Sample records for non-pmm regional structure

  1. Effects of Economic Structure on Regional Economic Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Sa Heum

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    critical factor that constitutes regional economic performance. Thus, in this dissertation, I evaluate regional economic performance in terms of both growth and stability. In most previous studies, economic structure was found to be a factor that can...

  2. Interpreting Helioseismic Structure Inversion Results of Solar Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chia-Hsien Lin; Sarbani Basu; Linghuai Li

    2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Helioseismic techniques such as ring-diagram analysis have often been used to determine the subsurface structural differences between solar active and quiet regions. Results obtained by inverting the frequency differences between the regions are usually interpreted as the sound-speed differences between them. These in turn are used as a measure of temperature and magnetic-field strength differences between the two regions. In this paper we first show that the "sound-speed" difference obtained from inversions is actually a combination of sound-speed difference and a magnetic component. Hence, the inversion result is not directly related to the thermal structure. Next, using solar models that include magnetic fields, we develop a formulation to use the inversion results to infer the differences in the magnetic and thermal structures between active and quiet regions. We then apply our technique to existing structure inversion results for different pairs of active and quiet regions. We find that the effect of magnetic fields is strongest in a shallow region above 0.985R_sun and that the strengths of magnetic-field effects at the surface and in the deeper (r < 0.98R_sun) layers are inversely related, i.e., the stronger the surface magnetic field the smaller the magnetic effects in the deeper layers, and vice versa. We also find that the magnetic effects in the deeper layers are the strongest in the quiet regions, consistent with the fact that these are basically regions with weakest magnetic fields at the surface. Because the quiet regions were selected to precede or follow their companion active regions, the results could have implications about the evolution of magnetic fields under active regions.

  3. Deuteron Spin Structure Functions in the Resonance and DIS Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Kulagin; W. Melnitchouk

    2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive relations between spin-dependent nuclear and nucleon g_1 and g_2 structure functions, valid at all Q^2, and in both the resonance and deep inelastic regions. We apply the formalism to the specific case of the deuteron, which is often used as a source of neutron structure information, and compare the size of the nuclear corrections calculated using exact kinematics and using approximations applicable at large Q^2.

  4. QUANTIFYING THE EVOLVING MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlon, Paul A.; McAteer, R.T. James; Gallagher, Peter T.; Fennell, Linda, E-mail: mcateer@nmsu.ed [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The topical and controversial issue of parameterizing the magnetic structure of solar active regions has vital implications in the understanding of how these structures form, evolve, produce solar flares, and decay. This interdisciplinary and ill-constrained problem of quantifying complexity is addressed by using a two-dimensional wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method to study the multifractal properties of active region photospheric magnetic fields. The WTMM method provides an adaptive space-scale partition of a fractal distribution, from which one can extract the multifractal spectra. The use of a novel segmentation procedure allows us to remove the quiet Sun component and reliably study the evolution of active region multifractal parameters. It is shown that prior to the onset of solar flares, the magnetic field undergoes restructuring as Dirac-like features (with a Hoelder exponent, h = -1) coalesce to form step functions (where h = 0). The resulting configuration has a higher concentration of gradients along neutral line features. We propose that when sufficient flux is present in an active region for a period of time, it must be structured with a fractal dimension greater than 1.2, and a Hoelder exponent greater than -0.7, in order to produce M- and X-class flares. This result has immediate applications in the study of the underlying physics of active region evolution and space weather forecasting.

  5. Trench process and structure for backside contact solar cells with polysilicon doped regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Ceuster, Denis; Cousins, Peter John; Smith, David D

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell includes polysilicon P-type and N-type doped regions on a backside of a substrate, such as a silicon wafer. An interrupted trench structure separates the P-type doped region from the N-type doped region in some locations but allows the P-type doped region and the N-type doped region to touch in other locations. Each of the P-type and N-type doped regions may be formed over a thin dielectric layer. Among other advantages, the resulting solar cell structure allows for increased efficiency while having a relatively low reverse breakdown voltage.

  6. Trench process and structure for backside contact solar cells with polysilicon doped regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Ceuster, Denis; Cousins, Peter John; Smith, David D

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell includes polysilicon P-type and N-type doped regions on a backside of a substrate, such as a silicon wafer. An interrupted trench structure separates the P-type doped region from the N-type doped region in some locations but allows the P-type doped region and the N-type doped region to touch in other locations. Each of the P-type and N-type doped regions may be formed over a thin dielectric layer. Among other advantages, the resulting solar cell structure allows for increased efficiency while having a relatively low reverse breakdown voltage.

  7. Trench process and structure for backside contact solar cells with polysilicon doped regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Ceuster, Denis (Woodside, CA); Cousins, Peter John (Menlo Park, CA); Smith, David D. (Campbell, CA)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell includes polysilicon P-type and N-type doped regions on a backside of a substrate, such as a silicon wafer. An interrupted trench structure separates the P-type doped region from the N-type doped region in some locations but allows the P-type doped region and the N-type doped region to touch in other locations. Each of the P-type and N-type doped regions may be formed over a thin dielectric layer. Among other advantages, the resulting solar cell structure allows for increased efficiency while having a relatively low reverse breakdown voltage.

  8. Evolution of HII regions in hierarchically structured molecular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Shabala; Simon Ellingsen; Stan Kurtz; Larry Forbes

    2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of the H91$\\alpha$ recombination line emission towards a sample of nine HII regions associated with 6.7-GHz methanol masers, and report arcsecond-scale emission around compact cores. We derive physical parameters for our sources, and find that although simple hydrostatic models of region evolution reproduce the observed region sizes, they significantly underestimate emission measures. We argue that these findings are consistent with young source ages in our sample, and can be explained by existence of density gradients in the ionised gas.

  9. MIRCO-STRUCTURES OF RF SURFACES IN THE ELECTRON-BEAM-WELD REGIONS OF NIOBIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Rong-Li

    MIRCO-STRUCTURES OF RF SURFACES IN THE ELECTRON-BEAM-WELD REGIONS OF NIOBIUM R.L. Gengyz , J-structures of RF surfaces in the electron-beam-weld (EBW) regions of niobium samples were studied. These surfaces.These observations have important impli- cations in explanations of the high-field-Q-drop of niobium superconducting

  10. Regional Structural Skeletal Discordance Assessed by Measures of Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzejak, Artur

    of complexity. Material and Methods: Out of a sample size of 30, 29 human specimens (a case with bone affecting). The skeletal regions distal radius, middle of the femoral neck and head, midaxial L3, proximal tibia (17 mm hole, femoral neck, calcaneus, distal radius, midshaft humerus, femoral head. The symbol annotation

  11. Detecting Cortical Surface Regions in Structural MR Data Biswajit Bose1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher III, John

    Detecting Cortical Surface Regions in Structural MR Data Biswajit Bose1, , John Fisher1 , Bruce on a challenging ex-vivo structural MR dataset for detection of Brodmann area 17. 1. Introduction Detection-resolution MR volume. Figure 1 shows a slice through structural MR data of the primary vi- sual cortex, where BA

  12. Density structure of an active region and associated moss using Hinode/EIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Tripathi; H. E. Mason; P. R. Young; G. Del Zanna

    2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: Studying the problem of active region heating requires precise measurements of physical plasma parameters such as electron density, temperature etc. It is also important to understand the relationship of coronal structures with the magnetic field. The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) aboard Hinode provides a rare opportunity to derive electron density simultaneously at different temperatures. Aims: MethodsWe study the density structure and characterise plasma in active regions and associated moss regions. In addition we study its relationship to the photospheric magnetic field. Methods: We used data recorded by the EIS, together with magnetic field measurements from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard SoHO and images recorded with the Transition Region And Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT/Hinode). Results: We find that the hot core of the active region is densest with values as high as 10^10.5 cm^-3. The electron density estimated in specific regions in the active region moss decreases with increasing temperature. The moss areas were located primarily on one side of the active region, and they map the positive polarity regions almost exactly. The density within the moss region was highest at log T=5.8-6.1, with a value around 10^(10.0-10.5) cm^-3. The moss densities were highest in the strong positive magnetic field region. However, there was no such correlation for the negative polarity areas, where there was a large sunspot.

  13. Beyond Basic Region Caching: Specializing Cache Structures for High Performance and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Sally A.

    Beyond Basic Region Caching: Specializing Cache Structures for High Performance and Energy University Tallahassee, FL 32306-4530 tyson@cs.fsu.edu Abstract. Increasingly tight energy design goals with a set of smaller region caches that significantly reduces energy consumption with little performance

  14. Regional-scale effects of eutrophication on ecosystem structure and services of seagrass beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    Regional-scale effects of eutrophication on ecosystem structure and services of seagrass beds with increasing eutrophication. As eutrophication increased, phytoplankton biomass increased on average 1.8 times to increasing tissue nitrogen content above ground with eutrophication. Despite province- and species

  15. Structural Assessment of D-Regions Affected by Alkali-Silica Reaction/Delayed Ettringite Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shih-Hsiang 1979-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    STRUCTURAL ASSESSMENT OF D-REGIONS AFFECTED BY ALKALI- SILICA REACTION/DELAYED ETTRINGITE FORMATION A Dissertation by SHIH-HSIANG LIU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Joseph M. Bracci Committee Members, John B. Mander Stefan Hurlebaus Harry A. Hogan Head of Department, John M. Niedzwecki December 2012 Major Subject: Civil...

  16. Vertical broad-line region structure in nearby active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kollatschny, W

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad emission lines are emitted in the surroundings of supermassive black holes in the centers of active galactic nuclei (AGN). This region is spatially not resolved. We intend to get information on the structure and geometry of this broad emitting line region (BLR) based on line profile observations. We model the rotational and turbulent velocities in the line-emitting regions based on observed full-width at half maximum line values (FWHM) and {\\sigma}_{line} of the variable broad emission lines in four nearby AGN: NGC 3783, NGC 7469, NGC 5548, and 3C 390.3. On the basis of these velocities, we estimate the height of the line-emitting regions above the midplane in context with their distances from the center. The H{\\beta} lines are emitted in a more flattened configuration above the midplane in comparison to the highly ionized lines. The H{\\beta} lines originate at heights of 0.7 to 1.6 light-days and at distances of 1.4 to 24 light-days with height/distance (H/R) ratios of only 0.07 to 0.5. The highly ioni...

