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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Health Effects Review of Asbestos Substitutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concern about the possible health effects of asbestos on the general population and the workplace has stimulated interest in the manufacture and use of other natural and man-made fibers. This report summarizes information available through July 21, 1993, on the health effects--carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic--of exposure to these fibers, including glass fibers, rockwool and slagwool, refractory ceramic fibers, calcium silicate, and perlite.

1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

Method for converting asbestos to non-carcinogenic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hazardous and carcinogenic asbestos waste characterized by a crystalline fibrous structure is transformed into non-carcinogenic, relatively nonhazardous, and non-crystalline solid compounds and gaseous compounds which have commercial utilization. The asbestos waste is so transformed by the complete fluorination of the crystalline fibrous silicate mineral defining the asbestos. 7 figs.

Selby, T.W.

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

3

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

4

NETL: Health Effects - Source Contributions to PM Health Effects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Contributions to PM Health Effects: DOE Office of Fossil Energy Analysis DOE's Division of Planning and Environmental Analysis, within its Office of Fossil Energy, Office of...

5

Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

Solid waste management and health effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report investigates possible health effects due to improper disposal of waste and the awareness within a community. The aim was also to investigate… (more)

Selin, Emma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Health Effects Associated with Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hexafluoride (UF6) UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Health Effects Associated with Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium...

9

Health effects of coal technologies: research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this 1977 Environmental Message, President Carter directed the establishment of a joint program to identify the health and environmental problems associated with advanced energy technologies and to review the adequacy of present research programs. In response to the President's directive, representatives of three agencies formed the Federal Interagency Committee on the Health and Environmental Effects of Energy Technologies. This report was prepared by the Health Effects Working Group on Coal Technologies for the Committee. In this report, the major health-related problems associated with conventional coal mining, storage, transportation, and combustion, and with chemical coal cleaning, in situ gasification, fluidized bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamic combustion, cocombustion of coal-oil mixtures, and cocombustion of coal with municipal solid waste are identified. The report also contains recommended research required to address the identified problems.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Health Effects of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents results of a project to identify and quantify toxic effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) in living organisms. The overall goal is to develop concentration and time-dependent profiles of CO2 toxicity in a variety of organisms. This project phase was designed to develop exposure-effect profiles for humans and nonhuman mammals and to identify the availability of information for other species.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

CO2 Health Effects in Wildlife Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CCS) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in wildlife animal species. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans, laboratory animals, and domesticated animals...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

12

Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits  

SciTech Connect

Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

Health Effects for Boron and Borates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron occurs in varying concentrations in coal fly ash and is typically found in fly ash leachates. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is in the process of performing a risk assessment to determine safe levels of boron for human ingestion. This report describes existing information on the health effects of boron and how that information is being used to calculate a reference dose (RfD) and acceptable concentration in drinking water.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Shift Work and Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to inform the electric power industry of current scientific knowledge on worker health and safety risks associated with shift work in order to support future research planning. Shift work has been found to be associated with increased cancer risks8212primarily of breast cancer and (to a lesser extent) prostate and colon cancer. Risk of occupational injuries increases with several common characteristics of shift work8212particularly rotating shifts and longer shift lengths....

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Estimated long-term health effects  

SciTech Connect

Apart from the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed as children, there is no evidence to date of a major public health impact of the radiation exposure from the Chernobyl accident in the three most affected countries. Although some increases in the frequency of cancer in exposed populations have been reported, these results are difficult to interpret, mainly because of differences in the intensity and method of follow-up between exposed populations and the general population to which they are compared. If the experience of atomic bomb survivors and of other exposed populations is applicable, the major radiological impact of the accident will be cancer and the total lifetime numbers of excess cancers will be greatest among the liquidators and among the residents of contaminated territories, of the order of 2,000 to 2,500. These increases would be difficult to detect epidemiologically against an expected background number of 41,500 and 433,000 respectively (size of the exposed populations: 200,000 and 3,700,000, respectively). It is noted, however, that the exposures received by populations exposed as a result of Chernobyl are different (in type and pattern) from those of atomic bomb survivors. Predictions derived from these populations are therefore uncertain. Indeed, the extent of the increase in thyroid cancer incidence in persons exposed as children was not foreseen. In addition, only ten years have passed since the accident. It is essential therefore that monitoring of the health of the population be continued in order to assess the public health impact of the accident, even if, apart from leukemia among liquidators, little detectable increase of cancers due to radiation from the Chernobyl accident is expected.

Cardis, F. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Okeanov, A.E. [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk (Belarus); Likthariev, I.; Prisyazhniuk [All-Union Scientific Centre of Radiation Medicine, Kiev (Ukraine); Anspaugh, L.R. [California Univ., Livermore, CA (United States) Lawrence Livermore Lab.; Mabuchi, K. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Ivanov, V.K. [MRRC of RAMS, Obninsk (Russia)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Health and Ecological Effects of Selenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selenium is a naturally occurring element that can be found at background levels in food, soil, and water. It is also present in coal combustion products (CCPs) and CCP leachate. While selenium is essential to human and animal life, it has the potential to cause toxicity to humans and other organisms above a certain threshold level. This report summarizes the adverse human and ecological effects that can potentially occur from overexposure to selenium and the levels at which the effects can occur, with p...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 6 Dairy Products: Role in the Diet and Effects on Cardiovascular Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 6 Dairy Products: Role in the Diet and Effects on Cardiovascular Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downlo

18

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 20 Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Microbes: Role in Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 20 Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Microbes: Role in Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

19

Health Effects of Inhalation of Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential human health effects of inhaled coal combustion products (CCPs), which consist of fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products. The focus is on as-managed CCPs, with evaluation of the potential effects of exposure through fugitive emissions from storage facilities. Because the literature pertaining to bottom ash, boiler slag, and FGD solids is scarce, this review draws almost entirely from studies of fly ash as a surrogate particulate ma...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 26 The Opposing Effects of Dietary Omega-3 and trans Fatty Acids on Health: A Yin-Yang Effect at the Molecular Level?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 26 The Opposing Effects of Dietary Omega-3 and trans Fatty Acids on Health: A Yin-Yang Effect at the Molecular Level? Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutritio

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Health Effects of CO2 in Animals of Economic Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CT&S) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in animals of economic importance. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans and selected animals, primarily labor...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

HEALTH EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST: AN HEI PERSPECTIVE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines have many advantages, including good fuel economy, power, durability, lower emissions of some pollutants (such as carbon monoxide) and of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). However, there are a number of concerns that need to be addressed: (1) emissions of nitrogen oxides (which contribute to ozone formation) and of particulate matter (PM); (2) questions about cancer and other health effects from exposure to diesel PM; and (3) as efforts to decrease emissions progress, a need to understand whether the nature and toxicity of the PM emitted has changed. This paper focuses on (1) carcinogenicity data, (2) noncancer effects, and (3) diesel as part of the complex ambient mixture of PM.

Warren, Jane

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Health effects associated with energy conservation measures in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air quality can conceivably be impacted by hundreds of different chemicals. More than 900 different organic compounds alone have been identified in indoor air. The health effects that could potentially arise from exposure to individual pollutants or mixtures of pollutants cover the full range of acute and chronic effects, including largely reversible responses, such as rashes and irritations, as well as irreversible toxic and carcinogenic effects. These indoor contaminants are emitted from a large variety of materials and substances that are widespread components of everyday life. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with indoor air contaminants for the Bonneville Power Administration to aid the agency in the preparation of environmental documents. The results of this search are reported in two volumes. Volume 1 is a summary of the results of the literature search; Volume 2 is the complete results of the literature search and contains all references to the material reviewed. 16 tabs.

Stenner, R.D.; Baechler, M.C.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Health and environmental effects document on geothermal energy: 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several of the important health and environmental risks associated with a reference geothermal industry that produces 21,000 MW/sub e/ for 30 y (equivalent to 20 x 10/sup 18/ J) are assessed. The analyses of health effects focus on the risks associated with exposure to hydrogen sulfide, particulate sulfate, benzene, mercury, and radon in air and arsenic in water. Results indicate that emissions of hydrogen sulfide are likely to cause odor-related problems in geothermal resources areas, assuming that no pollution controls are employed. For individuals living within an 80 km radius of the geothermal resources, chronic exposure to particulate sulfate could result in between 0 to 95 premature deaths per 10/sup 18/ J of electricity generated. The mean population risk of leukemia from the inhalation of benzene was calculated to be 3 x 10/sup -2/ cases per 10/sup 18/ J. Exposure to elemental mercury in the atmosphere could produce between 0 and 8.2 cases of tremors per 10/sup 18/ J of electricity. Inhalation of radon and its short-lived daughters poses a mean population risk of 4.2 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancers per 10/sup 18/ J. Analysis of skin cancer risk from the ingestion of surface water contaminated with geothermally derived arsenic suggests that a dose-response model is inconsistent with data showing that arsenic is an essential element and that excessive body burdens do not appear even when arsenic reaches 100 ..mu..g/liter in drinking water. Estimates of occupational health effects were based on rates of accidental deaths and occupational diseases in surrogate industries. According to calculations, there would be 14 accidental deaths per 10/sup 18/ J of electricity and 340 cases of occupational diseases per 10/sup 18/ J. The analysis of the effects of noncondensing gases on vegetation showed that ambient concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide are more likely to enhance rather than inhibit the growth of plants.

Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.; O'Banion, K.D.

1981-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

25

Health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island  

SciTech Connect

Between March 28 and April 15, 1979 the collective dose resulting from the radioactivity released to the population living within a 50-mile radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant was about 2000 person-rems, less than 1% of the annual natural background level. The average dose to a person living within 5 miles of the nuclear plant was less than 10% of annual background radiation. The maximum estimated radiation dose received by any one individual in the general population (excluding the nuclear plant workers) during the accident was 70 mrem. The doses received by the general population as a result of the accident were so small that there will be no detectable additional cases of cancer, developmental abnormalities, or genetic ill-health. Three Three Mile Island nuclear workers received radiation doses of about 3 to 4 rem, exceeding maximum permissible quarterly dose of 3 rem. The major health effect of the accident at Three Mile Island was that of a pronounced demoralizing effect on the general population in the Three Mile Island area, including teenagers and mothers of preschool children and the nuclear plant workers. However, this effect proved transient in all groups studied except the nuclear workers.

Fabrikant, J.I.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Health and Environmental Effects Document on Geothermal Energy -- 1982 update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We assess several of the important health and environmental risks associated with a reference geothermal industry that produces 21,000 MWe for 30 y (equivalent to 20 x 10{sup 18} J). The analyses of health effects focus on the risks associated with exposure to hydrogen sulfide, particulate sulfate, benzene, mercury, and radon in air and arsenic in food. Results indicate that emissions of hydrogen sulfide are likely to cause odor-related problems in 29 of 51 geothermal resources areas, assuming that no pollution controls are employed. Our best estimates and ranges of uncertainty for the health risks of chronic population exposures to atmospheric pollutants are as follows (risks expressed per 10{sup 18} J of electricity): particulate sulfate, 44 premature deaths (uncertainty range of 0 to 360); benzene, 0.15 leukemias (range of 0 to 0.51); elemental mercury, 14 muscle tremors (range of 0 to 39); and radon, 0.68 lung cancers (range of 0 to 1.8). The ultimate risk of fatal skin cancers as the result of the transfer of waste arsenic to the general population over geologic time ({approx} 100,000 y) was calculated as 41 per 10{sup 18} J. We based our estimates of occupational health effects on rates of accidental deaths together with data on occupational diseases and injuries in surrogate industries. According to our best estimates, there would be 8 accidental deaths per 10{sup 18} J of electricity, 300 cases of occupational diseases per 10{sup 18} J, and 3400 occupational injuries per 10{sup 18}J. The analysis of the effects of noncondensing gases on vegetation showed that ambient concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide are more likely to enhance rather than inhibit the growth of plants. We also studied the possible consequences of accidental releases of geothermal fluids and concluded that probably less than 5 ha of land would be affected by such releases during the production of 20 x 10{sup 18} J of electricity. Boron emitted from cooling towers in the Imperial Valley was identified as a potential source of crop damage. Our analyses, however, showed that such damage is unlikely. Finally, we examined the nonpollutant effects of land subsidence and induced seismicity. Land subsidence is possible around some facilities, but surface-related damage is not expected to be great. Induced seismic events that have occurred to date at geothermal resource areas have been nondestructive. It is not possible to predict accurately the risk of potentially destructive events, and more research is needed in this area.

Layton, David W.; Daniels, Jeffrey I.; Anspaugh, Lynn R.; O'Banion, Kerry D.

1983-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

WHAT GOOD IS WEALTH WITHOUT HEALTH? THE EFFECT OF HEALTH ON THE MARGINAL UTILITY OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate how the marginal utility of consumption varies with health. To do so, we develop a simple model in which the impact of health on the marginal utility of consumption can be estimated from data on permanent income, ...

Finkelstein, Amy

28

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

29

Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

members) Subject: Technical evaluation of “EPA’s analysis of Florida drywall samples 1 and review of analytical results from the Florida Department of Health, ” from the EPA’s National Air

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Modifications of models resulting from recent reports on health effects of ionizing radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The most recent health effects models resulting from these efforts were published in two reports, NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990) and Part 2 (1989). Several major health effects reports have been published recently that may impact the health effects models presented in these reports. This addendum to the Part 2 (1989) report, provides a review of the 1986 and 1988 reports by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council BEAR 5 Committee report and Publication 60 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection as they relate to this report. The three main sections of this addendum discuss early occurring and continuing effects, late somatic effects, and genetic effects. The major changes to the NUREG/CR-4214 health effects models recommended in this addendum are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies like that on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. The results presented in this addendum should be used with the basic NUREG/CR-4214 reports listed above to obtain the most recent views on the potential health effects of radionuclides released accidentally from nuclear power plants. 48 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs.

Abrahamson, S. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)); Bender, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Gilbert, E.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens.

Arundel, A.V.; Sterling, E.M.; Biggin, J.H.; Sterling, T.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1. ORAL EXPOSURES 3.1.1. Acute Toxicity 3.1.1.1. Human The central nervous system and cardiovascular system are the targets of acute...

33

Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Potential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - Environmental and human health salt (Proprietary) 10.0 - 30.0% #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale ActivitiesPotential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public Health Surveillance

Sibille, Etienne

35

University Health Services -Routine Fees and Charges Effective July 1, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Health Services - Routine Fees and Charges Effective July 1, 2012 Visit Fees STUDENT's Health Annual/Wellness Exam New Patient $40.00 99385 $90.00 Women's Health Annual/Wellness Exam $116.00 Yellow Fever - 0.5cc $113.00 90717 $122.00 Laboratory Fees HIV 1 + 2 $28.00 86703 $28.00 Pap

36

Worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident†  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study quantifies worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on 11 March 2011. Effects are quantified with a 3-D global atmospheric model driven by emission estimates and evaluated against daily worldwide Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) measurements and observed deposition rates. Inhalation exposure, ground-level external exposure, and atmospheric external exposure pathways of radioactive iodine-131, cesium-137, and cesium-134 released from Fukushima are accounted for using a linear no-threshold (LNT) model of human exposure. Exposure due to ingestion of contaminated food and water is estimated by extrapolation. We estimate an additional 130 (15–1100) cancer-related mortalities and 180 (24–1800) cancer-related morbidities incorporating uncertainties associated with the exposure–dose and dose–response models used in the study. We also discuss the LNT model’s uncertainty at low doses. Sensitivities to emission rates, gas to particulate I-131 partitioning, and the mandatory evacuation radius around the plant are also explored, and may increase upper bound mortalities and morbidities in the ranges above to 1300 and 2500, respectively. Radiation exposure to workers at the plant is projected to result in 2 to 12 morbidities. An additional 600 mortalities have been reported due to non-radiological causes such as mandatory evacuations. Lastly, a hypothetical accident at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant in

John E. Ten Hoeve A; Mark Z. Jacobson B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 3 Soy Isoflavones: Chemistry, Processing Effects, Health Benefits, and Commercial Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 3 Soy Isoflavones: Chemistry, Processing Effects, Health Benefits, and Commercial Production Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

38

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 4 Soybean Saponins: Chemistry, Analysis, and Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 4 Soybean Saponins: Chemistry, Analysis, and Potential Health Effects Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

39

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 27 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Effects on Steroid-hormone Biosynthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 27 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Effects on Steroid-hormone Biosynthesis Health eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Ch

40

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 1 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Effects on Endothelial Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 1 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Effects on Endothelial Functions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable p

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Establishing Economic Effectiveness through Software Health-Management  

SciTech Connect

More than two thirds of the annual software budget of large-scale organizations dealing with complex software systems is spent on the perfection, correction, and operation of existing software systems. A significant part of these running costs could be saved if the software systems that need to be constantly extende, maintained and operated were in a better technical condition. This paper proposes Software Health-Checks as a method to assess the technical condition of existing software systems and to deduce measures for improving the health of software in a structured manner. Since 2006 numerous commercial software systems with a total of 30 MLOC, implemented in various technologies, were already checked with this method. The actions suggested as a result of these Software 'Health-Checks', repeatedly yielded dramatic performance improvements, risk reductions and cost savings between 30% and 80%.

Pizka, M; Panas, T

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

University of Virginia Health Plan Effective Date: 1/1/2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Laboratory Services and XRay Procedures (Non-Urgent Only) Paid in Full2 Paid in Full2 Available In% Coinsurance #12;University of Virginia Health Plan Effective Date: 1/1/2013 2 SERVICES PROVIDED UVa PROVIDER HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES A. Inpatient Acute Care for Non-Biologically Based Mental Illnesses

Acton, Scott

43

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation: Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Two-parameter Weibull hazard functions are recommended for estimating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid and ''other''. The category, ''other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also provided. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Linear and linear-quadratic models are also recommended for assessing genetic risks. Five classes of genetic disease -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocation and multifactorial diseases --are considered. In addition, the impact of radiation-induced genetic damage on the incidence of peri-implantation embryo losses is discussed. The uncertainty in modeling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of all model parameters. Data are provided which should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk. 22 refs., 14 figs., 51 tabs.

Abrahamson, S.; Bender, M.; Book, S.; Buncher, C.; Denniston, C.; Gilbert, E.; Hahn, F.; Hertzberg, V.; Maxon, H.; Scott, B.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Occupational Noise Exposure and its Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue brief provides the electric power industry with a snapshot of the current scientific knowledge on worker health and safety risks associated with noise exposure. Noise exposure types are varied and include continuous, intermittent and/or impulse noise. Prolonged occupational exposure to continuous noise or acoustic trauma can cause noise-induced hearing loss. Recent scientific data from the aluminum industry suggest that those exposed below levels requiring hearing protective devices may ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The DOE/NREL Environmental Science and Health Effects Program - An Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes current work in the Environmental Science and Health Effects (ES and HE) Program being sponsored by DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The program is regulatory-driven, and focuses on ozone, airborne particles, visibility and regional haze, air toxics, and health effects of air pollutants. The goal of the ES and HE Program is to understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based and alternative transportation fuels. Each project in the program is designed to address policy-relevant objectives. Studies in the ES and HE Program have four areas of focus: improving technology for emissions measurements; vehicle emissions measurements, emission inventory development/improvement; and ambient impacts, including health effects.

Douglas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Environmental Science & Health Effects Program at the at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

Lawson, Douglas R.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In) Symposium on Nuclear Reactor Safety: Perspective. Ahealth effects of the nuclear reactor accident at Three Mile50-mile radius of the nuclear reactor site, approximately

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

NETL: Health Effects - Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the potential for adverse cardiopulmonary effects of airborne...

50

Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

52

Manage the Margins: Three Essays on Effective Policymaking for Social Inequality in Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation includes three studies, devoted to trying to understand inequality in health between people from different social groups in a democratic society. In the U.S., social inequality in health takes various forms and the key to understanding how democracy solves the problem of inequality lies in a complex set of political and social factors. I take an institutional approach and focus on examining how political and policy institutions, their administrative processes, and the policy implementation environment are linked to social inequality in health. The first essay, Whose Baby Matters More, uses a theoretical framework for evaluating heterogeneous group responses to public health policies and depicts how racial disparities in health are rooted in group heterogeneity in policy responses. The second essay, Anxious Girls and Inactive Boys, focuses on how state-level policy interventions and social capital interactively affect gender differences in health. The third essay, Responsibility for Equity, explores the link between publicness of state healthcare systems and social equity in healthcare access. In the first essay, I focus on racial disparities in infant mortality rates and pool state-level data from 1990 to 2006. The empirical analysis suggests that enhancing the capacity of state healthcare systems is critical to improving population health. Blacks and whites, nevertheless, exhibit different responses to the same policy. Racial disparities could be reduced only when policy interventions generate more relative benefits for Blacks. In the second essay, I find that social capital conditions the effect of public health policies with regard to managing childhood obesity. There are gender differences, moreover, in health outcomes and behavioral responses to state and local-level obesity policies. In the third essay, I find that different institutional factors exhibit different impact on inequality in healthcare access. While public finance resources may reduce inequality in healthcare access, public ownership and the public healthcare workforce do not have significant association with inequality in healthcare access. State Medicaid eligibility rules exhibit moderate impact on inequality in healthcare access.

Zhu, Ling

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this pamphlet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. (BPA is the Pacific Northwest`s Federal electric power marketing agency.) First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are described. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns raised by these studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this pamphlet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Metropolitan New York in the greenhouse: Air quality and health effects  

SciTech Connect

A variety of potential effects on human health resulting from climate change have been identified in several assessments. According to an international panel{sup 1} they include direct effects of extreme temperatures on cardiovascular deaths, secondary effects due to vector-borne diseases or crop yields, and tertiary effects such as those that might arise from conflicts over freshwater supplies. To this fist we add the secondary effects of increased air pollution, which may result either directly from climate change or indirectly from increased air conditioning loads and the corresponding pollutant emissions from electric utilities. Higher ozone concentrations have been linked to increased ambient temperatures by both theory and observations of monitoring data. A similar association with particulate matter has been limited to observations, thus far. The pollution-heat linkage has been recognized before` but health effects have not been evaluated in terms of predictions of the joint effects of both agents. This paper has been prepared in two sections. First, we discuss the ozone situation with special reference to the Northeast Corridor and New York. In the second section, we present estimates of the health effects of climate change on New York and discuss some mitigation options.

