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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Treatment of organic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic waste containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium is treated to achieve a substantial reduction in the volume of the waste and provide for fixation of the selected element in an inert salt. The method of treatment comprises introducing the organic waste and a source of oxygen into a molten salt bath maintained at an elevated temperature to produce solid and gaseous reaction products. The gaseous reaction products comprise carbon dioxide and water vapor, and the solid reaction products comprise the inorganic ash constituents of the organic waste and the selected element which is retained in the molten salt. The molten salt bath comprises one or more alkali metal carbonates, and may optionally include from 1 to about 25 wt.% of an alkali metal sulfate.

Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Optimizing Organic Waste to Energy Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A waste-to-energy firm that recycles organic waste with energy recovery performs two environmentally beneficial functions: it diverts waste from landfills and it produces renewable energy. At the same time, the waste-to-energy firm serves and collects ... Keywords: environment, operating strategy, organic waste to energy, regulation, sustainability

Bar?? Ata; Deishin Lee; Mustafa H. Tongarlak

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, D.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process is also disclosed. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile. 1 fig.

Bickford, D.F.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

5

Destruction of organic wastes with molten oxidizers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of biologically hazardous organic chemical wastes by using liquefied strongly oxidizing inorganic salts, such as the alkali metal nitrates, at high temperatures and atmospheric pressure, to yield inorganic salts, carbon dioxide, and water. The oxidizing salts are regenerated and recycled.

Bradshaw, R.W.; Holmes, J.T.; Tyner, C.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Destruction of organic wastes with molten oxidizers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of biologically hazardous organic chemical wastes by using liquefied strongly oxidizing inorganic salts, such as the alkali metal nitrates, at high temperatures and atmospheric pressure, to yield inorganic salts, carbon dioxide, and water. The oxidizing salts are regenerated and recycled.

Bradshaw, R.W.; Holmes, J.T.; Tyner, C.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Conversion of waste organic material to gasoline  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present status of a development project to convert organic waste material to gasoline has been described. The method is based on the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of straight-chain hydrocarbons from the pyrolysis gas with the subsequent reforming of these hydrocarbons to gasoline. The concept appears technically feasible. Implementation on a large scale is dependent on refinements in process performance and demonstrated operational reliability. If these objectives are achieved, the process economics could be attractive.

Kuester, J.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Low temperature hydrothermal destruction of organics in Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to evaluate and develop a low temperature hydrothermal process (HTP) for the destruction of organics that are present wastes temporarily stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. Organic compounds contribute to tank waste safety issues, such as hydrogen generation. Some organic compounds act as complexants, promoting the solubility of radioactive constituents such as {sup 90}Sr and {sup 241}Am, which is undesirable for waste pretreatment processing. HTP is thermal-chemical autogenous processing method that is typically operated between 250{degrees}C and 375{degrees}C and approximately 200 atm. Testing with simulated tank waste, containing a variety of organics has been performed. The distribution of strontium, cesium and bulk metals between the supernatant and solid phases as a function of the total organic content of the waste simulant will be presented. Test results using simulant will be compared with similar tests conducted using actual radioactive waste.

Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Zacher, A.H.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Schmidt, A.J.; Jones, E.O.; Hart, T.R.; Poshusta, J.C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Screening for organic solvents in Hanford waste tanks using organic vapor concentrations  

SciTech Connect

The potential ignition of organic liquids stored in the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks has been identified as a safety issue because expanding gases could potentially affect tank dome integrity. Organic liquid waste has been found in some of the waste tanks, but most are thought to contain only trace amounts. Due to the inhomogeneity of the waste, direct sampling of the tank waste to locate organic liquids may not conclusively demonstrate that a given tank is free of risk. However, organic vapors present above the organic liquid waste can be detected with a high degree of confidence and can be used to identify problem tanks. This report presents the results of a screening test that has been applied to 82 passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site to identify those that might contain a significant amount of organic liquid waste. It includes seven tanks not addressed in the previous version of this report, Screening for Organic Solvents in Hanford Waste Tanks Using Total Non-Methane Organic Compound Vapor Concentrations. The screening test is based on a simple model of the tank headspace that estimates the effective surface area of semivolatile organic liquid waste in a tank. Analyses indicate that damage to the tank dome is credible only if the organic liquid burn rate is above a threshold value, and this can occur only if the surface area of organic liquid in a tank is above a corresponding threshold value of about one square meter. Thirteen tanks were identified as potentially containing at least that amount of semivolatile organic liquid based on conservative estimates. Most of the tanks identified as containing potentially significant quantities of organic liquid waste are in the 241-BY and 241-C tank farms, which agrees qualitatively with the fact that these tank farms received the majority of the PUREX process organic wash waste and waste organic liquids.

Huckaby, J.L.; Sklarew, D.S.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Shipment and Disposal of Solidified Organic Waste (Waste Type IV) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April of 2005, the last shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site to the WIPP was completed. With the completion of this shipment, all transuranic waste generated and stored at Rocky Flats was successfully removed from the site and shipped to and disposed of at the WIPP. Some of the last waste to be shipped and disposed of at the WIPP was waste consisting of solidified organic liquids that is identified as Waste Type IV in the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC) document. Waste Type IV waste typically has a composition, and associated characteristics, that make it significantly more difficult to ship and dispose of than other Waste Types, especially with respect to gas generation. This paper provides an overview of the experience gained at Rocky Flats for management, transportation and disposal of Type IV waste at WIPP, particularly with respect to gas generation testing. (authors)

D'Amico, E. L [Washington TRU Solutions (United States); Edmiston, D. R. [John Hart and Associates (United States); O'Leary, G. A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (United States); Rivera, M. A. [Aspen Resources Ltd., Inc. (United States); Steward, D. M. [Boulder Research Enterprises, LLC (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Environment, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Field Organization Directory  

SciTech Connect

This directory was developed by the Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) from an outgrowth of the Departments efforts to identify and establish the regulatory response lead persons in the Field Organizations. The directory was developed for intemal EH-231 use to identify both the DOE and DOE contractor Field Organizations in the Environment, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management areas. The Field Organization directory is divided into three substantive sections: (1) Environment; (2) Environmental Restoration; and (3) Waste Management which are organized to correspond to the management hierarchy at each Field Organization. The information provided includes the facility name and address, individual managers name, and telephone/fax numbers.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Screening for organic solvents in Hanford waste tanks using total non- methane organic compound vapor concentrations  

SciTech Connect

The potential ignition of organic liquids stored in the Hanford high-level radioactive waste tanks is a safety issue because expanding gases could affect tank dome integrity. This report presents results of a screening test that was applied to 75 passively ventilated waste tanks at Hanford to determine those that might contain a significant amount of organic liquid waste. The screening test is based on a simple model of tank headspace, headspace organic vapor concentrations, and certain tank physical parameters. Analyses indicate that damage to the tank dome is credible only if the organic liquid burn rate is above a threshold value, and this can occur only if the surface area of organic liquid in a tank is above a corresponding threshold value of about one square meter. Twelve tanks were identified as potentially containing at least that amount of semivolatile organic liquid based on conservative estimates. Tank head space organic vapor concentrations and physical parameters required by the screening test have been compiled and are presented for each of the tanks studied. Estimates of the ventilation rates of the waste tanks were revised to reflect recent information obtained from hydrogen monitoring data. A simple analysis of the uncertainty in the test results suggests that the largest current uncertainty in the estimation of organic liquid surface area is that associated with knowledge of the tank ventilation rate. The uncertainty analysis is applied to determine 95% confidence limits for the estimated organic waste surface area in each tank.

Huckaby, J.L.; Glissmeyer, J.A.; Sklarew, D.S.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Bio-hydrogen production from renewable organic wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methane fermentation has been in practice over a century for the stabilization of high strength organic waste/wastewater. Although methanogenesis is a well established process and methane--the end-product of methanogenesis is a useful energy source; it is a low value end product with relatively less energy content (about 56 kJ energy/g CH{sub 4}). Besides, methane and its combustion by-product are powerful greenhouse gases, and responsible for global climate change. So there is a pressing need to explore alternative environmental technologies that not only stabilize the waste/wastewater but also generate benign high value end products. From this perspective, anaerobic bioconversion of organic wastes to hydrogen gas is an attractive option that achieves both goals. From energy security stand point, generation of hydrogen energy from renewable organic waste/wastewater could substitute non-renewable fossil fuels, over two-third of which is imported from politically unstable countries. Thus, biological hydrogen production from renewable organic waste through dark fermentation represents a critically important area of bioenergy production. This study evaluated both process engineering and microbial physiology of biohydrogen production.

Shihwu Sung

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Chemical Pretreatment And Enzymatic Hydrolysis Of Mixed Source-Separated Organic (SSO) And Wood Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper examines the effectiveness of two pretreatments on Source-Separated Organic waste (SSO) mixed with wood wastes: long term lime for SSO mixed with forestry (more)

Faye, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Recycling policy making of organic waste using analytical network process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) has been used widely in multicriteria selection problems. However, AHP can deal with only a simple hierarchy of elements. On the other hand, the Analytical Network Process (ANP) can deal with more complex structures ... Keywords: analytical network process (ANP), group discussion, multicriteria selection, organic waste recycling policy making

Kazuei Ishii; Toru Furuichi

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) has recently completed a Phase I program for the development of a two-step alternative to incineration for the destruction of organics in transuranic wastes at the Savannah River Site. This process is known as thermal desorption-supercritical water oxidation, or TD-SCWO. The GA TD process uses heat to volatilize and transport organics from the waste material for subsequent treatment by SCWO. SCWO oxidizes organics in a steam medium at elevated temperatures and pressures in a manner that achieves excellent destruction efficiencies and compliance with all environmental requirements without the need for complex pollution-abatement equipment. This application of TD-SCWO is focused on a full-scale batch process for 55-gallon drums of mixed transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site. The Phase I reduced-scale test results show that the process operates as intended on surrogate waste matrices chosen to be representative of Savannah River Site transuranic mixed wastes. It provides a high degree of hydrogen removal and full containment of the radionuclide surrogate, with minimal requirements for pre-treatment and post-treatment. Other test objectives were to verify that the process produces no dioxins or furans, and meets all applicable regulatory criteria for retention of toxic metals, particulate, and criteria pollutants, while meeting WIPP/WAC and TRUPACT-II requirements. Thermal desorption of surrogate SRS mixed wastes at 500 psi and 1000 F met all tested requirements for WIPP/WAC and TRUPACT-II. SCWO of the desorbed surrogate organic materials at 500 psi and 1500 F also appears to meet all requirements for a nonincineration alternative, although >99.99% DRE for chlorinated solvents has not yet been demonstrated.

Mike Spritzer

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

DECONTAMINATION/DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has approximately 5000 55-gallon drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste in interim storage. These may not be shipped to WIPP in TRUPACT-II containers due to the high rate of hydrogen production resulting from the radiolysis of the organic content of the drums. In order to circumvent this problem, the {sup 238}Pu needs to be separated from the organics--either by mineralization of the latter or by decontamination by a chemical separation. We have conducted ''cold'' optimization trials and surrogate tests in which a combination of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process (SILVER II{trademark}) and ultrasonic mixing have been used to decontaminate the surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes were impregnated with copper oxalate for plutonium dioxide. Our process combines both mineralization of reactive components (such cellulose, rubber, and oil) and surface decontamination of less reactive materials such as polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinylchloride. By using this combination of SILVER II and ultrasonic mixing, we have achieved 100% current efficiency for the destruction of the reactive components. We have demonstrated that: The degree of decontamination achieved would be adequate to meet both WIPP waste acceptance criteria and TRUPACT II packaging and shipping requirements; The system can maintain near absolute containment of the surrogate radionuclides; Only minimal pre-treatment (coarse shredding) and minimal waste sorting are required; The system requires minimal off gas control processes and monitoring instrumentation; The laboratory trials have developed information that can be used for scale-up purposes; The process does not produce dioxins and furans; Disposal routes for secondary process arisings have already been demonstrated in other programs. Based on the results from Phase 1, the recommendation is to proceed to Phase 2 and use the equipment at Savannah River Site to demonstrate the processing of genuine plutonium contaminated wastes.

Chris Jones; Javier Del Campo; Patrick Nevins; Stuart Legg

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Waste Tank Organic Safety Project organic concentration mechanisms task. FY 1994 progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Waste Tank Organic Safety Project is conducting research to support Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) Waste Tank Safety Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Tank Farm Project Office. The goal of PNL`s program is to provide a scientific basis for analyzing organics in Hanford`s underground storage tanks (USTs) and for determining whether they are at concentrations that pose a potentially unsafe condition. Part of this research is directed toward determining what organic concentrations are safe by conducting research on organic aging mechanisms and waste energetics to assess the conditions necessary to produce an uncontrolled energy release in tanks due to reactions between the organics and the nitrate and nitrate salts in the tank wastes. The objective of the Organic Concentration Mechanisms Task is to assess the degree of localized enrichment of organics to be expected in the USTs due to concentration mechanisms. This report describes the progress of research conducted in FY 1994 on two concentration mechanisms of interest to the tank safety project: (1) permeation of a separate organic liquid phase into the interstitial spaces of the tank solids during the draining of free liquid from the tanks; and (2) concentration of organics on the surfaces of the solids due to adsorption. Three experiments were conducted to investigate permeation of air and solvent into a sludge simulant that is representative of single-shell tank sludge. The permeation behavior of air and solvent into the sludge simulant can be explained by the properties of the fluid pairs (air/supernate and solvent supernate) and the sludge. One important fluid property is the interfacial tension between the supernate and either the solvent or air. In general, the greater the interfacial tension between two fluids, the more difficult it will be for the air or solvent to displace the supernate during dewatering of the sludge.

Gerber, M.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Organic tanks safety program FY95 waste aging studies  

SciTech Connect

This report gives the second year`s findings of a study of how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds in the underground tanks at Hanford. Efforts were focused on the global reaction kinetics in a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} rays and the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion. The gas production is predominantly radiolytic. Decarboxylation of carboxylates is probably an aging pathway. TBP was totaly consumed in almost every run. Radiation clearly accelerated consumption of the other compounds. EDTA is more reactive than citrate. Oximes and possibly organic nitro compounds are key intermediates in the radiolytic redox reactions of organic compounds with nitrate/nitrite. Observations are consistent with organic compounds being progressively degraded to compounds with greater numbers of C-O bonds and fewer C-H and C-C bonds, resulting in an overall lower energy content. If the radwaste tanks are adequately ventilated and continually dosed by radioactivity, their total energy content should have declined. Level of risk depends on how rapidly carboxylate salts of moderate energy content (including EDTA fragments) degrade to low energy oxalate and formate.

Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Lenihan, B.D.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Miron, Y. [Bureau of Mines (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Removal of floating organic in Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-103 restart plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decision whether or not to remove the organic layer from Waste Tank 241-C-103 was deferred until May, 1995. The following restart plan was prepared for removal of the organic if the decision is to remove the organic from the waste tank 241-C-103.

Wilson, T.R.; Hanson, C.

1994-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

Waste Heat Recovery by Organic Fluid Rankine Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Organic Rankine Cycle for waste heat recovery presents several characteristics which are analyzed in details. After a short comparison with steam cycles, the Organic Rankine Cycle is described : its simplicity is shown and achievable efficiencies versus heat source temperature are given. Available fluids are presented. The choice of the fluid allows a good adaptation to temperature and power for each application. The most interesting field for Organic Rankine Cycles are low mechanical powers of a few megawatts and medium temperatures, about 500 C/600 C, for flue gas. The very simple technology of turbines is shown. Three examples are presented. The first one is a test loop of 300 thermal kW built in BERTIN & Cie laboratory to experiment a supersonic turbine designed by the same company for organic vapor at 250 C. The second gives the main characteristics of recovery from exhaust gas of Diesel engines. The last deals with possible recovery from air quenching of clinker in cement plants.

Verneau, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Method for acid oxidation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed organic waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for reducing the volume of low level radioactive and mixed waste to enable the waste to be more economically stored in a suitable repository, and for placing the waste into a form suitable for permanent disposal. The invention involves a process for preparing radioactive, hazardous, or mixed waste for storage by contacting the waste starting material containing at least one organic carbon-containing compound and at least one radioactive or hazardous waste component with nitric acid and phosphoric acid simultaneously at a contacting temperature in the range of about 140.degree. C. to about 210 .degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the organic carbon-containing compound to gaseous products, thereby producing a residual concentrated waste product containing substantially all of said radioactive or inorganic hazardous waste component; and immobilizing the residual concentrated waste product in a solid phosphate-based ceramic or glass form.

Pierce, Robert A. (Aiken, SC); Smith, James R. (Corrales, NM); Ramsey, William G. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Bickford, Dennis F. (Folly Beach, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co(III) mediator in a neutral electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and neutral pH anolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the cobalt mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble radioactive species and is regenerated at the anode until all organics are converted to carbon dioxide and destroyed. The neutral electrolyte is non-corrosive, and thus extends the lifetime of the cell and its components.

Balazs, G. Bryan (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Patricia R. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co(III) mediator in a neutral electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and neutral pH anolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the cobalt mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble radioactive species and is regenerated at the anode until all organics are converted to carbon dioxide and destroyed. The neutral electrolyte is non-corrosive, and thus extends the lifetime of the cell and its components. 2 figs.

Balazs, G.B.; Lewis, P.R.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

29

Organic and Inorganic Hazardous Waste Stabilization Using Coal Combustion By-Product Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a laboratory investigation of four clean-coal by-products to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous waste stream materials. The wastes included API separator sludge, metal oxide-hydroxide waste, metal plating sludge, and creosote-contaminated soil. Overall, the investigation showed that the high alkalinity of the by-products may cost-effectively stabilize the acidic components of hazardous waste.

1994-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

30

Dynamic modeling and multivariable control of organic Rankine cycles in waste heat utilizing processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the dynamics of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) in waste heat utilizing processes is investigated, and the physical model of a 100 kW waste heat utilizing process is established. In order to achieve both transient performance and steady-state ... Keywords: Linear quadratic regulator, Organic Rankine cycles, Process control

Jianhua Zhang; Wenfang Zhang; Guolian Hou; Fang Fang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a potential environmental disadvantage of home composting. Because of a lack of reliable GHG emission data, a comprehensive experimental home composting system was set up. The system consisted of six composting units, and a static flux chamber method was used to measure and quantify the GHG emissions for one year composting of organic household waste (OHW). The average OHW input in the six composting units was 2.6-3.5 kg week{sup -1} and the temperature inside the composting units was in all cases only a few degrees (2-10 {sup o}C) higher than the ambient temperature. The emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were quantified as 0.4-4.2 kg CH{sub 4} Mg{sup -1} input wet waste (ww) and 0.30-0.55 kg N{sub 2}O Mg{sup -1} ww, depending on the mixing frequency. This corresponds to emission factors (EFs) (including only CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions) of 100-239 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww. Composting units exposed to weekly mixing had the highest EFs, whereas the units with no mixing during the entire year had the lowest emissions. In addition to the higher emission from the frequently mixed units, there was also an instant release of CH{sub 4} during mixing which was estimated to 8-12% of the total CH{sub 4} emissions. Experiments with higher loads of OHW (up to 20 kg every fortnight) entailed a higher emission and significantly increased overall EFs (in kg substance per Mg{sup -1} ww). However, the temperature development did not change significantly. The GHG emissions (in kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww) from home composting of OHW were found to be in the same order of magnitude as for centralised composting plants.

Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H.; Scheutz, C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Mixed Waste Utilizing the Oak Ridge Broad Spectrum Contracts  

SciTech Connect

To meet the requirements of the State of Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner's Order for treatment of mixed low level wastes, Oak Ridge has utilized commercial treatment companies to treat and dispose mixed waste. Over the past year, Oak Ridge has shipped organic-contaminated mixed waste for treatment to meet milestones under the Site Treatment Plan. Oak Ridge has established contracts with commercial treatment companies accessible by all DOE sites for treatment of a wide range of mixed wastes. The paper will describe and summarize the activities involved in treating and disposing of organic-contaminated mixed waste utilizing DOE complex-wide contracts and the treatment and disposal activities required. This paper will describe the case history of treatment of several organic-contaminated mixed wastes from the Oak Ridge Reservation requiring treatment prior to disposal. The paper will include waste category information, implementation activities, and contract access. The paper will discuss the specifics of the mixed waste treatment including waste characteristics, treatment process and equipment utilized, and treatment results. Additional information will be provided on task order development, waste profiling, treatment pricing, and the disposal process.

Estes, C. H.; Heacker, F. K.; Cunningham, J.; Westich, B.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

34

Organic Flash Cycles for Intermediate and High Temperature Waste Reclamation  

Researchers at Berkeley Lab have developed a highly efficient technology for the reclamation of waste heat in mechanical heat engines widely used in ...

35

Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

36

Process and installation for simultaneously producing compost and biogas from organic waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is described for the simultaneous treatment of solid or semi-solid organic waste and liquid organic waste with a view to the simultaneous production of compost and biogas, wherein the liquid organic waste is subjected to a liquid-solid separation. The liquid phase from this separation is subjected to anaerobic fermentation in at least one closed digester, the solid phase from the liquid-solid separation is mixed with the solid or semi-solid organic waste, and the resulting mixture is subjected to aerobic fermentation at the periphery of the digester and in contact therewith. Mud, clarified liquid and gas are respectively discharged from the digester whereas compost from the aerobic fermentation of the solid or semi-solid waste is recovered at the periphery of the digester wherein the digester is characterized by two superimposed compartments, an upper compartment at low pressure and a lower compartment at high pressure, the compartments communicating together through at least one lateral pipe and through a central siphon. A means is provided for lowering the pressure of the lower compartment when the liquid reaches a predetermined level therein. An installation is described for the simultaneous treatment of solid or semi-solid organic waste and liquid waste with a view to the simultaneous production of compost and biogas. This comprises: means for separating the liquid organic waste into a solid phase and a liquid phase; at least one closed digester; means for introducing the liquid phase into the digester; means for mixing the solid phase with the solid or semi-solid waste; means for bringing the resulting mixture to the periphery of the digester in contact therewith; and means for discharging respectively from the digester the gas which is formed therein by anaerobic fermentation and the sludges which are deposited therein.

Lebesgue, Y.; Zeana, A.

1986-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Biogas generation by two-phase anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The organic fraction of municipal solid waste can be a significant energy source for renewable energy generation. The total production of municipal solid waste in Turkey was 25??106 tones per year. Anaerobic digestion (AD) process may be a solution to the problems of energy demand and waste management since it provides biomethanation along with waste stabilization. AD can be operated in single or two phase configurations. Two-phase processes have some advantages over one phase systems in terms of selection of microorganisms

Eylem Dogan; Gksel N. Demirer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized. Total waste generation increased 9.8%, but it was possible to reduce the volume of non-recyclable materials (11%) and increase the volume of recyclable materials (4%). It was also possible to segregate organic waste (7%), which was forwarded for production of compost. The rate of infectious waste generation in critical areas decreased from 0.021 to 0.018 kg/procedure. Many improvements have been observed, and now the PHC complies with most of legal requirements, offers periodic training and better biosafety conditions to workers, has reduced the volume of waste sent to sanitary landfills, and has introduced indicators for monitoring its own performance. This evaluation method might subsidize the creation and evaluation of medical waste management plans in similar heath institutions.

Moreira, A.M.M., E-mail: anamariainforme@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil); Guenther, W.M.R. [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes without electrode separators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell/electrolyte/mediator combination is described for the efficient destruction of organic contaminants using metal salt mediators in a sulfuric acid electrolyte, wherein the electrodes and mediator are chosen such that hydrogen gas is produced at the cathode and no cell membrane is required. 3 figs.

Farmer, J.C.; Wang, F.T.; Hickman, R.G.; Lewis, P.R.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Organic Rankine Cycle System, Its Application to Extract Energy From Low Temperature Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conservation of energy by its recovery from low temperature waste heat is of increasing importance in today's world energy crisis. The Organic Rankine Cycle is a cost efficient and proven method of converting low temperature (200-400o F) waste heat to mechanical and/or electrical energy. Applying the Organic Rankine Cycle technology to typical liquid and mixed component condensing streams is described using actual examples. Selection of the organic working fluid is explored. The Rankine Cycle efficiency is directly dependent upon the temperature difference between its evaporating and condensing phases. The evaporating level is set by the heat source; therefore, to maximize efficiency, it is essential to obtain the lowest condensing temperature practical. Various condensing schemes are discussed emphasizing methods of optimizing the net output of the total system. Several Organic Rankine Cycle commercial applications are summarized with experience and general performance given. The economics and optimization techniques in typical applications including multiple heat sources are discussed.