  17. North African petroleum geology: regional structure and stratigraphic overview of a hydrocarbon-rich cratonic area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, T.E.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North Africa, including Sinai, contains some of the most important hydrocarbon-producing basins in the world. The North African Symposium is devoted to examining the exploration potential of the North African margin in light of the most recent and promising exploration discoveries. The geologic variety of the region is extraordinary and can challenge any exploration philosophy. Of primary interest are the Sirte basin of Libya, which has produced several billion barrels of oil, and the Gulf of Suez, a narrow, evaporite-capped trough with five fields that will produce more than 5 billion bbl. Both are extensional basins with minimal lateral movement and with good source rocks in direct proximity to reservoirs. Structural models of these basins give firm leads for future exploration. More difficult to evaluate are the Tethyan realm basins of the northern Sinai, and the Western Desert of Egypt, the Cyrenaican Platform of Libya, and the Tunisia-Sicily shelf area, where there are only limited subsurface data. These basins are extensional in origin also, but have been influenced by lateral tectonics. Favorable reservoirs exist, but source rocks have been a problem locally. Structural models with strong stratigraphic response offer several favorable play concepts. The Paleozoic Ghadames basin in Libya, Tunisia, and Algeria has the least complex structural history, and production appears to be limited to small structures. A series of stratigraphic models indicates additional areas with exploration potential. The Paleozoic megabasin of Morocco, with its downfaulted Triassic grabens, remains an untested but attractive area.

  18. Deep structure and mechanical behavior of the lithosphere in the Hangai^Hovsgol region, Mongolia: new constraints from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Deep structure and mechanical behavior of the lithosphere in the Hangai^Ho«vsgo«l region, Mongolia and mechanical behavior of the lithosphere beneath the Hangai^Ho«vsgo«l region, central Mongolia, Asia, in order rights reserved. Keywords: topography; gravity methods; Mongolia; Hangay Mountains; upper mantle; £exure

  19. Broad-line region structure and kinematics in the radio galaxy 3C 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kollatschny, W; Zetzl, M; Kaspi, S; Haas, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad emission lines originate in the surroundings of supermassive black holes in the centers of active galactic nuclei (AGN). One method to investigate the extent, structure, and kinematics of the BLR is to study the continuum and line profile variability in AGN. We selected the radio-loud Seyfert 1 galaxy 3C 120 as a target for this study. We took spectra with a high signal-to-noise ratio of 3C 120 with the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope between Sept. 2008 and March 2009. In parallel, we photometrically monitored the continuum flux at the Wise observatory. We analyzed the continuum and line profile variations in detail (1D and 2D reverberation mapping) and modeled the geometry of the line-emitting regions based on the line profiles. We show that the BLR in 3C 120 is stratified with respect to the distance of the line-emitting regions from the center with respect to the line widths (FWHM) of the rms profiles and with respect to the variability amplitude of the emission lines. The emission line wings of H{\\alpha...

  20. Structure of the dimerization domain of DiGeorge critical region 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senturia, R.; Faller, M.; Yin, S.; Loo, J.A.; Cascio, D.; Sawaya, M.R.; Hwang, D.; Clubb, R.T.; Guo, F. (UCLA)

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Maturation of microRNAs (miRNAs, {approx}22nt) from long primary transcripts [primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs)] is regulated during development and is altered in diseases such as cancer. The first processing step is a cleavage mediated by the Microprocessor complex containing the Drosha nuclease and the RNA-binding protein DiGeorge critical region 8 (DGCR8). We previously reported that dimeric DGCR8 binds heme and that the heme-bound DGCR8 is more active than the heme-free form. Here, we identified a conserved dimerization domain in DGCR8. Our crystal structure of this domain (residues 298-352) at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution demonstrates a previously unknown use of a WW motif as a platform for extensive dimerization interactions. The dimerization domain of DGCR8 is embedded in an independently folded heme-binding domain and directly contributes to association with heme. Heme-binding-deficient DGCR8 mutants have reduced pri-miRNA processing activity in vitro. Our study provides structural and biochemical bases for understanding how dimerization and heme binding of DGCR8 may contribute to regulation of miRNA biogenesis.

  1. Collective and non-collective structures in nuclei of mass region A ? 125

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, A. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Collaboration: INGA Collaboration; Gammasphere Collaboration

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of angular momentum in nuclei is a key question in nuclear structure studies. In single particle model, it is due to alignment of spin of individual nucleon available in the valence space, whereas coherent motion of nucleons are assumed in the collective model. The nuclei near the closed shell at Z = 50 with mass number A ? 120-125 represent ideal cases to explore the interplay between these competing mechanisms and the transition from non-collective to collective behavior or vice versa. Recent spectroscopic studies of nuclei in this region reveal several non-collective maximally aligned states representing the first kind of excitation mechanism, where 8-12 particles above the {sup 114}Sn align their spins to generate these states. Deformed rotational bands feeding the non-collective states in the spin range I=20-25 and excitation energies around 10 MeV have also been observed. Structure of the collective and non-collective states are discussed in the framework of Cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky model.

  2. Structure and morphology of the top of Precambrian crystalline rocks in the Illinois Basin region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargent, M.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Rupp, J.A. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN (United States)); Noger, M.C. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New basement tests and seismic-reflection profiles in the Rough Creek Graben, Wabash Valley Fault System, and other parts of the Illinois Basin have significantly advanced the authors understanding of basement morphology and tectonics. Few details of the paleotopographic component of basement morphology are known, but 100 m or more of local paleotopographic relief is documented in a few places and more than 300 m of relief is known in the western part of the basin. Based on fewer than 50 wells in the Illinois Basin that penetrate Precambrian crystalline basement, it is composed principally of granite and rhyolite porphyry with small amounts of basalt/diabase or andesite. Most of the regional morphology must be projected from structure maps of key Paleozoic horizons, including the top of Middle Ordovician Trenton (Galena), the top of Middle Devonian carbonate (base of New Albany Shale), and other horizons where data are available. The shallowest Precambrian crystalline basement within the Illinois Basin occurs in north-central Illinois where it is [minus]1,000 m MSL. Paleozoic sedimentary fill thickens southward to over 7,000 m in deeper parts of the Rough Creek Graben where crystalline basement has been depressed tectonically and by sediment loading to below [minus]7,000 m MSL. Although trends in Paleozoic strata show continued thickening in the area of the Mississippi Embayment, maximum sediment fill is preserved in the Rough Creek Graben. The general shape of the basin at the level of Precambrian crystalline basement is largely inferred from structure mapped on Paleozoic strata. Half-grabens and other block-faulted features in basement rocks are manifest in small-scale structures near the surface or have no expression in younger strata.

  3. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume II. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: regional structure, surface structure, surface fractures, hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume comprises appendices giving regional structure data, surface structure data, surface fracture data, and hydrology data. The fracture data covers oriented Devonian shale cores from West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. The subsurface structure of the Eastern Kentucky gas field is also covered. (DLC)

  4. Fine Structure in the Energy Region of the Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance: Characteristic Scales from a Wavelet Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponomarev, Vladimir

    of the Witwatersrand, PO Wits, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa 3 Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700, South Africa 4 iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129, South Africa 5 DepartmentFine Structure in the Energy Region of the Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance: Characteristic

  5. Structural studies of the metal-rich region in the ternary Ta-Nb-S system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Xiaoqiang.

    1991-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Six new solid solution type compounds have been prepared using high temperature techniques and characterized by means of single crystal x-ray techniques during a study of the metal-rich region of the ternary Ta-Nb-S system. The structures of Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 11-x}S{sub 4} are reminiscent of niobium-rich sulfides, rather than of tantalum-rich sulfides. The coordinations of sulfur are capped trigonal prismatic while the metal coordinations are capped distorted cubic prismatic for Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 11-x}S{sub 4}, and capped distorted cubic prismatic and pentagonal prismatic for Nb{sub 12-x}Ta{sub x}S{sub 4}. The structures of Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 5-x}S{sub 2} contain homoatomic layers sequenced S-M3-M2-M1-M2-M3-S (M is mixed Nb, Ta) generating six-layer sheets, respectively. Weak S-S interactions at 3.26 and 3.19{Angstrom} between sheets contrast with the M-M binding within and between the sheets in these two novel layered compounds. The former are presumably responsible for the observed graphitic slippage of the samples. Nb{sub 21-x}Ta{sub x}S{sub 8} and Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 2-x}S are isostructural with Nb{sub 21}S{sub 8} and Ta{sub 2}S, respectively. Extended Hueckel band calculations were carried out for two layered compounds, Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 5-x}S{sub 2} (x {approx} 1.72) and Nb{sub x}ta{sub 2-x}S (x {approx} 0.95). Based upon band calculations metallic properties can be expected for these two layered compounds. The relative preference of the metal sites for the two metal elements (Ta, Nb) in two layered compounds is explained by the results of the band calculations. 17 figs., 31 tabs., 80 refs.

  6. Aeroelastic Modeling of Offshore Turbines and Support Structures in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiani, R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US offshore wind turbines (OWTs) will likely have to contend with hurricanes and the associated loading conditions. Current industry standards do not account for these design load cases (DLCs), thus a new approach is required to guarantee that the OWTs achieve an appropriate level of reliability. In this study, a sequentially coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic modeling technique was used to address two design approaches: 1.) The ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) approach; and 2.) The Hazard Curve or API (American Petroleum Institute) approach. The former employs IEC partial load factors (PSFs) and 100-yr return-period (RP) metocean events. The latter allows setting PSFs and RP to a prescribed level of system reliability. The 500-yr RP robustness check (appearing in [2] and [3] upcoming editions) is a good indicator of the target reliability for L2 structures. CAE tools such as NREL's FAST and Bentley's' SACS (offshore analysis and design software) can be efficiently coupled to simulate system loads under hurricane DLCs. For this task, we augmented the latest FAST version (v. 8) to include tower aerodynamic drag that cannot be ignored in hurricane DLCs. In this project, a 6 MW turbine was simulated on a typical 4-legged jacket for a mid-Atlantic site. FAST-calculated tower base loads were fed to SACS at the interface level (transition piece); SACS added hydrodynamic and wind loads on the exposed substructure, and calculated mudline overturning moments, and member and joint utilization. Results show that CAE tools can be effectively used to compare design approaches for the design of OWTs in hurricane regions and to achieve a well-balanced design, where reliability levels and costs are optimized.

