatepetl volcano, located near Mexico City. The effects of stronger of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Chemical Transport Model (CTM) of sulfate in the atmosphere. The visualization on climate. Anthropogenic activities affect the aerosol content of the atmosphere. Anthropogenic emissions

319

Linear to nonlinear rheology of bread dough and its constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are many practical reasons for studying the deformational behavior or rheological properties of a dough system. The mass production of bread has led to a need of machines that are able to handle and process large ...

Ng, Shen Kuan (Trevor Shen Kuan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Day with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the computer codes developed for the coal combustion project. In Subsection B.1 the FORTRAN code developed for the percolative fragmentation model (or the discrete model, since a char is expressed as a collection of discrete elements in a discrete space) is presented. In Subsection B.2 the code for the continuum model (thus named because mineral inclusions are distributed in a continuum space) is presented. A stereological model code developed to obtain the pore size distribution from a two-dimensional data is presented in Subsection B.3.

Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shim-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

High capacity adsorption media for separating or removing constituents and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in thein the Assembly of PhotosystemVehiclesmethods

323

High capacity adsorption media for separating or removing constituents,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in thein the Assembly of

324

"Non-spectroscopic Method of Determining Gas Constituents through  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNG IHDR€ÍSolar Energy SystemsFebruary 7-8,MarchKnyszek,A. JaworskiAPSRotation;

325

METHODS OF USING ADSORPTION MEDIA FOR SEPARATING OR REMOVING CONSTITUENTS -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3,March

326

Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubeyChallengeMetal & AlloyandEnergy

327

If we consider the differences in the list of topics treated in the two books then we see for example that Ripley treats some nonneural techniques such as belief networks and decision trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If we consider the differences in the list of topics treated in the two books then we see for example that Ripley treats some nonneural techniques such as belief networks and decision trees while general book on pattern recognition, treating neural networks as one of the topics. Bishop's book can

Duin, Robert P.W.

328

Water Resources Management Degree Program Examples The tables below show some of the ways in which a student can tailor the Water Resources Management curriculum to fit their interests and needs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Management Degree Program Examples The tables below show some of the ways in which a student can tailor the Water Resources Management curriculum to fit their interests and needs. Each Hydrogeology Category B - Water Resources Institutions and Public Decision Making Processes Journalism 315

Sheridan, Jennifer

329

Linking Education R&D Institutes and IndustryLinking Education, R&D Institutes and Industry l ifi E b l AR)(examples are more specific to Egypt , but many apply to AR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Industry l ifi E b l AR)(examples are more specific to Egypt , but many apply to AR) Mohamed A. Abdou goals. The overall assessment indicates that: Egypt's current S&T system has failed to substantially impactEgypt s current S&T system has failed to substantially impact socio-economic development which

Abdou, Mohamed

330

National Climate Assessment Indicators: Background, Development, & Examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indicators are usually thought of as measurements or calculations that represent important features of the status, trend, or performance of a system of interest (e.g. the economy, agriculture, air quality). They are often used for the most practical of reasons – one cannot measure everything important about systems of interest, so there is a practical need to identify major features that can be reported periodically and used to guide both research and decisions (NRC 2000).

Janetos, Anthony C.; Chen, Robert; Arndt, Deke; Kenney, Melissa A.; Abbasi, Daniel; Armstrong, Tom; Bartuska, Ann; Blair, Maria; Buizer, Jim; Dietz, Tom; Easterling, Dave; Kaye, Jack; Kolian, Michael; McGeehin, Michael; O'Connor, Robert; Pulwarty, Roger; Running, Steve; Schmalensee, Dick; Webb, Robert; Weltzin, Jake; Baptista, Sandra; Enquist, Carolyn A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Chen, Robert; Arndt, Deke; Hatfield, Jerry; Hayes, Mark L.; Jones, K. Burce; McNutt, Chad; Meier, Wayne R.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Svoboda, Mark

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

Distributed generation - the fuel processing example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increased costs of transportation and distribution are leading many commercial and industrial firms to consider the on-site generation for energy and other commodities used in their facilities. This trend has been accelerated by the development of compact, efficient processes for converting basic raw materials into finished services at the distributed sites. Distributed generation with the PC25{trademark} fuel cell power plant is providing a new cost effective technology to meet building electric and thermal needs. Small compact on-site separator systems are providing nitrogen and oxygen to many industrial users of these gases. The adaptation of the fuel processing section of the PC25 power plant for on-site hydrogen generation at industrial sites extends distributed generation benefits to the users of industrial hydrogen.

Victor, R.A. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Farris, P.J.; Maston, V. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Public Private R&D Partnerships Examples  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Coal Power Plants 2010 * 400kW Modules -Residential, Commercial, Industrial CHP -Transportation APUs 2005 * 1 st Generation Prototypes - Testing & Evaluation 5 6 SECA...

333

Project Management Plan Examples 1- 80  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The descriptions below should be used to navigate to the subject of...

334

I. Introduction Noninnocence: an Illustrative Example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s d .... Energy Ligand HOMOs raised Electron Rich Ligands Highly Conjugated Ligands .... Szilagyi, S innocent ligand behavior e- e- e- e- e- e- e- e- Szilagyi, S. K.; Lim, B. S.; Glaser, T.; Holm, R. H

Stoltz, Brian M.

335

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MULTIPOLE CONFINEMENT (Examples)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

delphia APS meeting in November 1973. All cases are for neutral H 2 background. The excitation energy loss energy, so that little ionization occurs. As a result, the density builds steadily to a maximum at late at ionizing the neutrals. This ionization raises the charged particle density and thus lowers the heating rate

Sprott, Julien Clinton

336

Worked examples in the Geometry of Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Physical Metallurgy University of Cambridge Adjunct Professor of Computational Metallurgy Graduate

Cambridge, University of

337

Tutorial Examples in the book Solar Magnetohydrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-body radiation, namely, I = SBT4 , where SB is constant. Then, if the temperatures of a sunspot umbra and the ambient photosphere are 3700 K and 5800 K, respectively, by what factor is the umbra less bright than

Priest, Eric

338

CopyStyler : Web design by example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the design and implementation of CopyStyler, a tool to enable novice web users to style their own web pages by emulating the style of existing pages on the Web. The tool is implemented as a browser ...

Fitzgerald, Michael J., M. Eng Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Examples of Process Modifications that Reduce Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ideal approach to reducing or eliminating waste products is to avoid making them in the first place. This article will examine numerous process modifications that have accomplished that goal. We'll look at changes to raw materials, reactors...

Nelson, K. E.

340

Conforming Secondary Markets Models, Examples | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

secondarymarketmodelsexamples.pdf More Documents & Publications Creating Liquidity for Energy Efficiency Loans in Secondary Markets EECBG Creating Liquidity for Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fig. 1. Example System phase loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power system (SPS) consists of various components such as generators, cables, switchboards, load centers Transformer 9 25 12 Alternate path Generator switchboard Bus-tie breaker Generator 1 Generator 3 Generator 2 4 26 G 29 7 8 ABT 3 single phase cables Visualization for Shipboard Power Systems Karen L. Butler

342

Fire Modeling Examples in a Nuclear World  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Mark Schairer, P.E.,Technical Manager, Fire Protection Engineering Division - Engineering Planning and Management (EPM), Inc.

343

Architecture and the movies : two examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is a speculative inquiry into the relationship between movies and architecture, both of which are forms of expression simultaneously particular to the artist who created them and general, illustrative of a ...

Meagher, Mary Elizabeth

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Monitoring/Verification Using DMS: TATP Example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field-rugged and field-programmable differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) networks provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. CBE sensor motes used in conjunction with automated fast gas chromatography with DMS detection (GC/DMS) verification instrumentation integrated into situational operationsmanagement systems can be readily deployed and optimized for changing application scenarios. The feasibility of developing selective DMS motes for a “smart dust” sampling approach with guided, highly selective, fast GC/DMS verification analysis is a compelling approach to minimize or prevent the illegal use of explosives or chemical and biological materials. DMS is currently one of the foremost emerging technologies for field separation and detection of gas-phase chemical species. This is due to trace-level detection limits, high selectivity, and small size. GC is the leading analytical method for the separation of chemical species in complex mixtures. Low-thermal-mass GC columns have led to compact, low-power field systems capable of complete analyses in 15–300 seconds. A collaborative effort optimized a handheld, fast GC/DMS, equipped with a non-rad ionization source, for peroxide-based explosive measurements.