Sawyer, R. H.; Ichikawa, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method for removing and decolorizing aqueous waste effluents containing dissolved or dispersed organic matter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for treating organic waste material dissolved or dispersed in an aqueous effluent, which comprises contacting the effluent with an inert particulate carbonaceous sorbent at an oxygen pressure up to 2000 psi, irradiating the resultant mixture with high energy radiation until a decolorized liquid is produced, and then separating the decolorized liquid.

Case, F.N.; Ketchen, E.E.

1975-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

Final Report. Conversion of Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilizing Hermetic Organic Rankine Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The design of waste heat recovery using the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine is updated. Advances in power electronics with lower cost enable the use of a single shaft, high-speed generator eliminating wear items and allowing hermetic sealing of the working fluid. This allows maintenance free operation and a compact configuration that lowers cost, enabling new market opportunities.

Fuller, Robert L.

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

43

Characterizing the transformation and transfer of nitrogen during the aerobic treatment of organic wastes and digestates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonia emissions varied depending on the nature of wastes and the treatment conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen losses resulted from ammonia emissions and nitrification-denitrification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonification can be estimated from biodegradable carbon and carbon/nitrogen ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonification was the main process contributing to N losses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrification rate was negatively correlated to stripping rate of ammonia nitrogen. - Abstract: The transformation and transfer of nitrogen during the aerobic treatment of seven wastes were studied in ventilated air-tight 10-L reactors at 35 Degree-Sign C. Studied wastes included distinct types of organic wastes and their digestates. Ammonia emissions varied depending on the kind of waste and treatment conditions. These emissions accounted for 2-43% of the initial nitrogen. Total nitrogen losses, which resulted mainly from ammonia emissions and nitrification-denitrification, accounted for 1-76% of the initial nitrogen. Ammonification was the main process responsible for nitrogen losses. An equation which allows estimating the ammonification flow of each type of waste according to its biodegradable carbon and carbon/nitrogen ratio was proposed. As a consequence of the lower contribution of storage and leachate rates, stripping and nitrification rates of ammonia nitrogen were negatively correlated. This observation suggests the possibility of promotingnitrification in order to reduce ammonia emissions.

Zeng Yang, E-mail: yang.zeng@irstea.fr [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes Cedex (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France); Guardia, Amaury de; Daumoin, Mylene; Benoist, Jean-Claude [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes Cedex (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT&E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A/O/D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT&E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A/O/D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris.

Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evaluation of alternative nonflame technologies for destruction of hazardous organic waste  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) commissioned an evaluation of mixed waste treatment technologies that are alternatives to incineration for destruction of hazardous organic wastes. The purpose of this effort is to evaluate technologies that are alternatives to open-flame, free-oxygen combustion (as exemplified by incinerators), and recommend to the Waste Type Managers and the MWFA which technologies should be considered for further development. Alternative technologies were defined as those that have the potential to: destroy organic material without use of open-flame reactions with free gas-phase oxygen as the reaction mechanism; reduce the offgas volume and associated contaminants (metals, radionuclides, and particulates) emitted under normal operating conditions; eliminate or reduce the production of dioxins and furans; and reduce the potential for excursions in the process that can lead to accidental release of harmful levels of chemical or radioactive materials. Twenty-three technologies were identified that have the potential for meeting these requirements. These technologies were rated against the categories of performance, readiness for deployment, and environment safety, and health. The top ten technologies that resulted from this evaluation are Steam Reforming, Electron Beam, UV Photo-Oxidation, Ultrasonics, Eco Logic reduction process, Supercritical Water oxidation, Cerium Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation, DETOX{sup SM}, Direct Chemical Oxidation (peroxydisulfate), and Neutralization/Hydrolysis.

Schwinkendorf, W.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Musgrave, B.C. [BC Musgrave, Inc. (United States); Drake, R.N. [Drake Engineering, Inc. (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Organic chemical aging mechanisms: An annotated bibliography. Waste Tank Safety Program  

SciTech Connect

An annotated bibliography has been compiled of the potential chemical and radiological aging mechanisms of the organic constituents (non-ferrocyanide) that would likely be found in the UST at Hanford. The majority of the work that has been conducted on the aging of organic chemicals used for extraction and processing of nuclear materials has been in conjunction with the acid or PUREX type processes. At Hanford the waste being stored in the UST has been stabilized with caustic. The aging factors that were used in this work were radiolysis, hydrolysis and nitrite/nitrate oxidation. The purpose of this work was two-fold: to determine whether or not research had been or is currently being conducted on the species associated with the Hanford UST waste, either as a mixture or as individual chemicals or chemical functionalities, and to determine what areas of chemical aging need to be addressed by further research.

Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M.; Nelson, D.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Comparison of five organic wastes regarding their behaviour during composting: Part 2, nitrogen dynamic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aimed to compare household waste, separated pig solids, food waste, pig slaughterhouse sludge and green algae regarding processes ruling nitrogen dynamic during composting. For each waste, three composting simulations were performed in parallel in three similar reactors (300 L), each one under a constant aeration rate. The aeration flows applied were comprised between 100 and 1100 L/h. The initial waste and the compost were characterized through the measurements of their contents in dry matter, total carbon, Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate. Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrite and nitrate were measured in leachates and in condensates too. Ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions were monitored in continue. The cumulated emissions in ammonia and in nitrous oxide were given for each waste and at each aeration rate. The paper focused on process of ammonification and on transformations and transfer of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The parameters of nitrous oxide emissions were not investigated. The removal rate of total Kjeldahl nitrogen was shown being closely tied to the ammonification rate. Ammonification was modelled thanks to the calculation of the ratio of biodegradable carbon to organic nitrogen content of the biodegradable fraction. The wastes were shown to differ significantly regarding their ammonification ability. Nitrogen balances were calculated by subtracting nitrogen losses from nitrogen removed from material. Defaults in nitrogen balances were assumed to correspond to conversion of nitrate even nitrite into molecular nitrogen and then to the previous conversion by nitrification of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The pool of total ammoniacal nitrogen, i.e. total ammoniacal nitrogen initially contained in waste plus total ammoniacal nitrogen released by ammonification, was calculated for each experiment. Then, this pool was used as the referring amount in the calculation of the rates of accumulation, stripping and nitrification of total ammoniacal nitrogen. Separated pig solids were characterised by a high ability to accumulate total ammoniacal nitrogen. Whatever the waste, the striping rate depended mostly on the aeration rate and on the pool concentration in biofilm. The nitrification rate was observed as all the higher as the concentration in total ammoniacal nitrogen in the initial waste was low. Thus, household waste and green algae exhibited the highest nitrification rates. This result could mean that in case of low concentrations in total ammoniacal nitrogen, a nitrifying biomass was already developed and that this biomass consumed it. In contrast, in case of high concentrations, this could traduce some difficulties for nitrifying microorganisms to develop.

Guardia, A. de, E-mail: amaury.de-guardia@cemagref.f [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France); Mallard, P.; Teglia, C.; Marin, A.; Le Pape, C.; Launay, M.; Benoist, J.C.; Petiot, C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO.sub.2. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement.

Balazs, G. Bryan (Livermore, CA); Chiba, Zoher (Moraga, CA); Lewis, Patricia R. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Norvell (Palo Alto, CA); Steward, G. Anthony (Los Altos Hills, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO[sub 2]. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement. 2 figs.

Balazs, G.B.; Chiba, Z.; Lewis, P.R.; Nelson, N.; Steward, G.A.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

A multi-component partitioning model to predict organic leaching from stabilized/solidified oily wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) is an established remediation process in hazardous waste management. Recently this process has been applied to hazardous organic wastes with mixed results. These results have prompted further studies to examine the effectiveness of this process in containing organic contaminants. The primary goal of S/S is to contain the contaminants in a solidified form, removing them from the environment. This is accomplished by decreasing the contaminant surface area and chemically converting the waste by reducing the contaminant solubility. The most common S/S processes utilize the chemical reactions achieved in cement-based and pozzolanic mixes. The effectiveness of this process is determined by the degree to which contaminants will leach from the waste end-product. Leach models, therefore, are an effective way to predict the leaching of contaminants and to describe the immobilization and binding mechanisms that take place. The multi-component nature of oily wastes requires that a multi-component approach be taken to describe the partitioning between the aqueous and non-aqueous phases. The heterogeneous nature of these wastes precludes analysis of partitioning of all chemical species. Thus a pseudo-component model has been developed that describes the partitioning of TOC as caused by the partitioning of a small number of pseudo-components. A pseudo-component is used to represent a group of chemical species that have similar tendencies to partition between the aqueous and non-aqueous phases. A linear partitioning relationship is used to develop the partitioning model, with the values of the partitioning coefficients chosen to represent strongly sorbed, moderately sorbed, and weakly sorbed components. The partitioning characteristics of the waste were determined in a series of sequential experiments in which different amounts of water were added. After each addition, the system was allowed to equilibrate, the added water removed by centrifugation and its TOC measured. The model predicts that the measured concentrations of TOC are due to the sum of all pseudo-components in the aqueous or mobile phase.

O'Cleirigh, Declan Ronan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Analysis of organic carbon and moisture in Hanford single-shell tank waste  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a revised analysis performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory involving the organic carbon laboratory measurement data for Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) obtained from a review of the laboratory analytical data. This activity has as its objective to provide a best-estimate, including confidence levels, of total organic carbon (TOC) and moisture in each of the 149 SSTs at Hanford. The TOC and moisture information presented in this report is useful as part of the criteria to identify SSTs for additional measurements, or monitoring for the Organic Safety Program. In April 1994, an initial study of the organic carbon in Hanford single-shell tanks was completed at PNL. That study reflected the estimates of TOC based on tank characterizations datasets that were available at the time. Also in that study, estimation of dry basis TOC was based on generalized assumptions pertaining to the moisture of the tank wastes. The new information pertaining to tank moisture and TOC data that has become available from the current study influences the best estimates of TOC in each of the SSTs. This investigation of tank TOC and moisture has resulted in improved estimates based on waste phase: saltcake, sludge, or liquid. This report details the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the estimates of TOC and moisture in each of the 149 SSTs at Hanford.

Toth, J.J.; Heasler, P.G.; Lerchen, M.E.; Hill, J.G.; Whitney, P.D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks.

Chanakya, H.N. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)], E-mail: chanakya@astra.iisc.ernet.in; Sharma, Isha [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ramachandra, T.V. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste: Methane production modeling  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane generation may be modeled by means of modified product generation model of Romero Garcia (1991). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic matter content and particle size influence the kinetic parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher organic matter content and lower particle size enhance the biomethanization. - Abstract: The influence of particle size and organic matter content of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) in the overall kinetics of dry (30% total solids) thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion have been studied in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor (SSTR). Two types of wastes were used: synthetic OFMSW (average particle size of 1 mm; 0.71 g Volatile Solids/g waste), and OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant (average particle size of 30 mm; 0.16 g Volatile Solids/g waste). A modification of a widely-validated product-generation kinetic model has been proposed. Results obtained from the modified-model parameterization at steady-state (that include new kinetic parameters as K, Y{sub pMAX} and {theta}{sub MIN}) indicate that the features of the feedstock strongly influence the kinetics of the process. The overall specific growth rate of microorganisms ({mu}{sub max}) with synthetic OFMSW is 43% higher compared to OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant: 0.238 d{sup -1} (K = 1.391 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.167 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 7.924 days) vs. 0.135 d{sup -1} (K = 1.282 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.150 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 9.997 days) respectively. Finally, it could be emphasized that the validation of proposed modified-model has been performed successfully by means of the simulation of non-steady state data for the different SRTs tested with each waste.

Fdez-Gueelfo, L.A., E-mail: alberto.fdezguelfo@uca.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Alvarez-Gallego, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sales, D. [Department of Environmental Technologies, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Romero Garcia, L.I. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Correlation between Organic Matter Degradation and the Rheological Performance of Waste Sludge During Anaerobic Digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion has demonstrated to be a good possibility to reduce the organic matter contents in waste activated sludge resulting in the effluents treatment. An anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 3.5 L reactor at 35?C for a period of 20 days. An electronic thermostat controlled the temperature. The reactor was agitated at a rate of 200 rpm. The study of the rheological behavior of the waste activated sludge was done with an Anton Paar rheometer model MCR301 with a peltier plate for temperature control. Four?blade vane geometry was used with samples of 37 mL for determining rheological properties. Sampling (two samples) was taken every four days of anaerobic digestion through a peristaltic pump. The samples behavior was characterized by the Herschel?Bulkley model

Evangelina S. Morel; Jos A. Hernndez?Hernndes; Juan M. Mndez?Contreras; Denis Cant?Lozano

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Application of thermogravimetric analysis to study the thermal degradation of solid and liquid organic wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the thermolysis of composite binary mixtures of refinery or coal-processing waste with waste biomass and D-grade (long-flame) coal was analyzed in order to increase the efficiency of the cothermolysis of chemically different organic wastes mainly because of the synergism of the thermolysis of mixture components and, correspondingly, the selectivity of formation of high-quality by-products (solid, gaseous, or liquid). A new approach to the analysis of thermogravimetric data was proposed and developed as applied to complex binary mixtures of carbon-containing materials. This approach was based on (1) the preliminary separation of the thermal degradation of individual carbon-containing mixture components into individual structural constituents and (2) the monitoring of the conversion of each particular structure fragment as a constituent of the mixtures in the course of the cothermolysis of the mixtures of starting components. Based on the approach developed, data on the main synergism effects in the course of cothermolysis in the binary test systems were obtained: the temperature regions of the appearance of these effects were distinguished, the main conclusions were made with respect to particular structure fragments in complex organic wastes responsible for the interaction of components in composite systems, and the directions (positive or negative) of changes in the yields of solid by-products and the degrees of effects (difference between the yields of cothermolysis by-products in each particular region of the appearance of synergistic effects in the systems) were determined. Additionally, the influence of alkali metal carbonate additives on synergistic effects in the interaction between binary system components under the process conditions of cothermolysis was analyzed.

E.S. Lygina; A.F. Dmitruk; S.B. Lyubchik; V.F. Tret'yakov [Tugan-Baranovsky State University of Economy and Trade, Donetsk (Ukraine)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Continuous high-solids anaerobic co-digestion of organic solid wastes under mesophilic conditions  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > High-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion is attracting a lot of attention these days. > One reactor was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste. > Maximum biogas production rate of 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d was achieved at HRT 40 d and 40% TS. > The other reactor was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW). > Until a 40% LW content increase, the reactor exhibited a stable performance. - Abstract: With increasing concerns over the limited capacity of landfills, conservation of resources, and reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions, high-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste (OSW) is attracting a great deal of attention these days. In the present work, two dry anaerobic co-digestion systems fed with different mixtures of OSW were continuously operated under mesophilic conditions. Dewatered sludge cake was used as a main seeding source. In reactor (I), which was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste (PW), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solid content were controlled to find the maximum treatability. At a fixed solid content of 30% total solids (TS), stable performance was maintained up to an HRT decrease to 40 d. However, the stable performance was not sustained at 30 d HRT, and hence, HRT was increased to 40 d again. In further operation, instead of decreasing HRT, solid content was increased to 40% TS, which was found to be a better option to increase the treatability. The biogas production rate (BPR), CH{sub 4} production yield (MPY) and VS reduction achieved in this condition were 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, 0.25 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and 80%, respectively. Reactor (II) was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW), and LW content was increased during the operation. Until a 40% LW content increase, reactor (II) exhibited a stable performance. A BPR of 1.7 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, MPY of 0.26 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and VS reduction of 72% was achieved at 40% LW content. However, when the LW content was increased to 60%, there was a significant performance drop, which was attributed to free ammonia inhibition. The performances in these two reactors were comparable to the ones achieved in the conventional wet digestion and thermophilic dry digestion processes.

Kim, Dong-Hoon [Wastes Energy Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 102, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sae-Eun, E-mail: saeun@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, San 16-1, Duckmyoung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash: Characterization and kinetic studies of organic matter  

SciTech Connect

Bottom ash is the main solid residue which is produced by municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) facilities. To be reused in public works, it has to be stored previously a few months. This material is composed primarily of a mineral matrix but also contains unburnt organic matter. The mineral content and its change in the course of aging are relatively well-known, in contrast with the organic content. So in order to detect the phenomena responsible for changes in organic matter and their effects during aging, the concentrations of the main organic compounds previously characterized, the number of microorganisms, and the release of carbon dioxide were followed kinetically in model laboratory conditions. The results showed that the aging process led to the natural biodegradation of the organic matter available in bottom ash, composed essentially of carboxylic acids and n-alkanes (steroids and PAH`s to a lesser extent), and consequently that it would improve the bottom ash quality. Furthermore these results were confirmed by the study of aging conducted in conditions used in the industrial scale.

Dugenest, S.; Casabianca, H.; Grenier-Loustalot, M.F. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Vernaison (France). Service central d`Analyse; Combrisson, J. [Univ. Claude Bernard-Lyon I, Villeurbanne (France). Lab. d`Ecologie Microbienne du Sol

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Anaerobic digestion of pressed off leachate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly polluted liquid ('press water') was obtained from the pressing facility for the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in a composting plant. Methane productivity of the squeezed-off leachate was investigated in batch assays. To assess the technical feasibility of 'press water' as a substrate for anaerobic digestion, a laboratory-scale glass column reactor was operated semi-continuously at 37 {sup o}C. A high methane productivity of 270 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} COD{sub added} or 490 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} VS{sub added} was achieved in the batch experiment. The semi-continuously run laboratory-scale reactor was initially operated at an organic loading rate of 10.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The loading was increased to finally 27.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, corresponding to a reduction of the hydraulic retention time from initially 20 to finally 7.7 days. During the digestion, a stable elimination of organic material (measured as COD elimination) of approximately 60% was achieved. Linearly with the increment of the OLR, the volumetric methane production of the reactor increased from 2.6 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1} to 7.1 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The results indicated that 'press water' from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was a suitable substrate for anaerobic digestion which gave a high biogas yield even at very high loading rates.

Nayono, Satoto E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Yogyakarta State University, Campus UNY Karangmalang Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia); Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Winter, Josef, E-mail: josef.winter@iba.uka.d [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gallert, Claudia [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Application of the risk-based strategy to the Hanford tank waste organic-nitrate safety issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results from application of the Risk-Based Decision Management Approach for Justifying Characterization of Hanford Tank Waste to the organic-nitrate safety issue in Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). Existing chemical and physical models were used, taking advantage of the most current (mid-1997) sampling and analysis data. The purpose of this study is to make specific recommendations for planning characterization to help ensure the safety of each SST as it relates to the organic-nitrate safety issue. An additional objective is to demonstrate the viability of the Risk-Based Strategy for addressing Hanford tank waste safety issues.

Hunter, V.L.; Colson, S.D.; Ferryman, T.; Gephart, R.E.; Heasler, P.; Scheele, R.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Low temperature hydrothermal processing of organic contaminants in Hanford tank waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Batch and continuous flow reactor tests at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have shown that organics similar to those present in the single-shell and double-shell underground storage tanks at Hanford can be decomposed in the liquid phase at relatively mild temperatures of 150[degree]C to 350[degree]C in an aqueous process known as hydrothermal processing (HTP). The organics will react with the abundant oxidants such s nitrite already present in the Hanford tank waste to form hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, and ammonia. No air or oxygen needs to be added to the system. Ferrocyanides and free cyanide will hydrolyze at similar temperatures to produce formate and ammonia and may also react with nitrates or other oxides. During testing, the organic carbon was transformed first to oxalate at[approximately]310[degree]C and completely oxidized to carbonate at [approximately]350[degree]C accompanied by hydroxide consumption. Solids were formed at higher temperatures, causing a small-diameter outlet tube to plug. The propensity for plugging was reduced by diluting the feed with concentrated hydroxide.

Jones, E.O.; Pederson, L.R.; Freeman, H.D.; Schmidt, A.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Babad, H. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Low temperature hydrothermal processing of organic contaminants in Hanford tank waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Batch and continuous flow reactor tests at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have shown that organics similar to those present in the single-shell and double-shell underground storage tanks at Hanford can be decomposed in the liquid phase at relatively mild temperatures of 150{degree}C to 350{degree}C in an aqueous process known as hydrothermal processing (HTP). The organics will react with the abundant oxidants such s nitrite already present in the Hanford tank waste to form hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, and ammonia. No air or oxygen needs to be added to the system. Ferrocyanides and free cyanide will hydrolyze at similar temperatures to produce formate and ammonia and may also react with nitrates or other oxides. During testing, the organic carbon was transformed first to oxalate at{approximately}310{degree}C and completely oxidized to carbonate at {approximately}350{degree}C accompanied by hydroxide consumption. Solids were formed at higher temperatures, causing a small-diameter outlet tube to plug. The propensity for plugging was reduced by diluting the feed with concentrated hydroxide.

Jones, E.O.; Pederson, L.R.; Freeman, H.D.; Schmidt, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Babad, H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Business Plan : Residential Solid Waste Collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Residential solid waste means all the solid wastes produced in household level, which includes bio-waste, metal, mixed wastes, organic and inorganic waste. The inability of (more)

Mazengo, Dorice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Growth and elemental composition of sorghum sudangrass grown on flyash/organic waste-amended soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential benefitsof using fly ash/organic waste mixtures amended to soils for growth andcomposition of mineral elements by `sorgrass` (Sorghum vulgaris var.sudanense Hitchc.) a shorghum-sudangrass hybrid plant. This experimentwas conducted using a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to either sewage sludge,poultry manure, or dairy manure at six application rates. Our threeorganic wastes when mixed with fly ash at varied rates of applicationresulted in elevated concentrations of NO{sub 3}, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, B,Cu and Zn in both soil and plants. The data of this study indicated thatthe availability of elements to plants varied according to the organicsource mixed with fly ash and the rate of application. The elements Band Zn were observed to be significantly greater in plant tissuesexposed to fly ash/poultry manure or fly ash/dairy manure mixtures.Soils amended with fly ash/sewage sludge or poultry manure generallyimproved plant growth and enhanced yield when applied at rates of 25tons/acre, and decreased thereafter. However, soils amended with flyash/dairy manure improved plant growth and enhanced yield when appliedat rates upto 50 tons/acre and decreased thereafter. The decreases inyield beyond these application rates were probably due to theaccumulation of high levels of B and Zn which are phytotoxic and/orelevated levels of inorganic dissolved salts. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

Sajwan, K.S. [Savannah State College, GA (United States); Ornes, W.H.; Youngblood, T.V. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

Testoni, A. L.

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

65

Plant growth response in experimental soilless mixes prepared from coal combustion products and organic waste materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of organic materials such as animal manures, yard trimmings, and biosolids are produced each year. Beneficial use options for them are often limited, and composting has been proposed as a way to better manage these organic materials. Similarly, burning of coal created 125 million tons of coal combustion products (CCP) in the United States in 2006. An estimated 53 million tons of CCP were reused, whereas the remainder was deposited in landfills. By combining CCP and composted organic materials (COM), we were able to create soilless plant growth mixes with physicochemical conditions that can support excellent plant growth. An additional benefit is the conservation of natural raw materials, such as peat, which is generally used for making soilless mixes. Experimental mixes were formulated by combining CCP and COM at ratios ranging from 2:8 to 8:2 (vol/vol), respectively. Water content at saturation for the created mixes was 63% to 72%, whereas for the commercial control, it was 77%. pH values for the best performing mixes ranged between 5.9 and 6.8. Electrical conductivity and concentrations of required plant nutrient were also within plant growth recommendations for container media. Significantly (P < 0.0001) higher plant biomass growth (7%-130%) was observed in the experimental mixes compared with a commercial mix. No additional fertilizers were provided during the experiment, and reduced fertilization costs can thus accrue as an added benefit to the grower. In summary, combining CCP and COM, derived from source materials often viewed as wastes, can create highly productive plant growth mixes.