  7. Spatial structure of electric potential near the extraction region in Cs-seeded H{sup -} ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukano, A.; Hanatani, J.; Matsumiya, T.; Hatayama, A. [Mechanical Sysytems Engineering Course, Monozukuri Department, Tokyo Metropolitan College of Industrial Technology, Higashioi, Shinagawa, Tokyo 140-0011 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Structure of electric potential near the extraction region in a negative ion source is investigated analytically with the effect of strong surface H{sup -} production. The potential profile is analyzed one dimensional by solving the plasma-sheath equation, which gives the electric potential in the plasma region and the sheath region near the wall self-consistently. The potential profile depends on the production rate and the temperature of negative ions. As the production rate becomes large and the negative ion energy becomes small, the potential near the extraction region decreases. The negative potential peak is formed near the plasma grid (PG) surface for the case of large amount and low energy surface production. As a result, negative ions are reflected by this negative potential peak near the PG and returned to the PG surface. This reflection mechanism by the negative potential peak possibly affects the negative ion extraction.

  8. Nonlinear force-free models for the solar corona I. Two active regions with very different structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Regnier; E. R. Priest

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    With the development of new instrumentation providing measurements of solar photospheric vector magnetic fields, we need to develop our understanding of the effects of current density on coronal magnetic field configurations. The object is to understand the diverse and complex nature of coronal magnetic fields in active regions using a nonlinear force-free model. From the observed photospheric magnetic field we derive the photospheric current density for two active regions: one is a decaying active region with strong currents (AR8151), and the other is a newly emerged active region with weak currents (AR8210). We compare the three-dimensional structure of the magnetic fields for both active region when they are assumed to be either potential or nonlinear force-free. The latter is computed using a Grad-Rubin vector-potential-like numerical scheme. A quantitative comparison is performed in terms of the geometry, the connectivity of field lines, the magnetic energy and the magnetic helicity content. For the old decaying active region the connectivity and geometry of the nonlinear force-free model include strong twist and strong shear and are very different from the potential model. The twisted flux bundles store magnetic energy and magnetic helicity high in the corona (about 50 Mm). The newly emerged active region has a complex topology and the departure from a potential field is small, but the excess magnetic energy is stored in the low corona and is enough to trigger powerful flares.

  9. Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas G. Hildenbrand; Geoffrey A. Phelps; Edward A. Mankinen

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (< 1 km). The new model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.

  10. Mesozoic and Cenozoic structural geology of the CP Hills, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada; and regional implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, S.J. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States)

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed mapping and structural analysis of upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks in the CP Hills of the Nevada Test Site, together with analysis of published maps and cross sections and a reconnaissance of regional structural relations indicate that the CP thrust of Barnes and Poole (1968) actually comprises two separate, oppositely verging Mesozoic thrust systems: (1) the west-vergent CP thrust which is well exposed in the CP Hills and at Mine Mountain, and (2) the east-vergent Belted Range thrust located northwest of Yucca Flat. West-vergence of the CP thrust is indicated by large scale west-vergent recumbent folds in both its hangingwall and footwall and by the fact that the CP thrust ramps up section through hangingwall strata toward the northwest. Regional structural relations indicate that the CP thrust forms part of a narrow sigmoidal belt of west-vergent folding and thrusting traceable for over 180 km along strike. The Belted Range thrust represents earlier Mesozoic deformation that was probably related to the Last Chance thrust system in southeastern California, as suggested by earlier workers. A pre-Tertiary reconstruction of the Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in the region between the NTS and the Las Vegas Range bears a close resemblance to other regions of the Cordillera and has important implications for the development of hinterland-vergent deformation as well as for the probable magnitude of Tertiary extension north of Las Vegas Valley. Subsequent to Mesozoic deformation, the CP Hills were disrupted by at least two episodes of Tertiary extensional deformation: (1) an earlier episode represented by pre-middle Miocene low-angle normal faults, and (2) a later, post-11 Ma episode of high-angle normal faulting. Both episodes of extension were related to regional deformation, the latter of which has resulted in the present basin and range topography of the NTS region.

  11. Structure-sequence based analysis for identification of conserved regions in proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zemla, Adam T; Zhou, Carol E; Lam, Marisa W; Smith, Jason R; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are computational methods, and associated hardware and software products for scoring conservation in a protein structure based on a computationally identified family or cluster of protein structures. A method of computationally identifying a family or cluster of protein structures in also disclosed herein.

  12. Kinetic Structure of the Electron Diffusion Region in Antiparallel Magnetic Reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Jonathan

    Strong electron pressure anisotropy has been observed upstream of electron diffusion regions during reconnection in Earth’s magnetotail and kinetic simulations. For collisionless antiparallel reconnection, we find that the ...

  13. HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  14. Oceanic three-dimensional Lagrangian Coherent Structures: A study of a mesoscale eddy in the Benguela ocean region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    João H. Bettencourt; Cristóbal López; Emilio Hernández-García

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study three dimensional oceanic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) in the Benguela region, as obtained from an output of the ROMS model. To do that we first compute Finite-Size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE) fields in the region volume, characterizing mesoscale stirring and mixing. Average FSLE values show a general decreasing trend with depth, but there is a local maximum at about 100 m depth. LCSs are extracted as ridges of the calculated FSLE fields. They present a "curtain-like" geometry in which the strongest attracting and repelling structures appear as quasivertical surfaces. LCSs around a particular cyclonic eddy, pinched off from the upwelling front are also calculated. The LCSs are confirmed to provide pathways and barriers to transport in and out of the eddy.

  15. MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY AND THE THERMAL STRUCTURE OF THE CORONA OVER SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Title, Alan M., E-mail: schryver@lmsal.co [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of quiescent active-region coronae are characterized by ensembles of bright 1-2 MK loops that fan out from select locations. We investigate the conditions associated with the formation of these persistent, relatively cool, loop fans within and surrounding the otherwise 3-5 MK coronal environment by combining EUV observations of active regions made with TRACE with global source-surface potential-field models based on the full-sphere photospheric field from the assimilation of magnetograms that are obtained by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on SOHO. We find that in the selected active regions with largely potential-field configurations these fans are associated with (quasi-)separatrix layers (QSLs) within the strong-field regions of magnetic plage. Based on the empirical evidence, we argue that persistent active-region cool-loop fans are primarily related to the pronounced change in connectivity across a QSL to widely separated clusters of magnetic flux, and confirm earlier work that suggested that neither a change in loop length nor in base field strengths across such topological features are of prime importance to the formation of the cool-loop fans. We discuss the hypothesis that a change in the distribution of coronal heating with height may be involved in the phenomenon of relatively cool coronal loop fans in quiescent active regions.

  16. The magnetic structure of surges in small-scale emerging flux regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacTaggart, David; Haynes, Andrew; Simitev, Radostin; Zuccarello, Francesca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: To investigate the relationship between surges and magnetic reconnection during the emergence of small-scale active regions. In particular, to examine how the large-scale geometry of the magnetic field, shaped by different phases of reconnection, guides the flowing of surges. Methods: We present three flux emergence models. The first model, and the simplest, consists of a region emerging into a horizontal ambient field that is initially parallel to the top of the emerging region. The second model is the same as the first but with an extra smaller emerging region which perturbs the main region. This is added to create a more complex magnetic topology and to test how this complicates the development of surges compared to the first model. The last model has a non-uniform ambient magnetic field to model the effects of emergence near a sunspot field and impose asymmetry on the system through the ambient magnetic field. At each stage, we trace the magnetic topology to identify the locations of reconnection. T...

  17. On the feedback from super stellar clusters. I. The structure of giant HII regions and HII galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Tenorio-Tagle; C. Munoz-Tunon; E. Perez; S. Silich; E. Telles

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the structural properties of giant extragalactic HII regions and HII galaxies based on 2D hydrodynamic calculations, and propose an evolutionary sequence that accounts for their observed detailed structure. The model assumes a massive and young stellar cluster surrounded by a large collection of clouds. These are thus exposed to the most important star-formation feedback mechanisms: photoionization and the cluster wind. The models show how the two feedback mechanisms compete in the disruption of clouds and lead to two different hydrodynamic solutions: The storage of clouds into a long lasting ragged shell that inhibits the expansion of the thermalized wind, and the steady filtering of the shocked wind gas through channels carved within the cloud stratum. Both solutions are claimed to be concurrently at work in giant HII regions and HII galaxies, causing their detailed inner structure. This includes multiple large-scale shells, filled with an X-ray emitting gas, that evolve to finally merge with each other, giving the appearance of shells within shells. The models also show how the inner filamentary structure of the giant superbubbles is largely enhanced with matter ablated from clouds and how cloud ablation proceeds within the original cloud stratum. The calculations point at the initial contrast density between the cloud and the intercloud media as the factor that defines which of the two feedback mechanisms becomes dominant throughout the evolution. Animated version of the models can be found at http://www.iaa.csic.es/\\~{}eperez/ssc/ssc.html.

  18. Structure of HIV-1 gp120 with gp41-interactive region reveals layered envelope architecture and basis of conformational mobility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pancera, Marie; Majeed, Shahzad; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Chen, Lei; Huang, Chih-chin; Kong, Leopold; Kwon, Young Do; Stuckey, Jonathan; Zhou, Tongqing; Robinson, James E.; Schief, William R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D. (UWASH); (NIH); (Tulane); (DFCI)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The viral spike of HIV-1 is composed of three gp120 envelope glycoproteins attached noncovalently to three gp41 transmembrane molecules. Viral entry is initiated by binding to the CD4 receptor on the cell surface, which induces large conformational changes in gp120. These changes not only provide a model for receptor-triggered entry, but affect spike sensitivity to drug- and antibody-mediated neutralization. Although some of the details of the CD4-induced conformational change have been visualized by crystal structures and cryoelectron tomograms, the critical gp41-interactive region of gp120 was missing from previous atomic-level characterizations. Here we determine the crystal structure of an HIV-1 gp120 core with intact gp41-interactive region in its CD4-bound state, compare this structure to unliganded and antibody-bound forms to identify structurally invariant and plastic components, and use ligand-oriented cryoelectron tomograms to define component mobility in the viral spike context. Newly defined gp120 elements proximal to the gp41 interface complete a 7-stranded {beta}-sandwich, which appeared invariant in conformation. Loop excursions emanating from the sandwich form three topologically separate - and structurally plastic - layers, topped off by the highly glycosylated gp120 outer domain. Crystal structures, cryoelectron tomograms, and interlayer chemistry were consistent with a mechanism in which the layers act as a shape-changing spacer, facilitating movement between outer domain and gp41-associated {beta}-sandwich and providing for conformational diversity used in immune evasion. A 'layered' gp120 architecture thus allows movement among alternative glycoprotein conformations required for virus entry and immune evasion, whereas a {beta}-sandwich clamp maintains gp120-gp41 interaction and regulates gp41 transitions.