Kleinman, L.I.; Lipfert, F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Real estate's market value and a pollution and health effects analysis decision support system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors of this paper participated in the project Framework 6 intelligent Cities and the Lincoln institute of Land Policy Fellowship. One of the above project's goals was to develop and improve a Real Estate's Market Value, and the Pollution and ... Keywords: air pollution, cooperative decision making, health effects, market value, multiple-user, premises microclimate, voice stress analysis

E. Zavadskas; A. Kaklauskas; E. Maciunas; P. Vainiunas; A. Marsalka

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Health and environmental effects of oil shale technology. A workshop summary and panel reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the result of a workshop which addressed the health and environmental effects of oil shale technology. The purpose of this workshop were: to assemble biomedical and environmental scientists, representative of a broad range of disciplines, to address current developments in oil shale technology; to review and identify specific health and environmental issues and problems associated with the development and commercialization of oil shale technology; and to consider the research strategies required to address them and to identify the requisite research information needs, expressed via detailed task statements, for resolving the uncertainties of assessing the relevant impacts of oil shale technology. Throughout the workshop, attendees participated in six panels: health effects; air quality; water quantity, quality, and aquatic ecology; terrestrial effects; ambient measuring and monitoring; and source characterization. This report contains a presentation of the highlights of the issues considered by the panels and the panel reports which contain specific information on environmental and health effects, information requirements, and detailed research statements.

Brown, R. (ed.)

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation  

SciTech Connect

The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes. (PCS)

Fabrikant, J.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional FoodsChapter 8 Synergistic/Additive Health Effects of Fish Oil and Bio-Active Agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods Chapter 8 Synergistic/Additive Health Effects of Fish Oil and Bio-Active Agents Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Downloadable pdf...

59

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 7 Formation, Analysis, and Health Effects of Oxidized Sterols in Frying Fat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 7 Formation, Analysis, and Health Effects of Oxidized Sterols in Frying Fat Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

60

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 13 Effect of Feeding and Then Depleteing a High Fruit and Vegetable Diet on Oxidizability in Human Serum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 13 Effect of Feeding and Then Depleteing a High Fruit and Vegetable Diet on Oxidizability in Human Serum Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - B

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 14 Effect of Dietary Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Infancy on Both Visual and Neural Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 14 Effect of Dietary Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Infancy on Both Visual and Neural Development Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Bioch

62

An analysis of uranium dispersal and health effects using a Gulf War case study.  

SciTech Connect

The study described in this report used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War for both U.S. troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. Only a few veterans in vehicles accidentally struck by U.S. DU munitions are predicted to have inhaled sufficient quantities of DU particulate to incur any significant health risk (i.e., the possibility of temporary kidney damage from the chemical toxicity of uranium and about a 1% chance of fatal lung cancer). The health risk to all downwind civilians is predicted to be extremely small. Recommendations for monitoring are made for certain exposed groups. Although the study found fairly large calculational uncertainties, the models developed and used are generally valid. The analysis was also used to assess potential uranium health hazards for workers in the weapons complex. No illnesses are projected for uranium workers following standard guidelines; nonetheless, some research suggests that more conservative guidelines should be considered.

Marshall, Albert Christian

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Health Print E-mail Climate change can have a number of direct and indirect effects on human health. For example, rising temperatures can contribute to the number of deaths...

64

Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) Code are described and critiqued. The major elements analyzed are those concerning dosimetry, early effects, and late effects. The published comments on the models are summarized, as are the important findings since the publication of the RSS.

Cooper, D.W.; Evans, J.S.; Jacob, N.; Kase, K.R.; Maletskos, C.J.; Robertson, J.B.; Smith, D.G.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. In addition, models are included for assessing the risks of several nonlethal early and continuing effects -- including prodromal vomiting and diarrhea, hypothyroidism and radiation thyroiditis, skin burns, reproductive effects, and pregnancy losses. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and other.'' The category, other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also developed. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. The models of cancer risk are derived largely from information summarized in BEIR III -- with some adjustment to reflect more recent studies. 64 refs., 18 figs., 46 tabs.

Evans, J.S. (Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (USA). School of Public Health)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Research Programs on Low-Level Radiation Health Effects Supported by FEPCO  

SciTech Connect

The federation of Electric Power Companies (FEPCO) of Japan has been supporting several research projects on low-level radiation health effects for the purpose of the following: 1. to assist in the establishment of a reasonable system of radiation protection; 2. to release the public from unnecessary fear of ionizing radiation. We present some of the findings and current research programs funded or supported by FEPCO.

Kaneko, Masahito

1999-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

67

Program on Technology Innovation: Health Effects of Organic Aerosols: An EPRI/NARSTO Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI-NARSTO Health Effects of Organic Aerosols Workshop was held in Palo Alto, California on October 24-25, 2006. The workshop was intended to further our understanding of the organic fraction of ambient particulate matter (PM) and associated organic gases. The composition of organic aerosol is very complex, varying in accordance with physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere and comprising numerous organic compounds of both anthropogenic and natural origin. The workshop focused on organic ae...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

68

Health Effects of Subchronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive laboratory-based evaluation of selected respiratory and cardiac health hazards of subchronic (up to 6 months) inhalation of simulated key components of 'downwind plume' emissions of coal combustion. This project was performed as an integral part of a joint government-industry program termed the 'National Environmental Respiratory Center' (NERC), which is aimed at disentangling the roles of different physical-chemical air pollutants and their sources in the health effects associated statistically with air pollution. The characterization of the exposure atmosphere and the health assays were identical to those employed in the NERC protocols used to evaluate other pollution source emissions, such as diesel, gasoline, and wood combustion. The project had two phases, each encompassing multiple tasks. Guidelines for the composition of the exposure atmosphere were set by consensus of an expert workshop. Development of the capability to generate the exposure atmosphere and pilot studies of the comparative exposure composition using two coal types were accomplished in Phase 1. In Phase 2, the toxicological study was conducted using Powder River Basin Sub-bituminous coal. NETL provided 50% support for the work in Phase 1 and had intended to provide 20% support for the work in Phase 2. Phase 1 is completed and Phase 2 is in the final stages. All animal exposures were completed without incident, and the composition of the exposure atmospheres met the targets. All of the health sample collections are completed, but some samples remain to be analyzed. Data summaries and final statistical analysis of results remain to be completed. The goal is to submit all publications before the end of FY-08. Repeated exposure to simulated downwind coal emissions caused some significant health effects, but the number of effects tended to be fewer than those caused by the other NERC exposures (diesel and gasoline emissions and hardwood smoke). the lowest concentration, a dilution containing approximately 100 {micro}g particulate matter (PM)/m{sup 3}, was a no-effects level for nearly all measured variables. One of the most interesting findings was that few, if indeed any, health outcomes appeared to be caused by the PM component of the exposure. This finding strongly suggests that PM simulating the major contributions of coal combustion to environmental PM is of very low toxicity.

Joe Mauderly

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Health and environmental effects of synthetic fuel technologies: research priorities. Report to the Federal Interagency Committee on the health and environmental effects of energy technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an assessment of the health and environmental effects research priorities related to coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale development. It reflects the subjective judgments of well chosen research scientists in relevant disciplines. These scientists reviewed the results of workshops conducted in 1978 on coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale, background information on related federal research, and comments by relevant federal agencies. The scientists prepared a listing of current research needs according to major areas of concern. These were categorized as to generic, region-specific, or process specific research. For the latter category, various scales of development were addressed for two exemplary processes: SRC (solvent refined coal) II and above ground oil shale retorting. Subjective judgments were used to prioritize the research tasks and assess the adequacy of current research.

Brown, R.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Health Effects of SubChronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sara M. Pletcher sara M. Pletcher Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4236 sara.pletcher@netl.doe.gov Joe L. Mauderly Principal Investigator Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute 2425 Ridgecrest Drive, SE Albuquerque, NM 87108-5129 505-348-9432 jmauderl@lrri.org Environmental and Water Resources HealtH effects of sub-cHronic inHalation of simulated downwind coal combustion emissions Background Emissions from coal-fired power plants and their associated atmospheric reaction products contribute to environmental air pollution and are often cited as a critical cause of pollution-related health risks. However, there have been few toxicological evaluations of the heath hazards resulting from the inhalation of coal combustion

71

Assessment of zero gravity effects on space worker health and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One objective of the study is to assess the effects of all currently known deviations from normal of medical, physiological, and biochemical parameters which appear to be due to zero gravity (zero-g) environment and to acceleration and deceleration to be experienced, as outlined in the reference Solar Power Satellite (SPS) design, by space worker. Study results include identification of possible health or safety effects on space workers - either immediate or delayed - due to the zero gravity environment and acceleration and deceleration; estimation of the probability that an individual will be adversely affected; description of the possible consequence to work efficiently in persons adversely affected; and description of the possible/probable consequences to immediate and future health of individuals exposed to this environment. A research plan, which addresses the uncertainties in current knowledge regarding the health and safety hazards to exposed SPS space workers, is presented. Although most adverse affects experienced during space flight soon disappeared upon return to the Earth's environment, there remains a definite concern for the long-term effects to SPS space workers who might spend as much as half their time in space during a possible five-year career period. The proposed 90-day up/90 day down cycle, coupled with the fact that most of the effects of weightlessness may persist throughout the flight along with the realization that recovery may occupy much of the terrestrial stay, may keep the SPS workers in a deviant physical condition or state of flux for 60 to 100% of their five-year career. (JGB)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

Tenforde, T.S.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Health and environmental effects of oil and gas technologies: research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses health and environmental issues associated with oil and gas technologies as they are currently perceived - both those that exist and those that are expected to emerge over the next two decades. The various sections of this report contain discussions of specific problem areas and relevant new research activities which should be pursued. This is not an exhaustive investigation of all problem areas, but the report explores a wide range of issues to provide a comprehensive picture of existing uncertainties, trends, and other factors that should serve as the focus of future research. The problem areas of major concern include: effects of drilling fluids, offshore accidents, refineries and worker health, and biota and petroleum spills, indoor air pollution, information transfer, and unconventional resources. These are highlighted in the Executive Summary because they pose serious threats to human health and the environment, and because of the sparcity of accumulated knowledge related to their definition. Separate abstracts have been prepared for selected sections of this report for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

Brown, R. D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Economic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax Increase in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tobacco Control Section California Department of HealthExcise Tax Increase in California Table 1 – Tax increase= Tobacco Control Section California Department of Health

California Department of Health Services; Tobacco Control Section

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Economic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax Increase in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tobacco Control Section California Department of HealthExcise Tax Increase in California Table 1 – Tax increase= Tobacco Control Section California Department of Health

California Department of Health Services

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 8. Health effects of oil shale development  

SciTech Connect

Information on the potential health effects of a developing oil shale industry can be derived from two major sources: (1) the historical experience in foreign countries that have had major industries; and (2) the health effects research that has been conducted in the US in recent years. The information presented here is divided into two major sections: one dealing with the experience in foreign countries and the second dealing with the more recent work associated with current oil shale development in the US. As a result of the study, several observations can be made: (1) most of the current and historical data from foreign countries relate to occupational hazards rather than to impacts on regional populations; (2) neither the historical evidence from other countries nor the results of current research have shown pulmonary neoplasia to be a major concern, however, certain types of exposure, particularly such mixed source exposures as dust/diesel or dust/organic-vapor have not been adequately studied and the lung cancer question is not closed; (3) the industry should be alert to the incidence of skin disease in the industrial setting, however, automated techniques, modern industrial hygiene practices and realistic personal hygiene should greatly reduce the hazards associated with skin contact; and (4) the entire question of regional water contamination and any resultant health hazard has not been adequately addressed. The industrial practice of hydrotreating the crude shale oil will diminish the carcinogenic hazard of the product, however, the quantitative reduction of biological activity is dependent on the degree of hydrotreatment. Both Soviet and American experimentalists have demonstrated a correlation betweed carcinogenicity/toxicity and retorting temperature; the higher temperatures producing the more carcinogenic or toxic products.

Rotariu, G.J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Late health effects uncertain assessment. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA late health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the expert panel on late health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 2: Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on early health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Production of thin-film photovoltaic cells: health and environmental effects  

SciTech Connect

Health and safety hazards in production of major thin-film photovoltaic cells are identified and characterized for their potential to cause health effects. These hazards are identified by examining process data, control technology availability, biomedical effects, and environmental standards. Quantitative estimates of material inputs and outputs and control costs were made on the basis of preliminary engineering designs of hypothetical facilities capable of manufacturing 10 MWp photovoltaic cells a year. The most significant potential hazards are associated with toxic and explosive gases. Emissions of toxic gases during normal operation can be controlled using available control technology. Accidental release of stored gases, however, will pose significant risks to both workers and the public, as atmospheric dispersion computer studies indicate. Possible release preventing options and release control options are examined. Explosive and flammable gases may present significant occupational safety hazards; gas handling systems will need to be carefully designed. High voltages and radio frequency equipment also require close attention for their potential to present occupational hazards. 10 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Fthenakis, V.M.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part 1, Introduction, integration, and summary: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ``other``. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk.

Evans, J.S. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Abrahmson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilbert, E.S. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Health effects of residential wood combustion: survey of knowledge and research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Health and safety issues related to residential wood burning are examined. Current research and findings are also described, and research status is assessed in terms of future health and safety requirements. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Health and environmental effects of synthetic fuel technologies: research priorities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an assessment of the health and environmental effects research priorities related to coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale development. It reflects the subjective judgements of well chosen research scientists in relevant disciplines. These scientists reviewed the results of workshops conducted in 1978 on coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale (see PB-296 708, PB-297 096, and PB-297 618), background information on related Federal research, and comments by relevant Federal agencies. The scientists prepared a listing of current research needs according to major areas of concern. These were categorized as to generic, region-specific, or process specific research. For the latter category, various scales of development were addressed for two exemplary processes: SRC (solvent refined coal) II and above ground oil shale retorting. Subjective judgements were used to prioritize the research tasks and assess the adequacy of current research.

Brown, R.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Balancing health effects and economics in the management of radioactive materials  

SciTech Connect

The public perception of the benefits offered by nuclear energy and the risks to health and safety from ionizing radiation has dramatically altered over the fifty years since the advent of nuclear fission. The {open_quotes}Atomic Age{close_quotes} is seldom mentioned anymore. The attitudinal change from the acceptance of nuclear energy as an essential component of national defense, {open_quotes}Atoms for Peace,{close_quotes} and a new, abundant, and clean energy source for mankind to the perception of it as an object of protest and fear has resulted from events that included nuclear fallout from atmospheric weapons testing, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, classified radiation experiments, and a generally hostile news media. As a reflection of public concerns over radiation, federal, state, and local regulations have greatly multiplied in both the types of radioactive materials addressed and the threshold activity levels at which these regulations become effective.

Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M.; Rogers, V.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI HEALTH SYSTEM NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Effective Date: December 1, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for intelligence, counter-intelligence, and other national security activities authorized by law. v) Protective Security and Intelligence Activities. We may release Health Information to authorized federal officials

Miami, University of

88

The Effect of Placement Change on Foster Children's Utilization of Emergency Mental Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. R. (2008). Children's mental health emergencies- part2: Emergency department evaluation and treatment of childrenhealth disorders. Pediatric Emergency Care, 24(7), Barth, R.

Fawley-King, Kya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system concept development and evaluation program: nonmicrowave health and ecological effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Concept Development and Evaluation Program is being carried out for a proposed Satellite Power System (SPS). For purposes of this evaluation, a preliminary reference system has been developed. SPS, as described in the reference system, would collect solar energy on satellites in geosychronous orbit in space. The energy would be converted to microwaves and beamed to an earth-receiving antenna (rectenna). One task in the environmental part of the program is the assessment of the nonmicrowave effects on health and the environment. These effects would result from all phases of SPS development and operation. This report covers the current knowledge regarding these effects, and is based on the reference system. The assessment is summarized as to scope, methodology, impacts of terrestrial development, launch and recovery of spacecraft, space activities (including health effects of the space environment, ionizing radiation, electromagnetic exposure, spacecraft charging and environmental interactions, occupational hazards, etc.) and construction and operation of rectenna (ground receiving station).

White, M.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Review A New Tool for Epidemiology: The Usefulness of Dynamic-Agent Models in Understanding Place Effects on Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major focus of recent work on the spatial patterning of health has been the study of how features of residential environments or neighborhoods may affect health. Place effects on health emerge from complex interdependent processes in which individuals interact with each other and their environment and in which both individuals and environments adapt and change over time. Traditional epidemiologic study designs and statistical regression approaches are unable to examine these dynamic processes. These limitations have constrained the types of questions asked, the answers received, and the hypotheses and theoretical explanations that are developed. Agent-based models and other systems-dynamics models may help to address some of these challenges. Agent-based models are computer representations of systems consisting of heterogeneous microentities that can interact and change/adapt over time in response to other agents and features of the environment. Using these models, one can observe how macroscale dynamics emerge from microscale interactions and adaptations. A number of challenges and limitations exist for agent-based modeling. Nevertheless, use of these dynamic models may complement traditional epidemiologic analyses and yield additional insights into the processes involved and the interventions that may be most useful. computer simulation; environment and public health; epidemiologic methods; health behavior; models, theoretical; residence characteristics; systems theory

Amy H. Auchincloss; Ana V. Diez Roux

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Chernobyl Studies Project - working group 7.0 environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, October 1993--January 1994  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project was begun as part of a cooperative agreement between the US and the former USSR, (quote) To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future reactor accident (quote). Most of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus has now turned primarily to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are extensively engaged in case-control and cohort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children and in the Ukraine. A major part of the effort is providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and providing support and equipment for the medical teams. This document contains reports on progress in the following task areas: Management; External Dose; Hydrological Transport; Chromosome Painting Dosimetry; Stochastic Effects; Thyroid Studies; and Leukemia Studies.

Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Containing a trans Double Bond on Body Composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Containing a trans Double Bond on Body Composition eChapters Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Contai

93

Solar energy research at Sandia Laboratories and its effects on health and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various solar energy research and development projects at Sandia Laboratories are discussed with emphasis on the primary health and safety hazard associated with solar concentration systems. This limiting hazard is chorioretinal damage. The unique safety and health hazards associated with solar energy collector and receiver systems cannot be measured yet, but progress is being made rapidly. Research is continuing, especially for eye hazards, with more extensive work planned.

Young, L.L. III

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The potential human health effect(s) of the metal uranium in the environment. Report on the known human health effects associated with the exposure to the metal uranium  

SciTech Connect

Concern over the levels of the metal uranium in the environment as a result of industrial activities has been expressed by several Federal and State agencies. This concern is associated with potential human health effects of this metal on kidney function and bone formation. Although limits for the Metal uranium in the environment remain to be set, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently in the process of establishing guidance limits for this metal in water and soil. These limits will be established for both the metal and the associated radioactivity. The suggested limits currently being considered for water and soil are, 20 pCi/liter and 10 pCi/gram wet weight, respectively. For naturally occurring uranium EPA assumes that 1 ug of uranium metal equals 0.67 pCi at equilibrium (i.e. at equilibrium the mass ratio of {sup 234}uranium to {sup 238}uranium is small but their activities are equal). Thus the limits for water and soil on weight basis for the uranium metal would be 30 ug/liter and 15 ug/gram wet weight, respectively. These limits are being established based on the potential increase in cancer death in populations that exceed this limit. Since there does not appear to be a significant correlation between cancer deaths and.uranium metal exposure (see discussion below), these limits will probably be established based on the known association between radionuclides exposure and cancer deaths. The exposure limits for other health effects such as kidney damage and retardation in bone formation apparently are not being considered by EPA.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Trust in health infomediaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health infomediaries play an increasingly critical role in providing support for people's health and wellness decisions. Effectiveness of health infomediaries depends on people's trust in them. In this paper, we conceptualize a comprehensive synthesis ... Keywords: Health infomediary, Information quality, Risk belief, System quality, Trust, Trust beliefs, Trust signs

Jaeki Song; Fatemeh "Mariam" Zahedi

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Chernobyl Studies Project: Working group 7.0, Environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, March--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1988, the US and the former-USSR signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MOC) for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety; this MOC was a direct result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4 and the following efforts by the two countries to implement a joint program to improve the safety of nuclear power plants and to understand the implications of environmental releases. A Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS) was formed to implement the MOC. The JCCCNRS established many working groups; most of these were the responsibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as far as the US participation was concerned. The lone exception was Working Group 7 on Environmental Transport and Health Effects, for which the US participation was the responsibility of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of Working Group 7 was succintly stated to be, ``To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future nuclear reactor accident.`` To implement the work DOE then formed two subworking groups: 7.1 to address Environmental Transport and 7.2 to address Health Effects. Thus, the DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project began. The majority of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus is now turned to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are involved in and making progress on the case-control and co-hort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children. Dosimetric aspects are a fundamental part of these studies. We are currently working to implement similar studies in Ukraine. A major part of the effort of these projects is supporting these studies, both by providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and by providing support and equipment for the medical teams.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

THE HEALTH EFFECTS IN WOMEN EXPOSED TO LOW-LEVELS OF IONIZING RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Effects of Ionizing Radiation. New York, United Nations,Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR III). The EffectsLevels of Ionizing Radiation. Washington, D.C. , National

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Review and Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential health effects of low levels of radiation have predominantly been based on those effects observed at high levels of radiation. The authors have reviewed more than 200 percent publications in radiobiology and epidermiology related to low dose radiation and concluded that recent radiobiological studies at low-doses; that doses low dose radiation research should to holistic, systems-based approaches to develop models that define the shape of the dose-response relationships at low doses; and that these results should be combined with the latest epidermiology to produce a comprehensive understanding of radiation effects that addresses both damage, likely with a linear effect, and response, possibly with non-linear consequences.