Bardhan, S.; Watson, M.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Comparison of mass balance, energy consumption and cost of composting facilities for different types of organic waste  

SciTech Connect

Mass balance, energy consumption and cost are basic pieces of information necessary for selecting a waste management technology. In this study, composting facilities that treat different types of organic waste were studied by questionnaire survey and via a chemical analysis of material collected at the facilities. The mass balance was calculated on a dry weight basis because the moisture content of organic waste was very high. Even though the ratio of bulking material to total input varied in the range 0-65% on a dry basis, the carbon and ash content, carbon/nitrogen ratio, heavy metal content and inorganic nutrients in the compost were clearly influenced by the different characteristics of the input waste. The use of bulking material was not correlated with ash or elemental content in the compost. The operating costs were categorised into two groups. There was some economy of scale for wages and maintenance cost, but the costs for electricity and fuel were proportional to the amount of waste. Differences in operating costs can be explained by differences in the process characteristics.

Zhang Huijun [Lab of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Matsuto, Toshihiko, E-mail: matsuto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Lab of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis was used to assess stability and composition of organic matter in three diverse municipal waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with C mineralization during 90-day incubation, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis reflected the differences between the organic wastes before and after the incubation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated energy density showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional and thermal methods provide complimentary means of characterizing organic wastes. - Abstract: The use of organic municipal wastes as soil amendments is an increasing practice that can divert significant amounts of waste from landfill, and provides a potential source of nutrients and organic matter to ameliorate degraded soils. Due to the high heterogeneity of organic municipal waste streams, it is difficult to rapidly and cost-effectively establish their suitability as soil amendments using a single method. Thermal analysis has been proposed as an evolving technique to assess the stability and composition of the organic matter present in these wastes. In this study, three different organic municipal waste streams (i.e., a municipal waste compost (MC), a composted sewage sludge (CS) and a thermally dried sewage sludge (TS)) were characterized using conventional and thermal methods. The conventional methods used to test organic matter stability included laboratory incubation with measurement of respired C, and spectroscopic methods to characterize chemical composition. Carbon mineralization was measured during a 90-day incubation, and samples before and after incubation were analyzed by chemical (elemental analysis) and spectroscopic (infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance) methods. Results were compared with those obtained by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Total amounts of CO{sub 2} respired indicated that the organic matter in the TS was the least stable, while that in the CS was the most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

Fernandez, Jose M., E-mail: joseman@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States); Plaza, Cesar; Polo, Alfredo [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Plante, Alain F. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Pilot-scale anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste activated sludge in China: Effect of organic loading rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) was examined on a pilot-scale reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System performance and stability under OLR of 1.2, 2.4, 3.6, 4.8, 6.0 and 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} were analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and HRT of 15d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the increasing OLRs, pH values, VS removal rate and methane concentration decreased and VFA increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The changing of biogas production rate can be a practical approach to monitor and control anaerobic digestion system. - Abstract: The effects of organic loading rate on the performance and stability of anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated on a pilot-scale reactor. The results showed that stable operation was achieved with organic loading rates (OLR) of 1.2-8.0 kg volatile solid (VS) (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}, with VS reduction rates of 61.7-69.9%, and volumetric biogas production of 0.89-5.28 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and hydraulic retention time of 15 days. With increasing OLRs, the anaerobic reactor showed a decrease in VS removal rate, average pH value and methane concentration, and a increase of volatile fatty acid concentration. By monitoring the biogas production rate (BPR), the anaerobic digestion system has a higher acidification risk under an OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. This result remarks the possibility of relating bioreactor performance with BPR in order to better understand and monitor anaerobic digestion process.

Liu Xiao, E-mail: liuxiao07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Wei; Shi Yunchun; Zheng Lei [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gao Xingbao [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Qiao Wei [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhou Yingjun [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nisikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Wool-waste as organic nutrient source for container-grown plants  

SciTech Connect

A container experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that uncomposted wool wastes could be used as nutrient source and growth medium constituent for container-grown plants. The treatments were: (1) rate of wool-waste application (0 or unamended control, 20, 40, 80, and 120 g of wool per 8-in. pot), (2) growth medium constituents [(2.1) wool plus perlite, (2.2) wool plus peat, and (2.3) wool plus peat plus perlite], and (3) plant species (basil and Swiss chard). A single addition of 20, 40, 80, or 120 g of wool-waste to Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L.) and basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) in pots with growth medium provided four harvests of Swiss chard and five harvests of basil. Total basil yield from the five harvests was 1.6-5 times greater than the total yield from the unamended control, while total Swiss chard yield from the four harvests was 2-5 times greater relative to the respective unamended control. The addition of wool-waste to the growth medium increased Swiss chard and basil tissue N, and NO{sub 3}-N and NH{sub 4}-N in growth medium relative to the unamended control. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis of wool fibers sampled at the end of the experiments indicated various levels of decomposition, with some fibers retaining their original surface structure. Furthermore, most of the wool fibers' surfaces contained significant concentrations of S and much less N, P, or K. SEM/EDX revealed that some plant roots grow directly on wool-waste fibers suggesting either (1) root directional growth towards sites with greater nutrient concentration and/or (2) a possible role for roots or root exudates in wool decomposition. Results from this study suggest that uncomposted wool wastes can be used as soil amendment, growth medium constituent, and nutrient source for container-grown plants.

Zheljazkov, Valtcho D. [Mississippi State University, North Mississippi Research and Extension Center, Verona, MS 38879 (United States)], E-mail: vj40@pss.msstate.edu; Stratton, Glenn W. [Department of Plant and Animal Sciences and Department of Environmental Sciences, Nova Scotia Agricultural College, Truro, NS, B2N 5E3 (Canada); Pincock, James [Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4J3 (Canada); Butler, Stephanie [Department of Plant and Animal Sciences and Department of Environmental Sciences, Nova Scotia Agricultural College, Truro, NS, B2N 5E3 (Canada); Jeliazkova, Ekaterina A. [Mississippi State University, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Nedkov, Nedko K. [Research Institute for Roses and Aromatic Crops, 49 Osvobojdenie Blv., Kazanluk (Bulgaria); Gerard, Patrick D. [Department of Applied Economics and Statistics, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Design of organic Rankine cycles for conversion of waste heat in a polygeneration plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic Rankine cycles provide an alternative to traditional steam Rankine cycles for the conversion of low grade heat sources, where steam cycles are known to be less efficient and more expensive. This work examines organic ...

DiGenova, Kevin (Kevin J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste with FOG waste from a sewage treatment plant: Recovering a wasted methane potential and enhancing the biogas yield  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion is applied widely to treat the source collected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (SC-OFMSW). Lipid-rich wastes are a valuable substrate for anaerobic digestion due to their high theoretical methane potential. Nevertheless, although fat, oil and grease waste from sewage treatment plants (STP-FOGW) are commonly disposed of in landfill, European legislation is aimed at encouraging more effective forms of treatment. Co-digestion of the above wastes may enhance valorisation of STP-FOGW and lead to a higher biogas yield throughout the anaerobic digestion process. In the present study, STP-FOGW was evaluated as a co-substrate in wet anaerobic digestion of SC-OFMSW under mesophilic conditions (37 {sup o}C). Batch experiments carried out at different co-digestion ratios showed an improvement in methane production related to STP-FOGW addition. A 1:7 (VS/VS) STP-FOGW:SC-OFMSW feed ratio was selected for use in performing further lab-scale studies in a 5 L continuous reactor. Biogas yield increased from 0.38 {+-} 0.02 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} to 0.55 {+-} 0.05 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} as a result of adding STP-FOGW to reactor feed. Both VS reduction values and biogas methane content were maintained and inhibition produced by long chain fatty acid (LCFA) accumulation was not observed. Recovery of a currently wasted methane potential from STP-FOGW was achieved in a co-digestion process with SC-OFMSW.

Martin-Gonzalez, L., E-mail: lucia.martin@uab.ca [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Colturato, L.F. [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Font, X.; Vicent, T. [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambiental (ICTA) Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Optimal Use of Organic Waste in Future Energy Systems the Danish case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, gasification, fermentation (biogas production) and improved incineration. It is argued that it is important for CHP production. On the other hand least greenhouse gases are emitted if biogas is produced from waste. The approximate 70 Danish biogas plants contribute with a mere 1% of the electricity production

73

Utilization of geopressured resources in the oxidation of organic waste in supercritical water. Phase I, Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured resources are geothermal reservoirs containing dissolved methane in hot brine at pressures well in excess of their in situ hydrostatic pressure. In the US, geopressured resources are primarily located in the Gulf (of Mexico) Coast. The wells in this area are characterized by typical bottomhole temperatures of 120-180 C (250-360 F) (Negus-de Wys, 1991a) and bottomhole pressures of 675-1275 bar (9,800-18,500 psia) (Negus-de Wys, 1991b). Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the destruction of hazardous organic waste in which oxidation is carried out in a water medium above the critical point of pure water (374 C/705 F, 221 bar/3208 psia) (Tester et al., 1992). Geopressured resources are particularly suitable as an input stream to a SCWO waste treatment process due to the near critical conditions of their hot brine. By using a Rankine-type power cycle, electric power can be generated by capturing the available thermal and hydraulic energy from the geothermal resource and the chemical energy of the dissolved methane released by the oxidation process. In addition to oxidizing the methane to convert the chemical energy to thermal energy, auxiliary fuel in the form of an organic waste can be co-oxidized to increase the energy output to commercially sustainable levels. Coupling the treatment of geopressured brine with an organic waste in a SCWO process synergistically improves power production while providing a means for treating hazardous waste. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of using geopressured resources to simultaneously detoxify hazardous waste and generate electric power. Our ultimate aim is to develop conceptual process designs for above-ground and fully or modified in situ approaches to co-processing organic waste with geopressured brine in supercritical water. As a preparatory step for investigating in situ approaches, a realistic above-ground conceptual design was developed in this study. In that concept, the waste, brine and oxidant (air or oxygen) are introduced into the SCWO reactor at the system pressure of 234 bar (3400 psia). The heat of oxidation raises the temperature of the system to about 600 C (1100 F). Due to the low solubility of inorganic salts in supercritical water (about 200 ppm or less) (Armellini and Tester, 1990, 1991a, 1991b), solid salt forms and falls to the lower section of the reactor, where it is cooled and quenched with water, creating a concentrated (organic-free) brine that would be mixed with brackish water and reinjected back to the geopressured well. Power is generated by the expansion of the products of the SCWO process through a series of multi-stage turboexpanden. A processing capacity of 100,000 gallons per day (gpd) was initially taken as the design basis, following some investigations carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Propp et al., 1990). The process was modeled using the ASPEN PLUS{trademark} process flowsheet simulator and material and energy balances were determined. Both the cases of using air and oxygen as oxidant were investigated. Toluene was chosen as the model compound to represent the organic waste. Turbine design calculations based on the volumetric flowrates obtained for a 100,000 gpd capacity resulted in unrealistically high rotor rotational speeds and small wheel pitch diameters to achieve optimum efficiencies. Higher SCWO effluent flowrates would lower rotor rotational speeds and increase wheel pitch diameters to more practical levels. Thus, a 42-fold larger design capacity of 100,000 barrels per day (bpd) was adopted as the basis for an above-ground base case. The results for the material and energy balances for a processing capacity of 100,000 bpd using air and oxygen as oxidant scale up linearly from the results for the 100,000 gpd case. The best case flowsheet corresponding to a 100,000 bpi case using oxygen as oxidant is given in Figure 1. Our conceptual design study suggests that simultaneous detoxification of hazardous waste and production of power is possible by co-pr

Diaz, Alexander F.; Herzog, Howard J.; Tester, Jefferson W.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Organic Rankine Cycle Systems for Waste Heat Recovery in Refineries and Chemical Process Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a low temperature Rankine cycle system using R-113 working fluid for recovery and conversion of process waste heat is described for typical applications in oil refineries and chemical plants. The system is designed to produce electric power from waste heat available in a temperature range from 180oF to 400oF. The design of a new ORC turbo generator uniquely adapted to applications of this type is presented. The unit has been designed for power outputs from 3/4 to 2 1/2 MW and turbine inlet temperatures from 170 to 260oF. The machine design has eliminated the need for shaft seals, shaft couplings and the usual lube oil console normally required for turbine-generator units. Results of prototype tests of a 1 MW unit are presented. A product package and recommended division of responsibilities between purchaser, A&E company and supplier is presented for installations in refineries and process plants. The product package covers the electrical power range from 3/4 to 5 MW and waste heat streams from 20 to 130 million BTU/hr.

Meacher, J. S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Organic pollutants in Swiss compost and digestate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting (aerobic treatment of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing significance (more)

Brndli, Rahel Christine

76

Organic pollutants in Swiss compost and digestate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting (aerobic treatment of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing significance (more)

Brndli, Rahel Christine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns

Columbia University

78

High-temperature photochemical destruction of toxic organic wastes using concentrated solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Application of concentrated solar energy has been proposed to be a viable waste disposal option. Specifically, this concept of solar induced high-temperature photochemistry is based on the synergistic contribution of concentrated infrared (IR) radiation, which acts as an intense heating source, and near ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) radiation, which can induce destructive photochemical processes. Some significant advances have been made in the theoretical framework of high-temperature photochemical processes (Section 2) and development of experimental techniques for their study (Section 3). Basic thermal/photolytic studies have addressed the effect of temperature on the photochemical destruction of pure compounds (Section 4). Detailed studies of the destruction of reaction by-products have been conducted on selected waste molecules (Section 5). Some very limited results are available on the destruction of mixtures (Section 6). Fundamental spectroscopic studies have been recently initiated (Section 7). The results to date have been used to conduct some relatively simple scale-up studies of the solar detoxification process. More recent work has focused on destruction of compounds that do not directly absorb solar radiation. Research efforts have focused on homogeneous as well as heterogeneous methods of initiating destructive reaction pathways (Section 9). Although many conclusions at this point must be considered tentative due to lack of basic research, a clearer picture of the overall process is emerging (Section 10). However, much research remains to be performed and most follow several veins, including photochemical, spectroscopic, combustion kinetic, and engineering scale-up (Section 11).

Dellinger, B.; Graham, J.L.; Berman, J.M.; Taylor, P.H. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Converting Simulated Sodium-bearing Waste into a Single Solid Waste Form by Evaporation: Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale Test Results on Recycling Evaporator Overheads  

SciTech Connect

Conversion of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radioactive sodium-bearing waste into a single solid waste form by evaporation was demonstrated in both flask-scale and pilot-scale agitated thin film evaporator tests. A sodium-bearing waste simulant was adjusted to represent an evaporator feed in which the acid from the distillate is concentrated, neutralized, and recycled back through the evaporator. The advantage to this flowsheet is that a single remote-handled transuranic waste form is produced in the evaporator bottoms without the generation of any low-level mixed secondary waste. However, use of a recycle flowsheet in sodium-bearing waste evaporation results in a 50% increase in remote-handled transuranic volume in comparison to a non-recycle flowsheet.

Griffith, D.; D. L. Griffith; R. J. Kirkham; L. G. Olson; S. J. Losinski

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Bioenergy development from agricultural waste on Northern ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Summary This project will convert agricultural waste, including food waste, rice straw, and other organic farm waste to bioethanol through bacterial ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

EA-0952: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy 2: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana EA-0952: The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for incinerating combustible, non-recyclable office wastes from Louisiana State University (LSU) administrative/academic areas and combustible, non-renderable biological and potentially infectious wastes from the School of Veterinary Medicine and Student Health Center, both part of the LSU campus complex in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 24, 1994 EA-0952: Finding of No Significant Impact The Louisiana State University Waste-to Energy Incinerator

83

Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment were studied to enhance anaerobic digestion of organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The whole waste pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C or 145 Degree-Sign C had the highest biogas production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas production of the whole waste decreased at 175 Degree-Sign C due to formation of refractory compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pretreatment to 145 Degree-Sign C and 175 Degree-Sign C were the best when considering only the free liquid fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment had a lag phase and the biogas production was not higher than MW pretreated samples. - Abstract: In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175 Degree-Sign C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C and 145 Degree-Sign C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175 Degree-Sign C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145 Degree-Sign C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8 days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated.

Shahriari, Haleh, E-mail: haleh.shahriari@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Warith, Mostafa [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Hamoda, Mohamed [Department of Environmental Technology and Management, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Kennedy, Kevin J. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48 RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FBSR TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Hammond, C; William Pepper, W

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

86

SOME RESULTS OF STUDIES ON THE UPTAKE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS BY MARINE AND ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ORGANISMS USING CONTINUOUS CULTURE TECHNIQUES. Technical Report XXI  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in studies on the uptake of radioactive waste products by phytoplackton organisms in a marine environment. Laboratory studies were made of the growth requirements of a number of phytoplankton algae. Data are included on the uptake of Ru/sup 103/ by a green algae and oysters and the uptake of Zn/sup 65/ by selected marine algae. The advantages of the use of continuous culturing techniques for the study of the uptake of radioactive materials by phytoplankton organisms are discussed. (C.H.)

Taylor, W.R.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Final Report: Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research and development (R&D) project exemplifies a shared public private commitment to advance the development of energy efficient industrial technologies that will reduce the U.S. dependence upon foreign oil, provide energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for the conversion of waste heat from gas turbine exhaust to electricity. In conventional ORCs, the heat from the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to a hydrocarbon based working fluid by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. The Direct Evaporator accomplishes preheating, evaporation and superheating of the working fluid by a heat exchanger placed within the exhaust gas stream. Direct Evaporation is simpler and up to 15% less expensive than conventional ORCs, since the secondary oil loop and associated equipment can be eliminated. However, in the past, Direct Evaporation has been avoided due to technical challenges imposed by decomposition and flammability of the working fluid. The purpose of this project was to retire key risks and overcome the technical barriers to implementing an ORC with Direct Evaporation. R&D was conducted through a partnership between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and General Electric (GE) Global Research Center (GRC). The project consisted of four research tasks: (1) Detailed Design & Modeling of the ORC Direct Evaporator, (2) Design and Construction of Partial Prototype Direct Evaporator Test Facility, (3) Working Fluid Decomposition Chemical Analyses, and (4) Prototype Evaluation. Issues pertinent to the selection of an ORC working fluid, along with thermodynamic and design considerations of the direct evaporator, were identified. The FMEA (Failure modes and effects analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability analysis) safety studies performed to mitigate risks are described, followed by a discussion of the flammability analysis of the direct evaporator. A testbed was constructed and the prototype demonstrated at the GE GRC Niskayuna facility.

Donna Post Guillen; Jalal Zia

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Print Organization Print 2012-12 org chart A complete ALS organization chart (June 2013) is available in PDF. Appointed and elected members of advisory panels provide guidance to Berkeley Lab and ALS management in developing the ALS scientific and user programs. ALS Staff Photo staff photo thumb Click on the image to see a recent photo of ALS staff in front of the dome. The photo was taken on May 14, 2013. ALS Management and Advisory Team Steve Kevan, Deputy Division Director, Science Michael J. Banda, Deputy Division Director, Operations Robert W. Schoenlein, Senior Staff Scientist, Next Generation Light Source Initiative Janos Kirz, Scientific Advisor Paul Adams, Division Deputy for Biosciences ALS Scientific, Technical, and User Support Groups Accelerator Physics

89

Examining solid waste management issues in the City of Bryan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic aspects of household recycling behavior and attitudes in City of Bryan are examined to improve solid waste management policies in the city. Using survey data collected by mail and personal interviews, residents? attitudes towards solid waste management are analyzed, in general, and specifically, the factors influencing recycling behavior examined using logistic regression. In addition, three alternative policies are presented to respondents. First, support for an additional drop-off recycling center (Policy I) is examined. Second, WTP for two different recycling programs, curbside recycling service (Policy II), and curbside recycling with a drop-off recycling center (Policy III), as a function of socio-economic factors thought to influence WTP are computed using contingent valuation method, an indirect valuation tool. Finally, preference for a particular policy among the three alternatives presented to the residents of Bryan is explored. Because of the different data collection modes and assumptions on the bid prices two logit models are estimated to examine recycling behavior, and Policy I and two multinomial logit models for the most preferred policy, whereas four logit models are estimated for Policy II and III. The estimated models are similar both within the Policies and between the Policies in terms of the affects of variables, significance of coefficients, and consistency with previous studies indicating a potential set of factors that can be used to explain WTP for recycling services. Bryan residents that are female, white, employed, have higher incomes, have children, own a house, and are self-perceived environmentalists tend to recycle more. Similarly, males, nonwhites, older respondents, students, non-environmentalists and non-recyclers are more likely to support an additional drop-off center. WTP for Policy II is positively influenced by males, whites, respondents who are employed, low-income respondents, environmentalists, non-recyclers, and those who support Policy I. In comparison, WTP for Policy III is positively influenced by females, whites, respondents who are employed, younger respondents, environmentalists, non-recyclers, and those who support Policy I. In the case of both Policies I and II, the bid price negatively influences WTP as expected. While the WTP for Policy II is slightly higher than the estimated cost of a curbside recycling service ($2.50), the WTP for Policy III is lower than the estimated cost. No consistent pattern emerges across most of the coefficients and the four possible alternatives, three proposed policies and the current situation. However, probabilities computed using the multinomial logit results is the highest for Policy II, followed by either Policy III or no change to the existing solid waste management policy.

Arekere, Dhananjaya Marigowda

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Investigating potential efficiency improvement for light-duty transportation applications through simulation of an organic Rankine cycle for waste-heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to heat loss and combustion irreversibility. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, the potential benefits of such a strategy for light-duty applications are unknown due to transient operation, low-load operation at typical driving conditions, and the added mass of the system. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. Results from steady-state and drive-cycle simulations are presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and competition between waste-heat recovery systems, turbochargers, aftertreatment devices, and other systems for the limited thermal resources.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Interface control document between PUREX Plant Transition and Solid Waste Disposal Division  

SciTech Connect

The interfacing responsibilities regarding solid waste management are described for the Solid Waste Disposal Division and the PUREX Transition Organization.

Carlson, A.B.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From organic waste to biodiesel: Black soldier fly, Hermetiaorganic waste, to create biodiesel (Li et al. 2011). These

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission waste feed delivery plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a plan presenting the objectives, organization, and management and technical approaches for the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) Program. This WFD Plan focuses on the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project`s Waste Retrieval and Disposal Mission.

Potter, R.D.

1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

97

Effects of Mine Waste Contamination on Fish and Wildlife Habitat at Multiple Levels of Biological Organization in the Methow River, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-year multidisciplinary study was conducted on the relationship between mine waste contamination and the effects on aquatic and terrestrial habitats in the Methow River below abandoned mines near Twisp in Okanogan County, Washington (U.S.A.). Ore deposits in the area were mined for gold, silver, copper and zinc until the early 1950's. An above-and-below-mine approach was used to study potentially impacted sites. Although the dissolved metal content of water in the Methow River was below the limits of detection, eleven chemicals of potential environmental concern were identified in the tailings, mine effluents, groundwater, streamwater and sediments (Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se and Zn). The potential for ecosystem level impacts was reflected in the risk of contamination in the mine waste to communities and populations that are valued for their functional properties related to energy storage and nutrient cycling. Dissolved and sediment metal contamination changed the benthic insect community structure in a tributary of the Methow River below Alder Mine, and at the population level, caddisfly larval development in the Methow River was delayed. Arsenic accumulation in bear hair and Cd in fish liver suggest top predators are effected. In situ exposure of juvenile triploid trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to conditions at the downstream site resulted in reduced growth and increased mortality among exposed individuals. Histopathological studies of their tissues revealed extensive glycogen inclusions suggesting food is being converted into glycogen and stored in the liver but the glycogen is not being converted back normally into glucose for distribution to other tissues in the body. Subcellular observations revealed mitochondrial changes including a decrease in the number and increase in the size of electron-dense metrical granules, the presence of glycogen bodies in the cytoplasm, and glycogen nuclei in exposed trout hepatocytes, which are signs that Type IV Glycogen Storage disease is occurring. GSD IV is caused by either a deficiency or inactivation of the glycogen branching enzyme that results in the synthesis of an abnormal glycogen molecule that is insoluble and has decreased branch points and increased chain length. These results show that the effects of mine waste contaminants can be expressed at all levels of organization from molecular to ecosystem-level responses.