Kevin Kyle; Stephan Weeks

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Federal Gov Monthly state fuel tax examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NewYork Washington Florida Georgia Wyoming Arkansas Louisiana Texas NewMexico Oklahoma Alaska Freeway Texas New Mexico Oklahoma CentsperGallon How does Texas compare to other states? State Fuel Tax Rates.75 Texas Registration Fee Motor Fuel Lubricants Tax $43,275,000 Motor Vehicle Certificates of Title Fees

346

Example BCP Template | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S. Department of9 Examination

347

Query Generation From Multiple Media Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ren,R. Jose,J.M. the 7th International Workshop on Content-Based Multimedia Indexing pp 138-143 IEEE Computer Society Press

Ren, R.

348

COUNTER-EXAMPLES TO QUANTIFIER ELIMINATION FOR ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 6, 2006 ... Russian original: Malochleny, Moscow, 1987; Revised Russian edition: Fazis, Moscow, 1996. [10] J.-M. Lion and P. Speissegger, The theorem ...

1910-61-00T23:59:59.000Z

349

Energy-Momentum Distribution: Some Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we elaborate the problem of energy-momentum in General Relativity with the help of some well-known solutions. In this connection, we use the prescriptions of Einstein, Landau-Lifshitz, Papapetrou and M\\"{o}ller to compute the energy-momentum densities for four exact solutions of the Einstein field equations. We take the gravitational waves, special class of Ferrari-Ibanez degenerate solution, Senovilla-Vera dust solution and Wainwright-Marshman solution. It turns out that these prescriptions do provide consistent results for special class of Ferrari-Ibanez degenerate solution and Wainwright-Marshman solution but inconsistent results for gravitational waves and Senovilla-Vera dust solution.

M. Sharif; M. Azam

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

million in funding from DOE for an integrated renewable energy deployment plan using a biogas generation facility and solar photovoltaics (PV) to provide heating, cooling, and...

351

Microsoft Word - summary_example_19802.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA TrimodalRECENT PROGRESS2A comparison

352

Leading By Example | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXXLocated atPenrose C.InstitutionalBy

353

Category:LEDS Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind FarmAdd a newISGAN Definitions

354

Montana Construction Dewatering General Permit - Example Authorization |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgram Jump to: JumpOpen

355

Fortran MPI/OpenMP example output  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" Give Forms (All forms areofForthcoming

356

Example Retro-Commissioning Statement of Work  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse11 DOE Hydrogen andProgram TThePursuit6.111.3

357

Examples of spectacular software failure The last three examples from Software Engineering, by Hans Van Vliet.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a software bug in an energy management system sold by General Electric, according to a story on SecurityFocus. The bug meant that a computerized alarm that should have been triggered never went o#, hindering FirstEnergy Kruskal's Algorithm must compute a (i) spanning tree of (ii) minimal cost. Clarity refers to the overall

Soltys, Michael

358

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of msvp = 2 -1 . Calculate the mean model wind tunnel speed if the model is made to 1/10 scale. Assume in a wind tunnel. The airspeed range to be investigated is at the docking end of its range, a maximum -=-=-= --- Question 4: Sliding Board #12;A board with an area slides down an inclined ramp as is schematically

Thomas, Peter J.

359

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

end of its range, a maximum of msvp = 2 -1 . Calculate the mean model wind tunnel speed if the model = 20 m needs to be studied in a wind tunnel. The airspeed range to be investigated is at the docking an inclined ramp as is schematically illustrated in Figure 3. The ramp is inclined at an angle . The weight

Thomas, Peter J.

360

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set I)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The velocity of the plunger is Vp = 10 ms-1 . The oil film separating the plunger from the cylinder has. Question 2: Plunger A plunger is moving through a cylinder as schematically illustrated in the Figure 2 a dynamic viscosity of µ = 03. Nsm-2 . Assume that the oil-film thickness is uniform over the entire

Thomas, Peter J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set I)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1 . The oil film separating the plunger from the cylinder has a dynamic viscosity of µ=0.3 N.s.m-2 . Assume that the oil-film thickness is uniform over the entire peripheral surface of the plunger: s kg m s m m kg areationcrossVQ B 721602.1sec 2 3 =��=-��= Question 2: Plunger A plunger is moving

Thomas, Peter J.

362

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set IV)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modulus K, knowing its relationship with the speed of the sound `a' in a liquid and the density `': a C K a) It is observed that the velocity `V' of a liquid leaving a nozzle depends upon the pressure drop mr traveling at a speed ur as measured from the ground. Exhaust gases leave the engine nozzle (area

Thomas, Peter J.

363

ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set IV)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modulus K, knowing its relationship with the speed of the sound `a' in a liquid and the density `': a C K a) It is observed that the velocity `V' of a liquid leaving a nozzle depends upon the pressure drop

Thomas, Peter J.

364

P?~P; Cambridge journal of undergraduate philosophy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-value of the compounG is also given. 3ut the constitu'2nts of propositions to ;-hic';} jittgenstein refers, need not: be their apparent, linguJ_stic constituents. To ta:':;;o the COiTIInOil example "A believes that p~l, taking believes as an operator, this patently...

Griffiths, P E

365

A study of the changes occurring in the nitrogenous constituents of cottonseed meats during cooking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Loni It is !:news that large quantitios of soluble oarbobydrates r~y interfere with oomplote sstraotion of the fatai One hundred Crwns of tho dr! od meats are entraotod progressively with petroleum others ashy~ nous ethyl others aaotoneq bonsone absolute alcohol... 2 ~ Goa'to Cooko4 o, t 222 2 ~ "'oats Cooks4 at 293 ce etaatoo ;e of Day 00 of Gsaio Latraot ", . Of Day Roots ", ~ Of Hx tfast &~of D itof Boats Rats'ast 0 20 40 6o 60 LCO 120 120 (ooko) 0000069 0 066199 6 000108 O. OO140 5...

Adams, Robert Solomon

1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chemical Constituents in Sediment in Lake Pontchartrain and in Street Mud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Burkhardt, Kent A. Elrick, Barbara J. Mahler, James J. Smith, and Steven D. Zaugg National Water-USGS World Wide Web: http://www.usgs.gov/ Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive ...................................................................................................................4 Chlorinated Hydrocarbons and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons ........................4 Urban

367

APPLICATION OF PYROLYSIS-GC/MS TO THE STUDY OF BIOMASS AND BIOMASS CONSTITUENTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fast pyrolysis, the rapid thermal decomposition of organic material in the absence of oxygen, is a process that can be used to convert biomass into… (more)

Ware, Anne E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of Biomass Burning Aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural and prescribed biomass fires are a major source of atmospheric aerosols that can persist in the atmosphere for long periods of time. Biomass burning aerosols (BBA) can be associated with long range transport of water soluble N?, S?, P?, and metal?containing species. In this study, BBA samples were collected using a particle?into?liquid sampler (PILS) from laboratory burns of vegetation collected on military bases in the southeastern and southwestern United States. The samples were then analyzed using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/HR?MS) that enabled accurate mass measurements for hundreds of species with m/z values between 70 and 1000 and assignment of probable elemental formulae. Mg, Al, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Ba?containing organometallic species were identified. The results suggest that the biomass may have accumulated metal?containing species that were reemitted during biomass burning. Further research into the sources, persistence, and dispersion of metal?containing aerosols as well as their environmental effects is needed.

Chang-Graham, Alexandra L.; Profeta, Luisa Tm; Johnson, Timothy J.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

369

Algal Biomass Constituent Analysis: Method Uncertainties and Investigation of the Underlying Measuring Chemistries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Algal biomass compositional analysis data form the basis of a large number of techno-economic process analysis models that are used to investigate and compare different processes in algal biofuels production. However, the analytical methods used to generate these data are far from standardized. This work investigated the applicability of common methods for rapid chemical analysis of biomass samples with respect to accuracy and precision. This study measured lipids, protein, carbohydrates, ash, and moisture of a single algal biomass sample at 3 institutions by 8 independent researchers over 12 separate workdays. Results show statistically significant differences in the results from a given analytical method among laboratories but not between analysts at individual laboratories, suggesting consistent training is a critical issue for empirical analytical methods. Significantly different results from multiple lipid and protein measurements were found to be due to different measurement chemistries. We identified a set of compositional analysis procedures that are in best agreement with data obtained by more advanced analytical procedures. The methods described here and used for the round robin experiment do not require specialized instrumentation, and with detailed analytical documentation, the differences between laboratories can be markedly reduced.

Laurens, L. M. L.; Dempster, T. A.; Jones, H. D. T.; Wolfrum, E. J.; Van Wychen, S.; McAllister, J. S. P.; Rencenberger, M.; Parchert, K. J.; Gloe, L. M.

