National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for noncombustible constituents examples

  1. RECREATIONAL CONSTITUENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RECREATIONAL FISHERIES CONSTITUENTS ECONOMICS WORKSHOP Photo credit: Will Satterthwaite U-handed in giving both criticism and credit for a job well done. In the next section, we provide a brief summary

  2. Apparatus and method for separating constituents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maronde, Carl P. (McMurray, PA); Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01

    A centrifugal separator apparatus and method for improving the efficiency of the separation of constituents in a fluid stream. A cyclone separator includes an assembly for separately discharging both constituents through the same end of the separator housing. A rotary separator includes a rotary housing having a baffle disposed therein for minimizing the differential rotational velocities of the constituents in the housing, thereby decreasing turbulence, and increasing efficiency. The intensity of the centrifugal force and the time which the constituents reside within the housing can be independently controlled to improve efficiency of separation.

  3. Hazardous constituent source term. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-17

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has several facilities that either generate and/or store transuranic (TRU)-waste from weapons program research and production. Much of this waste also contains hazardous waste constituents as regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Toxicity characteristic metals in the waste principally include lead, occurring in leaded rubber gloves and shielding. Other RCRA metals may occur as contaminants in pyrochemical salt, soil, debris, and sludge and solidified liquids, as well as in equipment resulting from decontamination and decommissioning activities. Volatile organic compounds (VOCS) contaminate many waste forms as a residue adsorbed on surfaces or occur in sludge and solidified liquids. Due to the presence of these hazardous constituents, applicable disposal regulations include land disposal restrictions established by Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The DOE plans to dispose of TRU-mixed waste from the weapons program in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by demonstrating no-migration of hazardous constituents. This paper documents the current technical basis for methodologies proposed to develop a post-closure RCRA hazardous constituent source term. For the purposes of demonstrating no-migration, the hazardous constituent source term is defined as the quantities of hazardous constituents that are available for transport after repository closure. Development of the source term is only one of several activities that will be involved in the no-migration demonstration. The demonstration will also include uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of contaminant transport.

  4. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hazard Identification and Characterization Examples Example 13 2.02.04 Hazard Baseline Documentation The following is a listing of the hazard baseline documentation for the...

  5. Network Economics: two examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lelarge, Marc

    such that their action under best response dynamics spreads contagiously everywhere? · Contagion threshold: = largest q for which contagious dynamics are possible. · Example: interaction on the line #12;(2)Another example: d

  6. Apparatus for the field determination of concentration of radioactive constituents in a medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, R.W.; Schilk, A.J.; Warner, R.A.; Wogman, N.A.

    1995-08-15

    The instant invention is an apparatus for determining the concentration of radioactive constituents in a test sample; such as surface soils, via rapid real-time analyses, and direct readout on location utilizing a probe made up of multiple layers of detection material used in combination with an analyzer and real-time readout unit. This is accomplished by comparing the signal received from the probe, which can discriminate between types of radiation and energies with stored patterns that are based upon experimental results. This comparison can be used in the calibration of a readout display that reads out in real-time the concentrations of constituents per given volume. For example, the concentration of constituents such as Cs-137, Sr-90, U-238 in the soil, and noble gas radionuclides such as Kr-85 in the atmosphere, can be measured in real-time, on location, without the need for laboratory analysis of samples. 14 figs.

  7. Apparatus for the field determination of concentration of radioactive constituents in a medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard W. (Richland, WA); Schilk, Alan J. (Richland, WA); Warner, Ray A. (Benton City, WA); Wogman, Ned A. (Richland, WA)

    1995-01-01

    The instant invention is an apparatus for determining the concentration of radioactive constituents in a test sample; such as surface soils, via rapid real-time analyses, and direct readout on location utilizing a probe made up of multiple layers of detection material used in combination with an analyzer and real-time readout unit. This is accomplished by comparing the signal received from the probe, which can discriminate between types of radiation and energies with stored patterns that are based upon experimental results. This comparison can be used in the calibration of a readout display that reads out in real-time the concentrations of constituents per given volume. For example, the concentration of constituents such as Cs-137, Sr-90, U-238 in the soil, and noble gas radionuclides such as Kr-85 in the atmosphere, can be measured in real-time, on location, without the need for laboratory analysis of samples.

  8. MARSAME Illustrative Examples 8 ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an example of a disposition survey for a large quantity of bulk material at a mineral processing facility 8.4 are based on the same mineral processing facility that serves as the basis for Section 8 it is brought into a radiological control area (RCA) for the impacted bulk material. This baseline survey

  9. Baryon Spectroscopy and the Constituent Quark Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.W. Thomas; R.D. Young

    2005-07-26

    We explore further the idea that the lattice QCD data for hadron properties in the region m[^2][_pi] > 0.2GeV^2 can be described by the constituent quark model. This leads to a natural explanation of the fact that nucleon excited states are generally stable for pion masses greater than their physical excitation energies. Finally, we apply these same ideas to the problem of how pentaquarks might behave in lattice QCD, with interesting conclusions.

  10. Hybrid States from Constituent Glue Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Iddir; L. Semlala

    2007-12-11

    The hybrid meson is one of the most interesting new hadron specie beyond the naive quark model. It acquire a great attention both from the theoretical and experimental efforts. Many good candidates have been claimed to be observed, but there is no absolute confirmation about existence of hybrid mesons. In the present work we propose new calculations of the masses and decay widths of the hybrid mesons in the context of constituent gluon model.

  11. Example Hopper Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    batch system must wait for the desired big memory nodes to become available. Running Hybrid MPIOpenMP Applications Hybrid MPIOpenMP Example: New Recommendations (recommended)...

  12. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Stuart C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jeffery, Charles L. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  13. Relevance Vector Sinc Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Sparsity Will Penny Relevance Vector Regression Kernel Prior Inference Sinc Example Visual Coding Learning Self-Inhibition Receptive Fields References Sparsity Will Penny 24th March 2011 #12;Sparsity Will Penny Relevance Vector Regression Kernel Prior Inference Sinc Example Visual Coding Maximum Likelihood

  14. Property:BrineConstituents | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardee JumpBrineConstituents Jump to:

  15. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and a lead brick will be removed from the 772-D laboratory. Example 19 6.01.01 Characterization and Hazards Identification Accountable Nuclear Material The inventory of nuclear...

  16. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546Has Evidence ExampleExample

  17. Example batch scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546Has Evidence ExampleExample

  18. Electromagnetic form factors and the hypercentral constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanctis, M. De; Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.

    2007-12-15

    We present new results concerning the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon using a relativistic version of the hypercentral constituent quark model and a relativistic current.

  19. Advanced Usage Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAboutHelp &AdvancedAdvancedExamples Advanced

  20. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546Has Evidence Example Batch

  1. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546Has Evidence Example

  2. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.

    2003-02-11

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with inorganic nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. The potential of the system will be illustrated and demonstrated by the example of biopolymer production on oil recovery.

  3. Relating polymer matrix composite delamination behavior to constituent properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Jeremy R. (Jeremy Ryan), 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Developing predictive capabilities of composite material behavior from constituent properties is an important component of accelerating materials insertion. Many models exist that accomplish this objective for a range of ...

  4. Mass as a form of Energy in a simple example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dib, Claudio O

    2015-01-01

    A major consequence of special relativity, expressed in the relation $E_0 = m c^2$, is that the total energy content of an object at rest, including its thermal motion and binding energy among its constituents, is a measure of its inertia, i.e. its mass. This relation was first stated by Einstein. He showed that, in order to be consistent with the principles of special relativity, there must be a loss of inertia in a block that emits two pulses of electromagnetic radiation. A pedagogical difficulty with this example is that radiation is a purely relativistic phenomenon, and so the connection with the examples one learns in introductory Mechanics courses is not simple. Here we use a more familiar example of masses and springs, where the non-relativistic limit can be easily found and where the potential energy is clearly shown to be part of the mass of the bound system.

  5. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soung, Wen Y. (Houston, TX)

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  6. Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herbst, R. Scott (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Blackfoot, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID)

    2011-10-25

    Methods of using an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises contacting an adsorption medium with a feed stream comprising at least one constituent and removing the at least one constituent from the feed stream. The adsorption medium comprises a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) matrix and at least one metal hydroxide homogenously dispersed therein. The adsorption medium may comprise from approximately 15 wt % to approximately 90 wt % of the PAN and from approximately 10 wt % to approximately 85 wt % of the at least one metal hydroxide. The at least one metal hydroxide may be selected from the group consisting of ferric hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, lanthanum hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, titanium hydroxide, copper hydroxide, antimony hydroxide, and molybdenum hydroxide.

  7. Templates and Examples — Survey Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  8. Templates and Examples — Tree Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  9. Templates and Examples — Measurable Goals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  10. Method for verification of constituents of a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a method for validating a process stream for the presence or absence of a substance of interest such as a chemical warfare agent; that is, for verifying that a chemical warfare agent is present in an input line for feeding the agent into a reaction vessel for destruction, or, in a facility for producing commercial chemical products, that a constituent of the chemical warfare agent has not been substituted for the proper chemical compound. The method includes the steps of transmitting light through a sensor positioned in the feed line just before the chemical constituent in the input line enters the reaction vessel, measuring an optical spectrum of the chemical constituent from the light beam transmitted through it, and comparing the measured spectrum to a reference spectrum of the chemical agent and preferable also reference spectra of surrogates. A signal is given if the chemical agent is not entering a reaction vessel for destruction, or if a constituent of a chemical agent is added to a feed line in substitution of the proper chemical compound.

  11. Traversable wormholes: Some simple examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building on the work of Morris, Thorne, and Yurtsever, some particularly simple examples of traversable wormholes are exhibited. These examples are notable both because the analysis is not limited to spherically symmetric cases, and because it is possible to in some sense minimize the use of exotic matter. In particular, it is possible for a traveller to traverse such a wormhole without passing through a region of exotic matter. As in previous analyses, the weak energy condition is violated in these traversable wormholes.

  12. Traversable wormholes: Some simple examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2008-09-04

    Building on the work of Morris, Thorne, and Yurtsever, some particularly simple examples of traversable wormholes are exhibited. These examples are notable both because the analysis is not limited to spherically symmetric cases, and because it is possible to in some sense minimize the use of exotic matter. In particular, it is possible for a traveller to traverse such a wormhole without passing through a region of exotic matter. As in previous analyses, the weak energy condition is violated in these traversable wormholes.

  13. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Shah, N.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States))

    1991-09-01

    The technical objectives of this project are: (1) To define the partitioning of inorganic constituents associated with raw coal particles among products (including vapors, aerosols, and residual char/ash particles) formed under conditions representative of pulverized coal flames as a function of the specific (intrinsic and extrinsic) characteristics of the raw coal and the environment in which the transformations occur; and to characterize the resultant spectrum of products in detail. (2) To elucidate and quantify the fundamental processes (involving basic principles of physics, chemistry, thermodynamics) by which transformations of the inorganic constituents occur; and (3) to develop, based on the information required in (1) and (2), a tractable process'' model capable of predicting the significant features of the transformation process, most importantly, the nature and distribution of products. 26 refs., 151 figs., 51 tabs.

  14. Examples of Cost Estimation Packages

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Estimates can be performed in a variety of ways. Some of these are for projects for an undefined scope, a conventional construction project, or where there is a level of effort required to complete the work. Examples of cost estimation packages for these types of projects are described in this appendix.

  15. EXAMPLE ACADEMIC SANCTIONS/PENALTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    EXAMPLE ACADEMIC SANCTIONS/PENALTIES Assignment of a grade for the relevant assignment, exam member should inform the student what the potential academic sanction or penalty would, additional disciplinary sanctions, conditions, and restrictions may be imposed by a Conduct Officer. Explain

  16. Analytical methods for removing radiological constituents prior to organic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakonson, K.; Monagle, M.; Cournoyer, M.

    1997-12-31

    Within the Department of Energy (DOE), there is a need to analyze mixed waste materials (i.e. materials that are contaminated with both radiological and hazardous components). As part of the technical support the Organic Analysis Group provides for programs within Los Alamos National Laboratory, methods are under development for radiologically contaminated oil samples being tested for polychlorinated biphenyls and other semivolatile constituents. Radionuclides are removed from oil samples by filtering the samples through a commercials available solid phase extraction cartridge. An aliquot of the eluent is then analyzed to quantitate the residual radioactivity.

  17. Hanford ferrocyanide reactivity: Effects of other tank constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Tingey, J.M.; Johnston, J.W.; Sell, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents results of studies using synthetic chemicals to determine the effect of other potential waste constituents on the reactivity and explosivity of Hanford ferrocyanide wastes. These studies have shown that either individually or in combination some of the tested additives (sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate and the hydroxide precipitates of iron (III), chromium (III), and nickel] can at a concentration of 0.03 mole/mole ferrocyanide reduce the time to explosion of a near-stoichiometric mixture of sodium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite. These studies also found no reduction in observed minimum explosion temperature of 293{degrees}C.

  18. Fortran MPI/OpenMP example output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPIOpenMP example Fortran MPIOpenMP example Fortran MPIOpenMP Example program jacobimpiomp Solve (ddx)2 + (ddy)2 u(x,y) f(x,y) for u(x,y) in a rectangular ...

  19. Double parton correlations in Light-Front constituent quark model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Rinaldi; Sergio Scopetta; Marco Traini; Vicente Vento

    2014-12-09

    Double parton distribution functions (dPDF) represent a tool to explore the 3D proton structure. They can be measured in high energy proton-proton and proton nucleus collisions and encode information on how partons inside a proton are correlated among each other. dPFDs are studied here in the valence quark region, by means of a constituent quark model, where two particle correlations are present without any additional prescription. This framework allows to understand the dynamical origin of the correlations and to clarify which, among the features of the results, are model independent. Use will be made of a relativistic light-front scheme, able to overcome some drawbacks of the previous calculation. Transverse momentum correlations, due to the exact treatment of the boosts, are predicted and analyzed. The role of spin correlations is also shown. Due to the covariance of the approach, some symmetries of the dPDFs are seen unambigously. For the valence sector, the study of the QCD evolution of the model results, which can be performed safely thanks to the property of good support, has been also completed.

  20. Mechanical properties of nacre constituents and their impact on mechanical performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Mechanical properties of nacre constituents and their impact on mechanical performance François Barthelat, Chun-Ming Li, Claudia Comi,a) and Horacio D. Espinosab) Department of Mechanical Engineering) The mechanical properties of nacre constituents from red abalone were investigated. Electron microscopy studies

  1. Examples of Wind Energy Curtailment Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.; Fink, S.; Porter, K.

    2010-07-01

    This report addresses examples of wind energy curtailment practices internationally and in regions across the United States.

  2. Concept Learning Learning Concepts from Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on features #12;2 A Concept Learning Task Four Examples: Example Sky AirTemp Humidity Wind Water ForecastTemp Humidity Wind Water Forecast EnjoySport 1 Sunny Warm Normal Strong Warm Same Yes 2 Sunny Warm High Strong attributes Example Sky AirTemp Humidity Wind Water Forecast EnjoySpor 1 Sunny Warm Normal Strong Warm Same

  3. CONSTITUENCY AND UNIT PROGRAMS 6 -Org Chart_Constituency ProgramsN:\\Groups\\handbook\\1 -University_Advancement\\6 -Org Chart_Constituency Programs.docx 6/11/2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _Advancement\\6 - Org Chart_Constituency Programs.docx 6/11/2015 Agriculture and Natural Resources, University & Info Technology Services Seth Martin, Director Katherine Diamond, Development Assistant Lyman Briggs Assistant Natural Science/Cyclotron Corey Longley, Senior Director Karen Wenk, Associate Director Becky Jo

  4. Templates and Examples — Preparing Test Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities.

  5. Example Cost Codes for Construction Projects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides an example outline of cost items and their corresponding cost codes that may be used for construction projects.

  6. Templates and Examples — Analysis and Reporting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities.

  7. Templates and Examples — Planning Your Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities.

  8. Compositional differences in biomarker constituents of the hydrocarbon, resin, asphaltene and kerogen fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Allen P.

    Compositional differences in biomarker constituents of the hydrocarbon, resin, asphaltene fraction, so biomarker parameters measured for different fractions are not directly comparable. The samples- tion are of equal magnitude to the quantities that are present in the extractable aliphatic hydrocarbon

  9. Method and apparatus for the removal or bioconversion of constituents of organic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.; Scott, C.D.

    1994-10-25

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the removal or conversion of constituents from bulk organic liquids. A countercurrent biphasic bioreactor system is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the constituent. Two transient, high-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the constituent to produce a product which is then removed from the bioreactor in the aqueous phase or retained in the organic phase. The organic liquid, now free of the original constituents, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 1 fig.

  10. Effective moduli of granular and layered composites with piezoelectric constituents Tamara Olsony and Marco Avellanedaz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Tamara

    made from piezoelectric materials are examined, with particular emphasis on applications to unpoledEffective moduli of granular and layered composites with piezoelectric constituents Tamara Olsony piezoelectric ceramics and layered materials. Explicit formulae for the effective moduli and coupling

  11. Digestibility by Sheep of the Constituents of the Nitrogen-Free Extract of Feeds. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, , George Stronach

    1930-01-01

    . MACKEY, M. S., Antmal Husbandry *Dean School of Veterinary Medicine. ?As of November 1, 1930. **In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. The sugars, starch, and other constituents of feeding stuffs were studied by means of chemical...

  12. Texas County Extension Agents Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Using Facebook to Communicate with Constituents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Lacey

    2014-01-08

    , and perceptions using social media, Facebook in particular, to communicate with constituents. The participants in the study were a randomly selected group of Texas extension agents. A web-based questionnaire was used to measure the perceived level of confidence...

  13. Templates and Examples — Customer Profiles and Personas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  14. User Experience Research Templates and Examples

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable (EERE) has custom templates and specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities for EERE websites and applications. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them.

  15. Tutorial Examples in the book Solar Magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priest, Eric

    expands to a red giant? EXAMPLE 1.2. Sunlight Duration During an Equinox. Why are the durations of sunlight and night-time not the same at an equinox? EXAMPLE 1.3. Association of the Corona with the Sun

  16. Motivation Examples Star Avoiding Ramsey Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaak, Garth

    Motivation Examples Star Avoiding Ramsey Numbers Jonelle Hook, Garth Isaak Department and Cryptography Jonelle Hook, Garth Isaak Star Avoiding Ramsey Numbers #12;Motivation Examples Graph Ramsey-coloring of K13 has a red C5 or a blue K4. Jonelle Hook, Garth Isaak Star Avoiding Ramsey Numbers #12

  17. Templates and Examples — Interviews and Focus Groups

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  18. Support Vector Machines with Example Dependent Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brefeld, Ulf

    Support Vector Machines with Example Dependent Costs Ulf Brefeld, Peter Geibel, and Fritz Wysotzki neu- ral networks and machine learning, typically, do not take any costs into account or allow only costs depending on the classes of the examples that are used for learning. As an extension of class

  19. EXAMPLES OF NON-COMMUTATIVE HODGE STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabbah, Claude

    EXAMPLES OF NON-COMMUTATIVE HODGE STRUCTURES by Claus Hertling & Claude Sabbah Abstract. We show form, then the associated integrable twistor structure (or TERP structure, or non-commutative Hodge structure) is pure and polarized. Contents Introduction

  20. Example of Environmental Restoration Code of Accounts

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter describes the fundamental structure of an example remediation cost code system, lists and describes the Level 1 cost codes, and lists the Level 2 and Level 3 cost codes.

  1. An example of Feynman-Jackson integral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael Diaz; Eddy Pariguan

    2007-07-10

    We review the construction of a q-analogue of the Gaussian measure. We apply that construction to obtain a q-analogue of Feynman integrals and to compute explicitly an example of such integrals.

  2. MAMA Software Features: Visual Examples of Quantification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggiero, Christy E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Porter, Reid B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-05-20

    This document shows examples of the results from quantifying objects of certain sizes and types in the software. It is intended to give users a better feel for some of the quantification calculations, and, more importantly, to help users understand the challenges with using a small set of ‘shape’ quantification calculations for objects that can vary widely in shapes and features. We will add more examples to this in the coming year.

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF LEACHXS/ORCHESTRA CAPABILITIES BY SIMULATING CONSTITUENT RELEASE FROM A CEMENTITIOUS WASTE FORM IN A REINFORCED CONCRETE VAULT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Meeussen, J.; Sloot, H.

    2010-03-31

    The objective of the work described in this report is to demonstrate the capabilities of the current version of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for simulating chemical behavior and constituent release processes in a range of applications that are relevant to the CBP. This report illustrates the use of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for the following applications: (1) Comparing model and experimental results for leaching tests for a range of cementitious materials including cement mortars, grout, stabilized waste, and concrete. The leaching test data includes liquid-solid partitioning as a function of pH and release rates based on laboratory column, monolith, and field testing. (2) Modeling chemical speciation of constituents in cementitious materials, including liquid-solid partitioning and release rates. (3) Evaluating uncertainty in model predictions based on uncertainty in underlying composition, thermodynamic, and transport characteristics. (4) Generating predominance diagrams to evaluate predicted chemical changes as a result of material aging using the example of exposure to atmospheric conditions. (5) Modeling coupled geochemical speciation and diffusion in a three layer system consisting of a layer of Saltstone, a concrete barrier, and a layer of soil in contact with air. The simulations show developing concentration fronts over a time period of 1000 years. (6) Modeling sulfate attack and cracking due to ettringite formation. A detailed example for this case is provided in a separate article by the authors (Sarkar et al. 2010). Finally, based on the computed results, the sensitive input parameters for this type of modeling are identified and discussed. The chemical speciation behavior of substances is calculated for a batch system and also in combination with transport and within a three layer system. This includes release from a barrier to the surrounding soil as a function of time. As input for the simulations, the physical and chemical properties of the materials are used. The test cases used in this demonstration are taken from Reference Cases for Use in the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (Langton et al. 2009). Before it is possible to model the release of substances from stabilized waste or radioactive grout through a cement barrier into the engineered soil barrier or natural soil, the relevant characteristics of such materials must be known. Additional chemical characteristics are needed for mechanistic modeling to be undertaken, not just the physical properties relevant for modeling of transport. The minimum required properties for modeling are given in Section 5.0, 'Modeling the chemical speciation of a material'.

  4. Effects of Constituent Properties on Performance Improvement of a Quenching and Partitioning Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Taylor, Mark D.; De Moor, Emmanuel; Speer, John; Matlock, David K.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of material parameters of the constituent phases on the macroscopic tensile behavior of Q&P steel and then to do a computational materials design approach for its performance improvement. For this purpose, a model Q&P steel is first produced and various experiments are then performed to characterize the steel. Actual microstructure-based model is generated based on the information from EBSD, SEM and nano-indentation test, and the material properties for the constituent phases are determined based on the initial constituents’ properties from HEXRD test and the subsequent calibration of model prediction to tensile test results. Influence of various material parameters of the constituents on the macroscopic behaviors is then investigated by separately adjusting them by small amount. Based on the observation on the respective influence of constituents’ material parameters, a new set of material parameters are devised, which results in better performance in ductility. The results indicate that various material parameters may need to be concurrently adjusted in a cohesive way in order to improve the performance of Q&P steel. In summary, higher austenite stability, less strength difference between the phases, higher hardening exponents of the phases are generally beneficial for the performance improvement. The information from this study can be used to devise new Q&P heat-treating parameters to produce the Q&P steels with better performance.

  5. Methods of removing a constituent from a feed stream using adsorption media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Rigby, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-05-24

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  6. Modeling of constituent redistribution in U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G. L.; Hayes, S. L.; Yacout, A. M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; INL

    2006-12-01

    A computer model was developed to analyze constituent redistribution in U-Pu-Zr metallic nuclear fuels. Diffusion and thermochemical properties were parametrically determined to fit the postirradiation data from a fuel test performed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The computer model was used to estimate redistribution profiles of fuels proposed for the conceptual designs of small modular fast reactors. The model results showed that the level of redistribution of the fuel constituents of the designs was similar to the measured data from EBR-II.

  7. Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

    1984-02-22

    A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentrations at regions of interest within the object.

  8. Free energy of the edge of an open lipid bilayer based on the interactions of its constituent molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meisam Asgari; Aisa Biria

    2015-04-05

    Lipid-bilayers are the fundamental constituents of the walls of most living cells and lipid vesicles, giving them shape and compartment. The formation and growing of pores in a lipid bilayer have attracted considerable attention from an energetic point of view in recent years. Such pores permit targeted delivery of drugs and genes to the cell, and regulate the concentration of various molecules within the cell. The formation of such pores is caused by various reasons such as changes in cell environment, mechanical stress or thermal fluctuations. Understanding the energy and elastic behaviour of a lipid-bilayer edge is crucial for controlling the formation and growth of such pores. In the present work, the interactions in the molecular level are used to obtain the free energy of the edge of an open lipid bilayer. The resulted free-energy density includes terms associated with flexural and torsional energies of the edge, in addition to a line-tension contribution. The line tension, elastic moduli, and spontaneous normal and geodesic curvatures of the edge are obtained as functions of molecular distribution, molecular dimensions, cutoff distance, and the interaction strength. These parameters are further analyzed by implementing a soft-core interaction potential in the microphysical model. The dependence of the elastic free-energy of the edge to the size of the pore is reinvestigated through an illustrative example, and the results are found to be in agreement with the previous observations.