  19. Microwave electrode discharge in nitrogen: Structure and characteristics of the electrode region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, Yu. A.; Solomakhin, P. V.; Shakhatov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Topchiev Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The parameters of the electrode region of an electrode microwave discharge in nitrogen are studied by emission spectroscopy. The radial and axial distributions of the intensities of the bands of the second (N{sub 2}(C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} {sup {yields}}B{sup 3{Pi}}{sub g})) and first (N{sub 2}(B{sup 3{Pi}}{sub g} {sup {yields}}A{sup 3{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +})) positive systems of molecular nitrogen and the first negative system of nitrogen ions (N{sub 2}{sup +} (B{sup 2{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +} {sup {yields}}X{sup 2{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +})), the radial profiles of the electric field E and the electron density N{sub e}, and the absolute populations of the vibrational levels v{sub C} = 0-4 of the C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} excited state of N{sub 2} and the vibrational level v{sub Bi} = 0 of the B{sup 2{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +} excited state of a molecular nitrogen ion are determined. The population temperature of the first vibrational level T{sub V} of the ground electronic state X{sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +} of N{sub 2} and the excitation temperature T{sub C} of the C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} state in the electrode region of the discharge are measured. The radius of the spherical region and the spatially integrated plasma emission spectra are studied as functions of the incident microwave power and gas pressure. A method for determining the electron density and the microwave field strength from the plasma emission characteristics is described in detail.

  20. Crustal structure of the Ouachita Mountains region from lithosphere seismic profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkoros, George Fotios

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    implies, this is a region of numerous large scale, north verging, thrust faults cutting east-west trending folds. The Choctaw thrust I'ault is commonly taken to be the boundary between the Arkoma basin and the Frontal thrust zone of the Ouachitas.... At this boundary the basement dips steeply southward to depths of 10, 000 m (Flawn et al. , 1961). It is believed (Viele, 1973) that the basement is not involved in the thrusting, but acts as a ramp for the thrust faulting of deep-water Paleozoic deposits...

  1. First Structure Formation: I. Primordial Star Forming Regions in hierarchical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Peter Anninos; Michael L. Norman; Yu Zhang

    1997-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of very early formation of primordial star clusters from high-\\sigma perturbations in cold dark matter dominated structure formation scenarios. For this we have developed a powerful 2-level hierarchical cosmological code with a realistic and robust treatment of multi-species primordial gas chemistry, paying special attention to the formation and destruction of hydrogen molecules, non-equilibrium ionization, and cooling processes. We performed 3-D simulations at small scales and at high redshifts and find that, analogous to simulations of large scale structure, a complex system of filaments, sheets, and spherical knots at the intersections of filaments form. On the mass scales covered by our simulations (5x10^5 - 1x10^9\\Ms) that collapse at redshifts z>25, we find that only at the spherical knots can enough H2 be formed (n_{H_2}/n_H > 5x10^-4) to cool the gas appreciably. Quantities such as the time dependence of the formation of H2 molecules, the final H2 fraction, and central densities from the simulations are compared to the theoretical predictions of Abel (1995) and Tegmark et al. (1997) and found to agree remarkably well. Comparing the 3-D results to an isobaric collapse model we further discuss the possible implications of the extensive merging of small structure that is inherent in hierarchical models. Typically only 5-8% percent of the total baryonic mass in the collapsing structures is found to cool significanlty. Assuming the Padoan (1995) model for star formation our results would predict the first stellar systems to be as small as ~30\\Ms. Some implications for primordial globular cluster formation scenarios are also discussed.

  2. DIRECT IMAGING OF FINE STRUCTURES IN GIANT PLANET-FORMING REGIONS OF THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND AB AURIGAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, J.; Tamura, M.; Fukue, T.; Kokubo, E. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Muto, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kudo, T. [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Fukagawa, M. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Goto, M.; Henning, T. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); Grady, C. A. [Eureka Scientific and Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hodapp, K. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Honda, M. [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Inutsuka, S. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan); Knapp, G.; McElwain, M. W.; Turner, E. L. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Momose, M.; Okamoto, Y. K. [College of Science, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Ohashi, N.; Takami, M., E-mail: jun.hashimoto@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: motohide.tamura@nao.ac.jp [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report high-resolution 1.6 {mu}m polarized intensity (PI) images of the circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur at a radial distance of 22 AU (0.''15) up to 554 AU (3.''85), which have been obtained by the high-contrast instrument HiCIAO with the dual-beam polarimetry. We revealed complicated and asymmetrical structures in the inner part ({approx}<140 AU) of the disk while confirming the previously reported outer (r {approx}> 200 AU) spiral structure. We have imaged a double ring structure at {approx}40 and {approx}100 AU and a ring-like gap between the two. We found a significant discrepancy of inclination angles between two rings, which may indicate that the disk of AB Aur is warped. Furthermore, we found seven dips (the typical size is {approx}45 AU or less) within two rings, as well as three prominent PI peaks at {approx}40 AU. The observed structures, including a bumpy double ring, a ring-like gap, and a warped disk in the innermost regions, provide essential information for understanding the formation mechanism of recently detected wide-orbit (r > 20 AU) planets.

  3. Possible Fine Structure in the Delayed Neutron Yields in the Resonance Region for Pu-239

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohsawa, Takaaki; Torii, Takayuki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kinki University, Higashi-osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Hambsch, Franz-Josef [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analysis of fluctuation in the delayed neutron yield on the basis of the multimodal fission model was applied to the low-energy resolved resonances for Pu-239. The present calculation using recent data of the fluctuation of the mode branching ratios for the resolved resonances showed both positive and negative resonance structure in the delayed neutron yield relative to the thermal neutron value. This is in contrast to the U-235 case, for which mainly negative dips of about -3.5% were predicted.

  4. Urban spatial-temporal activity structures: a New Approach to Inferring the Intra-urban Functional Regions via Social Media Check-In Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi, Ye; Wang, Shaowen; Deng, Min; Gao, Jing; Li, Haifeng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most existing literature focuses on the exterior temporal rhythm of human movement to infer the functional regions in a city, but they neglects the underlying interdependence between the functional regions and human activities which uncovers more detailed characteristics of regions. In this research, we proposed a novel model based on the low rank approximation (LRA) to detect the functional regions using the data from about 15 million check-in records during a yearlong period in Shanghai, China. We find a series of latent structures, called urban spatial-temporal activity structure (USTAS). While interpreting these structures, a series of outstanding underlying associations between the spatial and temporal activity patterns can be found. Moreover, we can not only reproduce the observed data with a lower dimensional representative but also simultaneously project both the spatial and temporal activity patterns in the same coordinate system. By utilizing the K-means clustering algorithm, five significant types ...

  5. The NMDA Receptor NR1 C1 Region Bound to Calmodulin: Structural Insights into Functional Differences between Homologous Domains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ataman, Zeynep Akyol; Gakhar, Lokesh; Sorensen, Brenda R.; Hell, Johannes W.; Shea, Madeline A. (Iowa)

    2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates tetrameric N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) by binding tightly to the C0 and C1 regions of its NR1 subunit. A crystal structure (2HQW; 1.96 {angstrom}) of calcium-saturated CaM bound to NR1C1 (peptide spanning 875-898) showed that NR1 S890, whose phosphorylation regulates membrane localization, was solvent protected, whereas the endoplasmic reticulum retention motif was solvent exposed. NR1 F880 filled the CaM C-domain pocket, whereas T886 was closest to the N-domain pocket. This 1-7 pattern was most similar to that in the CaM-MARCKS complex. Comparison of CaM-ligand wrap-around conformations identified a core tetrad of CaM C-domain residues (FLMM{sub C}) that contacted all ligands consistently. An identical tetrad of N-domain residues (FLMM{sub N}) made variable sets of contacts with ligands. This CaM-NR1C1 structure provides a foundation for designing mutants to test the role of CaM in NR1 trafficking as well as insights into how the homologous CaM domains have different roles in molecular recognition.

  6. Highly polarized structures in the near-nuclear regions of Cygnus A: intrinsic anisotropy within the cones?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. N. Tadhunter; W. Sparks; D. J. Axon; L. Bergeron; N. J. Jackson; C. Packham; J. H. Hough; A. Robinson; S. Young

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present near-IR imaging polarimetry observations of the nucleus of Cygnus A, taken with the NICMOS camera of the HST at a wavelength of 2.0 microns.These maps reveal a highly collimated region of polarized emission straddling the nucleus and extending to a radius of 1.2 arcseconds. Remarkably, this feature coincides with one, but only one, limb of the edge-brightened bicone structure seen in the total intensity image. The high degree (P_k ~ 25%) and orientation of the extended polarization feature are consistent with a scattering origin. Most plausibly, the detection of polarization along only one limb of the bicone is a consequence of intrinsic anisotropy of the near-IR continuum within the radiation cones, with the direction of maximum intensity of the near-IR radiation field significantly displaced from the direction of the radio axis. The unresolved nuclear core source is also highly polarized (P_k > 28%), with a position angle close to the perpendicular to the radio axis. Given that this high degree of nuclear polarization can only be explained in terms of dichroic extinction if the dichroic mechanism is unusually efficient in Cygnus A, it is more likely that the nuclear polarization is due to the scattering of nuclear light in an unresolved scattering region close to the AGN. In this case, the flux of the core source in the K-band is dominated by scattered rather than transmitted quasar light, and previous extinction estimates based on K-band photometry of the core substantially underestimate the true nuclear extinction.