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Transfer Learning for Constituency-Based Grammars Yuan Zhang, Regina Barzilay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The standard solution to this bottleneck has re- lied on manually crafted transformation rules that map readily these transformation rules is a major un- dertaking which requires multiple correction cy- cles and a deep manually-crafted transformation rules, this approach relies on a small amount of annotations in the target

Barzilay, Regina

371

Performance demonstration program plan for RCRA constituent analysis of solidified wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance Demonstration Programs (PDPS) are designed to help ensure compliance with the Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The PDPs are intended for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) to assess and approve the laboratories and other measurement facilities supplying services for the characterization of WIPP TRU waste. The PDPs may also be used by CAO in qualifying laboratories proposing to supply additional analytical services that are required for other than waste characterization, such as WIPP site operations. The purpose of this PDP is to test laboratory performance for the analysis of solidified waste samples for TRU waste characterization. This performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated, solidified TRU waste according to the criteria established in this plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will address levels of regulatory concern and will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization samples. Analyses that are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in the PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples for the balance of this document.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The effect of some dissolved constituents on the redox potential of water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4Laa&Xs?4 esSygea ~ashS?tgasa, Xaa&41&t&Iy' b&fes? e&als1- Lag ths ieaLN~ Swa a?&mt&4 aa4 ih& yg aa4 ssLXXLeali s?&4Laga?eea ebs&La&4 fecss ih& So&be?a a?tee, The ebsyeeok to ih& esssyle bobble eaa i&&b&L Tb&eeqysa Li &&a fLXX&4 &a4 yose4it&4 ic... R IAI IS D o Ial 0 Sl Sl NUMERICAL VALUES INDICATE pH 0 Zg0 300 400 SOO 800 700 Eh, mv. 50 The s44itiea of tbe ferrio iea to the se4i~ ohlori4e solatiea iaoreases tbo re4cec yoteatial of the solntiea. At a yU valse of 7, 00 the re4oa...

Wales, Robert David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Digestibility by Chickens of the Constituents of the Nitrogen-Free Extract of Feeds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Polysac- charosea 100.0 94.7 97.4 85.3 92.3 94.3 88.1 87.8 97.5 94.8 97.8 74.5 70.1 88.2 93.8 50.0 71.9 95.2 97.8 100.0 98.5 98.8 98.3 92.1 92.1 96.3 97.3 98.7 99.3 96.0 99.3 93.6 98.9 100.0 99.6 97.3 of Reducing....4 100.0 9.1 67.4 93.5 87.0 89.7 72.1 65.1 84.2 93.9 78.9 80.4 95.2 72.2 58.9 76.7 85.5 81.9 88.3 83.0 for chick Polysac- charoses 98.6 88.2 93.4 91.6 92.3 92.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 97.8 97.9 97.9 100.0 100.0 100...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Importance of the polarization in the retrieval of oceanic constituents from the remote sensing reflectance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 2007. [1] The influence of marine particles on the polarized radiation exiting the ocean are investigated. Simulations were carried out using a vector radiative transfer model. Open ocean and coastal and analysis of the spectral and angular polarization signature of the oceanic and atmospheric radiation

Chami, Malik

375

Effect of various pollutants and soil-like constituents on laccase from Cerrena unicolor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laccase from Cerrena unicolor catalyses the oxidation of a wide range of aromatic compounds, either xenobiotic or naturally occurring phenols, leading to the formation of polymeric products. These are characterized by their low solubility and often may form precipitates or aggregates. The oxidizing efficiency of the enzyme is strictly dependent on the number of hydroxyl groups and the position of substituents on the phenolic molecules. During the reaction with some substrates, the enzyme is inactivated, because of possible adsorption of laccase molecules on newly formed polyphenols. By contrast, the oxidation of humic precursors (i.e., resorcinol, gallic acid, and pyrogallol) does not influence greatly the residual laccase activity. The triazinic herbicides, triazine and prometryn (2,4-bis(isopropylamino)-6-methylthio-s-triazine), are not substrates of laccase. They, however, inhibit laccase activity assayed with 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) or catechol as substrates. The reduction of substrate oxidation rates is usually accompanied by the retention of higher levels of residual enzymatic activity. These results, together with the slight recovery in laccase activity following dialysis of the assay mixture, provide further evidence that the enzyme may be incorporated into or adsorbed onto polyphenolic products, with a consequent reduction in the concentration of active forms of laccase.

Filazzola, M.T.; Sannino, F.; Rao, M.A.; Gianfreda, L.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Embodied Energy Calculation: Method and Guidelines for a Building and its Constituent Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sum of all energy embedded in products and processes used in constructing a building is known as embodied energy. According to the literature, the current state of embodied energy research suffers from three major issues. First, there is little...

Dixit, Manish Kumar

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

377

Impact of Solar Resource and Atmospheric Constituents on Energy Yield Models for Concentrated Photovoltaic Systems .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Global economic trends suggest that there is a need to generate sustainable renewable energy to meet growing global energy demands. Solar energy harnessed by concentrated… (more)

Mohammed, Jafaru

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Provenance of Corexit-related chemical constituents found in nearshore and inland Gulf Coast waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the watershed including Orange Beach), upland forest, and agriculture. There are major timber companies Company. Additionally, fa

Clement, Prabhakar

379

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Frankel uses break from Congress to explore constituents'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a seemingly nonstop tour of the Broward-Palm Beach County congressional district she was elected to represent over the two counties from morning to night. From Jan. 24 through Friday, she racked up more than 550 at 6:45 a.m., catching a Tri-Rail train near her West Palm Beach home to attend a breakfast meeting

Fernandez, Eduardo

380

Synapse formation and cognitive brain development: effect of docosahexaenoic acid and other dietary constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formula diets that lack DHA [4]; and the consumption, by term infants of a formula supplemented with DHA, and of the other membrane phosphatides (per cell or per mg protein), are increased by 50% or more. In adult animals, this treatment is also known to increase synaptic proteins (eg, synapsin-l, syntaxin-3, GluR-l, PSD-95

Wurtman, Richard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Data for First Responder Use of Photoionization Detectors for Vapor Chemical Constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

First responders need appropriate measurement technologies for evaluating incident scenes. This report provides information about photoionization detectors (PIDs), obtained from manufacturers and independent laboratory tests, and the use of PIDs by first responders, obtained from incident commanders in the United States and Canada. PIDs are valued for their relatively low cost, light weight, rapid detection response, and ease of use. However, it is clear that further efforts are needed to provide suitable instruments and decision tools to incident commanders and first responders for assessing potential hazardous chemical releases. Information provided in this report indicates that PIDs should always be part of a decision-making context in which other qualitative and more definitive tests and instruments are used to confirm a finding. Possible amelioratory actions ranging from quick and relatively easy fixes to those requiring significant additional effort are outlined in the report.

Keith A. Daum; Matthew G. Watrous; M. Dean Neptune; Daniel I. Michael; Kevin J. Hull; Joseph D. Evans

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

VOLUTION ET RLE DES CONSTITUANTS CHIMIQUES AU COURS DU PROCESSUS DE FABRICATION DES VARISTANCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxide based varistors have been characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron VARISTANCES A BASE D'OXYDE DE ZINC M. GRACIET, R. SALMON, G. LE FLEM et P. HAGENMULLER Laboratoire de Chimie à base d'oxyde de zinc ont été caractérisées par microscopie optique, diffraction X et à l'aide de

Boyer, Edmond

383

Bose-Einstein Condensation of Gases in the Frame of Quantum Electrodynamics: Interconnection of Constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bose-Einstein condensate of rarified atomic gases is considered as the state formed by exchange of virtual photons, resonant to the lowest levels of atoms; such representation corresponds to the Einstein opinion about an inter-influence of condensable particles. Considered interactions directly lead to the QED structure of nonlinear potential in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Linear momenta that correspond to the thermal energy of condensable atoms are connected to near field of particles and therefore leave atoms immovable. The estimations of these effects do not contradict the observed data; the general quantum principles predict possibility of stimulating of BEC formation by resonant irradiation. All this requires the spectroscopic investigation of BEC on different steps of formation.

Mark E. Perel'man

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

384

Organization of ISI by Divisions and Constituent Units Information Sciences Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Sciences Division Agricultural and Ecological Research Unit Human Genetics Unit Biological Unit Canteen Security Unit Medical Welfare Unit Telephone Unit Transport Unit Guest House Audio Visual

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

385

A model for determining the fate of hazardous constituents in waste during in-vessel composting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composting is one of the techniques that has evolved as a safe disposal and predisposal alternative to the stringent regulations on hazardous waste disposal. The implementation of this technique needs careful evaluation of the processes a hazardous...