  9. Organic Constituents on the Surfaces of Aerosol Particles from Southern Finland, Amazonia, and California Studied by Vibrational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Organic Constituents on the Surfaces of Aerosol Particles from Southern Finland, Amazonia of Physics, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

  10. RESEARCH INVOLVING PRISONERS DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 RESEARCH INVOLVING PRISONERS 05/30/2008 DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES The DUHS IRB reviews and approves research involving prisoners in compliance with 45 CFR 46 Subpart C and other applicable regulations and laws. The provisions of Subpart C apply whenever the research targets prisoners as subjects

  11. Strategic Planning Process Constituencies contacted/engaged as of May, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Planning Process Constituencies contacted/engaged as of May, 2015 Student Engagement Open Meeting with Raleigh alumni Community Engagement Planned for fall 2015: to be determined from meeting with the Vice President for Public Affairs and Government Relations Staff engagement Planned for fall 2015

  12. Constituents of political cognition: Race, party politics, and the alliance detection system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosmides, Leda

    Constituents of political cognition: Race, party politics, and the alliance detection system David contains a set of adaptations for detecting alliances: an alliance detection system, which monitors for, encodes, and stores alliance information and then modifies the activation of stored alliance categories

  13. Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result, or materials. Before 1200 AD · Air pollution results from wood burning, tanning, decaying trash, smelting with carbon PbO + C -> Pb + CO Pollutants Produced: CO, SO2 ·Hong, et al., Greenland ice evidence

  14. Responses in Milk Constituents to Intravascular Administration of Two Mixtures of Amino Acids to Dairy Cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bequette, Brian J.

    to inves- tigate the effects of intravascular infusions of AA mixtures on milk constituents. Cows were infusion, followed by a 5-djugular infusion of a mixture of AA. Two mixtures of AA were used in a crossover (total AA); this mixture was infused at 400 g of M d . The other mixture represented the essential AA

  15. ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    ES2A7 - Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set III) Question 1: Distance between.mol- = - Perfect Gas constant: 1 1 R 8.31J.K .mol- - = Question 2: Type of Fluid Consider 2 identical vertical are filled with the same height of fluid: A Newtonian fluid is used with tube X whereas a non-Newtonian fluid

  16. ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    ES2A7 - Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set III) Question 1 10610 40031.8 -- ×=×= × × == APN RT d Question 2: Type of Fluid #12;Consider 2 identical vertical tubes are filled with the same height of fluid: A Newtonian fluid is used with tube X whereas a non-Newtonian fluid

  17. Some examples of exponentially harmonic maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A D Kanfon; A Füzfa; D Lambert

    2002-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to study some examples of exponentially harmonic maps. We study such maps firstly on flat euclidean and Minkowski spaces and secondly on Friedmann-Lema\\^ itre universes. We also consider some new models of exponentially harmonic maps which are coupled with gravity which happen to be based on a generalization of the lagrangian for bosonic strings coupled with dilatonic field.

  18. Web Markup Languages Definitions and examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inkpen, Diana

    1 Web Markup Languages Definitions and examples http://www.w3schools.com #12;2 What is HTML? · HTML · The markup tags tell the Web browser how to display the page · An HTML file must have an htm or html file is a complement to HTML, not a replacement. In future Web development it is most likely that XML will be used

  19. Devices and methods for managing noncombustible gasses in nuclear power plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marquino, Wayne; Moen, Stephan C; Wachowiak, Richard M; Gels, John L; Diaz-Quiroz, Jesus; Burns, Jr., John C

    2014-12-23

    Systems passively eliminate noncondensable gasses from facilities susceptible to damage from combustion of built-up noncondensable gasses, such as H2 and O2 in nuclear power plants, without the need for external power and/or moving parts. Systems include catalyst plates installed in a lower header of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) condenser, a catalyst packing member, and/or a catalyst coating on an interior surface of a condensation tube of the PCCS condenser or an annular outlet of the PCCS condenser. Structures may have surfaces or hydrophobic elements that inhibit water formation and promote contact with the noncondensable gas. Noncondensable gasses in a nuclear power plant are eliminated by installing and using the systems individually or in combination. An operating pressure of the PCCS condenser may be increased to facilitate recombination of noncondensable gasses therein.

  20. " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",2.6

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981" ,"DataWorking17.2 116.9 107.6 104.9612.94. Total First Use.5

  1. 6.2. DESIGN EXAMPLE 1 81 6.2 Design Example 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helton, J. William

    6.2. DESIGN EXAMPLE 1 81 6.2 Design Example 1 The system is a slide drive, driven by a DC motor the gear train which steps the speed down to ! 2 (t). The gear train is connected to a table which slides of the table very precisely. w 2 LOAD TABLE RAIL GEAR TRAIN w 1 DC MOTOR + ­ U Figure 6.5: Slide drive

  2. Example BCP Template | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996 EM HealthCybersecurityExamination Report: OAS-RA-13-01ExaminationExample

  3. Category:LEDS Example | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia:Geothermal Regulatory RoadmapISGANLEDS Example Jump

  4. Effects of fine particulate matter and its constituents on low birth weight among full-term infants in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Rupa; Harris, Maria; Sie, Lillian; Malig, Brian; Broadwin, Rachel; Green, Rochelle

    2014-01-15

    Relationships between prenatal exposure to fine particles (PM{sub 2.5}) and birth weight have been observed previously. Few studies have investigated specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, which may identify sources and major contributors of risk. We examined the effects of trimester and full gestational prenatal exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and 23 PM{sub 2.5} constituents on birth weight among 646,296 term births in California between 2000 and 2006. We used linear and logistic regression models to assess associations between exposures and birth weight and risk of low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g), respectively. Models were adjusted for individual demographic characteristics, apparent temperature, month and year of birth, region, and socioeconomic indicators. Higher full gestational exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and several PM{sub 2.5} constituents were significantly associated with reductions in term birth weight. The largest reductions in birth weight were associated with exposure to vanadium, sulfur, sulfate, iron, elemental carbon, titanium, manganese, bromine, ammonium, zinc, and copper. Several of these PM{sub 2.5} constituents were associated with increased risk of term LBW. Reductions in birth weight were generally larger among younger mothers and varied by race/ethnicity. Exposure to specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, especially traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals, were associated with decreased birth weight in California. -- Highlights: • Examine full gestational and trimester fine particle and its constituents on term birth weight. • Fine particles and several of its constituents associated with birth weight reductions. • Largest reductions for traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals. • Greater birth weight reductions for younger mothers, and varied by race/ethnicity.

  5. Autonomous Energy Transducer: Proposition, Example, Basic Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoko Nakagawa; Kunihiko Kaneko

    2003-09-22

    We propose a concept of autonomous energy transducer at a molecular scale, where output is produced with small input energy, of the same order of the thermal energy, without restriction of magnitude or timing of input, and without any control after the input. As an example that satisfies these requisites, a dynamical systems model with several degrees of freedom is proposed, which transduces input energy to output motion on the average. It is shown that this transduction is robust and the coupling between the input and output is generally loose. How this transducer works is analyzed in terms of dynamical systems theory, where chaotic dynamics of the internal degrees of freedom, as well as duration of active state which is self-organized with the energy flow, is essential. We also discuss possible relationships to enzyme dynamics or protein motors.

  6. Emergent rainbow spacetimes: Two pedagogical examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2008-01-03

    There is a possibility that spacetime itself is ultimately an emergent phenomenon, a near-universal "low-energy long-distance approximation", similar to the way in which fluid mechanics is the near-universal low-energy long-distance approximation to quantum molecular dynamics. If so, then direct attempts to quantize spacetime are misguided - at least as far as fundamental physics is concerned. Based on this and other considerations, there has recently been a surge of interest in the notion of energy-dependent and momentum-dependent "rainbow'' geometries. In the present article I will not discuss these exotic ideas in any detail, instead I will present two specific and concrete examples of situations where an energy-dependent "rainbow'' geometry makes perfectly good mathematical and physical sense. These simple examples will then serve as templates suggesting ways of proceeding in situations where the underlying physics may be more complex. The specific models I will deal with are (1) acoustic spacetimes in the presence of nontrivial dispersion, and (2) a mathematical reinterpretation of Newton's second law for a non-relativistic conservative force, which is well-known to be equivalent to the differential geometry of an energy-dependent conformally flat three-manifold. These two models make it clear that there is nothing wrong with the concept of an energy-dependent "rainbow'' geometry per se. Whatever problems may arise in the implementation of any specific quantum-gravity-inspired proposal for an energy-dependent spacetime are related to deeper questions regarding the compatibility of that specific proposal with experimental reality.

  7. Customer Messages for Specific Markets: Examples from JEA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents examples of various types of marketing materials and strategies used by Jacksonville, Florida.

  8. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX)

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  9. SAFEGUARDS ENVELOPE: PREVIOUS WORK AND EXAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Metcalf; Aaron Bevill; William Charlton; Robert Bean

    2008-07-01

    The future expansion of nuclear power will require not just electricity production but fuel cycle facilities such as fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants. As large reprocessing facilities are built in various states, they must be built and operated in a manner to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation. Process monitoring has returned to the spotlight as an added measure that can increase confidence in the safeguards of special nuclear material (SNM). Process monitoring can be demonstrated to lengthen the allowable inventory period by reducing accountancy requirements, and to reduce the false positive indications. The next logical step is the creation of a Safeguards Envelope, a set of operational parameters and models to maximize anomaly detection and inventory period by process monitoring while minimizing operator impact and false positive rates. A brief example of a rudimentary Safeguards Envelope is presented, and shown to detect synthetic diversions overlaying a measured processing plant data set. This demonstration Safeguards Envelope is shown to increase the confidence that no SNM has been diverted with minimal operator impact, even though it is based on an information sparse environment. While the foundation on which a full Safeguards Envelope can be built has been presented in historical demonstrations of process monitoring, several requirements remain yet unfulfilled. Future work will require reprocessing plant transient models, inclusion of “non-traditional” operating data, and exploration of new methods of identifying subtle events in transient processes.

  10. Integral quantizations with two basic examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, H.; Gazeau, J.P.

    2014-05-15

    The paper concerns integral quantization, a procedure based on operator-valued measure and resolution of the identity. We insist on covariance properties in the important case where group representation theory is involved. We also insist on the inherent probabilistic aspects of this classical–quantum map. The approach includes and generalizes coherent state quantization. Two applications based on group representation are carried out. The first one concerns the Weyl–Heisenberg group and the euclidean plane viewed as the corresponding phase space. We show that a world of quantizations exist, which yield the canonical commutation rule and the usual quantum spectrum of the harmonic oscillator. The second one concerns the affine group of the real line and gives rise to an interesting regularization of the dilation origin in the half-plane viewed as the corresponding phase space. -- Highlights: •Original approach to quantization based on (positive) operator-valued measures. •Includes Berezin–Klauder–Toeplitz and Weyl–Wigner quantizations. •Infinitely many such quantizations produce canonical commutation rule. •Set of objects to be quantized is enlarged in order to include singular functions or distributions. •Are given illuminating examples like quantum angle and affine or wavelet quantization.

  11. AN EXAMPLE RELATED TO BRODY'S THEOREM ORG WINKELMANN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henri Poincaré -Nancy-Université, Université

    AN EXAMPLE RELATED TO BRODY'S THEOREM J  ORG WINKELMANN Abstract. We discuss an example related to the workshop in Freiburg in September 2003. 1 #12; 2 J  ORG WINKELMANN Bloch principle hold for the class

  12. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch...

  13. Leading by Example on Climate Change: Our New Federal Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leading by Example on Climate Change: Our New Federal Sustainability Plan Leading by Example on Climate Change: Our New Federal Sustainability Plan March 19, 2015 - 3:15pm Addthis...

  14. Examples, demos, drills, projects Getting it to happen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    Examples, demos, drills, projects Getting it to happen Challenges and struggles Teaching Statistics University 3 June 2005 Andrew Gelman Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks #12;Examples, demos, drills #12;Examples, demos, drills, projects Getting it to happen Challenges and struggles Themes Active

  15. TA Seminar 2006 Name . Grading Two Example Student Laboratory Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    TA Seminar 2006 Name . Page 1 Grading Two Example Student Laboratory Reports Introductory physics laboratory reports, students are provided the opportunity to learn about physics through written assignments the 2 example student laboratory reports. Mark down any and all comments on the example student

  16. Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Wide-Area Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Wide-Area Programming William Cook, Jayadev Misra, David Kitchin, Adrian Quark Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu #12;Overview Orc Notation Examples Outline Overview Orc Notation Examples #12;Overview Orc Notation

  17. Learning Linear Classifiers Sensitive to Example Dependent and Noisy Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brefeld, Ulf

    Learning Linear Classifiers Sensitive to Example Dependent and Noisy Costs Peter Geibel, Ulf costs into ac- count or allow only costs depending on the classes of the examples that are used for learning. As an extension of class dependent costs, we con- sider costs that are example, i.e. feature

  18. Carbonaceous aerosols are increasingly rec-ognized as an important atmospheric constituent.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sunlight strongly and almost uniformly across the solar spectrum. However,the graphite seldom is pure with time; as,for example,with the transition from household stoves to less polluting central heating

  19. Constituent-quark model description of triply heavy-baryon nonperturbative lattice QCD data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijande, J; Garcilazo, H

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides results for the spectra of triply charmed and bottom baryons based on a constituent quark model approach. We take advantage of the assumption that potential models are expected to describe triply heavy baryons to a similar degree of accuracy as the successful results obtained in the charmonium and bottomonium sectors. The high precision calculation of the ground state and positive and negative parity excited states recently reported by nonperturbative lattice QCD provides us with a unique opportunity to confront model predictions with data. This comparison may also help to build a bridge between two difficult to reconcile lattice QCD results, namely, the lattice SU(3) QCD static three-quark potential and the recent results of nonperturbative lattice QCD for the triply heavy-baryon spectra.

  20. Effect of potential Hanford ferrocyanide waste constituents on the reaction between ferrocyanide and nitrates/nitrites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Sell, R.L.

    1993-02-01

    During the 1950s, ferrocyanide- and nitrate-bearing wastes were produced at Hanford. A concern about continued safe storage and future treatment of these wastes has arisen because ferrocyanide and nitrate mixtures can explode when heated. Because of this concern, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory has performed experimental studies to determine the conditions needed to continue storing the wastes safely. In this paper, we present the results of our studies on the effects of other potential ferrocyanide waste constituents on the explosivity of mixtures of sodium nickel ferrocyanide and sodium nitrate and nitrite. In particular, this paper presents the results of investigations on the diluent effects of equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite, sodium nickel ferrocyanide, and sodium aluminate, and the catalyst or initiator effects of nickel sulfide.

  1. Constituent-quark model description of triply heavy-baryon nonperturbative lattice QCD data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Vijande; A. Valcarce; H. Garcilazo

    2015-07-14

    This paper provides results for the spectra of triply charmed and bottom baryons based on a constituent quark model approach. We take advantage of the assumption that potential models are expected to describe triply heavy baryons to a similar degree of accuracy as the successful results obtained in the charmonium and bottomonium sectors. The high precision calculation of the ground state and positive and negative parity excited states recently reported by nonperturbative lattice QCD provides us with a unique opportunity to confront model predictions with data. This comparison may also help to build a bridge between two difficult to reconcile lattice QCD results, namely, the lattice SU(3) QCD static three-quark potential and the recent results of nonperturbative lattice QCD for the triply heavy-baryon spectra.

  2. Optical methods and systems for detecting a constituent in a gas containing oxygen in harsh environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Michael A. (Scotia, NY); Sirinakis, George (Bronx, NY)

    2011-01-04

    A method for detecting a gas phase constituent such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen, or hydrocarbons in a gas comprising oxygen such as air, includes providing a sensing material or film having a metal embedded in a catalytically active matrix such as gold embedded in a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix. The method may include annealing the sensing material at about 900.degree. C., exposing the sensing material and gas to a temperature above 400.degree. C., projecting light onto the sensing material, and detecting a change in the absorption spectrum of the sensing material due to the exposure of the sensing material to the gas in air at the temperature which causes a chemical reaction in the sensing material compared to the absorption spectrum of the sensing material in the absence of the gas. Systems employing such a method are also disclosed.

  3. Method and apparatus for maintaining condensable constituents of a gas in a vapor phase during sample transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2010-05-18

    A system for fluid transport at elevated temperatures having a conduit having a fluid inlet end and a fluid outlet end and at least one heating element disposed within the conduit providing direct heating of a fluid flowing through the conduit. The system is particularly suited for preventing condensable constituents of a high temperature fluid from condensing out of the fluid prior to analysis of the fluid. In addition, operation of the system so as to prevent the condensable constituents from condensing out of the fluid surprisingly does not alter the composition of the fluid.

  4. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for redistribution. Example 69 6.01.02 Hazard Controls 1. Definition of the Work Characterization Walkdowns will be performed, as necessary, to supplement the existing...

  5. A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A Shining Example of Dr. Kings legacy Kathy Chambers Senior Science and Technical Information Specialist, OSTI Editor's Note: This blog was originally posted on OSTI's blog....

  6. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    will be required include procedure compliance, data management, data verification, and continuous process improvement. Example 65 9 Quality Assurance Strategy 9.1 Introduction A...

  7. Example of classification problems Formulating Support Vector Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page Jr., C. David

    discriminate between the two classes #12;Example: Credit Card Application Age (yrs) Income ($) Rent), we have to maximize the margin! VC dimension margin maximize the margin!mar

  8. Examples of integral domains inside power series rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract. We present examples of Noetherian and non-Noetherian integral do- ... over a Noetherian integral domain R and given a subfield L of the total quotient.

  9. Examples of the Zeroth Theorem of the History of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    examples, some of which are Avogadro’s number (6.022 × 10Loschmidt in 1865 (although Avogadro had found in 1811 that

  10. Example-Based Single-Image Super-Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Chih-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Frame Super-Resolution, Asian Conference on Computer VisionExample-based super-resolution. IEEE Computer Graphics andSuper-Resolution: A Benchmark, European Conference on Computer

  11. The University of North Carolina Wilmington is one of 17 constituent universities in the UNC system. We are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    about UNCW The University of North Carolina Wilmington is one of 17 constituent universities in the UNC system. We are located in southeastern North Carolina in the city of Wilmington, situated Environmental StudiesUniversity of North Carolina Wilmington "Dare to learn" - William Madison Randall 601 South

  12. On an example of genuine quantum chaos Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On an example of genuine quantum chaos M. Kuna Department of Physics Pedagogical College of S@halina.univ.gda.pl Abstract: The first example of a quantum system with the genuine quantum chaos is presented. PACS numbers the definition of ``quantum chaos''. Several defi­ nitions exist and their interconnections have not been fully

  13. Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

  14. Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Application Development over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Overview Orc Notation Examples Structured Application Development over Wide-Area Networks William of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu #12;Overview Orc Notation. - #12;Overview Orc Notation Examples Orchestrating Components (services) Acquire data from services

  15. Examples of Program Composition Illustrating the Use of Universal Properties ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charpentier, Michel

    of software modules in a repository such as the Web, where each module is published with its specification. An example of a universal property is ''the component is entirely dark colored.'' If we put entirely dark­colored components together we get entirely dark­colored (larger) components. An example of an existential property

  16. Templates and Examples — Statistics and Search Log Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  17. From constituent quarks to hadrons in course of nuclear matter expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. D. Chernavskaya; I. I. Royzen

    2002-01-13

    The up-dated three-phase concept of nuclear matter evolution in course of cooling down - from the phase of quark-qluon plasma (QGP) through the intermediate phase allowing for massive constituent quarks (valons), pions and kaons (QPK) to the phase of hadronic matter (H) - is exploited for the treatment of relative hadronic yields in the central region of heavy ion collisions. The most attention is paid to the description of the QPK-phase which is argued to be a gaseous one and lasts until the valonic spacing approaches the confinement radius (at the temperature about 110 MeV), when the valons start fusing to be locked, in the end, within the hadrons. The hadronic yields emerged from thermal treatment of QPK-phase and simple combinatorial approach to the hadronization process are shown to fit the available experimental data from AGS, SPS and RHIC quite well. This provides an alternative insight into the real origin of the observed relative hadronic yields which is (to a considerable extent) free of the well known puzzle inherent in some conventional models where the early chemical freeze-out is assumed: namely, why the gaseous thermal approach to actually tightly packed (even overlapping) hadrons seems workable? Many predictions for the other hadronic yields which could be observed at these machines as well as at LHC are given.

  18. Higher twists in polarized DIS and the size of the constituent quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander Sidorov; Christian Weiss

    2006-02-15

    The spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry implies the presence of a short-distance scale in the QCD vacuum, which phenomenologically may be associated with the ''size'' of the constituent quark, rho {approx} 0.3 fm. We discuss the role of this scale in the matrix elements of the twist-4 and 3 quark-gluon operators determining the leading power (1/Q{sup 2}-) corrections to the moments of the nucleon spin structure functions. We argue that the flavor-nonsinglet twist-4 matrix element, f{sub 2}{sup u-d}, has a sizable negative value of the order rho{sup -2}, due to the presence of sea quarks with virtualities {approx} rho{sup -2} in the proton wave function. The twist-3 matrix element, d{sub 2}, is not related to the scale rho{sup -2}. Our arguments support the results of previous calculations of the matrix elements in the instanton vacuum model. We show that this qualitative picture is in agreement with the phenomenological higher-twist correction extracted from an NLO QCD fit to the world data on g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup n}, which include recent data from the Jefferson Lab Hall A and COMPASS experiments. We comment on the implications of the short-distance scale rho for quark-hadron duality and the x-dependence of higher-twist contributions.

  19. Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

  20. Generating Example Data for Dataflow Programs Christopher Olston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olston, Christopher

    Blvd. Santa Clara, CA utkarsh@yahoo-inc.com ABSTRACT While developing data-centric programs, users example input data for data-centric programs. We focus on an important category of data-centric pro- grams

  1. Email Address: (For Example: Bachelor of Science in Architecture)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Email Address: (For Example: Bachelor of Science in Architecture) Date Degree Received: Did you receive Honor, High Honor, Highest Honor? Undergraduate Degrees: Enter your degree designator: Duplicate Diploma Request Form Georgia Institute of Technology PERSONAL INFORMATION Legal Name: PRINT FULL

  2. 163 SDSU Curriculum Guide 2010 COURSE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM --EXAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    163 SDSU Curriculum Guide 2010 COURSE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM -- EXAMPLES Course Classification of business and other machines; accounting, geography, foreign languages, home economics, psychology, library, cartography, audiovisual, mathematics, library science, police science. C-16 Science laboratories Laboratories

  3. DOE Leading by Example with Green Button, American Energy Data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE Leading by Example with Green Button, American Energy Data Challenge contest 4 Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central NickL's picture Submitted by NickL(127) Contributor 5...

  4. Advanced Semantic Search: The Medical World as an Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamir, Ron

    to be specific. · The example query "Which disease has the symptom of coughing?" brings a result set in hakia of coughing?" #12;20 4. Handling Concept Matching · Perhaps the most challenging functionality among all

  5. Terrestrial fate of coal-liquid constituents: behavior of alkyl anilines in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felice, L.J.; Zachara, J.M.; Rogers, J.E.

    1982-07-01

    The low molecular weight aromatic amines (anilines) are important water soluble constituents of coal liquids. The impact of anilines released to the terrestrial environment will largely depend on their mobility and persistence. Studies were conducted to investigate those processes governing the mobility and persistence of the alkylanilines, namely, soil sorption and chemical/microbial degradation. Soil sorption measurements were conducted on aniline and several methyl substituted anilines on A and B horizons of a soil profile collected from Davies County, Kentucky. The magnitude of sorption was large in all horizons. Sorption in the B horizons was larger than in the A horizon for many of the anilines studied, indicating the importance of both the mineral matrix and organic carbon content of the soil in determining the magnitude of sorption. Results of these measurements indicate that movement of the anilines through the soil would be significantly attenuated by sorption reactions. Aniline sorption measurement in the A horizon after removal of the organic matter and in the B/sub 22/ horizon after removal of amorphous iron oxides and crystalline iron oxides indicate that organic matter largely controls aniline sorption in the A horizon, while crystalline iron oxides and phyllosilicates are important in the B horizons. The effects of pH on aniline sorption was also examined and shown to have significant effects on the magnitude of sorption in both A and B horizons. Soil degradation studies using /sup 14/C-3-methylaniline as a model for alkyl aniline degradation show that 3-methylaniline is readily metabolized by soil microorganisms during the 32-day period examined.

  6. Groundwater transport modeling of constituents originating from the Burial Grounds Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, P.F.; Shupe, M.G.; Spalding, C.P. [GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (US)

    1992-10-30

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), operates a number of sites for the land disposal of various leachable radionuclide, organic, and inorganic wastes. Located within the General Separations Area (GSA) of SRS are the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) and the Old Burial Ground (OBG). A portion of the LLRWDF has been designated as the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF). The OBG began receiving waste in 1952 and was closed in 1974. Various wastes, including transuranic, intermediate and low level beta-gamma, and solvents, were received during this period of operation. In 1969, prior to the closing of the OBG, a portion of the MWMF/LLRWDF (the MWMF) began receiving waste. GeoTrans, Inc. was contracted by WSRC to conduct a numerical modeling study to assess groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vicinity of the MWMF in support of an Alternate Concentration Limits demonstration for the Part B permit. The project was divided into two phases: development of a groundwater flow model of the hydrogeologic system underlying the MWMF which includes the entire GSA, and development of a solute transport model to assess migration of 19 designated constituents of concern (COCs) over a period 30 years into the future. The first phase was completed in May of 1992 and the results documented in GeoTrans (1992). That report serves as the companion volume to the present contaminant transport modeling report. The transport study is intended to develop predictions of concentration and mass flux of the 19 COCs at downgradient exposure points over the 30 year period of interest. These results are to be used in human health and ecological risk assessments which are also being performed in support of the Part B permit.

  7. Stability of SiC-Matrix Microencapsulated Fuel Constituents at Relevant LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt A; Katoh, Yutai; Leonard, Keith J; Perez-Bergquist, Alex G; Silva, Chinthaka M; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses certain key feasibility issues facing the application of SiC-matrix microencapsulated fuels for light water reactor application. Issues addressed are the irradiation stability of the SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix under LWR-relevant irradiation conditions, the presence or extent of reaction of the SiC matrix with zirconium-based cladding, the stability of the inner and outer pyrolytic graphite layers of the microencapsulated (TRISO) particle at this uncharacteristically low irradiation temperature, and the state of the particle-matrix interface following irradiation which could possibly effect thermal transport. In the process of determining these feasibility issues microstructural evolution and change in dimension and thermal conductivity was studied. As a general finding the SiC matrix was found to be quite stable with behavior similar to that of CVD SiC. In magnitude the irradiation-induced swelling of the matrix material was slightly higher and irradiation-degraded thermal conductivity was slightly lower as compared to CVD SiC. No significant reaction of this SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix material with Zircaloy was observed. Irradiation of the TRISO in the 320-360 C range to a maximum dose of 7.7 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) did not have significant negative impact on the constituent layers of the TRISO fuel. At the highest dose studied layer structure and interface integrity remained essentially unchanged with good apparent thermal transport through the microsphere to the surrounding matrix.