Peplow, Dan; Edmonds, Robert.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

Heterogeneous waste processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination of treatment methods are provided for treatment of heterogeneous waste including: (1) treatment for any organic compounds present; (2) removal of metals from the waste; and, (3) bulk volume reduction, with at least two of the three treatment methods employed and all three treatment methods emplyed where suitable.

Vanderberg, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM); Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Brainard, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Trudi M. (Los Alamos, NM); Hanners, John L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Certification plan transuranic waste: Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWBF; and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

103

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 {sup o}C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 {sup o}C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO{sub 2} at a rate lower than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

Trzcinski, Antoine P., E-mail: a.trzcinski05@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stuckey, David C., E-mail: d.stuckey@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Certification Plan, Radioactive Mixed Waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). RMW is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or transuranic (TRU) waste that is co-contaminated with dangerous waste as defined in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations, 173-303-040 (18). This waste is to be transferred to the Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington. This plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF (Section 4); and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

ZERO WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with (more)

Upadhyaya, Luv

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

NEW TRENDS IN FLUE GAS CLEANING TECHNOLOGIES FOR EUROPEAN AND ASIAN WASTE INCINERATION FACILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic Compound TCLP EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure TRU Transuranic Waste VOC Volatile

Columbia University

108

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

110

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300{degrees}C to 800{degrees}C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100{degrees}C to 1400{degrees}C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Tank waste chemistry: A new understanding of waste aging  

SciTech Connect

There is concern about the risk of uncontrolled exothermic reaction(s) in Hanford Site waste tanks containing NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 2} based salts and/or metal hydroxide sludges in combination with organics or ferrocyanides. However, gradual oxidation of the waste in the tanks to less reactive species appears to have reduced the risk. In addition, wastes sampled to date contain sufficiently large quantities of water so that propagation reactions are highly unlikely. This paper investigates various aspects of the aging of Hanford tank wastes.

Babad, H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Camaioni, D.M.; Lilga, M.A.; Samuels, W.D.; Strachan, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

113

Waste Disposition Update by Christine Gelles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Disposition Update Waste Disposition Update Christine Gelles Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management (EM-30) EM SSAB Chairs Meeting Washington, DC 2 October 2012 www.em.doe.gov 2 o Waste Stream Highlights o DOE Transportation Update o Greater Than Class C (GTCC) Low Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement o Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future o Nuclear Regulatory Commission's LLW Regulatory Initiatives Discussion Topics www.em.doe.gov 3 Waste Stream Highlights www.em.doe.gov 4 o Within current budget outlook, it is especially critical that EM ensures safe, reliable and cost effective disposition paths exist. o The program's refocused organization and the detailed

114

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Russell, Lynn

115

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

Firtel, Richard A.

116

Waste Management Process Improvement Project  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel Hanford-led Environmental Restoration Contractor team's Waste Management Process Improvement Project is working diligently with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office to improve the waste management process to meet DOE's need for an efficient, cost-effective program for the management of dangerous, low-level and mixed-low-level waste. Additionally the program must meet all applicable regulatory requirements. The need for improvement was highlighted when a change in the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project's waste management practices resulted in a larger amount of waste being generated than the waste management organization had been set up to handle.

Atwood, J.; Borden, G.; Rangel, G. R.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

NONE

1998-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

118

Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System. Waste management 1993 symposium papers and viewgraphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has the most diverse and largest amount of highly radioactive waste of any site in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored in large underground tanks since 1944. A Tank Waste Remediation System Program has been established within the DOE to safely manage and immobilize these wastes in anticipation of permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Waste Management 1993 Symposium Papers and Viewgraphs covered the following topics: Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Overview; Tank Waste Retrieval Issues and Options for their Resolution; Tank Waste Pretreatment - Issues, Alternatives and Strategies for Resolution; Low-Level Waste Disposal - Grout Issue and Alternative Waste Form Technology; A Strategy for Resolving High-Priority Hanford Site Radioactive Waste Storage Tank Safety Issues; Tank Waste Chemistry - A New Understanding of Waste Aging; Recent Results from Characterization of Ferrocyanide Wastes at the Hanford Site; Resolving the Safety Issue for Radioactive Waste Tanks with High Organic Content; Technology to Support Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Objectives.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Chelan County Public Works Department would like to thank the following organizations and individuals for their assistance in the development of this plan: ? Chelan Countys Solid Waste Council members, past and present, and the municipalities they represent. ? Chelan Countys Solid Waste Advisory Committee members, past and present, and the agencies and businesses they represented. ? the ChelanDouglas Health District staff. ? Washington Department of Ecology staff. Chelan County residents and businesses also contributed to this document through comments provided during public meetings and through various other channels. The Board of County Commissioners and the Public Works Department gratefully acknowledge this input by the

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Waste= Capital.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The evolution of manufacturing practices over the last century has led to the creation of excess waste during the production process, depleting resources and overwhelming (more)

Stidham, Steve P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.wte.org/ Cost: Free The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. Overview The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. The website includes information on waste-to-energy basics

124

Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau Depa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the upcoming federal fiscal year: * SR-RL-BCLDP.001 : A Remote Handled transuranic debris waste stream This remote-handled transuranic debris waste stream consists of organic...

125

Metal Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Issues in Nuclear Waste Management in the 21st Century. Presentation Title, Metal Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy Applications.

126

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

127

WIMS - Waste Information Management System  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Welcome To WIMS Welcome To WIMS Waste Information Management System WIMS new web address: http://www.emwims.org WIMS is developed to provide DOE Headquarters and site waste managers with the tools necessary to easily visualize, understand, and manage the vast volumes, categories, and problems of forecasted waste streams. WIMS meets this need by providing a user-friendly online system to gather, organize, and present waste forecast data from DOE sites. This system provides a method for identification of waste forecast volumes, material classes, disposition pathways, and potential choke points and barriers to final disposition. Disclaimer: Disposition facility information presented is for planning purposes only and does not represent DOE's decisions or commitments. Any selection of disposition facility will be made after technical, economic, and policy considerations.

128

Solid Waste Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Solid Waste Management Program Plan (SWMPP) is to provide a summary level comprehensive approach for the storage, treatment, and disposal of current and future solid waste received at the Hanford Site (from onsite and offsite generators) in a manner compliant with current and evolving regulations and orders (federal, state, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford)). The Plan also presents activities required for disposal of selected wastes currently in retrievable storage. The SWMPP provides a central focus for the description and control of cost, scope, and schedule of Hanford Site solid waste activities, and provides a vehicle for ready communication of the scope of those activities to onsite and offsite organizations. This Plan represents the most complete description available of Hanford Site Solid Waste Management (SWM) activities and the interfaces between those activities. It will be updated annually to reflect changes in plans due to evolving regulatory requirements and/or the SWM mission. 8 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Duncan, D.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Biogas from waste in Belgium  

SciTech Connect

This article describes plans for a dry anaerobic composting plant in Brecht, Belgium. The new plant will utilize dry conditions and thermophilic temperatures to produce an average of 6 to 8 volumes of biogas per volume of reactor per day could be produced from vegetable, fruit, garden and paper waste, and a soil amendment from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste according to researchers.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Revaluing waste in New York City : planning for small-scale compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One-third of the municipal solid waste stream is organic material that, when processed in landfills, produces methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. Composting is a proven strategy for organic waste management, which ...

Neilson, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL #12;#12;PNNL-SA-69994 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax- Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

132

A brief analysis and description of transuranic wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at INEL  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a brief summary of the wastes and waste types disposed of in the transuranic contaminated portions of the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from 1954 through 1970. Wastes included in this summary are organics, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, and atypical wastes. In addition to summarizing amounts of wastes disposed and describing the wastes, the document also provides information on disposal pit and trench dimensions and contaminated soil volumes. The report also points out discrepancies that exist in available documentation regarding waste and soil volumes and make recommendations for future efforts at waste characterization. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Knight, J.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton capacity, it...

134

Swedish nuclear waste efforts  

SciTech Connect

After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

Rydberg, J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 1. Project summaries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Phase II research project on emission of potentially toxic organic compounds (PTOCs) from wastewater treatment plants were fivefold: (1) assessment of the importance of gaseous emissions from municipal wastewater collection systems; (2) resolution of the discrepancy between the measured and estimated emissions (Phase I), from the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant (JWPCP) operated by the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (CSDLAC); (3) determination of airborne concentrations of PTOCS immediately downwind of an activated sludge aeration process at the City of Los Angeles' Hyperion Treatment Plant (HTP); (4) a modeling assessment of the effects of transient loading on emissions during preliminary and primary treatment at a typical municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP); (5) a preliminary investigation of effects of chlorination practices on haloform production. Volume 1, for which the abstract was prepared, contains a summary of results from each project; Volume 2 contains the discussion regarding the modeling of collection system emissions; Volume 3 addresses methods development and field sampling efforts at the JWPCP and HTP, data on emissions from a mechanically ventilated sewer and results of some preliminary haloform formation studies in wastewaters; and Volume 4 discusses aspects of the emissions modeling problem.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Schroeder, E.D.; Corsi, R.L.; Guensler, R.; Meyerhofer, J.A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

Donna Post Guillen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geopolymers in Nuclear Waste Immobilization: Past, Present, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Issues in Nuclear Waste Management in the 21st Century. Presentation Title ... Metal Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy Applications.

138

High Level Radioactive Waste- Doing Something about It  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Issues in Nuclear Waste Management in the 21st Century. Presentation Title ... Metal Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy Applications.

139

Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Inc (AWS)" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAgriculturalWasteSolutionsIncAWS&oldid341893" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

140

Hazardous Waste Technician Vandenberg AFB, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Technician Vandenberg AFB, California POSITION A Hazardous Waste Technician, California. ORGANIZATION CEMML is a research, education and service unit within the Warner College of Natural of California. The base, with its 45 miles of scenic coastline, is home to 53 species of mammals, 315 species

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

142

Mixed waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of mixed waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. Mixed waste is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500.degree. C. by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO.sub.3. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500 C by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO[sub 3]. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed. 3 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

145

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

146

Municipal Solid Waste:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contact This report was prepared by staff of the Renewable Information Team, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels.

147

REVIEW OF RHEOLOGY MODIFIERS FOR HANFORD WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)?s strategic development scope for the Department of Energy ? Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste feed acceptance and product qualification scope, the SRNL has been requested to recommend candidate rheology modifiers to be evaluated to adjust slurry properties in the Hanford Tank Farm. SRNL has performed extensive testing of rheology modifiers for use with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulated melter feed ? a high undissolved solids (UDS) mixture of simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm sludge, nitric and formic acids, and glass frit. A much smaller set of evaluations with Hanford simulated waste have also been completed. This report summarizes past work and recommends modifiers for further evaluation with Hanford simulated wastes followed by verification with actual waste samples. Based on the review of available data, a few compounds/systems appear to hold the most promise. For all types of evaluated simulated wastes (caustic Handford tank waste and DWPF processing samples with pH ranging from slightly acidic to slightly caustic), polyacrylic acid had positive impacts on rheology. Citric acid also showed improvement in yield stress on a wide variety of samples. It is recommended that both polyacrylic acid and citric acid be further evaluated as rheology modifiers for Hanford waste. These materials are weak organic acids with the following potential issues: ? The acidic nature of the modifiers may impact waste pH, if added in very large doses. If pH is significantly reduced by the modifier addition, dissolution of UDS and increased corrosion of tanks, piping, pumps, and other process equipment could occur. Smaller shifts in pH could reduce aluminum solubility, which would be expected to increase the yield stress of the sludge. Therefore, it is expected that use of an acidic modifier would be limited to concentrations that do not appreciably change the pH of the waste. ? Organics are typically reductants and could impact glass REDOX if not accounted for in the reductant addition calculations. ? Stability of the modifiers in a caustic, radioactive environment is not known, but some of the modifiers tested were specifically designed to withstand caustic conditions. ? These acids will add to the total organic carbon content of the wastes. Radiolytic decomposition of the acids could result in organic and hydrogen gas generation. These potential impacts must be addressed in future studies with simulants representative of real waste and finally with tests using actual waste based on the rheology differences seen between SRS simulants and actual waste. The only non-organic modifier evaluated was sodium metasilicate. Further evaluation of this modifier is recommended if a reducing modifier is a concern.

Pareizs, J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Method for catalytic destruction of organic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for converting waste organic materials into an innocuous product gas. The method comprises maintaining, in a pressure vessel, in the absence of oxygen, at a temperature of 250.degree. C. to 500.degree. C. and a pressure of at least 50 atmospheres, a fluid organic waste material, water, and a catalyst consisting essentially of reduced nickel in an amount sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the organic waste material to produce an innocuous product gas composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. The methane in the product gas may be burned to preheat the organic materials.

Sealock, Jr., L. John (Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Method for catalytic destruction of organic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for converting waste organic materials into an innocuous product gas. The method comprises maintaining, in a pressure vessel, in the absence of oxygen, at a temperature of 250 to 500 C and a pressure of at least 50 atmospheres, a fluid organic waste material, water, and a catalyst consisting essentially of reduced nickel in an amount sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the organic waste material to produce an innocuous product gas composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. The methane in the product gas may be burned to preheat the organic materials. 7 figs.

Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

Understanding Cement Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2009 ... Ongoing nuclear operations, decontamination and decommissioning, salt waste disposal, and closure of liquid waste tanks result in...

151

Waste Minimization Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Waste Minimization Contents...

152

Biogas production from broiler manure, wastewater treatment plant sludge, and greenhouse waste by anaerobic co-digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inappropriate management of organic wastes can cause serious damage to the environment by polluting water and air

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Characterization of urban solid waste in Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of urban solid waste generation is fundamental for adequate decision making in the management strategy of urban solid waste in a city. The objective of this study is to characterize the waste generated in the households of Chihuahua city, and to compare the results obtained in areas of the city with three different socioeconomic levels. In order to identify the different socioeconomic trends in waste generation and characterization, 560 samples of solid waste were collected during 1 week from 80 households in Chihuahua and were hand sorted and classified into 15 weighted fractions. The average waste generation in Chihuahua calculated in this study was 0.676 kg per capita per day in April 2006. The main fractions were: organic (48%), paper (16%) and plastic (12%). Results show an increased waste generation associated with the socioeconomic level. The characterization in amount and composition of urban waste is the first step needed for the successful implementation of an integral waste management system.

Gomez, Guadalupe [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 Chihuahua (Mexico); Meneses, Montserrat [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ballinas, Lourdes [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 Chihuahua (Mexico); Castells, Francesc [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: francesc.castells@urv.cat

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany BREFs and their BATs Next Generation of Waste Fired Power Plants: Getting the most out of your trash Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

155

METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

BARKER, S.A.

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771, Flammable Gas Safety Isme Resolution. Appendices A through I provide supporting information. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste and characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 6 is the annual update of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

TU, T.A.

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Objectives: Reduce the risk associated with implementing the FBSR NAS waste form as a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Conduct test with actual tank wastes Use the best science to fill key data gaps Linking previous and new results together 4 Outline FBSR NAS waste form processing scales FBSR NAS waste form data/key assumptions FBSR NAS key data gaps FBSR NAS testing program 5 FBSR NAS Waste Form Processing

158

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

159

Comparison of the Organic Flash Cycle (OFC) to other advanced ...  

Comparison of the Organic Flash Cycle (OFC) to other advanced vapor cycles for intermediate and high temperature waste heat reclamation and solar thermal

160

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium, and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Medical School Biomedical Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical School Biomedical Waste Labware, gloves, pipets, pipet tips Stock cultures, bacterial with or without needles, razor blades, scalpel blades) Key: Pathological waste BL1 & BL2 waste (low risk ­ LR) BL2 waste (moderate risk - MR)/BL3 waste Blood Blood Autoclave Needle box Metal Cart Must either bleach

Cooley, Lynn

163

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction: This waste sorting game was originally designed to be one have completed the waste sorting activity quickly, no team was able to complete the waste sorting task who were unfamiliar with Dalhousie's waste management system. Goals: The primary goal of the activity

Beaumont, Christopher

164

University of Waste Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Maryland Hazardous And Regulated Waste Procedures Manual Revised July 2001 #12;Review II. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT III. BIOLOGICAL, PATHOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL WASTE (BPMW) MANAGEMENT IV. LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLRW) MANAGEMENT V. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES VI. WASTE MINIMIZATION VII

Rubloff, Gary W.

165

Process for removing sulfate anions from waste water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid emulsion membrane process for removing sulfate anions from waste water is disclosed. The liquid emulsion membrane process includes the steps of: (a) providing a liquid emulsion formed from an aqueous strip solution and an organic phase that contains an extractant capable of removing sulfate anions from waste water; (b) dispersing the liquid emulsion in globule form into a quantity of waste water containing sulfate anions to allow the organic phase in each globule of the emulsion to extract and absorb sulfate anions from the waste water and (c) separating the emulsion including its organic phase and absorbed sulfate anions from the waste water to provide waste water containing substantially no sulfate anions.

Nilsen, David N. (Lebanon, OR); Galvan, Gloria J. (Albany, OR); Hundley, Gary L. (Corvallis, OR); Wright, John B. (Albany, OR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Electrochemical oxidation of organic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a method and apparatus for the direct oxidation of organic materials, especially organic wastes, in an electrochemical cell. It fulfills the need for a simple, cost-effective way for generators of small quantities of waste to deal with that waste. It does not use an electron transfer agent, which may be a source of additional hazardous waste. The anode is made of carbon felt; the cathode is platinum; and the electrolyte is a strong oxidizer, preferably nitric acid. The potential difference is 2 to 3 volts; the current density is 0.15 to 0.25 A/cm{sup 2}. The porous barrier is a medium grade alumina frit or an ion exchange membrane. The organic materials are fed to the anode compartment; the resulting oxygen bubbling circumvents the need for stirring or circulating the waste. Many different types of waste (e.g. rubber gloves, TBP, process solutions, etc.) can be fed to the anode compartment without the need to process or store it. 3 figs. (DLC)

Almon, A.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

MST: Organizations: Organic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Composites Encapsulation Materials Characterization Mechanical Testing Molding, Thermoforming, & Compounding Organizations Organic Materials Composite-to-metal adhesive bond Experimental/analytical study of composit-to-metal adhesive bond. The Organic Materials department in the Advanced Manufacturing and Processing Laboratory provides innovative prototype fabrication, full service small lot production, materials technology, processing expertise, and a broad range of organic material characterization and mechanical testing techniques. We encapsulate, we join and bond, we foam, we analyze and image, we build composite structures. We strive to make you, our customers, successful! We partner with you to find the right combination of materials, processing, and fixturing that will result in the highest value

168

Mediated electrochemical hazardous waste destruction  

SciTech Connect

There are few permitted processes for mixed waste (radioactive plus chemically hazardous) treatment. We are developing electrochemical processes that convert the toxic organic components of mixed waste to water, carbon dioxide, an innocuous anions such as chloride. Aggressive oxidizer ions such as Ag{sup 2+} or Ce{sup +4} are produced at an anode. These can attack the organic molecules directly. They can also attack water which yields hydroxyl free radicals that in turn attack the organic molecules. The condensed (i.e., solid and/or liquid) effluent streams contain the inorganic radionuclide forms. These may be treated with existing technology and prepared for final disposal. Kinetics and the extent of destruction of some toxic organics have been measured. Depending on how the process is operated, coulombic efficiency can be nearly 100%. In addition, hazardous organic materials are becoming very expensive to dispose of and when they are combined with transuranic radioactive elements no processes are presently permitted. Mediated electrochemical oxidation is an ambient-temperature aqueous-phase process that can be used to oxidize organic components of mixed wastes. Problems associated with incineration, such as high-temperature volatilization of radionuclides, are avoided. Historically, Ag (2) has been used as a mediator in this process. Fe(6) and Co(3) are attractive alternatives to Ag(2) since they form soluble chlorides during the destruction of chlorinated solvents. Furthermore, silver itself is a toxic heavy metal. Quantitative data has been obtained for the complete oxidation of ethylene glycol by Fe(6) and Co(3). Though ethylene glycol is a nonhalogenated organic, this data has enabled us to make direct comparisons of activities of Fe(6) and Co(3) with Ag(2). Very good quantitative data for the oxidation of ethylene glycol by Ag(2) had already been collected. 4 refs., 6 figs.

Hickman, R.G.; Farmer, J.C.; Wang, F.T.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Microbial Transformation of TRU and Mixed Waste: Actinide Speciation and Waste Volume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to understand the susceptibility of transuranic and mixed waste to microbial degradation (as well as any mechanism which depends upon either complexation and/or redox of metal ions), it is essential to understand the association of metal ions with organic ligands present in mixed wastes. These ligands have been found in our previous EMSP study to limit electron transfer reactions and strongly affect transport and the eventual fate of radionuclides in the environment. As transuranic waste (and especially mixed waste) will be retained in burial sites and in legacy containment for (potentially) many years while awaiting treatment and removal (or remaining in place under stewardship agreements at government subsurface waste sites), it is also essential to understand the aging of mixed wastes and its implications for remediation and fate of radionuclides. Mixed waste containing actinides and organic materials are especially complex and require extensive study. The EMSP program described in this report is part of a joint program with the Environmental Sciences Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Stony Brook University portion of this award has focused on the association of uranium (U(VI)) and transuranic analogs (Ce(III) and Eu(III)) with cellulosic materials and related compounds, with development of implications for microbial transformation of mixed wastes. The elucidation of the chemical nature of mixed waste is essential for the formulation of remediation and encapsulation technologies, for understanding the fate of contaminant exposed to the environment, and for development of meaningful models for contaminant storage and recovery.

Halada, Gary P

2008-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

171

Waste Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management Facility ISO 14001 Registered A wide range of wastes are generated during the normal course of business at BNL. These waste streams are common to many businesses...

172

Conversion Technology and the San Jose Zero Waste Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conversion Technology and the Conversion Technology and the San José Zero Waste Initiative DOE Webinar - April 16, 2013 Michele Young - Organics Manger - City of San Jose San Jose's Green Vision Plant Master Plan Climate Protection Plan Zero Waste Strategic Plan Organics-to-Energy Strategic Work Plan Integrated Strategic Planning Zero Waste San José Green Vision Renewable Energy 75% Diversion by 2013 Zero Waste by 2022 100% Renewable by 2022 100% Green City Fleet by 2022 Infrastructure - Technology Type - Processing costs

173

Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager 2.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Waste Manager, part of EPRI's Waste Logic series of computer programs, analyzes decommissioning waste cost and volume reduction strategies with the intent of quantifying the existing waste management program for any given waste generator.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

175

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

176

Recycling Electronic Waste - Website  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2010 ... Joined: 2/13/2007. Below is a link to a website that has articles on recycling electronic waste. http://www.scientificamerican....ectronic-waste-...

177

International Trade with Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis, trade with waste between developed countries and the third world will be presented to analyze whether waste?trading can create a possible (more)

Willn, Jenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Organic solvent topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

COWLEY, W.L.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

179

Method for treating liquid wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering .sup.99 Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of .sup.99 TcO.sub.4.sup.- from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of .sup.99 Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester .sup.99 Tc from those liquids.

Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Singh, Prahlad (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Method for treating liquid wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering {sup 99}Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of {sup 99}Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester {sup 99}Tc from those liquids. 6 figs.

Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Singh, P.; Ketring, A.R.

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ORGANICS: YARD TRIMMINGS AND FOOD SCRAPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the methodology used in EPAs Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate streamlined life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for yard trimmings and food scraps beginning at the point of waste generation. The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with these two organic material types in the following three

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Waste management/waste certification plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Waste Management/Waste Certification (C) Plan, written for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), outlines the criteria and methodologies to be used in the management of waste generated during ORNL ER field activities. Other agreed upon methods may be used in the management of waste with consultation with ER and Waste Management Organization. The intent of this plan is to provide information for the minimization, handling, and disposal of waste generated by ER activities. This plan contains provisions for the safe and effective management of waste consistent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) guidance. Components of this plan have been designed to protect the environment and the health and safety of workers and the public. It, therefore, stresses that investigation derived waste (IDW) and other waste be managed to ensure that (1) all efforts be made to minimize the amount of waste generated; (2) costs associated with sampling storage, analysis, transportation, and disposal are minimized; (3) the potential for public and worker exposure is not increased; and (4) additional contaminated areas are not created.