Bollineni, Prasanthi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites ProposedOccupational Health Services > Return toBiomass

387

The Effects of EGR and Its Constituents on the Autoignition of Single- and  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOfficeTheDepartmentAgreement

388

Criterion Five: Engagement and Service As called for by its mission, IUPUI identifies its constituencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, IUPUI completed a "Self Study on Civic Engagement" as part of the institutional re- accreditation. The campus has articulated a clear vision for the work, strategically convened stakeholders, set concrete Compact, etc.), and allocated campus resources to support the campus mission of civic engagement. IUPUI

Zhou, Yaoqi

389

Acute changes in pulse pressure in relation to constituents of particulate air pollution in elderly persons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An increased pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure) suggests aortic stiffening. The objective of this study was to examine the acute effects of both particulate matter (PM) mass and composition on blood pressure, among elderly persons. We carried out a panel study in persons living in elderly homes in Antwerp, Belgium. We recruited 88 non-smoking persons, 70% women with a mean age of 83 years (standard deviation: 5.2). Blood pressure was measured and a blood sample was collected on two time points, which were chosen so that there was an exposure contrast in ambient PM exposure. The elemental content of the collected indoor and outdoor PM{sub 2.5} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 {mu}m) mass concentration was measured. Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) on outdoor PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 {mu}m) were measured. Each interquartile range increase of 20.8 {mu}g/m Superscript-Three in 24-h mean outdoor PM{sub 2.5} was associated with an increase in pulse pressure of 4.0 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 1.8-6.2), in persons taking antihypertensive medication (n=57), but not in persons not using antihypertensive medication (n=31) (p for interaction: 0.02). Vanadium, iron and nickel contents of PM{sub 2.5} were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, among persons on antihypertensive medication. Similar results were found for indoor concentrations. Of the oxy-PAHs, chrysene-5,6-dione and benzo[a]pyrene-3,6-dione were significantly associated with increases in systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. In elderly, pulse pressure was positively associated with acute increases in outdoor and indoor air pollution, among persons taking antihypertensive medication. These results might form a mechanistic pathway linking air pollution as a trigger of cardiovascular events.

Jacobs, Lotte [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Buczynska, Anna [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium)] [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Walgraeve, Christophe [Research group EnVOC, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, UGent, Gent (Belgium)] [Research group EnVOC, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, UGent, Gent (Belgium); Delcloo, Andy [Royal Meteorological Institute, Brussels (Belgium)] [Royal Meteorological Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium) [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Molecular Science Institute, School of Chemistry, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester (United Kingdom); Van Grieken, Rene [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium)] [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Demeestere, Kristof; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman [Research group EnVOC, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, UGent, Gent (Belgium)] [Research group EnVOC, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, UGent, Gent (Belgium); De Backer, Hugo [Royal Meteorological Institute, Brussels (Belgium)] [Royal Meteorological Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Nemery, Benoit, E-mail: ben.nemery@med.kuleuven.be [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Nawrot, Tim S. [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium) [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 3, Appendices: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the computer codes developed for the coal combustion project. In Subsection B.1 the FORTRAN code developed for the percolative fragmentation model (or the discrete model, since a char is expressed as a collection of discrete elements in a discrete space) is presented. In Subsection B.2 the code for the continuum model (thus named because mineral inclusions are distributed in a continuum space) is presented. A stereological model code developed to obtain the pore size distribution from a two-dimensional data is presented in Subsection B.3.

Helble, J.J. [ed.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Kang, Shim-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Molecular Characterization of S- and N-containing Organic Constituents in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification and Application ofof a Coflow Diffusion

392

The Total Fatty Acids and Other Ether-Soluable Constituents of Feedstuffs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS VON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRINTERS, AUSTIN, TEXAS 1914 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS C h a r l e s P u r y e a r , President P ro Tem . TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Ch ah rles...Pehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh Atin t??Pite ???? Ah Ch a ? H H ? t , ??i?PuhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhAtin t??Pite ???? ?h ?h ? P ? ? P ? n e , ??i...

Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Mercury, Methylmercury, and Other Constituents in Sediment and Water from Seasonal and Permanent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands in the Cache Creek Settling Basin and Yolo Bypass, Yolo County, California, 2005-06 Open File Creek Settling Basin and Yolo Bypass, Yolo County, California, 2005-06 By Mark Marvin and permanent wetlands in the Cache Creek Settling Basin and Yolo Bypass, Yolo County, California, 2005-06: U

394

Fundamental Mechanisms of Copper CMP – Passivation Kinetics of Copper in CMP Slurry Constituents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to obtain theimpedance spectroscopy (EIS) was conducted at different DCabout 0 V and 0.8 V SCE. EIS measurements were taken at the

Tripathi, Shantanu; Doyle, F M; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Certain constituents in the developing bovine fetus and associated tissues and fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different breeds Hammond (1927) has presented weight data on the uterus, i'etus, fetal membranes, and fetal fluids at various stages of gestationo Winters et ~. (194. 2) studied prenatal de- velopment in the bovine, They tabulated and graphed their data.... 26 per cent ash. One cow was killed just previous to parturition and the following data resultedc Weight Moisture Pat Protein Ash +nilotic Fluid 32n7 lbs. 95. 9 0. 92 3. 36 0. 65 Placenta 18 ' 3 lb' 85. 6 Oe92 12+20 0. 89 Using energy...

Crawford, Wid Philips

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Environmental movements in Russia (An example from the Baikal region).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis presents the analysis of environmental movements in Russia. Through a collective memory and discourse framework, this study reviews the overlap and disparity… (more)

Dampilon, Zhargal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

advanced application examples: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

398

Enhancing inductive learning with feature selection and example selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

independently and as a combined scheme. We propose a sequential search filter approach called Subset selection using Case-based Relevance APproach (SCRAP) for identifying and eliminating irrelevant features. The SCRAP filter addresses the problem of finding a...

Raman, Baranidharan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Value of Options in Airport Expansion - Example of AICM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investments decisions for airport capacity expansion are usually taken, either when demand exceeds the current capacity and the airport is working under congestion, or when current demand is expected to overcome current ...

Morgado, Frederico

400

Strategic relational communication in crisis : the humanitarian example  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discourse on Haiti is both vast and varied with public attention soaring when an earthquake hit the island in January 2010. Many questions have since been raised by global stakeholders as to how the situation was ...

Michaels, Olufunke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ris-R-1418(EN) Examples of Fatigue Lifetime and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provides also calculations of re- liabilities and partial load safety factors under specific assumptions calculations of reliabilities and partial load safety factors under specific assump- tions about uncertainty-sectional loads to hot-spot stresses · Simulation of wind turbine response at given mean wind speeds

402

INTEGRATION OF SYSTEM COMPONENTS AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS - HANFORD EXAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{sm_bullet} Deterministic 'One Off' analyses as basis for evaluating sensitivity and uncertainty relative to reference case {sm_bullet} Spatial coverage identical to reference case {sm_bullet} Two types of analysis assumptions - Minimax parameter values around reference case conditions - 'What If' cases that change reference case condition and associated parameter values {sm_bullet} No conclusions about likelihood of estimated result other than' qualitative expectation that actual outcome should tend toward reference case estimate

WOOD MI

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

403

Folk Theorems on Transmission Access: Proofs and Counter Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12;[11] S. Stoft, \\On the meaning of transmission prices." Private Communication, 18 October 1994

California at Berkeley. University of

404

Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

emissions that cause climate change. The utility-scale PV solar story gets to the heart of what we aim to do at LPO - help launch new markets. To provide more details on this...