  8. The influence of constituent properties on the compression behavior of graphite fiber reinforced composites containing geometric discontinuities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crane, David Lee

    1990-01-01

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE DECEMBER 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE INFLUENCE OF CONSTITUENT PROPERTIES ON THE COMPRESSION BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES CONTAINING... Committee: Walter L. Bradley This study addresses the compressive behavior of graphite fiber reinforced composites containing toughened matrices. The effect of thermoplastic and rubber particulate toughening mechanisms is evaluated utilizing four...

  9. Regional Examples of Geological Settings for Nuclear Waste Disposal in Deep Boreholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapiie, B.

    This report develops and exercises broad-area site selection criteria for deep boreholes suitable for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and/or its separated constituents. Three candidates are examined: a regional site in the ...

  10. Examples of OSUR Assisted Projects | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546Has Evidence ExampleExample

  11. Logistic maps General systems Motivating examples in dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climenhaga, Vaughn

    Logistic maps General systems Motivating examples in dynamical systems Vaughn Climenhaga University of Houston October 16, 2012 Vaughn Climenhaga (University of Houston) October 16, 2012 1 / 7 #12;Logistic #12;Logistic maps General systems The logistic map Logistic map: f (x) = x(1 - x) 0 4 x f(x) = 0

  12. FlowSort parameters elicitation based on classification examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    2014 Dimitri Van Asschea, , Yves De Smeta aComputer & Decision Engineering Department (CoDE), ´Ecole. The parameters of the GA will be optimized using the iRace procedure. We illustrate both the performances on multiple conflicting criteria. For instance, in the common example of buying a new car, you typically try

  13. Face Photo Retrieval by Sketch Example Hamed Kiani Galoogahi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Terence

    Face Photo Retrieval by Sketch Example Hamed Kiani Galoogahi School of Computing National University of Singapore Singapore, 117417 tsim@comp.nus.edu.sg ABSTRACT Face photo-sketch matching has of matching face photo and sketch is difference of visual characteristics between face photo and sketch which

  14. Plasticity and language: an example of the Baldwin effect?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirtes, Peter

    Plasticity and language: an example of the Baldwin effect? Kevin Zollman Department of Philosophy step in this direction. We examine a game-theoretic model of the interaction between plastic- ity, and Santiago Amaya for helpful suggestions. 1 #12;environmental circumstances. This phenotypic plasticity has

  15. An example in NQTHM: Ramsey's Theorem Matt Kaufmann \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Robert Stephen

    An example in NQTHM: Ramsey's Theorem Matt Kaufmann \\Lambda Computational Logic, Inc. 1717 W. 6th of Ramsey's Theorem for exponent 2 using the Boyer­Moore theorem prover. The presentation is intended. That is, I chronicle here the development of a mechanically­checked proof of the finite version of Ramsey

  16. Learning Hierarchical Shape Models from Examples Alex Levinshtein1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson,Sven

    is a Marr-like abstraction hierarchy, in which a shape feature at a coarser scale can be decomposed generic object models proposed by researchers such as Marr and Nishihara [11] and Brooks [10] not only the representation of objects at multiple scales, using an abstraction hierarchy. Marr's classical example of a human

  17. New examples of three-dimensional dilational materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graeme Walter Milton

    2015-04-29

    Two-dimensional dilational materials, for which the only easy mode of deformation is a dilation are reviewed and connections are drawn between models previously proposed in the literature. Some models which appear to be dilational materials, but which in fact are not, are also discussed. Finally, four new examples of three-dimensional dilational materials are given.

  18. Examples on Typesetting Commutative Diagrams Using X Y -pic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiao-Wu

    Examples on Typesetting Commutative Diagrams Using X Y -pic M. Alsani Edition 1 E-mail: alsani using X Y -pic's \\xymatrixf...g command which view commutative diagrams as \\matrix-like diagrams". The printout is an attempt to introduce the complete newcomer to X Y -pic. July 10, 2001 #12; Contents 1

  19. Systematic Editing: Generating Program Transformations from an Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinley, Kathryn S.

    Systematic Editing: Generating Program Transformations from an Example Na Meng Miryung Kim Kathryn the edit script to new program locations. To correctly encode a relative position of the edits in a new, but not identical, program changes to multiple contexts. Exist- ing tools for systematic program transformation

  20. Termination Checking: Comparing Structural Recursion and Sized Types by Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking: Comparing Structural Recursion and Sized Types by Examples David Thibodeau Decemer 3, 2011 Abstract Termination is an important property for programs and is necessary for formal proofs to make sense. In order to make sure that a program using recursion is terminating, one can use

  1. Assessment of turbulence by high-order statistics. Offshore example.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research University of Oldenburg, Germany 1 Summary OffshoreAssessment of turbulence by high-order statistics. Offshore example. Allan Morales Joachim Peinke. Keywords: Offshore turbulence. Intermittency. Tur- bulence Intensity. Log-Normal distributions. 2 Data sets

  2. Manufacturing time operators: Covariance, selection criteria, and examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegerfeldt, G. C. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, DE-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, ES-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    We provide the most general forms of covariant and normalized time operators and their probability densities, with applications to quantum clocks, the time of arrival, and Lyapunov quantum operators. Examples are discussed of the profusion of possible operators and their physical meaning. Criteria to define unique, optimal operators for specific cases are given.

  3. Manufacturing time operators: covariance, selection criteria, and examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. C. Hegerfeldt; J. G. Muga; J. Muñoz

    2010-05-27

    We provide the most general forms of covariant and normalized time operators and their probability densities, with applications to quantum clocks, the time of arrival, and Lyapunov quantum operators. Examples are discussed of the profusion of possible operators and their physical meaning. Criteria to define unique, optimal operators for specific cases are given.

  4. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  5. Threatened groundwater resources in rural India : an example of monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Threatened groundwater resources in rural India : an example of monitoring J. C. MARECHAL A,D , S.marechal@brgm.fr (corresponding author) B National Geophysical Research Institute, Indo-French Centre for Groundwater Research-French Centre for Groundwater Research, National Geophysical Research Institute, Uppal Road, 500 007 Hyderabad

  6. Dynamics of a relativistic Rankine vortex for a two-constituent superfluid in a weak perturbation of cylindrical symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Boisseau

    1999-01-18

    From a recent study of a stationary cylindrical solution for a relativistic two-constituent superfluid at low temperature limit, we propose to specify this solution under the form of a relativistic generalisation of a Rankine vortex (Potential vortex whose the core has a solid body rotation).Then we establish the dynamics of the central line of this vortex by supposing that the deviation from the cylindrical configuration is weak in the neighbourhood of the core of the vortex. In "stiff" material the Nambu-Goto equations are obtained.

  7. Modeling Constituent Redistribution in U-Pu-Zr Metallic Fuel Using the Advanced Fuel Performance Code BISON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Porter; Steve Hayes; Various

    2014-06-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) metallic fuels currently being tested have higher zirconium and plutonium concentrations than those tested in the past in EBR reactors. Current metal fuel performance codes have limitations and deficiencies in predicting AFC fuel performance, particularly in the modeling of constituent distribution. No fully validated code exists due to sparse data and unknown modeling parameters. Our primary objective is to develop an initial analysis tool by incorporating state-of-the-art knowledge, constitutive models and properties of AFC metal fuels into the MOOSE/BISON (1) framework in order to analyze AFC metallic fuel tests.

  8. High Q{sup 2} behavior of the electromagnetic form factors in the relativistic hypercentral constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.; Giannini, M. M.; De Sanctis, M.

    2010-12-15

    The ratio R{sub p} between the electric and magnetic proton form factors has been recently measured at Jefferson Lab up to Q{sup 2}=8.5 GeV{sup 2}. We have extended the calculation of the nucleon form factors with the hypercentral constituent quark model and compared them with the data on R{sub p} and on the Q{sup 2} behavior of the ratio Q{sup 2}F{sub 2}/F{sub 1}. In both cases, the theoretical curves agree with the experimental points.

  9. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  10. Excellence in Energy Awards: Military Academies Leading by Example |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 InfographiclighbulbsDepartmentDeveloping11, 20125EXAMPLE DOE FDepartment

  11. Background and Motivation Literature The Model Examples Summary Sustainable Supply Chain Network Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Background and Motivation Literature The Model Examples Summary Sustainable Supply Chain Network and Motivation Literature The Model Examples Summary Acknowledgments The first author's research was supported Sustainable Supply Chain Network Design #12;Background and Motivation Literature The Model Examples Summary

  12. Optimization Modelling Example Design Implementation Conclusions A Structure-Conveying Modelling Language for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grothey, Andreas

    Optimization Modelling Example Design Implementation Conclusions A Structure-Conveying Modelling Languages for Mathematical Programming 3 An example problem from network design 4 Design of Structured, K. Woodsend Structure-Conveying Modelling Language #12;Optimization Modelling Example Design

  13. Examples of complete solvability of 2D classical superintegrable systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willard Miller Jr.; Qiushi Li; Yuxuan Chen; Ernie G. Kalnins

    2015-05-04

    Classical (maximal) superintegrable systems in $n$ dimensions are Hamiltonian systems with $2n-1$ independent constants of the motion,globally defined,the maximum number possible.They are very special because they can be solved algebraically.In this paper we show explicitly,mostly through examples of 2nd order superintegrable systems in 2 dimensions,how the trajectories can be determined in detail using rather elementary algebraic,geometric and analytic methods applied to the closed quadratic algebra of symmetries of the system,without resorting to separation of variables techniques or trying to integrate Hamilton's equations.We treat a family of 2nd order degenerate systems: oscillator analogies on Darboux,nonzero constant curvature,and flat spaces,related to one another via contractions,and obeying Kepler's laws,and two 2nd order nondegenerate systems:an analogy of a caged Coulomb problem on the 2-sphere and its contraction to a Euclidean space caged Coulomb problem.In all cases the symmetry algebra structure provides detailed information about the trajectories.An interesting example is the occurrence of metronome orbits,trajectories confined to an arc rather than a loop,which are indicated clearly from the structure equations but might be overlooked using more traditional methods.We also treat the Post-Winternitz system,an example of a classical 4th order superintegrable system that cannot be solved using separation of variables.Finally we treat a superintegrable system,related to the addition theorem for elliptic functions,whose constants of the motion are only rational in the momenta,a system of special interest because its constants of the motion generate a closed polynomial algebra.This paper contains many new results but we have tried to present most of the material in a fashion that is easily accessible to nonexperts,in order to provide entree to superintegrablity theory.

  14. Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, S.; Goff, F.

    1997-04-01

    The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.

  15. Dynamics of quasi-stationary systems: Finance as an example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinn, Philip; Peinke, Joachim; Guhr, Thomas; Schäfer, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    We propose a combination of cluster analysis and stochastic process analysis to characterize high-dimensional complex dynamical systems by few dominating variables. As an example, stock market data are analyzed for which the dynamical stability as well as transitions between different stable states are found. This combined method also allows to set up new criteria for merging clusters to simplify the complexity of the system. The low-dimensional approach allows to recover the high-dimensional fixed points of the system by means of an optimization procedure.

  16. A method for Hamiltonian truncation: A four-wave example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viscondi, Thiago F; Morrison, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    A method for extracting finite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems from a class of 2+1 Hamiltonian mean field theories is presented. These theories possess noncanonical Poisson brackets, which normally resist Hamiltonian truncation, but a process of beatification by coordinate transformation near a reference state is described in order to perturbatively overcome this difficulty. Two examples of four-wave truncation of Euler's equation for scalar vortex dynamics are given and compared: one a direct nonHamiltonian truncation of the equations of motion, the other obtained by beatifying the Poisson bracket and then truncating.

  17. Evaluation of plant life extension modifications; A condenser retubing example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lula, J.J.; Kostyk, D.A.; Franceschinis, R.D. (Fluor Daniel, Inc., Chicago, IL (US))

    1989-01-01

    An integral part of plant life extension programs is the development of an implementation plan for the modifications identified during the study phase. A systematic approach for evaluating these modifications and making timing decisions is needed. A methodology must be used to identify and quantify important factors and assign economic parameters to these factors to provide a common basis for an overall evaluation. The development of a cash flow schedule from this analysis provides the technique for quantifying the total value of a modification and also can be used to determine the effect of installation timing. To illustrate this evaluation methodology, a condenser retubing example is presented.

  18. Workplace Charging Toolkit: Example Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 -Energy CostsEnergy City ofPlug-in ElectricExample

  19. Microsoft Word - Appendix B - Example Contact Record.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E HGroundwater OLF0Example

  20. Example Cleanup: Removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Hillside 140

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8) Wigner HomeExample Cleanup Removal of

  1. Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector Better Buildings Neighborhood...

  2. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  3. Effect of potential waste constituents on the reactivity of Hanford ferrocyanide wastes: Diluent, catalyst, and initiator studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, R.D.; Johnston, J.W.; Tingey, J.M.; Burger, L.L.; Sell, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    During the 1980s, scientists at the Hanford Site began considering disposal options for wastes in underground storage tanks. As a result of safety concerns, it was determined that special consideration should be given to ferrocyanide-bearing wastes to ensure their continued safe storage. In addition, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) chartered Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the conditions necessary for vigorous reactions to occur in the Hanford Site ferrocyanide wastes. As part of those studies, PNL has evaluated the effects of selected potential waste constituents to determine how they might affect the reactivity of the wastes. The authors` investigations of the diluent, catalytic, or initiating effects of potential waste constituents included studies (1) to determine the effect of the oxidant-to-ferrocyanide ratio, (2) to establish the effect of sodium aluminate concentration, (3) to identify materials that could affect the explosivity of a mixture of sodium nickel ferricyanide (a potential aging product of ferrocyanide) and sodium nitrate and nitrite, (4) and to determine the effect of nickel sulfide concentration. They also conducted a thermal sensitivity study and analyzed the results to determine the relative behaviors of sodium nickel ferrocyanide and ferricyanide. A statistical evaluation of the time-to-explosion (TTX) test results from the catalyst and initiator screening study found that the ferricyanide reacted at a faster rate than did the ferrocyanide analog. The thermal analyses indicated that the ferricyanide form is more thermally sensitive, exhibiting exothermic behavior at a lower temperature than the ferrocyanide form. The increased thermal sensitivity of the ferricyanide, which is a potential oxidation product of ferrocyanide, relative to the ferrocyanide analog, does not support the hypothesis that aging independent of the reaction pathway will necessarily reduce the reaction hazard of ferrocyanide wastes.

  4. Several organic parameters on underlying hazardous constituents list can not be measured at the universal treatment standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, H.C.

    1998-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has several permitted treatment, storage and disposal facilities. The INEEL Sample Management Office (SMO) conducts all analysis subcontracting activities for Department of Energy Environmental Management programs at the INEEL. In this role, the INEEL SMO has had the opportunity to subcontract the analyses of various wastes (including ash from an interim status incinerator) requesting a target analyte list equivalent to the constituents listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations. These analyses are required to ensure that treated wastes do not contain underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) at concentrations greater than the universal treatment standards (UTS) prior to land disposal. The INEEL SMO has conducted a good-faith effort by negotiating with several commercial laboratories to identify the lowest possible quantitation and detection limits that can be achieved for the organic UHC analytes. The results of this negotiating effort has been the discovery that no single laboratory (currently under subcontract with the INEEL SMO) can achieve a detection level that is within an order of magnitude of the UTS for all organic parameters on a clean sample matrix (e.g., sand). This does not mean that there is no laboratory that can achieve the order of magnitude requirements for all organic UHCs on a clean sample matrix. The negotiations held to date indicate that it is likely that no laboratory can achieve the order of magnitude requirements for a difficult sample matrix (e.g., an incinerator ash). The authors suggest that the regulation needs to be revised to address the disparity between what is achievable in the laboratory and the regulatory levels required by the UTS.

  5. Examples of molecular self-assembly at surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Whitelam

    2014-12-05

    The self-assembly of molecules at surfaces can be caused by a range of physical mechanisms. Assembly can be driven by intermolecular forces, or molecule-surface forces, or both; it can result in structures that are in equilibrium or that are kinetically trapped. Here we review examples of self-assembly at surfaces that have been studied within the User program of the Molecular Foundry at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, focusing on a physical understanding of what causes patterns seen in experiment. Some apparently disparate systems can be described in similar physical terms, indicating that simple factors -- such as the geometry and energy scale of intermolecular binding -- are key to understanding the self-assembly of those systems.

  6. Field examples of electrical resistivity changes during steamflooding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansure, A.J. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Meldau, R.F.; Weyland, H.V.

    1993-03-01

    An essential part of using electrical geodiagnostic techniques to map thermal recovery processes is understanding the relationship between the process and the formation resistivity. This paper shows how the relationship used to interpret electrical well logs can be used to understand steamflood resistivity changes. Examples are presented of data from steamfloods in fields with different reservoir characteristics. Included is a typical heavy-oil steamflood (Kern River field) and a steamflood where fresh water is used for the steam generator feedwater (Elk Hills field). Because of differences in reservoir characteristics, changes in resistivity vary from reservoir to reservoir. The information presented include well logs taken before and after steamflooding and petrophysical measurements sufficient to determine the factors that controlled the resistivity changes in each field.

  7. Lessons & Examples for Establishing Partnerships Between Grantees & Financial Institutions (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript of the webinar, "Lessons & Examples for Establishing Partnerships Between Grantees & Financial Institutions."

  8. Part XI. University of North Carolina Policy Manual and the UNC Code As a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina, East Carolina University is subject to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalakrishnan, K.

    Part XI. University of North Carolina Policy Manual and the UNC Code As a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina, East Carolina University is subject to the policies in the University of North Carolina Policy Manual, which contains the Code of the Board of Governors of the University of North

  9. Notional Examples and Benchmark Aspects Of a Resilient Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig. G. Rieger

    2010-08-01

    Digital control system technology has pervaded most industries, leading to improvements in the efficiency and reliability of the associated operations. However, the ease of distributing and connecting related control systems for the purposes of increasing performance has resulted in interdependencies that can lead to unexpected conditions. Even with less complex designs, operators and engineers alike are often left with competing goals that are difficult to resolve. A fundamental reason for this dichotomy is that responsibilities lie with different disciplines, and operations are hosted on separate control systems. In addition, with the rising awareness of cyber security and diverse human interactions with control systems, an understanding of human actions from a malicious and benevolent standpoint is necessary. Resilience considers the multiple facets of requirements that drive the performance of control systems in a holistic fashion, whether they are security or stability, stability or efficiency, human interactions or complex interdependencies. As will be shown by example, current research philosophies lack the depth or the focus on the control system application to satisfy these requirements, such as graceful degradation of hierarchical control while under cyber attack. A resilient control system promises to purposefully consider these diverse requirements, developing an adaptive capacity to complex events that can lead to failure of traditional control system designs.

  10. Example Work Domain Analysis for a Reference Sodium Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugo, Jacques; Oxstrand, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear industry is currently designing and building a new generation of reactors that will include different structural, functional, and environmental aspects, all of which are likely to have a significant impact on the way these plants are operated. In order to meet economic and safety objectives, these new reactors will all use advanced technologies to some extent, including new materials and advanced digital instrumentation and control systems. New technologies will affect not only operational strategies, but will also require a new approach to how functions are allocated to humans or machines to ensure optimal performance. Uncertainty about the effect of large scale changes in plant design will remain until sound technical bases are developed for new operational concepts and strategies. Up-to-date models and guidance are required for the development of operational concepts for complex socio-technical systems. This report describes how the classical Work Domain Analysis method was adapted to develop operational concept frameworks for new plants. This adaptation of the method is better able to deal with the uncertainty and incomplete information typical of first-of-a-kind designs. Practical examples are provided of the systematic application of the method in the operational analysis of sodium-cooled reactors. Insights from this application and its utility are reviewed and arguments for the formal adoption of Work Domain Analysis as a value-added part of the Systems Engineering process are presented.

  11. Future waste treatment and energy systems – examples of joint scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Münster, M., E-mail: maem@dtu.dk [System Analysis Division, DTU Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Finnveden, G. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Department of Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research – fms, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Wenzel, H. [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Allé 1, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Approach for use of scenarios dealing with both waste management and energy issues. • Overall scenarios for the common project and sub-scenarios in parts of the project. • Combining different types of scenarios to the tools of different disciplines. • Use of explorative external scenarios based on marginals for consequential LCA. - Abstract: Development and use of scenarios for large interdisciplinary projects is a complicated task. This article provides practical examples of how it has been carried out in two projects addressing waste management and energy issues respectively. Based on experiences from the two projects, recommendations are made for an approach concerning development of scenarios in projects dealing with both waste management and energy issues. Recommendations are given to develop and use overall scenarios for the project and leave room for sub-scenarios in parts of the project. Combining different types of scenarios is recommended, too, in order to adapt to the methods and tools of different disciplines, such as developing predictive scenarios with general equilibrium tools and analysing explorative scenarios with energy system analysis tools. Furthermore, as marginals identified in differing future background systems determine the outcomes of consequential life cycle assessments (LCAs), it is considered advisable to develop and use explorative external scenarios based on possible marginals as a framework for consequential LCAs. This approach is illustrated using an on-going Danish research project.

  12. UTIS as one example of standardization of subsea intervention systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugen, F.G.

    1995-12-31

    The number of diverless subsea interventions has increased dramatically during the last few years. A number of types of tools and equipment have been designed and used. A typical procedure has been to develop new intervention tools under each new contract based on experience from the previous project. This is not at all optimal with regard to project cost and risk, and is no longer acceptable as the oil industry now calls for cost savings within all areas of field development. One answer to the problem will be to develop universal intervention systems with the capability to perform a range of related tasks, with only minor, planned modifications of the system. This philosophy will dramatically reduce planning, engineering, construction and interface work related to the intervention operation as the main work will be only to locate a standardized landing facility on the subsea structure. The operating procedures can be taken ``off the shelf``. To adapt to this philosophy within the tie-in area, KOS decided to standardize on a Universal Tie-In System (UTIS), which will be included in a Tool Pool for rental world-wide. This paper describes UTIS as a typical example of standardization of subsea intervention systems. 16 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.; Mansure, A.J.

    1997-08-26

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recovery, transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products. 7 figs.

  14. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal mircrobalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recover transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products.

  15. Examples of backreaction of small scale inhomogeneities in cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen R. Green; Robert M. Wald

    2013-06-19

    In previous work, we introduced a new framework to treat large scale backreaction effects due to small scale inhomogeneities in general relativity. We considered one-parameter families of spacetimes for which such backreaction effects can occur, and we proved that, provided the weak energy condition on matter is satisfied, the leading effect of small scale inhomogeneities on large scale dynamics is to produce a traceless effective stress-energy tensor that itself satisfies the weak energy condition. In this work, we illustrate the nature of our framework by providing two explicit examples of one-parameter families with backreaction. The first, based on previous work of Berger, is a family of polarized vacuum Gowdy spacetimes on a torus, which satisfies all of the assumptions of our framework. As the parameter approaches its limiting value, the metric uniformly approaches a smooth background metric, but spacetime derivatives of the deviation of the metric from the background metric do not converge uniformly to zero. The limiting metric has nontrivial backreaction from the small scale inhomogeneities, with an effective stress-energy that is traceless and satisfies the weak energy condition, in accord with our theorems. Our second one-parameter family consists of metrics which have a uniform Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker limit. This family satisfies all of our assumptions with the exception of the weak energy condition for matter. In this case, the limiting metric has an effective stress-energy tensor which is not traceless. We emphasize the importance of imposing energy conditions on matter in studies of backreaction.

  16. Seismic expressions of Monterey Formation diagenesis: examples from offshore California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, M.B.

    1988-03-01

    Diagenesis of the diatomaceous rocks in the Monterey Formation in California coastal and offshore basins involves changes from amorphous biogenic silica to a stable crystalline quartz facies. In the intermediate stage, the transformation undergoes passage from the Opal-A to the Opal-CT phase. Associated with this diagenetic process is a marked increase in bulk densities between the different silica phases, owing to loss of porosity from compaction and solution recrystallization caused by increase in burial load and other physical factors. The sharp density contrast between the silica phases is manifested by an acoustic impedance boundary that may be expressed on seismic records. This seismic event can be distinct and independent of structural configuration, and in many places cuts through stratigraphic boundaries. Several examples of seismic records from offshore California demonstrate the diagenetically caused reflection cutting through Monterey and post-Monterey formations. Current and future exploration efforts in offshore California will continue to center on the widespread Monterey Formation. In addition to being the main source rock, the Monterey is also the reservoir rock. Recent discoveries indicate that oil production is mainly from the highly permeable, fractured, silica-rich sections. It is therefore important to recognize the diagenetic boundaries on seismic records and to delineate the more brittle quartz-rich facies where the reservoir quality is expected to be better than the intermediate Opal-A or Opal-CT facies. Furthermore, these boundaries could also provide good diagenetic traps off the flanks of structures where updip unaltered impermeable rocks hinder fluid migration.

  17. Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, Marcus Bianchi

    2010-08-01

    This document provides an example procedure for establishing acceptance-range criteria to assess results from software undergoing BESTEST-EX. This example method for BESTEST-EX is a modified version of the method described in HERS BESTEST.

  18. Contributions Motivation Literature Models Synergy Measure Numerical Examples Conclusions Supply Chain Network Models for Humanitarian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Contributions Motivation Literature Models Synergy Measure Numerical Examples Conclusions Supply Motivation Literature Models Synergy Measure Numerical Examples Conclusions 1 Contributions 2 Motivation 3 University of Massachusetts Amherst #12;Contributions Motivation Literature Models Synergy Measure Numerical

  19. Motivations Problem Formulation Main Results Example Conclusions Robust H Control for Model-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng

    Motivations Problem Formulation Main Results Example Conclusions Robust H Control for Model Formulation Main Results Example Conclusions Outline 1 Motivations Networked Control Systems Our Novelty 2 Problem Formulation NCS Configuration NCS Dynamics 3 Main Results Robust Stochastic Stability Synthesis

  20. Example Summary Research Plan Extracted from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Example Summary Research Plan 2007-2013 Extracted from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council.................................................................................................... 15 (11) Human Development .......................................................................................... 16 i #12;Example Summary Research Plan, 2007-2013 I. Introduction For 25 years, the Northwest Power

  1. Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program: Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector, May 10, 2012: A discussion of business models and case examples for working with the real estate...