  7. Lithospheric structure in the Baikal-central Mongolia region from integrated1 geophysical-petrological inversion of surface-wave data and topographic elevation2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    1 Lithospheric structure in the Baikal-central Mongolia region from integrated1 geophysical the inversion to central Mongolia, south of the24 Baikal Rift Zone, a key area of deformation in Asia-asthenosphere boundary, petro-physical modeling,35 Mongolia, Baikal Rift, mantle composition36 37 38 39 1. Introduction40

  8. Measurement of the 3He Spin Structure Functions in the Resonance Region: A Test of Quark-Hadron Duality on the Neutron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Solvignon

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the biggest challenges in the study of the nucleon structure is the understanding of the transition from partonic degrees of freedom to hadronic degrees of freedom. In 1970, Bloom and Gilman noticed that structure function data taken at SLAC in the resonance region average to the scaling curve of deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Early theoretical interpretations suggested that these two very different regimes can be linked under the condition that the quark-gluon and quark-quark interactions are suppressed. Substantial efforts are ongoing to investigate this phenomenon both experimentally and theoretically. Quark-hadron duality has been confirmed for the unpolarized structure function F{sub 2} of the proton and the deuteron using data from the experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Indications of duality have been seen for the proton polarized structure function g{sub 1} and the virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 1} at JLab Hall B and HERMES. Because of the different resonance behavior, it is expected that the onset of duality for the neutron will happen at lower momentum transfer than for the proton. Now that precise spin structure data in the DIS region are available at large x, data in the resonance region are greatly needed in order to test duality in spin-dependent structure functions. The goal of experiment E01-012 was to provide such data on the neutron ({sup 3}He) in the moderate momentum transfer (Q{sup 2}) region, 1.0 < Q{sup 2} < 4.0 (GeV/c{sup 2}), where duality is expected to hold. The experiment ran successfully in early 2003 at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. It was an inclusive measurement of longitudinally polarized electrons scattering from a longitudinally or transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Asymmetries and cross section differences were measured in order to extract the {sup 3}He spin structure function g{sub 1} and virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 1} in the resonance region. A test of quark-hadron duality has then been performed for the {sup 3}He and neutron structure functions. The study of spin duality for the neutron will provide a better understanding of the mechanism of the strong interaction. Moreover, if duality is well understood, our resonance data will bring information on the high x region where theoretical predictions for A{sub 1} are drastically different.

  9. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II and Characterization of Salivary Agglutinin Adherence Domains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Crowley, Paula J.; Kelly, Charles; Mitchell, Tim J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion (King); (Cornell); (UAB); (Glasgow); (Florida)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein that adheres to salivary components and extracellular matrix molecules. Here we report the 2.5 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complete C-terminal region of AgI/II. The C-terminal region is comprised of three major domains: C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. Each domain adopts a DE-variant IgG fold, with two {beta}-sheets whose A and F strands are linked through an intramolecular isopeptide bond. The adherence of the C-terminal AgI/II fragments to the putative tooth surface receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG), as monitored by surface plasmon resonance, indicated that the minimal region of binding was contained within the first and second DE-variant-IgG domains (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) of the C terminus. The minimal C-terminal region that could inhibit S. mutans adherence to SAG was also confirmed to be within the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains. Competition experiments demonstrated that the C- and N-terminal regions of AgI/II adhere to distinct sites on SAG. A cleft formed at the intersection between these C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains bound glucose molecules from the cryo-protectant solution, revealing a putative binding site for its highly glycosylated receptor SAG. Finally, electron microscopy images confirmed the elongated structure of AgI/II and enabled building a composite tertiary model that encompasses its two distinct binding regions.

  10. Crystal structures of the F and pSLT plasmid TraJ N-terminal regions reveal similar homodimeric PAS folds with functional interchangeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Ruiying; Adkins, Joshua N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Glover, Mark

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the F-family of conjugative plasmids, TraJ is an essential transcriptional activator of the tra operon that encodes most of the proteins required for conjugation. Here we report for the first time the X-ray crystal structures of the TraJ N-terminal regions from the prototypic F plasmid (TraJF11-130) and from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT (TraJpSLT 1-128). Both proteins form similar homodimeric Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) fold structures. Mutational analysis reveals that the observed dimeric interface is critical for TraJF transcriptional activation, indicating that dimerization of TraJ is required for its in vivo function. An artificial ligand (oxidized dithiothreitol) occupies a cavity in the TraJF dimer interface, while a smaller cavity in corresponding region of the TraJpSLT structure lacks a ligand. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-electron ionization analysis of dithiothreitol-free TraJF suggests indole may be the natural TraJ ligand; however, disruption of the indole biosynthetic pathway does not affect TraJF function. Heterologous PAS domains from pSLT and R100 TraJ can functionally replace the TraJF PAS domain, suggesting that TraJ allelic specificity is mediated by the region C-terminal to the PAS domain.

  11. Equatorial scattering and the structure of the broad-line region in Seyfert nuclei: evidence for a rotating disc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Smith; A. Robinson; S. Young; D. J. Axon; Elizabeth A. Corbett

    2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present detailed scattering models confirming that distinctive variations in polarization across the broad Halpha line, which are observed in a significant fraction of Seyfert 1 galaxies, can be understood in terms of a rotating line-emitting disc surrounded by a co-planar scattering region (the equatorial scattering region). The predicted polarization properties are: averaged over wavelength, the position angle of polarization is aligned with the projected disc rotation axis and hence also with the radio source axis; (ii) the polarization PA rotates across the line profile, reaching equal but opposite (relative to the continuum PA) rotations in the blue and red wings; (iii) the degree of polarization peaks in the line wings and passes through a minimum in the line core. We identify 11 objects which exhibit these features to different degrees. In order to reproduce the large amplitude PA rotations observed in some cases, the scattering region must closely surround the emission disc and the latter must itself be a relatively narrow annulus -- presumably the Halpha-emitting zone of a larger accretion disc. Asymmetries in the polarization spectra may be attributable to several possible causes, including bulk radial infall in the equatorial scattering region, or contamination by polar scattered light. The broad Halpha lines do not, in general, exhibit double-peaked profiles, suggesting that a second Halpha-emitting component of the broad-line region is present, in addition to the disc.

  12. Holocene freshwater carbonate structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Margarita M. Marinova a,b , A. Nele Meckler c , Christopher P. McKay b region of the Sahara Desert, near the triple border of Egypt, Sudan, and Libya (N22°, E25°), re- ceives- ibrated years BP; Wendorf and expedition, 1977). While some parts of southwest Egypt have been extensively

  13. The structure of SecB/OmpA as visualized by electron microscopy: The mature region of the precursor protein binds asymmetrically to SecB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Ying; Pan, Xijiang [State-Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State-Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tai, Phang C. [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)] [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Sui, Sen-Fang, E-mail: suisf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State-Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State-Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    SecB, a molecular chaperone in Escherichia coli, binds a subset of precursor proteins that are exported across the plasma membrane via the Sec pathway. Previous studies showed that SecB bound directly to the mature region rather than to the signal sequence of the precursor protein. To determine the binding pattern of SecB and the mature region of the preprotein, here, we visualized the structure of the SecB/OmpA complex by electron microscopy. This complex is composed by two parts: the main density represents one SecB tetramer and the unfolded part of OmpA wrapping round it; the elongated smaller density represents the rest of OmpA. Each SecB protomer makes a different contribution to the binding of SecB with OmpA. The binding pattern between SecB tetramer and OmpA is asymmetric.

  14. MODELING MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION CORONA USING NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELDS IN SPHERICAL GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Y.; Sun, X. D. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); DeRosa, M. L. [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Wiegelmann, T., E-mail: guoyang@nju.edu.cn [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We test a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) optimization code in spherical geometry using an analytical solution from Low and Lou. Several tests are run, ranging from idealized cases where exact vector field data are provided on all boundaries, to cases where noisy vector data are provided on only the lower boundary (approximating the solar problem). Analytical tests also show that the NLFFF code in the spherical geometry performs better than that in the Cartesian one when the field of view of the bottom boundary is large, say, 20 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 20 Degree-Sign . Additionally, we apply the NLFFF model to an active region observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) both before and after an M8.7 flare. For each observation time, we initialize the models using potential field source surface (PFSS) extrapolations based on either a synoptic chart or a flux-dispersal model, and compare the resulting NLFFF models. The results show that NLFFF extrapolations using the flux-dispersal model as the boundary condition have slightly lower, therefore better, force-free, and divergence-free metrics, and contain larger free magnetic energy. By comparing the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we find that the NLFFF performs better than the PFSS not only for the core field of the flare productive region, but also for large EUV loops higher than 50 Mm.

  15. Ultracompact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stan Kurtz; Jose Franco

    2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent observational results on the properties of ultracompact HII regions, in particular the presence of extended continuum emission surrounding ultracompact sources and the discovery of a new class of so-called ``Hypercompact'' HII regions. In addition, we discuss recent attempts to probe the density structure within UC HII regions using the technique of spectral index analysis.

  16. Tracing the general structure of Galactic molecular clouds using Planck data: I. The Perseus region as a test case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanchev, Orlin; Kauffmann, Jens; Donkov, Sava; Shetty, Rahul; Körtgen, Bastian; Klessen, Ralf S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of probability distribution functions (pdfs) of column density in different zones of the star-forming region Perseus and its diffuse environment based on the map of dust opacity at 353 GHz available from the Planck archive. The pdf shape can be fitted by a combination of a lognormal function and an extended power-law tail at high densities, in zones centred at the molecular cloud Perseus. A linear combination of several lognormals fits very well the pdf in rings surrounding the cloud or in zones of its diffuse neighbourhood. The slope of the mean density scaling law $\\langle\\rho\\rangle_L \\propto L^\\alpha$ is steep ($\\alpha=-1.93$) in the former case and rather shallow ($\\alpha=-0.77\\pm0.11$) in the rings delineated around the cloud. We interpret these findings as signatures of two distinct physical regimes: i) a gravoturbulent one which is characterized by nearly linear scaling of mass and practical lack of velocity scaling; and ii) a predominantly turbulent one which is best described ...

  17. LOW-FIDELITY COVARIANCES FOR NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS ON 57 STRUCTURAL AND 31 HEAVY NUCLEI IN THE FAST REGION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PIGNI,M.T.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We produced a large set of neutron cross section covariances in the energy range of 5 keV-20 MeV. The present set of data on 57 structural materials and 31 heavy nuclei follows our earlier work on 219 fission product materials and completes our extensive contribution to the low-fidelity covariance project (307 materials). This project aims to provide initial, low-fidelity yet consistent estimates of covariance data for nuclear criticality safety applications. The evaluation methodology combines the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE which calculates sensitivity to nuclear reaction model parameters, and the Bayesian code KALMAN that propagates uncertainties of the model parameters to cross sections. Taking into account the large scale of the project, only marginal reference to experimental data was made. The covariances were derived from the perturbation of several key model parameters selected by the sensitivity analysis. These parameters refer to the optical model potential, the level densities and the strength of the pre-equilibrium emission. This work represents the first attempt ever to generate nuclear data covariances on such a large scale.