405

Adsorption on surfaces Example: H2/H/Pd(210)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= (x, y, z) Image potential of a hydrogen atom in front of a metal surface: Vim = - e2 2 1 |2R| + 1 |2R interaction Taylor expansion of image force in |r|/|R|: Vim = - e2 8Z3 x2 + y2 2 + z2 + 3e2 16Z4 z 2 (x2 + y2-order correction defines dynamical image plane at Z0 Vim(Z) = - Cv Z3 - 3CvZ0 Z4 + O(Z-5 ) = - Cv (Z - Z0)3 + O(Z-5

Pfeifer, Holger

406

DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices evaluation instrument examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Training evaluation determines a training program`s effectiveness in meeting its intended purpose: producing competent employees. Evaluation is the quality assurance component of a systematic approach to training program. This guide provides information on evaluation instruments used to gather employee, supervisor, and instructor feedback to identify strengths and weaknesses of training programs at DOE facilities. It should be used in conjunction with ``DOE Training Program Handbook: A Systematic Approach to Training`` and ``DOE Handbook, Alternative Systematic Approaches to Training.``

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

EXAMPLES OF CONTEMPORARY TOPICS Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the potential for ecosystem service markets in Tennessee and how might they affect forest management? 20. What analysis as a tool for bioenergy/biorefinery evaluation 2) What is the best bioenergy crop for the US-scale bioenergy crop development on wildlife and fisheries habitat 7) Top technologies for biomass conversion 8

Gray, Matthew

408

Threatened groundwater resources in rural India : an example of monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in rural areas. Therefore, quality and quantity aspects of groundwater management constitute acute issues the villages, and pollution plumes downgradient of the main inhabited areas. The absence of sewage or solid waste collection and treatment facilities threatens groundwater quality by increasing its chloride

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

409

Anomalous partially hyperbolic diffeomorphisms I: dynamically coherent examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

splits into three one-dimensional1 Df-invariant continuous bundles TM = Ess Ec Euu such that there exists > 0 such that for every x M: Df |Ess(x) is partially hyperbolic and there exists Ess(x)

410

10 DOMAIN-APPROPRIATE DEVICES * For a video example, see  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of drawing as its application area, and a process control system in a power plant has the domain of that power plant and its functions as its application area. However, most interactive systems use a lot of work into creating "meta- phors" in which the virtual, on-screen world resembles items

Borchers, Jan

411

Revised Illustrative Example for DFS, April 29, 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HLH 31,814,906 Non-Fed Energy HLH -722,176 Tier 1 Energy HLH 31,092,730 Tier 1 HLH SSL 28,195,560 2,583,477,791 Tier 1 HLH Load Shaping 2,897,170 kWh @ 0.04716 136,631 47.16...

412

How a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

change and the growing opportunities to promote economic growth and cut carbon pollution by adopting renewable energy resources and implementing sustainable "green building"...

413

Examples of the Zeroth Theorem of the History of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 49. FIG. 3: George F. FitzGerald IV.B Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) Nikola Tesla was born in Smiljan, Croatia in 1856 ofof 86. FIG. 4: (L-R) Nikola Tesla, Winfried O. Schumann IV.D

Jackson, J.D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

arid environments examples: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

moisture is investigated so that feasibility of using optical remote sensing Texas at San Antonio, University of 256 What can ecological science tell us about opportunities for...

415

DOE standard compliance demonstration program: An office building example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) issued interim new building energy standards (10 CFR 435 1989) to achieve maximum energy efficiency in the designs of new buildings. DOE then entered into a project to demonstrate and assess the impact of these standards on the design community. One area of focus was a test to see how a less conventional design-focused building would meet the standards` requirements -- DOE wanted to demonstrate that compliance with energy standards does not mean compromising the architectural intent of a building. This study, which was initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), illustrated the process by which compliance with the standards can be proven for a highly {open_quotes}design-oriented{close_quotes} office building. The study also assessed the impact of the whole building simulation compliance alternatives on design. This report documents the compliance requirements, gives a description of the sample building chosen for the study, provides general guidance for the compliance process, documents the method of compliance that was undertaken for the sample building, presents the results of the study, and provides a recommendation on how the compliance requirements could be improved to reflect more realistic use types.

Bailey, S.A.; Keller, J.M.; Wrench, L.E.; Williams, C.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Example minor programs in Civil Engineering 1) Structural Engineering focus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Q Accessing Architecture through Drawing (A,W) 4 CEE 100 Managing Sustainable Building Projects (S and Management focus CEE 100 Managing Sustainable Building Projects (A) 4 CEE 102 Legal Aspects of Engineering Buildings (W; w/lab) 4 4) Sustainability focus CEE 31Q Accessing Architecture through Drawing (A,W; prereq

Prinz, Friedrich B.

417

Example minor programs in Environmental Engineering 1) Energy focus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; for breadth) 3 CEE 173A Energy Resources (A) 5 CEE 176A Energy Efficient Buildings (W; w/lab) 4 CEE 176B to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions (S) 3 2) Sustainability focus CEE 64 Air Pollution: Urban Smog to Global a Student Workforce for Sustainability (W) 3 CEE 142A Creating Sustainable Development (W) 3 CEE 173A Energy

Prinz, Friedrich B.

418

Tutorial Counting and Tracking -Useful Examples from Digital Image Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jakob Søndergaard Jensen, DTU, Lyngby 45 15 16 -17 Optimal Reactor Concepts for Plantwide Process -17 Quo Vadis EAM 30 00 17 -19 Dinner 00 45 19 -19 Multi-scale Optimization for Integrated Design 30 00 15 -16 Coffee Break Focal Topic IV Optimization of Periodic Structures Carolin Körner, E

Sanderson, Yasmine

419

Lead By Example with Smart Energy Management (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brochure outlining the mission and activities of the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program, which facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship.

Not Available

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Global Optimization: Examples, Methods and July 5, 2011 1 --5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy E0 n(r) Matrices generation Ak = Bk = 40% time usage Generalized, next to Aachen University main building. More information can be found here: http://www.aices.rwth-aachen.de/find-us Initialization: non-interacting spherical V0(r) Calculation of full-potential V (r)[n] usage Charge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Teaching IP Core Development: An Example Aleksandar Milenkovic, David Fatzer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In spite of its great benefits, this design flow cannot successfully bridge the ever-increasing gap between Technology Roadmap, by the end of this decade the semiconductor industry will manufacture chips with four

Milenkovi, Aleksandar

422

Club's Chairman Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in the winter now as a result of the retrofits," he says. "I used to just not run my furnace and I would freeze, but now I can be much more comfortable at a lower cost." Work...

423

NAC Technology and Innovation Committee Examples and recommendations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologist for SOMD #12;Flight Hardware on a Service Contract Water Production Services on the ISS

Christian, Eric

424

Example 7: Record of Tender PROJECT TITLE: REFERENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

above this threshold must be tendered ­ by the Purchasing Officer ­ in accordance with the Public Supply/Service Contract Regulations. Approximately 90 days should be allowed for this). SPECIFICATION OF REQUIREMENTS

Siddharthan, Advaith

425

Cost Type Examples Salary costs for staff working  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Equipment access charges Service contracts, running costs, materials and consumables and staff time

Rambaut, Andrew

426

Physical Examples of the Heun-to-Hypergeometric Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Heun's equation having four regular singularities emerge in many applications in physics. Therefore relating this equation with the well-known hypergeometric equation may provide a complete understanding of the mathematics of the Heun's equation as well as the behavior of the physical system. We studied the Heun-to-hypergeometric reductions for three physical problems: The Schrodinger's equation which was written in terms of the Heun's general equation for the Coulomb problem on a 3-sphere, the s-wave bound state equation in the problem of the attractive inverse square potential and the equation for the limit density function for the discrete-time quantum walk. We applied the limiting cases and tried to figure out if a reduction is possible. While some problems permit these reductions, some others does not because of the restrictions on the physical parameters. A Sage code is given in the appendix for the calculation of some Heun identities.

Tolga Birkandan

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fractional Factorial Design Reactor Example i BHH kap. 12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ CDE AC + BDE AD + BCE AE + BCD BC + ADE BD + ACE BE + ACD CD + ABE CE + ABD DE + ABC Data Display Row;Factorial Fit: Y versus A; B; C; D; E Estimated Effects and Coefficients for Y (coded units) Term Effect for Y (coded units) Source DF Seq SS Adj SS Adj MS F P Main Effects 5 2453,5 2453,5 490,70 * * 2-Way

Langseth, Helge

428

Engineering This presentation brings examples from two materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and technologies for micro-power sources, enzymatic bio-fuel cells, sensor systems design and integration of micro electrocatalyst powders with varied chemical structure and desired morphology for fuel cell and related was a project leader in fuel cell electrocatalysts development that resulted in introduction of spray pyrolysis

Reisslein, Martin

429

Explicit Rational Solution of the KZ Equation (example)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov linear differential system. The coefficients of this system are rational functions. We have proved that the solution of the KZ system is rational when k is equal to two and n is equal to three (see [5]) . In this paper, we construct the corresponding solution in the explicit form.

Andrey Tydnyuk

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management FEMP (Revised Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brochure provides the primary audience of Federal facility and energy managers with an accurate understanding of the services and assistance available through FEMP.