Clark, C. Jr.; Hunt-Davenport, L.D.; Cofer, G.H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Waste analysis plan for central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for the Central Waste Complex which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, and obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.

Weston, N.L.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

An Act Concerning the Recycling of Organic Materials by Certain...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and conservation centers that generate at least 104 tons of organic waste each year to compost it. The Act goes into effect once the state has two source-separated organics...

185

Transuranic Waste Tabletop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transuranic Waste Tabletop Transuranic Waste Tabletop Transuranic Waste Tabletop OBJECTIVES Given a simulated radioactive materials transportation accident, applicable procedures, and map references, demonstrate through participatory discussion a working knowledge of the following emergency response and concept of operations elements: „ Concept of operations for the emergency response to a radioactive materials transportation accident, including the Unified Incident Command System utilized in the field. „ Initial and extended response of emergency personnel and the interface between these organizations and Federal and State Regulatory agencies (i.e., Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], Department of Transportation [DOT], and the appropriate State agency). „ Communications between the Incident Commander (IC) and the

186

Radiation chemistry of synthetic waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The yield of H{sub 2} from radiolysis of aqueous solutions is substantially reduced by the presence of nitrate and nitrite in the waste solutions. Nitrate is more efficient in scavenging the precursors to H{sub 2} than is nitrite, therefore, the latter should be maintained at higher levels if minimization of radiolytic gas production is required. Nitrate is the major scavenger for e{sub aq}{sup {minus}} and nitrite is the major scavenger for H atoms. At the concentration levels of the waste solutions some fraction of the radiation energy will be absorbed directly by the solutes, primarily the nitrate/nitrite components. Organic additive will increase the generation of H{sub 2} and mechanistic information is available to allow predictive modeling of trends in the rate of the generation. Physical parameters such as temperature, viscosity, and pressure will not significantly affect the gas generation relative to its generation under normal conditions. Radiolytic generation of N{sub 2}O is very inefficient in the absence of organic solutes. No mechanistic information is available on its generation in the presence of organic additives. At the concentration levels of the inorganic salts in the waste solutions, it will be very difficult to find a chemical additive that could efficiently reduce the yield of the generated H{sub 2}, except, perhaps, increasing the concentration of the nitrite/nitrate components.

Meisel, D.; Diamond, H.; Horwitz, E.P.; Jonah, C.D.; Matheson, M.S.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.; Sullivan, J.C.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Robust Solution to Difficult Hydrogen Issues When Shipping Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been open, receiving, and disposing of transuranic (TRU) waste since March 26, 1999. The majority of the waste has a path forward for shipment to and disposal at the WIPP, but there are about two percent (2%) or approximately 3,020 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of the volume of TRU waste (high wattage TRU waste) that is not shippable because of gas generation limits set by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste includes plutonium-238 waste, solidified organic waste, and other high plutonium-239 wastes. Flammable gases are potentially generated during transport of TRU waste by the radiolysis of hydrogenous materials and therefore, the concentration at the end of the shipping period must be predicted. Two options are currently available to TRU waste sites for solving this problem: (1) gas generation testing on each drum, and (2) waste form modification by repackaging and/or treatment. Repackaging some of the high wattage waste may require up to 20:1 drum increase to meet the gas generation limits of less than five percent (5%) hydrogen in the inner most layer of confinement (the layer closest to the waste). (This is the limit set by the NRC.) These options increase waste handling and transportation risks and there are high costs and potential worker exposure associated with repackaging this high-wattage TRU waste. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is pursuing a twofold approach to develop a shipping path for these wastes. They are: regulatory change and technology development. For the regulatory change, a more detailed knowledge of the high wattage waste (e.g., void volumes, gas generation potential of specific chemical constituents) may allow refinement of the current assumptions in the gas generation model for Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging for Contact-Handled (CH) TRU waste. For technology development, one of the options being pursued is the use of a robust container, the ARROW-PAK{trademark} System. (1) The ARROW-PAK{trademark} is a macroencapsulation treatment technology, developed by Boh Environmental, LLC, New Orleans, Louisiana. This technology has been designed to withstand any unexpected hydrogen deflagration (i.e. no consequence) and other benefits such as criticality control.

Countiss, S. S.; Basabilvazo, G. T.; Moody, D. C. III; Lott, S. A.; Pickerell, M.; Baca, T.; CH2M Hill; Tujague, S.; Svetlik, H.; Hannah, T.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT HANFORD SITE [SEC 1 & 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generate ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as diluents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semivolatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in tank headspace as described in RPP-7771, Flammable Gas Safety Issue Resolution. Appendices A through L provide supporting information. This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste and characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event.

BARKER, S.A.; HEDENGREN, D.C.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs.

Krapukhin, V.B.; Krasavina, E.P. Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS). Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.trp-training.info/ Cost: Paid Language: English References: Training Resource Pack[1] "The new TRP+ provides a structured package of notes, technical summaries, visual aids and other training material concerning the (hazardous) waste

195

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

BIOLOGICAL DECOMPOSITION OF RADIOACTIVE LAUNDRY WASTE  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests was conducted on a laundry waste containing radtoactive materials, using an activated sludge process, to determine whether the organic materials which would interfere with a process of flocculation and adsorption could be removed along with a substantial quantity of the radioactive material. A trickling filter was used to treat the waste over a long period of time. The filter removed nearly all of the activity and most of the organic compounds. However, sufficient residual activity remained in the effluent to require either two-stage operation or final processing by flocculation and adsorption. Recirculation was beneficial. A supplementary bacteria feed of ammonium nitrate was necessary. (auth)

Wiederhold, E.W.

1954-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nuclear waste solidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

An assessment of management practices of wood and wood-related wastes in the urban environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that yard waste{sup 1} accounts for approximately 16% of the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream (US EPA, 1994). Until recently, specific data and related information on this component of the (MSW) stream has been limited. The purposes of this study, phase two of the three-phase assessment of urban wood waste issues, are to assess and describe current alternatives to landfills for urban wood waste management; provide guidance on the management of urban wood waste to organizations that produce or manage wood waste; and clarify state regulatory and policy positions affecting these organizations. For this study, urban wood waste is defined as solid waste generated by tree and landscape maintenance services (public and private). Urban wood waste includes the following materials: unchipped mixed wood, unchipped logs, and unchipped tops and brush; clearing and grubbing waste; fall leaves and grass clippings; and chips and whole stumps. Construction and demolition debris and consumer-generated yard waste are not included in this study. Generators of urban wood waste include various organizations; municipal, county, and commercial tree care divisions; nurseries, orchards, and golf courses; municipal park and recreation departments; and electric and telephone utility power line maintenance, excavator and land clearance, and landscape organizations. (1) US EPA defines yard waste as ''yard trimmings'' which includes ''grass, leaves and tree brush trimmings from residential, institutional, and commercial sources.''

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Eligibility...

200

MANAGING HANFORD'S LEGACY NO-PATH-FORWARD WASTES TO DISPOSITION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) has adopted the 2015 Vision for Cleanup of the Hanford Site. This vision will protect the Columbia River, reduce the Site footprint, and reduce Site mortgage costs. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company's (CHPRC) Waste and Fuels Management Project (W&FMP) and their partners support this mission by providing centralized waste management services for the Hanford Site waste generating organizations. At the time of the CHPRC contract award (August 2008) slightly more than 9,000 m{sup 3} of waste was defined as 'no-path-forward waste.' The majority of these wastes are suspect transuranic mixed (TRUM) wastes which are currently stored in the low-level Burial Grounds (LLBG), or stored above ground in the Central Waste Complex (CWC). A portion of the waste will be generated during ongoing and future site cleanup activities. The DOE-RL and CHPRC have collaborated to identify and deliver safe, cost-effective disposition paths for 90% ({approx}8,000 m{sup 3}) of these problematic wastes. These paths include accelerated disposition through expanded use of offsite treatment capabilities. Disposal paths were selected that minimize the need to develop new technologies, minimize the need for new, on-site capabilities, and accelerate shipments of transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

WEST LD

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ Sector: Energy Website: www.gtz.de/en/themen/umwelt-infrastruktur/abfall/30026.htm References: GHG Calculator for Waste Management[1] Waste Management - GTZ Website[2] Logo: GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management The necessity to reduce greenhouse gases and thus mitigate climate change is accepted worldwide. Especially in low- and middle-income countries, waste management causes a great part of the national greenhouse gas production, because landfills produce methane which has a particularly strong effect on climate change. Therefore, it is essential to minimize

202

Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC) Place Washington, DC Product GWECC is a global alternative energy company headquartered in Washington DC, USA. References Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC) is a company located in Washington, DC . References ↑ "Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company (GWECC)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Waste_to_Energy_Conversion_Company_GWECC&oldid=345924" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

203

High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Karthik Subramanian Bruce Wiersma November 2008 High Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting karthik.subramanian@srnl.doe.gov bruce.wiersma@srnl.doe.gov 2 Acknowledgements * Bruce Wiersma (SRNL) * Kayle Boomer (Hanford) * Michael T. Terry (Facilitator) * SRS - Liquid Waste Organization * Hanford Tank Farms * DOE-EM 3 Background * High level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks provide critical interim confinement for waste prior to processing and permanent disposal * Maintaining structural integrity (SI) of the tanks is a critical component of operations 4 Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 * Discuss the HLW tank integrity technology needs based upon the evolving waste processing and tank closure requirements along with its continued storage mission

204

Slurry growth and gas retention in synthetic Hanford waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work seeks to establish chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within waste from a particular high-level waste tank on the Hanford Site, Tank 101-SY, through the use of synthetic wastes on a laboratory scale. The goal of these activities is to support the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Laboratory studies of aged synthetic waste have shown that gas generation occurs thermally at a significant level at current tank temperatures. Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}. Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the synthetic waste. Retention of gases in the synthetic waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Slurry growth and gas retention in synthetic Hanford waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work seeks to establish chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within waste from a particular high-level waste tank on the Hanford Site, Tank 101-SY, through the use of synthetic wastes on a laboratory scale. The goal of these activities is to support the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Laboratory studies of aged synthetic waste have shown that gas generation occurs thermally at a significant level at current tank temperatures. Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N[sub 2], N[sub 2]O, and H[sub 2]. Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the synthetic waste. Retention of gases in the synthetic waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

Ragaini, R.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Organization Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Mission Organization Staff - Organization Chart About Us Bob Cottingham, 865-241-0554 Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Meghan Drake 865-241-8288 Michael...

208

Science Organizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

209

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raya James Johnson Rad/Mixed Waste** Steve Bakhtiar Leadhazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste at the Hazardoustraining. Radioactive and mixed waste generators must take

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by: Environmental Health and Safety Department Revised February 2012 #12;Waste Minimization Plan Table of Contents Policy Statement........................................................... 3 Centralized Waste Management Program

211

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may: cause or significantly...

212

NATURE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The integrated processes of nuclear industry are considered to define the nature of wastes. Processes for recovery and preparation of U and Th fuels produce wastes containing concentrated radioactive materials which present problems of confinement and dispersal. Fundamentals of waste treatment are considered from the standpoint of processes in which radioactive materials become a factor such as naturally occurring feed materials, fission products, and elements produced by parasitic neutron capture. In addition, the origin of concentrated fission product wastes is examined, as well as characteristics of present wastes and the level of fission products in wastes. Also, comments are included on high-level wastes from processes other than solvent extraction, active gaseous wastes, and low- to intermediate-level liquid wastes. (J.R.D.)

Culler, F.L. Jr.

1959-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

National Waste Terminal Storage Program: potenial problems in the waste transportation system  

SciTech Connect

Potential problems are identified which may impact the planning, organization, and operation of nuclear waste transportation systems serving federal repositories. These system-level problems have the potential of seriously interfering with the overall OWI Transportation/Logistics Study objective of having a viable nuclear waste transportation system in 1985. This report includes recommended action and priority judgments to address these problems and minimize their impact. The potential problems identified as most important have consequences which may impact the overall state of future preparedness for transporting nuclear waste. Other important concerns relate to the imposition of unnecessarily severe and costly restrictions on nuclear waste transportation, public and carrier acceptance, and the involvement of interested parties in planning and decision-making. The major recommendation of this report is that the planning and development of the waste transportation system should be controlled by a central planning activity which anticipates the impact of uncertainties and undesirable events.

DeSteese, J.G.; Rhoads, R.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Method for recovering metals from waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300-800.degree. C. to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000-1,550.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (North Augusta, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Gainesville, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Method for recovering metals from waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800 C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000--1,550 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification. 2 figs.

Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Method for recovering metals from waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree.-800.degree. C. to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000.degree.-1,550.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (North Augusta, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Gainesville, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Method for recovering materials from waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, a vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800{degrees}C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1000--1550{degrees}C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Thermocatalytic conversion of food processing wastes: Topical report, FY 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The efficient utilization of waste produced during food processing operations is a topic of growing importance to the industry. While incineration is an attractive option for wastes with relatively low ash and moisture contents (i.e., under about 50 wt % moisture), it is not suitable for wastes with high moisture contents. Cheese whey, brewer's spent grain, and fruit pomace are examples of food processing wastes that are generally too wet to burn efficiently and cleanly. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a thermocatalytic conversion process that can convert high-moisture wastes (up to 98 wt % moisture) to a medium-Btu fuel gas consisting primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. At the same time, the COD of these waste streams is reduced by 90% to 99%, Organic wastes are converted by thermocatalytic treatment at 350/degree/C to 400/degree/C and 3000 to 4000 psig. The process offers a relatively simple solution to waste treatment while providing net energy production from wastes containing as little as 2 wt % organic solids (this is equivalent to a COD of approximately 25,000 mg/L). This report describes continuous reactor system (CRS) experiments that have been conducted with food processing wastes. The purpose of the CRS experiments was to provide kinetic and catalyst lifetime data, which could not be obtained with the batch reactor tests. These data are needed for commercial scaleup of the process.

Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Irvine, Orange County, California Proposed Facility Location: Southern California Description: This company has experience building biomass power plants in California and their technology has been demonstrated at the pilot scale. One of its partners is Waste Management Inc., a leading waste-to-energy company. This project will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation process not using enzymes. CEO or Equivalent: Arnold Klann Participants: Waste Management, Inc., JGC Corporation; MECS Inc.; NAES; PetroDiamond Production: * 19 million gallons/year in the unit in which DOE will be participating. Technology & Feedstocks: * Concentrated acid processing of 700 tons/day of sorted green waste and wood

220

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Irvine, Orange County, California Proposed Facility Location: Southern California Description: This company has experience building biomass power plants in California and their technology has been demonstrated at the pilot scale. One of its partners is Waste Management Inc., a leading waste-to-energy company. This project will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation process not using enzymes. CEO or Equivalent: Arnold Klann Participants: Waste Management, Inc., JGC Corporation; MECS Inc.; NAES; PetroDiamond Production: * 19 million gallons/year in the unit in which DOE will be participating. Technology & Feedstocks: * Concentrated acid processing of 700 tons/day of sorted green waste and wood

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

make an excellent natural fertilizer, so they can be used to get next year's pumpkin crop started. Discarded pumpkins and other organic waste material can be used for more than...

222

REVIEW OF RHEOLOGY MODIFIERS FOR HANFORD WASTE  

SciTech Connect

As part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)?s strategic development scope for the Department of Energy ? Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste feed acceptance and product qualification scope, the SRNL has been requested to recommend candidate rheology modifiers to be evaluated to adjust slurry properties in the Hanford Tank Farm. SRNL has performed extensive testing of rheology modifiers for use with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulated melter feed ? a high undissolved solids (UDS) mixture of simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm sludge, nitric and formic acids, and glass frit. A much smaller set of evaluations with Hanford simulated waste have also been completed. This report summarizes past work and recommends modifiers for further evaluation with Hanford simulated wastes followed by verification with actual waste samples. Based on the review of available data, a few compounds/systems appear to hold the most promise. For all types of evaluated simulated wastes (caustic Handford tank waste and DWPF processing samples with pH ranging from slightly acidic to slightly caustic), polyacrylic acid had positive impacts on rheology. Citric acid also showed improvement in yield stress on a wide variety of samples. It is recommended that both polyacrylic acid and citric acid be further evaluated as rheology modifiers for Hanford waste. These materials are weak organic acids with the following potential issues:  The acidic nature of the modifiers may impact waste pH, if added in very large doses. If pH is significantly reduced by the modifier addition, dissolution of UDS and increased corrosion of tanks, piping, pumps, and other process equipment could occur. Smaller shifts in pH could reduce aluminum solubility, which would be expected to increase the yield stress of the sludge. Therefore, it is expected that use of an acidic modifier would be limited to concentrations that do not appreciably change the pH of the waste.  Organics are typically reductants and could impact glass REDOX if not accounted for in the reductant addition calculations.  Stability of the modifiers in a caustic, radioactive environment is not known, but some of the modifiers tested were specifically designed to withstand caustic conditions.  These acids will add to the total organic carbon content of the wastes. Radiolytic decomposition of the acids could result in organic and hydrogen gas generation. These potential impacts must be addressed in future studies with simulants representative of real waste and finally with tests using actual waste based on the rheology differences seen between SRS simulants and actual waste. The only non-organic modifier evaluated was sodium metasilicate. Further evaluation of this modifier is recommended if a reducing modifier is a concern.

Pareizs, J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Tandem microwave waste remediation and decontamination system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Gainesville, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Medical waste treatment and decontamination system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which hybrid microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional hybrid microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Biological production of ethanol from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products is disclosed. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various product, such as organic acids, alcohols H.sub.2, SCP, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A model for a national low level waste program  

SciTech Connect

A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste Immobilization.

229

Why should I recycle? The average American generates 4.5 pounds of waste daily.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why should I recycle? The average American generates 4.5 pounds of waste daily. Instead of throwing throughout campus.These guidelines will help you recycle more and waste less. What's recyclable? · Mixed and plastic-coated papers · Tissue and paper towels · Paper or containers soiled by food or organic waste

Tsien, Roger Y.

230

Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO.sub.2 gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO.sub.2 gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO.sub.2 absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste: Any laboratory waste, whether chemical or biological, containing radioactive material, should be disposed as radioactive waste. Radioactive waste should be removed from the laboratory to the departmental waste area, soon after finishing the experiment

Maoz, Shahar

232

Technical area status report for waste destruction and stabilization  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs/activities throughout the DOE complex. In order to successfully achieve the goal of properly managing waste and the cleanup of the DOE sites, the EM was divided into five organizations: the Office of Planning and Resource Management (EM-10); the Office of Environmental Quality Assurance and Resource Management (EM-20); the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30); the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40); and the Office of Technology and Development (EM-50). The mission of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is to develop treatment technologies for DOE`s operational and environmental restoration wastes where current treatment technologies are inadequate or not available. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by OTD to assist in the development of treatment technologies for the DOE mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) whose purpose is to identify, evaluate, and develop treatment technologies within five general technical areas representing waste treatment functions from initial waste handling through generation of final waste forms. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Physical/Chemical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. This report describes the functions of the Waste Destruction and Stabilization (WDS) group. Specifically, the following items are discussed: DOE waste stream identification; summary of previous efforts; summary of WDS treatment technologies; currently funded WDS activities; and recommendations for future activities.

Dalton, J.D.; Harris, T.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Transuranic (TRU) Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste with half-lives greater than 20 years, except for (A)...

234

Transuranic Waste Screener  

The TRU waste screener (TRU-WS) is a multifunctional system for the rapid screening of transuranic material for criticality safety or screening for TRU content in open trays or waste containers.

235

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy (DOE) is closing the circle on the generation, management, and disposal of transuranic waste. But the WIPP story is not just about radioactive waste. It is...

238

Immobilization of Nuclear Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010 ... Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms: Michael Ojovan1; Bill Lee2; ... wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... has been vitrifying the Department of Energy's High Level Waste (HLW) at...

239

The wild wild waste: e-waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-Waste is a popular, informal name for discarded electronic products such as computers, VCRs, cameras, which have reached the end of their "useful life". Discarded electronic products contain a stew of toxic metals and chemicals such as lead, mercury, ... Keywords: donate, e-waste, ecology, efficiency, environment, green computing, hazardous material, re-use, recycle, reduce, thin-client, upgrade, virtualization

Scott E. Hanselman; Mahmoud Pegah

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes in the form of a solidified glass includes fins supported from the center with the tips of the fins spaced away from the wall to conduct heat away from the center without producing unacceptable hot spots in the canister wall.

Duffy, James B. (Fullerton, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary Name: IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Cost: Free Related Tools Energy Development Index (EDI) Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model ... further results A simple spreadsheet model for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from existing waste management practices (transportation, composting, anaerobic digestion, mechanical biological treatment, recycling, landfilling) in

242

Mixed Waste Treatment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing integrated mixed waste program, EPRI has documented nuclear utility industry experience in the on-site treatment of mixed waste. This report reviews all available exclusions/exceptions to EPA permitting requirements for environmentally responsible on-site management of mixed waste. Included is a description of emerging mixed waste treatment technologies along with a detailed evaluation of off-site treatment/disposal facilities.

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us Organization Organization Leadership Organization History Careers Contact Us Organization...

244

Organization and Functions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working to Ensure the Safety and Security of Hazardous Material Shipments Working to Ensure the Safety and Security of Hazardous Material Shipments Organization and Functions Mission Unit EM-30 Deputy Assistant Secretary/ADAS Waste Management Director Office of Packaging and Transportation EM-33 Regulations & Standards Support * ANSI * ASME/ ASTM * DHS * DOD FEMA * FMCSA * FRA * IAEA * ICAO * IMO * NRC * Orders * PHMSA TSA * UN TDG SCOE Packaging Certification * CoCs for Type B/AF Packages * DOE Exemptions * DOT Special Permits & COCA * QA * RAMPAC * SCALE * Technical Assistance * Training Program & Site Support * ATMS * EFCOG * EIS Reviews * IPT * Load Securement Guide * PMC * RADCALC * RADTRAN * Secure transport * Technical assistance * Tenders * TMC * TRAGIS

245

Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AR No. 5 Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action Separate scrap plastic bag waste from solid waste stream and recycle. This can be accomplished by either arranging for no-cost pick-up of loose waste or by selling baled waste material. Assessment Recommendation Summary Recommended Waste Cost Implementation

Tullos, Desiree

246

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

247

Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I ' I I t Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan AMs President Mike Lee (left to right), Point Grey M U recycling given high priority on campus By GAVIN WILSON UBC is taking stepsto reduce waste and encourageGellatly,Vice-President,Administration and Finance,to develop and recommend university policies on waste recycling. Another task force has submitted

Farrell, Anthony P.