  2. Using Vital Sensors in Mobile Healthcare Business Applications Challenges, Examples, Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Using Vital Sensors in Mobile Healthcare Business Applications Challenges, Examples, Lessons, Android, Smart Mobile Device, Healthcare, Vital Signs, Mobile Business Application. Abstract: Today, sensors are increasingly used for data collection. In the medical domain, for example, vital signs (e

  3. Basic definitions and first examples The main result and its proof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuske, Dietrich

    Basic definitions and first examples The main result and its proof Concluding remarks Finite of November 2011 Lutz H. Strüngmann FAP Groups #12;Basic definitions and first examples The main result and its proof Concluding remarks Contents 1 Basic definitions and first examples 2 The main result and its

  4. Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions A Simple Example of Transmission Congestion #12 Example of Transmission Congestion #12;Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply of Transmission Congestion #12;Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical

  5. GEOPHYSICAL INVERSION IN AN INTEGRATED EXPLORATION PROGRAM: EXAMPLES FROM THE SAN NICOL AS DEPOSIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    GEOPHYSICAL INVERSION IN AN INTEGRATED EXPLORATION PROGRAM: EXAMPLES FROM THE SAN NICOL ´AS DEPOSIT information to the explorationist. This thesis examines the role geophysical inversion can assume in an integrated explo- ration program, and the impact it can have on the results. As an example, geophysical data

  6. Industrial Solid-State Energy Harvesting: Mechanisms and Examples Matthew Kocoloski, Carnegie Mellon University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    Industrial Solid-State Energy Harvesting: Mechanisms and Examples Matthew Kocoloski, Carnegie the potential for solid-state energy harvesting in industrial applications. In contrast to traditional heat in an industrial application. The example considers energy harvesting from a furnace at a glass manufacturing

  7. Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example example of Yellowstone National Park indi- cate that the diversity of microbial life at the geothermal temperatures. The geothermal subsurface-surface interface in the presence of both electron donors and acceptors

  8. DataONE Example NSF Data Management Plan www.dataone.org 2011 DataONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ONE Example Data Management Plan, based on the work of C.D. Keeling and Colleagues,4]. In addition to the CO2 data, we will record weather data (wind speed and directionDataONE Example NSF Data Management Plan www.dataone.org © 2011 Data

  9. September 1999 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 Examples of polynomial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    1 September 1999 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 Examples of polynomial interpolation For simplicity, we polynomial using the Newton basis. September 1999 Dianne P. O'Leary 2 Formulas Given the four conditions (z01,...,zk])/(z0-zk) . September 1999 Dianne P. O'Leary 3 Example: Suppose that we want p(1) = -5 z0

  10. Modeling pedestrian flows in train stations: The example of Lausanne railway station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    Modeling pedestrian flows in train stations: The example of Lausanne railway station Flurin S, April 15 ­ 17, 2015 #12;Modeling pedestrian flows in train stations: The example of Lausanne railway Engineering EPFL ­ Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Modeling pedestrian flows in train stations

  11. Figure 1. Example Current Weather Product INTEGRATING REAL-TIME WEATHER INTO AN INTERNET LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelmson, Robert

    Figure 1. Example Current Weather Product INTEGRATING REAL-TIME WEATHER INTO AN INTERNET LEARNING ENVIRONMENT: WW2010 CURRENT WEATHER PRODUCTS Daniel J. Bramer, David P. Wojtowicz, Joel Plutchak, Robert B ­ is that accurate, useful, and if possible, real-life examples of weather phenomena are necessary to best enhance

  12. TCMS Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BPA - Firm NT BPA Direct Connect Load Figure 2 BPA - Secondary NT BPA Figure 3 3 rd Party - Firm PTP BPA - NT (Firm or Secondary) BPA 3 rd Party Transferor Transfer Load Figure 5...

  13. ACML Example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News BelowAsked toUSC-Aiken,AUii ABSTRACT4

  14. TCMS Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With LivermoreSustainable Landmimic keySystemssystemso TABLESArchived

  15. GSL Example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERAL ASSIGNMENT KNOW09-001.doc Crane ALTD Math

  16. Commodity Money Equilibrium in a Walrasian Trading Post Model: An Elementary Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STARR, ROSS M

    2005-01-01

    that the existence of money poses to the theorist is this:This pattern of trade poses a problem. It is not anin a Walrasian Trading Post Model: An Elementary Example

  17. Mengerian Saleableness and Commodity Money in a Walrasian Trading Post Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starr, Ross M.

    2008-01-01

    Money in a Walrasian Trading Post Example Ross M. Starr ?commodity-pairwise trading posts and transac- tion costs,C62, E40 Keywords: trading post, transaction cost, commodity

  18. Commodity Money Equilibrium in a Walrasian Trading Post Model: An Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starr, Ross M.

    2006-01-01

    that the existence of money poses to the theorist is this:This pattern of trade poses a problem. It is not anin a Walrasian Trading Post Model: An Elementary Example BY

  19. The Coffee Robot: An Example of Ubiquitous Computing Tomoko Koda / Sara Elo / Bradley Rhodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . It is an example of ubiquitous computing achieved by adding sensors to a household appliance. The Coffee Robot stages: by enabling currently passive objects to detect and transmit information about their status

  20. Learning from one example in machine vision by sharing probability densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Erik G. (Erik Gundersen)

    2002-01-01

    Human beings exhibit rapid learning when presented with a small number of images of a new object. A person can identify an object under a wide variety of visual conditions after having seen only a single example of that ...

  1. Statistical meta modeling of computer experiments Kriging as the main tool: two examples of computer experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Su-Yun

    factors · Simulation codes with calibration parameters 8 #12;Example: Designing Cellular Heat Exchangers in Qian et al. (2006, ASME) Related to the autoregressive model in Kennedy and O'Hagan (2000) · x = (x1

  2. Elemental Teleology and an Interpretation of the Rainfall Example in Physics 2.8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinlaw, Caleb

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an interpretation of the rainfall example in which Aristotle does not himself think that crop growth is the final cause of rain. The grounds for this interpretation will be an ‘elemental teleology’ ...

  3. On the "counter-example" in the article "Max -controlled siphons for liveness of S3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reveliotis, Spiridon "Spyros"

    On the "counter-example" in the article "Max -controlled siphons for liveness of S3 PGR2 characterization of the S3PGR2 nets by means of the structural object of deadly marked siphon, are correct

  4. Model selection as a tool for phylogeographic inference: an example from the willow Salix melanopsis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Jack

    Model selection as a tool for phylogeographic inference: an example from the willow Salix in order to infer the phylogeographic history of Salix melan- opsis, a riparian willow with a disjunct

  5. Catching Paul Revere, An Example Of The Analysis Of A Social Network.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    of Mathematics New Mexico Tech Socorro, NM 87801 borchers@nmt.edu #12;Social Network Analysis A social network of interactions on the internet. For example, the Facebook social network has billions of nodes and edges. #12

  6. Visualization of 3D Geologic maps: an example using volumetric clipping with hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caumon, Guillaume

    Visualization of 3D Geologic maps: an example using volumetric clipping with hardware Guillaume is never explicitly computed in three-dimensions, but filled by graphics hardware in screen space using

  7. Sorption of selected volatile organic constituents of jet fuels and solvents on natural sorbents from gas and solutions phases. Final report, April 1985-September 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, P.S.; Rhue, R.D.; Johnson, C.T.; Oguada, R.A.

    1988-08-01

    Sorption of selected volatile organic constituents (VOC) of jet fuels and solvents on several natural sorbents from the gas and aqueous phases was investigated. The sorbates studied were: trans-1,2-dichloroethylene; 1,2-dichloroethane; trichloroethylene; 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane; toluene; ethylbenzene; p-xylene; o-xylene; and cyclohexane. The sorbents used included clays (kaolin, montmorillonite, SAz-1), soils (Webster and Oldsmar), and aquifer materials (Borden and Lula). Sorption from the vapor phase was studied using three techniques; the headspace analysis method, dynamic-flow method, and a gas chromatographic method. Sorption of VOC on anhydrous sorbents and sorbents in equilibrium with water at different relative humidities was examined. The energetics of sorption were characterized by measuring VOC sorption at several temperatures.

  8. Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment Indices Link Importance Numerical Examples Summary Environmental Impact Assessment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Examples Summary Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links in an Era S. Nagurney Environmental Impact Assessment Indices #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Networks The Environmental Impact Assessment Indices 5 Link Importance Identification and Ranking 6 Numerical Examples 7

  9. Investigating the Selection of Example Sentences for Unknown Target Words in ICALL Reading Texts for L2 German 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segler, Thomas M.

    2007-06-26

    This thesis considers possible criteria for the selection of example sentences for difficult or unknown words in reading texts for students of German as a Second Language (GSL). The examples are intended to be provided ...

  10. Non-AdS holography in 3-dimensional higher spin gravity - General recipe and example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Afshar; M. Gary; D. Grumiller; R. Rashkov; M. Riegler

    2012-11-16

    We present the general algorithm to establish the classical and quantum asymptotic symmetry algebra for non-AdS higher spin gravity and implement it for the specific example of spin-3 gravity in the non-principal embedding with Lobachevsky (H^2xR) boundary conditions. The asymptotic symmetry algebra for this example consists of a quantum W_3^2 (Polyakov-Bershadsky) and an affine u(1) algebra. We show that unitary representations of the quantum W_3^2 algebra exist only for two values of its central charge, the trivial c=0 "theory" and the simple c=1 theory.

  11. 1999,2001 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 An Example of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    1 1999,2001 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 An Example of Gauss Elimination Original matrix: 4 4 8 2 8 7 1 3 6 1999,2001 Dianne P. O'Leary 2 An Example of Gauss Elimination 4 4 8 2 8 7 1 3 6 4 4 8 0 6 3 0 2 4 Original matrix: Step 1: Put zeros in first column -1/2 I + II: -1/4 I + III: I II III 1999,2001 Dianne P

  12. Using reflection techniques for flexible problem solving with examples from diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Teije, Annette

    Using reflection techniques for flexible problem solving with examples from diagnosis Annette ten problem solving consists of the dynamic selection and configurationof problem solving methods for a particular prob­ lem type, depending on the particular problem and the goal of problem solving. In this paper

  13. Functions in C The concept of a function is a fundamental idea in mathematics. For example,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, John

    be either defined by the programmer or pre-defined as part of a system library. First, we look at examples from the C system libraries. 1 Then: how to define your own functions. Programming with Libraries · No "components" are stored in a software library from whichp y they can be retrieved and incorporated into new

  14. Online Appendix with an Additional Example for Subjective Auxiliary State for Coarse-Grained Concurrency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanevski, Aleksandar

    .nanevski}@imdea.org 1. Buffer Library and Producer/Consumer Client To illustrate separate verification of a library and its client, we adapt another classic example due to Owicki and Gries. The library is a one arrays have identical contents. 1.1 Buffer Library The buffer library BufferLib (Figure 1, left) provides

  15. 1 Problem Solving: How do you do it? Classic example is the Tower of Hanoi problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Randall C.

    1 Problem Solving: How do you do it? Classic example is the Tower of Hanoi problem: Initial State state. 3 Problem Solving Heuristics Brute force search: explore entire problem space. Hill climbing away from the goal for a bit, it will eventually solve the problem. This is a problem for people too

  16. SALD 18A: JMP examples for one-sample t-test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    SALD 18A: JMP examples for one-sample t-test #12;Introduction Notes #12;DO NOT COPY Copyright calculation in JMP To perform a one-sample t-test, select from the data table main menu Analyze 18A-8 To perform a one-sample t-test in JMP, first perform a distribution analysis Under Select

  17. ADVECTION OF METHANE IN THE HYDRATE ZONE: MODEL, ANALYSIS AND EXAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADVECTION OF METHANE IN THE HYDRATE ZONE: MODEL, ANALYSIS AND EXAMPLES MALGORZATA PESZYNSKA, RALPH for the advective-diffusive trans- port of methane in liquid phase through sediment with the accompanying formation and disso- lution of methane hydrate. This free-boundary problem has a unique generalized solution in L1

  18. Lecture 01 -Supplement: Examples of Modeling ## age elevation length mass sex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotella, Jay J.

    .87701 9.21 5.3e-11 *** ## age 1.50580 0.05214 28.88 .93 9.2e-11 *** ## age 1.50638 0.05306 28.39 Lecture 01 - Supplement: Examples of Modeling Approaches A dataset head(d) ## age elevation length

  19. Computing over Networks: An Illustrated Example Bernd Bruegge, Hiroshi Nishikawa, Peter Steenkiste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steenkiste, Peter

    to interactively monitor their 2. Simulating the Air Pollution in Los Angeles application, to show the behavior simulation program is an simulating the air pollution in Los Angeles, to illustrate example of a medium. Introduction program that tracks pollutant particles in the atmosphere of the Los Angeles area to Nectar

  20. Motivations Problem Formulation Main Results Numerical Example Conclusions On Separation Principle for a Class of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng

    Motivations Problem Formulation Main Results Numerical Example Conclusions On Separation Principle, U.K. 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, 2009 #12;Motivations Problem Formulation Main 2 Problem Formulation NCS Configuration NCS Close-Loop Dynamics 3 Main Results Separation Principle

  1. Legal Challenges in Government Imposition of Water Conservation: The Kansas Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peck, John C.

    2014-08-08

    This article deals with legal challenges in conserving water in the United States, using Kansas as an example. The focus is on one aspect of American water allocation law—the extent to which a state can force reductions in pumping by holders...

  2. Origins of non-equilibrium lithium isotopic fractionation in xenolithic peridotite minerals: Examples from Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    : Examples from Tanzania Sonja Aulbach , Roberta L. Rudnick Geochemistry Laboratory, Department of Geology metasomatised peridotite xenoliths from three lithospheric mantle sectionsbeneath theEast African Rift inTanzania, if the samples were erupted in lavas. In Tanzania, the peridotites experienced rift-related heating prior

  3. Eukaryotic microbes, species recognition and the geographic limits of species: examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eukaryotic microbes, species recognition and the geographic limits of species: examples from of eukaryotic microbes, the Fungi. We show that inferred geographic range of a fungal species depends upon structure (Finlay & Fenchel 2004). Finlay & Fenchel's claim of global ranges for eukaryotic microbes echoes

  4. Dating of Sand Dunes Using Cosmogenic Chlorine-36: An Example From the Nebraska Sand Hills, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    Dating of Sand Dunes Using Cosmogenic Chlorine-36: An Example From the Nebraska Sand Hills, USA Stephen Moysey, Marek Zreda and Jim Goeke The large-scale mobility of sand dunes in continental dune of the history of a dune field can therefore, provide a proxy climate record derived from the continental plains

  5. Hybrid Rule-Based Example-Based MT: Feeding Apertium with Sub-sentential Translation Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Way, Andy

    Hybrid Rule-Based ­ Example-Based MT: Feeding Apertium with Sub-sentential Translation Units Felipe S´anchez-Mart´inez Mikel L. Forcada Andy Way Dept. Llenguatges i Sistemes Inform`atics Universitat University Dublin 9, Ireland {mforcada,away}@computing.dcu.ie Abstract This paper describes a hybrid machine

  6. Stimulated particle emission --a simple example. Christopher King (1) and Roger Waxler (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8/20/1997 Stimulated particle emission -- a simple example. Christopher King (1) and Roger Waxler emission in a simple model of the atom plus radiation system, namely a two state atom inter­ acting that stimulated emission does occur for certain initial photon states, but only at quadratic order in the rescaled

  7. Safety Analysis of an Airbag System using Probabilistic FMEA and Probabilistic Counter Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leue, Stefan

    Safety Analysis of an Airbag System using Probabilistic FMEA and Probabilistic Counter Examples Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a technique to reason about possible system hazards that result from system or system component failures. Traditionally, FMEA does not take the probabilities

  8. The Use of Java in High Performance Computing: A Data Mining Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, David W.

    The Use of Java in High Performance Computing: A Data Mining Example David Walker and Omer Rana in high performance computing is discussed with particular reference to the efforts of the Java Grande Java, Parallel Computing, Neu­ ral Networks, Distributed Objects 1 Introduction High performance

  9. R and Data Mining: Examples and Case Studies1 2 Yanchang Zhao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    R and Data Mining: Examples and Case Studies1 2 Yanchang Zhao yanchangzhao@gmail.com http://www.RDataMining for Data Mining. #12;Contents List of Figures v List of Tables vii List of Abbreviations ix 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Data Mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1

  10. A Learnable Class of CCGs from Typed Examples DANIELA DUDAU-SOFRONIE, ISABELLE TELLIER, MARC TOMMASI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tellier, Isabelle

    , MARC TOMMASI 1.1 Introduction Categorial Grammars are well known lexicalized formalisms, often used). Chapter 1, Copyright c 2003, Daniela Dudau-Sofronie, Isabelle Tellier, Marc Tommasi . #12;A Learnable Class of CCGs from Typed Examples: Daniela Dudau-Sofronie, Isabelle Tellier, Marc Tommasi2 entities

  11. Cellulose Biodegradation Models; An Example of Cooperative Interactions in Structured Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroshnikov, Alexey

    Cellulose Biodegradation Models; An Example of Cooperative Interactions in Structured Populations Pierre-Emmanuel Jabin Alexey Miroshnikov Robin Young Abstract We introduce various models for cellulose the structure of the cellulose chains and are allowed to depend on the phenotypical traits of the population

  12. The lethal fighting of larvae in many parasitoid species is a striking example of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayhew, Peter

    The lethal fighting of larvae in many parasitoid species is a striking example of sibling rivalry. Theory has suggested that such fighting, and subsequent solitary development, might be irreversible larvae, with the retention of fighting behaviour, is one way to escape the trap of solitary development

  13. Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data Table G.1 gives data it is possible that some manufacturer's subsidies might be hidden in the quoted capital costs. Table G.1 Data) CT Use of cooling tower (=1) BW Nuclear steam supply system manufactured by Babcock-Wilcox (=1) N

  14. Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    1 Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data Table G.1 gives and for which it is possible that some manufacturer's subsidies might be hidden in the quoted capital costs-east region (=1) CT Use of cooling tower (=1) BW Nuclear steam supply system manufactured by Babcock

  15. SENSITIVITY OF CHEMICAL REACTION NETWORKS: A STRUCTURALAPPROACH. 1. EXAMPLES AND THE CARBON METABOLIC NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Bernold

    -1- SENSITIVITY OF CHEMICAL REACTION NETWORKS: A STRUCTURALAPPROACH. 1. EXAMPLES AND THE CARBON of Theoretical Biology, June 21, 2014) #12;-2- Abstract In biological cells, chemical reaction pathways lead information on the network alone. We investigate how the sensitivity responses of chemicals in a reaction

  16. Motivations Problem Formulation Particle Swarm Optimisation Examples Conclusions A Tunable Radial Basis Function Model for Nonlinear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng

    Formulation Nonlinear System Identification Tunable RBF Model Construction 3 Particle Swarm Optimisation PSO Algorithm PSO Aided Tunable RBF Modelling 4 Examples Engine Data Set Nonlinear Liquid Level System 5 Model Construction 3 Particle Swarm Optimisation PSO Algorithm PSO Aided Tunable RBF Modelling 4

  17. Developing the global exploration roadmap: An example using the humans to the lunar surface theme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing the global exploration roadmap: An example using the humans to the lunar surface theme C: Space exploration Lunar exploration Global exploration roadmap Test bed a b s t r a c t The development of the Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) by 12 space agencies participating in the International Space

  18. Surface electric variations induced by deep hydraulic stimulation: An example from the Soultz HDR site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sailhac, Pascal

    Surface electric variations induced by deep hydraulic stimulation: An example from the Soultz HDR Strasbourg (CNRS/ULP), Strasbourg, France Andre´ Ge´rard EEIG Heat Mining, Soultz-sous-Fore^ts, France carried out monitoring of surface electric potential variations at the Soultz Hot Dry Rock site (France

  19. Stress Management Stress is part of everyday life. Examples of stressful situations for university students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Stress Management Stress is part of everyday life. Examples of stressful situations for university stress can actually be beneficial as a motivator, higher levels of ongoing stress can lead to medical, psychological and social problems. WHAT IS STRESS? Stress refers to the demands, pressures or forces applied

  20. Membrane protein folding on the example of outer membrane protein A of Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.

    Membrane protein folding on the example of outer membrane protein A of Escherichia coli J. H and mechanisms by which membrane proteins insert and fold into a biomem- brane have mostly been studiedA that involves at least three struc- turally distinct folding intermediates. Key words. Membrane protein folding

  1. Examples of Program Composition Illustrating the Use of Universal Properties \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems development is to support the publication of software modules in a repository such as the Web together in a jigsaw puzzle. An example of a universal property is ''the component is entirely dark colored.'' If we put entirely dark­ colored components together we get entirely dark­colored (larger) components

  2. University of Massachusetts Lowell EXAMPLE ACADEMIC PLAN FOR PhD in PHYSICS -MEDICAL PHYSICS OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    University of Massachusetts Lowell EXAMPLE ACADEMIC PLAN FOR PhD in PHYSICS - MEDICAL PHYSICS OPTION Entering with MS in Physics This sequence assumes the entering student has advanced preparation in the core Physics courses, which are part of the requirements for the PhD degree in Physics. This includes

  3. University of Massachusetts Lowell EXAMPLE ACADEMIC PLAN FOR PhD in PHYSICS -MEDICAL PHYSICS OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    University of Massachusetts Lowell EXAMPLE ACADEMIC PLAN FOR PhD in PHYSICS - MEDICAL PHYSICS OPTION Entering with BS in Physics This sequence assumes the entering student has adequate preparation no physics remedial courses (95.500 level) are necessary. Year 1, Semester 1 (Fall) 95.605 Mathematical

  4. Kirchhoff vs. Competitive Electricity Markets: A Few Examples Carlos E. Murillo-%nchez Ray D. Zimmerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchhoff vs. Competitive Electricity Markets: A Few Examples Carlos E. Murillo-%nchez Ray D. Zimmerman School of Electrical and Computer Cornell University Ithaca, New York Robert J. Thomas Engineering AMract-Electric power is often regarded as a homoge- neous commodity due to the ubiquity

  5. The Impact of Divergence Time on the Nature of Population Structure: An Example from Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, David

    The Impact of Divergence Time on the Nature of Population Structure: An Example from Iceland Alkes, Reykjavik, Iceland, 5 University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland, 6 Department of Mental Health, University The Icelandic population has been sampled in many disease association studies, providing a strong motivation

  6. Virtual Prototyping Examples for Automotive Industries Fan Dai, Wolfgang Felger, Thomas Fruhauf,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    Virtual Prototyping Examples for Automotive Industries Fan Dai, Wolfgang Felger, Thomas Fr­ ical prototypes. In the automotive industries, CAD and CAE systems are widely used. This provides a good basis for virtual prototyping. This vision is therefore extremely interesting for automotive in

  7. Modeling nonlinear relationships in ERP data using mixed-effects regression with R examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling nonlinear relationships in ERP data using mixed-effects regression with R examples ANTOINE of event-related potential (ERP) data, the assumption of linearity comes at a cost and may significantly be relaxed and how to model nonlinear relationships between ERP amplitudes and predictor variables within

  8. RealPigment: Paint Compositing by Example Jingwan Lu1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    RealPigment: Paint Compositing by Example Jingwan Lu1,2 Stephen DiVerdi3 Willa A. Chen1 Connelly in the chart improves on radial basis functions for paint-like behaviors. Abstract The color of composited pigments in digital painting is generally computed one of two ways: either alpha blending in RGB

  9. RealBrush: Painting with Examples of Physical Media Jingwan Lu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RealBrush: Painting with Examples of Physical Media Jingwan Lu1 Connelly Barnes2 Stephen DiVerdi2: A simple painting created by our system. Left to right: (a) shows oil (left) and plasticine (right) exemplars which are used to synthesize the painting in (b). The foreground flower strokes use oil exemplars

  10. Examples of the Generalized Quantum Permanent Compromise Attack to the Blum-Micali Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guedes, Elloá B; Lula, Bernardo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents examples of the quantum permanent compromise attack to the Blum-Micali construction. Such attacks illustrate how a previous attack to the Blum-Micali generator can be extended to the whole Blum-Micali construction, including the Blum-Blum-Shub and Kaliski generators.

  11. An Example-based Approach to Text-driven Speech Animation with Emotional Expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Henry

    .1 Motivation Visual speech animations of virtual characters have been playing increasingly im- portant roles in human-computer interaction. For example, virtual characters with talking faces are now widely used. In general, the visual speech animation of a virtual character is required to be synchronized with a given

  12. Radionuclides, inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and bacteria in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Edwards, D.D. [Geological Survey, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Campbell, L.J. [State of Idaho, Dept. of Water Resources (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy, sampled 19 sites as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for manmade pollutants and naturally occurring constituents. The samples were collected from seven irrigation wells, five domestic wells, two springs, one stock well, two dairy wells, one observation well, and one commercial well. Two quality assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. The water samples were analyzed for selected radionuclides, inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and bacteria. None of the radionuclides, inorganic constituents, or organic compounds exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Most of the radionuclide and inorganic constituent concentrations exceeded their respective reporting levels. All samples analyzed for surfactants and dissolved organic carbon had concentrations that exceeded their reporting level. Toluene concentrations exceeded the reporting level in one water sample. Two samples contained fecal coliform bacteria counts that exceeded established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water.