Not Available

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Leading by Example with Smart Energy Management (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Energy Management Program facilitates the Federal Government?s implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation?s energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP does this by focusing on the needs of its Federal customers, delivering an array of products grouped into project transaction services, applied technology services, and decision support services. This document outlines FEMP services and programs.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Geothermal Development and Changes in Surficial Features: Examples...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

between such surficial changes and contributing factors. Author Michael L. Sorey Conference World Geothermal Congress; Kyushu-Tohoku, Japan; 05282000 Published World...

433

Example Cost Codes for Construction Projects - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and their corresponding cost codes that may be used for construction projects. g4301-1chp16.pdf -- PDF Document, 93 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

434

Examples of Cost Estimation Packages - DOE Directives, Delegations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1997 CRD: No DNFSB: No Related History Exemptions Standards Related to: DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 9, Operating Costs DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 19, Data Collection and Normalization for the...

435

Example of Environmental Restoration Code of Accounts - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

describes the Level 1 cost codes, and lists the Level 2 and Level 3 cost codes. g4301-1chp17.pdf -- PDF Document, 12 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

436

Modeling intraurban price competition: an example of gasoline pricing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three interacting market models are considered as models for intraurban retail price variation for a single homogenous good, price-posted gasoline. Modifications include spatial markets instead of interacting economic sectors and supply functions independent of price levels in other markets. The final section discusses the results of fitting one of the models to gasoline data for the city of Sheffield during a period of intensifying price competition in the first quarter of 1982. It is concluded, with respect to gasoline price modeling, both independent and interacting market models exist but at different intraurban scales. 15 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

Haining, R.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

MARSAME Appendix C C. EXAMPLES OF COMMON RADIONUCLIDES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ra and progeny Depleted uranium collimators Metal Foundry 40 K 60 Co 137 Cs Thorium series control devices) 226 Ra and progeny Depleted uranium January 2009 C-1 NUREG-1575, Supp. 1 #12;Appendix C-thorium alloys Nickel-thorium alloys 147 Pm (lighted dials and gauges) 226 Ra and progeny (radium dials) Depleted

438

Leading by Example: Argonne Senior Management Makes "Green" Vehicle Choices  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne's senior management shows leadership in the sustainability arena with their own personal choices in "green" vehicles. They don't just talk the talk ? they walk the walk.

Peters, Mark; Kearns, Paul;

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

439

know. Like, for example, professor Jack Lockwood putting UNH on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

," says John Aber, UNH vice president for research and public service and JOHN MACRI, Space Science Center for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space · A University of New Hampshire Research Institute · Morse Hall) and Jack Lockwood in 1962. Photo courtesy of University of New Hampshire Archives. Space Science at Fifty

440

Leading by Example: Argonne Senior Management Makes "Green" Vehicle Choices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne's senior management shows leadership in the sustainability arena with their own personal choices in "green" vehicles. They don't just talk the talk — they walk the walk.

Peters, Mark; Kearns, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hybrid user interfaces : design guidelines and implementation examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A hybrid user interface is a new type of computer user interface that achieves high usability by combining features of graphical user interfaces and command line interfaces. The main goal of a hybrid user interface is to ...

Ahn, Sehyun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Task analysis: a detailed example of stepping up from JSA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses a pilot task analysis of operations in a proposed facility for the cutting and packaging of radioactively contaminated gloveboxes, for long-term storage or burial. The objective was to demonstrate how task analysis may be used as a tool for planning and risk management. Two specific products were generated - preliminary operating procedures and training requirements. The task data base, procedures list and training requirements developed were intended as first order categorizations. The analysis was limited to tasks that will be performed within the boundaries of the operational facility and the associated load-out area. The analysis documents tasks to be performed by D and D (Decontamination and Decommissioning) Workers. However, the analysis included all tasks identified as an integral part of glovebox processing within the facility. Thus tasks involving Radiation Protection Technicians (RPTs) are included. Based on hazard assessments, it is planned that at least two RPTs will be assigned full-time to the facility, so they may be considered part of its crew. Similarly, supervisory/administrative tasks are included where they were determined to be directly part of process sequences, such as obtaining appropriate certification. 11 tables.

Banks, W.W.; Paramore, B.A.; Buys, J.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

COLLOQUIUM: Extreme Global Warming: Examples from the Past | Princeton  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science, andAnalysis15InformationLabPhysics

444

IRC Budget Proposal spreadsheet example | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4InFindingIR-2003- More Documents & PublicationsAn

445

Caused? A Monsoon Example: India Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites ProposedOccupational Healthcatalysts . |withzeolite:Open

446

Procurement Standards Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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447

Retrofit Program Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromComments onReplyofRetiring Procurement OfficialRetrofit Program

448

User:Nlangle/Migration Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401Upson County,Monkeymosaic Jump to: navigation,

449

A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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450

COUNTER-EXAMPLES TO THE "JACOBIAN CONJECTURE AT INFINITY"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a smooth analytic surface and l #26; U a smooth compact (i.e. isomorphic to CP 1 ) curve of self, holomorphic on U nl, is extendable to the whole C 2 by the theorem of removing compact singularities. Moreover concretely formulated) was posed to me by A.G. Vitushkin when I was his graduate student. Typeset by A M S

Orevkov, Stepan

451

STOCHASTIC NETWORKS EXAMPLE SHEET 2 SOLUTIONS ELENA YUDOVINA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the mean arrival rate into colony j is n (n)( k q(Tjkn, n)+j) = n (n)( k kjk(nk+1))+j = k kj n (n)k(nk+1(Tjk(n), n) = k(nk + 1)/j(nj)kjk(nk + 1) = j(nj) k/j kj . Note that this has the required form, with j

Kelly, Frank

452

Examples of the Zeroth Theorem of the History of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development of Schumann resonances,” Radio Science 42 RS2S02delta function ?(x); the Schumann resonances of the earth-else could they be? IV. SCHUMANN RESONANCES OF THE EARTH-

Jackson, J.D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Examples of the Zeroth Theorem of the History of Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The zeroth theorem of the history of science, enunciated byE. P. Fischer, states that a discovery (rule,regularity, insight) namedafter someone (often) did not originate with that person. I present fiveexamples from physics: the Lorentz condition partial muAmu = 0 definingthe Lorentz gauge of the electromagnetic potentials; the Dirac deltafunction, delta(x); the Schumann resonances of the earth-ionospherecavity; the Weizsacker-Williams method of virtual quanta; the BMTequation of spin dynamics. I give illustrated thumbnail sketches of boththe true and reputed discoverers and quote from their "discovery"publications.

Jackson, J.D.

2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

454

Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Decision Records | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais a villageBucyrus,Burbank, Oklahoma:

455

Bureau of Land Management - Examples of FONSIs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais a villageBucyrus,Burbank, Oklahoma:FONSIs Jump to:

456

CDOT - Permit Standard Provisions Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline Rock - Basement Jump to:EnvirosProvisions

457

Leading by Example: Better Buildings Challenge Partners Cut Energy Use |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXXLocated atPenroseDepartment of

458

Utility Cost Calculation Example? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip: 84111Jump to:AccessUtility Cost

459

Bureau of Land Management - Examples of Scoping Reports | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek WindBurcoEnergy|

460

Distributed Generation Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Montana Portable Suction Dredging General Permit - Example Authorization |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A.Information ConservationOpenOpen Energy

462

Montana Produced Water General Permit - Example Authorization | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A.Information ConservationOpenOpen

463

Earth Day: Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement Tuesday, Septemberof EnergyM AMichael Dunn,

464

Energy Efficiency Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoThese Web sites offer educationalof Energyand

465

Revised Illustrative Example for DFS, April 29, 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource Program September 2010 B O NTransfer in TernaryMarch

466

Supporting Leadership by Example in States | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4Superhard CoatingNovemberDecember 23, 2009

467

Example Measurement & Verification Plan for a Super ESPC Project  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse11 DOE Hydrogen andProgram TThePursuit6.1

468

Example Measurement & Verification Plan for a Super ESPC Project |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review:Department of Energy EnvironmentalJuly 2015communication83

469

Example Retro-Commissioning Statement of Work | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review:Department of Energy EnvironmentalJuly 2015communication83Retro-Commissioning

470

Excellence in Energy Awards: Military Academies Leading by Example |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review:Department of Energy EnvironmentalJulyDepartment of Energy Excellence in

471

Building Standards Lead-by-Example Resources | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prev nextInvestigationof EnergyStandards

472

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision has been approved for thisDatabus - Qfrom the

473

Integrated HCP/EA Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (bot load) ErrorEnergyInnovation FuelsIntegrated Fuel