  18. USING STRUCTURAL EQUATIONS MODELLING TO UNRAVEL THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE PATTERNS ON TRAVEL BEHAVIOR OF URBAN ADULT WORKERS OF PUGET SOUND REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Abreu e Silva, João; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior observation in the Puget Sound region: sampleHighway Administration and the Puget Sound Regional Council,OF URBAN ADULT WORKERS OF PUGET SOUND REGION João de Abreu e

  19. Using Structural Equations Modelling to Unravel the Influence of Land Use Patterns on Travel Behavior of Urban Adult Workers of Puget Sound Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    e Silva, Joao de Abreu; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior observation in the Puget Sound region: sampleHighway Administration and the Puget Sound Regional Council,OF URBAN ADULT WORKERS OF PUGET SOUND REGION João de Abreu e

  20. A Measurement of the Interference Structure Function, R_LT, for the 12C(e,e'p) reaction in the Quasielastic Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Holtrop; D. Jordan; T. McIlvain; R. Alarcon; R. Beck; W. Bertozzi; V. Bhushan; W. Boeglin; J. P. Chen; D. Dale; G. Dodson; S. Dolfini; K. Dow; J. Dzengeleski; M. B. Epstein; M. Farkhondeh; S. Gilad; J. Gorgen; K. Joo; J. Kelsey; W. Kim; R. Laszewski; R. Lourie; J. Mandeville; D. Margaziotis; D. Martinez; R. Miskimen; C. Papanicolas; S. Penn; W. Sapp; A. J. Sarty; D. Tieger; C. Tschalaer; W. Turchinetz; G. Warren; L. Weinstein; S. Williamson

    1998-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The coincidence cross-section and the interference structure function, R_LT, were measured for the 12C(e,e'p) 11B reaction at quasielastic kinematics and central momentum transfer of q=400 MeV/c. The measurement was at an opening angle of theta_pq=11 degrees, covering a range in missing energy of E_m = 0 to 65 MeV. The R_LT structure function is found to be consistent with zero for E_m > 50 MeV, confirming an earlier study which indicated that R_L vanishes in this region. The integrated strengths of the p- and s-shell are compared with a Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. The s-shell strength and shape are compared with a Hartree Fock-Random Phase Approximation calculation. The DWIA calculation overestimates the cross sections for p- and s-shell proton knockout as expected, but surprisingly agrees with the extracted R_LT value for both shells. The HF-RPA calculation describes the data more consistently, which may be due to the inclusion of 2-body currents in this calculation.

  1. EUV SPECTRAL LINE FORMATION AND THE TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF ACTIVE REGION FAN LOOPS: OBSERVATIONS WITH HINODE/EIS AND SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Young, Peter R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22020 (United States); Warren, Harry P., E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the aim of studying active region fan loops using observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), we investigate a number of inconsistencies in modeling the absolute intensities of Fe VIII and Si VII lines, and address why spectroheliograms formed from these lines look very similar despite the fact that ionization equilibrium calculations suggest that they have significantly different formation temperatures: log(T{sub e} /K) = 5.6 and 5.8, respectively. It is important to resolve these issues because confidence has been undermined in their use for differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, and Fe VIII is the main contributor to the AIA 131 A channel at low temperatures. Furthermore, the strong Fe VIII 185.213 A and Si VII 275.368 A lines are the best EIS lines to use for velocity studies in the transition region, and for assigning the correct temperature to velocity measurements in the fans. We find that the Fe VIII 185.213 A line is particularly sensitive to the slope of the DEM, leading to disproportionate changes in its effective formation temperature. If the DEM has a steep gradient in the log(T{sub e} /K) = 5.6-5.8 temperature range, or is strongly peaked, Fe VIII 185.213 A and Si VII 275.368 A will be formed at the same temperature. We show that this effect explains the similarity of these images in the fans. Furthermore, we show that the most recent ionization balance compilations resolve the discrepancies in absolute intensities. With these difficulties overcome, we combine EIS and AIA data to determine the temperature structure of a number of fan loops and find that they have peak temperatures of 0.8-1.2 MK. The EIS data indicate that the temperature distribution has a finite (but narrow) width < log ({sigma}{sub Te}/K) = 5.5 which, in one detailed case, is found to broaden substantially toward the loop base. AIA and EIS yield similar results on the temperature, emission measure magnitude, and thermal distribution in the fans, though sometimes the AIA data suggest a relatively larger thermal width. The result is that both the Fe VIII 185.213 A and Si VII 275.368 A lines are formed at log(T{sub e} /K){approx} 5.9 in the fans, and the AIA 131 A response also shifts to this temperature.

  2. Damage-prone regions in structural composite materials are difficult to detect and even harder to repair. Damage is preceded by complex spatial and temporal changes in stress state, and it is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Materials Seminar Damage-prone regions in structural composite materials are difficult to detect and even harder to repair. Damage is preceded by complex spatial and temporal changes in stress state about in response to damage or high-stress conditions include: (1) signal generation to warn of ensuing

  3. Rutgers Regional Report # Regional Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    , population, income, and building permits over a 32-year period from 1969 to 2001 for the 31-county Tri counties of the Tri-State (Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York) Region have been divided for analytical the nation and the Tri-State Region. What has not been fully documented, however, is the apparent shift

  4. Structural analysis of the 5 prime flanking region of the. beta. -globin gene in African sickle cell anemia patients: Further evidence for three origins of the sickle cell mutation in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chebloune, Y.; Pagnier, J.; Trabuchet, G.; Faure, C.; Verdier, G.; Labie, D.; Nigon, V. (Universite Claude Bernard-Lyon, Villeurbane (France))

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Haplotype analysis of the {beta}-globin gene cluster shows two regions of DNA characterized by nonrandom association of restriction site polymorphisms. These regions are separated by a variable segment containing the repeated sequences (ATTTT){sub n} and (AT){sub x}T{sub y}, which might be involved in recombinational events. Studies of haplotypes linked to the sickle cell gene in Africa provide strong argument for three origins of the mutation: Benin, Senegal, and the Central African Republic. The structure of the variable segment in the three African populations was studied by S1 nuclease mapping of genomic DNA, which allows a comparison of several samples. A 1080-base-pair DNA segment was sequenced for one sample from each population. S1 nuclease mapping confirmed the homogeneity of each population with regard to both (ATTTT){sub n} and (AT){sub x}T{sub y} repeats. The authors found three additional structures for (AT){sub x}T{sub y} correlating with the geographic origin of the patients. Ten other nucleotide positions, 5{prime} and 3{prime} to the (AT){sub x}T{sub y} copies, were found to be variable when compared to homologous sequences from human and monkey DNAs. These results allow us to propose an evolutionary scheme for the polymorphisms in the 5{prime} flanking region of the {beta}-globin gene. The results strongly support the hypothesis of three origins for the sickle mutation in Africa.

  5. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the western half of the study area (Eurasia and the Middle East) and (ii) identify well located seismic events with event-station paths isolated to individual tectonic provinces within the study area and collect broadband waveforms and source parameters for the selected events. The 1D models obtained from the joint inversion will then be combined with published geologic terrain maps to produce regionalized models for distinctive tectonic areas within the study area, and the models will be validated through full waveform modeling of well-located seismic events recorded at local and regional distances.

  6. Natacha Aveline, "Effects of Economic Globalisation on Spatial Structure and Property Markets in the Paris Region", Comprehensive Urban Studies, actes du colloque de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'université Métropolitaine de Tokyo, n°62, 2000, p.243-256 NATACHA AVELINE EFFECTS OF GLOBALIZATION ON THE SPATIAL STRUCTURE, published in "Globalization and large cities, Tokyo : Japan (1999)" #12;2 The impressive development gave rise to expectations that the economy would become independent of concrete territories

  7. Time series of high resolution photospheric spectra in a quiet region of the Sun. II. Analysis of the variation of physical quantities of granular structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puschmann, K G; Vazquez, M; Bonet, J A; Hanslmeier, A; 10.1051/0004-6361:20047193

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the inversion of a time series of high resolution slit spectrograms obtained from the quiet sun, the spatial and temporal distribution of the thermodynamical quantities and the vertical flow velocity is derived as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Spatial coherence and phase shift analyzes between temperature and vertical velocity depict the height variation of these physical quantities for structures of different size. An average granular cell model is presented, showing the granule-intergranular lane stratification of temperature, vertical velocity, gas pressure and density as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Studies of a specific small and a specific large granular cell complement these results. A strong decay of the temperature fluctuations with increasing height together with a less efficient penetration of smaller cells is revealed. The T -T coherence at all granular scales is broken already at log tau =-1 or z~170 km. At the layers beyon...

  8. A Change of Solar He II EUV Global Network Structure of the Transition Region as an Indicator of Geo-Effectiveness of Solar Minima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Didkovsky, Leonid

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar activity during 2007--2009 was very low, causing anomalously low thermospheric density. A comparison of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance in the He II spectral band (26 to 34 nm) from the Solar Extreme ultraviolet Monitor (SEM), one of instruments on the Charge Element and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) onboard of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) for the two latest solar minima showed a decrease of the absolute irradiance of about 15 +- 6 % during the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24 compared with the Cycles 22/23 minimum when a yearly running mean filter was used. We found that some local, shorter-term minima including those with the same absolute EUV flux in the SEM spectral band show a larger concentration of spatial power in the global network structure from the 30.4 nm SOHO Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) images for the local minimum of 1996 compared with the minima of 2008--2011. We interpret this larger concentration of spatial power in the transition reg...