Dauer, Lawrence T.; Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Morgan, William F.; Stram, Daniel; Tran, Phung

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Potential Health Effects of Crystalline Silica Exposures from Coal Fly Ash: A Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of crystalline silica in coal fly ash (CFA) depends on a variety of factors, including the amount of silica in the pre-combustion coal, the combustion process, and emission control technologies among others. Occupational exposures to crystalline silica in CFA are related to these factors as well as activities associated with exposures and durations of exposure. This review summarizes the occupational and environmental health literature relevant to the presence of crystalline silica in CFA from...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

100

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed ProcessingChapter 1 Oil and Oilseed-Based Bioactive Compounds and Their Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed Processing Chapter 1 Oil and Oilseed-Based Bioactive Compounds and Their Health Effects Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Oil and Oil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Volume 6 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. [In California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants, emphasizing impacts which may occur through emissions into the atmosphere, and treating other impacts briefly. Federal regulations as well as California state and local regulations are reviewed. Emissions are characterized by power plant type, including: coal-fired, oil-fired, gas-fired, combined cycle and advanced fossil-fuel plants; and liquid and vapor geothermal systems. Dispersion and transformation of emissions are treated. The state of knowledge of health effects, based on epidemiological, physiological, and biomedical studies, is reviewed.

Case, G.D.; Bertolli, T.A.; Bodington, J.C.; Choy, T.A.; Nero, A.V.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Ocean Health and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2002. Indicators of ocean health and human health:Nature 423:280–283. Oceans and Human Health Act. 2003. S.Editorial Guest Editorial Ocean Health and Human Health

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

An evaluation of theories concerning the health effects of low-dose radiation exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The danger of high, acute doses of radiation is well documented, but the effects of low-dose radiation below 100 mSv is still heavily debated. Four theories concerning the effects of lowdose radiation are presented here: ...

Wei, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Jay)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Biological and Health Effects of EM and Acoustic - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009... ago suggested that simple plants – grasses, beans, and corn-exhibited varying effects in simulated geomagnetic fields and in electric fields.

105

Medicaid Expansions and Welfare Contractions: Offsetting Effects on Prenatal Care and Infant Health?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ruggles. "When Do Women Use AFDC & Food Stamps? The Dynamicsthe Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program.Thus, the loss of AFDC effectively raised the administrative

Currie, Janet; Grogger, Jeffrey

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Medicaid Expansions and Welfare Contractions: Offsetting Effects on Prenatal Care and Infant Health?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ruggles. "When Do Women Use AFDC & Food Stamps? The DynamicsA i d to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program.Thus, the loss of AFDC effectively raised the administrative

Currie, Janet; Grogger, Jeffrey T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Distribution Principles in Health Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that "the organizational model for the health care system wehealth care system functioned effectively to implement central plans ("the organizational

Bringedal, Berit

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

PUBLIC HEALTH STATEMENT MERCURY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Public Health Statement is the summary chapter from the Toxicological Profile for Mercury. It is one in a series of Public Health Statements about hazardous substances and their health effects. A shorter version, the ToxFAQs™, is also available. This information is important because this substance may harm you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Environmental and Potential Health Effects of High Voltage Direct Current Transmission Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-voltage direct current (HVDC) technology plays an important but highly selective role in the U.S. power delivery system. It is a cost-effective technology for transferring bulk power over long distances, a critical technology for asynchronous grid interconnection, and the preferred technology for long-distance underwater cable transmission. Current interest in renovating the national grid for greater loads and higher reliability as well as unique applications for renewable energy projects, including...

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Office of International Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Health Studies International Health Studies Home Mission and Functions Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Studies Marshall Islands Program Russian Health Studies Program Russian Radiobiology Human Tissue Repository Spain (Palomares) Program Health and Safety HSS Logo Office of International Health Studies Reports to the Office of Health and Safety Mission and Functions Mission The Office of International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents. The mission includes providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

111

Workshop on short-term health effects of reactor accidents: Chernobyl  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-dose early-effects research that has been continued has been done in the context of infrequent accidents with large radiation sources and the use of bone marrow transfusions for treating malignancies, especially leukemia. It thus seemed appropriate to bring together those who have done research on and have had experience with massive whole-body radiation. The objectives were to review what is known about the acute effects of whole-body irradiation, to review the current knowledge of therapy, and particularly of the diagnostic and immunologic problems encountered in bone marrow therapy, and to compare this knowledge with observations made to date on the Chernobyl accident radiation casualties. Dr. Robert Gale, who had helped to care for these casualties, was present at the Workshop. It was hoped that such a review would help those making continuing clinical and pathological observations on the Chernobyl casualties, and that these observations would provide a basis for recommendations for additional research that might result in improved ability to manage successfully this type of severe injury.

Not Available

1986-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

112

Healthful Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids addresses critical and current regulatory issues and emerging technologies, as well as the efforts made toward the production of healthier lipids. Healthful Lipids Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants d

113

Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For inhalation or ingestion of soluble or moderately soluble compounds such as uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) or uranium tetrafluoride (UF4), the uranium enters the bloodstream and...

114

health effects Flow cytometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Geothermal Energy Engineered Geothermal Systems Nonproliferation and Verificatio n Seismic Modeling

Kurien, Susan

115

Data driven health system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective use of data is believed to be the key to address systemic inefficiencies in health innovation and delivery, and to significantly enhance value creation for patients and all stakeholders. However, there is no ...

Rosen Ceruolo, Melissa Beth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Health News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Open Data for Climate and Health Insights Print E-mail Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health (MATCH) Website Thursday, May 9, 2013 Posted by Tom Armstrong, Executive...

117

PM, Mercury, and Health Effects: A Workshop for Technical and Communications Staff: Proceedings of Air Quality Workshop Held on Octo ber 2, 2002, Atlanta, GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An EPRI-sponsored workshop, entitled "PM, Mercury, and Health Effects: A Workshop for Technical and Communications Staff," was held in Atlanta, Georgia on October 2, 2002. Members of the Air Quality and Media Relations Groups conducted the workshop. Attendees were all utility-associated, although several attendees were from non-utility companies. In all, there were 69 attendees, of whom 39 had technical positions and 30 were involved with communications. The workshop was intended to serve as a primer for...

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects and Risks Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has performed a systematic review of recently published, peer-reviewed scientific studies in the fields of epidemiology and radiobiology that discuss health risks associated with exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. As a result of this study, the EPRI team concludes that there is a need to re-evaluate the magnitude of dose and dose-rate effectiveness factors (DDREF), including the significant body of radiobiology data that suggests non-linear risks at...

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgThe Health Effects of Coal Electricity Generation in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To help inform pollution control policies in the Indian electricity sector we estimate the health damages associated with particulate matter, sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from individual coal-fired power plants. We calculate the damages per ton of pollutant for each of 89 plants and compute total damages in 2008, by pollutant, for 63 plants. We estimate health damages by combining data on power plant emissions of particulate matter, SO2 and NOx with reduced-form intake fraction models that link emissions to changes in population-weighted ambient concentrations of fine particles. Concentration-response functions for fine particles from Pope et al. (2002) are used to estimate premature cardiopulmonary deaths associated with air emissions for persons 30 and older. Our results suggest that 75 percent of premature deaths are associated with fine particles that result from SO2 emissions. After characterizing the distribution of premature mortality across plants we calculate the health benefits and cost-per-life saved of the flue-gas desulfurization unit installed at the Dahanu power plant in Maharashtra and the health benefits of coal washing at the Rihand power plant in Uttar Pradesh.

Shama Gamkhar; Kabir Malik; Alex Limonov; Ian Partridge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Exploring the Effect of mHealth Technologies on Communication and Information Sharing in a Pediatric Critical Care Unit: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Communication and information sharing is an important aspect of healthcare information technology and mHealth management. A main requirement in the quality of patient care is the ability of all health care participants to communicate. Research illustrates ... Keywords: Health Care Technology, Information Technology, Management of Technology, Professional Communication, Technology Assessment, eHealth, mHealth

Rocci Luppicini; Victoria Aceti

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Health IT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fewer errors and redundant tests. ... Since 2004, NIST has worked closely with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the National ...

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Office of Health & Safety - Health Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search System Public Health Activities Agenda for Public Health Activities Access Handbook - Guidelines for Researchers Conducting Health Studies at DOE HHS Communication...

124

Link Climate Change and Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Make Our Science Accessible Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Link Climate Change and Human Health Print E-mail Health News Check out the latest climate change and human health news and announcements in our Health News Feed. Climate change poses unique challenges to human health. Unlike health threats caused by a particular toxin or disease pathogen, there are many ways that climate change can lead to potentially harmful health effects. Direct health impacts may include increased illnesses and deaths from extreme heat events, injuries and deaths from extreme weather events, and respiratory illnesses due to changes in air quality Indirect health impacts include illnesses and deaths that may arise from

125

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health. Topics of discussion included in this manuscript are related to responding to a radiation emergency, and the necessary balance between desired high accuracy laboratory results and rapid turnaround requirements. Considerations are addressed for methodology with which to provide the most competent solutions despite challenges presented from incomplete datasets and, at times, limited methodology. An emphasis is placed on error and uncertainty of sample analysis results, how error affects products, and what is communicated in the final product.

Mena, R., Pemberton, W., Beal, W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Role of prostaglandin-H synthase in mediating genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of estrogens. Environ. Health Perspect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been found to be oxidized in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells by prostaglandin-H synthase (PGH synthase). It is hypothesized that PGH synthase mediates adverse effects of DES and other carcinogenic estrogens such as induction of neoplastic transformation and genotoxicity. Interest in PGH synthase-catalyzed reactions focuses on two aspects: oxidation and metabolic activation of stilbene and steroid estrogens by PGH synthase, and modulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis via effects of these compounds on PGH synthase. Studies of the former aspect of PGH synthase-catalyzed in vitro metabolism have revealed that cooxidation of DES, DES analogues, and steroid estrogens gives rise to reactive intermediates; DES and DES analogues known to transform SHE cells are metabolized by PGH synthase in vitro; PGH synthase catalyzes both the formation and oxidation of catechol metabolites from steroid estrogens, and reactive intermediates from DES and from steroid estrogens are stable enough to bind both to the catalytic enzyme PGH synthase and to other proteins. The data support the contention that PGH synthase-catalyzed metabolic activation plays a role in the induction of neoplastic transformation by stilbene and steroid estrogens but is not conclusive evidence for a cause-effect relationship. More recently, two closely related DES indanyl analogues have been found to differ in their interaction with PGH synthase: indenestrol A is cooxidized and activated like DES, whereas indenestrol B inhibits the enzyme. They provide useful tools to test the above hypothesis from a new perspective. The interaction between estrogens and PGH synthase is also viewed with respect to its potential role in tumor promotion and progression, processes in which prostaglandins have been implicated as important mediators. Cooxidation of estrogens in vitro is accompanied by a stoichiometric increase in prostaglandin production. Useful approaches to study this and other effects of estrogens on PGH synthase that could result in a modulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis are discussed.

Gisela H. Degen

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Superfund Cleanups and Infant Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989 and 2003 ...

Currie, Janet

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Influence of the greenhouse effect on human health through stratospheric cooling: Possible increase in acquired immunodeficient syndrome  

SciTech Connect

The greenhouse effect cools the stratosphere and increases formation of PSC (polar stratospheric cloud) in polar regions and enhances ozone depletion. If the enhanced ozone depletion diffused to lower latitudes, it could increase ultraviolet radiation (UV), which might increase acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemiological studies are made to test this hypothesis. The relation between AIDS prevalence R and latitude {theta}. Comparison of analyses shows that R of Caucasians would be higher than Non-Caucasians at the same {theta}. These trends are similar to those of skin cancers known to be caused by UV. In developing countries poverty, malnutrition, etc., could cause high R, and since most developing countries are located at low {theta}, the low {theta} increase may be due to these factors. However if so in Africa they are about the same and the low {theta} increase would disappear, but data on African countries also show the low {theta} increase and the significant correlation. Some countries at low {theta} have low R, probably because HIV is not prevalent for them. Then the upper envelope of the distribution of R would be cases when HIV is prevalent and UV is most effective. Therefore analyses are repeated using maxima of R within intervals of {theta} of 1, 3 and 5{degree}. In all cases the low {theta} increase and the correlation becomes more significant. These results support the hypothesis that AIDS is promoted by UV.

Okamoto, Kazuto; Tsushima, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Shin [Toyo Gakuen Univ. Chiba (Japan)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ORNL Health Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page ORNL Home | ESH&Q Home | Health Services Internal A division in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Directorate The Health Services Division at Oak Ridge...

131

Allergy arising from exposure to airborne contaminants in an insect rearing facility: Health effects and exposure control  

SciTech Connect

In agricultural crop improvement, yield under various stress conditions and limiting factors is assessed experimentally. Of the stresses on plants which affect yield are those due to insects. Ostrinia nubilalis, the European corn borer (corn borer) is a major pest in sweet and field corn in the U.S. There are many ways to fight crop pests such as the corn borer, including (1) application of chemical insecticides, (2) application of natural predators and, (3) improving crop resistance through plant genetics programs. Randomized field trials are used to determine the effectiveness of pest management programs. These trials frequently consist of randomly selected crop plots to which well-defined input regimes are instituted. For example, corn borers might be released onto crop plots in several densities at various stages of crop development, then sprayed with different levels of pesticide. These experiments are duplicated across regions and, in some cases across the country, to determine, in this instance for example, the best pesticide application rate for a given pest density and crop development stage. In order to release these pests onto crop plots, one must have an adequate supply of the insect pest. In winter months studies are carried out in the laboratory to examine chemical and natural pesticide effectiveness, as well as such things as the role of pheromones in moth behavior. The advantage in field trials is that yield data can be garnered directly. In this country, insects are raised for crop research primarily through the US Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with public Land Grant Universities and, by the private sector agricultural concerns - seed companies and others. This study quantifies the airborne allergen exposure of persons working in a Land Grant University entomology lab were allergy to European corn borer was suspected.

Wolff, D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forms Beryllium Health Surveillance Program Summary Beryllium-Associated Workers: Medical Surveillance Beryllium Health Surveillance Program Forms Appendix B to the Preamble...

133

Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades. Author(s) ... is mandatory for the cost-effective operation of an offshore wind power plant.

134

Arsenic Health Research Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research program investigating the health effects of inorganic arsenic continues to focus on understanding the biological significance of low-level inorganic arsenic exposure. The major component of ongoing work is the development of an alternative, nonlinear approach to revising the inorganic arsenic cancer potency value (or cancer slope factor). Current, default linear approaches for establishing a cancer slope factor do not account for the biological mode o...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Health benefits of particle filtration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health benefits of particle filtration Health benefits of particle filtration Title Health benefits of particle filtration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fisk, William J. Journal Indoor Air Date Published 02/12/2013 Abstract The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

136

Millersville University Health Services Health Form Instructions Millersville University Health Services is dedicated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratories as ordered by a medical provider. Health Services works cooperatively with Quest, ACM, and CDDMillersville University Health Services Health Form Instructions Millersville University Health, and health education. Health Services Information Millersville University Health Services is centrally

Hardy, Christopher R.

137

Operational health physics training  

SciTech Connect

The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

NONE

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas...

139

ORISE: Worker Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Health Studies Capabilities Overview Illness and Injury Surveillance Worker Health Research Medical Data Management Beryllium Exposure Studies and Testing Radiation Exposure...

140

ORISE: Health physics training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surveys Health physics services Radiochemical analyses Health physics training How ORISE is Making a Difference Overview Environmental characterization at ORNL a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Selection of a discount rate for use in NRC regulatory analyses and application of discount rates to future averted health effects  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this report is to provide background information and recommendations on the use of discount rates in the regulatory analysis process. The report focuses on two issues selecting the appropriate discount rate or rates to use when conducting a regulatory analysis, and applying the selected discount rate to future health-related benefits estimated to result from alternative regulatory actions.

Paananen, O.H.; Hendrickson, P.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Medical Surveillance in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Occupational in Occupational Health Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM The Johns Hopkins UniversHy Bloomberg School of Public Health + Compliance with legal requirements + Early detection (preclinical) and therapy - many established occupational diseases are not curable + Prevention of disease in co-worleffects . l e s of Suroeilltmce + Condition of interest should be an important heaHh problem * Accepted treatment available when adverse health effect or disease diagnosed (may be cessation of exposure in occupational disease) * Suitable & acceptable test available + Early or latent stage to screen for

143

Henry Ford Health System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Serving Southeast Michigan with More than Health Care. The HFHS workforce supports southeast Michigan with annually ...

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

144

Health Care Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Health Care Health Care Characteristics by Activity... Health Care Health care buildings are those used as diagnostic and treatment facilities for both inpatient and outpatient care. Doctor's and dentist's offices are considered health care if they use any type of diagnostic medical equipment and office if they do not. Skilled nursing or other residential care buildings are categorized as lodging. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Health Care Buildings... Health care buildings in the South tended to be smaller and were more numerous than those in other regions of the country. Buildings on health care complexes tended to be newer than those not on multibuilding facilities. The median age for buildings on health care complexes was 9.5 years, compared to 29.5 years for health care buildings not on a multibuilding facility.

145

Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

Webster, Mort D.

146

Essays on health care consumption and household finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores how health insurance affects the decisions that individuals make. The first chapter studies the effect of insurance on health care consumption. Nearly 10 percent of teenagers become ineligible for their ...

Gross, Tal (Tal A.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Superfund Cleanups and Infant Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989-2003 in ...

Currie, Janet

148

Tailoring persuasive health games to gamer type  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persuasive games are an effective approach for motivating health behavior, and recent years have seen an increase in games designed for changing human behaviors or attitudes. However, these games are limited in two major ways: first, they are not based ... Keywords: behavior theory, hbm, player typology, gamer types, games design, health, persuasive game, serious games

Rita Orji; Regan L. Mandryk; Julita Vassileva; Kathrin M. Gerling

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

ORISE: Health Literacy Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Literacy Development Literacy Development While health disparities may be attributed to a number of factors, health literacy development and access to health information can help special populations gain a better understanding of wellness and prevention. The Internet and other means of electronic communication have become popular tools that are allowing people to take control of their health. According to Healthy People 2010, nearly half of American adults (90 million people) are deemed "health illiterate"-an increasing problem among special populations that appears to contribute to health disparities. Health literacy refers to the ability to read and understand materials related to personal health, as well as navigate the health system. To assist government agencies and organizations educate populations facing

150

ORISE: Public Health Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communication Communication Public Health Communication The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in addressing public health challenges by developing evidence-based communication programs and social marketing initiatives that resonate with target populations. Because approximately half of American adults do not understand basic health information, ORISE develops the types of messages that will attract attention and motivate people to address their personal and family health. ORISE also develops and executes evidence-based and culturally-competent public health communication programs that help change behaviors and result in healthier lifestyles. Communication Planning and Products Public health organizations are faced with increasing demands for

151

Energy Systems and Population Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well-documented that energy and energy systems have a central role in social and economic development and human welfare at all scales, from household and community to regional and national (41). Among its various welfare effects, energy is closely linked with people s health. Some of the effects of energy on health and welfare are direct. With abundant energy, more food or more frequent meals can be prepared; food can be refrigerated, increasing the types of food items that are consumed and reducing food contamination; water pumps can provide more water and eliminate the need for water storage leading to contamination or increased exposure to disease vectors such as mosquitoes or snails; water can be disinfected by boiling or using other technologies such as radiation. Other effects of energy on public health are mediated through more proximal determinants of health and disease. Abundant energy can lead to increased irrigation, agricultural productivity, and access to food and nutrition; access to energy can also increase small-scale income generation such as processing of agricultural commodities (e.g., producing refined oil from oil seeds, roasting coffee, drying and preserving fruits and meats) and production of crafts; ability to control lighting and heating allows education or economic activities to be shielded from daily or seasonal environmental constraints such as light, temperature, rainfall, or wind; time and other economic resources spent on collecting and/or transporting fuels can be used for other household needs if access to energy is facilitated; energy availability for transportation increases access to health and education facilities and allow increased economic activity by facilitating the transportation of goods and services to and from markets; energy for telecommunication technology (radio, television, telephone, or internet) provides increased access to information useful for health, education, or economic purposes; provision of energy to rural and urban health facilities allows increased delivery and coverage of 3 various health services and interventions such as tests and treatments, better storage of medicine and vaccines, disinfection of medical equipment by boiling or radiation, and more frequent and efficient health system encounters through mobile clinics or longer working hours; and so on. In fact, while the dominant view of development-energy-health linkages has been that improvements in energy and health are outcomes of the socioeconomic development process (e.g., the ''energy ladder'' framework discussed below), it has even been argued that access to higher quality energy sources and technologies can initiate a chain of demographic, health, and development outcomes by changing the household structure and socioeconomic relationships. For example, in addition to increased opportunities for food and income production, reduced infant mortality as a result of transition to cleaner fuels or increased coverage of vaccination with availability of refrigerators in rural clinics may initiate a process of ''demographic transition'' to low-mortality and low-fertility populations (14). Such a transition has historically been followed with further improvements in maternal and child health and increased female participation in the labor markets and other economic activities.

Ezzati, Majid; Bailis, Rob; Kammen, Daniel M.; Holloway, Tracey; Price, Lynn; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Barnes, Brendon; Chaurey, Akanksha; Dhanapala, Kiran N.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

Health and Nutrition Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Health and Nutrition Division promotes and facilitates communication and cooperation among professionals whose interests in lipid biochemistry and physiology relate to all aspects of dietary fats and health; encompasses the technical areas of dietary f

153

ORISE: Worker Health Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Health Research Worker Health Research Worker Health Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides technical assistance to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies by performing specialized worker health research to assess the health of workers and other populations. Statistical methods, epidemiologic research and hazard assessments are core ORISE worker health research competencies. Because information technology is an integral part of the epidemiologic research process, ORISE also capitalizes on its benefits by organizing worker health research data into manageable databases. By providing DOE and the scientific community with accessible information on the long-term health outcomes of occupational exposures, ORISE is helping improve the

154

Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decisions and, on a limited but growing scale, improving communication between clinicians and patients. [10] Some health care delivery organizations have already suc- edge for clinicians improves the quality and/or safety and efficiency of health care... by the individual or family, plus non-clinical information such as self-care trackers and directories of health care providers. The health care delivery dimension includes information such as pro- vider notes, clinical orders, decision-support programs, digital...