  13. Herbarium (NCSC), Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, http://herbarium.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University is a land-grant university and a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    Herbarium (NCSC), Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, http://herbarium.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University is a land-grant university and a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina PLANT IDENTIFICATION REQUEST FROM: Agent

  14. Herbarium (NCSC), Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, http://herbarium.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University is a land-grant university and a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    Herbarium (NCSC), Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, http://herbarium.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University is a land-grant university and a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina PLANT IDENTIFICATION REQUEST FROM: Name

  15. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /31/98 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth

  16. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth

  17. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /31/96 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth

  18. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth fluocarbonate mineral, was mined

  19. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth

  20. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5 Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth fluocarbonate mineral, was mined

  1. Preliminary conceptual design for the destruction of organic/ferrocyanide constituents in the Hanford tank waste with low-temperature hydrothermal processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Jones, E.O.; Orth, R.J.; Cox, J.L.; Elmore, M.E.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Meng, C.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Hydrothermal processing (HTP) is a thermal-chemical processing method that can be employed to destroy organic and ferrocyanide constituents in Hanford tank waste by using the abundant existing oxidants in the tank waste such as nitrite and nitrate. Use-temperature HTP effectively destroys organics at temperatures from 250{degree}C to 400{degree}C to eliminate safety hazards and improve further processing. This proposal describes a conceptual design of a low-temperature HTP system (including a preliminary flow diagram and plot plan, equipment descriptions and sizes, utility requirements, and costs); the experimental work supporting this effort at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL); the reaction chemistry and kinetics; the technical maturity of the process; and a preliminary assessment of maintenance, operation, and safety of a system. Nitrate destruction using organic reductants is also described. The low-temperature hydrothermal program at PNL was initiated in January 1993. It is part of an overall program to develop organic destruction technologies, which was originally funded by Hanford`s Tank Waste Remediation System program and then was transferred to the Initial Pretreatment (IPM) project. As described in the document, low-temperature HTP (1) meets or exceeds system requirements in organic, ferrocyanide, and nitrate destruction, and processing rate; (2) is technically mature with little additional technology development required; (3) is a simple process with good operational reliability; (4) is flexible and can be easily integrated in the system; (5) has reasonable costs and utility requirements; and (6) is safe and environmentally-benign.

  2. SALD 19A: JMP examples for two-sample t-test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    SALD 19A: JMP examples for two-sample t-test #12;Introduction Notes #12;DO NOT COPY Copyright. All rights reserved. Slide 19A-10 Performing a two-sample t-test To perform a two-sample t-test. Deming and Stephen L. Morgan. All rights reserved. Slide 19A-11 Two-sample t-test output for equal group

  3. Example of a limit that does not exist -1 if x < 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    Example of a limit that does not exist Let f(x) = 1 if x 0 -1 if x (x) does not exist. To justify this claim, I will show that no matter what number L you pick, lim x0 f(x) does not take the value L. Recall that, in order to have lim x0 f(x) = L, f(x) must approach L whenever

  4. Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CommRE) program, which is a more than $20 million effort funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, to promote investment in clean energy solutions and provide real-life examples for other local governments, campuses, and small utilities to replicate. Five community-based renewable energy projects received funding from DOE through the CommRE and their progress is detailed.

  5. Example U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program Information Worksheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 InfographiclighbulbsDepartmentDeveloping11, 20125EXAMPLE DOE F 540.1#

  6. Organic Constituents of the Soil. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01

    materials. As might be expected, those in the excrement are the most resistant to the action of the soil bacteria. Other experiments were made, but the results were similar to this one. SUGARS BY HYDROLYSIS OF SOILS The reducing sugars formed by heating... sheep excrement. The amount of reducing substance, calculated as sugars, produced by heating the soil with la per cent. sulphuric acid varied from .OO2 to .215 per cent. with the average of .058 for 7'7 soils. The nitrogen insoluble in permanganate...

  7. Example process hazard analysis of a Department of Energy water chlorination process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    On February 24, 1992, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released a revised version of Section 29 Code of Federal Regulations CFR Part 1910 that added Section 1910.119, entitled ``Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (the PSM Rule). Because US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 5480.4 and 5483.1A prescribe OSHA 29 CFR 1910 as a standard in DOE, the PSM Rule is mandatory in the DOE complex. A major element in the PSM Rule is the process hazard analysis (PrHA), which is required for all chemical processes covered by the PSM Rule. The PrHA element of the PSM Rule requires the selection and application of appropriate hazard analysis methods to systematically identify hazards and potential accident scenarios associated with processes involving highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs). The analysis in this report is an example PrHA performed to meet the requirements of the PSM Rule. The PrHA method used in this example is the hazard and operability (HAZOP) study, and the process studied is the new Hanford 300-Area Water Treatment Facility chlorination process, which is currently in the design stage. The HAZOP study was conducted on May 18--21, 1993, by a team from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Battelle-Columbus, the DOE, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The chlorination process was chosen as the example process because it is common to many DOE sites, and because quantities of chlorine at those sites generally exceed the OSHA threshold quantities (TQs).

  8. Comprehensive Report For Proposed Elevated Temperature Elastic Perfectly Plastic (EPP) Code Cases Representative Example Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg L. Hollinger

    2014-06-01

    Background: The current rules in the nuclear section of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code , Section III, Subsection NH for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above 1200F (650C)1. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (E-PP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures. The proposed rules for strain limits and creep-fatigue evaluation were initially documented in the technical literature 2, 3, and have been recently revised to incorporate comments and simplify their application. The revised code cases have been developed. Task Objectives: The goal of the Sample Problem task is to exercise these code cases through example problems to demonstrate their feasibility and, also, to identify potential corrections and improvements should problems be encountered. This will provide input to the development of technical background documents for consideration by the applicable B&PV committees considering these code cases for approval. This task has been performed by Hollinger and Pease of Becht Engineering Co., Inc., Nuclear Services Division and a report detailing the results of the E-PP analyses conducted on example problems per the procedures of the E-PP strain limits and creep-fatigue draft code cases is enclosed as Enclosure 1. Conclusions: The feasibility of the application of the E-PP code cases has been demonstrated through example problems that consist of realistic geometry (a nozzle attached to a semi-hemispheric shell with a circumferential weld) and load (pressure; pipe reaction load applied at the end of the nozzle, including axial and shear forces, bending and torsional moments; through-wall transient temperature gradient) and design and operating conditions (Levels A, B and C).

  9. Anisotropic Power-law Inflation: A counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiro Soda

    2014-10-31

    It is widely believed that anisotropy in the expansion of the universe will decay exponentially fast during inflation. This is often referred to as the cosmic no-hair conjecture. However, we find a counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture in the context of supergravity. As a demonstration, we present an exact anisotropic power-law inflationary solution which is an attractor in the phase space. We emphasize that anisotropic inflation is quite generic in the presence of anisotropic sources which couple with an inflaton.

  10. Research Support Facility Data Center: An Example of Best Practices Implementation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure details the design and operations of the Research Support Facility (RSF) data center. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world-renowned for its commitment to green building construction. To further this commitment to green building and leading by example, NREL included an ultra-energy-efficient data center in the laboratory's new Research Support Facility (RSF), which recently received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design{reg_sign} (LEED) Platinum designation from the U.S. Green Building Council.

  11. Using Proteins In Unusual Environments: Water-Reduced & Water-Free Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taralp, Alpay

    University #12;Example I: Rate comparisons in octane Enzyme kcat/Km (M-1s-1) Rate (kENZ) Rate(kNONENZ) Enhancement Chymotrypsin 0.7 1.1 x 10-11 6.4 x 1010 Subtilisin 1.8 1.1 x 10-11 1.6 x 1010 N-Ac-L-Phe-OEt + amyl alcohol N-Ac-L-Phe-OAmyl + EtOH in octane NOTE ­ Reactions in water are much faster! The new view

  12. Emergent Semiclassical Time in Quantum Gravity. Full Geometrodynamics and Minisuperspace Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Anderson

    2007-11-04

    I apply the preceding paper's semiclassical treatment to geometrodynamics. The analogy between the two papers is quite useful at the level of the quadratic constraints, while I document the differences between the two due to the underlying differences in their linear constraints. I provide a specific minisuperspace example for my emergent semiclassical time scheme and compare it with the hidden York time scheme. Overall, interesting connections are shown between Newtonian, Leibniz--Mach--Barbour, WKB and cosmic times, while the Euler and York hidden dilational times are argued to be somewhat different from these.

  13. Solvable Examples of Drift and Diffusion of Ions in Non-uniform Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahn, Robert; Cahn, Robert N.; Jackson, John David

    2008-05-30

    The drift and diffusion of a cloud of ions in a fluid are distorted by an inhomogeneous electric field. If the electric field carries the center of the distribution in a straight line and the field configuration is suitably symmetric, the distortion can be calculated analytically. We examine the specific examples of fields with cylindrical and spherical symmetry in detail assuming the ion distributions to be of a generally Gaussian form. The effects of differing diffusion coefficients in the transverse and longitudinal directions are included.

  14. Example Program and Makefile for BG/Q | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8) Wigner HomeExample Cleanup Removal

  15. Motivations Blind Equalisation Main Results Example Conclusions Blind Equalisation of High-Order QAM Channels Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng

    Motivations Blind Equalisation Main Results Example Conclusions Blind Equalisation of High International Conference on Automation & Computing, 2009 #12;Motivations Blind Equalisation Main Results Example Equalisation Signal Model CMA and SDD Equaliser 3 Main Results Fuzzy Step Size CMA Fuzzy-Logic Aided CMA

  16. Remarkable waxing, waning, and wandering of populations of Mimulus guttatus: An unexpected example of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickery, R.K. Jr.

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the dynamics of a meta-population of Mimulus guttatus. Changes in size and location of 16 original populations and the new populations established in their vicinities in Big Cottonwood Canyon, Salt Lake county, Utah, were observed for 25 yr. Twenty-three new populations appeared. Seven original populations and 13 new populations had become extinct by the end of the observation period in 1996. Many populations died out and were reestablished, often repeatedly, during the observation period. Altogether there were 54 population disappearances and 34 reappearances. Many populations changed size as much as 100-fold or more from year to year. There were spectacular examples of populations expanding to fill newly available, large habitats. Frequent extinctions were due overwhelmingly to the canyon drying trend, which led to the drying up of most Mill D North drainage springs, creeks, and ponds. Precipitation and minimum temperatures increased moderately during the observation period. The growing season lengthened almost 50%, a typical consequence of global warming. The drying trend, lengthened growing season, and disappearance of Mimulus populations in Big Cottonwood Canyon appear to be a clear, local example of global warming.

  17. Market leadership by example: Government sector energy efficiency in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Harris, Jeffrey; Breceda, Miguel; Campbell, Stephanie; Sachu, Constantine; della Cava, Mirka; Gonzalez Martinez, Jose; Meyer, Sarah; Romo, Ana Margarita

    2002-05-20

    Government facilities and services are often the largest energy users and major purchasers of energy-using equipment within a country. In developing as well as industrial countries, government ''leadership by example'' can be a powerful force to shift the market toward energy efficiency, complementing other elements of a national energy efficiency strategy. Benefits from more efficient energy management in government facilities and operations include lower government energy bills, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, less demand on electric utility systems, and in many cases reduced dependence on imported oil. Even more significantly, the government sector's buying power and example to others can generate broader demand for energy-efficient products and services, creating entry markets for domestic suppliers and stimulating competition in providing high-efficiency products and services. Despite these benefits, with the exception of a few countries government sector actions have often lagged behind other energy efficiency policies. This is especially true in developing countries and transition economies - even though energy used by public agencies in these countries may represent at least as large a share of total energy use as the public sector in industrial economies. This paper summarizes work in progress to inventory current programs and policies for government sector energy efficiency in developing countries, and describes successful case studies from Mexico's implementation of energy management in the public sector. We show how these policies in Mexico, begun at the federal level, have more recently been extended to state and local agencies, and consider the applicability of this model to other developing countries.

  18. Science and the Energy Security Challenge: The Example of Solid-State Lighting

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Philips, Julia [Sandia

    2010-01-08

    Securing a viable, carbon neutral energy future for humankind will require an effort of gargantuan proportions. As outlined clearly in a series of workshops sponsored by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html), fundamental advances in scientific understanding are needed to broadly implement many of the technologies that are held out as promising options to meet future energy needs, ranging from solar energy, to nuclear energy, to approaches to clean combustion. Using solid state lighting based on inorganic materials as an example, I will discuss some recent results and new directions, emphasizing the multidisciplinary, team nature of the endeavor. I will also offer some thoughts about how to encourage translation of the science into attractive, widely available products ? a significant challenge that cannot be ignored. This case study offers insight into approaches that are likely to be beneficial for addressing other aspects of the energy security challenge.

  19. Examples of naked singularity formation in higher-dimensional Einstein-vacuum spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Xinliang; Lü, H

    2015-01-01

    The vacuum Einstein equations in 5+1 dimensions are shown to admit solutions describing naked singularity formation in gravitational collapse from nonsingular asymptotically locally flat initial data. We present a class of specific examples with spherical extra dimensions. Thanks to the Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction, these spacetimes are constructed by lifting continuously self-similar solutions of the 4-dimensional Einstein-scalar field system with a negative exponential potential. Their existence provides a new test-bed for weak cosmic censorship in higher-dimensional gravity. In addition, we point out why a similar attempt of embedding Christodoulou's well-known solutions for massless scalar fields fails to capture formation of naked singularities in 4+1 dimensions.

  20. Hidden correlations in indivisible qudits as a resource for quantum technologies on examples of superconducting circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margarita A Man'ko; Vladimir I Man'ko

    2015-12-28

    We show that the density-matrix states of noncomposite qudit systems satisfy entropic and information relations like the subadditivity condition, strong subadditivity condition, and Araki--Lieb inequality, which characterize hidden quantum correlations of observables associated with these indivisible systems. We derive these relations employing a specific map of the entropic inequalities known for density matrices of multiqudit systems to the inequalities for density matrices of single-qudit systems. We present the obtained relations in the form of mathematical inequalities for arbitrary Hermitian NxN-matrices. We consider examples of superconducting qubits and qudits. We discuss the hidden correlations in single-qudit states as a new resource for quantum technologies analogous to the known resource in correlations associated with the entanglement in multiqudit systems.

  1. Dynamic leakage of faults during differential depletion: Theory, models, and examples from the Niger delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, N.L.; Kaars Sijpestein, C.H.; Osai, L.N.; Okoli, O.C. (Shell Petroleum Development Co. of Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria))

    1991-08-01

    Previous studies of fault sealing have addressed possible fault leakage during secondary migration due to the effects of increased hydrocarbon-water capillary pressure, fracturing, or small-scale incremental fault movements. Of equal importance to production geologists is the failure and leakage of faults during field development due to differential depletion of adjacent fault blocks. This paper examines the unique problems associated with this dynamic leakage of faults. It is theoretically shown that the fault sealing mechanism, and the extent of the seal, directly influences the failure process which in turn results in a variety of favorable and unfavorable effects on field development. The qualitative models give considerable insight into such aspects as oil-column expansion and resaturation losses, interfault block aquifer support (with important implications to material balance calculations), possible leakage or spillage of oil across faults, and potential fault failure during (re)injection projects. Examples of dynamic fault leakage are presented from selected fields of the Niger delta.

  2. Difference Operator Example Transformations Main Idea Invariant Local Data Liouvillian Special Functions Closed Form Solutions of Linear Difference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoeij, Mark van

    Functions Closed Form Solutions of Linear Difference Equations Yongjae Cha Florida State University Yongjae Liouvillian 7 Special Functions Yongjae Cha Closed Form Solutions of Linear Difference Equations #12 Operator Example Transformations Main Idea Invariant Local Data Liouvillian Special Functions Linear

  3. Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment Indices Link Importance Numerical Examples Summary a Environmental Impact Assessment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Examples Summary a Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links Environmental Impact Assessment Indices #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment is gratefully acknowledged. Anna Nagurney, Qiang Qiang,, Ladimer S. Nagurney Environmental Impact Assessment

  4. The Cat (Felis catus) as an Example of the Contribution that Comparative Psychology Has Made to Human Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Duncan A

    1992-01-01

    development in kittens {Felis catus): A cross- ComparativeVol. No. THE CAT (Felis catus) AS AN EXAMPLE OF THEinto human behavior. The cat {Felis catus) is a particularly

  5. Reliability Engineering Approach to Probabilistic Proliferation Resistance Analysis of the Example Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronholm, Lillian Marie

    2012-10-19

    ENGINEERING APPROACH TO PROBABILISTIC PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE ANALYSIS OF THE EXAMPLE SODIUM FAST REACTOR FUEL CYCLE FACILITY A Thesis by LILLIAN MARIE CRONHOLM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2011 Major Subject: Health Physics RELIABILITY ENGINEERING APPROACH TO PROBABILISTIC PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE ANALYSIS OF THE EXAMPLE SODIUM FAST REACTOR FUEL...

  6. Large-Scale Urban Decontamination; Developments, Historical Examples and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Demmer

    2007-02-01

    Recent terrorist threats and actual events have lead to a renewed interest in the technical field of large scale, urban environment decontamination. One of the driving forces for this interest is the real potential for the cleanup and removal of radioactive dispersal device (RDD or “dirty bomb”) residues. In response the U. S. Government has spent many millions of dollars investigating RDD contamination and novel decontamination methodologies. Interest in chemical and biological (CB) cleanup has also peaked with the threat of terrorist action like the anthrax attack at the Hart Senate Office Building and with catastrophic natural events such as Hurricane Katrina. The efficiency of cleanup response will be improved with these new developments and a better understanding of the “old reliable” methodologies. Perhaps the most interesting area of investigation for large area decontamination is that of the RDD. While primarily an economic and psychological weapon, the need to cleanup and return valuable or culturally significant resources to the public is nonetheless valid. Several private companies, universities and National Laboratories are currently developing novel RDD cleanup technologies. Because of its longstanding association with radioactive facilities, the U. S. Department of Energy National Laboratories are at the forefront in developing and testing new RDD decontamination methods. However, such cleanup technologies are likely to be fairly task specific; while many different contamination mechanisms, substrate and environmental conditions will make actual application more complicated. Some major efforts have also been made to model potential contamination, to evaluate both old and new decontamination techniques and to assess their readiness for use. Non-radioactive, CB threats each have unique decontamination challenges and recent events have provided some examples. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as lead agency for these emergency cleanup responses, has a sound approach for decontamination decision-making that has been applied several times. The anthrax contamination at the U. S. Hart Senate Office Building and numerous U. S. Post Office facilities are examples of employing novel technical responses. Decontamination of the Hart Office building required development of a new approach for high level decontamination of biological contamination as well as techniques for evaluating the technology effectiveness. The World Trade Center destruction also demonstrated the need for, and successful implementation of, appropriate cleanup methodologies. There are a number of significant lessons that can be gained from a look at previous large scale cleanup projects. Too often we are quick to apply a costly “package and dispose” method when sound technological cleaning approaches are available. Understanding historical perspectives, advanced planning and constant technology improvement are essential to successful decontamination.

  7. Example risk management plan and offsite consequence analysis for power plant aging using ammonia and chlorine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, R.C. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    This paper provides an example of a risk management plan (RMP) for a utility power plant required under Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). Under Title III, certain facilities are required to identify hazards associated with chemicals used to prevent accidental releases, and to minimize consequences of releases. Ammonia is used to reduce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions and is injected in the post-combustion system based on the selective catalyst reduction (SCR) process. Chlorine is used in the potable water treatment process. This paper provides an overview of the elements required in the RMP and specific methods and procedures currently recommended by the EPA for estimating hazardous air pollutant emissions and impacts related to the ammonia and chlorination processes cited in this paper. Information is presented that addresses the potential extent of a pollutant's impacts, including methods and assumptions designed to over-estimate concentrations. Alternative approaches are used to estimate more realistic but still conservative concentrations. Based on the results of these analyses, strategies are recommended that the plant could incorporate to reduce the level of potential impacts and, therefore, program requirements under RMP.

  8. Qualification of data obtained during a severe accident. Illustrative examples from TMI-2 evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, Joy L.; Knudson, Darrell L.

    2015-02-01

    The accidents at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) provide unique opportunities to evaluate instrumentation exposed to severe accident conditions. Conditions associated with the release of coolant and the hydrogen burn that occurred during the TMI-2 accident exposed instrumentation to harsh conditions, including direct radiation, radioactive contamination, and high humidity with elevated temperatures and pressures. Post-TMI-2 instrumentation evaluation programs focused on data required by TMI-2 operators to assess the condition of the reactor and containment and the effect of mitigating actions taken by these operators. Prior efforts also focused on sensors providing data required for subsequent forensic evaluations and accident simulations. This paper provides additional details related to the formal process used to develop a qualified TMI-2 data base and presents data qualification details for three parameters: reactor coolant system (RCS) pressure; containment building temperature; and containment pressure. These selected examples illustrate the types of activities completed in the TMI-2 data qualification process and the importance of such a qualification effort. These details are described to facilitate implementation of a similar process using data and examinations at the Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 reactors so that BWR-specific benefits can be obtained.

  9. Lattice Gauge Theory for Condensed Matter Physics: Ferromagnetic Superconductivity as its Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikuo Ichinose; Tetsuo Matsui

    2014-09-07

    Recent theoretical studies of various strongly-correlated systems in condensed matter physics reveal that the lattice gauge theory(LGT) developed in high-energy physics is quite a useful tool to understand physics of these systems. Knowledges of LGT are to become a necessary item even for condensed matter physicists. In the first part of this paper, we present a concise review of LGT for the reader who wants to understand its basics for the first time. For illustration, we choose the abelian Higgs model, a typical and quite useful LGT, which is the lattice verison of the Ginzburg-Landau model interacting with a U(1) gauge field (vector potential). In the second part, we present an account of the recent progress in the study of ferromagnetic superconductivity (SC) as an example of application of LGT to topics in condensed matter physics, . As the ferromagnetism (FM) and SC are competing orders with each other, large fluctuations are expected to take place and therefore nonperturbative methods are required for theoretical investigation. After we introduce a LGT describing the FMSC, we study its phase diagram and topological excitations (vortices of Cooper pairs) by Monte-Carlo simulations.

  10. Examples of MC and A systems to meet prompt accountability specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggers, R F; Brouns, R J; Bryant, J L; Davenport, L C; Brite, D W; Kinnison, R R; Fager, J E; Williams, R C; Wilson, R L

    1983-01-01

    Proposed regulations for NRC licensees authorized to possess and process formula quantities of strategic special nuclear material (SSNM) would require each licensee to implement a material control and accounting (MC and A) system capable of prompt loss detection and alarm resolution. In support of the loss detection and alarm response activities an overcheck program would also be implemented. This program would include personnel qualification and training, quality control, inventory verification and shipper-receiver transaction verification. However, the frequeny of physical inventory verification would be about once per year rather than once every two months. In addition MC and A activities would include procedures for the prevention and detection of data falsification and other forms of deceit that might undermine the performance of the loss detection and response systems. This report provides examples of prompt accountability systems for four plants: mixed oxide fuel fabrication, uranium hexafluoride conversion, high enriched uranium fuel fabrication, and high enriched uranium scrap recovery. Purpose of this report is to provide guidance to the MC and A system designer and evaluator on how the proposed requirements might be met.

  11. Determining sand-body geometries for waterflood reservoirs: Examples from Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreisa, R.D.; Pinero, E. )

    1987-02-01

    Waterflood projects require an accurate knowledge of reservoir geometry and well-to-well continuity. However, sandstones with thin, multiple-pay zones can be extremely difficult to correlate with confidence. Two case studies of Pennsylvanian sandstones in Oklahoma illustrate how a model for the depositional history of such reservoirs can be an effective tool for determining reservoir continuity. In contrast, correlation criteria such as similar wireline log signatures and relative sand-body thicknesses are not reliable in many situations. In Southwest Logan field (Beaver County), 5 to 15-ft thick reservoir sands formed as shallow marine sand ridges. Their dimensions were approximated from height-to-width ratios of modern sand ridges. Then the reservoir sands were mapped using wireline logs and core data. Individual reservoir sands were approximately 1-2 km wide and stacked en echelon vertically. Thus, a line-drive waterflood pattern oriented parallel to the axes of the ridges is recommended. Tatums field (Carter County) consists of 5 to 50-ft thick sandstones deposited in various deltaic environments. Distributary channel sands have good continuity downdip, but are narrow and lenticular across depositional strike. Crevasse splay and other bay-fill sands were deposited marginal to the channels and are extremely discontinuous. This depositional model can be used to improve flood patterns for these sands, leading to improved sweep efficiency. In both examples, for effective mapping, the depositional facies models have been used to register reservoir quality and wireline log signatures.

  12. The OGLE-II event sc5_2859 -- An example of disk-disk microlensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Smith

    2003-06-10

    We present a new long-duration parallax event from the OGLE-II database, sc5_2859, which has the second longest time-scale ever identified (tE = 547.6{+22.6}{-7.8} days). We argue that both the lens and source reside in the Galactic disk, making event sc5_2859 one of the first confirmed examples of so-called disk-disk microlensing. We find that the source star is most probably located at a distance of D_S ~ 2 kpc, and from this we conclude that the lens is unlikely to be a main-sequence star due to the strict limits that can be placed on the lens brightness. A simple likelihood analysis is carried out on the lens mass, which indicates that the lens could be another candidate stellar mass black hole. We recommend that spectroscopic observations of the source be carried out in order to constrain the source distance, since this is the main source of uncertainty in our analysis. In addition, we briefly discuss whether there appears to be an excess of long duration microlensing events in the OGLE-II catalogue.

  13. Bloch spin waves and emergent structure in protein folding with HIV envelope glycoprotein as an example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Jin; He, Jianfeng; Sieradzan, Adam; Ilieva, Nevena

    2015-01-01

    We inquire how structure emerges during the process of protein folding. For this we scrutinise col- lective many-atom motions during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce, develop and employ various topological techniques, in combination with analytic tools that we deduce from the concept of integrable models and structure of discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The example we consider is an alpha-helical subunit of the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41. The helical structure is stable when the subunit is part of the biological oligomer. But in isolation the helix becomes unstable, and the monomer starts deforming. We follow the process computationally. We interpret the evolving structure both in terms of a backbone based Heisenberg spin chain and in terms of a side chain based XY spin chain. We find that in both cases the formation of protein super-secondary structure is akin the formation of a topological Bloch domain wall along a spin chain. During the process we identify three individual...