  9. Specific features of the structure of the Z-pinch emitting region formed during the implosion of a foam-wire load at the ANGARA-5-1 facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru; Grabovski, E. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Laukhin, Ya. N.; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Oleinik, G. M.; Medovshchikov, S. F. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)] [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Shevel'ko, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the structure of the compressed plasma of a Z-pinch produced during the implosion of a foam-wire load at the current of up to 3 MA. The foam-wire load consisted of two nested cylindrical cascades, one of which was a solid or hollow cylinder made of low-density agar-agar foam, while the other was a wire array. The wall thickness of a hollow foam cylinder was 100-200 {mu}m. The images of the pinch and its spectrum obtained with the help of multiframe X-ray cameras and a grazing incidence spectrograph with a spatial resolution were analyzed. Data on the spatial structure of the emitting regions and the soft X-ray (SXR) spectrum of the Z-pinch in the final stage of compression of a foam-wire load were obtained. The implosion modes characterized by the formation of hot regions during implosion of such loads were revealed. The characteristic scale lengths of the hot regions were determined. It is shown that the energy distribution of SXR photons in the energy range from 80 eV to 1 keV forms the spatial structure of Z-pinch images recorded during the implosion of foam-wire loads. It is revealed that the spectral density of SXR emission in the photon energy range of 300-600 eV from hot Z-pinch regions exceeds the spectral density of radiation from the neighboring Z-pinch regions by more than one order of magnitude. Groups of lines related to the absorption and emission of radiation by atoms and multicharged ions of carbon and oxygen in the outer foam cascade of a foam-wire load were recorded for the first time by analyzing the spatial distribution of the SXR spectra of multicharged ions of the Z-pinch. The groups of absorption lines of ions (C III, O III, O IV, and O VI) corresponding to absorption of SXR photons in the Z-pinch of a tungsten wire array, which served as the inner cascade of a foam-wire load, were identified. The plasma electron temperature measured from the charge composition of carbon and oxygen ions in the outer agar-agar foam cascade was 10-40 eV. During the implosion of foam-wire loads at currents of up to 3 MA, SXR pulses (h{nu} > 100 eV) with a duration of 10 ns and peak power of 3 TW were detected. It is shown that the temporal profile of single-peak and double-peak SXR pulses can be controlled by varying the parameters of the outer and inner cascades of the foam-wire load.

  10. Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , for the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and the Western and Central Pacific Fishery Commission, for the Western PacificRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  11. HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM date ­ November 23, 2004 · Contract end date ­ March 31, 2006 #12;Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania · Objectives ­ Capture

  12. Crystal Structure of Cascade

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ribbon-like structure (Figure 1). This structure is facilitated by rotation of nucleotides out of the duplex region at six base pair intervals and stabilized by the highly...

  13. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

  14. SITN Regional Outreach Map

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Region States in Region Awardee(s) Location of Awardee(s) Contact(s) Northeast (Photovoltaics) CT * ME * MA * NH NY * RI * VT Hudson Valley Community College Troy, NY Richard...

  15. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  16. CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for...

  17. CEMI Western Regional Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please Join Assistant Secretary of Energy Dr. David Danielson for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western Regional Summit. Register now for this free event.

  18. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  19. Extended emission associated with young HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Ellingsen; S. S. Shabala; S. E. Kurtz

    2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to make observations of a sample of eight young ultra-compact HII regions, selected on the basis that they have associated class II methanol maser emission. We have made observations sensitive to both compact and extended structures and find both to be present in most sources. The scale of the extended emission in our sample is in general less than that observed towards samples based on IRAS properties, or large single-dish flux densities. Our observations are consistent with a scenario where extended and compact radio continuum emission coexists within HII regions for a significant period of time. We suggest that these observations are consistent with a model where HII evolution takes place within hierarchically structured molecular clouds. This model is the subject of a companion paper (Shabala et al. 2005) and addresses both the association between compact and extended emission and UCHII region lifetime problem.

  20. Regional Districts (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Adjacent Water Control and Improvement Districts and Municipal Utility Districts can opt to form a Regional District to oversee water issues. Such districts may be created:(1) to purchase, own,...

  1. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  2. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  3. Mitotic chromosome structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heermann, Dieter W., E-mail: heermann@tphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  4. Regional Report Issue Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regional Report Introduction The economy of the United States is more than three and one-half years accounting for both increasing shares of the economy and of recessionary employment losses. Manufacturing, driven by globalization and advancing information technology. Recoveries now produce jobs new

  5. LEADERSHIP HANDBOOK FOR REGIONAL COMMUNITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    LEADERSHIP HANDBOOK FOR REGIONAL COMMUNITIES JOHNS HOPKINS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION & THE OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS #12;Leadership Handbook for Regional Chapters 2 CONTENTS Contents .......................................................................................................................9 Chapter Leadership

  6. Regional Competitions - EERE Commercialization Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Runner-up Teams The Six Regional Competitions The Massachusetts Institute of Technology logo. Northeast Region Lead: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA) This...

  7. Structuring Structural Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van.A. Reniers CIP­DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Mousavi, MohammadReza Structuring Structural Operational Semantics / MohammadReza Mousavi. ­ Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2005

  8. Structuring Structural Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reniers, Michel

    aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van.A. Reniers CIP-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Mousavi, MohammadReza Structuring Structural Operational Semantics / MohammadReza Mousavi. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2005

  9. Regional Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    Committee for this study. ? Develop a coordination public transportation plan ? Identify resources required to develop the plan ? Provide policy guidance to lead the planning and coordination effort Golden Crescent Regional Transit 1... of Texas. This resource will be relied upon for further development of the Intermodal Transportation Terminal. ? FTA Section 5309 (Bus) Discretionary Support ? To assist in meeting the GCRPC?s capital replacement needs. This resource...

  10. Petrovay: Solar physics The solar cycle ACTIVE REGIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrovay, Kristóf

    Petrovay: Solar physics The solar cycle ACTIVE REGIONS Large scale (up to 100 Mm) anomalies in the structure and radiation of the solar atmosphere. Photosphere : AR = cluster of strong magnetic flux tubes of facular points. Filamentary structure due to supergranulation. #12;Petrovay: Solar physics The solar cycle

  11. Regional Energy Baseline 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-TR-11-09-02 REGIONAL ENERGY BASELINE (1960 ~ 2009) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 To tal En erg y U se pe r C ap ita (M MB tu) Year Total Energy... Use per Capita (1960-2009) US SEEC 12-States TX Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. September 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University...

  12. Regional Energy Baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    ESL-TR-11-09-02 REGIONAL ENERGY BASELINE (1960 ~ 2009) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 To tal En erg y U se pe r C ap ita (M MB tu) Year Total Energy... Use per Capita (1960-2009) US SEEC 12-States TX Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. September 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University...

  13. Regional companies eye growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved JustificationBio-Inspired PowerRegional companies eye

  14. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  15. Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Executive Master in Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care Learning Outcomes Health Systems, Policy and Reform - Communicating with Policy Makers - Evidence - Human Resources Management - Data and Decision Making Executive Master in Health Care Leadership (EMHCL

  16. Southern Region Watershed Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinators and the organization, management and activities of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

  17. Regional Summary Pacific Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bocaccio, Pacific ocean perch, cowcod, and darkblotched and widow rockfish are currently in rebuildingRegional Summary Pacific Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  18. 6, 1332313366, 2006 Regional pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 13323­13366, 2006 Regional pollution potentials of major population centers M. G. Lawrence a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Regional pollution potentials. Lawrence (lawrence@mpch-mainz.mpg.de) 13323 #12;ACPD 6, 13323­13366, 2006 Regional pollution potentials

  19. Structured Regions of Alpha-synuclein Fibrils Include the Early...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diseases. Three single point mutations in the AS gene, as well as multiplication of the wild-type (WT) AS allele, have been previously identified in families with early-onset PD....

  20. Crustal Structure and tectonics of the Imperial Valley Region California |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and HeatOpen Energy Information Imperial Valley

  1. Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India* Jeffrey D. Sachs Director The Earth Institute at Columbia_ramiah@yahoo.co.uk Asian Economic Papers 1:3 © 2002 The Earth Institute at Columbia University and the Massachusetts

  2. Finding Regions of Interest on Toroidal Meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kesheng; Sinha, Rishi R; Jones, Chad; Ethier, Stephane; Klasky, Scott; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Shoshani, Arie; Winslett, Marianne

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion promises to provide clean and safe energy, and a considerable amount of research effort is underway to turn this aspiration intoreality. This work focuses on a building block for analyzing data produced from the simulation of microturbulence in magnetic confinementfusion devices: the task of efficiently extracting regions of interest. Like many other simulations where a large amount of data are produced,the careful study of ``interesting'' parts of the data is critical to gain understanding. In this paper, we present an efficient approach forfinding these regions of interest. Our approach takes full advantage of the underlying mesh structure in magnetic coordinates to produce acompact representation of the mesh points inside the regions and an efficient connected component labeling algorithm for constructingregions from points. This approach scales linearly with the surface area of the regions of interest instead of the volume as shown with bothcomputational complexity analysis and experimental measurements. Furthermore, this new approach is 100s of times faster than a recentlypublished method based on Cartesian coordinates.

  3. How to move ionized gas: an introduction to the dynamics of HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William J. Henney

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This review covers the dynamic processes that are important in the evolution and structure of galactic HII regions, concentrating on an elementary presentation of the physical concepts and recent numerical simulations of HII region evolution in a non-uniform medium. The contents are as follows: (1) The equations (Euler equations; Radiative transfer; Rate equations; How to avoid the dynamics; How to avoid the atomic physics). (2) Physical concepts (Static photoionization equilibrium; Ionization front propagation; Structure of a D-type front; Photoablation flows; Other ingredients - Stellar winds, Radiation pressure, Magnetic fields, Instabilities). (3) HII region evolution (Early phases: hypercompact and ultracompact regions; Later phases: compact and extended regions; Clumps and turbulence).

  4. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and computational study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Shutthanandan, V.; Hu, Jian Z.; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The interfacial region between graphene and an imidazolium based ionic liquid is studied using spectroscopic analysis and computational modelling. This combined approach reveals that the molecular level structure of the interfacial region is significantly influenced by functional group defects on the graphene surface.The combined experimental and computational study reveals that the molecular structure at interfacial region between graphene and imidazolium based ionic liquid is defined by the hydroxyl functional groups on the graphene surface

  5. LNG (liquefied natural gas) in the Asia-Pacific region: Twenty years of trade and outlook for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiani, B.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: the current status of LNG trade in the Asia-Pacific region; present structure and projected demand in the Asia-Pacific region; prospective and tentative projects; and LNG contracts: stability versus flexibility.

  6. Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan: Heart of Texas Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heart of Texas Council of Governments

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan Heart of Texas Region Bosque, Falls, Freestone, Hill, Limestone & McLennan Counties December 1, 2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements... of Texas Council of Governments (HOTCOG) and the McLennan County Youth Collaboration (MCYC) ---21 Central Texas Senior Ministries (CTSM), Hill County Transit (HCT) and Scott and White (S&W) Medical Facilities...

  7. Regional Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs Regional Energy Efficiency Programs This presentation covers regional industrial energy efficiency programs in the Midwest, Southeast, and Southwest. Regional Energy...

  8. A regional economic impact model for identifying the relationship between transportation investments and economic development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freyre, German Eleodoro

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Allocation of Project Investment Calculation for Efficiency Savings Calculation of Mobility Savings Calculation of Safety Savings FHWA-47 Form Program Structure Basic Procedures Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Urban Interstate System... Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Urban Primary System Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Rural Interstate System Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Rural Primary System 15 17 18 20 . 23 27 56 58 95 96 97...