474

Appendix A - Examples of Potential Experiments for ACRSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes LaboratoryAntonyaAppeals Appeals FOIAA4.A7.A8.A9.A

475

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The followingDirectLow CarbonOpen1 June,Ecofys Feed NO

476

Geothermal Development and Changes in Surficial Features: Examples from the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6TheoreticalFuelCellGeminiEnergyPowerTablesPhase) Jump

477

Example Measurement and Verification Plan for an ESPC Project | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -DepartmentNovember 1, 2010December 1,Goals Past11,Tuesday,Theof

478

NREL: Technology Deployment - Disaster Resiliency and Recovery Example  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and Resources NRELIncorporates Sustainability in

479

NREL: Technology Deployment - Disaster Resiliency and Recovery Example  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and Resources NRELIncorporates Sustainability inProject:

480

NREL: Technology Deployment - Disaster Resiliency and Recovery Example  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and Resources NRELIncorporates Sustainability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncombustible constituents examples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

NREL: Technology Deployment - Disaster Resiliency and Recovery Example  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and Resources NRELIncorporates SustainabilityProject: New

482

Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy: Three recent examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most serious challenges in the design of chambers for inertial fusion energy (IFE) are 1) protecting the first wall from fusion energy pulses on the order of several hundred megajoules released in the form of x rays, target debris, and high energy neutrons, and 2) operating the chamber at a pulse repetition rate of 5-10 Hz (i.e., re-establishing, the wall protection and chamber conditions needed for beam propagation to the target between pulses). In meeting these challenges, designers have capitalized on the ability to separate the fusion burn physics from the geometry and environment of the fusion chamber. Most recent conceptual designs use gases or flowing liquids inside the chamber. Thin liquid layers of molten salt or metal and low pressure, high-Z gases can protect the first wall from x rays and target debris, while thick liquid layers have the added benefit of protecting structures from fusion neutrons thereby significantly reducing the radiation damage and activation. The use of thick liquid walls is predicted to 1) reduce the cost of electricity by avoiding the cost and down time of changing damaged structures, and 2) reduce the cost of development by avoiding the cost of developing a new, low-activation material. Various schemes have been proposed to assure chamber clearing and renewal of the protective features at the required pulse rate. Representative chamber concepts are described, and key technical feasibility issues are identified for each class of chamber. Experimental activities (past, current, and proposed) to address these issues and technology research and development needs are discussed.

Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Abdou, M.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

483

Mathematical Models and Methods in Applied Sciences Vol. 14, No. 12 (2004) 17351759  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the attributes of the constituent ma- terials, as in the case for example of ceramics or reinforced concrete. Common examples of composites are bones, which are porous composites, porous rock, in which the pores are often filled with salt water or oil, construction materials, such as wood and concrete, martensite

Tesi, Maria Carla

484

Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive/thermo-chemical attack mechanisms; (iv) developing a mechanics-based analysis of the driving forces for crack growth and delamination, based on molten phase infiltration, misfit upon cooling, and loss of compliance; (v) understanding changes in TGO growth mechanisms associated with these emerging combustion product streams; and (vi) identifying degradation resistant alternative materials (including new compositions or bi-layer concepts) for use in mitigating the observed degradation modes. To address the materials stability concerns, this program integrated research thrusts aimed at: (1) Conducting tests in simulated syngas and HHC environments to evaluate materials evolution and degradation mechanisms; assessing thermally grown oxide development unique to HHC environmental exposures; carrying out high-resolution imaging and microanalysis to elucidate the evolution of surface deposits (molten phase formation and infiltration); exploring thermo-chemical instabilities; assessing thermo-mechanical drivers and thermal gradient effects on degradation; and quantitatively measuring stress evolution due to enhanced sintering and thermo-chemical instabilities induced in the coating. (2) Executing experiments to study the melting and infiltration of simulated ash deposits, and identifying reaction products and evolving phases associated with molten phase corrosion mechanisms; utilizing thermal spray techniques to fabricate test coupons with controlled microstructures to study mechanisms of instability and degradation; facilitating thermal gradient testing; and developing new materials systems for laboratory testing; (3) Correlating information on the resulting combustion environments to properly assess materials exposure conditions and guide the development of lab-scale simulations of material exposures; specification of representative syngas and high-hydrogen fuels with realistic levels of impurities and contaminants, to explore differences in heat transfer, surface degradation, and deposit formation; and facilitating combustion rig testing of materials test coupons.

Mumm, Daniel

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Method and apparatus for using hazardous waste form non-hazardous aggregate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for converting hazardous waste into non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregate, the apparatus. It comprises: a source of particulate solid materials, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products; oxidizing means comprising at least one refractory-lined, water-cooled, metal-walled vessel; means for introducing the particulate solid material, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products to the oxidizing means; means for inducing combustion in the oxidizing means, the heat of combustion forming molten slag and noncombustible fines from noncombustible material; means for accumulating the slag; means for introducing the noncombustible fines to the molten slag; means for removing the mixture from the apparatus; and means for cooling the mixture to form the non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregates.

Kent, J.M.; Robards, H.L. Jr.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

486

The influence of constituent properties on the compression behavior of graphite fiber reinforced composites containing geometric discontinuities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

material systems. Two Dow Chemical cyanate based resin systems, one neat and the other with graft rubber concentrate (GRC) to enhance toughness are studied along with two Hercules epoxy based resins known as 3501-6 and 8551-7. All four systems... to evaluate the effect resin toughness has on notched and post impact compression behavior. Conclusions further identify the key roles that rubber particle additions within the matrix and improved interfacial shear strength between fiber and matrix have...

Crane, David Lee

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Apparatus and method for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dilution apparatus for diluting a gas sample. The apparatus includes a sample gas conduit having a sample gas inlet end and a diluted sample gas outlet end, and a sample gas flow restricting orifice disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end connected with the sample gas conduit and providing fluid communication between the exterior and the interior of the sample gas conduit. A diluted sample gas conduit is provided within the sample gas conduit having a mixing end with a mixing space inlet opening disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end, thereby forming an annular space between the sample gas conduit and the diluted sample gas conduit. The mixing end of the diluted sample gas conduit is disposed at a distance from the sample gas flow restricting orifice. A dilution gas source connected with the sample gas inlet end of the sample gas conduit is provided for introducing a dilution gas into the annular space, and a filter is provided for filtering the sample gas. The apparatus is particularly suited for diluting heated sample gases containing one or more condensable components.

Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

488

Method and apparatus for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

Farthing, William Earl (Pinson, AL) [Pinson, AL; Felix, Larry Gordon (Pelham, AL) [Pelham, AL; Snyder, Todd Robert (Birmingham, AL) [Birmingham, AL

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

489

Method and apparatus maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

Farthing, William Earl (Pinson, AL); Felix, Larry Gordon (Pelham, AL); Snyder, Todd Robert (Birmingham, AL)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

Bulk-SQUID effect in a discrete superconductor as a consequence of generation frequency locking in constituent josephson junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theory of the bulk-SQUID effect in discrete superconductors is constructed for the first time. It is shown that the bulk-SQUID effect emerges in the system of 2D intrinsically stochastic multijunction SQUID (i.e., with random values of critical currents of the junctions, injection currents, and the coupling coefficients between the junction) due to generation frequency locking in all junctions. It is demonstrated that the bulk-SQUID effect occurs in a wide range of random parameters of the system. This domain of variation of the system parameters can be divided into three subdomains. The first one is the subdomain of coherent dynamics of phases at the junctions, the second is the subdomain of incoherent dynamics, in which the phases of the junctions are not locked, but the bulk-SQUID effect persists, and the third is the subdomain of transient dynamics, in which coherent dynamics and the bulk-SQUID effect are observed in parts. A simple mathematical model of noninteracting junctions, which correctly describes basic features of the dynamics of the initial system and makes it possible to calculate some of its statistical characteristics, is proposed and analyzed.

Ginzburg, S. L.; Nakin, A. V.; Savitskaya, N. E., E-mail: savitska@inbox.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Konstantinov Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

491

Cluster building by policy design: a sociotechnical constituency study of information communication technology (ICT) industries in Scotland and Hong Kong   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates whether and how public policies can help build industrial clusters. The research applies a case study method based on 60 interviews to the emerging information communication technology (ICT) ...