  14. Margin of Safety Definition and Examples Used in Safety Basis Documents and the USQ Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R. A.

    2013-10-03

    The Nuclear Safety Management final rule, 10 CFR 830, provides an undefined term, margin of safety (MOS). Safe harbors listed in 10 CFR 830, Table 2, such as DOE?STD?3009 use but do not define the term. This lack of definition has created the need for the definition. This paper provides a definition of MOS and documents examples of MOS as applied in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved safety basis for an existing nuclear facility. If we understand what MOS looks like regarding Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) parameters, then it helps us compare against other parameters that do not involve a MOS. This paper also documents parameters that are not MOS. These criteria could be used to determine if an MOS exists in safety basis documents. This paper helps DOE, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and its contractors responsible for the safety basis improve safety basis documents and the unreviewed safety question (USQ) process with respect to MOS.

  15. Large batch dimensional metrology demonstrated in the example of a LIGA fabricated spring.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aigeldinger, Georg; Skala, Dawn M.; Ceremuga, Joseph T.

    2004-04-01

    Deep x-ray lithography in combination with electroforming is capable of producing high precision metal parts in small lot series. This study deals with a high aspect ratio structure with overall dimensions on the order of 10 mm x 7 mm x 1.5 mm, with the smallest line width being 150 {micro}m. The lateral deviation from the design is to be kept to a minimum, preferably below 5 {micro}m. To ensure adequate quality control, a semi-automated metrology technique has been established to measure all parts. While the paper will give a brief overview of all involved techniques, it focuses on the method to measure the top and bottom of the parts and the top of geometries following the process. The instrument used is a View Engineering Voyager V6x12 microscope, which is fully programmable. The microscope allows direct measurement of geometries but also is capable of saving all captured data as point clouds. These point clouds play a central role when evaluating part geometry. After measuring the part, the point cloud is compared to the computer aided design (CAD) contour of the part, using a commercially available software package. The challenge of proper edge lighting on a nickel alloy part is evaluated by varying lighting conditions systematically. Results of two conditions are presented along with a set of optimized parameters. With the introduced set of tools, process flow can be monitored by measuring geometries, e.g. linewidths in every step of the process line. An example for such analysis is given. After delivery of a large batch of parts, extensive numbers of datasets were available allowing the evaluation of the variation of part geometries. Discussed in detail is the deviation from part top to part bottom geometries indicating swelling of the PMMA mold in the electroplating bath.

  16. Example-Based Automatic Music-Driven Conventional Dance Motion Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Songhua; Fan, Rukun; Geng, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for synthesizing dance motions that follow the emotions and contents of a piece of music. Our method employs a learning-based approach to model the music to motion mapping relationship embodied in example dance motions along with those motions' accompanying background music. A key step in our method is to train a music to motion matching quality rating function through learning the music to motion mapping relationship exhibited in synchronized music and dance motion data, which were captured from professional human dance performance. To generate an optimal sequence of dance motion segments to match with a piece of music, we introduce a constraint-based dynamic programming procedure. This procedure considers both music to motion matching quality and visual smoothness of a resultant dance motion sequence. We also introduce a two-way evaluation strategy, coupled with a GPU-based implementation, through which we can execute the dynamic programming process in parallel, resulting in significant speedup. To evaluate the effectiveness of our method, we quantitatively compare the dance motions synthesized by our method with motion synthesis results by several peer methods using the motions captured from professional human dancers' performance as the gold standard. We also conducted several medium-scale user studies to explore how perceptually our dance motion synthesis method can outperform existing methods in synthesizing dance motions to match with a piece of music. These user studies produced very positive results on our music-driven dance motion synthesis experiments for several Asian dance genres, confirming the advantages of our method.

  17. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Feedback Examples

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    do not conform to specified requirements will be controlled so that the output of the process or service is used. Corrective actions are designed to be commensurate with the...

  18. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Organization Examples

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    is responsible for supporting the FDH and RL project offices with adequate day-to-day planning and review technical management, coordination, control, and reporting of project...

  19. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Execution Example

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for successfully completing stabilization of the material streams for the type of processes to be used were identified. Based on the results of these workshops, flow diagrams,...

  20. Example 1: Bioenergetic analysis of combining mitochondria-targeted drugs with 2-deoxyglucose in breast cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Example 1: Bioenergetic analysis of combining mitochondria-targeted drugs with 2- deoxyglucose in breast cancer cells OVERVIEW The MCW Cancer Center Bioenergetics Shared Resource opened in January 2012 in MFRC 2013. The purpose of the Bioenergetics Shared Resource is four- fold: investigate cancer cell

  1. Urban areas may serve as habitat and corridors for dry-adapted, heat tolerant species; an example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    and assemblage composition. Since urban areas are warmer (i.e., heat island effect) we also tested if cities were be particularly successful at tracking future climate change. Keywords Urban heat island . Range shift . AntUrban areas may serve as habitat and corridors for dry-adapted, heat tolerant species; an example

  2. A synthetic example of anisotropic P-wave processing for a model from the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    A synthetic example of anisotropic P-wave processing for a model from the Gulf of Mexico Baoniu Han, typical for the Gulf of Mexico, has a moderate structural complexity and includes a salt body elastic properties of shale formations and thin-bed sedimentary sequences (Thomsen, 1986; Sayers, 1994

  3. Lower crustal ow and the role of shear in basin subsidence: an example from the Dead Sea basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Lower crustal £ow and the role of shear in basin subsidence: an example from the Dead Sea basin, MA 02543, USA Abstract We interpret large-scale subsidence (5^6 km depth) with little attendant that lower crustal flow would occur within the time frame of basin subsidence if the viscosity is 9 7U1019 ^1

  4. EXAMPLES OF DAMAGE DETECTION IN REAL-LIFE SETTINGS BASED ON THE POSITION OF THE NEUTRAL AXIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EXAMPLES OF DAMAGE DETECTION IN REAL-LIFE SETTINGS BASED ON THE POSITION OF THE NEUTRAL AXIS discussed in this paper is to create damage detection methods based on universal parameters an appropriate parameter and validate that it can be used to detect damage in real-life settings. The centroid

  5. The influence of sediment cover variability on longterm river incision rates: An example from the Peikang River,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Karl

    The influence of sediment cover variability on longterm river incision rates: An example from reach of the Peikang River. Sediment from these landslides produced widespread aggradation the spatial and temporal variability of sediment cover for the Peikang River. Because the river is undergoing

  6. Comparative Methods for the Analysis of Gene-Expression Evolution: An Example Using Yeast Functional Genomic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    this increasing database, gene-expression evolution is rarely modeled explicitly. One approach to studying geneComparative Methods for the Analysis of Gene-Expression Evolution: An Example Using Yeast-Hsiung Li* *Ecology and Evolution, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Chicago Understanding

  7. Patent analysis, detection of new markets for employment Example of technologies related to the aging of population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Patent analysis, detection of new markets for employment Example of technologies related normes : complémentarités et conflits, Tours : France (2013)" #12;2 Patent analysis, detection of new Patent Analysis). The world patent database from the EPO (the European Patent Office), covers more than

  8. EXAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINE FOR B.A. MAJOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY For matriculants entering in odd-numbered years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turc, Catalin

    EXAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINE FOR B.A. MAJOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY For matriculants entering in odd) SOPHMORE (Even Years) EEPS 110, Physical Geology (3)b EEPS 119, Geology Laboratory (1) PHYS 115 Geology (3) c EEPS 391, Senior Project (2) STAT 201, Basic Statistics for Social and Life Sciences (3

  9. EXAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINE FOR B.A. MAJOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY For matriculants entering in even-numbered years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turc, Catalin

    EXAMPLE CURRICULUM OUTLINE FOR B.A. MAJOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY For matriculants entering Activities (0) SOPHMORE (odd years) EEPS 110, Physical Geology (3)b EEPS 119, Geology Laboratory (1) PHYS 115 of Biology (3) STAT 201, Basic Statistics for Social and Life Sciences (3) EEPS 220, Environmental Geology (3

  10. A Double-Deletion Method to Quantifying Incremental Binding Energies in Proteins from Experiment: Example of a Destabilizing Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sancho, Javier

    A Double-Deletion Method to Quantifying Incremental Binding Energies in Proteins from Experiment: Example of a Destabilizing Hydrogen Bonding Pair Luis A. Campos,*y Santiago Cuesta-Lo´pez,*z Jon Lo of a specific hydrogen bond in apoflavodoxin to protein stability is investigated by combining theory

  11. Motifs in Protein SequencesMotifs in Protein Sequences Examples: Helix-Turn-Helix, Zinc-finger,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Giri

    -finger, Homeobox domain, Hairpin-beta motif, Calcium-binding motif, Beta-alpha-beta motif, Coiled-coil motifs. Examples: Helix-Turn-Helix, Zinc-finger, Homeobox domain, Hairpin-beta motif, Calcium-binding motif, Beta-alpha-beta minimum energy configuration? Unfolded Molten Globule State Folded Native State Rapid (

  12. Presentation 2.9: Economic and environmental implications of woodfuel production and competition with other uses: Europe as an example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the field of renewable energies could serve as an example of the possible environmental and economic impacts, if the policies are well designed: · the most obvious environmental impact is the climate change mitigation potential in forests and in products, exported environmental impacts resulting from higher dependence on raw

  13. Coal Problems 1. Name two examples of clean coal technology and in what manner do they clean the coal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    Coal Problems 1. Name two examples of clean coal technology and in what manner do they clean the coal? a. Coal Washing- Crushing coal then mixing it with a liquid to allow the impurities to settle. b burning coal altogether. With integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems, steam and hot

  14. 48 2 Functional Analysis for Linear Saddle Point Problems 2.4 Examples of Pairs of Finite Element Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Volker

    48 2 Functional Analysis for Linear Saddle Point Problems 2.4 Examples of Pairs of Finite Element Spaces Violating the Discrete Inf-Sup Condition Remark 2.50. On simple pairs of finite element spaces. The simplest and most common finite element spaces are spaces of continuous functions which are piecewise

  15. Page 34 MARGINS Newsletter No. 9, Fall 2002 Towards a Data Management Infrastructure for MARGINS: Examples from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    : Examples from Boomerang 8 and the Virtual Research Vessel Dawn J. Wright Department of Geosciences, Oregon- sues concerning the origin and structure of the Tonga forearc and trench includ- ing: (1) testing sites, as well as a comprehensive dredging program. The resulting web site is very simple by today

  16. UC Irvine Construction Related Hazardous Waste Some construction related wastes are hazardous and require special handling. Examples of such wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    UC Irvine Construction Related Hazardous Waste Scope Some construction related wastes are hazardous the hazardous waste manifest. Process 1. When a construction project will generate hazardous wastes, the project and require special handling. Examples of such wastes include: · Asbestos Containing Materials · Mercury

  17. CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND-SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE BOISE HYDROGEOPHYSICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND- SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM Crosswell seismic data contain first-arrival information for velocity inversion and reflec- tions for seismic stratigraphic analysis. Seismic velocity information is useful for directly com- paring to

  18. Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling Conclusions Outline Introduction Literature review An integrated electric power supply chain and fuel market Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions Electric Power Supply Chains and Fuel

  19. Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling supply chain and fuel market network framework Empirical case study and examples Conclusions. #12 Power Supply Chains and Fuel Suppliers #12;Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power

  20. Examples of cooler reflective streets for urban heat-island mitigation : Portland cement concrete and chip seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chang, S.-C.; Levinson, R.; Pon, B.

    2003-04-30

    Part of the urban heat island effect can be attributed to dark pavements that are commonly used on streets and parking lots. In this paper we consider two light colored, hence cooler, alternative paving materials that are in actual use in cities today. These are Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and chip seals. We report measurements of the albedos of some PCC and chip sealed pavements in the San Francisco Bay Area. The albedos of the PCC pavements ranged from about 0.18 to 0.35. The temperatures of some PCC pavements are also measured and calculated. We then consider how the albedos of the constituent materials of the PCC (stone, sand and cement) contribute to the albedos of the resulting finished concrete. The albedos of a set of chip sealed pavements in San Jose, CA, were measured and correlated with the times of their placement. It is found that the albedos decrease with age (and use) but remain higher than that of standard asphalt concrete (AC) for about five years. After t hat, the albedos of the chip seals are about 0.12, similar to aged AC. The fact that many PCC pavements have albedos at least twice as high as aged AC suggests that it is possible to have pavement albedos that remain high for many years.

  1. Breaking of the number-of-constituent-quark scaling for identified-particle elliptic flow as a signal of phase change in low-energy data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Tian; J. H. Chen; Y. G. Ma; X. Z. Cai; F. Jin; G. L. Ma; S. Zhang; C. Zhong

    2009-06-29

    We argue that measurements of identified-particle elliptic flow in a wide energy range could shed light on the possible phase change in high-energy heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). When the hadronization process is dominated by quark coalescence, the number-of-constituent-quark (NCQ) scaling for the identified-particle elliptic flow can serve as a probe for studying the strong interacting partonic matter. In the upcoming RHIC low-energy runs, the NCQ scaling behavior may be broken because of the change of the effective degrees of freedom of the hot dense matter, which corresponds to the transition from the dominant partonic phase to the dominant hadronic phase. A multiphase transport model is used to present the dependence of NCQ scaling behavior on the different hadronization mechanisms.

  2. Towards a wave--extraction method for numerical relativity: III. Analytical examples for the Beetle--Burko radiation scalar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lior M. Burko; Thomas W. Baumgarte; Christopher Beetle

    2005-11-18

    Beetle and Burko recently introduced a background--independent scalar curvature invariant for general relativity that carries information only about the gravitational radiation in generic spacetimes, in cases where such radiation is incontrovertibly defined. In this paper we adopt a formalism that only uses spatial data as they are used in numerical relativity and compute the Beetle--Burko radiation scalar for a number of analytical examples, specifically linearized Einstein--Rosen cylindrical waves, linearized quadrupole waves, the Kerr spacetime, Bowen--York initial data, and the Kasner spacetime. These examples illustrate how the Beetle--Burko radiation scalar can be used to examine the gravitational wave content of numerically generated spacetimes, and how it may provide a useful diagnostic for initial data sets.

  3. MEE 452: Example 3-2 ShellShell--andand--Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis:Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    MEE 452: Example 3-2 ShellShell--andand--Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis:Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis-butyl alcohol @150oF. Two-tube-pass for illustration only COUNTER FLOW T PARALLEL FLOW T Heat Exchanger/c,out or 16/Re otherwise Tube-side Pressure drop ... MathCAD S&T HX analysis 7 of 7 Tube-side Pressure drop

  4. Matrix Operations on the TI-83 For the examples, we will consider the matrix 2 7 6 -7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClendon, David M.

    Matrix Operations on the TI-83 For the examples, we will consider the matrix 2 7 6 -7 -3 -5 -7 -2 -2 3 8 5 A. How to type in a matrix into the TI-83 Hit [MATRX]. You will see Use the right arrow matrices. If you want to put the matrix into [A], highlight "[A]" and hit [ENTER]; if you want to put

  5. Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation. Volume 2, Detailed description of first example flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Disposal of high-level tank wastes at the Hanford Site is currently envisioned to divide the waste between two principal waste forms: glass for the high-level waste (HLW) and grout for the low-level waste (LLW). The draft flow diagram shown in Figure 1.1 was developed as part of the current planning process for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), which is evaluating options for tank cleanup. The TWRS has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to safely manage the Hanford tank wastes. It includes tank safety and waste disposal issues, as well as the waste pretreatment and waste minimization issues that are involved in the ``clean option`` discussed in this report. This report describes the results of a study led by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine if a more aggressive separations scheme could be devised which could mitigate concerns over the quantity of the HLW and the toxicity of the LLW produced by the reference system. This aggressive scheme, which would meet NRC Class A restrictions (10 CFR 61), would fit within the overall concept depicted in Figure 1.1; it would perform additional and/or modified operations in the areas identified as interim storage, pretreatment, and LLW concentration. Additional benefits of this scheme might result from using HLW and LLW disposal forms other than glass and grout, but such departures from the reference case are not included at this time. The evaluation of this aggressive separations scheme addressed institutional issues such as: radioactivity remaining in the Hanford Site LLW grout, volume of HLW glass that must be shipped offsite, and disposition of appropriate waste constituents to nonwaste forms.

  6. Title Slide Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drives what counts * Portfolio savings at least 1.5% of community electric use Energy Policy Goals Where are the opportunities? * Efficiency * Technology grows new...

  7. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    125E, 126, 126A, and 126B. Room 116 contains the connection point to the plant fiber optics system. Asbestos containing materials are expected to exist in building components...

  8. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    required to support S&M and D&D Certified vendor information Chemical and hazardous substance inventory Deactivation work plans Descriptionphotos of spaces...

  9. Motion transformation by example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Eugene, 1979-

    2008-01-01

    Animated characters bring the illusion of life to feature films, television shows, video games, and educational simulations. However, it is difficult for artists to define natural and expressive movement. This challenge ...

  10. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    device such as a WBGT. Worker condition can be checked using body temperature, pulse and visual assessment. Varies by conditions and work tasks. Noise 85 dB continuous for...

  11. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    using wire strippers or other hand tools, fall off ladder or scaffolding if used. Lockouttagout (LOTO) not used properly, all workers not informed of LOTO status. Improper...

  12. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    16 Danger, Caution and Warning Tags WSRC 8Q, Procedure 31 Hazardous Energy Control (LockoutTagout) WSRC 8Q, Procedure 32 Confined Space Entry WSRC 8Q, Procedure 33 Work...

  13. Title Slide Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 17, 2012 Home Energy Reports: Three Year Review Puget Sound Energy Joel Smith and Bobbi Wilhelm Facilitated by Summer Goodwin, BPA July 2012 Puget Sound Energy Joel Smith and...

  14. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    process, and Potential pressurization of gloveboxes due to off-gas from styrene decomposition during the pyrolysis process for polycubes. These items above reflect...

  15. Issue Development sheet Example

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISSUE DEVELOPMENT SHEET INFORMATION ONLY The information provided below indicates that a potential concern for finding has been identified. Please provide any objective evidence you may have that could either alleviate the concern or eliminate the finding. If no objective evidence is available/can be provided by the end of this audit (at the scheduled end of field work), this information will be included in the audit report and reported as a concern or an audit finding as appropriate.

  16. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the hierarchical and checklist end points methods that are described elsewhere on this web site. In both cases there are steps to identify systems that must remain operational...

  17. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    criticality safety representative at least annually in accordance with Section 4.1.6 of ANSIANS-8.1- 1983, American National Standard for Nuclear Criticality in Operations with...

  18. Examples of seismic modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Pamyatnykh

    2008-10-09

    Findings of a few recent asteroseismic studies of the main-sequence pulsating stars, as performed in Wojciech Dziembowski's group in Warsaw and in Michel Breger's group in Vienna, are briefly presented and discussed. The selected objects are three hybrid pulsators Nu Eridani, 12 Lacertae and Gamma Pegasi, which show both Beta Cephei and SPB type modes, and the Delta Scuti type star 44 Tauri.

  19. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the open market. A potential use of a D&R subcontract for 322-M could be the D&R of the stainless steel exhaust process vent duct system for the building. This subcontracting...

  20. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    accelerates the project schedule and significantly reduces the project total life cycle cost. Current Baseline (FY99 MYWP) Revised Project Baseline Project Scope: ...

  1. Batch Script Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock andBasics

  2. C Example HYPRE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum6 Shares of U.S.6Low-Cost ThermalofHYPRE C

  3. C Example MUMPS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum6 Shares of U.S.6Low-Cost ThermalofHYPRE

  4. Data Transfer Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDaniel Shechtman andDarkID Service(EIA)» Data

  5. Fortran Example MUMPS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServicesAmes LaboratoryForms

  6. Proj. Plan Example SEM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrderNATIONALofDefine Review Purpose50(S3TEC )(DOE) CUSTOMER

  7. Title Slide Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 to 1990 Timeline2Presented at 6 June

  8. Title Slide Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 to 1990 Timeline2Presented at 6 June

  9. LibSci Example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging ofLibSci LibSci Overview

  10. Scientific poster example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOffice ofTorus Experiment | PrincetonScientific2-000

  11. A "Hybrid" Approach for Synthesizing Optimal Controllers of Hybrid Systems: A Case Study of the Oil Pump Industrial Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengjun; Kapur, Deepak; Larsen, Kim G

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach to reduce the optimal controller synthesis problem of hybrid systems to quantifier elimination; furthermore, we also show how to combine quantifier elimination with numerical computation in order to make it more scalable but at the same time, keep arising errors due to discretization manageable and within bounds. A major advantage of our approach is not only that it avoids errors due to numerical computation, but it also gives a better optimal controller. In order to illustrate our approach, we use the real industrial example of an oil pump provided by the German company HYDAC within the European project Quasimodo as a case study throughout this paper, and show that our method improves (up to 7.5%) the results reported in [3] based on game theory and model checking.

  12. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitzman, D.O.; stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

    2003-02-11

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

  13. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. O. Hitzman; A. K. Stepp; D. M. Dennis; L. R. Graumann

    2003-03-31

    This research program is directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal is to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work is underway. Microbial cultures have been isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters with cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Field pilot studies are underway.

  14. Foot-conditioned phonotactics and prosodic constituency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Ryan Thomas

    2012-01-01

    and Harmonic Serialism, London: Equinox. Available online as227–260. Lon- don: Equinox. Itô, Junko & Armin Mester.of Elisabeth Selkirk, London: Equinox. Jackendo?, Ray. 2011.

  15. Thermal denitration and mineralization of waste constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenni, J.A.; Boardman, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    In order to produce a quality grout from LLW using hydraulic cements, proper conditioning of the waste is essential for complete cement curing. Several technologies were investigated as options for conditions. Since the LLW is dilute, removal of all, or most, of the water will significantly reduce the final waste volume. Neutralization of the LLW is also desirable since acidic liquids to not allow cement to cure properly. The nitrate compounds are very soluble and easily leached from solid waste forms; therefore, denitration is desirable. Thermal and chemical denitration technologies have the advantages of water removal, neutralization, and denitration. The inclusion of additives during thermal treatment were investigated as a method of forming insoluable waste conditions.

  16. Environmental constituents of Electrical Discharge Machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Margaret H. (Margaret Hyunjoo), 1982-

    2004-01-01

    Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) is a non-traditional process that uses no mechanical forces to machine metals. It is extremely useful in machining hard materials. With the advantages EDM has to offer and its presence ...

  17. Volatile constituents in a wood pyrolysis oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Shih-Chien

    1978-01-01

    was determined on six me als. Acetic and formic acids were found to be the major corrosive agents. !Vine frac ions of pyrolysis oil obtained by vacuum fractional d still ation were classified on a 0$-1-38/H PO / 3 4 SP1210, 80/100 chromosorb G. C. column. Ph... Naterial s One objective of this work was to determine the corn- position of nine fraction' obtained by vacuum fractiona- tion of whole pyrolysis oil. The nine fractions were ch. omatographed on a 08-1-38/H PO /SP1210/80/100 chromosorb 3 4 W-AW column...

  18. HYDROCARBON CONSTITUENTS OF ICELAND LEAF FOSSIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

    2008-01-01

    and the fossils. the ~~illows Salix~. (with long, slender,and cottony winged seeds); Salix matsudana (its roundedpresent). Table II n-C 27 Salix n-C 29 Salix matsudana

  19. HYDROCARBON CONSTITUENTS OF ICELAND LEAF FOSSIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

    2008-01-01

    Survey for supplies of Iceland Leaf Fossils. part by Theof the Tertiary History of Iceland, North Atl anti c Bi otaFigure 1 A small slab of Iceland leaf fossil. 20cm long and

  20. To Customers, Constituents, Tribes and Stakeholders:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program to expense, BPA will no longer need to proceed with third-party financing for energy efficiency or with conservation billing credits. If BPA were to transition EE from...

  1. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

    2003-02-11

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with inorganic nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

  2. INNOVATIVE MIOR PROCESS UTILIZING INDIGENOUS RESERVOIR CONSTITUENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.O. Hitzman; A.K. Stepp; D.M. Dennis; L.R. Graumann

    2003-09-01

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions and technologies for improving oil production. The goal was to identify and utilize indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work in model sandpack cores was conducted using microbial cultures isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters using cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Increased oil recovery in multiple model sandpack systems was achieved and the technology and results were verified by successful field studies. Direct application of the research results has lead to the development of a feasible, practical, successful, and cost-effective technology which increases oil recovery. This technology is now being commercialized and applied in numerous field projects to increase oil recovery. Two field applications of the developed technology reported production increases of 21% and 24% in oil recovery.

  3. HYDROCARBON CONSTITUENTS OF ICELAND LEAF FOSSIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

    2008-01-01

    L.S. (1962) Isoprenoid hydrocarbons in petroleum. Anal.and EVANS E. D. (1965) Hydrocarbons in non-reservo; r-rockVI. Distribution of wax hydrocarbons in plants at different

  4. To Customers, Constituents, Tribes and Stakeholders:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81 to 1990Be PreseRted at the 27thTo

  5. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  6. Shape resonances in ground-state diatomic molecules: General trends and the example of RbCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Londono, B. E.; Mahecha, J. E.; Luc-Koenig, E.; Crubellier, A.

    2010-07-15

    The presence of shape resonances due to tunneling through the centrifugal barrier modifies strongly the dynamics of cold atom scattering. As shown on the example of the ground and lowest triplet electronic states of the {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule, the crucial parameter is, as usual for cold collisions, the scattering length. A general description of shape resonances of diatomic molecules is given from three simple single channel asymptotic models, whose respective performances are discussed. The first model, which consists of a R{sup -6} potential limited at short range by a repulsive wall, positioned to reproduce the s-wave scattering length, accounts satisfactorily for the main system-independent properties of shape resonances. Introduction in the model of energy- and angular-momentum-dependent nodal lines specific to the inner part of the potential greatly improves its efficiency. When the energy and angular momentum dependence of the nodal lines cannot be deduced from full potential calculations or from experiment, a rough, but universal, estimate of these properties is obtained by extending the R{sup -6} behavior of the potential up to the origin.