Detmer, Don E

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

Health IT Workshop Notice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... among NVLAP, the NIST Information Technology Laboratory, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), laboratories interested in ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services Dr. Marcelle Holmes Assistant Vice Chancellor CARE Career Student Health Center #12;The mission of the Wellness, Health & Counseling Services cluster is to support · Dedicated to promoting principles of wellness, prevention and healthy life-style choices for students

Stanford, Kyle

157

Environmental Public Health at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requiring special laboratory expertise · The Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services, which, environmental sanitation, and laboratory sciences----to protect public health · Responding and sharing solutions to environmental public health problems worldwide "We" are---- · The Division of Laboratory Sciences, which

158

Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect

An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities that are old, poorly maintained, and contain radioactive and hazardous substances, the extent of which may be unknown. In addition, many excess facilities do not have historical facility documents such as operating records, plant and instrumentation diagrams, and incident records. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program, its safety performance, and associated safety and health lessons learned and good practices. Illustrative examples of these lessons learned and good practices are also provided. The primary focus of this report is on the safety and health activities and implications associated with the planning phase of Oak Ridge facility disposition projects. Section 1.0 of this report provides the background and purpose of the report. Section 2.0 presents an overview of the facility disposition activities from which the lessons learned and good practices discussed in Section 3.0 were derived.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Human Resources for Health BioMed Central Commentary Public health workforce: challenges and policy issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. This paper reviews the challenges facing the public health workforce in developing countries and the main policy issues that must be addressed in order to strengthen the public health workforce. The public health workforce is diverse and includes all those whose prime responsibility is the provision of core public health activities, irrespective of their organizational base. Although the public health workforce is central to the performance of health systems, very little is known about its composition, training or performance. The key policy question is: Should governments invest more in building and supporting the public health workforce and infrastructure to ensure the more effective functioning of health systems? Other questions concern: the nature of the public health workforce, including its size, composition, skills, training needs, current functions and performance; the appropriate roles of the workforce; and how the workforce can be strengthened to support new approaches to priority health problems. The available evidence to shed light on these policy issues is limited. The World Health Organization is supporting the development of evidence to inform discussion on the best

Robert Beaglehole; Mario R Dal Poz; Robert Beaglehole; Mario R Dal Poz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Three fold system (3FS) for mental health domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with an increase in the number of mentally ill people, research into all aspects of mental health has increased in recent years. In all disciplines information is the key to success but major problems adversely affect the efficiency and effectiveness ... Keywords: data mining, health information systems, intelligent information retrieval, mental health research, ontology-based multi-agent systems

Maja Hadzic; Roberta Ann Cowan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Asset Health Workshop Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the initial findings and expectations from member asset managers with regard to asset health. Principal objectives were expressed at an asset health workshop hosted by BC Hydro July 7th, 2007. Participants shared experiences in asset health and aligned on an approach to capture and use asset health information. Asset health will be a key component of EPRI's asset and risk management program. The notes of the meeting will be utilized as a starting point for framing out the asset hea...

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

THE EFFECTS OF NEW MEDIA ON ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT AMONG MILLENNIALS: A CASE STUDY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES ALUMNI.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the effects of new media, specifically the Internet and the popular social networking site Facebook, on alumni engagement among Millennials in the… (more)

Horseman, Allison M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Audit Report Westinghouse Savannah River Company's Health Benefit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with Aetna Insurance expired on December 31, 1996. Westinghouse chose Blue CrossBlue Shield of South Carolina (BCBS) to administer its health plan, effective January 1, 1997....

164

Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory  

SciTech Connect

Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m{sup 3} (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

Al-Khatib, Issam A. [Institute of Environmental and Water Studies, Birzeit University, P.O. Box 14, Birzeit, Ramallah, West Bank (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)], E-mail: ikhatib@birzeit.edu; Sato, Chikashi [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as other federal and state agencies. From radiological facility audits and reviews to dose modeling and technical evaluations, ORISE is nationally-recognized for its health physics support to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the United States. Our health physics services include: Environmental survey Applied health physics projects We work with government agencies and organizations to identify, measure and assess the presence of radiological materials during the D&D process. ORISE

166

Worker and Public Health Activities Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Safety Programs Health and Safety Programs Home About HS-13 What's New HS-13 Staff Pandemic Influenza Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry CEDR Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Epi Moratorium United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries Occupational Medicine Worker and Community Public Health Activities Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) Program Chronic Beryllium Disease Bio-repository Initiative Articles Links HSS Logo Worker and Public Health Activities Program The aim of the Worker and Public Health Activities Program is to improve our understanding of the consequences of exposures to ionizing radiation and other hazardous materials to workers and to the public. One of the program's strategic objectives is to support studies related to current and past operations of DOE facilities that ascribe to the highest scientific standards and policies and to communicate the health effects into impact-driven practices for improving worker and public health. This objective strives to ensure that the studies and public health activities address the most relevant research pertaining to DOE operations and provide a framework for intervention. Periodic evaluation of the research via independent external peer review enhances this objective. DOE encourages publication in scientific peer-reviewed journals and presentations at scientific meetings.

167

ORISE: Environmental Assessment and Health Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessments and Health Physics Environmental Assessments and Health Physics Performing environmental assessments and independent verification is essential to building public trust and confidence in radiological cleanup. As the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies target contaminated sites across the country for decontamination and decommissioning, strict guidelines must be followed to ensure that property is effectively remediated before being released for public or private use. Through a combination of environmental assessments, health physics services, and radiochemistry analyses, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent environmental assessment and verification at DOE cleanup sites across the country. ORISE applies its

168

Office of Health and Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Health and Safety Health and Safety Office of Health and Safety Mission The Office of Health and Safety establishes worker safety and health requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of workers from the hazards associated with Department operations. The Office conducts health studies to determine worker and public health effects from exposure to hazardous materials associated with Department operations and supports international health studies and programs. The Office implements medical surveillance and screening programs for current and former workers and support the Department of Labor in the implementation of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA). Additionally, the office provides assistance to Headquarters and field elements in implementation of policy and resolving

169

Health Risks Associated with Low Doses of Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite a wealth of information, there remains uncertainty concerning human radiation effects at low dose levels. This report provides background information and a literature review of research on the potential health hazards associated with exposure to low-level ionizing radiation. Topics include radiation characteristics, protection standards, epidemiologic data and risk models, the nature of human health exposure-related effects, important radiation health studies to date, and the scientific method fo...

1994-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DATE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DATE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH ANIMAL HEALTH AND SHIPPING CERTIFICATE Health The animals described hereon have been examined and found on visual observation. Unless otherwise stated, no laboratory tests have been performed. I hereby certify

Bandettini, Peter A.

171

Provides leadership for a national program to increase knowledge and advance effective strategies to deal with problems and issues in the promotion of mental health and the prevention and treatment of mental illness;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and supports mental health services research concerned with the impact of the organization, financing, and management of health services on the quality, cost, access to, and outcomes of care; · Provides assistance to to deal with problems and issues in the promotion of mental health and the prevention and treatment

Bandettini, Peter A.

172

Evironmental health policy in ukraine after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

The 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine produced severe environmental health problems. This paper reports on the environmental health conditions in Ukraine after the accident and the health policy approaches employed to respond to the environmental conditions and health problems. Crisis conditions and a period of rapid change in Ukraine contributed to the difficulties of developing and implementing policy to address serious environmental health problems. Despite these difficulties, Ukraine is taking effective action. The paper describes the primary environmental health problem areas and the efforts taken to solve them. The effect of intense public fear of radiation on policymaking is described. The paper discusses the ability of public fear to distort health policy towards certain problems, leaving problems of greater importance with fewer resources. 35 refs., 1 fig.

Page, G.W.; Bobyleva, O.A.; Naboka, M.V. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

U.S. Environmental Health Effects and Treatment of Mercury Exposure IAP 2006, 12.091 Medical Geology/Geochemistry Term Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The various methods of treatment to mercury toxicity in the human body have been studied and investigated with somewhat mixed conclusions. This paper discusses the various types of mercury, the cycle of mercury in the environment, human exposure to mercury and treatment, and methods of reducing mercury pollution and its effect in the human population in the U.S.

Sergio Navarro

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Health and Nutrition News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US National Institutes of Health (NIH)used modern statistics to review data that were not included in the original 1978 publication of results from the Sydney Diet Heart Study (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 109:317–330). Health and Nutritio

175

Technology in mental health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mental illness has been identified as one of the greatest challenges facing society in the coming decades. However, there are significant barriers to access for many people suffering from mental illness, including overburdened public health care systems, ... Keywords: cognitive rehabilitation, computer based treatment, engagement, ethics, exposure therapy, mental health, psychotherapy, stigma, universal design, user centered design

Gavin Doherty; John Sharry; Magnus Bang; Mariano Alcañiz; Rosa Baños

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effects of Heat Stress and Increased Protein Fed in Milk Replacers on the Health and Growth Parameters of Neonatal Holstein Bull Calves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objectives of the study were to evaluate if calves fed 6 L of high protein milk replacer (HPMR; 1135 g/d, 28% crude protein (CP), 20% fat) had improved performance and health as compared to calves fed 4 L of a conventional milk replacer (CMR; 454 g/d, 20% CP, 20% fat) in heat stress and non heat stress environments. Holstein bull calves (n=52) Water consumption (WC) in mL and starter intake (SI) in grams was measured daily. Feed conversion (FC) was also calculated for each nutritional treatment and environment. Fecal scores (FS) of 1 to 4 (1=hard, firm, 2=soft, firm, 3=no form, and 4=watery) were recorded daily. Calves with a FS of >3 were considered to have diarrhea and required treatment. Respiration rates (RR) were recorded at 0630 (AM) and 1830 (PM) to monitor respiratory challenges while rectal temperatures (RT) were also measured using a digital thermometer daily in AM and PM to monitor febrile events. If RT was greater than 39.2 degrees C for NHS calves and 39.7 degrees C for HS calves, they were treated for febrile events (FE). Data was analyzed using PROC MIXED (SAS 9.2). HPMR had a greater (P < 0.01) WH, HG, BL, HH, ADG, WC, and FS than the CMR (0.15 vs. 0.11, 0.37 vs. 0.28, 0.27 vs. 0.22, 0.21 vs. 0.14, 0.82 vs. 0.58, 4235 vs. 2656, and 2.05 vs. 1.73, respectively). HS had a greater (P < 0.01) WC than NHS (4365 vs. 2526, respectively). CMR had a greater SI and FC (P < 0.05) than HPMR (0.942 vs. 0.437, and 1.99 vs. 1.78, respectively). HS had a higher RT AM, RT PM, RR AM, and RR PM (P<0.01) than NHS (38.87 vs. 38.77, 39.03 vs. 38.79, 35.79 vs. 32.77, and 55.73 vs. 38.57, respectively. Calves in NHS had a higher FE (P<0.01) than the HS calves (6.24 vs. 2.33). There was no significant difference in growth parameters in HS or NHS in calves of like feeding strategies. The results show calves in HS experienced higher RT AM, RT PM, RR AM, and RR PM. The increased protein and energy fed to the HPMR calves resulted in greater FS and increased growth.

Krenek, Andrew

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Heart Health Alaska Natives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart Health Educator's Manual for Alaska Natives U . S . D E Health Service Office of Prevention, Education, and Control #12;Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Indian Health Service NIH Publication No. 06-5218 Revised

Bandettini, Peter A.

178

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Health Services: Clinical Services...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clinical Services: Occupational Health Mission Statement In support of the pursuit of world class science at the Berkeley Laboratory, Health Services promotes the highest level of...

179

Health & Safety Plan Last Updated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................ 4 Organizational Health and Safety Committees corrective measures, and obtain the participation of all personnel. a. Organizational Health and Safety Committees Department employees are represented on the University's Organizational Health and Safety

Anderson, Richard

180

PNNL: About PNNL: Environment, Health, Safety & Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, Safety and Security Environment, Health, Safety and Security The success of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is, in part, dependent upon operational excellence. At PNNL, "operational excellence" means harnessing the energy and passion of every staff member to accomplish our mission: delivering outstanding research results in science and technology while cost effectively managing the Laboratory with the highest standards of good citizenship, safety, health, and environmental stewardship. The Environment, Health, Safety and Security business unit of PNNL contributes to operational success by providing efficient and effective systems, processes, tools and services that enable staff to conduct their work in a safe, compliant and environmentally sound manner.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Safety and Health Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Safety & Health Services Division (SHSD) provides subject matter expertise and services in industrial hygiene, safety engineering, and safety & health programs for the Lab....

182

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Safety and Health Standards Set for LBNL Environment, Safety and Health Standards Set for LBNL Due to a recent Contract 31 action, the Necessary and Sufficient process...

183

Energy Systems and Population Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infrastructure Energy, gender, and health While much of theof energy and health linkages: poverty and gender. We thengender-based priorities, community and cultural factors, energy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Health & Nutrition News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sperm quality and dietary fat Health & Nutrition News Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Analytical Chemistry Biochemistry Biotechnology Soybeans Industrial Oil Products The type and amount of fat men eat may affect their se

185

Russian Health Studies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

186

Health.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAY 2000 MAY 2000 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES FOLLOW-UP AUDIT OF HEALTH BENEFIT COSTS AT THE DEPARTMENT'S MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTORS AUDIT REPORT DOE/IG-0470 May 11, 2000 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Follow-up Audit of Health Benefit Costs at the Department's Management and Operating Contractors" BACKGROUND In Calendar Year (CY) 1998, the Department of Energy (Department) spent about $480 million to provide health benefits for employees of its contractors. In 1994, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) evaluated the system in place at that time to determine if contractor employee health benefit

187

(. 4 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &..HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~..""~ "+" ~. (. 4 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH &..HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service ~,~..Health Bethesda, Maryland 20892 January 18, 1995 TO: Addressees FROM: Deputy Director for Intramural Research SUBJECT: Disposition of Laboratory Animals There was an incident over

Bandettini, Peter A.

188

Health Satisfaction and Energy Spending  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the direct link between energy spending and health satisfaction and control for impacts of other determinants such as access to gas, age, income, and satisfaction levels in other domains of life such as social life or leisure. Indirect effects are assumed... in the context with energy affordability. Rising energy prices and the realization of climate change objectives will have impacts on energy usage and spending of households. At least for some households it will for example be more difficult to warm their homes...

Meier, Helena

189

368 Health Science 1997/98 CSULB Catalog HEALTH SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

368 · Health Science · 1997/98 CSULB Catalog HEALTH SCIENCE College of Health and Human Services Champlin Director, Radiation Therapy Stephanie Eatmon Director, School Health Education Susan C. Giarratano Coordinator, Student Affairs/Radiation Therapy Robert Pfister Advisor, Single Subject Credential Dale W. Evans

Sorin, Eric J.

190

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FY 2002 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME 1 Foreword of an Interdisciplinary Approach.................................17 Section III: Department of Health and Human ServicesNATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH National Institutes of Health Strategic Research Plan and Budget

Bandettini, Peter A.

191

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Monday, April 22, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program What are the potential effects of global climate change on human health? This is a question that a growing number of federally funded studies seek to answer. A new analysis recently published in the journal, Environmental Health Perspectives, looks at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) research portfolio on climate change and human health. Climate change is affecting human health through environmental consequences, such as sea-level rise, changes in precipitation, heat waves, changes in intensity of hurricanes and storms, and degraded air quality, according to the World Health Organization and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

192

-----_ _111 _ _ _ __ HEALTH STATU~S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- - - - -_ _111 _ _ _ __ HEALTH STATU~S OF VIETNAM VETER~I~NS SUPPLEMENT A LABORATORY METHOD~3 AND QUALITY CONTROL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SEIIVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE Control Vietnam Experience Study January 1989 t t U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

193

Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research  

SciTech Connect

Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Nanotech/Environment, Health & Safety Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nanotech/Environment, Health & Safety Portal. Nanotech/Environment, Health & Safety Portal. Programs and ...

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

Environment, Safety & Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links ESSH Policy Site Environmental Reports Environmental Regulators Upton Ecological and Research Reserve Pollution Prevention Organizations ES&H Directorate Environmental Protection Division Environmental Restoration Division Safety & Health Services Other BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Environment, Safety & Health Brookhaven National Lab is committed to continual improvement in environmental, safety, security, and health (ESSH) performance. Full policy description. Restoration Projects Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor decommissioning, High Flux Beam Reactor decommissioning Groundwater Projects Peconic River Cleanup Peconic River Working Group Environmental Restoration Projects green tech ISB-inspired Greening Strategies for Your Home or Office Being green isn't rocket science. Several strategies that earned the ISB its LEED Gold certification can help reduce energy usage and make any building more environmentally friendly.

196

Independent Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Health Studies Independent Health Studies A study of cancer rates within a 15-mile radius of Brookhaven National Laboratory found no relationship between Brookhaven Lab and cancer. Suffolk County Task Force Report (PDF) New York State Department of Health Cancer Registry Report (PDF) Report of the Rhabdomyosarcoma Task Force (PDF) According to a 1998 report by the Suffolk County Environmental Task Force on the Laboratory, "cancer rates of all types of cancers [the task force] studied are not elevated near BNL" for the years 1979-93. Task Force Chair Roger Grimson, a biostatistician and an associate professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, concluded in a Newsday article at that time, "There is no link between Brookhaven National Lab and

197

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for ‘green’ energy 1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for ‘green’ energy1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for SULFATE Formal Toxicity Summary for SULFATE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 5. REFERENCES JUNE 1991 Prepared by: Cheryl Bast, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program.

200

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for STRONTIUM-90 Formal Toxicity Summary for STRONTIUM-90 NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES DECEMBER 1994 Prepared by: Sylvia S. Talmage, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THALLIUM THALLIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES DECEMBER 1994 Prepared by: Tim Borges and Mary Lou Daugherty, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge,

202

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LEAD LEAD NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 HUMAN 3.2 ANIMAL 3.3 REFERENCE DOSE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 HUMAN 4.2 ANIMAL 4.3 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.4 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES December 1994 Prepared by Kowetha A. Davidson, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Program, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

203

Health effects of radon in air  

SciTech Connect

Widely accepted risk estimates for exposure to radon in homes are derived largely from studies of miners. These include large groups of US Czechoslovakian, and Canadian uranium miners, Newfoundland fluorspar miners, and Swedish iron, lead, and zinc miners, all of which give roughly consistent results, with the excess risk of lung cancer increasing linearly with the exposure to radon. The authors have studied correlations between average radon levels and lung cancer rates in counties of the US. One study based on 50,000 purchased measurements in the main living areas of houses in which there have been no previous measurements involves 310 counties. It gives a weak but statistically significant negative correlation between mean radon levels and lung cancer rates for both females and males, whereas the usual risk estimates predict a large positive correlation.

Cohen, B.L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Linking Environmental Exposures to Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studies conducted by his group, including occupational and environmental exposures to benzene and other VOCs and air levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons following the World...

205

NETL: Health Effects - Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sub-chronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions The objective of this project is to conduct a laboratory study providing a comprehensive, contemporary...

206

NETL: Health Effects - Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TERESA: Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emissions of Source Aerosols The overall objective of the TERESA program is to investigate and clarify the impact of the sources and...

207

NETL: Health Effects - Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Feasibility Assessment of a Retrospective Epidemiologic Study of Coal-Fired Power Plant Emissions in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Region The overall objective of this...

208

Can tailoring increase elaboration of health messages delivered via an adaptive educational site on adolescent sexual health and decision making?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tailoring, the development of health messages based on assessment of key psychosocial variables that influence a prescribed behavior, has been gaining ground as an effective health education approach. The efficacy of this approach is based on the assumption ... Keywords: human computer interaction, information processing

Juliann Cortese; Mia Liza A. Lustria

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 7 Macular Carotenoids in Eye Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 7 Macular Carotenoids in Eye Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloadable pdf...

210

Healthful LipidsChapter 28 Nutritional Characteristics of Diacylglycerol Oil and Its Health Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 28 Nutritional Characteristics of Diacylglycerol Oil and Its Health Benefits Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chap

211

Collaborative Worker Health and Safety Improvement Activities | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collaborative Worker Health and Safety Improvement Activities Collaborative Worker Health and Safety Improvement Activities Collaborative Worker Health and Safety Improvement Activities Worker health and safety programs at DOE are most effective when they reflect the knowledge and experience of the Department's frontline workers. "Our workers are the lifeblood of accomplishing the Department's mission at DOE sites, and as such, ensuring their safety is foremost," explains Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer. "It is imperative that we communicate and establish relationships with those elements that train, manage and represent our workforce to improve the safety culture at DOE sites." Meeting Documents Available for Download November 30, 2012 Health and Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ) Survey Report

212

Learning and Applying Health Disparity Education through Texas TEKS Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the US population grows in diversity, so has the number of health disparities. Health disparities continue to affect a large portion of the minority population resulting in negative health outcomes. Education remains a key element in the prevention of these adverse health conditions, especially among the ethnically diverse youth. Health education presently fails to be effectively implemented in the activities and instruction in classrooms, which is greatly impacted by the lack of knowledge and training of educators. Through the development and implementation of a new Texas health-science curriculum, educators can acquire the skills and framework necessary to approach a diverse classroom on good health practices. This program will identify the concepts of cultural competency and cultural influences to allow instructors the capacity to adapt a curriculum that suits all students. The analysis and reconstruction of current TEKS curricula is the purpose of this research study. Through studying these sets of data, an increased understanding in health education can be formulated and relayed to grade school level students. Thus, by the increase in health education students of minority can develop good behavioral norms; reducing the risks associated with rising health disparities.

Mazac, Taylor T

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

MERCURY & DIMETHYLMERCURY EXPOSURE & EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies the dose response data available for several toxic mercury compounds and summarizes the symptoms and health effects associated with each of them.

HONEYMAN, J.O.

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

214

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Services, Mark Buchanan MD_______________________________________ Title: CDOC Director Health Services orders for laboratory, radiology, or pharmacy services prior to the next routine OBIS feed (around 2: CDOC Director Health Services, Daniel Bannish PsyD _________________________________________ #12

Oliver, Douglas L.