248

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working be thoroughly familiar with waste handling and emergency procedures ap- plicable to their job responsibilities before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

249

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

250

Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell T h l i O i Innovation for Our Energy Future Technologies Overview Presented to: DOD-DOE Waste-to- Energy Workshop Energy Workshop Dr. Robert J. Remick J 13 2011 January 13, 2011 Capital Hilton Hotel Washington, DC NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Global Approach for Using Biogas Innovation for Our Energy Future Anaerobic Digestion of Organic Wastes is a Good Source of Methane. Organic waste + methanogenic bacteria → methane (CH 4 ) Issues: High levels of contamination Time varying output of gas quantity and quality Innovation for Our Energy Future Photo courtesy of Dos Rios Water Recycling Center, San Antonio, TX

253

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste Batteries, used or unwanted including lithium, alkaline, lead ­ acid or lithium aluminum hydride Chemical Waste Check Disposal of Toxics website for disposal options or Take to Bookstore Biological Waste Biological Waste Residential

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

254

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sandia National Laboratories: No More Green Waste in the Landfill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No More Green Waste in the Landfill No More Green Waste in the Landfill June 09, 2011 Dump Truck Image On the heels of Sandia National Laboratories' successful food waste composting program, Pollution Prevention (P2) has teamed with the Facilities' Grounds and Roads team and the Solid Waste Transfer Facility to implement green waste composting. Previously, branches and logs were being diverted and mulched by Kirtland Air Force Base at their Construction & Demolition Landfill that is on base and utilized under contract by Sandia. The mulch is available to the Air Force and Sandia for landscaping uses. However, grass clippings, leaves, and other green waste were being disposed in the landfill. In an initiative to save time and trips by small trucks with trailers to the landfill carrying organic debris, two 30 cubic yard rolloffs were

257

Waste treatment at the La Hague and Marcoule sites  

SciTech Connect

In this report, an overview of waste treatment and solidification facilities located at the La Hague and Marcoule sites, which are owned and/or operated by Cogema, provided. The La Hague facilities described in this report include the following: The STE3 liquid effluent treatment facility (in operation); the AD2 solid waste processing facility (also in operation); and the UCD alpha waste treatment facility (under construction). The Marcoule facilities described in this report, both of which are in operation, include the following: The STEL-EVA liquid effluent treatment facilities for the entire site; and the alpha waste incinerator of the UPI plant. This report is organized into four sections: this introduction, low-level waste treatment at La Hague, low-level waste treatment at Marcoule, and new process development. including the solvent pyrolysis process currently in the development stage for Cogema`s plants.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NIST Organization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... What We Do; Organization Chart; Budget Information; Office of the Director; Laboratories & Major Programs; Locations; Staff Directory; Working With ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

260

Symposium Organizer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volunteer Training Module. March 2013. 1. Your Professional Partner for Career Advancement. Symposium Organizer. Online Training Module. March 2013...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The TEES process cleans waste and produces energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification system is under development that can be used with most types of wet organic wastes. The system operates at 350{degrees}C and 205 atm using a liquid water phase as the processing medium. Since a pressurized system is used, the wet waste can be fed as a solution or slurry to the reactor without drying. Through the development of catalysts, a useful processing system has been produced. The system has utility both for direct conversion of high-moisture biomass to fuel gas or as a wastewater cleanup system for wet organic wastes including unconverted biomass from bioconversion processes. By the use of this system >99% conversions of organic waste to medium-Btu fuel gas can be achieved.

Elliott, D.C.; Silva, L.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 4050 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as silt-rich, mixed, and quartz-rich, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on silt-rich waste rock was four-fold that on quartz-rich waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on quartz-rich waste rock, but richness greatest on silt-rich waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for organization 1700.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Organization 1700 in June, 2006. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist Organization 1700 in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes and procedures. This report contains a summary of the information collected, analyses performed and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Pollution Prevention staff will continue to work with Organization 1700 to implement the recommendations.

Gerard, Morgan Evan

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A method and apparatus for destroying hazardous organics and other combustible materials in a subcritical/supercritical reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waste destruction method is described using a reactor vessel to combust and destroy organic and combustible waste, including the steps of introducing a supply of waste into the reactor vessel, introducing a supply of an oxidant into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste forming a waste and oxidant mixture, introducing a supply of water into the reactor vessel to mix with the waste and oxidant mixture forming a waste, water and oxidant mixture, reciprocatingly compressing the waste, water and oxidant mixture forming a compressed mixture, igniting the compressed mixture forming a exhaust gas, and venting the exhaust gas into the surrounding atmosphere.

Janikowski, Stuart K.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

Francis, A.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

MIxed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP): Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is to develop and demonstrate innovative and emerging technologies for the treatment and management of DOE`s mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) for use by its customers, the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30) and the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). The primary goal of MWIP is to develop and demonstrate the treatment and disposal of actual mixed waste (MMLW and MTRU). The vitrification process and the plasma hearth process are scheduled for demonstration on actual radioactive waste in FY95 and FY96, respectively. This will be accomplished by sequential studies of lab-scale non-radioactive testing followed by bench-scale radioactive testing, followed by field-scale radioactive testing. Both processes create a highly durable final waste form that passes leachability requirements while destroying organics. Material handling technology, and off-gas requirements and capabilities for the plasma hearth process and the vitrification process will be established in parallel.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Commingled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE/EIS-0026-SA02) (6/23/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal of Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Commingled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE/EIS-0026-SA02) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action Transuranic (TRU) waste is waste that contains alpha particle-emitting radionuclides with atomic numbers greater than uranium (92) and half-lives greater than 20 years, in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram of waste. Some TRU wastes are mixed with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (referred to as PCB-commingled TRU waste). PCBs exist in DOE's TRU waste as mixtures of synthetic organic chemicals with physical properties ranging from oily liquids to waxy solids. Exposure to PCBs can result in adverse health effects. For example, PCBs in blood or in fatty tissue as a result of inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption may cause reproductive effects,

268

FTIR fiber optic methods for the analysis of Hanford Site waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling and chemical characterization of mixed high-level waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site is currently in progress. Waste tank safety concerns have provided impetus to analyze this waste. A major safety issue is the possibility of significant concentrations of fuel (ferrocyanide and/or organic compounds) in contact with oxidizers (nitrates and nitrites). It is postulated that under dry conditions and elevated temperatures, ferrocyanide- and/or organic-bearing wastes could undergo rapid exothermic reactions. To maintain the tanks in a safe condition, data are needed on the moisture and fuel concentrations in the waste. Because of the highly radioactive nature of the waste, non-radioactive waste simulants mimicking actual waste are used to provide an initial basis for identifying realistic waste tank safety concerns. Emphasis has been placed on the use of new or existing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)-based systems with potential for field or tank deployment to perform in situ remote waste characterization. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance and mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance fiber optic probes coupled to a Bio-Rad FTS 60A spectrometry system have been evaluated. The near-infrared diffuse reflectance fiber probe system has also been used for preliminary screening of the moisture content and chemical composition of actual Hanford Site waste tank waste core samples. The attributes of this method for analyzing actual radioactive waste are discussed.

Rebagay, T.V.; Cash, R.J.; Dodd, D.A. [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Recovery, reuse, and recycle of industrial waste  

SciTech Connect

The major goal of this work is to produce a document useful in planning efforts aimed at elimination of industrial wastes through the application of recycle, recovery, and reuse technology. The pollutants considered in this study are basically organic and inorganic by-products from wastewater effluents, solid residue and gaseous emissions from industrial operations. The first section contains chapters on methodology currently available for recovery of industrial and hazardous waste, and developing technology for recycle, reuse and recovery. The second section contains chapters on 5 technical categories, used for recovery namely, sorption, molecular separation, phase transition, chemical modification, and physical dispersion and separation.

Noll, K.E.; Haas, C.N.; Schmidt, C.; Kodukula, P.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Buried waste integrated demonstration configuration management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document defines plans for the configuration management requirements for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program. Since BWID is managed programmatically by the Waste Technology Development Department (WTDD), WTDD Program Directive (PD) 1.5 (Document Preparation, Review, Approval, Publication, Management and Change Control) is to be followed for all internal EG&G Idaho, Inc., BWID programmatic documentation. BWID documentation generated by organizations external to EG&G Idaho is not covered by this revision of the Configuration Management Plan (CMP), but will be addressed in subsequent revisions.

Cannon, P.G.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Buried waste integrated demonstration configuration management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document defines plans for the configuration management requirements for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program. Since BWID is managed programmatically by the Waste Technology Development Department (WTDD), WTDD Program Directive (PD) 1.5 (Document Preparation, Review, Approval, Publication, Management and Change Control) is to be followed for all internal EG G Idaho, Inc., BWID programmatic documentation. BWID documentation generated by organizations external to EG G Idaho is not covered by this revision of the Configuration Management Plan (CMP), but will be addressed in subsequent revisions.

Cannon, P.G.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

274

Revaluing waste in New York City : planning for small-scale compost; Planning for small-scale compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??One-third of the municipal solid waste stream is organic material that, when processed in landfills, produces methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. Composting is a (more)

Neilson, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

TSA waste stream and final waste form composition  

SciTech Connect

A final vitrified waste form composition, based upon the chemical compositions of the input waste streams, is recommended for the transuranic-contaminated waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The quantities of waste are large with a considerable uncertainty in the distribution of various waste materials. It is therefore impractical to mix the input waste streams into an ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste. As a result, waste stream input to a melter could vary widely in composition, with the potential of affecting the composition and properties of the final waste form. This work examines the extent of the variation in the input waste streams, as well as the final waste form under conditions of adding different amounts of soil. Five prominent Rocky Flats Plant 740 waste streams are considered, as well as nonspecial metals and the ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste streams. The metals waste stream is the most extreme variation and results indicate that if an average of approximately 60 wt% of the mixture is soil, the final waste form will be predominantly silica, alumina, alkaline earth oxides, and iron oxide. This composition will have consistent properties in the final waste form, including high leach resistance, irrespective of the variation in waste stream. For other waste streams, much less or no soil could be required to yield a leach resistant waste form but with varying properties.

Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Integrated Waste Services Association National Solid Wastes Management Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can Help Meet Our Energy Needs October 5, 2006 - WASHINGTON, DC--A broad coalition of government-244-4700 Evan Von Leer, SWANA 240-494-2252 John Varrasi, ASME 212-591-8158 Don't Waste Waste! Waste-Based Energy and utilization of energy produced from waste, or waste-based energy (WBE). The United States Conference of Mayors

Columbia University

277

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report 06/06/2008 07:50 2.6 % LASB00411 % % Report Date Run by Report Site Id Container Number Waste Stream Data Status Code PEARCYM Version RP0360 Selection Criteria - Total Pages PRD02Instance 5 #12;Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Container Data Report

278

8-Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8- Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management 1. Each worker is responsible for correctly bagging and labeling his/her own waste. 2. A BSL3 technician will be responsible for transporting and autoclaving the waste. Waste will be autoclaved once or twice per day, depending on use

279

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid scintillation vials must be collected separately. 5. Any "mixed waste" must be cleared with the RSO and labeled

280

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIPP Waste Information System Waste Container Data Report 06/06/2008 07:49 2.6 % LAS817174 % % Report Date Run by Report Site Id Container Number Waste Stream Data Status Code PEARCYM Version RP0360 Selection Criteria - Total Pages PRD02Instance 5 #12;Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Container Data Report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

282

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

283

Hospital waste management and toxicity evaluation: A case study  

SciTech Connect

Hospital waste management is an imperative environmental and public safety issue, due to the waste's infectious and hazardous character. This paper examines the existing waste strategy of a typical hospital in Greece with a bed capacity of 400-600. The segregation, collection, packaging, storage, transportation and disposal of waste were monitored and the observed problematic areas documented. The concentrations of BOD, COD and heavy metals were measured in the wastewater the hospital generated. The wastewater's toxicity was also investigated. During the study, omissions and negligence were observed at every stage of the waste management system, particularly with regard to the treatment of infectious waste. Inappropriate collection and transportation procedures for infectious waste, which jeopardized the safety of staff and patients, were recorded. However, inappropriate segregation practices were the dominant problem, which led to increased quantities of generated infectious waste and hence higher costs for their disposal. Infectious waste production was estimated using two different methods: one by weighing the incinerated waste (880 kg day{sup -1}) and the other by estimating the number of waste bags produced each day (650 kg day{sup -1}). Furthermore, measurements of the EC{sub 50} parameter in wastewater samples revealed an increased toxicity in all samples. In addition, hazardous organic compounds were detected in wastewater samples using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrograph. Proposals recommending the application of a comprehensive hospital waste management system are presented that will ensure that any potential risks hospital wastes pose to public health and to the environment are minimized.

Tsakona, M.; Anagnostopoulou, E. [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineers, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100 Polytechnioupolis, Chania, Crete (Greece); Gidarakos, E. [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineers, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100 Polytechnioupolis, Chania, Crete (Greece)], E-mail: gidarako@mred.tuc.gr

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Tank Waste and Waste Processing Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Waste Management Nuclear...

285

NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste...

286

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

287

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

289

Guidelines for mixed waste minimization  

SciTech Connect

Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

Owens, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Operational Waste Volume Projection  

SciTech Connect

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

STRODE, J.N.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

Organization Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spacer spacer spacer About DOE Organization News Contact Us Search Search Go spacer U.S. Department of Energy header image Science & Technology Energy Sources Energy Efficiency...

292

Study of physical properties, gas generation and gas retention in simulated Hanford waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to establish the chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within high-level waste from Tank 101-SY on the Hanford Site. This research, conducted using simulated waste on a laboratory scale, supports the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Simulated waste formulations are based on actual waste compositions. Selected physical properties of the simulated waste are compared to properties of actual Tank 101-SY waste samples. Laboratory studies using aged simulated waste show that significant gas generation occurs thermally at current tank temperatures ({approximately}60{degrees}C). Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}. Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the simulated waste. Retention of gases in the simulated waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles. This attachment phenomenon is related to the presence of organic constituents (HEDTA, EDTA, and citrate) of the simulated waste. A mechanism is discussed that relates the gas bubble/particle interactions to the partially hydrophobic surface produced on the solids by the organic constituents.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

294

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

CLAB Transuranic Waste Spreadsheets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building 772-F Far-Field Transuranic (TRU) Waste Counting System is used to measure the radionuclide content of waste packages produced at the Central Laboratory Facilities (CLAB). Data from the instrument are entered into one of two Excel spreadsheets. The waste stream associated with the waste package determines which spreadsheet is actually used. The spreadsheets calculate the necessary information required for completion of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Form (OSR 29-90) and the Radioactive Solid Waste Burial Ground Record (OSR 7-375 or OSR 7-375A). In addition, the spreadsheets calculate the associated Low Level Waste (LLW) stream information that potentially could be useful if the waste container is ever downgraded from TRU to LLW. The spreadsheets also have the capability to sum activities from source material added to a waste container after assay. A validation data set for each spreadsheet along with the appropriate results are also presented in this report for spreadsheet verification prior to each use.

Leyba, J.D.

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

296

Solid Waste Permits (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the rules and regulations governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery, and reuse of solid waste protect the air,...

297

The Power of Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Abstract It is estimated that up to 2 percent of the population in Third World countries survives on waste in one way or another. (more)

Frykman, Carina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Making waste public.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis questions the boundaries that define waste as a public or private dilemma, investigating these boundaries as productive sites for the imagination of social (more)

Gambetta, Curt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Make love not waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this thesis was to investigate a waste management project and its public awareness components, in the Korca region, Albania. We wanted (more)

Carlsson Engstrm, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Making Waste Public.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis questions the boundaries that define waste as a public or private dilemma, investigating these boundaries as productive sites for the imagination of social (more)

Gambetta, Curt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

WEB RESOURCE: Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2007 ... This resource offers a a very broad explanation of how the Belgian Agency for Management of Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Material...

302

Integrated waste management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrated waste management is considered from a systems approach, with a particular emphasis on advancing sustainability. The focus of the thesis is to examine the (more)

Seadon, Jeffrey Keith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Waste Clean Up 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... deployment and clean-up activities of robot arms into a nuclear contaminated pit at the opening of waste storage tank C-106 at Hanford, Washington ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management's Yucca Mountain Project and the Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) programs. Efforts...

305

Process and system for treating waste water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of treating raw or primary waste water using a powdered, activated carbon/aerated biological treatment system is disclosed. Effluent turbidities less than 2 JTU (Jackson turbidity units), zero TOC (total organic carbon) and in the range of 10 mg/l COD (chemical oxygen demand) can be obtained. An influent stream of raw or primary waste water is contacted with an acidified, powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture. Lime is then added to the slurry to raise the pH to about 7.0. A polyelectrolyte flocculant is added to the slurry followed by a flocculation period -- then sedimentation and filtration. The separated solids (sludge) are aerated in a stabilization sludge basin and a portion thereof recycled to an aerated contact basin for mixing with the influent waste water stream prior to or after contact of the influent stream with the powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture.

Olesen, Douglas E. (Kennewick, WA); Shuckrow, Alan J. (Pasco, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Function analysis for waste information systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study has a two-fold purpose. It seeks to identify the functional requirements of a waste tracking information system and to find feasible alternatives for meeting those requirements on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and the Portsmouth (PORTS) and Paducah (PGDP) facilities; identify options that offer potential cost savings to the US government and also show opportunities for improved efficiency and effectiveness in managing waste information; and, finally, to recommend a practical course of action that can be immediately initiated. In addition to identifying relevant requirements, it also identifies any existing requirements that are currently not being completely met. Another aim of this study is to carry out preliminary benchmarking by contacting representative companies about their strategic directions in waste information. The information obtained from representatives of these organizations is contained in an appendix to the document; a full benchmarking effort, however, is beyond the intended scope of this study.

Sexton, J.L.; Neal, C.T.; Heath, T.C.; Starling, C.D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Technology development activities supporting tank waste remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes work being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The specific work activities are organized by the following categories: safety, characterization, retrieval, barriers, pretreatment, low-level waste, and high-level waste. In most cases, the activities presented here were identified as supporting tank remediation by EM-50 integrated program or integrated demonstration lead staff and the selections were further refined by contractor staff. Data sheets were prepared from DOE-HQ guidance to the field issued in September 1993. Activities were included if a significant portion of the work described provides technology potentially needed by TWRS; consequently, not all parts of each description necessarily support tank remediation.

Bonner, W.F.; Beeman, G.H.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Reports and summaries are provided for the following programs: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclide in soils; low-level waste generation reduction handbook; waste management system studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comp.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Thermal Treatment of Solid Wastes Using the Electric Arc Furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermal waste treatment facility has been developed at the Albany Research Center (ARC) over the past seven years to process a wide range of heterogeneous mixed wastes, on a scale of 227 to 907 kg/h (500 to 2,000 lb/h). The current system includes a continuous feed system, a 3-phase AC, 0.8 MW graphite electrode arc furnace, and a dedicated air pollution control system (APCS) which includes a close-coupled thermal oxidizer, spray cooler, baghouse, and wet scrubber. The versatility of the complete system has been demonstrated during 5 continuous melting campaigns, ranging from 11 to 25 mt (12 to 28 st) of treated wastes per campaign, which were conducted on waste materials such as (a) municipal incinerator ash, (b) simulated low-level radioactive, high combustible-bearing mixed wastes, (c) simulated low-level radioactive liquid tank wastes, (d) heavy metal contaminated soils, and (e) organic-contaminated dredging spoils. In all cases, the glass or slag products readily passed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Program (TCLP) test. Additional studies are currently under way on electric utility wastes, steel and aluminum industry wastes, as well as zinc smelter residues. Thermal treatment of these solid waste streams is intended to produce a metallic product along with nonhazardous glass or slag products.

O'Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

dispose of transuranic radioactive waste, or TRU waste, left over from the production of nuclear weapons. After more than 20 years of scientific study, public input, and...

312

A fuzzy multi-criteria group decision making framework for evaluating health-care waste disposal alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, as in all other organizations, the amount of waste generated in the health-care institutions is rising due to their extent of service. Medical waste management is a common problem of developing countries including Turkey, which are becoming ... Keywords: Fuzzy integral, Group decision making, Health-care waste management, Multi-criteria decision making, OWA

Mehtap Dursun; E. Ertugrul Karsak; Melis Almula Karadayi

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Virginia Waste Management Act (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Solid waste and hazardous waste are regulated under a number of programs at the Department of Environmental Quality. These programs are designed to encourage the reuse and recycling of solid waste...

314

Solid Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The main purpose of the Solid Waste Act is to authorize and direct the establishment of a comprehensive solid waste management program. The act states details about specific waste management...

315

Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

316

Waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats during FY 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rocky Flats Plant Transuranic Waste Drums were sampled for gas composition. Combustibles, plastics, Raschig rings, solidified organic sludge, and solidified inorganic sludge transuranic waste forms were sampled. Plastic bag material and waste samples were also taken from some solidified sludge waste drums. A vacuum system was used to sample each layer of containment inside a waste drum, including individual waste bags. G values (gas generation) were calculated for the waste drums. Analytical results indicate that very low concentrations of potentially flammable or corrosive gas mixtures will be found in vented drums. G(H{sub 2}) was usually below 1.6, while G(Total) was below 4.0. Hydrogen permeability tests on different types of plastic waste bags used at Rocky Flats were also conducted. Polyvinylchloride was slightly more permeable to hydrogen than polyethylene for new or creased material. Permeability of aged material to hydrogen was slightly higher than for new material. Solidified organic and inorganic sludges were sampled for volatile organics. The analytical results from two drums of solidified organic sludges showed concentrations were above detection limits for four of the 36 volatile organics analyzed. The analytical results for four of the five solidified inorganic sludges show that concentrations were below detection limits for all volatile organics analyzed. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Roggenthen, D.K.; McFeeters, T.L.; Nieweg, R.G.

1991-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mixed Waste Management Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of mixed waste presents serious challenges to nuclear utilities. Regulatory and practical predicaments make compliance with the letter of all applicable regulations extremely difficult. Utility experts developed these guidelines to identify opportunities for improving work practices and regulatory compliance while minimizing any potential adverse impacts of mixed waste management.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Mixed Waste Characterization Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the process of characterizing potential mixed waste streams from nuclear power plants. Utility experts developed these guidelines to help guide utility personnel through the characterization process and provide a mechanism for properly documenting the characterization of individual waste streams.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

BIOREMEDIATION OF URANIUM CONTAMINATED SOILS AND WASTES.  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (i) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (ii) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste such as Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Na released into solution are removed, thus reducing the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

FRANCIS,A.J.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

323

Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer.

Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO); Maness, Pin-Ching (Golden, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer. 3 figures.

Weaver, P.F.; Pinching Maness.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

326

SRS - Programs - Solid Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manner possible. SRS's waste is categorized as transuranic, low-level, hazardous, mixed, high-level or sanitary waste. SWM is responsible for managing all of these...

327

Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

328

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste"means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

329

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

330

Solid waste management of Jakarta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Solid waste management has been one of the critical issues in Jakarta, Indonesia.With enormous amounts of generated waste per day and limited supportinginfrastructure, the (more)

Trisyanti, Dini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids...

332

Drilling Waste Management Technology Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search you are in this section...

333

DOE Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange - Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 1, 2009 June 1, 2009 Agenda Hotel Information Registration Presentation Guidelines Poster Guidelines Webcast Waiver Contacts Home Waste Processing Technical Exchange Agenda (Version 1.1) Pre-Registration: Monday, May 18, 5:00p - 7:00p Organizer/Session Chair: Blocker (early registration & speaker check-in) Day 1: Tuesday, May 19 Registration - 7:00a - 8:00a Session One - Opening Session Two - Waste Retrieval and Closure 1 Session Three - Waste Form Development Day 2: Wednesday, May 20 Session Four - Pretreatment 1 Session Five - Facility Readiness and Start-up Session Six - Pretreatment 2 Session Seven - Waste Retrieval and Closure 2 Session Eight - Poster Presentations Day 3: Thursday, May 21 Session Nine - Regulatory Activity and Performance Assessment Session Ten - Waste Storage and Tank Farm Operational Improvements

334

Upgrading the Radioactive Waste Management Infrastructure in Azerbaijan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radionuclide uses in Azerbaijan are limited to peaceful applications in the industry, medicine, agriculture and research. The Baku Radioactive Waste Site (BRWS) 'IZOTOP' is the State agency for radioactive waste management and radioactive materials transport. The radioactive waste processing, storage and disposal facility is operated by IZOTOP since 1963 being significantly upgraded from 1998 to be brought into line with international requirements. The BRWS 'IZOTOP' is currently equipped with state-of-art devices and equipment contributing to the upgrade the radioactive waste management infrastructure in Azerbaijan in line with current internationally accepted practices. The IAEA supports Azerbaijan specialists in preparing syllabus and methodological materials for the Training Centre that is currently being organized on the base of the Azerbaijan BRWS 'IZOTOPE' for education of specialists in the area of safety management of radioactive waste: collection, sorting, processing, conditioning, storage and transportation. (authors)

Huseynov, A. [Baku Radioactive Waste Site IZOTOP, Baku (Azerbaijan); Batyukhnova, O. [State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, M. [Sheffield Univ., Immobilisation Science Lab. (United Kingdom); Rowat, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dept. of Nuclear Safety and Security, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999.

LUKE, S.N.

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Waste and biomass as energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Organic fuels can be manufactured by converting major sources of continuously renewable nonfossil carbon to synfuels that are interchangeable with, or can be substituted for, natural gas and petroleum-derived fuels. Promising sources of this carbon are waste materials, such as urban refuse, and biomass produced from solar energy by photosynthesis. The development of this concept is presented in this paper. The broad scope of the technology and its potential impact on energy supplies are reviewed. The renewable feature of both wastes and biomass makes them valuable natural resources that inevitably will be fully developed and commercialized as sources of energy-intensive products and synfuels. The perpetual availability of organic fuels will permit the conservation of valuable fossil fuel reserves, and, as time passes, offer a long-term solution to independence from foreign energy supplies and fossil fuel depletion.