  7. AquaFuel: An example of the emerging new energies and the new methods for their scientific study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruggero Maria Santilli

    1998-05-23

    In this paper we initiate studies of the emerging new forms of energy by using as a representative example the new combustible gas called AquaFuel, discovered and patented by William H. Richardson, jr., whose rights are now owned by Toups Technology Licensing, Inc. (TTL), of Largo, Florida. In essence, AquaFuel is a new energy converter capable of transforming Carbon and water into a new combustible gas via an electric discharge. We show that AquaFuel can be produced easily, safely and rapidly in large amounts, and exhibits greatly reduced emission pollutants as compared to fossil fuels of current use. Despite its simplicity, the chemical and physical characteristics of AquaFuel are largely unknown at this writing. We then review nine basic experimental measurements which are necessary for a scientific appraisal of AquaFuel. We outline the limitations of quantum mechanics and chemistry for the treatment of {\\it new} forms of energy, namely, energies which by definition should be {\\it beyond} said theories. We finally point out the availability of broader theories specifically constructed for the study of new energies and point out available applications.

  8. UNSAT-H Version 3.0: Unsaturated Soil Water and Heat Flow Model Theory, User Manual, and Examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Fayer

    2000-06-12

    The UNSAT-H model was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the water dynamics of arid sites and, in particular, estimate recharge fluxes for scenarios pertinent to waste disposal facilities. During the last 4 years, the UNSAT-H model received support from the Immobilized Waste Program (IWP) of the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This program is designing and assessing the performance of on-site disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site (LMHC 1999). The IWP is interested in estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the vadose zone disposal of tank wastes. Simulation modeling with UNSAT-H is one of the methods being used to provide those estimates (e.g., Rockhold et al. 1995; Fayer et al. 1999). To achieve the above goals for assessing water dynamics and estimating recharge rates, the UNSAT-H model addresses soil water infiltration, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, deep drainage, and soil heat flow as one-dimensional processes. The UNSAT-H model simulates liquid water flow using Richards' equation (Richards 1931), water vapor diffusion using Fick's law, and sensible heat flow using the Fourier equation. This report documents UNSAT-H .Version 3.0. The report includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plants, and the code manual. Version 3.0 is an, enhanced-capability update of UNSAT-H Version 2.0 (Fayer and Jones 1990). New features include hysteresis, an iterative solution of head and temperature, an energy balance check, the modified Picard solution technique, additional hydraulic functions, multiple-year simulation capability, and general enhancements.

  9. A Comparison of Multi-Parametric Programming, Mixed-Integer Programming, Gradient Descent Based, and the Embedding Approach on Four Published Hybrid Optimal Control Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Richard; DeCarlo, Raymond A

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares the embedding approach for solving hybrid optimal control problems to multi-parameter programming, mixed-integer programming, and gradient-descent based methods in the context of four published examples. The four examples include a spring-mass system, moving-target tracking for a mobile robot, two-tank filling, and a DC-DC boost converter. Numerical advantages of the embedding approach are set forth and validated for each example: significantly faster solution time, no ad hoc assumptions (such as predetermined mode sequences) or control models, lower performance index costs, and algorithm convergence when other methods fail. Specific (theoretical) advantages of the embedding approach over the other methods are also described: guaranteed existence of a solution under mild conditions, convexity of the embedded optimization problem solvable with traditional techniques such as sequential quadratic programming with no need for any mixed-integer programming, applicability to nonlinear systems, e...

  10. Assessing National Employment Impacts of Investment in Residential and Commercial Sector Energy Efficiency: Review and Example Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, David M.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.

    2014-06-18

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) modeled the employment impacts of a major national initiative to accelerate energy efficiency trends at one of two levels: • 15 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, efficiency activities save about 15 percent of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Reference Case electricity consumption by 2030. It is assumed that additional energy savings in both the residential and commercial sectors begin in 2015 at zero, and then increase in an S-shaped market penetration curve, with the level of savings equal to about 7.0 percent of the AEO 2014 U.S. national residential and commercial electricity consumption saved by 2020, 14.8 percent by 2025, and 15 percent by 2030. • 10 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, additional savings begin at zero in 2015, increase to 3.8 percent in 2020, 9.8 percent by 2025, and 10 percent of the AEO reference case value by 2030. The analysis of the 15 percent case indicates that by 2030 more than 300,000 new jobs would likely result from such policies, including an annual average of more than 60,000 jobs directly supporting the installation and maintenance of energy efficiency measures and practices. These are new jobs resulting initially from the investment associated with the construction of more energy-efficient new buildings or the retrofit of existing buildings and would be sustained for as long as the investment continues. Based on what is known about the current level of building-sector energy efficiency jobs, this would represent an increase of more than 10 percent from the current estimated level of over 450,000 such jobs. The more significant and longer-lasting effect comes from the redirection of energy bill savings toward the purchase of other goods and services in the general economy, with its attendant influence on increasing the total number of jobs. This example analysis utilized PNNL’s ImSET model, a modeling framework that PNNL has used over the past two decades to assess the economic impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) energy efficiency programs in the buildings sector.

  11. A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production: a distillation tower, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvin, David

    A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production: a distillation tower, which takes in crude oil, up to a maximum of 650,000 barrels per day (bbl/day) and produces **" means "**% octane".) Once crude oil enters the system, it goes fully through the process. The refinery

  12. A Decade of Adult Intensive Care Unit Design: A Study of the Physical Design Features of the Best?Practice Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2006-10-01

    This article reports a study of the physical design characteristics of a set of adult intensive care units (ICUs), built between 1993 and 2003. These ICUs were recognized as the best-practice examples by the Society of Critical Care Medicine...

  13. Coupled fluid transport processes and numerical examples The expression "coupled fluid processes" refers to the central role of groundwater in transferring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Coupled fluid transport processes and numerical examples The expression "coupled fluid processes" refers to the central role of groundwater in transferring energy (i.e. heat) mass (i.e. solutes) over #12;Stability criteria TdK RaT Solutal Rayleigh number Thermal Rayleigh number d sat s D CdK CC Ra

  14. Example Curriculum Plan Neuromotor control and rehabilitation concentration area Requirements: 10 credits of rehabilitation science coursework, 12 credits of research tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    Example Curriculum Plan ­ Neuromotor control and rehabilitation concentration area Requirements: 10 credits of rehabilitation science coursework, 12 credits of research tools coursework and 22 credits Rehabilitation Science I,II 6 PTRS689 (2 semesters) Research Seminar: I-IV (4 semesters) 4 PTRS788 Total: 10

  15. Motivation Literature Trans. Network Models Relative Total Cost Indices Numerical Examples Summary A Relative Total Cost Index for the Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    A Relative Total Cost Index for the Evaluation of Transportation Network Robustness in the Presence Index #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Network Models Relative Total Cost Indices Numerical Examples, Qiang Qiang Relative Total Cost Index #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Network Models Relative Total

  16. Evaluation of the Utility of NMR Structures Determined from Minimal NOE-Based Restraints for Structure-Based Drug Design, Using MMP-1 as an Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Evaluation of the Utility of NMR Structures Determined from Minimal NOE-Based Restraints in the utility of these structures for a structure-based drug design program. As an example, the catalytic on the protein structure and its utility in drug design with a particular interest in the effect on the active

  17. examples show a detected power of only $30 pW (i.e., 75 dBm) very close to the detection background level. As characterized, most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Seong-Ook

    examples show a detected power of only $30 pW (i.e., À75 dBm) very close to the detection in next evolutions of the setup can eventually reduce them efficiently. Improvements are also expected-input-multiple-output antenna array at 700 MHz has been proposed for long-term evolution-standardized handsets. A simple shunt

  18. Tectonic features associated with the overriding of an accretionary wedge on top of a rifted continental margin: An example from Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    continental margin: An example from Taiwan Andrew T. Lin a, , Char-Shine Liu b , Che-Chuan Lin a , Philippe,d a Institute of Geophysics, National Central University, Taiwan b Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taiwan c Institute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan d CPC Corporation, Taiwan

  19. 4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING In general, building materials contain low levels of radioactivity. For example, the range of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING MATERIALS In general, building materials contain low levels of radioactivity. For example, the range of natural uranium concentrations may average as low as about 0.5 ppm (0.34 pCi/g or 13 Bq/kg) total uranium activity in sandstone building materials to as high

  20. Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a user of that drug (e.g. it produces a positive result with probability .98 in the case that the tested individual uses the drug) and 90% accurate in the case of a non

  1. Comparison of Petrophysical Rock Types from Core and Well-logs using Post-stack 3D Seismic Data: Field Example from Maracaibo-Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Kumar

    : Field Example from Maracaibo-Venezuela Francisco Cheng* and Kumar Ramachandran, The University of Tulsa in an area located on the West side of Lake Maracaibo-Venezuela. The calculated petrophysical rock types were Description The study area is located on the West side of Lake Maracaibo-Venezuela, in shallow, transition

  2. Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug .98 in the case that the tested individual uses the drug) and 90% accurate in the case of a non it is known that 10% of the entire population uses this drug. You test someone and the test is positive. What

  3. GUIDANCE ON ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS This document includes definitions and examples of expenditure types that would typically be considered unallowable direct charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    GUIDANCE ON ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS This document includes definitions and examples Circular A-21 and the Cost Accounting Standards (CAS). This document is meant to be a reference tool to as needed. This document is general in nature and is NOT an exhaustive list of unallowable costs for all

  4. Example of computation in R and Bugs We illustrate some of the practical issues of simulation by fitting a single This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    the general statistical package R. We proceed from data input, through statistical inference, to posterior in Bugs. Section C.4 presents several different ways of programming the model directly in RAPPENDIX C Example of computation in R and Bugs We illustrate some of the practical issues

  5. Impact of mine closure and access facilities on gas emissions from old mine workings to surface: examples of French iron and coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    : examples of French iron and coal Lorraine basins C. Lagny, R. Salmon, Z. Pokryszka and S. Lafortune (INERIS of mine shafts located in the iron Lorraine basin, in the Lorraine and in North-East coal basins are quite in mine workings but gas entrance and exit are allowed. Coal shafts are secured and can be equipped

  6. Post Canonical System: Examples First The definition follows some examples.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stansifer, Ryan

    : N Nx Nx | Ny +y = y x +y = z x | +y = z | A Post system for Hoftstadter's MU puzzle: MI xI xIU Mx is equivalent to all the others. #12;Post System: Tally Notation Two productions: N Nx Nx | This Post system, and z, and the signs {N,|,+,=}. N Nx Nx | Ny +y = y x +y = z x | +y = z | The last two rules reflect

  7. FLARE UP EXAMPLE? Regionally c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    significant phase in the Galapagos or ocean island systems presents an enigma:if the active phase is dominated

  8. HCP Example | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,SolarFERCInformation 3.1 - Amendments to6E -ScanHCEHCP

  9. Example Queries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,PowerEvaporative Coolers Jumpin

  10. example | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data book Home Graham7781'semissionsengineer Home

  11. OpenEI Community - example

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid Data available for download onst,/0 enBig Clean Data

  12. Hamiltonian dynamics in extended phase space for gravity and its consistency with Lagrangian formalism: a generalized spherically symmetric model as an example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Shestakova

    2013-03-06

    Among theoretical issues in General Relativity the problem of constructing its Hamiltonian formulation is still of interest. The most of attempts to quantize Gravity are based upon Dirac generalization of Hamiltonian dynamics for system with constraints. At the same time there exists another way to formulate Hamiltonian dynamics for constrained systems guided by the idea of extended phase space. We have already considered some features of this approach in the previous MG12 Meeting by the example of a simple isotropic model. Now we apply the approach to a generalized spherically symmetric model which imitates the structure of General Relativity much better. In particular, making use of a global BRST symmetry and the Noether theorem, we construct the BRST charge that generates correct gauge transformations for all gravitational degrees of freedom.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

    2009-03-25

    The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

  14. In-Situ, Real Time Measurement of Elemental Constituents | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    generating high-temperature plasma consisting of excited neutral atoms, ions, and electrons. Any chemical compounds present in the sample are rapidly separated into their...

  15. Investigation into mechanical properties of bone and its main constituents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evdokimenko, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    mineral to the elastic-plastic properties of bone. J Bonec properties, hardness, viscosity and plastic deformation ofin the plastic region is a function of collagen properties

  16. One Person, One Lobbyist? American Public Constituencies and Organized Representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Clearing House Congressional Testimony maintained bylevels of Congressional testimony whereas representatives ofin Congress Testimony to Congressional Committees Farmers

  17. Constituents without citizenship? : immigrant political incorporation in new destinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobbs, Erica Rose

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the role of native activists in the incorporation of new immigrants. Motivated by concerns that this process would be limited in countries with no tradition of immigration, it focuses on Spain, ...

  18. Linear to nonlinear rheology of bread dough and its constituents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Shen Kuan (Trevor Shen Kuan)

    2007-01-01

    There are many practical reasons for studying the deformational behavior or rheological properties of a dough system. The mass production of bread has led to a need of machines that are able to handle and process large ...

  19. Graphic values for some organic constituents of beneficiated coal samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohlenberger, L.B.

    1991-01-01

    The first objective of this one-year project is to obtain analytical data on a series of fractions of coal sample IBC-101 of widely varying ash content obtained via a froth flotation physical coal cleaning process. Froth flotation is the fractionation technique to be used rather than float/sink testing as in the Stansfield-Sutherland method because (1) most of the data in our files which were used in the development of these techniques were froth flotation tests and (2) as a way of showing that the fractionating is as effective by one technique as the other, so long as no chemical changes are effected. Analytical values will be obtained in the Coal Analysis Laboratory for moisture, ash, volatile matter, fixed carbon, total carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, total sulfur, sulfate sulfur, organic sulfur, and calorific value. The next objective will be to plot the various values of each of the analyzed species versus its corresponding ash values to obtain x/y plots for each as a function of ash. From the resulting curves, it should be possible to calculate for coal sample IBC-101 a precise measure of its mineral matter content, its dry or moist ,mineral-matter-free calorific value as used in determining the rank of the coal sample, calculate organic sulfur values corresponding to each ash value in cases where the relationship is linear, and possibly find other analyzed values which have a direct correlation with the mineral matter content of the coal.

  20. Characterizing cemented TRU waste for RCRA hazardous constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeamans, D.R.; Betts, S.E.; Bodenstein, S.A. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has characterized drums of solidified transuranic (TRU) waste from four major waste streams. The data will help the State of New Mexico determine whether or not to issue a no-migration variance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) so that WIPP can receive and dispose of waste. The need to characterize TRU waste stored at LANL is driven by two additional factors: (1) the LANL RCRA Waste Analysis Plan for EPA compliant safe storage of hazardous waste; (2) the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) The LANL characterization program includes headspace gas analysis, radioassay and radiography for all drums and solids sampling on a random selection of drums from each waste stream. Data are presented showing that the only identified non-metal RCRA hazardous component of the waste is methanol.

  1. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shim-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington

    1992-11-01

    This report contains the computer codes developed for the coal combustion project. In Subsection B.1 the FORTRAN code developed for the percolative fragmentation model (or the discrete model, since a char is expressed as a collection of discrete elements in a discrete space) is presented. In Subsection B.2 the code for the continuum model (thus named because mineral inclusions are distributed in a continuum space) is presented. A stereological model code developed to obtain the pore size distribution from a two-dimensional data is presented in Subsection B.3.

  2. Investigation into mechanical properties of bone and its main constituents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evdokimenko, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    treatment of intrabony periodontal defects: 6 year resultsbones, to repair periodontal defects, bone removal from

  3. Measuring Constituent Policy Preferences in Congress, State Legislatures, and Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tausanovitch, Chris

    Little is known about the American public’s policy preferences at the level of Congressional districts, state legislative districts, and local municipalities. In this article, we overcome the limited sample sizes that have ...

  4. Investigation into mechanical properties of bone and its main constituents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evdokimenko, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    Kinetic studies of bone demineralization at different HClKinetic studies of the demineralization and deproteinationJ. McKittrick, “Bone demineralization and deproteination

  5. "Non-spectroscopic Method of Determining Gas Constituents through

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXuRod Hunt (208) 386-52542 120"Geek"LittleRotation;

  6. How likely are constituent quanta to initiate inflation? (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (JournalArchitectures.Thesis/Dissertation:Warminghigh tc|

  7. Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulkChapter 9Desert Arroyo Seepage

  8. Crowdsourcing, citizen sensing and Sensor Web technologies for public and environmental health surveillance and crisis management: trends, OGC standards and application examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged; Resch, Bernd; Crowley, David N.; Breslin, John G.; Sohn, Gunho; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Jeziersk, Eduardo; Slayer Chuang, Kuo Yu

    2011-12-21

    The PIE Activity Awareness Environment is designed to be an adaptive data triage and decision support tool that allows role and activity based situation awareness through a dynamic, trainable filtering system. This paper discusses the process and methodology involved in the application as well as some of its capabilities. 'Wikification of GIS by the masses' is a phrase-term first coined by Kamel Boulos in 2005, two years earlier than Goodchild's term 'Volunteered Geographic Information'. Six years later (2005-2011), OpenStreetMap and Google Earth (GE) are now full-fledged, crowdsourced 'Wikipedias of the Earth' par excellence, with millions of users contributing their own layers to GE, attaching photos, videos, notes and even 3-D (three dimensional) models to locations in GE. From using Twitter in participatory sensing and bicycle-mounted sensors in pervasive environmental sensing, to creating a 100,000-sensor geo-mashup using Semantic Web technology, to the 3-D visualisation of indoor and outdoor surveillance data in real-time and the development of next-generation, collaborative natural user interfaces that will power the spatially-enabled public health and emergency situation rooms of the future, where sensor data and citizen reports can be triaged and acted upon in real-time by distributed teams of professionals, this paper offers a comprehensive state-of-the-art review of the overlapping domains of the Sensor Web, citizen sensing and 'human-in-the-loop sensing' in the era of the Mobile and Social Web, and the roles these domains can play in environmental and public health surveillance and crisis/disaster informatics. We provide an in-depth review of the key issues and trends in these areas, the challenges faced when reasoning and making decisions with real-time crowdsourced data (such as issues of information overload, 'noise', misinformation, bias and trust), the core technologies and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards involved (Sensor Web Enablement and Open GeoSMS), as well as a few outstanding project implementation examples from around the world.

  9. Water Resources Management Degree Program Examples The tables below show some of the ways in which a student can tailor the Water Resources Management curriculum to fit their interests and needs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Water Resources Management Degree Program Examples The tables below show some of the ways in which a student can tailor the Water Resources Management curriculum to fit their interests and needs. Each Hydrogeology Category B - Water Resources Institutions and Public Decision Making Processes Journalism 315

  10. VOLUME 77, NUMBER 2 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 8 JULY 1996 Short-Wave Limit of Hydrodynamics: A Soluble Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorban, Alexander N.

    of Hydrodynamics: A Soluble Example Alexander N. Gorban and Iliya V. Karlin* Computing Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk-36, 660036 Russian Federation (Received 4 January 1996) The Chapman-Enskog series, a possibility to compute a solution as a formal series in powers of Knudsen number e (where e is a ratio between

  11. Linking Education R&D Institutes and IndustryLinking Education, R&D Institutes and Industry l ifi E b l AR)(examples are more specific to Egypt , but many apply to AR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    and Industry l ifi E b l AR)(examples are more specific to Egypt , but many apply to AR) Mohamed A. Abdou goals. The overall assessment indicates that: Egypt's current S&T system has failed to substantially impactEgypt s current S&T system has failed to substantially impact socio-economic development which

  12. Drug testing Example for Conditional Probability and Bayes Theorem Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    Drug testing Example for Conditional Probability and Bayes Theorem Suppose that a drug test a positive result with probability .98 in the case that the tested individual uses the drug) and 90% accurate not use the drug). Suppose it is known that 10% of the entire population uses this drug. You test someone

  13. Effect of the Pauli exclusion principle and the polarization of nuclei on the potential of their interaction for the example of the {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesterov, V. A.

    2013-05-15

    On the basis of the energy-density method, the effect of simultaneously taking into account the Pauli exclusion principle and the monopole and quadrupole polarizations of interacting nuclei on their interaction potential is considered for the example of the {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O system by using the wave function for the two-center shell model. The calculations performed in the adiabatic approximation reveal that the inclusion of the Pauli exclusion principle and the polarization of interacting nuclei, especially their quadrupole polarization, has a substantial effect on the potential of the nucleus-nucleus interaction.

  14. Federal Gov Monthly state fuel tax examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taxes $10 Federal Fuel Taxes $9 Light-duty Truck Passenger Vehicle $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 California 18.5 miles per gallon 1,000 miles driven per month $10.81 2012 Ford F-150 Truck 23.5 miles per gallon

  15. National Climate Assessment Indicators: Background, Development, & Examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janetos, Anthony C.; Chen, Robert; Arndt, Deke; Kenney, Melissa A.; Abbasi, Daniel; Armstrong, Tom; Bartuska, Ann; Blair, Maria; Buizer, Jim; Dietz, Tom; Easterling, Dave; Kaye, Jack; Kolian, Michael; McGeehin, Michael; O'Connor, Robert; Pulwarty, Roger; Running, Steve; Schmalensee, Dick; Webb, Robert; Weltzin, Jake; Baptista, Sandra; Enquist, Carolyn A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Chen, Robert; Arndt, Deke; Hatfield, Jerry; Hayes, Mark L.; Jones, K. Burce; McNutt, Chad; Meier, Wayne R.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Svoboda, Mark

    2012-02-28

    Indicators are usually thought of as measurements or calculations that represent important features of the status, trend, or performance of a system of interest (e.g. the economy, agriculture, air quality). They are often used for the most practical of reasons – one cannot measure everything important about systems of interest, so there is a practical need to identify major features that can be reported periodically and used to guide both research and decisions (NRC 2000).

  16. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Policy & Operational Decisions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report for 322-M (Reference 1) was issued in March 1998 and is an excellent source of detailed information on the history and current status of the 322-M Metallurgical...

  17. APPENDIX 33 : Minitab Examples for Control Charting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    and Stephen L. Morgan. All rights reserved. Slide A33-18 Control Charts/Xbar-R: Options Test data: Western by Stanley N. Deming and Stephen L. Morgan. All rights reserved. Slide A33-19 Control Charts/Xbar-R: Output Copyright © 2013 by Stanley N. Deming and Stephen L. Morgan. All rights reserved. Slide A33-5 Introduction

  18. Architecture and the movies : two examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary Elizabeth

    1986-01-01

    This thesis is a speculative inquiry into the relationship between movies and architecture, both of which are forms of expression simultaneously particular to the artist who created them and general, illustrative of a ...

  19. Examples of Process Modifications that Reduce Waste 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, K. E.

    1990-01-01

    , simply piping the hot stream directly into the suction of the storage tank pump as shown in Figure 9 may solve the problem ade quately. Make sure that the storage tank pump can handle hot material without cavitating. Hot Intermediate Process...

  20. Marine Conservation: The Farallon Islands Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    contamination (e.g. hydrocarbons, etc) · Oil pollution · Gill-netting · Disturbance at breeding areas Perspectives Major Threats to Populations · Ocean currents, upwelling · Changes in water temperature · Chemical · Protect breeding and staging areas · Reduce chemical contaminants · Reduce plastic particle pollution

  1. Query Generation From Multiple Media Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, R.

    Ren,R. Jose,J.M. the 7th International Workshop on Content-Based Multimedia Indexing pp 138-143 IEEE Computer Society Press

  2. Subspaces of R. H. Bing's example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Ira Wayne

    1974-01-01

    no limit points. Thus the definition for preparacompactness is always vacuously satisfied by G. 2. K jHodel, [13] and f8]3 Let K = F U ( p Every open cover of fU(p, r )g where gp j er for metalindelof. f ) f(q) = 1 for at most countably many qadi...]q), and p p p P A = A 'QA ". Then there exists an uncountable subset P" of P' p p p such that g' g A , " = p for all p, p' in P". Let f be defined by f(q) = 1 iff qeA ' for some pep". Then f is in X C'X and fsU(p, r )Q X for each peP". Thus U is not m...

  3. project examples | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle (IGCC) concept at a commercial scale, the Cool Water Project, part of DOE's Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. The Cool Water Project was conducted in Southern...

  4. Designing for Heterogeneity and Unreliability: Examples from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    part of my talk. In the second part I will give a broad overview of my earlier work with software engineering of FLASH, a multi-component & multi-physics community code....

  5. REDUCING CARBON EMISSIONS REAL WORLD EXAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    process are used to produce carbon- neutral bio-energy 1 2 3 4 5 #12;GHG REDUCTION COMMITMENT Percentage

  6. CopyStyler : Web design by example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzgerald, Michael J., M. Eng Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and implementation of CopyStyler, a tool to enable novice web users to style their own web pages by emulating the style of existing pages on the Web. The tool is implemented as a browser ...

  7. Fire Modeling Examples in a Nuclear World

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Mark Schairer, P.E.,Technical Manager, Fire Protection Engineering Division - Engineering Planning and Management (EPM), Inc.

  8. Herbicide-Common Name (example trade name)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Brad

    Pomegranate dichlobenil (Casoron) L / 20 N N N N R R N R N N N N N N N R N N N diuron (Karmex,Diurex) C2 / 7 N R N R R R N N N R N N R N N R N R N EPTC (Eptam) N / 8 R N N R N N N N N N N N R N N N N N N flazasulfuron (Mission) B / 2 N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N R N N N flumioxazin (Chateau) E / 14 R R R R R R R R

  9. Regenerative Medicine: Learning from Past Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couto, Daniela S.

    Regenerative medicine products have characteristically shown great therapeutic potential, but limited market success. Learning from the past attempts at capturing value is critical for new and emerging regenerative medicine ...

  10. Project Management Plan Examples 1- 80

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The descriptions below should be used to navigate to the subject of...

  11. Appendix C: Examples of review questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This set of review questions was pulled from a number of EERE evaluations by the PEER Review Task Force and organized to show how questions for assessing a program differ from questions for assessing projects that make up that program.