215

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY, HEALTH PHYSICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contamination and internal exposures to radiation? Disposable gloves __X__ Disposable booties_____ Lab coat __XRUA # 1384 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY, HEALTH PHYSICS Radiation radioactive contamination and/or radiation fields? Wipes and liquid scintillation counting C. At what

Singer, Mitchell

216

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Speaker(s): Carol Rao Date: July 9, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mark Mendell Exposures to fungi have been linked with asthma, toxicoses, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and a range of non-specific symptoms. Definitive associations between indoor fungal exposure and health effects in population-based exposure-response studies, however, have not been well established. Issues in exposure assessment methods, both in collection and analysis, are major limitations. Classic methods for assessing airborne fungi rely upon collecting and analyzing whole fungal spores by culture. However, quantifying whole fungal spores may not fully describe fungal exposures, especially for purposes of investigating adverse respiratory

217

Student Health Services Student Health Services provides students with on-campus health care. We are an appointment-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student Health Services @ Student Health Services provides students with on-campus health care. We & Immunizations Sexually Transmitted Infections Testing Laboratory Services Physiotherapy Massage Therapy 519

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

218

Environmental and health management in small and medium size enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workers and employees are increasingly exposed in the workplace to chemical compounds and substances that are potentially toxic; for most of these compounds, no information exist regarding effects on human health. As one ...

Arredondo, Juan C. (Juan Carlos Arredondo Brun), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Automotive Battery State-of-Health Monitoring Methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effective vehicular power management requires accurate knowledge of battery state, including state-of-charge (SOC) and state-of-health (SOH). An essential functionality of automotive batteries is delivering high… (more)

Grube, Ryan J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

An assessment of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exploration of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations is made by assessing the results of a study of aviation's effects on United States air quality mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The ...

Sequeira, Christopher J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A healthy and salubrious place : public health and city form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As cities grew larger and more complex at the end of the eighteenth century, they suffered new and more pressing public health problems. The responses to these problems had, in time, an effect on the environment that ...

Ozonoff, Victoria Vespe

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The Oregon Health Insurance Experiment: Evidence from the First Year  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008, a group of uninsured low-income adults in Oregon was selected by lottery to be given the chance to apply for Medicaid. This lottery provides an opportunity to gauge the effects of expanding access to public health ...

Taubman, Sarah

223

PIA - Richland Health Services Scheduling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Health Services Scheduling PIA - Richland Health Services Scheduling PIA - Richland Health Services Scheduling PIA - Richland Health Services Scheduling More Documents &...

224

Choline, Phospholipids, Health, and Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proceedings of the 7th International Congress on Phospholipids. Choline, Phospholipids, Health, and Disease Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

225

The Health of Colorado's Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Fort Collins, Colo., and Aerial Survey Coordinator, Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS. Patricia M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International, Fort Collins, Colo. Brian Howell, Aerial SurveyThe Health of Colorado's Forests 2009 Report Special Issue: Threats to Colorado's Current

226

ORISE: Health Communication and Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

around the world. Where we're training... Health Communication Map ORISE is helping train health care providers across the U.S. and around the world. View the map (PDF, 198 KB)...

227

health_risks.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Background Definition Sources of Radiation During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas

228

Security, Safety and Health  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, Fourth Quarter, 2012 8, Fourth Quarter, 2012 www.fossil.energy.gov/news/energytoday.html HigHligHts inside 2 Security and Sustainability A Column from the FE Director of Health, Security, Safety and Health 4 Training Goes 3-D NETL's AVESTAR Center Deploys New Virtual Training System 5 Secretary Achievement Awards Two FE Teams Earn Secretary of Energy Recognition 7 Vast Energy Resource Identified FE Study Says Billions of Barrels of Oil in Residual Oil Zones 8 Presidential Award NETL-RUA Engineer Earns Highest Government Honor in Science & Engineering This September marked a major mile- stone for one of the Office of Fossil Energy's largest carbon capture, utili- zation and storage projects: the opening

229

Arsenic Health Research Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes EPRI-sponsored arsenic health research results to date, examines implications of these results for reducing uncertainties in arsenic cancer risk assessment, and identifies remaining research needs. The most important contributions of this research toward reducing key uncertainties for arsenic cancer risk estimates include a revised arsenic inhalation unit risk value, support for a nonlinear dose-response relationship, an estimate of bioavailability of arsenic in coal fly ash, deter...

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

230

Organizational Readiness in Specialty Mental Health Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the organizational social context (OSC) of mental healthOrganizational Readiness in Specialty Mental Health Careorganizational assessment in specialty mental health, in

Hamilton, Alison B.; Cohen, Amy N.; Young, Alexander S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

ORISE: Capabilities in Worker Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Research Worker Health Research ORISE performs statistical analyses, epidemiologic research and hazards assessments to evaluate workforce health. Medical Data Management...

232

HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;' HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM MANUAL Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Laboratory Revision.C.M.P. (UBC campus) . .......................................(604) 224-1322 Student Health Services (UBC Date: September, 2008 #12;#12;AMPEL Health and Safety Program Revised September, 2008 1 TABLE

Handy, Todd C.

233

REPORT NO. 3 health implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT NO. 3 health implications of fallout from nuclear weapons testing through 1961 May 1962 Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;REPORT NO. 3 health implications of fallout from nuclear............................................................................................. 10 iii #12;REPORT OF THE FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF FALLOUT FROM NUCLEAR

234

Shared Health Care Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article will provide one approach to the challenges faced by access managers, as they attempt to share, gather, and manage information from diverse sources. Like most industries, health care continues to experience resource scarcity. Academic research provides exchange, hierarchical, and market paradigms to explain how organizations cope with and overcome resource scarcity. Levine and White (1961) examined interorganizational relationships among 22 New England community health care agencies including social welfare organizations, community hospitals, and clinics. They suggested that exchange fell into three categories (i.e., in the context of health care organizations): (1) referrals of cases, clients, or patients, (2) the giving or receiving of labor services, including volunteer, clerical, professional personnel services, and (3) the sending of funds, equipment, and information on cases and technical matters. The work of these authors focused on organizational relationships with little emphasis on information technology. Since Levine and White (1961), academic studies (Malone, et al., 1987; Bakos, 1991) have examined the role of interorganizational information systems in the context of electronic markets and hierarchies. Electronic markets allow buyers to engage in comparative shopping and the selection of goods or 2

Fay Cobb Payton

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Improving Performance and Quality of Working Life: A Model for Organizational Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving Performance and Quality of Working Life: A Model for Organizational Health Assessment of organizational health blends the pursuit of individual wellness with organiza- tional effectiveness to yield a strategy for economic resilience. This article introduces a novel model for organizational health

Huang, Samuel H.

236

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HEALTH (ISH) HEALTH (ISH) OBJECTIVE ISH.1 A comprehensive industrial safety & health program has been implemented to address applicable safety requirements at the TA 55 SST Facility. (Core Requirements 1, 3, and 4) Criteria * Procedures are implemented to address applicable industrial & health safety issues. * An adequate number of trained personnel are available to support SST facility regarding industrial safety & health concerns. * Portable fire extinguishers are appropriate for the class of fire they are expected to fight and are located within the proper distance. * Cranes, hooks, slings, and other rigging are plainly marked as to their capacity and inspected prior to use. * Forklifts and other powered lifting devices are adequately inspected.

237

Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed. (auth)

Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Savannah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Savannah River Site, February 2006 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Savannah River Site, February 2006 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight (Independent Oversight) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) during January and February 2006. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Most aspects of EM/SR, NNSA/SRSO, and WSRC ISM systems are conceptually sound, and many aspects are effectively implemented. For the most part, WSRC managers and workers were well qualified and demonstrated their understanding of and commitment to safety. WSRC has devoted significant

239

Calling All Health Innovators: Health Data Palooza Live June...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

event. Hashtag healthapps. The Health Data Initiative is an incredibly exciting public-private collaboration that is encouraging innovators to utilize data made publicly...

240

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for NITRATES Formal Toxicity Summary for NITRATES NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES AUGUST 1995 Prepared By: Andrew Francis, M.S., DABT, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for ALUMINUM Formal Toxicity Summary for ALUMINUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES September 1993 Prepared by Cheryl B. Bast, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical

242

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for PHENANTHRENE Formal Toxicity Summary for PHENANTHRENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES AUGUST 1993 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

243

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for METHYL MERCURY Formal Toxicity Summary for METHYL MERCURY NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES FEBRUARY, 1992 Prepared by: Robert A. Young, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation

244

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for BERYLLIUM Formal Toxicity Summary for BERYLLIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES April 1992 Prepared by: Mary Lou Daugherty, M.S., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

245

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for MERCURY Formal Toxicity Summary for MERCURY NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES Prepared by: Robert Young, Ph.D., who is a member of the Chemical Hazard

246

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XYLENE XYLENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES September 1994 Prepared by Carol S. Forsyth, Ph.D. and Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis

247

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for 2,6-DINITROTOLUENE Formal Toxicity Summary for 2,6-DINITROTOLUENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group in

248

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for LITHIUM Formal Toxicity Summary for LITHIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES May 1995 Prepared by Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

249

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for 1,1-DICHLOROETHANE Formal Toxicity Summary for 1,1-DICHLOROETHANE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES February 1994 Prepared by: Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

250

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARSENIC ARSENIC NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES April 1992 Prepared by: Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis

251

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for AROCLOR-1260 Formal Toxicity Summary for AROCLOR-1260 NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES Prepared by C. B. Bast, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

252

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for BARIUM Formal Toxicity Summary for BARIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES Prepared by A. A. Francis, M.S., D.A.B.T., and Carol S. Forsyth, Ph.D.,

253

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ZINC AND ZINC COMPOUNDS ZINC AND ZINC COMPOUNDS NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1. ABSORPTION 2.2. DISTRIBUTION 2.3. METABOLISM 2.4. EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1. ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2. INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3. OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4. TARGET ORGAN/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1. ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2. INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3. OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4. EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5. SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES April 1992 Prepared by Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

254

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for CARBON TETRACHLORIDE Formal Toxicity Summary for CARBON TETRACHLORIDE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES DECEMBER 1992 Prepared by: Andrew Francis, M.S., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

255

The Risk Assessment Information System  

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Formal Toxicity Summary for 1,2-DICHLOROETHANE Formal Toxicity Summary for 1,2-DICHLOROETHANE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES May 1994 Prepared by Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

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Formal Toxicity Summary for TRINITROPHENYLMETHYLNITRAMINE Formal Toxicity Summary for TRINITROPHENYLMETHYLNITRAMINE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES NOVEMBER, 1991 Prepared by: Mary Lou Daugherty, M.S., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

257

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COPPER COPPER NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES DECEMBER 1992 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis

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FormalToxicity Summary for ANTHRACENE FormalToxicity Summary for ANTHRACENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES November 1991 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication

259

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INDENO[1,2,3-cd]PYRENE INDENO[1,2,3-cd]PYRENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES MAY 1994 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

260

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TOLUENE TOLUENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES JANUARY 1994 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

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Formal Toxicity Summary for PENTACHLOROPHENOL Formal Toxicity Summary for PENTACHLOROPHENOL NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES SEPTEMBER 1994 Prepared by: Robert A. Young, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation

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FLUORANTHENE FLUORANTHENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES August 1993 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

263

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K]FLUORANTHENE K]FLUORANTHENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES May 1994 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

264

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DIBENZ[A,H]ANTHRACENE DIBENZ[A,H]ANTHRACENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES May 1995 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

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Formal Toxicity Summary for CHLOROFORM Formal Toxicity Summary for CHLOROFORM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES DECEMBER 1992 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

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CHROMIUM CHROMIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES September 1992 Prepared by: Mary Lou Daugherty, M.S., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

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HEPTACHLOR HEPTACHLOR NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES The toxicity information included in this summary was researched and compiled by R. A. Faust, Ph.D., who is a member of the Chemical Hazard

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Formal Toxicity Summary for ACENAPHTHENE Formal Toxicity Summary for ACENAPHTHENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES January 1994 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

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Formal Toxicity Summary for BIS(2-ETHYLHEXYL) PHTHALATE Formal Toxicity Summary for BIS(2-ETHYLHEXYL) PHTHALATE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES MARCH 1993 Prepared by Andrew Francis, M.S., DABT, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

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Formal Toxicity Summary for NAPTHALENE Formal Toxicity Summary for NAPTHALENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES JANUARY 1993 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

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Formal Toxicity Summary for ACETONE Formal Toxicity Summary for ACETONE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES May 1995 Prepared by Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

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4-DICHLOROBENZENE 4-DICHLOROBENZENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES Prepared by: James C. Norris, Ph.D, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group in the

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Formal Toxicity Summary for METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE Formal Toxicity Summary for METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES July 1995 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

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Formal Toxicity Summary for CHLORDANE Formal Toxicity Summary for CHLORDANE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES December 1994 Prepared by: Carol S. Forsyth, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

275

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G,H,I]PERYLENE G,H,I]PERYLENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES May 1994 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

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CHRYSENE CHRYSENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES December 1994 Prepared by: H. T. Borges, Ph.D., MT(ASCP), D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard

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Formal Toxicity Summary for NITROBENZENE Formal Toxicity Summary for NITROBENZENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES MARCH 1993 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

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CYANIDE CYANIDE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES February 1994 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis

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Formal Toxicity Summary for MANGANESE Formal Toxicity Summary for MANGANESE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISTRIBUTION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES July 1995 Prepared by A. A. Francis and C. Forsyth, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

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VANADIUM VANADIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES DECEMBER 1991 Prepared by: Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for NICKEL AND NICKEL COMPOUNDS Formal Toxicity Summary for NICKEL AND NICKEL COMPOUNDS NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES JULY 1995 Prepared by: Robert A. Young, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation

282

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for 1,1,2,2-TETRACHLORETHANE Formal Toxicity Summary for 1,1,2,2-TETRACHLORETHANE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES Prepared by J.C. Norris, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group in the

283

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for 1,1,1-TRICHLOROETHANE Formal Toxicity Summary for 1,1,1-TRICHLOROETHANE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES Prepared by M. W.Daugherty, M.S., and Carol S. Forsyth, Ph.D., Chemical

284

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANTIMONY ANTIMONY NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES DECEMBER 1992 Prepared by Robert A. Young, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation

285

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SELENIUM SELENIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES MARCH 1993 Prepared by: Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

286

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for TETRACHLOROETHYLENE Formal Toxicity Summary for TETRACHLOROETHYLENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES MARCH 1993 Prepared by: Mary Lou Daugherty, M.S., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

287

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for 1,1-DICHLOROETHYLENE Formal Toxicity Summary for 1,1-DICHLOROETHYLENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES September 1994 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and

288

ORISE: Health Promotion and Outreach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that promote health literacy. Capacity Building Capacity Building ORISE develops skills and strengthens the infrastructure necessary for government agencies and organizations...

289

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to assist Berkeley Lab supervisors and managers in conducting discussions on environment, safety and health topics with their staff. Each slide delivers focused talking...

290

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recommendations to the Laboratory Director on the development and implementation of Environment, Safety & Health (ES&H) policy, guidelines, codes and regulatory interpretation. It...

291

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concerns Training SubcontractorsVendors (SJHA) Waste Management What We Do The EnvironmentHealthSafety division helps Berkeley Lab staff perform their work safely and in an...

292

Powering Health | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powering Health Powering Health Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Powering Health Agency/Company /Organization: USAID Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Health Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.poweringhealth.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America Language: English Related Tools SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook ProForm Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) ... further results

293

Health impact assessment in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

Kang, Eunjeong, E-mail: marchej@kihasa.re.r [Division for Health Promotion Research, Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs, 268 Jinheung-ro, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngsoo, E-mail: leeys@kei.re.k [Centre for Environmental Impact Assessment Review, Korea Environment Institute, 290 Jinheung-ro, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyeong-gu (Korea, Republic of); Harris, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1981 (Australia); Koh, Kwangwook, E-mail: kwkoh@hanafos.co [Department of Preventive Medicine, Kosin University, 149-1 Dongsam-1-dong, Youngdo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keonyeop, E-mail: pmkky@knu.ac.k [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine and Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Public Health, KyungPook National University, 101 Dongin 2 , Jung-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

journal Environmental Health Perspectives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners A simulation Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners A simulation based assessment for Southern California journal Environmental Health Perspectives year month abstract p Background Residential natural gas cooking burners NGCBs can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting p p Objective Quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes p p Methods A mass balance model was applied to estimate time dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the exposure concentrations experienced by individual occupants The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide NO2 carbon monoxide CO and formaldehyde HCHO concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample

295

People of Color and Disenfranchised Communities Environmental Health  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

People of Color and Disenfranchised Communities Environmental People of Color and Disenfranchised Communities Environmental Health Network (the Coalition) People of Color and Disenfranchised Communities Environmental Health Network (the Coalition) Since 1997, federal agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy, have been working with the Coalition to respond to the recommendations in their Implementation Plan. The recommendations and plan describe activities that are aimed at building more positive relationships with agency officials and building the means for community empowerment to seek effective redress of the problems, which continue to plague such communities. People of Color and Disenfranchised Communities Environmental Health Network (May 2000) More Documents & Publications Environmental Justice Brochure

296

Worker Safety and Health Program Area Index | Safety and Health...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Safety and Health Program Area Index A B C D E F G H I J L M N O P Q R S T U V W BNL's Worker Safety and Health Program Areas were established to assist line and operations...

297

Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address 591 Ala Moana Blvd. Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96813 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.300314°, -157.864542° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.300314,"lon":-157.864542,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

298

Asbestos Exposure Limit AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Mine Safety and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration (MSHA) is revising its existing health standards for asbestos exposure at metal and nonmetal mines, surface coal mines, and surface areas of underground coal mines. This final rule reduces the permissible exposure limits for airborne asbestos fibers and makes clarifying changes to the existing standards. Exposure to asbestos has been associated with lung cancer, mesothelioma, and other cancers, as well as asbestosis and other nonmalignant respiratory diseases. This final rule will help improve health protection for miners who work in an environment where asbestos is present and lower the risk that miners will suffer material impairment of health or functional capacity over their working lifetime. DATES: This final rule is effective April

Rwilkins On Prodpc Rules_; Patricia W. Silvey At

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ozone depletion and health  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the state of knowledge of the ozone layer and the greenhouse effect. Deleterious effects of ultra-violet radiation on humans, animals, and plants are discussed. Alternatives to chloro-fluoro-carbons and political responses to the scientific discoveries are also addressed.

Russell-Jones, R.; Wigley, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

2011 Report on the Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Brian Howell, Aerial Survey Program Manager, Forest Health Protection, USDA Forest Service William2011 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests #12;Acknowledgments Thanks to William M. Ciesla of this report and his work as a contributing author and photographer. Thanks to the following Colorado State

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Health and Nutrition Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryHealth & Nutrition Division2013 Members348 Members as of October 1, 2013Abeywardena, MahindaCSIRO Health NutritionAdelaide, SA, AustraliaAdam, RoyOilseeds International LtdSan Francisco, CA, USAAdriaenssens, MarkBarry Ca

302

Health and Environmental Research. Summary of Accomplishments  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

1984-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

303

Ethical Issues in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETillCAL ISSUES IN ETillCAL ISSUES IN OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 17, 2002 OH Ethical Issues * Autonomy * Confidentiality * Right to Know * Putcmalism * Informed Consent OH Ethical Issues * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others - Engineering controls - Exposure monitoring/ walk throughs - Health screening/ Health surveillance - Health promotion - Occupational Health Research Ethical Principles * Autonomy: The right to self-determination * Nonmaleficence: The duty to do no harm * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others * .Justice: Fairness or giving person what is due them OH Ethical Issues * Nonmale.ficence - High risk jobs - Second Party induced Hazards - Incompetent , wtethical, illegal practices

304

Moisture, Microbes and Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

effects and their mechanisms. Prevalence studies have shown that half of the housing stock has signs of previous or present moisture faults, and the problems are also common in...

305

National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the intersectoral collaboration among epidemiology, laboratory, and environmental health service programsNational Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services-Net) is a collaborative forum of environmental health specialists, epidemiologists, and laboratory professionals who work

306

DOE | Office of Health, Safety and Security | Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Worker Safety and Health Program" FAQs "Worker Safety and Health Program" FAQs 10 CFR 851 “Worker Safety and Health Program" Frequently Asked Questions Updated October 19, 2010 Please Note: The responses to the following Frequently Asked Questions are not Official interpretations, only the Office of General Counsel may issue and interpretive ruling. Please see 10 CFR 851.7 and 851.8 for more information. Subpart A—General Provisions 851.1 Scope and purpose. 851.2 Exclusions. 851.3 Definitions. 851.4 Compliance order. 851.5 Enforcement. 851.6 Petitions for generally applicable rulemaking. 851.7 Request for a binding interpretive ruling. 851.8 Informal requests for information. Subpart B—Program Requirements 851.10 General requirements. 851.11 Development and approval of worker safety and health program.