Klass, Donald L.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t DOE 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1981. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): Record of Decision. Federal Register, Vol. 46, No. 18, p. 9162, (46 Federal Register 9162), January 28, 1981. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026-FS, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Record of Decision: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 121, 25689-25692, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1994. Comparative Study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transportation Alternatives.

338

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

339

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

340

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan, fiscal year 1994. Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A was promulgated in final form on September 26, 1988. The order requires heads of field organizations to prepare and to submit updates on the waste management plans for all operations under their purview according to the format in Chap. 6, {open_quotes}Waste Management Plan Outline.{close_quotes} These plans are to be submitted by the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) in December of each year and distributed to the DP-12, ES&H-1, and other appropriate DOE Headquarters (DOE-HQ) organizations for review and comment. This document was prepared in response to this requirement for fiscal year (FY) 1994. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) waste management mission is reduction, collection, storage, treatment, and disposal of DOE wastes, generated primarily in pursuit of ORNL missions, in order to protect human health and safety and the environment. In carrying out this mission, waste management staff in the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division (WMRAD) will (1) guide ORNL in optimizing waste reduction and waste management capabilities and (2) conduct waste management operations in a compliant, publicly acceptable, technically sound, and cost-efficient manner. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of this document is compilation and consolidation of information on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what activities are planned for FY 1994, and how all of the activities are documented.

Turner, J.W. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Anaerobic digestion as a waste disposal option for American Samoa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tuna sludge and municipal solid waste (MSW) generated on Tutuila Island, American Samoa, represent an ongoing disposal problem as well as an emerging opportunity for use in renewable fuel production. This research project focuses on the biological conversion of the organic fraction of these wastes to useful products including methane and fertilizer-grade residue through anaerobic high solids digestion. In this preliminary study, the anaerobic bioconversion of tuna sludge with MSW appears promising.

Rivard, C

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Gas generation from Tank 241-SY-103 waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress made in evaluating mechanisms by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using actual waste from Tank 241-SY-103. The objective of this work is to establish the identity and stoichiometry of degradation products formed in actual tank wastes by thermal and radiolytic processes as a function of temperature. The focus of the gas generation tests on Tank 241-SY-103 samples is first the effect of temperature on gas generation (volume and composition). Secondly, gas generation from irradiation of Tank 241-SY-103 samples at the corresponding temperatures as the thermal-only treatments will be measured in the presence of an external radiation source (using a {sup 137}Cs capsule). The organic content will be measured on a representative sample prior to gas generation experiments and again at the termination of heating and irradiation. The gas generation will be related to the extent of organic species consumption during heating. Described in this report are experimental methods used for producing and measuring gases generated at various temperatures from highly radioactive actual tank waste, and results of gas generation from Tank 241-SY-103 waste taken from its convective layer. The accurate measurement of gas generation rates from actual waste from highly radioactive waste tanks is needed to assess the potential for producing and storing flammable gases within the waste tanks. This report addresses the gas generation capacity of the waste from the convective layer of Tank 241-SY-103, a waste tank listed on the Flammable Gas Watch List due to its potential for flammable gas accumulation above the flammability limit.

Bryan, S.A.; King, C.M.; Pederson, L.R.; Forbes, S.V.; Sell, R.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

AVLIS production plant waste management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the executive summary, this document contains the following: (1) waste management facilities design objectives; (2) AVLIS production plant wastes; (3) waste management design criteria; (4) waste management plan description; and (5) waste management plan implementation. 17 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Broin Companies Broin Companies Corporate HQ: Sioux Falls, South Dakota Facility Location: Emmetsburg, Palo Alto County, Iowa Description: This Midwest-based company is an innovative corn dry mill technology provider and ethanol plant builder/owner. Their proposal will demonstrate the benefits of integrating an innovative corn waste to ethanol biochemical process into an existing dry corn mill infrastructure. CEO or Equivalent: Jeff Broin Participants: E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company; Novozymes North America, Inc.; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Production: * 125 million gallons/year of ethanol, of which roughly 25 percent will be from lignocellulosics. * Ethanol from lignocellulosic stream and ethanol, chemicals and animal feed from

345

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALICO, Inc. ALICO, Inc. Corporate HQ: LaBelle, Hendry County, Florida Proposed Facility Location: LaBelle, Florida Description: This company is a major agricultural company that will use an innovative thermochemical technology company that ferments synthesis gas. This thermochemical/fermentation conversion alternative could be suitable to feedstocks that are not easily processed biologically such as wood and wood wastes. CEO or Equivalent: John Alexander Participants: Bioengineering Resources, Inc. of Fayetteville, Arkansas; Washington Group International of Boise, Idaho; GeoSyntec Consultants of Boca Raton, Florida; BG Katz Companies/JAKS,LLC of Parkland, Florida; Emmaus Foundation, Inc. Production: * Ethanol, electricity, ammonia and hydrogen

346

Treatment of Mixed Wastes via Fixed Bed Gasification  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the details of research performed under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-96MC33258 to evaluate the ChemChar hazardous waste system for the destruction of mixed wastes, defined as those that contain both RCRA-regulated haz- ardous constituents and radionuclides. The ChemChar gasification system uses a granular carbonaceous char matrix to immobilize wastes and feed them into the gasifier. In the gasifier wastes are subjected to high temperature reducing conditions, which destroy the organic constituents and immobilize radionuclides on the regenerated char. Only about 10 percent of the char is consumed on each pass through the gasifier, and the regenerated char can be used to treat additional wastes. When tested on a 4-inch diameter scale with a continuous feed unit as part of this research, the ChemChar gasification system was found to be effective in destroying RCRA surrogate organic wastes (chlorobenzene, dichloroben- zene, and napht.halene) while retaining on the char RCRA heavy metals (chromium, nickel, lead, and cadmium) as well as a fission product surrogate (cesium) and a plutonium surrogate (cerium). No generation of harmful byproducts was observed. This report describes the design and testing of the ChemChar gasification system and gives the operating procedures to be followed in using the system safely and effectively for mixed waste treatment.

None

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

347

Analysis of Organic Rankine Cycle for Low and Medium Grade Heat Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is an effective technique to generate power from low and medium temperature heat source, including industrial waste heat, solar heat, geothermal and biomass etc. Advantages of ORC are high efficiency, simple system, environment ... Keywords: organic Rankine cycle, new energy, waste heat recovery

Zhonghe Han, Yida Yu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Tank Waste Remediation System fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 1.1. Revision 1, Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of data relating to the Tank Waste Remediation System Multi-Year Program. Topics discussed include: management systems; waste volume, transfer and evaporation management; transition of 200 East and West areas; ferricyanide, volatile organic vapor, and flammable gas management; waste characterization; retrieval from SSTs and DSTs; heat management; interim storage; low-level and high-level radioactive waste management; and tank farm closure.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290301  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290­301 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2002 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X Introduction Chromated copper of sorting technologies for CCA treated wood waste Monika Blassino Helena Solo-Gabriele University of Miami

Florida, University of

350

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O Waste Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O #12;· Waste Waste · Value () · · Flow #12;Genchi GenbutsuGenchi Genbutsu Top management should participate in regular "Ground Zero" walks CQI CQI RCA #12; waste/ value waste/ value · Eliminate · Re-arrange · Re-structure · Simplify · Combine · IT #12

Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

351

WASTE SEPARATION-DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE SEPARATION- DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS? A. John Chandler A a commendable job in proving that trace emissions from a modem waste to energy plant have little to do with the trace compounds in individual components of municipal solid waste. Ogden, the leader in designing

Columbia University

352

Waste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172177  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management & Research172 Waste Manage Res 2003: 21: 172­177 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2003 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X In many market segments of PVC in Germany increased by 9%, the fastest growth rate of all plastics. The waste stream in Germany

Columbia University

353

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN THE GREEN ECONOMY Submission to the Ministry of the Environment Regarding the Minister's Report on the Waste Diversion Act 2002 Review Submitted by: Submitted to of the Environment 10 Rambert Crescent Integrated Environmental Policy Division Toronto, Ontario M6S 1E6 Waste

Columbia University

354

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

355

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

356

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

An Act Concerning the Recycling of Organic Materials by Certain Food Wholesalers, Manufacturers, Supermarkets, and Conference Centers (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act requires all commercial food wholesalers and distributors, industrial food manufacturers, and resource and conservation centers that generate at least 104 tons of organic waste each year...

358

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O Waste Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L/O/G/OL/O/G/O #12;· Waste Waste · Value () · · Flow #12;Genchi GenbutsuGenchi Genbutsu of waste) Zero Inventory #12;Just in Time in HealthcareJust in Time in Healthcare Takt time (pitch), one · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5 WHY · · · RCA · · · 5 WHY · · #12; waste/ value waste/ value

Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Approach for tank safety characterization of Hanford site waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall approach and associated technical basis for characterizing Hanford Site waste to help identify and resolve Waste Tank Safety Program safety issues has been summarized. The safety issues include flammable gas, noxious vapors, organic solvents, condensed-phase exothermic reactions (ferrocyanide and organic complexants), criticality, high heat, and safety screening. For the safety issues involving chemical reactions (i.e., flammable gas, organic solvents, ferrocyanide, and organic complexants), the approach to safety characterization is based on the fact that rapid exothermic reactions cannot occur if either fuel, oxidizer, or temperature (initiators) is not sufficient or controlled. The approach to characterization has been influenced by the progress made since mid-1993: (1) completion of safety analyses on ferrocyanide, criticality, organic solvent in tank 241-C-103, and sludge dryout. (2) successful mitigation of tank 241-SY-101; (3) demonstration of waste aging in laboratory experiments and from waste sampling, and (4) increased understanding of the information that can be obtained from headspace sampling. Headspace vapor sampling is being used to confirm that flammable gas does not accumulate in the single-shell tanks, and to determine whether organic solvents are present. The headspaces of tanks that may contain significant quantities of flammable gas will be monitored continuously using standard hydrogen monitors. For the noxious vapors safety issue, characterization will consist of headspace vapor sampling of most of the Hanford Site waste tanks. Sampling specifically for criticality is not required to confirm interim safe storage; however, analyses for fissile material will be conducted as waste samples are obtained for other reasons. High-heat tanks will be identified through temperature monitoring coupled with thermal analyses.

Meacham, J.E.; Babad, H.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Eberlein, S.J.; Hamilton, D.W.; Johnson, G.D.; Osborne, J.W.; Payne, M.A.; Sherwood, D.J. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Plasma cleaning for waste minimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although plasma cleaning is a recognized substitute for solvent cleaning in removing organic contaminants, some universal problems in plasma cleaning processes prevent wider use of plasma techniques. Lack of understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of the process, unreliable endpoint detection techniques, and slow process times make plasma cleaning processes less than desirable. Our approach to address these plasma cleaning problems is described. A comparison of plasma cleaning rates of oxygen and oxygen/sulfur hexafluoride gases shows that fluorine-containing plasmas can enhance etch rates by 400% over oxygen alone. A discussion of various endpoint indication techniques is discussed and compared for application suitability. Work toward a plasma cleaning database is discussed. In addition to the global problems of plasma cleaning, an experiment where the specific mixed-waste problem of removal of machine oils from radioactive scrap metal is discussed.

Ward, P.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method for calcining radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA); McElroy, Jack L. (Richland, WA); Mendel, John E. (Kennewick, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration Florence, April 24 2009 Julie B. Svendsen 24 20092 Presentation · General introduction to Copenhagen Waste Management System · National incentives · Waste Management plan 2012 · Incineration plants #12;Florence, April 24 20093 Copenhagen Waste

Columbia University

365

Waste to Energy Time Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

Columbia University

366

Contained recovery of oily waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for recovering oily waste from oily waste accumulations underground comprising sweeping the oily waste accumulation with hot water to recover said oily waste, wherein said area treated is isolated from surrounding groundwater hydraulically. The hot water may be reinjected after the hot-water displacement or may be treated to conform to any discharge requirements.

Johnson, Jr., Lyle A. (Laramie, WY); Sudduth, Bruce C. (Laramie, WY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Urban Wood Waste Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study collected and analyzed data on urban wood waste resources in 30 randomly selected metropolitan areas in the United States. Three major categories wood wastes disposed with, or recovered from, the municipal solid waste stream; industrial wood wastes such as wood scraps and sawdust from pallet recycling, woodworking shops, and lumberyards; and wood in construction/demolition and land clearing debris.

Wiltsee, G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Environment Department addresses its responsibilities through activities in a variety of areas. The need for a comprehensive management control system for these activities has been identified by the Department of Energy (DOE). The WM QA (Waste Management Quality Assurance) Plan is an integral part of a management system that provides controls necessary to ensure that the department`s activities are planned, performed, documented, and verified. This WM QA Plan defines the requirements of the WM QA program. These requirements are derived from DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, the LBL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP, LBL PUB-3111), and other environmental compliance documents applicable to WM activities. The requirements presented herein, as well as the procedures and methodologies that direct the implementation of these requirements, will undergo review and revisions as necessary. The provisions of this QA Plan and its implementing documents apply to quality-affecting activities performed by and for WM. It is also applicable to WM contractors, vendors, and other LBL organizations associated with WM activities, except where such contractors, vendors, or organizations are governed by their own WM-approved QA programs. References used in the preparation of this document are (1) ASME NQA-1-1989, (2) ANSI/ASQC E4 (Draft), (3) Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (LBL PUB-5352, Rev. 1), (4) LBL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP), LBL PUB-3111, 2/3/93. A list of terms and definitions used throughout this document is included as Appendix A.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Tank Waste Strategy Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste Subcommittee www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 1 Tank Waste Subcommittee Ken Picha Office of Environmental Management December 5, 2011 Background Tank Waste Subcommittee (TWS)originally chartered, in response to Secretary's request to perform a technical review of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in May 2010. Three tasks: o Verification of closure of WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issues. o WTP Technical Design Review o WTP potential improvements Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 2 Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 Follow-on scope for TWS identified immediately after briefing to DOE and

370

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

371

Handford Waste Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Hanford Waste Diversion SAN Teleconference June 21, 2012 Tom Ferns, DOE-RL 2 Hanford Site Mission The Hanford Site is engaged in one of the largest and most complex environmental...

372

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

request for further delays After the EPA certified that the WIPP met the standards for disposal of transuranic waste in May 1998, then-New Mexico Attorney General Tom Udall...

373

ORNL radioactive waste operations  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards.

Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES - SIA RADON EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect

This review describes high temperature methods of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) treatment currently used at SIA Radon. Solid and liquid organic and mixed organic and inorganic wastes are subjected to plasma heating in a shaft furnace with formation of stable leach resistant slag suitable for disposal in near-surface repositories. Liquid inorganic radioactive waste is vitrified in a cold crucible based plant with borosilicate glass productivity up to 75 kg/h. Radioactive silts from settlers are heat-treated at 500-700 0C in electric furnace forming cake following by cake crushing, charging into 200 L barrels and soaking with cement grout. Various thermochemical technologies for decontamination of metallic, asphalt, and concrete surfaces, treatment of organic wastes (spent ion-exchange resins, polymers, medical and biological wastes), batch vitrification of incinerator ashes, calcines, spent inorganic sorbents, contaminated soil, treatment of carbon containing 14C nuclide, reactor graphite, lubricants have been developed and implemented.

Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Lifanov, F.A.; Kobelev, A.P.; Popkov, V.N.; Polkanov, M.A.; Savkin, A.E.; Varlakov, A.P.; Karlin, S.V.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Karlina, O.K.; Semenov, K.N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Municipal solid waste management in India: From waste disposal to recovery of resources?  

SciTech Connect

Unlike that of western countries, the solid waste of Asian cities is often comprised of 70-80% organic matter, dirt and dust. Composting is considered to be the best option to deal with the waste generated. Composting helps reduce the waste transported to and disposed of in landfills. During the course of the research, the author learned that several developing countries established large-scale composting plants that eventually failed for various reasons. The main flaw that led to the unsuccessful establishment of the plants was the lack of application of simple scientific methods to select the material to be composted. Landfills have also been widely unsuccessful in countries like India because the landfill sites have a very limited time frame of usage. The population of the developing countries is another factor that detrimentally impacts the function of landfill sites. As the population keeps increasing, the garbage quantity also increases, which, in turn, exhausts the landfill sites. Landfills are also becoming increasingly expensive because of the rising costs of construction and operation. Incineration, which can greatly reduce the amount of incoming municipal solid waste, is the second most common method for disposal in developed countries. However, incinerator ash may contain hazardous materials including heavy metals and organic compounds such as dioxins, etc. Recycling plays a large role in solid waste management, especially in cities in developing countries. None of the three methods mentioned here are free from problems. The aim of this study is thus to compare the three methods, keeping in mind the costs that would be incurred by the respective governments, and identify the most economical and best option possible to combat the waste disposal problem.

Narayana, Tapan [Hidayatullah National Law University, HNLU Bhawan, Civil Lines, Raipur 492001, Chhattisgarh (India)], E-mail: tapan.narayana@gmail.com

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Final Waste Forms (FWF) Technical Area Status Report (TASR) Working Group, the Vitrification Working Group (WG), and the Performance Standards Working Group were established as subgroups to the FWF Technical Support Group (TSG). The FWF TASR WG is comprised of technical representatives from most of the major DOE sites, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the EPA Office of Solid Waste, and the EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). The primary activity of the FWF TASR Working Group was to investigate and report on the current status of FWFs for LLNM in this TASR. The FWF TASR Working Group determined the current status of the development of various waste forms described above by reviewing selected articles and technical reports, summarizing data, and establishing an initial set of FWF characteristics to be used in evaluating candidate FWFS; these characteristics are summarized in Section 2. After an initial review of available information, the FWF TASR Working Group chose to study the following groups of final waste forms: hydraulic cement, sulfur polymer cement, glass, ceramic, and organic binders. The organic binders included polyethylene, bitumen, vinyl ester styrene, epoxy, and urea formaldehyde. Section 3 provides a description of each final waste form. Based on the literature review, the gaps and deficiencies in information were summarized, and conclusions and recommendations were established. The information and data presented in this TASR are intended to assist the FWF Production and Assessment TSG in evaluating the Technical Task Plans (TTPs) submitted to DOE EM-50, and thus provide DOE with the necessary information for their FWF decision-making process. This FWF TASR will also assist the DOE and the MWIP in establishing the most acceptable final waste forms for the various LLMW streams stored at DOE facilities.

Mayberry, J.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Medical and Biohazardous Waste Generator's Guide (Revision 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Training Medical/Biohazardous WasteInspections 7. Forms and Supplies Medical Waste AccumulationLog Ordering Medical Waste Supplies 8. Solid Medical Waste

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energys Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Developing and Implementing a Company-Wide Waste Accounting System at Public Service Electric & Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste accounting systems will enable utilities to track their recycling, reuse, and prevention efforts. This manual describes the implementation of EPRI's waste accounting method in support of Public Service Electric & Gas Company's pollution prevention efforts. This method provided a means for organizing information from many facilities, transmitting regular performance reports to facility personnel and management, and identifying opportunities for improving pollution prevention performance.

1998-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Analysis and stabilization of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s multiphase mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five drums of mixed waste were accepted from LBL during FY 1994; they contain inorganic acids and compounds, as well as organic reagents and radioactive materials. This document defines the work plan for stabilization and characterization of the waste in three of these 5 drums.

Crawford, B.A.

1995-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Pennsylvania Name Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Coal with CCS, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

383

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

384

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

385

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project Waste Form Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has created a waste acceptance process to help guide the overall program for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a federal repository. This Waste Form Qualification Program Plan describes the hierarchy of strategies used by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project to satisfy the waste form qualification obligations of that waste acceptance process. A description of the functional relationship of the participants contributing to completing this objective is provided. The major activities, products, providers, and associated scheduling for implementing the strategies also are presented.

Randklev, E.H.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Low level waste shipment accident lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

On October 1, 1994 a shipment of low-level waste from the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, was involved in an accident near Rolla, Missouri. The accident did not result in the release of any radioactive material. The accident did generate important lessons learned primarily in the areas of driver and emergency response communications. The shipment was comprised of an International Standards Organization (ISO) container on a standard flatbed trailer. The accident caused the low-level waste package to separate from the trailer and come to rest on its top in the median. The impact of the container with the pavement and median inflicted relatively minor damage to the container. The damage was not substantial enough to cause failure of container integrity. The success of the package is attributable to the container design and the packaging procedures used at the Fernald Environmental Management Project for low-level waste shipments. Although the container survived the initial wreck, is was nearly breached when the first responders attempted to open the ISO container. Even though the container was clearly marked and the shipment documentation was technically correct, this information did not identify that the ISO container was the primary containment for the waste. The lessons learned from this accident have DOE complex wide applicability. This paper is intended to describe the accident, subsequent emergency response operations, and the lessons learned from this incident.

Rast, D.M.; Rowe, J.G.; Reichel, C.W.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Waste -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Do not transport or ship hazardous material wastes off-site. Only Waste Management, Radiation Protection or approved...

390

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions the availability of tax credits for waste facilities. Energy recovery from the destruction of a hazardous waste may be...

391

Annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Report - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contain both combustible and noncombustible waste items. Combustible waste may include wood, plastics, paper, and rags. Noncombustible waste items may include metals, glass,...

392

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations & Criteria (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations & Criteria is to establish a minimum State Criteria under the Mississippi Solid Waste Law for all solid waste management...

393

Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Waste Isolation Pilot...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) The DOE Carlsbad Field Office funds a number of...

394

Determinants of sustainability in solid waste management - The Gianyar Waste Recovery Project in Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our assessment tool helps evaluate success factors in solid waste projects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Success of the composting plant in Indonesia is linked to its community integration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appropriate technology is not a main determining success factor for sustainability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structured assessment of 'best practices' can enhance replication in other cities. - Abstract: According to most experts, integrated and sustainable solid waste management should not only be given top priority, but must go beyond technical aspects to include various key elements of sustainability to ensure success of any solid waste project. Aside from project sustainable impacts, the overall enabling environment is the key feature determining performance and success of an integrated and affordable solid waste system. This paper describes a project-specific approach to assess typical success or failure factors. A questionnaire-based assessment method covers issues of: (i) social mobilisation and acceptance (social element), (ii) stakeholder, legal and institutional arrangements comprising roles, responsibilities and management functions (institutional element); (iii) financial and operational requirements, as well as cost recovery mechanisms (economic element). The Gianyar Waste Recovery Project in Bali, Indonesia was analysed using this integrated assessment method. The results clearly identified chief characteristics, key factors to consider when planning country wide replication but also major barriers and obstacles which must be overcome to ensure project sustainability. The Gianyar project consists of a composting unit processing 60 tons of municipal waste per day from 500,000 inhabitants, including manual waste segregation and subsequent composting of the biodegradable organic fraction.

Zurbruegg, Christian, E-mail: zurbrugg@eawag.ch [Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec), Ueberlandstrasse 133, P.O. Box 611, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Gfrerer, Margareth, E-mail: margareth.gfrerer@gmx.net [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Ashadi, Henki, E-mail: henki@eng.ui.ac.id [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Brenner, Werner, E-mail: werner.brenner@gmx.at [Faculty of Engineering, University of Indonesia, Depok Campus, 16424 Jakarta (Indonesia); Kueper, David, E-mail: dkuper@indo.net.id [Yayasan Pemilahan Sampah Temesi, Temsi-Gianyar, Bali (Indonesia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone The Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total. May 31, 2011 A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository. Contact Fred deSousa Communicatons Office (505) 665-3430 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 31, 2011 - Los Alamos National Laboratory has reached an important milestone in its campaign to ship transuranic (TRU) waste from Cold War-era nuclear operations to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This month, the Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total.