  12. DMBC: After Effects After Effects Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Files New Compositions (New Files) Composition > New Compostions Composition Name Presets o NTSC DV o Timeline Panel Project Panel Right column Panels Tool Bar Animation Basics Tool Bar Move Tool Magnifying Glass Rotation Tool Text Tool #12;Adding Animation Timeline Layers Property Layers Transform

  13. AWtemplate Examples, 1 Content Conversion and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdun, Uwe

    place, interactive, Web-based applications represent their services using HTML pages. An HTTP server transfers HTML pages with the HTTP protocol. A Web user agent, such as a browser, communicates with a Web to be decorated with HTML markup. On the first glance, content creation on the Web seems to be a simple effort

  14. Montana Construction Dewatering General Permit - Example Authorization |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett, 2004)Michigan:Montana Building6 Jump and

  15. LOPP Example Acceptance Letter | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville,LEDSGP/activities <LEDSGP/hometraining <

  16. Leading By Example | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA PublicLED ADOPTION REPORTLand andDr. Penrose C.

  17. Fortran MPI/OpenMP example

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)Forthcoming Upgrades to the ARM MMCRs: Improved Radar

  18. LNG to CNG refueling stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branson, J.D. [ECOGAS Corp., Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    While the fleet operator is concerned about the environment, he or she is going to make the choice based primarily on economics. Which fuel provides the lowest total operating cost? The calculation of this costing must include the price-per-gallon of the fuel delivered, as well as the tangible and intangible components of fuel delivery, such as downtime for vehicles during the refueling process, idle time for drivers during refueling, emissions costings resulting from compressor oil blow-by, inclusion of non-combustible constituents in the CNG, and energy consumption during the refueling process. Also, the upfront capital requirement of similar delivery capabilities must be compared. The use of LNG as the base resource for the delivered CNG, in conjunction with the utilization of a fully temperature-compressed LNG/CNG refueling system, eliminates many of the perceived shortfalls of CNG. An LNG/CNG refueling center designed to match the capabilities of the compressor-based station will have approximately the same initial capital requirement. However, because it derives its CNG sales product from the {minus}260 F LNG base product, thus availing itself of the natural physical properties of the cryogenic product, all other economic elements of the system favor the LNG/CNG product.

  19. ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    -3 . (i) Use Figure 3 to estimate the drag forces acting on the sphere. (ii) Calculate the buoyancy force acting on the sphere. (i) We need to calculate the Reynolds number associated with the motionAreationalCrossu ForceDrag CD expsec 2 20 -× = #12;220 2 ru ForceDrag CD × = =ForceDrag 220 2 ruCD

  20. ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    is 1200=s kgm-3 . (i) Use Figure 3 to estimate the drag forces acting on the sphere. (ii) Calculate the buoyancy force acting on the sphere. Figure 3: Drag coefficient of smooth, axially symmetric bodies (From peripheral surface of the plunger. Calculate the force and the power required to maintain this motion. Figure

  1. ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    of msvp = 2 -1 . Calculate the mean model wind tunnel speed if the model is made to 1/10 scale. Assume in a wind tunnel. The airspeed range to be investigated is at the docking end of its range, a maximum -=-=-= --- Question 4: Sliding Board #12;A board with an area slides down an inclined ramp as is schematically

  2. ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Example Questions (Set II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    end of its range, a maximum of msvp = 2 -1 . Calculate the mean model wind tunnel speed if the model = 20 m needs to be studied in a wind tunnel. The airspeed range to be investigated is at the docking an inclined ramp as is schematically illustrated in Figure 3. The ramp is inclined at an angle . The weight

  3. Effects of weathering on coal and its sulfur constituents in refuse piles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, L.A.; Berggren, D.J.; Hughes, R.E.

    1984-12-01

    The rejects from coal mining and processing operations are intensively weathered in refuse piles. The effects of weathering on coal and and its associated sulfur-containing compounds are economically and environmentally significant. Chemical and x-ray diffraction analyses of material from abandoned mined lands, collected for a study of historic long-wall mines in Illinois, showed that most pyrite in weathered samples is converted to gypsum, jarosite, and minor alunite. There were only small reductions in the trace element concentrations of these samples. Coal readily takes up oxygen from air. Coal-oxygen complexes produced by oxygen adsorption or peroxide formation are very unstable, and the oxygen can be removed as oxygen gas, CO/sub 2/, or H/sub 2/O upon heating and evacuation. Heating coal under partial vacuum decreases its surface charge. The decrease in surface charge increases with heating time and temperature. This suggests that the adverse effect of exposure to air may be partially reversed, with a corresponding gain in the efficiency of the coal recovery processes.

  4. Method for recycling tires and similarly compounded materials to recover usable constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letsch, W.

    1980-12-23

    A processing plant and method are described for processing scrap tires and similar materials containing a mixture of technical rubber, scrap metal and tire cord in which the plant is essentially vehicular and thus eliminates the necessity of hauling accumulated tires long distances with the accompanying costs. The plant includes means for directing mixed tire sizes to a cyrogenic section where the technical rubber is reduced to a sufficient temperature making it brittle so that initial separation of reusable technical rubber is accomplished; the plant is operated essentially on the reusable by-products of pyrolytic reduction of the tires so that hydrocarbons and heated gas are utilized and additional commercial by-products such as commercial soots, metal and tire beads are obtained.

  5. Salivary influences upon levels of certain chemical constituents in forage residues collected from esophageally cannulated sheep 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radde, Kenneth Albert

    1967-01-01

    - hydrate content of the offered fo. ames PercentaSe incre, e in ash exnressed on a dry matter basis 24 +- CVG x 100 ? Level of water soluble carbohydrates in foraGe residues relative to calculated level of inc:ested w. . ter soluble carbohydrates...

  6. Client perceptions of university computing services from the faculty computing skills constituency perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claybourn, C. Kay

    1990-01-01

    to Cynthia Burdick who coded the software question virtually by herself. Keeping track of over 800 different software packages spread out over three machine platforms was a monumental task. Elaine Barnett endured with extreme patience the trial of key..., 044 in The document follows the style of The American Sociological Review. 1989, for each university, an increase of 48. 2 percent for each of the five years (Warlick, 1989) (Table 1). Although the machines, in computerese "hardware...

  7. CONSTITUENTS OF Hiraea reclinataAND THEIRANTI-HIVACTIVITY AHMED A. HUSSEIN1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, Phyllis

    , MARLA RAMOS1 , MARIA HELLER2 , PHYLLIS D. COLEY2,3 , PABLO N. SOLIS1 , AND MAHABIR P. GUPTA1 protons, (Escobar, L. K. et al., 1983) and are thus reporting in Table 1 full 1 H and 13 C NMR data

  8. The effect of some dissolved constituents on the redox potential of water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wales, Robert David

    1952-01-01

    yeaobLoel ~ease aassbe a eateassgo aleaiwNSa Le eel Laebsse af iba bphNaa Oleeie4e ~ ?ateeacee aleAnde La ibs oe4eeaM ~ balf~ seeL Li La eyebea io gLee ihe Eb NLaee ibe ylabLeea alaaiwde ie Lssaeis LL Le aei aNeAsC Q ~%coos bai ibe ~ ball4sell Le aft... ~ darLag ahLeh ih& Impasse aae 4&g&ee&4s faQeeN by a yes%&4 ~ abXoh ~ ?&co t&bsa &ad oa&lysa&L, The 4IIgaeeL&g oyos?tie& see gee tbe yasp?eo &f et&rhbIg ib& naa aLth & lsas dLeaale&4 osSyg&a edae The ibse~eba4 f lech &s&L lb& re+ ~ ssoe? fLU?4 sslth...

  9. Further study of the $N\\Omega$ dibaryon within constituent quark models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Hongxia; Wang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the discovery of the dibaryon $d^{*}$, we extend our research from nonstrange dibaryons to strange dibaryon of $N\\Omega$ in the framework of quark delocalization color screening model and chiral quark model. We have found $N\\Omega$ was a narrow resonance in $\\Lambda\\Xi$ D-wave scattering. However, it is difficult to observe the $\\Lambda-\\Xi$ scattering process in experiments. In order to give more information to the experiment, here we study the low-energy scattering phase shifts, the scattering length, the effective range and the binding energy of $N\\Omega$ system. All results show there exists a $N\\Omega$ state, which could be observed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC, or by the hadron beam experiments at J-PARC and FAIR. Besides, we also find the channel-coupling is important for the $N\\Omega$ intermediate-range attraction.

  10. 1. Constituents of rainwater 2. pH and pKa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    of soluble gases (reminder) { SO 2 1. Coal burning coal + O 2 (g) #1; ! SO 2 (g) + electricty 2. Volcanos to important physical properties: 1. Density of ice lower than liquid water in range T = 0 4 C. Important

  11. Acute changes in pulse pressure in relation to constituents of particulate air pollution in elderly persons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Lotte; Buczynska, Anna; Walgraeve, Christophe; Delcloo, Andy; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja; Molecular Science Institute, School of Chemistry, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester ; Van Grieken, Rene; Demeestere, Kristof; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman; De Backer, Hugo; Nemery, Benoit; Nawrot, Tim S.; Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek

    2012-08-15

    An increased pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure) suggests aortic stiffening. The objective of this study was to examine the acute effects of both particulate matter (PM) mass and composition on blood pressure, among elderly persons. We carried out a panel study in persons living in elderly homes in Antwerp, Belgium. We recruited 88 non-smoking persons, 70% women with a mean age of 83 years (standard deviation: 5.2). Blood pressure was measured and a blood sample was collected on two time points, which were chosen so that there was an exposure contrast in ambient PM exposure. The elemental content of the collected indoor and outdoor PM{sub 2.5} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 {mu}m) mass concentration was measured. Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) on outdoor PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 {mu}m) were measured. Each interquartile range increase of 20.8 {mu}g/m Superscript-Three in 24-h mean outdoor PM{sub 2.5} was associated with an increase in pulse pressure of 4.0 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 1.8-6.2), in persons taking antihypertensive medication (n=57), but not in persons not using antihypertensive medication (n=31) (p for interaction: 0.02). Vanadium, iron and nickel contents of PM{sub 2.5} were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, among persons on antihypertensive medication. Similar results were found for indoor concentrations. Of the oxy-PAHs, chrysene-5,6-dione and benzo[a]pyrene-3,6-dione were significantly associated with increases in systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. In elderly, pulse pressure was positively associated with acute increases in outdoor and indoor air pollution, among persons taking antihypertensive medication. These results might form a mechanistic pathway linking air pollution as a trigger of cardiovascular events.

  12. Capturing optically important constituents and properties in a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, A. E.

    We present a numerical model of the ocean that couples a three-stream radiative transfer component with a marine biogeochemical–ecosystem component in a dynamic three-dimensional physical framework. The radiative transfer ...

  13. DETECTION AND MEASUREMENTS OF AIR POLLUTANTS AND CONSTITUENTS BY MELLIMETER-WAVE MICROWAVE SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leskovar, Branko

    2011-01-01

    of Sulfur Dioxide Microwave Rotational Lines. Journal ofT. Buscher, B. Leskovar, Microwave Absorption CoefficientsPiezo- electric-Tuned Microwave Cavity for Absorption

  14. Tidal constituent database. West Coast of the United States and Eastern North pacific ocean. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This technical note describes a database of tidal elevation boundary condition information generated in support of the `Long-Term Fate of Dredged Material Disposed in Open Water` research of the Dredging Research Program (DRP), being conducted at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. The database, described in detail by Hench and others (1994), allows the user to manually generate time series of tidal elevations or to use a program to access the full database to generate time series of both tidal elevations and currents for any location along the West Coast of the United States and Eastern North Pacific Ocean, extending from Seal Cape on Unimak Island, Alaska, in the North to Punta Parada, Peru, in the South. The land boundary includes the Pacific shorelines of Alaska, Canada, mainland United States, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Columbia, and Northern Peru. Although the capability to generate these time series was developed to provide input to the Long-Term Fate and Stability Model (LTFATE), the generated time series can be used for any application requiring tidal forcing data.

  15. Provenance of Corexit-related chemical constituents found in nearshore and inland Gulf Coast waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    , crude oil from the Deepwater Hori- zon accident began washing onto northern Gulf of Mexico(GOM) sandy beaches, continuing until about mid-July, 2010.This oil ar- rived considerably altered from its original, stocks of this dispersant were quickly exhausted and Corexit 9500 was used during the remaining response

  16. Identification of lipid and saccharide constituents of whole microalgal cells by 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Phytoplankton Dynamic filter Cell surface Membrane Organelle Storage Microalgae are unicellular organisms and Nannochloropsis oculata) microalgae with different cell wall charac- teristics. C. reinhardtii is covered rights reserved. 1. Introduction Microalgae are unicellular microorganisms whose diameter typically

  17. Corpus-Based Induction of Syntactic Structure: Models of Dependency and Constituency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Christopher

    empirically against the poverty of the stimulus (Clark, 2001), to use induction systems as a first stage for these patterns in the data, and hence un- dermines arguments based on "the poverty of the stimulus" (Chomsky

  18. CorpusBased Induction of Syntactic Structure: Models of Dependency and Constituency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Dan

    empirically against the poverty of the stimulus (Clark, 2001), to use induction systems as a first stage for these patterns in the data, and hence undermines arguments based on ``the poverty of the stimulus'' (Chomsky

  19. CorpusBased Induction of Syntactic Structure: Models of Dependency and Constituency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Christopher

    empirically against the poverty of the stimulus (Clark, 2001), to use induction systems as a first stage for these patterns in the data, and hence un­ dermines arguments based on ``the poverty of the stimulus'' (Chomsky

  20. Digestibility by Chickens of the Constituents of the Nitrogen-Free Extract of Feeds. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1931-01-01

    Engineering J. H. KNOX, M. S. Animal Husbandry A. K. MACKEY, M. S., A~imal Husbandry A. L. DARNELL, ~kf. A., Dairy Husbrrndry *Dean School of Veterinary Medicine. ?As of November 1, 1931. **In cooperation w~th U. S. Department of Agriculture...

  1. Systematic study of longitudinal and transverse helicity amplitudes in the hypercentral Constituent Quark Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Giannini

    2015-06-19

    The predictions of the hypercentral Consituent Quark Model for the nucleon helicity amplitudes are briefly reported. Some future perspectives are also discussed.

  2. The Total Fatty Acids and Other Ether-Soluable Constituents of Feedstuffs. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

    1914-01-01

    . Percentage of Fatty Acids in Feedstuffs and Excrements by Various Methods. Labora? tory No. Ether extract. Fatty acids in ether extract. ?a.3 ? g S | . 2 5 a a'-"a _ Differ? ence (B-A) Diges? tion Method. Precipi? tation Method. O O... Q'S'o'cS ? "3 Is E-i . c *= =? a J=! ^ c3 12996 3.79 3.08 0.37 3.45 4.43 0 98 12999 4.31 3.77 0.16 3.93 4.34 0 41 13021 15.23 13.82 0.69 14.51 14.46 -0 05 13023 7.75 6 .2 1 0.39 6.60 8 . 1 0 1 50 13030 3.22 2.05 0.37 2.42 2.92 0 50 13045...

  3. INFLUENCE OF CARBON AND METAL OXIDE NANOMATERIALS ON AQUEOUS CONCENTRATIONS OF THE MUNITION CONSTITUENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    -aluminum and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are incorporated into nano- thermites, energetics, and propellant

  4. Embodied Energy Calculation: Method and Guidelines for a Building and its Constituent Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixit, Manish Kumar

    2013-10-23

    an embodied energy definition, a complete system boundary model, and a set of data collection, embodied energy calculation, and result reporting guidelines. The main goal of proposing the guidelines was to streamline the process of embodied energy calculation...

  5. Genotypic influences on norepinephrine-induced change in thermogenesis and plasma constituents in newborn calves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostyn, Paul Curtis

    1995-01-01

    production was measured by indirect calorimetry and blood samples collected prior to and following norepinephrine infusion at 35 jig- kg-I-min-1 for 4 min. Calves bom to B dams were 12.9% lighter than calves bom to A dams. Weight-specific therrnoneutral...

  6. Issue Voting in a Polarized Era: Ideology, Constituencies and Policy-Making in Congress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringenberg, Thomas

    2015-05-31

    that incorporate issue politics guide our understanding? This research considers issue voting in an era of polarization and explores the impact of these diverse interests on policy voting in Congress. The results suggest that dimensionality, or the appearance...

  7. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 3, Appendices: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helble, J.J. [ed.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Kang, Shim-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains the computer codes developed for the coal combustion project. In Subsection B.1 the FORTRAN code developed for the percolative fragmentation model (or the discrete model, since a char is expressed as a collection of discrete elements in a discrete space) is presented. In Subsection B.2 the code for the continuum model (thus named because mineral inclusions are distributed in a continuum space) is presented. A stereological model code developed to obtain the pore size distribution from a two-dimensional data is presented in Subsection B.3.

  8. Charleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Robert T.

    COMMUNICATION: R. Taylor gave the board an update on an expelled student and possibly rescinding the expulsion Meeting: Thursday, February 16, 2012 6:00 p.m. BOARD MEMBERS PRESENT: R. Lewis, E. Haynes, R. Dillon, P. Tecklenburg Ruth Taylor, Assistant Associate Superintendent ABSENT: Rhonda Hills CALL TO ORDER EXECUTIVE

  9. The Effects of EGR and Its Constituents on the Autoignition of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research Microsoft PowerPoint - DEER03-P.ppt HCCI and Stratified-Charge CI Engine Combustion Research...

  10. Multispectral UV Fluorescence Detection of a Dilute Constituent in an Optically Dense Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, O.H.; Gray, P.C., Wehlburg, C.M.; Rubenstein, R.; Tisone, G.C.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-15

    Multispectral UV fluorescence measurements were made of an optically dense medium (fetal bovine serum, FBS) spiked with sodium salicylate at concentrate ions from 0.2 to 500 pg/ml . Analysis of the spectra show that, depending on experimental conditions, reasonably good estimates of concentration can be obtained across the entire range of concentrate ions. Experimental conditions required for recovering these estimates are demonstrated.

  11. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Trace Chemical and Major Constituents Measurements of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and carbon dioxide) in a space vehicle or station. It is designed to operate autonomously and maintenance = In Flight Maintenance ISS = International Space Station JPL = Jet Propulsion Laboratory JSC = Johnson Space-Purpose Logistics Module NCO = Numerically-Controlled Oscillator NIST = National Institute of Science and Technology

  12. Galaxies and their constituents at the highest angular resolutions ASP Conference Series, Vol. ???, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcke, Heino

    ra- dio emission from AGNs? Perhaps the engines are the same but the jets get disrupted by dense ISM in radio-quiet objects, or else the engines are intrinsically di#11;erent with jet power scaling with, say. ???, 2001 R. Schilizzi, S. Vogel, F. Paresce, M. Elvis Parsec-Scale Jets and Tori in Seyfert Galaxies A

  13. Anisotropy in the compressive mechanical properties of bovine cortical bone and the mineral and protein constituents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKittrick, Joanna

    Cortical bone Compression Demineralization Deproteinization a b s t r a c t The mechanical properties of fully demineralized, fully deproteinized and untreated cortical bovine femur bone were investigated. Demineralization and deproteinization of the bone demonstrated that contiguous, stand-alone structures result

  14. A model for determining the fate of hazardous constituents in waste during in-vessel composting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bollineni, Prasanthi

    1994-01-01

    importance in waste management. It is basically used for methane production('gobargas', biogas). Composting is further classified based on the reactor type, solids flow function, bed conditions and methods of air supply into open and in-vessel systems...

  15. 2010-05 "Interim Measure for Volatile Organic Constituent Contaminant

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s i s t a nsecond report released

  16. User:Nlangle/Math Examples | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:PowerNew York:CategoryLists < User:Nlangle

  17. User:Nlangle/Migration Example | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:PowerNew York:CategoryLists < User:NlangleMigration

  18. User:Nlangle/Reference Example | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:PowerNew York:CategoryLists <Nlangle/Reference

  19. FACT SHEET: Examples of Administration Activities for Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    job-driven training agenda, the program is based on the specific needs of high-growth solar employers, is tailored to build on the technician skills that veterans have acquired...

  20. RESEARCH PAPER Interaction of edge influence from multiple edges: examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    ) in harvested forest landscapes could impair, or possibly enhance, their effectiveness. When multiple edges of cutblocks (harvested areas) and water bodies were entered into the models to predict edge influence) positive interaction, observed edge influence is greater than from either edge alone; (3) negative

  1. Random free fermions: An analytical example of eigenstate thermalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magan, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    Having analytical instances of the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis (ETH) is of obvious interest, both for fundamental and applied reasons. This is generically a hard task, due to the belief that non-linear interactions are basic ingredients of the thermalization mechanism. In this article we proof that random gaussian free fermions satisfy ETH in the multiparticle sector, by analytically computing the correlations and entanglement entropies of the theory. With the explicit construction at hand, we finally comment on the differences between fully random Hamiltonians and random Gaussian systems, and on the connection between chaotic energy spectra and ETH.

  2. DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices evaluation instrument examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    Training evaluation determines a training program`s effectiveness in meeting its intended purpose: producing competent employees. Evaluation is the quality assurance component of a systematic approach to training program. This guide provides information on evaluation instruments used to gather employee, supervisor, and instructor feedback to identify strengths and weaknesses of training programs at DOE facilities. It should be used in conjunction with ``DOE Training Program Handbook: A Systematic Approach to Training`` and ``DOE Handbook, Alternative Systematic Approaches to Training.``

  3. Expert systems - An overview and a mining example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, J.L.; Ramani, R.V.; Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1986-01-01

    The knowledge-based expert systems (KBES) is a potentially powerful technique to the mining engineer in traditional areas of mine design and operations, as well as in the emerging areas of mining automation and robotics. Since KBES is still experimental in many respects, caution must be exercised as this ''high tech'' tool is developed and applied to mining. The objective of this paper is to demystify expert systems by introducing the elements of KBES, discussing the strengths and weaknesses, and identifying some areas of application in mining, based on the authors' experiences.

  4. know. Like, for example, professor Jack Lockwood putting UNH on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    to nearly Superdome size with six million cubic feet of helium. Here, floating about in the frigid regions

  5. Part IB Metals Course A: Worked Examples (2022)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    2022-01-01

    and the surface finish is good. A heat­resistant nickel base alloy cast using the lost wax process in which a wax model is surrounded by ceramic, the wax is then burnt off and the metal cast into the ceramic mould

  6. Part IB Metals Course A: Worked Examples (20-22)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    -resistant nickel base alloy cast using the lost wax process in which a wax model is surrounded by ceramic, the wax

  7. Multilevel Analysis in R with a Broken-line Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeuw, Jan de

    2008-01-01

    conduction velocity",col="RED ",lwd=3,main="FIML") for (i ini]+2*vml[i]),col="GREEN" ,lwd=3) ymllwd=3) for (i in 1:7) lines(c(

  8. Multilevel Analysis in R with a Broken-line Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan de Leeuw

    2011-01-01

    conduction velocity",col="RED ",lwd=3,main="FIML") for (i ini]+2*vml[i]),col="GREEN" ,lwd=3) ymllwd=3) for (i in 1:7) lines(c(

  9. Long Range Dependence of Point Processes, with Queueing Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vesilo, Rein

    var \\Gamma P n i=1 Y i \\Delta n = 1: (1:2) Within the context of `standard' queueing models with a renewal arrival process and i.i.d. service times, we show in x2 that when the input process is renewal: (1:3) We note that a renewal process, which can never be LRiD, can exhibit long range count

  10. Examples Class 1: Stereographic Projections The Stereographic Projection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    these properties ­ be careful not to let the plastic hemisphere touch the bulb or it may melt. Lines or dots drawn on the 1 #12;plastic hemisphere are projected as shadows cast by the light from the `point' light source in the shadow projector. 1. Unmount a hemisphere and making use of the bendy plastic strip, draw a great circle

  11. Value of Options in Airport Expansion - Example of AICM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgado, Frederico

    Investments decisions for airport capacity expansion are usually taken, either when demand exceeds the current capacity and the airport is working under congestion, or when current demand is expected to overcome current ...

  12. Geothermal Development and Changes in Surficial Features: Examples...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of declines in thermal-water discharge, increases in fumarolic steam discharge, and subsidence. At other areas noted above, similar types of changes have occurred but existing...

  13. On The Distribution of Linear Biases: Three Instructive Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    . Lyngby, Denmark {M.A.Abdelraheem,P.Beelen,G.Leander}@mat.dtu.dk 2 Dept. of Electrical and Information strong copyright protection mechanisms, or after-sale feature activation in modern cars. Virtually all

  14. Club's Chairman Leading by Example | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and habitats by advocating clean energy use and encouraging Americans to live eco-friendly lifestyles. Sierra Club Oregon Chairman Wes Kempfer is doing his part to further...

  15. Excellence in Energy Awards: Military Academies Leading by Example...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 - 9:55am Addthis Federal Energy Management Program Director Dr. Timothy Unruh (fourth from left) with Air Force Academy staff and students. The Air Force Academy team won a...

  16. Example Performance Targets and Efficiency Packages Greensburg, Kansas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation shows the energy performance targets and efficiency packages for residential buildings in Greensburg, Kansas.

  17. EXAMPLES OF CONTEMPORARY TOPICS Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    . How does increasing carbon dioxide affect forest productivity? 5. Interest in locally grown produce of controlling invasive species in forests 7. Feasibility of measuring individual trees using remote sensing 8 Carbon 1) Life cycle analysis as a tool for bioenergy/biorefinery evaluation 2) What is the best

  18. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    utilizing the phase contrast microscope means of analytical technique 70 structuresmm utilizing the transmission electron microscopy technique 4.7.5 Polychlorinated Biphenyls...

  19. Microbial Physiology and Biosignature Production: Mineralogical, Morphological and Geochemical Examples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Zhirui

    2014-11-21

    promote carbonate precipitation. However, little is known about how iron reducing bacteria induce carbonate formation, and control carbonate composition and morphology. Direct observation and geochemical modeling indicated actively metabolizing cells...

  20. Decentralized Control across Bit-Limited Communication Channels: An Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vijay

    of real time multi-agent coordina- tion, classical information theory faces several fundamental problems- tional information theory tools are not easily applied. Many researchers have already seen [13] much progress (both theoretical and practical) has been made in information theory. The success