Wong, Alexandra Wai Wah

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

DOE's Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board: The Roles, Work, and Assessment of the Constituent Local Boards - 13587  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The charter for the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) Site-Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) was approved under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) in 1994. With a unique mandate to provide public input on issues associated with the cleanup of nuclear legacy sites in the U.S., the EM SSAB comprises eight local boards, which are based at major EM sites. While each board is unique to the community in which it is located and reflects the diversity of the local population, the boards are governed by FACA, related regulations, and DOE policies that are intended to standardize agency advisory board operations. The EM SSAB local boards are made up of a diverse group of citizens who want to understand the mission and goals of the EM program and to help EM achieve those goals for the benefit of their communities. Some are quite passionate about their mission; others need to be coaxed into active participation. Maintaining productive relationships and a supportive environment for effective board operations is the challenge of board management for DOE EM and the board members themselves. DOE draws on research findings and best practices literature from academics and practitioners in the field of public involvement in its board management practices. The EM SSAB is also evaluated annually under the law to ensure that the investment of taxpayer dollars in the board is warranted in light of the contributions of the board. Further evaluation takes place at the agency and site levels in order to identify what aspects of board functioning the agency and board members find important to its success and to address areas where improvement is needed. Board contributions, compliance factors, and measurable outcomes related to board products and process areas are key to agency commitment to ongoing support of the boards and to participant satisfaction and thus continued member involvement. In addition to evaluation of these factors in improving board effectiveness, the agency draws on the experience of members to create best practices for the EM SSAB, as a unique form of public involvement. Four areas that have been identified by local board Chairpersons as important to their local board operations are - Enhancing communication between technical and non-technical board members; - Building on common ground toward recommendations; - Public involvement in EM SSAB local board activities; - The EM SSAB annual work plan process. The first three areas are addressed below by current or former chairpersons of the EM SSAB: Ralph Phelps, former Chairperson of the Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board; Susan Leckband, former Chairperson and current Vice Chairperson of the Hanford Advisory Board; and Val Francis, Vice Chairperson of the Portsmouth (PORTS) SSAB. In addition, Eric Roberts, facilitator of the PORTS SSAB, has contributed to the section on public involvement. In a separate paper for this session, Ralph Young, Chairperson of the Paducah Citizens' Advisory Board addresses the EM SSAB annual work plan process. (authors)

Alexander, Catherine [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Office of Intergovernmental and Community Activities, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W.,Washington, D.C. 20585 (United States)] [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Office of Intergovernmental and Community Activities, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W.,Washington, D.C. 20585 (United States); Freeman, Jenny [Strata-G, LLC, 2027 Castaic Lane, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States)] [Strata-G, LLC, 2027 Castaic Lane, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States); Cantrell, Yvette [Restoration Services, Inc., 136 Mitchell Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc., 136 Mitchell Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Fouling of ceramic filters and thin-film composite reverse osmosis membranes by inorganic and bacteriological constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two significant problems have been identified during the first three years of operating the Savannah River Site Effluent Treatment Facility. These problems encompass two of the facility`s major processing areas: the microfiltration and reverse osmosis steps. The microfilters (crossflow ceramic filters {minus}0.2{mu} nominal pore size) have been prone to pluggage problems. The presence of bacteria and bacteria byproducts in the microfilter feed, along with small quantities of colloidal iron, silica, and aluminum, results in a filter foulant that rapidly deteriorates filter performance and is difficult to remove by chemical cleaning. Processing rates through the filters have dropped from the design flow rate of 300 gpm after cleaning to 60 gpm within minutes. The combination of bacteria (from internal sources) and low concentrations of inorganic species resulted in substantial reductions in the reverse osmosis system performance. The salt rejection has been found to decrease from 99+% to 97%, along with a 50% loss in throughput, within a few hours of cleaning. Experimental work has led to implementation of several changes to plant operation and to planned upgrades of existing equipment. It has been shown that biological control in the influent is necessary to achieve design flowrates. Experiments have also shown that the filter performance can be optimized by the use of efficient filter backpulsing and the addition of aluminum nitrate (15 to 30 mg/L Al{sup 3+}) to the filter feed. The aluminum nitrate assists by controlling adsorption of colloidal inorganic precipitates and biological contaminants. In addition, improved cleaning procedures have been identified for the reverse osmosis units. This paper provides a summary of the plant problems and the experimental work that has been completed to understand and correct these problems.

Siler, J.L.; Poirier, M.R.; McCabe, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

Fouling of ceramic filters and thin-film composite reverse osmosis membranes by inorganic and bacteriological constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two significant problems have been identified during the first three years of operating the Savannah River Site Effluent Treatment Facility. These problems encompass two of the facility's major processing areas: the microfiltration and reverse osmosis steps. The microfilters (crossflow ceramic filters {minus}0.2{mu} nominal pore size) have been prone to pluggage problems. The presence of bacteria and bacteria byproducts in the microfilter feed, along with small quantities of colloidal iron, silica, and aluminum, results in a filter foulant that rapidly deteriorates filter performance and is difficult to remove by chemical cleaning. Processing rates through the filters have dropped from the design flow rate of 300 gpm after cleaning to 60 gpm within minutes. The combination of bacteria (from internal sources) and low concentrations of inorganic species resulted in substantial reductions in the reverse osmosis system performance. The salt rejection has been found to decrease from 99+% to 97%, along with a 50% loss in throughput, within a few hours of cleaning. Experimental work has led to implementation of several changes to plant operation and to planned upgrades of existing equipment. It has been shown that biological control in the influent is necessary to achieve design flowrates. Experiments have also shown that the filter performance can be optimized by the use of efficient filter backpulsing and the addition of aluminum nitrate (15 to 30 mg/L Al{sup 3+}) to the filter feed. The aluminum nitrate assists by controlling adsorption of colloidal inorganic precipitates and biological contaminants. In addition, improved cleaning procedures have been identified for the reverse osmosis units. This paper provides a summary of the plant problems and the experimental work that has been completed to understand and correct these problems.

Siler, J.L.; Poirier, M.R.; McCabe, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Biochemical studies concerning the relationship of various blood and urine constituents to rate of gain in young beef animals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of gain in beef animals~ it seeesg XogLoal thai the Xoeele af aortain nutrient blocaL ocaayoneccte shouM be ~sureiL in tbe Xabesatory in this search for a gsoeth incLm, eLnoe these bloog eaterials sores as tbe buUcLing stones fcn groeth anc...LNaLLeae NLe14eLLeal eeelyreLe eae ayykh4 Le eD data ebLaLee4 La %a abeea 4eLeeaLIaaLeae La aa aeLeeLA ee ~L? aey et 4h~ btee4 eeaeLL|eeaLe eLLb eaLe et NsLa et ebe ~i StcaKes bass been oocduotcd oonoercdng possible correlations between rate of gain in bsof...

Ware, James Harold

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

496

Groupe de travail "Ecomateriaux" Amac/Mecamat, Lyon, 30.06.11 PHOTODEGRADATION DE COMPOSITES CONSTITUES DE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

délignifiée qui passe par un procédé Organosolve avec de l'éthanol jusqu'à un nombre de Kappa de 84 (11% de un procédé Organosolve avec de la monoethanolamine (MEA). Le groupe CMEA contient 5% de lignine, qui est également obtenue en utilisant le procédé organosolve avec MEA. Tous les matériaux ont été séchés

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

497

17 May 2013 To whom it may concern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, plastic bottles, drink cans and glass bottles. A. Collection point: the nearest waste collection point 3. Waste collection points · Ordinary waste such as plastic waste, paper waste, empty cans and bottles. Please make sure to sort them into five categories: combustible waste, non-combustible waste

Kawato, Suguru

498

16 May 2014 To whom it may concern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, plastic bottles, drink cans and glass bottles. A. Collection point: the nearest waste collection point 3. Waste collection points · Ordinary waste such as plastic waste, paper waste, empty cans and bottles. Please make sure to sort them into five categories: combustible waste, non-combustible waste

Kawato, Suguru

499

22 November 2013 To whom it may concern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, plastic bottles, drink cans and glass bottles. A. Collection point: the nearest waste collection point 3. Waste collection points · Ordinary waste such as plastic waste, paper waste, empty cans and bottles. Please make sure to sort them into five categories: combustible waste, non-combustible waste

Yamamoto, Hirosuke

500

Sept.. 1060 HYDROGENS O R P T I O N O X GRAPHITEAT E L E V A T E D TEMPERATURES 1093 HYDROGEN SORPTIOK ON GRAPHITE AT ELEVATED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.iiig in adverse effects. For example, in the graphite-moderated nuclear reac- tor, hydrogen and carbon monoxide steel) result- ing in hardening and embritt'lemeiit of the metal. Released carbon monoxide can. 111 general, they report that hydrogen and carbon monoxide are the major constituents of the released