307

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The third volume in the AOCS PRESS MONOGRAPH SERIES ON OILSEEDS is a unique blend of information focusing on edible oils in the oilseed. Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Health Nutrition Biochemistry Hardback Books Health - Nutrition - Bioc

308

Micronutrients and Health: Molecular Biological Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book contains papers presented at a workshop on micronutrients and health held in 2000. Micronutrients and Health: Molecular Biological Mechanisms Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats divisi

309

Facilities Services and Environmental Health and Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facilities Services and Environmental Health and Safety Laboratory Ventilation Management Program Guidance Document Facilities Services and Environmental Health and Safety This group is comprised of support staff from Facilities Services and Environmental Health and Safety who make observations

Pawlowski, Wojtek

310

Preferences for health information and decision-making: development of the Health Information Wants (HIW) questionnaire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Health Information Wants (HIW) Questionnaire was developed to measure 1) a broad range of the types and amount of each type of information health consumers want to have in dealing with health-related issues; and 2) the degree to which health consumers ... Keywords: decision-making, health information, health information wants (HIW), instrument development

Bo Xie; Mo Wang; Robert Feldman

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Speaker(s): Julian Marshall Date: May 18, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone It is well documented that exposure to ambient air pollution at concentrations typically found in U.S. cities causes significant health effects. Reducing exposure to air pollution is a large, long-term goal for the environmental health community. In this talk, I will address three questions: 1) How should we prioritize emission reduction efforts? 2) Can urban planning help reduce exposure to air pollution? 3) Are there correlations between exposure to air pollution and demographic attributes such as ethnicity and income? I use three case studies to address these

312

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Health Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Investigators Health Physics The March 2011 special issue of Health Physics highlights the Victor Bond Workshop held May 2-5, 2010, in Richland, Wash. The workshop honored the late Dr. Victor (Vic) Bond for his lifetime achievement in the radiation sciences. Dr. Bond's research resulted in numerous influential scientific papers that contributed greatly to the understanding of radiation effects in biological systems. The workshop attracted internationally recognized experts in biophysics, experimental radiation biology, epidemiology, and risk assessment to discuss issues of low-dose risk. Participants included current and previously funded U.S. Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research

313

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Hanford Site, March 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Hanford Site, March 2002 The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) management at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in January-February 2002. Overall, RL and FHI have made significant improvements and established the framework for an effective ISM program. RL and FHI have provided leadership and devoted resources to ES&H programs and ISM, including innovative tools and aggressive efforts to address worker concerns. Section 2 provides an overall discussion of the results of the review of

314

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

315

Individual- and Neighbourhood-Level Indicators of Subjective Well-Being in a Small and Poor Eastern Cape Township: The Effect of Health, Social Capital, Marital Status, and Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Our study used multilevel regression analysis to identify individual- and neighbourhood-level factors that determine individual-level subjective well-being in Rhini, a deprived suburb of Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. The Townsend index and Gini coefficient were used to investigate whether contextual neighbourhood-level differences in socioeconomic status determined individual-level subjective well-being. Crime experience, health status, social capital, and demographic variables were assessed at the individual level. The indicators of subjective well-being were estimated with a two-level random-intercepts and fixed slopes model. Social capital, health and marital status (all p \\.001), followed by income level (p \\.01) and the Townsend score (p \\.05) were significantly related to individual-level subjective well-being outcomes. Our findings showed that individual-level subjective well-being is influenced by neighbourhood-level socioeconomic status as measured by the Townsend deprivation score. Individuals reported higher levels of subjective well-being in less deprived neighbourhoods. Here we wish to highlight the role of context for subjective well-being, and to suggest that subjective well-being outcomes may also be defined in ecological terms. We hope the findings are useful for implementing programs and interventions designed to achieve greater subjective well-being for people living in deprived areas.

J. M. Cramm; A. P. Nieboer; A. P. Nieboer; V. Møller

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Human health implications of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental problems consist of the release of noncondensable gases and vapors, disposal of saline fluids, possible land subsidence and enhanced seismicity, noise, accidents such as well blowouts, and socioeconomic impacts. The most important issue related to human health is believed to be the emission of noncondensable gases, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury, and radon. Based upon data at The Geysers, California, Power Plant, emissions of mercury and radon are not large enough to result in concerns for human health. Hydrogen sulfide emissions, however, have resulted in complaints of odor annoyance and health impairment. These complaints have been caused by exposure to levels of up to approximately 0.1 ppmv in ambient air. This is above the California standard of 0.03 ppmv. Achievement of this standard may not eliminate annoyance complaints, as the odor detection threshold is lognormally distributed and about 20% of the population can detect hydrogen sulfide at levels of 0.002 ppmv. Abatement systems for hydrogen sulfide have been utilized at The Geysers since 1975. This has resulted in an increase of occupational illness caused by exposure to the abatement chemicals and wastes. More effective, and hopefully safer, abatement systems are now being tested. Occupational hazards are evaluated; the more significant ones are exposure to toxic chemicals and hazardous materials and noise. Available occupational illness data are summarized; there clearly indicate that the most significant cause of illness has been exposure to the chemicals and wastes associated with hydrogen sulfide abatement.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Hahn, J.L.

1979-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Compounding conservatisms: EPA's health risk assessment methods  

SciTech Connect

Superfund conjures up images of hazardous waste sites, which EPA is spending billions of dollars to remediate. One of the law's most worrisome effects is that it drains enormous economic resources without returning commensurate benefits. In a Sept. 1, 1991, front page article in The New York Times, experts argued that most health dangers at Superfund sites could be eliminated for a fraction of the billions that will be spent cleaning up the 1,200 high-priority sites across the country. Even EPA has suggested that the Superfund program may receive disproportionate resources, compared with other public health programs, such as radon in houses, the diminishing ozone layer and occupational diseases. Public opinion polls over the last decade consistently have mirrored the public's vast fear of hazardous waste sites, a fear as great as that held for nuclear power plants. Fear notwithstanding, the high cost of chosen remedies at given sites may have less to do with public health goals than with the method EPA uses to translate them into acceptable contaminant concentrations in soil, groundwater and other environmental media.

Stackelberg, K. von; Burmaster, D.E. (Alceon Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NIOSH Office of Mine Safety & Health Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIOSH Office of Mine Safety & Health Research. NVLAP Lab Code: 200716-0. ... Safety & Health URL: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/homepage.html ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

ORISE Health Communication and Training: Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

interactive, computer-based training programs, from Webcasts to simulations and animations. Health Promotion and Outreach Health Promotion and Outreach ORISE develops outreach...

320

Health IT Mobile Device Use Case Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health IT Mobile Device Use Case Meeting. Purpose: ... This meeting will address the Health IT project's first use case, Mobile Devices. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Office of Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the South Pacific. DOE Office of Health and Safety supports studies of the Japanese A-Bomb survivors, the Russian nuclear weapons workers at Mayak and in the community around...

322

Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Services HS Home Clinical Services Policies and Procedures Forms Contact Us EH&S Training images Building 26 (510) 486-6266 Mon-Fri, 7:30 am - 3:30 pm In case of Emergency:...

324

The Environment, Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health and Safety Program at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center Catherine Fiore PSFC Office of ES&H May 14, 2003 C Mod Alcator Design of the EHS system for...

325

Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health Los Alamos scientists are developing science and technology to improve pathogen detection, create better therapeutics, and anticipate-even prevent-epidemics and pandemics. Bioenergy» Environmental Microbiology» Proteins» Biosecurity and Health» Genomics and Systems Biology» Algal vats Read caption + Los Alamos scientists used genetic engineering to develop magnetic algae, thus making it much easier to harvest for biofuel production. Harvesting algae accounts for approximately 15-20 percent of the total cost of biofuel production-magnetic algae can reduce such costs by more than 90%. Overview Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory

326

The NIEHS supports a wide variety of research programs directed toward preventing health problems caused by our environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Unlike the other NIH institutes, the NIEHS is locatedThe NIEHS supports a wide variety of research programs directed toward preventing health problems that may affect human health. Current NTP initiatives are examining the effects of cell phone radiation

Bandettini, Peter A.

327

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 14 Cholesterol Oxidation Products: Other Biological Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 14 Cholesterol Oxidation Products: Other Biological Effects Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

328

Alternative Exposure Metrics and Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure assessments are critical components of human health studies. These assessments may be geared toward defining where an environmental agent might be present, its levels or concentrations, the conditions under which exposure occurs, those exposed, and additional details of possible exposure scenarios. The assessments may also be used by epidemiologists to address potential linkages between the exposure and health outcomes.Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure science has evolved due ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 17 Vitamin A in Health and Disease in Developing Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 17 Vitamin A in Health and Disease in Developing Countries Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   ...

331

Impacts of Particulate Matter on Human Health: An Updated Summary of EPRI Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hundreds of toxicological and epidemiological studies have been conducted over the past 20 years to better understand the effects of particulate matter (PM), and air pollution in general, on human health. Examples of environmental regulations and policies driven by these health concerns include the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), as well as State Implementation Plans (SIPs) and multi-pollutant control legislation. EPRI's PM/Health Research Program...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

332

Safeguarding Health Information: Building Assurance through ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This event page is for the 2013 Safeguarding Health Information: Building Assurance through HIPAA Security conference. ...

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

Sponsored by: UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Information Partnership & Services Organization UC DAVIS FACULTY Estella M. Geraghty, MD, MS, MPHSponsored by: UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM Office of Continuing Medical Education and UC Davis Health Informatics Graduate Program HEALTH INFORMATICS 7TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013 Educating the Informatics Workforce

California at Davis, University of

334

THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES HEALTH & WELLNESS CENTER University Health-8958 Healthcare Compliance Information Florida State University's University Health Services (UHS) is staffed service laboratory; pickup service is available for students whose insurance requires the use of Lab Corps

Weston, Ken

335

Environmental Health and Safety Department Annual Report 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;4 EH&S funding per Net Assignable Square Foot (NASF) has dropped approximately 15% over the past 5 in a responsive and cost effective manner. Vision: UCI Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) provides reliable ($650,000) - Supports & recovers all costs related to special services such as plan reviews and asbestos

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

336

Fish, Omega 3 and Human Health, 2nd Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second edition of Fish, Omega-3 and Human Health reaffirms that the essential fatty acids in the foods we eat form hormones that have powerful effects on human life. While many find it hard to believe that a simple change of diet can affect so many asp

337

Experiences with bulk SMS for health financing in Uganda  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short message service (SMS, aka text messaging) is a low-cost and effective means of communication for organizations attempting to maintain contact with many people. In this paper we look at the deployment and of a bulk mobile text-messaging platform ... Keywords: braided communications, bulksms, health, ictd, mobile phone, sms

Melissa Densmore

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Your Environment.Your Health. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services #12;Your Environment.Your Health. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH),a part of the U.S.Department of Health and Human

Bandettini, Peter A.

339

Linking public health and the health of the Chesapeake Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Bay has a profound impact on the lives of all who reside in the 64,000 square miles of its watershed. From crab cakes to sailboats, drinking water to naval ships, the Bay touches virtually every aspect of life in the region. The Bay has inspired literature, driven the regional economy, and shaped political decision making and development patterns for homes, industry, agriculture, and transportation. As population demands increase and urban boundaries expand into pristine landscapes, the sustainability of the Chesapeake Bay and its resources face unprecedented pressures. Consequently, the public's health also is vulnerable to Bay pollution and other stresses stemming from development activities and widespread growth occurring throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. This paper will examine the linkages between the environmental quality of the Bay and the population health status, recommend ways to bridge ecological and human health concerns in the context of the Bay, and finally present a framework for developing a public health report card for the Bay.

Burke, T.A.; Litt, J.S.; Fox, M.A.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Aligning temporal data by sentinel events: discovering patterns in electronic health records  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) and other temporal databases contain hidden patterns that reveal important cause-and-effect phenomena. Finding these patterns is a challenge when using traditional query languages and tabular displays. We present an interactive ... Keywords: electronic health record, evaluation, information visualization, search, temporal data, uncertainty

Taowei David Wang; Catherine Plaisant; Alexander J. Quinn; Roman Stanchak; Shawn Murphy; Ben Shneiderman

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Mixing psychology and HCI in evaluation of augmented reality mental health technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies present Augmented Reality Exposure Therapy (ARET) as a potentially effective technology in the Mental Health (MH) field. This study evaluates the ARET system applied to treatment of cockroach phobia in a clinical setting. The results seem ... Keywords: augmented reality, mental health, small animal phobia

Maja Wrzesien; Jean-Marie Burkhardt; Mariano Alcañiz Raya; Cristina Botella

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Privacy-preserving screen capture: Towards closing the loop for health IT usability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As information technology permeates healthcare (particularly provider-facing systems), maximizing system effectiveness requires the ability to document and analyze tricky or troublesome usage scenarios. However, real-world health IT systems are typically ... Keywords: Health IT, Privacy, Redaction, Security, Usability

Joseph Cooley, Sean Smith

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nutrition and Biochemistry of PhospholipidsChapter 13 Effects of Phosphatidylcholine Intake on Liver Function and Liver Carcinogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrition and Biochemistry of Phospholipids Chapter 13 Effects of Phosphatidylcholine Intake on Liver Function and Liver Carcinogenesis Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press ...

344

College of Charleston Authorization to Disclose Protected Health Information Student Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: ______________________________ Social Security Number: _____________________________________ I authorize CofC Student Health Services to disclose/release information to: I authorize CofC Student Health Services to obtain information from: Name providers Verbal communication between health care providers Laboratory results

Kunkle, Tom

345

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Massage Master Emergency Plan Medical - Health Services at the Lab Memorandum of Understanding - UCBLBNL Moving Hazardous...

346

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z PUB-3000 - Health & Safety Manual PUB-3092 - Waste Generator Guidelines PUB-3140 - Integrated Safety Management Plan (ISM)...

347

Applications: Wind turbine structural health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of turbine system management. The data obtained from this multi-scale sensing capability will be fullyCapability Applications: Wind turbine structural health monitoring Individual turbine maintenance for active control in the field Limit damage propagation and maintenance costs Maximize return

348

Health Profile of California's Adolescents: Findings from the 2001 California Health Interview Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH PROFILE OF CALIFORNIA’S ADOLESCENTS: FINDINGSFROM THE 2001 CALIFORNIA HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY UCLA CenterPopulation: U.S. and California, 2000 Exhibit 2. Adolescent

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The State of Health Insurance in California: Findings from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUITE 300 LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 PHONE: (310) 794-Health Insurance California in Findingsfrom the 2003 California Health Interview Survey The State

Brown, E. Richard; Lavarreda, Shana Alex; Rice, Thomas; Kincheloe, Jennifer R.; al., et

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The State of Health Insurance in California: Findings from the 2007 California Health Interview Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suite 1550 Los Angeles, California 90024 Phone: 310.794.0909State of Health Insurance in California August 2009 Findingsfrom the 2007 California Health Interview Survey E. Richard

Brown, Richard E.; Kronick, Richard; Kincheloe, Jennifer R.; Lavarreda, Shana Alex; Peckham, Erin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The State of Health Insurance in California: Findings from the 2005 California Health Interview Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE STATE OF HEALTH INSURANCE IN CALIFORNIA FINDINGS FROMTHE 2005 CALIFORNIA HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY JULY 2007 E.by grants from The California Endowment and The California

Brown, E. Richard; Lavarreda, Shana Alex; Ponce, Ninez; Yoon, Jean; al., et

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

International Study of the Sublethal Effects of Fire Smoke on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Study of the Sublethal Effects of Fire Smoke on Survival and Health” (SEFS) to provide scientific information on these effects for public policy makers ...

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

353

Improved Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Improved Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments Recently completed analyses suggest that improving buildings and indoor environments could reduce health-care costs and sick leave and increase worker performance, resulting in an estimated productivity gain of $30 to $150 billion annually. The research literature provides strong evidence that characteristics of buildings and their indoor environments influence the prevalence of several adverse health effects. These include communicable respiratory disease (e.g., common colds and influenza), allergy and asthma symptoms, and acute sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms such as headaches, and irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin. For example, in six studies, the number of respiratory illnesses in building occupants varied by a factor of 1.2 to

354

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Our Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health Our Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health FE's 2011 ESS&H Annual Report The Office of Fossil Energy is committed to conducting our mission to achieve the greatest benefit for all our stakeholders, including our employees and the public, while actively adhering to the highest applicable standards for environment, security, safety and health (ESS&H). We are working to continuously improve our practices through effective integration of ESS&H into all facets of work planning and execution. We intend to make consistent, measurable progress in implementing this Commitment throughout our operations while striving to eliminate injuries, incidents, and environmental releases.

356

Network governance for the provision of behavioral health services to the US Army  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under a charter from the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the author participated in a study of the military's behavioral health system for the purpose of determining the means and effectiveness of that system for ...

Scott, Shane P. (Shane Paul)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Quantifying the health and economic impacts of mercury : an integrated assessment approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a toxic pollutant that endangers human and ecosystem health. Especially potent in the form of methyl mercury, exposure is known to lead to adverse neurological effects, and, a growing body of evidence suggests, ...

Giang, Amanda (Amanda Chi Wen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

SAR/QSAR methods in public health practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship ((Q)SAR) modeling play an important and active role in ATSDR programs in support of the Agency mission to protect human populations from exposure to environmental contaminants. They are used for cross-chemical extrapolation to complement the traditional toxicological approach when chemical-specific information is unavailable. SAR and QSAR methods are used to investigate adverse health effects and exposure levels, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetic properties of hazardous chemical compounds. They are applied as a part of an integrated systematic approach in the development of Health Guidance Values (HGVs), such as ATSDR Minimal Risk Levels, which are used to protect populations exposed to toxic chemicals at hazardous waste sites. (Q)SAR analyses are incorporated into ATSDR documents (such as the toxicological profiles and chemical-specific health consultations) to support environmental health assessments, prioritization of environmental chemical hazards, and to improve study design, when filling the priority data needs (PDNs) as mandated by Congress, in instances when experimental information is insufficient. These cases are illustrated by several examples, which explain how ATSDR applies (Q)SAR methods in public health practice.

Demchuk, Eugene, E-mail: edemchuk@cdc.gov; Ruiz, Patricia; Chou, Selene; Fowler, Bruce A.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Mobile Persuasive Technologies for Rural Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Iterative Design with Rural Health Workers 4.13 Understanding the Role of Technology in Rural Maternal 3.15 Mobile Persuasive Messages for Rural Health Promotion 5.1

Ramachandran, Divya Lalitha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Probiotic Bacteria Induce a ‘Glow of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiant skin and hair are universally recognized as indications of good health. However, this ‘glow of health’ display remains poorly understood. We found that feeding of probiotic bacteria to aged mice induced integumentary ...

Levkovich, Tatiana

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Integrating community health workers in schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) has set the tone for a radically revised health landscape in America that focuses on community-based care. Our health care system, however, has neither the infrastructure ...

Williams, Roy Jerome, III

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms Page 1 of 4 Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms * This glossary has many commonly used terms, but isn't a full list. These...

363

Trends in the Health of Older Californians  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hing E, Burt CW, Hall MJ. Trend Data On Medical Encounters:Ver5-C.1 TRENDS IN THE HEALTH OF OLDER CALIFORNIANS: DataSurveys November 2008 TRENDS IN THE HEALTH OF OLDER

Wallace, Steven P.; Lee, Jennifer H.; Jawad, May Aydin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Health, Safety and Wellness 2011 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health, Safety and Wellness 2011 Annual Report Occupational Health & Safety and Rehabilitation Services #12;2 | P a g e Table of Contents Year in Review...................................................................................................................12 Laboratory Safety Program

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

365

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY EMPLOYEE SAFETY ORIENTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERVICES ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Discovery 2 Building, Room 265 8888 University Drive BurnabyENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY EMPLOYEE SAFETY ORIENTATION SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY SAFETY & RISK SIGNAGE 26740 INCIDENT INVESTIGATION Supervisors, Safety Committees, EHS LABORATORY SAFETY 27265

366

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on AddThis.com... Pollutants and Health Pollutants emitted from burning conventional and alternative fuels fall into two categories: Criteria and Non-Criteria pollutants. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

367

HEALTH PHYSICS TECHNICIAN SUBCONTRACTS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HEALTH PHYSICS TECHNICIAN SUBCONTRACTS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, ER-B-99-08 HEALTH PHYSICS TECHNICIAN SUBCONTRACTS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, ER-B-99-08 To...

368

Structural health monitoring of wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To properly determine what is needed in a structural health monitoring system, actual operational structures need to be studied. We have found that to effectively monitor the structural condition of an operational structure four areas must be addressed: determination of damage-sensitive parameters, test planning, information condensation, and damage identification techniques. In this work, each of the four areas has been exercised on an operational structure. The structures studied were all be wind turbines of various designs. The experiments are described and lessons learned will be presented. The results of these studies include a broadening of experience in the problems of monitoring actual structures as well as developing a process for implementing such monitoring systems.

Simmermacher, T.; James, G.H. III.; Hurtado, J.E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

HIPAA 2013 - Health Information Exchange Organizations ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... transmission or routine access) to a statewide ... Expansion of Shared Services, Value Added • Cloud hosting ... Health plans • Patients and Families ...

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Safeguarding Health Information: Building Assurance through ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Privacy Workgroup Panelists: Balavignesh Thirumalainambi (NJ-HITEC) Joseph McClure, JD (Siemens) Doreen Espinosa (Utah Health Information ...

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Office of Health, Safety and Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Home Sub Offices Security Evaluations Cyber Security Evaluations Emergency Management Oversight Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations...

372

CapStar Health System Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Occupational Safety and Health ... xiv Protection Agency, Nuclear Regulatory Agency, and Centers for ...

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

373

Bioscience & Health Standard Reference Materials Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Our goal is to develop advanced measurement tools and standards for measuring ... see all Bioscience & Health Standard Reference Materials ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

374

Climate Instability and Public Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Instability and Public Health Climate Instability and Public Health Speaker(s): Paul Epstein Date: August 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Evan Mills Climate restricts the range of infectious diseases, while weather affects the timing and intensity of outbreaks. The ranges of several key diseases or their vectors are changing, along with shifts in plant communities and the retreat of alpine glaciers. In addition, extreme weather events associated with warming create conditions conducive to "clusters" of disease outbreaks. The rapid spread of West Nile virus in the Americas is related, paradoxically, to drought and its impact on wildlife (230 species of animals, 138 species of birds) could alter the ratios of predator birds to their prey (including rodents) and thus have implications for human

375

Poll of radiation health scientists  

SciTech Connect

A sampling of 210 university-employed radiation health scientists randomly selected from the membership lists of the Health Physics Society and the Radiation Research Society was polled in a secret ballot. The results support the positions that the public's fear of radiation is substantially greater than realistic, that TV, newspapers and magazines substantially exaggerate the dangers of radiation, that the amount of money now being spent on radiation protection is sufficient, and that the openness and honesty of U.S. government agencies about dangers of radiation were below average before 1972 but have been above average since then. Respondents give very high credibility ratings to BEIR, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and NCRP and to the individual scientists associated with their reports, and very low credibility ratings to those who have disputed them.