396

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

397

Waste form product characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has operated nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to support national interests for several decades. Since 1953, it has supported the development of technologies for the storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) and the resultant wastes. However, the 1992 decision to discontinue reprocessing of SNF has left nearly 768 MT of SNF in storage at the INEL with unspecified plans for future dispositioning. Past reprocessing of these fuels for uranium and other resource recovery has resulted in the production of 3800 M{sup 3} calcine and a total inventory of 7600 M{sup 3} of radioactive liquids (1900 M{sup 3} destined for immediate calcination and the remaining sodium-bearing waste requiring further treatment before calcination). These issues, along with increased environmental compliance within DOE and its contractors, mandate operation of current and future facilities in an environmentally responsible manner. This will require satisfactory resolution of spent fuel and waste disposal issues resulting from the past activities. A national policy which identifies requirements for the disposal of SNF and high level wastes (HLW) has been established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) Sec.8,(b) para(3)) [1982]. The materials have to be conditioned or treated, then packaged for disposal while meeting US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The spent fuel and HLW located at the INEL will have to be put into a form and package that meets these regulatory criteria. The emphasis of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) future operations has shifted toward investigating, testing, and selecting technologies to prepare current and future spent fuels and waste for final disposal. This preparation for disposal may include mechanical, physical and/or chemical processes, and may differ for each of the various fuels and wastes.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines December 23, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Aspen Cass, a relative of an EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) employee, holds donated coats with Farok Sharif (left), president and project manager of Nuclear Waste Partnership, the WIPP management and operating contractor, and Joe Franco, manager of CBFO. Aspen Cass, a relative of an EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) employee, holds donated coats with Farok Sharif (left), president and project manager of Nuclear Waste Partnership, the WIPP management and operating contractor, and Joe Franco, manager of CBFO. The clothing drive’s organizers — Margaret Gee (left), Yolanda Navarrete (center) and Dana Dorr — hold up some of the donated coats before providing them to Carlsbad area schools. Gee is with CBFO and Navarrete and Dorr are with Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP). NWP's Yolanda Salmon, another drive organizer, is not pictured.

399

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you. Are your waste containers properly labeled? us Waste label as soon t Do you accumulate waste in a safe

Wilcock, William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-recycled organic waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A summary of available information on ferrocyanide tank wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford site during the mid to late 1950s to make more tank space available for the storage of high level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed as a method of removing {sup 137}Cs from existing waste solutions and from process solutions that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in waste tanks. During the coarse of the research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was discovered that ferrocyanide materials when mixed with NaNO{sub 3} and/or NaNO{sub 2} exploded. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s when the safety associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety associated with these wastes and the current research and waste management programs. Over the past three years, numerous explosive test have been carried out using milligram quantities of cyanide compounds. These tests provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions. On heating a mixture of ferrocyanide and nitrate or nitrite, an explosive reaction normally begins at about 240{degrees}C, but may occur well below 200{degrees}C in the presence of catalysts or organic compounds that may act as initiators. The energy released is highly dependent on the course of the reaction. Three attempts to model hot spots in local areas of the tanks indicate a very low probability of having a hot spot large enough and hot enough to be of concern. The main purpose of this document is to inform the members of the Tank Waste Science Panel of the background and issues associated with the ferrocyanide wastes. Hopefully, this document fulfills similar needs outside of the framework of the Tank Waste Science Panel. 50 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

Burger, L.L.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Reynolds, D.A. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Schulz, W.W. (Schulz (W.W.), Wilmington, DE (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Biodegradation of hazardous waste using white rot fungus: Project planning and concept development document  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been shown to effectively degrade pollutants such as trichlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins and other halogenated aromatic compounds. These refractory organic compounds and many others have been identified in the tank waste, groundwater and soil of various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The treatment of these refractory organic compounds has been identified as a high priority for DOE's Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT E) waste treatment programs. Unlike many bacteria, the white rot fungus P. chrysosporium is capable of degrading these types of refractory organics and may be valuable for the treatment of wastes containing multiple pollutants. The objectives of this project are to identify DOE waste problems amenable to white rot fungus treatment and to develop and demonstrate white rot fungus treatment process for these hazardous organic compounds. 32 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Luey, J.; Brouns, T.M.; Elliott, M.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

EA-1135: Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to treat contact-handled low-level mixed waste, containing polychlorinated biphenyls and other organics, to meet existing regulatory...

404

Stepping Towards Sustainable Business: An Evaluation of Waste Minimization Practices in US Manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central to the movement of organizations toward environmental sustainability is the financial viability and environmental effectiveness of the techniques for improving environmental performance. While waste-minimization practices (WMPs) have been touted ... Keywords: Environment, Organizational studies--effectiveness--performance

Iain J. Clelland; Thomas J. Dean; Thomas J. Douglas

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Review and Status of Solid Waste Management Practices in Multan, Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trucks Suzuki Vans Truck Compost Water Sprinkling Vehicles3solid wastes by making compost of the organic content of theafter the sale of the compost the profit was to be shared

Shoaib, Muhammad; Mirza, Umar Karim; Sarwar, Muhammad Avais

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Microbial effects on radioactive wastes at SLB sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are to determine the significance of microbial degradation of organic wastes on radionuclide migration on shallow land burial for humid and arid sites, establish which mechanisms predominate and ascertain the conditions under which these mechanisms operate. Factors contolling gaseous eminations from low-level radioactive waste disposal sites are assessed. Importance of gaseous fluxes of methane, carbon dioxide and possibly hydrogen from the site stems from the inclusion of tritium and/or /sup 14/C into the elemental composition of these compounds. In that the primary source of these gases is the biodegradation of organic components of the waste materials, primary emphasis of the study involved on examination of the biochemical pathways producing methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and the environmental parameters controlling the activity of the microbial community involved. Although the methane and carbon dioxide production rate indicates the degradation rate of the organic substances in the waste, it does not predict the methane evolution rate from the trench site. Methane fluxes from the soil surface are equivalent to the net synthesis minus the quantity oxidized by the microbial community as the gas passes through the soil profile. Gas studies were performed at three commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (West Valley, New York; Beatty, Nevada; Maxey Flats, Kentucky) during the period 1976 to 1978. The results of these studies are presented. 3 tables.

Colombo, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Systematic evaluation of options to avoid generation of noncertifiable transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

At present, >35% of the volume of newly generated transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory is not certifiable for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Noncertifiable waste would constitute 900--1,000 m{sup 3} of the 2,600 m{sup 3} of waste projected during the period of the Environmental Management (EM) Accelerated Cleanup: Focus on 2006 plan (DOE, 1997). Volume expansion of this waste to meet thermal limits would increase the shipped volume to {approximately}5,400 m{sup 3}. This paper presents the results of efforts to define which TRU waste streams are noncertifiable at Los Alamos, and to prioritize site-specific options to reduce the volume of certifiable waste over the period of the EM Accelerated Cleanup Plan. A team of Los Alamos TRU waste generators and waste managers reviewed historic generation rates and thermal loads and current practices to estimate the projected volume and thermal load of TRU waste streams for Fiscal Years 1999--2006. These data defined four major problem TRU waste streams. Estimates were also made of the volume expansion that would be required to meet the permissible wattages for all waste. The four waste streams defined were: (1) {sup 238}Pu-contaminated combustible waste from production of Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) with {sup 238}Pu activity which exceeds allowable shipping limits by 10--100X. (2) {sup 241}Am-contaminated cement waste from plutonium recovery processes (nitric and hydrochloric acid recovery) are estimated to exceed thermal limits by {approximately}3X. (3) {sup 239}Pu-contaminated combustible waste, mainly organic waste materials contaminated with {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am, is estimated to exceed thermal load requirements by a factor of {approximately}2X. (4) Oversized metal waste objects, (especially gloveboxes), cannot be shipped as is to WIPP because they will not fit in a standard waste box or drum.

Boak, J.M.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Triay, I.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Montoya, A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER EG&G IDAHO, INC. SUBCONTRACT NO. EGG-C93-170221, W(A)-93-005, CH-0757 Under this subcontract, Waste Management Environmental Services, Inc. (WMES) will demonstrate key technical features of its proposed Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Pit-9 remediation program. Pit-9 is an area in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL containing radioactive and hazardous materials in the form of toxic metals and organic materials, including plutonium and americium. Specifically, the subject subcontract is directed toward a Proof-of-Process (POP) demonstration program intended to provide EG&G Idaho, Inc. (EG&G) with additional information that it will use in the

409

Environment Canada research on land treatment of petroleum wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the studies presented in this book is to identify wastes which can be applied to land in an environmentally acceptable manner and to provide information on which to base guidelines for the proper application of such wastes to land. The information which has been collected to date has focused on the persistence and fate of oil and toxic constituents of petroleum wastes when applied to soil, potential environmental impacts and risk to human health associated with application to land, and site managements techniques which enhance treatment of organic constituents of wastes while protecting environmental quality. The potential for contamination of groundwater, the accumulation of hazardous substances in soil and effects on plant growth have undergone the most intensive investigation to date. Impingement on air quality has received limited study.

Bulman, T.L.; Scroggins, R.P. (Wastewater Technolgy Centre, Burlington, Ontario (CA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies to economically recover low-temperature waste energy in chemical plants and refineries are the holy grail of industrial energy efficiency. Low temperature waste energy streams were defined by the Texas Industries of the Future Chemical and Refining Sectors Advisory Committee as streams with a temperature below 400 degrees F. Their waste energy streams were also characterized as to state, flow rate, heat content, source and temperature. These criteria were then used to identify potential candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle, and fuel cell technologies. This paper characterizes each of these technologies, technical specifications, limitations, potential costs/ payback and commercialization status as was discussed in the Technology Forum held in Houston, TX in May 2012 (TXIOF 2012).

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

R D activities at DOE applicable to mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Within the new organization, the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is responsible for research, development, demonstration, testing and evaluation (RDDT E) activities aimed at meeting DOE cleanup goals, while minimizing cost and risk. Because of US governmental activities dating back to the Manhattan project, mixed radioactive and hazardous waste is an area of particular concern to DOE. The OTD is responsible for a number of R D activities aimed at improving capabilities to characterize, control, and properly dispose of mixed waste. These activities and their progress to date will be reviewed. In addition, needs for additional R D on managing mixed waste will be presented. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

Erickson, M.D.; Devgun, J.S.; Brown, J.J.; Beskid, N.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Transportation functions of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System  

SciTech Connect

Within the framework of Public Law 97.425 and provisions specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 961, the US Department of Energy has the responsibility to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from various organizations which have entered into a contract with the federal government in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers. In implementing these requirements, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, among other things, supported the identification of functions that must be performed by a transportation system (TS) that will accept the waste for transport to a federal facility for storage and/or disposal. This document, through the application of system engineering principles, identifies the functions that must be performed to transport waste under this law.

Shappert, L.B. (ed.); Attaway, C.R.; Pope, R.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Dixon, L.D. (Dixon (L.D.), Martinez, GA (United States)); Jones, R.H. (Jones (R.H.), Los Gatos, CA (United States)); Klimas, M.J. (USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (United States)); Peterson, R.W

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Sustainable recycling of municipal solid waste in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

This research focuses on recycling in developing countries as one form of sustainable municipal solid waste management (MSWM). Twenty-three case studies provided municipal solid waste (MSW) generation and recovery rates and composition for compilation and assessment. The average MSW generation rate was 0.77 kg/person/day, with recovery rates from 5-40%. The waste streams of 19 of these case studies consisted of 0-70% recyclables and 17-80% organics. Qualitative analysis of all 23 case studies identified barriers or incentives to recycling, which resulted in the development of factors influencing recycling of MSW in developing countries. The factors are government policy, government finances, waste characterization, waste collection and segregation, household education, household economics, MSWM (municipal solid waste management) administration, MSWM personnel education, MSWM plan, local recycled-material market, technological and human resources, and land availability. Necessary and beneficial relationships drawn among these factors revealed the collaborative nature of sustainable MSWM. The functionality of the factor relationships greatly influenced the success of sustainable MSWM. A correlation existed between stakeholder involvement and the three dimensions of sustainability: environment, society, and economy. The only factors driven by all three dimensions (waste collection and segregation, MSWM plan, and local recycled-material market) were those requiring the greatest collaboration with other factors.

Troschinetz, Alexis M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sustainable Futures Institute, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)], E-mail: alexis_troschinetz@yahoo.com; Mihelcic, James R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sustainable Futures Institute, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

415

Understanding waste phenomenology to reduce the amount of sampling and analysis required to resolve Hanford waste tank safety issues  

SciTech Connect

Safety issues associated with Hanford Site waste tanks arose because of inadequate safety analyses and high levels of uncertainty over the release of radioactivity resulting from condensed phase exothermic chemical reactions (organic solvent fires, organic complexant-nitrate reactions, and ferrocyanide-nitrate reactions). The approach to resolving the Organic Complexant, Organic Solvent, and Ferrocyanide safety issues has changed considerably since 1990. The approach formerly utilized core sampling and extensive analysis of the samples with the expectation the data would provide insight into the hazard. This resulted in high costs and the generation of a large amount of data that was of limited value in resolving the safety issues. The new approach relies on an understanding of the hazard phenomenology to focus sampling and analysis on those analytes that are key to ensuring safe storage of the waste.

Meacham, J.E.; Babad, H.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

DOE Waste Treatability Group Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidance presents a method and definitions for aggregating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste into streams and treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. Adaptable to all DOE waste types (i.e., radioactive waste, hazardous waste, mixed waste, sanitary waste), the guidance establishes categories and definitions that reflect variations within the radiological, matrix (e.g., bulk physical/chemical form), and regulated contaminant characteristics of DOE waste. Beginning at the waste container level, the guidance presents a logical approach to implementing the characteristic parameter categories as part of the basis for defining waste streams and as the sole basis for assigning streams to treatability groups. Implementation of this guidance at each DOE site will facilitate the development of technically defined, site-specific waste stream data sets to support waste management planning and reporting activities. Consistent implementation at all of the sites will enable aggregation of the site-specific waste stream data sets into comparable national data sets to support these activities at a DOE complex-wide level.

Kirkpatrick, T.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Inconsistent pathways of household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to provide policy-makers and waste management planners with information about how recycling programs affect the quantities of specific materials recycled and disposed of. Two questions were addressed: which factors influence household waste generation and pathways? and how reliable are official waste data? Household waste flows were studied in 35 Swedish municipalities, and a wide variation in the amount of waste per capita was observed. When evaluating the effect of different waste collection policies, it was found to be important to identify site-specific factors influencing waste generation. Eleven municipal variables were investigated in an attempt to explain the variation. The amount of household waste per resident was higher in populous municipalities and when net commuting was positive. Property-close collection of dry recyclables led to increased delivery of sorted metal, plastic and paper packaging. No difference was seen in the amount of separated recyclables per capita when weight-based billing for the collection of residual waste was applied, but the amount of residual waste was lower. Sixteen sources of error in official waste statistics were identified and the results of the study emphasize the importance of reliable waste generation and composition data to underpin waste management policies.

Dahlen, Lisa [Division of Waste Science and Technology, Lulea University of Technology, SE, 971 87 Lulea (Sweden)], E-mail: lisa.dahlen@ltu.se; Aberg, Helena [Department of Food, Health and Environment, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 12204, SE, 402 42 Gothenburg (Sweden); Lagerkvist, Anders [Division of Waste Science and Technology, Lulea University of Technology, SE, 971 87 Lulea (Sweden); Berg, Per E.O. [HB Anttilator, Stagnellsgatan 3, SE, 652 23, Karlstad (Sweden)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Waste Form Performance Modeling [Nuclear Waste Management using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

419

Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important).

Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Transuranic Waste Tabletop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste (Hazard Class 7 Radioactive) Moderator's Version of Tabletop Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-07D.p65 This page intentionally left blank table of contents Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) planning tools planning tools planning tools planning tools T T T T Tr r r r ransur ansur ansur ansur ansuranic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) Waste aste aste aste aste (Hazar (Hazar (Hazar (Hazar (Hazard Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radioactiv activ activ activ active) e) e) e) e) Moder Moder Moder Moder Moderat at at at ator' or' or' or' or's V s V s V s V s Version of T ersion of T ersion of T ersion of T ersion of Tablet ablet ablet ablet abletop

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421

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 3 T he journey to the WIPP began nearly 60 years before the first barrels of transuranic waste arrived at the repository. The United States produced the world's first sig- nificant quantities of transuranic material during the Manhattan Project of World War II in the early 1940s. The government idled its plutonium- producing reactors and warhead manu- facturing plants at the end of the Cold War and scheduled most of them for dismantlement. However, the DOE will generate more transuranic waste as it cleans up these former nuclear weapons facilities. The WIPP is a cor- nerstone of the effort to clean up these facilities by providing a safe repository to isolate transuranic waste in disposal rooms mined out of ancient salt beds, located 2,150 feet below ground. The need for the WIPP

422

RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

423

THE SUCCESSFUL UTILIZATION OF COMMERCIAL TREATMENT CAPABILITIES TO DISPOSITION HANFORD NO-PATH-FORWARD SUSPECT TRANSURANIC WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) has adopted the 2015 Vision for Cleanup of the Hanford Site. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company's (CHPRC) Waste and Fuels Management Project (W&FMP) and their partners support this mission by providing centralized waste management services for the Hanford Site waste generating organizations. At the time of the CHPRC contract award (August 2008) slightly more than 9,000 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of legacy waste was defined as ''no-path-forward waste.'' A significant portion of this waste (7,650 m{sup 3}) comprised wastes with up to 50 grams of special nuclear materials (SNM) in oversized packages recovered during retrieval operations and large glove boxes removed from Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Through a collaborative effort between the DOE, CHPRC, and Perma-Fix Environmental Services, Inc. (PESI), pathways for these problematic wastes were developed and are currently being implemented.

BLACKFORD LT; CATLOW RL; WEST LD; COLLINS MS; ROMINE LD; MOAK DJ

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

Weigh your waste: a sustainable way to reduce waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increased concern for the environment has brought about an arena to develop and experiment with new devices to support sustainable design. The 'Weigh Your Waste' (WYW) device will allow the user to monitor their waste charges and provide a platform ... Keywords: bin tax, pay by weight, proenvironmental behavior, recycling, rubbish, sustainable design, trash, waste

Alex A. Gartland; Paulina Piasek

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Applicant Organization: | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applicant Organization: Applicant Organization: Applicant Organization: More Documents & Publications BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Applicant Organization: Applicant Organization:...

426

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE STATE _______________ ) ) ss: __________________ COUNTY OF _____________ ) That I, ________________________, am the _________________________ (Indicate relationship) of ___________________________, who is deceased and make the attached request pursuant to 10 CFR, Section 1008. That the information contained on the attached request is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I am signing this authorization subject to the penalties provided in 18 U.S.C. 1001. ____________________________ SIGNATURE NOTARIZATION: SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this ______day of __________, 20_____

427

Ferrocyanide waste simulant characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide waste simulants were prepared and characterized to help assess safety concerns associated with the ferrocyanide sludges stored in underground single-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Simulants were prepared to represent the variety of ferrocyanide sludges stored in the storage tanks. Physical properties, chemical compositions, and thermodynamic properties of the simulants were determined. The simulants, as produced, were shown to not sustain propagating reactions when subjected to a strong ignition source. Additional testing and evaluations are recommended to assess safety concerns associated with postulated ferrocyanide sludge dry-out and exposure to external ignition sources.

Jeppson, D.W.; Wong, J.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Explosive Waste Treatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

106 106 Environment a 1 Assessment for th.e Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MASTER November 1995 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Washington, DOC. 20585 Portions of this document maly be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Table of Contents 1 . 0 2.0 3 . 0 4.0 5 . 0 6.0 7 . 0 8 . 0 Document Summary .............................................................. 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ............................................. 3 Description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives ............................ 4 3.1.1 Location ............................................................. 4

429

Metal decontamination for waste minimization using liquid metal refining technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current Department of Energy Mixed Waste Treatment Project flowsheet indicates that no conventional technology, other than surface decontamination, exists for metal processing. Current Department of Energy guidelines require retrievable storage of all metallic wastes containing transuranic elements above a certain concentration. This project is in support of the National Mixed Low Level Waste Treatment Program. Because of the high cost of disposal, it is important to develop an effective decontamination and volume reduction method for low-level contaminated metals. It is important to be able to decontaminate complex shapes where surfaces are hidden or inaccessible to surface decontamination processes and destruction of organic contamination. These goals can be achieved by adapting commercial metal refining processes to handle radioactive and organic contaminated metal. The radioactive components are concentrated in the slag, which is subsequently vitrified; hazardous organics are destroyed by the intense heat of the bath. The metal, after having been melted and purified, could be recycled for use within the DOE complex. In this project, we evaluated current state-of-the-art technologies for metal refining, with special reference to the removal of radioactive contaminants and the destruction of hazardous organics. This evaluation was based on literature reports, industrial experience, plant visits, thermodynamic calculations, and engineering aspects of the various processes. The key issues addressed included radioactive partitioning between the metal and slag phases, minimization of secondary wastes, operability of the process subject to widely varying feed chemistry, and the ability to seal the candidate process to prevent the release of hazardous species.

Joyce, E.L. Jr.; Lally, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical manual  

SciTech Connect

A key element of the Hanford waste management strategy is the construction of a new facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), to vitrify existing and future liquid high-level waste produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. The HWVP mission is to vitrify pretreated waste in borosilicate glass, cast the glass into stainless steel canisters, and store the canisters at the Hanford Site until they are shipped to a federal geological repository. The HWVP Technical Manual (Manual) documents the technical bases of the current HWVP process and provides a physical description of the related equipment and the plant. The immediate purpose of the document is to provide the technical bases for preparation of project baseline documents that will be used to direct the Title 1 and Title 2 design by the A/E, Fluor. The content of the Manual is organized in the following manner. Chapter 1.0 contains the background and context within which the HWVP was designed. Chapter 2.0 describes the site, plant, equipment and supporting services and provides the context for application of the process information in the Manual. Chapter 3.0 provides plant feed and product requirements, which are primary process bases for plant operation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes the technology for each plant process. Chapter 5.0 describes the engineering principles for designing major types of HWVP equipment. Chapter 6.0 describes the general safety aspects of the plant and process to assist in safe and prudent facility operation. Chapter 7.0 includes a description of the waste form qualification program and data. Chapter 8.0 indicates the current status of quality assurance requirements for the Manual. The Appendices provide data that are too extensive to be placed in the main text, such as extensive tables and sets of figures. The Manual is a revision of the 1987 version.

Larson, D.E. [ed.; Watrous, R.A.; Kruger, O.L. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Solid Waste Management Program (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Solid Waste Management Program in the Department of Natural Resources regulates the management of solid waste in the state of Missouri. A permit is required prior to the construction or...

432

Waste Management Assistance Act (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section promotes the proper and safe storage, treatment, and disposal of solid, hazardous, and low-level radioactive wastes in Iowa, and calls on Iowans to assume responsibility for waste...

433

Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals,...

434

The reduction of packaging waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one third of the waste being sent to our solid waste landfills. These wastes range from product and shipping containers made from plastic, glass, wood, and corrugated cardboard to packaging fillers and wraps made from a variety of plastic materials such as shrink wrap and polystyrene peanuts. The amount of packaging waste generated is becoming an important issue for manufacturers, retailers, and consumers. Elimination of packaging not only conserves precious landfill space, it also reduces consumption of raw materials and energy, all of which result in important economic and environmental benefits. At the US Department of Energy-Richland Field Office's (DOE-RL) Hanford Site as well as other DOE sites the generation of packaging waste has added importance. By reducing the amount of packaging waste, DOE also reduces the costs and liabilities associated with waste handling, treatment, storage, and disposal.

Raney, E.A.; McCollom, M.; Hogan, J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The reduction of packaging waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one third of the waste being sent to our solid waste landfills. These wastes range from product and shipping containers made from plastic, glass, wood, and corrugated cardboard to packaging fillers and wraps made from a variety of plastic materials such as shrink wrap and polystyrene peanuts. The amount of packaging waste generated is becoming an important issue for manufacturers, retailers, and consumers. Elimination of packaging not only conserves precious landfill space, it also reduces consumption of raw materials and energy, all of which result in important economic and environmental benefits. At the US Department of Energy-Richland Field Office`s (DOE-RL) Hanford Site as well as other DOE sites the generation of packaging waste has added importance. By reducing the amount of packaging waste, DOE also reduces the costs and liabilities associated with waste handling, treatment, storage, and disposal.

Raney, E.A.; McCollom, M.; Hogan, J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas) Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation...

437

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Gro