Cohen, B.L.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Web sites related to Health Education and Training and Statistics Web sites related to Health Education and Training and Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.apha.org/ Association of Public Health Laboratories http://www.aphl.org/ Association of Schools of Public Health http and Territorial http://www.astho.org/ California Dept. of Health Services-Vital Statistics Data Tables http://www://www.hcfa.gov/stats/stats.htm Health Communication Research Laboratory http://hcrl.slu.edu/ HealthWeb: Public Health-- Health

de Lijser, Peter

377

10 CFR 851 - Worker Safety and Health Program Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video Windows Media Player Office of Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Health and Safety Home HSS Logo Archives 10 CFR 851: Worker Safety and Health Program Legislation...

378

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Health and Environment Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Name Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Address 4300...

379

LM Environment, Safety, and Health Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment, Safety, and Health Policy LM Environment, Safety, and Health Policy LM Policy 450.9 - Environment, Safety, and Health Policy (Last ReviewUpdate 11292011 ) LM...

380

Conservation of resources theory and research use in health systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

taxonomy of organizational (health systems) resources thatmodel for organizational stress in health systems and otherthat organizational resources may affect health systems

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Deriving Criteria Weights for Health Decision Making: A Brief Tutorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? j Health Impact Strategic Alignment Organizational ImpactCriterion Health Impact Strategic Alignment OrganizationalHealth Impact (HI) Strategic Alignment (SA) Organizational

Aragon, Tomas J; Dalnoki-Veress, Ferenc; Shiu, Karen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Health and Nutrition Newsletter September 201/span>3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the September Health and Nutrition newsletter Health and Nutrition Newsletter September 201/span>3 Health and Nutrition Newsletter September 201/span>3 ...

383

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Monday, April 22, 2013 Featured by...

384

Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in the Workplace  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the Workplace Sheila Fitzgerald, PhD, RN Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health .Origins of Health Promotion Health Maintenance Act of 1973...

385

Healthful LipidsChapter 13 Lipids with Antioxidant Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 13 Lipids with Antioxidant Properties Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 13 Lipids with Antioxidant Properti

386

Health Physics Records System (Dosimetry), Carlsbad Field Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Health Physics Records System (Dosimetry), Carlsbad Field Office Health Physics Records System (Dosimetry), Carlsbad Field Office Health Physics Records System (Dosimetry),...

387

Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect

Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

Strom, Daniel J.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Analysis of an online health social network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the continued advances of Web 2.0, health-centered Online Social Networks (OSNs) are emerging to provide knowledge and support for those interested in managing their own health. Despite the success of the OSNs for better connecting the users through ... Keywords: correlation analysis, health osn, social influence

Xiaoxiao Ma; Guanling Chen; Juntao Xiao

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Davison Health Center Price List* Spring 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Davison Health Center Price List* Spring 2013 Visits to Health Services are free and part of your services can be filed through insurance. Please see a Health Center representative for claim information - $21.00 Tetanus vaccine - $25.00 Tdap vaccine - $45.00 Typhim vaccine - $65.00 Laboratory Services

Devoto, Stephen H.

390

SUFFOLK COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUFFOLK COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ABOVEGROUND OUTDOOR, M.D., M.P.H. Commissioner SUFFOLK COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES #12;Suffolk County Department of Health Services' Aboveground Outdoor Tank and Associated Piping Design Standards _____________________ 1

Homes, Christopher C.

391

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and coordinates (in its own laboratories and through contracts, grants, and support of Environmental Health Program (NTP) Laboratory (6) Library and Information Services Branch (HNV184) Office of Policy, PlanningNational Institute of Environmental Health Sciences National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences

Bandettini, Peter A.

392

Health impacts of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus is on electric power production using geothermal resources greater than 150/sup 0/C because this form of geothermal energy utilization has the most serious health-related consequences. Based on measurements and experience at existing geothermal power plants, atmospheric emissions of noncondensing gases such as hydrogen sulfide and benzene pose the greatest hazards to public health. Surface and ground waters contaminated by discharges of spent geothermal fluids constitute another health hazard. It is shown that hydrogen sulfide emissions from most geothermal power plants are apt to cause odor annoyances among members of the exposed public - some of whom can detect this gas at concentrations as low as 0.002 parts per million by volume. A risk assessment model is used to estimate the lifetime risk of incurring leukemia from atmospheric benzene caused by 2000 MW(e) of geothermal development in California's Imperial Valley. The risk of skin cancer due to the ingestion of river water in New Zealand that is contaminated by waste geothermal fluids containing arsenic is also assessed. Finally, data on the occurrence of occupational disease in the geothermal industry are summarized briefly.

Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the response to an emergency or disaster. The National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), Division Public Health Emergency Response Guide for State, Local, and Tribal Public Health Directors State, local and response. Public health professionals within these departments should have immediate access to guidance

394

Web Sites related to Minority Health Web Sites Related to Minority Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Sites related to Minority Health Web Sites Related to Minority Health Bettering the Health://www.ihs.gov/ Individual Web Sites Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Minority Health http://www.omhrc.gov/ file:///C|/Program%20Files/Adobe/Adobe%20Dreamweaver%...ks/Web%20Sites%20related%20to%20Minority%20

de Lijser, Peter

395

UCSC Student Health Services Student Health Insurance Office 1156 High Street Phone: (831) 459-2389  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UCSC Student Health Services Student Health Insurance Office 1156 High Street Phone: (831) 459 your health plan's customer service number for assistance.** 5. Does your health insurance plan cover conditions? Yes / No Emergency room services? Yes / No Diagnostic services including laboratory tests? Yes

396

~+.,..;.. '1I.Ylcrl.~ (!DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTES OF HEALTH ......SERVICE DELIVERY: Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare in compliance with the Public Health Service (PHS) Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Policy~+.,..;.. '1I.Ylcrl.~ (!DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE NATIONAL

Oliver, Douglas L.

397

The state and health care reform: the National Health Insurance and Public Health Act of 1949  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State-centered theory, elite theory, and the organizational state environment perspective have all been put forth to explain how policies come to be enacted in government and who benefits from such policy initiatives. It is proposed that the same forces affecting policy enactment can also prevent certain policies from being enacted. This study evaluates the capacity of these three theories to explain why the National Health Insurance and Public Health Act of 1949 was not enacted. This research includes an analysis of historical processes and environmental factors influencing this outcome. The findings indicate that there is very little support for state-centered theory. Limitations of the historical data limit the ability of this research to fully assess elite theory's capacity to explain the outcome. The organizational state environment perspective holds greater explanatory power in this case than either state-centered or elite theory.

Schemmer, Ruth Ann, 1960

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Health and Safety Office of Health and Safety Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy Home Mission and Functions Office Contacts Radiological Safety Radiation Protection Policy Current Topics in Radiological Control DOELAP Occupational Exposures (REMS) Training Radiological Control Coordinating Committee Non-Radiological Safety Worker Safety and Health Program Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Construction Safety Hoisting and Rigging Contractor Substance Abuse Program Chemical Safety Program Emerging Technology: Nanotechnology BioSafety ErgoEaser Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities (FRA) Integrated Safety Management Industrial Hygiene Coordinating Committee Respiratory Protection Safety Bulletins Operating Experiences Office of Safety & Health Response Line Hot Topic

399

Southern California Children's Health Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To determine whether chronic respiratory effects are produced by air pollutants in Southern Californian children

Peters, John M.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

Health Plans | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Plans Health Plans Health Plans A side-by side benefit comparison for medical, vision, and prescription drugs is provided here for your information. A similar comparison is provided for the two dental plans. The plans are available to employees and pre-65 retirees. As required under health care reform, employer group health plans must complete a Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC) document for each medical plan offered in 2014. The SBC must be provided to plan participants. This requirement applies even if the plan benefits are not changing. The Y-12 health plans impacted by the 2014 health reform notice requirements are the medical and prescription drug benefit plans. If the medical and prescription benefits are not changing, then they are referred to as "grandfathered" plans, and participants must be told the benefits

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

High voltage research (breakdown strengths of gaseous and liquid insulators) and environmental effects of dielectric gases. Semiannual report, April 1, 1979-September 30, 1979. [Health and Safety Research Div. , ORNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of gas mixtures are suggested for industrial-scale testing. Electron attachment rates were measured and unfolded to give attachment cross section functions for CCl/sub 3/F, CCl/sub 2/F/sub 2/, and CClF/sub 3/ each in N/sub 2/, and for CCl/sub 3/F in Ar. Electron attachment rates were measured also for n-C/sub 6/F/sub 14/ in both Ar and N/sub 2/. The effects of molecular structure on energy, cross section, and lifetime of negative ion states of organic molecules were considered. A study was made of the potential role of electron detachment in breakdown. The role of dipolar scattering of electrons in inhibiting breakdown was investigated. The nature of synergisms among constituents of a gas dielectric mixture is discussed. Examples are cited from recent breakdown measurements. Breakdown measurements in plane-plane geometry were made for CF/sub 4/, 1,1,1-CH/sub 3/CF/sub 3/, and CHF/sub 3/. Similar measurements were conducted with binary mixtures containing one of (c-C/sub 4/F/sub 8/, SF/sub 6/) and one of (CF/sub 4/, CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/, 1,1,1-CH/sub 3/CF/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/). Of special interest in these results were observed synergisms and the effect of dipole moment on the breakdown strengths. The initial fragmentation of 1,1,2-C/sub 2/Cl/sub 3/F/sub 3/ under electron impact was studied. Final decomposition products of sparked SF/sub 6//2-C/sub 4/F/sub 6/ mixtures were identified and quantified. The breakdown products of SF/sub 6/ were studied. Impulse measurements concentrated on c-C/sub 4/F/sub 8//SF/sub 6/ mixtures. Values of V/sub 50/, V/sub NO/, and V/sub 10x/ were obtained and evaluated. In the practical conditions of cylindrical geometry with and without surface roughness, many multicomponent mixtures of the gases SF/sub 6/, c-C/sub 4/F/sub 8/, 2-C/sub 4/F/sub 8/, N/sub 2/, and 1,1,1-CH/sub 3/CF/sub 3/ were tested, at both 1 and 4.4 atmospheres. The electric fields were calculated. In the study of liquid dielectrics n-hexane and perfluoro-n-hexane were tested. 35 figures, 20 tables.

Christophorou, L.G.; James, D.R.; Pai, R.Y.; Mathis, R.A.; Sauers, I.; Frees, L.; Pace, M.O.; Bouldin, D.W.; Chan, C.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Possibilities for health-conscious assisted housing mobility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many poor, segregated, urban neighborhoods are rife with risks to health, which contributes to stark racial and geographic disparities in health. Fighting health disparities requires buy-in from non-health professionals ...

Arcaya, Mariana Clair

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

College of Health Sciences Clinical Partners Dental Hygiene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center IHC Health Services, Inc Laboratory Corporation of America Health Systems Sentara Laboratory Systems Sentara Leigh Hospital Shore Health Services Veterans Marine Care Services Kasei Virginia Corporation Loudon County Health Department Naval Occupational Safety

404

Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

Rowe, M.D.

1992-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Evaluation of Cultural Competence and Health Disparities Knowledge and Skill Sets of Public Health Department Staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life expectancy and overall health have improved in recent years for most Americans, thanks in part to an increased focus on preventive medicine and dynamic new advances in medical technology. However, not all Americans are benefiting equally. This suggests a level of urgency for need to assist our public health professionals in obtaining specific skills sets that will assist them in working better with ethnic and racial minority populations. The overall goal of the research was to assess cultural competence knowledge and programmatic skill sets of individuals employed by an urban department of health located in the southwest region of the US. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) guided the research design to effectively evaluate the correlation between behavior and beliefs, attitudes and intention, of an individual, as well as their level of perceived control. Within the program design, 90 participants were identified using convenience sampling. In order to effectively evaluate these constructs, a quantitative research approach was employed to assess attitudes, beliefs, knowledge and competencies of the subject matter. Participants completed the Cultural Competence Assessment (CCA), which is designed to explore individual knowledge, feelings and actions of respondents when interacting with others in health service environments (Schim, 2009). The instrument is based on the cultural competence model, and measures cultural awareness and sensitivity; cultural competence behaviors and cultural diversity experience on a 49 item scale. It seeks to assess actual behaviors through a self report, rather than self-efficacy of performing behaviors. In addition, information was obtained to assess participant perception of organizational promotion of culturally competent care and; availability of opportunities to participate in professional development training. The analysis suggested healthcare professionals who are more knowledgeable and possess attitudes which reflect increased cultural sensitivity, are more likely to engage in culturally competent behaviors. In addition, positive attitudes and increased knowledge were associated with diversity training participation. Respondents reported high levels of interaction with patients from ethnic and racial minorities. Observing the clinical and non-clinical respondents, approximately 47% and 57% respectively, stated their cultural diversity training was an employer sponsored program.

Hall, Marla

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Oral Histories: Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D. Conducted October 14, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments June 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Graduate Studies at University of Rochester AEC-Funded Research at University of Rochester Use of Human Subjects at University of Rochester AEC Direction of University of Rochester Research Contacts With Researchers Into Radiation Effects No Knowledge of Uranium Injections at Rochester Beginning a Career at Hanford Radionuclide Inhalation Studies at Hanford Use of Animals in Radiation Studies Identifying Health Effects of Inhaled Radionuclides Expanded Customer Base for Inhalation Studies Limited Involvement With Human Studies

407

ITL Bulletin The Exchange of Health Care Information ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... HIPAA requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HSS) to adopt, among other standards, security standards for certain health ...

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

408

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

409

NIST, Partners Develop Testing Infrastructure for Health IT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Health and Human Services (HHS) identified ... The health IT testing infrastructure does ... NIST's National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program ...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

410

Occupational Health Programs - Jacqueline Agnew, PhD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Knowledge Base -Hospital - Construction -Brewery -Garment -Printing - Research Facilities Essential Components of Occupational & Environmental Health Programs 1 . Health...

411

ORISE: How to Work With Us | Worker Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health. Services provided include illness and injury surveillance, worker health research, medical data management, beryllium exposure studies and testing, radiation...

412

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 10 Fatty Acids in Nuts: Cardiometabolic Health Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 10 Fatty Acids in Nuts: Cardiometabolic Health Benefits Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

413

Environmental Health and Safety Department Annual Report 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;4 EH&S funding per Net Assignable Square Foot (NASF) has dropped approximately 19.5 % over the past 6 in a responsive and cost effective manner. Vision: UCI Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) provides reliable-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 EH&S Funding (69750 & 75041) Per Laboratory $- $0.10 $0.20 $0.30 $0.40 $0.50 $0

El Zarki, Magda

414

HOTSPOT Health Physics codes for the PC  

SciTech Connect

The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes are a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT codes produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly or scaling a universal nomogram during an emergency. The HOTSPOT codes are designed for short-term (less than 24 hours) release durations. Users requiring radiological release consequences for release scenarios over a longer time period, e.g., annual windrose data, are directed to such long-term models as CAPP88-PC (Parks, 1992). Users requiring more sophisticated modeling capabilities, e.g., complex terrain; multi-location real-time wind field data; etc., are directed to such capabilities as the Department of Energy`s ARAC computer codes (Sullivan, 1993). Four general programs -- Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension -- calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Other programs deal with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from the inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides; calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground-survey measurements; and screen plutonium uptake in the lung (see FIDLER Calibration and LUNG Screening sections).

Homann, S.G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Ozone, Air Pollution, and Respiratory Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of the outdoor air pollutants regulated by the Clean Air Act of 1970 (and recently revised in 1990), ozone has been the one pollutant most difficult to control within the federal standards. The known human health effects are all on the respiratory system. At concentrations of ozone which occur during summer air-pollution episodes in many urban metropolitan areas of the United States, a portion of the healthy population is likely to experience symptoms and reversible effects on lung function, particularly if exercising heavily outdoors. More prolonged increase in airway responsiveness and the presence of inflammatory cells and mediators in the airway lining fluid may also result from these naturally occurring exposures. Serial exposures to peak levels of ozone on several consecutive days are more characteristic of pollution episodes in the Northeast United States and may be associated with recurrent symptoms. No "high-risk " or more sensitive group has been found, in contrast to the case of sulfur dioxide, to which asthmatics are more susceptible than normals. The occurrence of multiple exposure episodes within a single year over many years in some areas of California has led to studies looking for chronic effects of ozone exposure on the lung. To date, no conclusive studies have been reported, although further work is under way. Much of what we know about the effects of this gas on the lung are based on controlled exposures to pure gas within an environmental exposure laboratory. Interactions between substances which commonly co-occur in air-pollution episodes are also under investigation.

William S

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Sensitivity of Children to EMF Exposure: Proceedings of the 2004 EPRI-Cosponsored World Health Organization Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 2004, EPRI cosponsored a scientific workshop held by the World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with the Medical Faculty of Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey, to evaluate available information on possible health effects from exposure of children to electromagnetic fields (EMF). Research recommended by an expert Working Group will help fill knowledge gaps. Workshop results will also contribute to a comprehensive WHO EMF health risk evaluation scheduled for completion in 2005.

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

417

2012 Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories (EPA 822-S-12-001)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edition of the Drinking Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories 2012 Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories EPA 822-S-12-001 Office of Water U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC Spring 2012 Date of update: April, 2012 Recycled/Recyclable Printed on paper that contains at least 50% recycled fiber. Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories Spring 2012 Page iii of vi iii The Health Advisory (HA) Program, sponsored by the EPA's Office of Water (OW), publishes concentrations of drinking water contaminants at Drinking Water Specific Risk Level Concentration for cancer (10 -4 Cancer Risk) and concentrations of drinking water contaminants at which noncancer adverse health effects are not anticipated to occur over specific exposure

418

Health Care Reform, What’s in It? Rural Communities and Rural Medical Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A critical component of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), the federal health care reform law, is the expansion of health insurance coverage and a resulting improvement in health outcomes through access to affordable and timely medical care. One notable concern expressed in the wake of passage of the law is the ability of the health care system to effectively serve over 30 million newly insured, plus deliver effective services to the currently insured in order to meet the goals of the new law. (McMorrow) We have long said the ultimate goal of health care reform is to help make people healthier. Access to health services is a crucial need to meet that goal, and constraints on access will make the health care reform law less meaningful than it should. (McMorrow) Access issues are even more acute in rural communities. As we have shown, many rural communities have severe medical professional shortages, few of the nation’s medical professionals practice in rural areas, rural health professionals are aging, fewer professionals are being trained in primary care and fewer new professionals are being educated and trained. (Top 10 paper) Medicare and Medicaid—major components of rural medical care—pay rural medical providers and facilities less than do private insurers and less than providers in urban areas. All of these exist at a time when, in general, rural people have greater medical care needs than do nonrural people. (National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Center on an Aging Society) Access provisions turned out to be a major part of the health reform law, but an unsung part that received little

Jon M. Bailey

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

COMMUNICATING PUBLIC HEALTH INFORMATION EFFECTIVELY POP HEALTH SCIENCES 660 (1 credit)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Privacy in Digital Rights Management, ACM CCS-9 Workshop, DRM 2002, Washington, DC, USA, November 18, 2002­684, Washington, DC, USA, 2005. IEEE Computer Society. 11. Dag Arne Osvik, Adi Shamir, and Eran Tromer. Cache to succeed. There is no restriction on which window of 8 round functions to chose. In the conducted tests

Sheridan, Jennifer

420

ONE OCEAN, ONE HEALTH NOAA IN THE LEAD FINAL REPORT FROM THE OCEANS AND HEALTH WORKING GROUP TO THE NOAA SCIENCE ADVISORY BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ocean 1 provides many health benefits, from low fat, high protein food sources and therapeutic drugs to regulation of global temperature. The ocean also poses many hazards, such as hurricanes, pathogens, animal attacks, toxins and contaminants that can cause loss of life or impair health. The potential impact of these threats is enhanced because more than half of the US population lives along the coast. Even those living inland are not immune to the ocean’s effects, as ocean-driven climate patterns have been linked to inland outbreaks of several pathogens. These and other threats are likely to increase with predicted changes in climate. NOAA has multiple programs intended to promote health, but has struggled to define its role in relation to the many other agencies that also have health-related responsibilities. To help NOAA more clearly define its role and actions needed to fulfill that role, the NOAA Science Advisory Board (SAB) established an Oceans and Health Working Group (OHWG) that includes experts in the fields of epidemiology, toxicology, public health, environmental modeling, veterinary science, marine biotechnology, economics, and ocean sciences. The OHWG has been charged with identifying opportunities to enhance NOAA’s ongoing health-related efforts, including all relationships between the ocean and the physiological well-being of organisms. This report

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Integrating Equipment Health Information Into Grid Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, grid operators have expressed keen interest in having equipment health information available in real time. The health status of critical power system equipment can help operators assess situations, identify associated risks, and develop mitigation strategies/solutions in a time frame commensurate with the risk level. Health status information can also help operators recognize potential failures and take proactive actions, such as unloading a transformer or breaker that has shown signs of...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

423

Health and Strategic Sustainability: Business to Business.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is a study of how businesses might influence other businesses to move towards sustainability. Two health club businesses in North America actively participated and… (more)

Nelson, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Office of Health, Safety and Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manager: Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health; Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management; Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs. Due Date: February...

425

PNNL: Procurement: Contractor Environment, Safety & Health: Manuals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search PNNL Home About Research Publications Jobs News Contacts Business Contractor Environment, Safety & Health PNNL Visitor Orientation PNNL Visitors Guide Manuals PNNL...

426

Office of Worker Safety and Health Assistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program and line organizations in the identification and resolution of worker safety and health issues and management concerns utilizing a corporate issues management process for...

427

Health and Nutrition Division Poster Competition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Student poster presentations at the AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo. Health and Nutrition Division Poster Competition Divisions achievement agricultural analytical application award awards biotechnology detergents distinguished division Divisions edibl

428

Time Trends in Dutch Children's Mental Health.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigated time trends in Dutch children's and adolescent's mental health problems by comparing population samples from different time periods. From 1983 to 2003,… (more)

Tick, N.T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Records Retention for Occupational Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Records Retained Under the Moratorium on the Destruction of Health Related Records DOE CIO Records Management Division DOE's OpenNet Database The Virtual Library of Energy...

430

ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Medical Data Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

agencies with health and medical data management and related information technology services. Through partnership development and in-house expertise, ORISE develops and manages...

431

Interactive graphics for communicating health risks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Materials for consumer informatics, patient decision support, and health promotion frequently incorporate quantitative risks such as percentages, rates, or proportions. These risks are frequently… (more)

Ancker, Jessica S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Sandia National Laboratories: Public Health Service Financial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Health Service (PHS) Agency includes: Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Administration on Aging (AoA) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Agency...

433

NSLS Committees | Environmental, Safety & Health Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental, Safety & Health Committee Charge The NSLS ES&H Committee shall meet as needed to review: Proposed modifications to the accelerator facility, its operation, or...

434

An Overview of Health IT @ Kaiser Permanente  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A complete health care business and management ... long-term quality of services, and the improvement of service coordination and continuity of care ...

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

Safety and Health | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Industrial Hygiene and Safety (MA-433) has created Headquarters safety and health policies and procedures for Headquarters employees and contractors. These programs help DOE...

436

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL/PUB-3092 LBNL/PUB-3092 Guidelines for Generators to Meet HWHF Acceptance Requirements for Hazardous, Radioactive, and Mixed Wastes at Berkeley Lab Waste Management Group Environment, Health, and Safety Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 Revision 7.1 October 2011 1. Hazardous Wastes. 1- 1 Summary of Hazardous Waste Requirements. 1- 2 1.1 How Do I Know If My Waste Is Hazardous?. 1- 3 1.1.1 Characteristic Waste. 1- 4 1.1.1.1 Ignitability. 1- 4 1.1.1.2 Corrosivity. 1- 4 1.1.1.3 Reactivity. 1- 5 1.1.1.4 Toxicity. 1- 5 1.1.2 Listed Waste. 1- 6 1.1.3 Chemical Compatibility. 1- 7 1.1.4 Excess Laboratory Chemicals and Laboratory Cleanouts. 1- 10 1.1.5 Unknowns. 1- 10

437

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Recycling Guide Berkeley Lab Recycling Guide The Berkeley Lab supports the philosophy that prevention is superior to remediation. The goal of waste minimization is to incorporate pollution prevention into the decision-making process at every level throughout the Lab. Additionally, where waste generation is unavoidable, the preference is to reuse or recycle. Reduce Source reduction is to garbage what preventive medicine is to health: a means of eliminating a problem before it can happen. Reduce the amount of paper you use. Use electronic transfer of information. Reduce disposal costs: By decreasing office waste you can dramatically lower the costs of garbage pick-up service. Reduce pollution: The manufacturing of new paper products from recycled materials results in a 74 percent reduction in air pollution and

438

Health risks of energy technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume examines occupational, public health, and environmental risks of the coal fuel cycle, the nuclear fuel cycle, and unconventional energy technologies. The 6 chapters explore in detail the relationship between energy economics and risk analysis, assess the problems of applying traditional cost-benefit analysis to long-term environmental problems (such as global carbon dioxide levels), and consider questions about the public's perception and acceptance of risk. Also included is an examination of the global risks associated with current and proposed levels of energy production and comsumption from all major sources. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 6 chapters; all are included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and four in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Travis, C.C.; Etnier, E.L. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Office of Health, Safety and Security Report to the Secretary of Energy -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Health, Safety and Security Report to the Secretary of Office of Health, Safety and Security Report to the Secretary of Energy - February 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security Report to the Secretary of Energy - February 2011 February 2011 Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) performed an effectiveness review of the DOE Action Plan for the Columbia space shuttle accident and Davis-Besse event and the comprehensive operating experience program. The review was performed to fulfill Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan to Improve Oversight of

440

Exploring early evaluation techniques of ambient health promoting devices in home environments of senior citizens living independently  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, our goal is to explore different early evaluation techniques and their effectiveness for designing better ambient health- promoting devices for the elderly. One cannot assess the complete impact of these devices without full implementation ... Keywords: Wizard of Oz, ambient technology, early evaluation methods, health monitoring devices, senior citizens, storyboarding, technology probe

Rajasee Rege; Heekyoung Jung; William Hazelwood; Greg Orlov; Kay Connelly; Kalpana Shankar

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Input devices in mental health applications: steering performance in a virtual reality paths with WiiMote  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies present Virtual Reality (VR) as potentially effective technology in the Mental Health (MH) field. The objective of this paper is to evaluate two interaction techniques (traditional vs novel) using a popular and low-cost input device (WiiMote) ... Keywords: mental health, steering law, virtual reality

Maja Wrzesien; María José Rupérez; Mariano Alcañiz

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Responding to traveling patients' seasonal demands for health care services in the Veterans Health Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides care to over eight million Veterans and operates over 1,700 sites of care distributed across twenty-one regional networks in the United States. Health care providers within ...

Al-Haque, Shahed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Web Sites Related to Women's Health Web Sites Related to Women's Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Sites Related to Women's Health Web Sites Related to Women's Health Agency for Healthcare.html file:///C|/Program%20Files/Adobe/Adobe%20Dreamweaver...Science/Links/Web%20Sites%20Related%20to%20

de Lijser, Peter

444

Dual Use of Veterans Health Administration and Indian Health Service: Healthcare Provider and Patient Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organizational coordination through a shared electronic healthorganizational change by developing a more integrated health-health outcomes, the MOU encourages local colla- borations without addressing coordination of care across these two systems with significant organizational

Kramer, B. Josea; Vivrette, Rebecca L.; Satter, Delight E.; Jouldjian, Stella; McDonald, Leander Russell

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

2013-2014 Student Health Services Health Promotion GA IMPACT Program Instructor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

schedule. · Ability to conduct research and work on program development2013-2014 Student Health Services ­ Health Promotion GA IMPACT Program Description The IMPACT program seeks to provide students with education and feedback

Tullos, Desiree

446

other hospital U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There's no other hospital like it U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES · National the laboratory into better health and health care has been the Clinical Center's focus since the facility Institutes of Health 2008D I R E C T O R ' S A N N U A L R E P O R T · N I H C L I N I C A L C E N T E R P R

447

Human health issues for plutonium inhalation: Perspectives from laboratory animal studies  

SciTech Connect

Since the first production of plutonium in the 1940s, potential health effects from plutonium have been a concern for humans. The few people exposed to plutonium and the relatively small intakes that have occurred, at least in the Western world, have resulted in very little direct information from human population studies. The Manhattan Project workers have been followed for decades, and few health effects have been observed. The situation is similar for the population of workers at the Rocky Flats facility. Some information is now being released from the former Soviet Union on selected worker populations who show biological effects, primarily pulmonary fibrosis and some increase in lung cancers.

Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Guilmette, R.A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

College of Public Health Dean of the College of Public Health is Stephen W.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,healthcarefacilities,universities,state and national agencies, social service agen- cies, and community-centered health educa- tion facilities- tion/disease prevention programs, and in ini- tiatives for improving health care services. The College in public health. Unique sequencingofcourses,community-basedpro- gram activities, and field/laboratory

Kim, Mi-Ok

449

( / ....V'(II.', DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERViCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERViCE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH' SERVICE DELIVERY: FOR EXPRESS MAIL Office of Laboratory Anim~1 Welfare Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare Service (PHS) Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Policy), as revised August 2002. Your

Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

450

LOW-LEVEL RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS: PROGRAMS AND PANEL DISCUSSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accident. The report of the Soviet Union to the International Atomic Energy Agency experts' meeting plutonium had been produced in reactors and separated for bomb production for -40 yr (Ref. 1 OBTAINED SO FAR The Russians have been studying cohorts 5, 6, and 7 for 30 yr and have several reports

Shlyakhter, Ilya

451

Health Effects from Advanced Combustion and Fuel Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This document requires a separate file for the figures. It is for DOE's Office of Vehicle Technologies Annual Report

Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Connatser, Raynella M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk...

453

Quantifiable Effects of Nuclear Conflict on Health and Society  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The much-heralded Non-Proliferation Treaty is now taking hard knocks—sadly and paradoxically from its initial proponents, and governments are glibly talking.

454

Potential Health Effects of Menthol: A White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nicotine Dependence: A White Paper. 2010. (21) R&D BG, GUYEffects of Menthol: A White Paper Written by Maria Victoriacollected in the present white paper suggest that menthol

Salgado, Maria Victoria MD

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Effects of the San Francisco Employer Health Spending Mandate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown, D. (Apr 1990) “The Restaurant and Fast Food Race:Accommodation Employment Restaurant Employment 24 Largest Accommodation Wages Restaurant Wages 24 Largest U.S.  MSAs ?

Colla, Carrie Hoverman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within 50 miles of the nuclear power plant was estimated tothe radiation from the nuclear power plant accident. From anand the Peach Bottom nuclear power plants, like the general

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Air Pollution Health Effects: Toward an Integrated Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientists and policy makers have become increasingly aware of the need to jointly study climate change and air pollution because of the interactions among policy measures and in the atmospheric chemistry that creates the ...

Yang, Trent.

458

NETL: Health Effects - Laboratory Generation of Coal Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Generation of Coal Combustion Atmospheres Although emissions from coal-fired power plants and their atmospheric reaction products contribute to environmental air...

459

Arsenic Health and Ecological Effects: Soil and Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arsenic is a naturally occurring element found throughout the environment in many different forms. It is also found in coal and thus coal combustion products and can be associated with other power plant generation and delivery operations. This report summarizes information on the toxicity of arsenic in the environment and derives risk factors based on this information.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

460

Effects of Fluctuating Temperatures on Fish Health and Survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report increases understanding of fish response to fluctuating temperature regimes and intermittent exposure to lethal or near lethal temperatures. The report will be of value to industry environmental managers, government regulators, environmental protection organizations, and natural resource managers.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Record Retention Schedule Environmental Health and Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indefinitely Environmental Health and Safety 1 Air Quality Sampling Files 30 2 Chemical Inventories 30 1 if not inspected Material Safety Data Sheets 30 Medical Records (except health insurance claim records) 30 after Disposal Records (OTHER THAN hazardous or medical waste) 3 Presence, Location and Quantity of Asbestos

Marsh, David

463

Let's play!: mobile health games for adults  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers have designed a variety of systems that promote wellness. However, little work has been done to examine how casual mobile games can help adults learn how to live healthfully. To explore this design space, we created OrderUP!, a game ... Keywords: behavior change, casual games, food, health, mobile games, nutrition, transtheoretical model

Andrea Grimes; Vasudhara Kantroo; Rebecca E. Grinter

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and investigating occupational health and safety research. This is the seventh annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected for EPRI's OHSD program.

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

465

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and investigating occupational health and safety research. This is the eighth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected for the OHSD program.

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

466

Continued on page 2 IMPLEMENTING THE HEALTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rule, were published by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) on February 20, 2003. PurposeApril 2005 Continued on page 2 IMPLEMENTING THE HEALTH INSURANCE PORTABILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (HIPAA) SECURITY RULE By Joan S. Hash, Computer Security Division, Information Technology Laboratory

467

Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Headquarters Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics The Department of Energy recognizes the importance of maintaining a healthy and fit Federal workforce. To that end, our occupational health care professionals at the Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics in Forrestal and Germantown provide the following services: Walk-in care. Assessment, nursing care and follow-up for minor illnesses and injuries on a walk-in basis. First-response. Emergency treatment to any employee, contractor or visitor experiencing a life-threatening medical emergency. Wellness seminars. A variety of workshops designed to educate participants on a wide range of health-related topics. Physician directed services: For employees whose physician has directed medical care such as allergy injections, blood pressure

468

NEPA and Children's Health [EPA][2012]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 AUG 1 2012 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act FROM: Susan Broom Director, Office of Federal Activities Peter Grevatt Director, Office of Children's Health Protection TO: Regional 309 Environmental Review and Regional Children's Environmental Health Coordinators Executive Order 13045, "Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks " (April 21, 1997), directs Federal agencies, to the extent permitted by law and appropriate, to make it a high priority to identify and assess environmental health and safety risks that may disproportionately affect children and to ensure that policies, programs, activities,

469

Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Health Benefits Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Benefits > Health Benefits Health Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play

470

PUBLIC HEALTH EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PUBLIC HEALTH EVALUATION PUBLIC HEALTH EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON (PRODUCTION TESTING) by R o y B . E v a n s , D a v i d E . B e r n h a r d t P r o g r a m s 'and P l a n s S o u t h w e s t e r n R a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h L a b o r a t o r y U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h , E d u c a t i o n a n d Welfare P u b l i c H e a l t h S e r v i c e E n v i r o n m e n t a 1 H e a l t h S e r v i c e E n v i r o n m e n t a l C o n t r o l A d m i n i s t r a t i o n B u r e a u of R a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h D r a f t e d - O c t o b e r 1969 P u b l i s h e d - May 1 9 7 0 S e c o n d P r i n t i n g - A u g u s t 1 9 7 0 This page intentionally left blank ABSTRACT Project Rulison i s a Plowshare experiment t o i n v e s t i g a t e the f e a s i b i l i t y o f nuclear explosive s t i m u l a t i o n of n a t u r a l gas production. The detonation of t h e e x p l o s i v e took place on September 1 0 , 1969. Production t e s t i n g a c t i v i t i e s w i i l be i n i t i a t e d s i x months or more a f t e r t h e d e t o n a t i o n and w i l l e n t a i l f l

471

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

472

Towards an e-health system for suicide prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic health (e-Health) is an emerging research field that focuses on healthcare based in emerging information and communication technologies. Researchers on e-Health have been working on database management systems to store and retrieve electronically ... Keywords: PSIS, e-health system for mental health, rule-based DSS, significant factors, suicidality

S. Chattopadhyay; P. Ray; M. B. Lee; H. S. Chen

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

University of New Hampshire Form #201.1 Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of New Hampshire Form #201.1 Health Services AUTHORIZATION TO RELEASE OR REQUEST HEALTH given for UNH Health Services to release/request the following information from the health record: Check-ray reports History & physical exam Immunization Laboratory tests Complete health record Other

New Hampshire, University of

474

Space, light, and time : prospective analysis of Circadian illumination for health-based daylighting with applications to healthcare architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light in architecture can be studied for its objective or perceptual effects. This thesis describes an objective link between human health and architectural design. Specifically, the link between daylight and human circadian ...

Pechacek, Christopher S. (Christopher Scott)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

World Health Through Collaboration World Health Through Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as Lyme disease orWest Nile virus (WNV) in humans (LoGiudice et al.2003,Ezenwa et al.2006).At the same or manipulation of the snail community. Lyme disease Recent studies have demonstrated that variation in host species diversity has a strong effect on the level of human risk from Lyme disease, the most frequently

Sheridan, Jennifer

476

ONE OCEAN, ONE HEALTH NOAA IN THE LEAD A REPORT FROM THE NOAA SCIENCE ADVISORY BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ocean 1 provides many health benefits, from low fat, high protein food sources and therapeutic drugs to regulation of global temperature. The ocean also poses many hazards, such as hurricanes, pathogens, animal attacks, toxins and contaminants that can cause loss of life or impair health. The potential impact of these threats is enhanced because more than half of the US population lives along the coast. Even those living inland are not immune to the ocean’s effects, as ocean-driven climate patterns have been linked to inland outbreaks of several pathogens. These and other threats are likely to increase with predicted changes in climate. NOAA has multiple programs intended to promote health, but has struggled to define its role in relation to the many other agencies that also have health-related responsibilities. To help NOAA more clearly define its role and actions needed to fulfill that role, the NOAA Science Advisory Board (SAB) established an Oceans and Health Working Group (OHWG) that includes experts in the fields of epidemiology, toxicology, public health, environmental modeling, veterinary science, marine biotechnology, economics, and ocean sciences. The OHWG was charged with identifying opportunities to enhance NOAA’s ongoing health-related efforts, including all relationships between the ocean and the physiological well-being of organisms. This report from

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Gender Identity: Pending? Identity Development and Health Care Experiences of Transmasculine/Genderqueer Identified Individuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

informed consent) Organizational qualities Health insurancetrans-friendly organizational qualities, health insurancemodel, absence of organizational policies, health insurance

Schulz, Sarah L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

California's Public Health Laboratories: Inter-organizational cooperation models to bolster laboratory capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Health Services, Laboratory Field Services,delivering health services, including laboratories. Duringof Health Services, Environmental Laboratory Certification (

Hsieh, Kristina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Enforcement Regulations and Directives - Worker Safety and Health...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Regulations and Directives - Worker Safety and Health Regulations 10 C.F.R. Part 851 - Worker Safety and Health Program; Final Rule 10 C.F.R....

480

Trends in the Health of Young Children in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Brief October 2008 Trends in the Health of YoungThis brief examines trends in key health indicators forpoints (Exhibit 2). This trend has kept the overall health

Grant, David; Kurosky, Samantha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noncarcinogenic health effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Environment, Safety & Health Directorate Assistant Laboratory Director (ALD)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environment, Safety & Health Directorate Assistant Laboratory Director (ALD) Environmental Division (4) Matrixed from Safety & Health Services Division (5) Matrixed from Procurement & Property Procurement Support (5) D&D Manager Work Control Manager Safety & Health Manager (4) Facility Configuration

Homes, Christopher C.

482

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health examination, order laboratory tests (primarily blood tests), and recommend any other tests that seem

483

Vice President for Student Affairs Executive Director, CSU Health Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Director of Medical Services Pharmacy Dental Services Laboratory Services Women's Clinic Assistant Director Behavioral Health Director of Specialty Counseling Services Drugs, Alcohol, & You (DAY) Programs i Behavioral Health Director of Business Services Accounting Student Health Insurance Human Resources Manager

484

Public Health Issues Associated with Small Drinking Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the combined efforts of epidemiologists, environmental health specialists, and laboratory personnel from technical assistance to state and local environmental health agencies to enhance laboratory capacity, environmental health services, and epidemiologic expertise. NCEH proposed a number of specific projects

485

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation book has four main focuses and sections. Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats divis

486

Healthful LipidsChapter 19 Patent Review on Lipid Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 19 Patent Review on Lipid Technology Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 19 Patent Review on Lipid Technology

487

Health Physics Enrollents and Degrees Survey, 2006 Data  

SciTech Connect

This annual survey collects 2006 data on the number of health physics degrees awarded as well as the number of students enrolled in health physics academic programs. Thirty universities offer health physics degrees; all responded to the survey.

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

488

Healthful LipidsChapter 21 Genetically Engineered Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 21 Genetically Engineered Oils Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 21 Genetically Engineered Oils from the bo

489

November 5, 2008, DOE HSS Memorandum on 10 CFR Part 85 1, Worker Safety and Health  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5,2008 5,2008 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION A FROM: URITY OFFICER SECURITY SUBJECT: 10 C.F. ' d.Part 85 1, "Worker Safety and Health" The attached letter regarding 10 C.F.R. Part 85 1, "Worker Safety and Health" was sent to contract management for Department of Energy facilities (listed in attachment 2) in order to reemphasize the importance of the rule. The Office of Health, Safety and Security will be working with your organizations to ensure that effective implementation and support are provided to increase worker awareness of their rights and responsibilities with regards to 10 C.F.R. 85 1. If you have any questions, please contact me at (301) 903-3777 or your stafTmay contact Bill McArthur, Director, Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy, at

490

Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

Wike, L

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Assessment of mercury health risks to adults from coal combustion  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is preparing, for the U.S. Congress, a report evaluating the need to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from electric utilities. This study, to be completed in 1995, will have important health and economic implications. In support of these efforts, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1000 MW{sub e} coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. The approach draws on the extant knowledge in each of the important steps in the calculation chain from emissions to health effects. Estimated results at key points in the chain were compared with actual measurements to help validate the modeled estimates. Two cases were considered: the baseline case (no local impacts), and the impact case (maximum local power-plant impact). The BNL study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Many implicit and explicit sources of uncertainty exist in this analysis. Those that appear to be most in need of improvement include data on doses and responses for potentially sensitive subpopulations (e.g., fetal exposures). Rather than considering hypothetical situations, it would also be preferable to assess the risks associated with actual coal-fired power plants and the nearby sensitive water bodies and susceptible subpopulations. Finally, annual total Hg emissions from coal burning and from other anthropogenic sources are still uncertain; this makes it difficult to estimate the effects of U.S. coal burning on global Hg concentration levels, especially over the long term.

Lipfert, F.W.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.; Saroff, L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

ON THE MOVE! The New Jersey Department of Agriculture Division of Animal Health and Animal Health Di-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Health, Environmental, and Agricultural Laboratories (NJPHEAL) facility, located in Ewing, New residues. All Division Staff will now be located at the NJPHEAL. The Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory provides diagnostic services to support disease control programs, health management, and productivity

Delgado, Mauricio

493

Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH EVALUATIONS APPRAISAL PROCESS GUIDE July 2009 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and...

494

AN L-88-12 Environment. Safety and Health Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8-12 Environment. Safety and Health Department Environment. Safety and Health Department Environment. Safety and Hearth Department 4rivironment Safety and ni.r.prfrwTanf...

495

DOE Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Facility Disposition Activities DOE Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Facility Disposition...

496

Review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Health Services...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Health Administration SQUIRM Super Quality Improvement and Risk Management 1 OFFICE OF OVERSIGHT REVIEW OF THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORIES HEALTH SERVICES...

497

Striving for Environmental, Security, Safety and Health and Sustainabi...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Striving for Environmental, Security, Safety and Health and Sustainability Excellence Striving for Environmental, Security, Safety and Health and Sustainability Excellence FE's FY...

498

Pandora's Poison: Chlorine, Health, and a New Environmental Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Pandora's Poison: Chlorine, Health, and a NewJoe Thornton. Pandora's Poison: Chlorine, Health, and a Newlives. The introduction of chlorine chemistry in the 20th

Stirling, Dale

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Pages that link to "Colorado Department of Public Health and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment" Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Jump to: navigation,...

500

Changes related to "Colorado Department of Public Health and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment" Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Jump to: navigation,...