  9. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is a diverse partnership covering eleven states involving the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) an interstate compact; regulatory agencies and/or geological surveys from member states; the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); academic institutions; a Native American enterprise; and multiple entities from the private sector. Figure 1 shows the team structure for the partnership. In addition to the Technical Team, the Technology Coalition, an alliance of auxiliary participants, in the project lends yet more strength and support to the project. The Technology Coalition, with its diverse representation of various sectors, is integral to the technical information transfer, outreach, and public perception activities of the partnership. The Technology Coalition members, shown in Figure 2, also provide a breadth of knowledge and capabilities in the multiplicity of technologies needed to assure a successful outcome to the project and serve as an extremely important asset to the partnership. The eleven states comprising the multi-state region are: Alabama; Arkansas; Florida; Georgia; Louisiana; Mississippi; North Carolina; South Carolina; Tennessee; Texas; and Virginia. The states making up the SECARB area are illustrated in Figure 3. The primary objectives of the SECARB project include: (1) Supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program by promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. This requires the development of relevant data to reduce the uncertainties and risks that are barriers to sequestration, especially for geologic storage in the SECARB region. Information and knowledge are the keys to establishing a regional carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage industry with public acceptance. (2) Supporting the President's Global Climate Change Initiative with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by 2012. A corollary to the first objective, this objective requires the development of a broad awareness across government, industry, and the general public of sequestration issues and establishment of the technological and legal frameworks necessary to achieve the President's goal. The information developed by the SECARB team will play a vital role in achieving the President's goal for the southeastern region of the United States. (3) Evaluating options and potential opportunities for regional CO{sub 2} sequestration. This requires characterization of the region regarding the presence and location of sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), primarily CO{sub 2}, the presence and location of potential carbon sinks and geological parameters, geographical features and environmental concerns, demographics, state and interstate regulations, and existing infrastructure.

  10. PITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    AND COMMUNITIES PITTSBURGH, PA. | AUGUST 2013 #12;PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS 32 PITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS REPORT PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS (HAPs)/AIR TOXICS PREPARED BY AUTHORSPITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS (PRETA) REPORT PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR

  11. 1, 497531, 2004 Regional hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms: evidence from a glacial catchment T. J. Battin1, , A. Wille2@pflaphy.pph.univie.ac.at) 497 #12;BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al

  12. REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 3.1 INTRODUCTION Water supply planning on a regional scale

  13. Presentation of Regional SDSN Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garulli, Andrea

    ;Conference topics: Pollution in the Mediterranean sea Climate change Improving the management Energy#12;Presentation of UN SDSN and MED SDSN Regional SDSN Center for the Mediterranean Region #12;UN for the Mediterranean Basin Why a Mediterranean Network? Shared history Shared environment Shared future MED

  14. Nuclear Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - A250 region - K-isomers, highest neutron orbitals, reduced pairing, higher order multipole shapes Chowdhury ATLAS User Workshop May 15, 2014 * Deep-inelastic collisions with...

  15. GLOBAL DYNAMICS OF SUBSURFACE SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jouve, L. [UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Universite de Toulouse CNRS, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France)] [UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Universite de Toulouse CNRS, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Brun, A. S. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)] [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Aulanier, G., E-mail: ljouve@irap.omp.eu [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of a magnetic loop evolving in either a convectively stable or unstable rotating shell. The magnetic loop is introduced into the shell in such a way that it is buoyant only in a certain portion in longitude, thus creating an {Omega}-loop. Due to the action of magnetic buoyancy, the loop rises and develops asymmetries between its leading and following legs, creating emerging bipolar regions whose characteristics are similar to those of observed spots at the solar surface. In particular, we self-consistently reproduce the creation of tongues around the spot polarities, which can be strongly affected by convection. We further emphasize the presence of ring-shaped magnetic structures around our simulated emerging regions, which we call 'magnetic necklace' and which were seen in a number of observations without being reported as of today. We show that those necklaces are markers of vorticity generation at the periphery and below the rising magnetic loop. We also find that the asymmetry between the two legs of the loop is crucially dependent on the initial magnetic field strength. The tilt angle of the emerging regions is also studied in the stable and unstable cases and seems to be affected both by the convective motions and the presence of a differential rotation in the convective cases.

  16. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  17. The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote regional collaboration,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention to the research, extension and education resources available through the Land Grant University System

  18. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting...

  19. Regional Public Coordination Transportation Plan Texoma Region #22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texoma Council of Governments

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in conjunction with TxDOT to increase public awareness of the project. As an integral part of this project, each of the 24 regions studying public transportation in their area was charged with assessing Barriers, Constraints and Best Practices in public... Sherman TAPS TAPS TAPS operates in seven (7) counties, with three (3) of the counties in the Texoma Region. TAPS services include demand response, commuter bus services and special services. Square Miles Population ?00 Rider Trips ?05 Clay 1...

  20. Fueling Gas to the Central Region of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiichi Wada

    2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Supplying gas to the galactic central regions is one of key ingredients for AGN activity. I will review various fueling mechanisms for a R ~ 1 kpc region, determined mainly by numerical simulations over the last decade. I will also comment on the bars-within-bars mechanism. Observations suggest that the stellar bar is not a sufficient condition for gas fueling. Moreover, considering the various factors for the onset of gas accretion, stellar bars would not even be a necessary condition. I introduce recent progress obtained through our two- and three-dimensional, high resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the ISM in the central 0.1--1 kpc region of galaxies. Possible structure of the obscuring molecular tori around AGNs is also shown. The nuclear starburst is an important factor in determining the structure of the molecular tori and the mass accretion rate to the nucleus. It is natural that the ISM in the central 100 pc region is a highly inhomogeneous and turbulent structure. As a result, gas accretion to the central parsec region should be time dependent and stochastic. The conventional picture of gas fueling and the AGN unified model may be modified in many respects.

  1. Active constraint regions for optimal operation of distillation columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Active constraint regions for optimal operation of distillation columns Magnus G. Jacobsen the control structure of distillation columns, with optimal operation in mind, it is important to know how for distillation columns change with variations in energy cost and feed flow rate. The production of the most

  2. Introduction Large scale structure of the Earth Small scale structure Dynamics and evolution Conclusions and outlook Structure, dynamics and evolution of the core-mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Large scale structure of the Earth Small scale structure Dynamics and evolution Conclusions and outlook Structure, dynamics and evolution of the core-mantle boundary region Stéphane Labrosse École normale supérieure de Lyon Institut universitaire de France 14 mai 2012 1 / 63 Structure, dynamics

  3. Pacific Islands Region News Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Islands Region News Release Contact: Wende Goo FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 808-721-4098 May 27 of these unique twins by contributing more than 100 hours of work to construct a holding pen for the young seal

  4. Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping Study Generating Resources Advisory Committee 11 to determine potential, and draw conclusions Determine if realistic, reasonable assumption for hydropower at existing non-powered dams, and upgrades at existing hydropower facilities #12;Questions Asked Can

  5. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  6. RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3B—Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed Kimberly Ogden, Professor, University of Arizona, Engineering Technical Lead, National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

  7. Regional 166 Direct Loan (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Development Services Agency's (ODSA) Regional 166 Direct Loan provides low-interest loans to businesses creating new jobs or preserving existing employment opportunities in the State of Ohio.

  8. U.S. Metropolitan Spatial Structure and Employment Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xiaoyan

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explores the influence of US metropolitan spatial structure evolution on regional employment growth rate. The first part of this study investigates the evolution of US metropolitan spatial structures from 2000 to 2010. At the macro level...

  9. Parameter space region in the collisional magnetized electronegative plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasserian, Kiomars [Department of Physics, Karaj Branch, P.O. Box 31485-313, Islamic Azad University, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aslaninejad, Morteza [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the elastic collisions on the structure of a magnetized electronegative discharge is investigated. For a constant magnetic field, the profiles of the velocities of positive ions, the density of species, and electric potential are obtained. Furthermore, the positive ion flux is obtained as a function of magnetic field strength for different values of the collision frequency. The results show that in the absence of collision in a constant magnetic field, the discharge structure is uniform while by taking the collision into account, the structure becomes multilayer stratified. By increasing the collision frequency the discharge leaves the multilayer structure, and related oscillations in the plasma potential and space charge vanish. The parameter space region is obtained for collisionless and collisional cases. In this paper it is shown that a combined effect of collision and magnetic field determines the presheath-sheath structure.

  10. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

  11. Regional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-SettingHead5 IdleRegardingIndustrial Technologies|3

  12. Southeast Texas Region Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeast Texas Regional Planning Commission

    Providers Public transportation in the southeast Texas region includes primarily demand- response service, with two localities managing fixed-route systems. Table 2 identifies the transportation providers within the region. The major transportation... citywide bus services with eleven local routes. PAT operates from 6:15am to 6:15pm five days a week. Annual ridership for BMT totaled 671,420 fixed route and 22,155 demand response trips in 2005, while PAT ridership reached 116,632 fixed route and 20...

  13. Ninebrane structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisham Sati

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    String structures in degree four are associated with cancellation of anomalies of string theory in ten dimensions. Fivebrane structures in degree eight have recently been shown to be associated with cancellation of anomalies associated to the NS5-brane in string theory as well as the M5-brane in M-theory. We introduce and describe "Ninebrane structures" in degree twelve and demonstrate how they capture some anomaly cancellation phenomena in M-theory. Along the way we also define certain variants, considered as intermediate cases in degree nine and ten, which we call "2-Orientation" and "2-Spin structures", respectively. As in the lower degree cases, we also discuss the natural twists of these structures and characterize the corresponding topological groups associated to each of the structures, which likewise admit refinements to differential cohomology.

  14. Regions for Select Spot Prices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved JustificationBio-Inspired PowerRegional companiesRegions

  15. Circumnuclear Regions of Star Formation in Early Type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Angeles I; Hagele, Guillermo F; Castellanos, Marcelo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circumnuclear star forming regions, also called hotspots, are often found in the inner regions of some spiral galaxies where intense processes of star formation are taking place. In the UV, massive stars dominate the observed circumnuclear emission even in the presence of an active nucleus, contributing between 30 and 50% to the H$\\beta$ total emission of the nuclear zone. Spectrophotometric data of moderate resolution (3000 < R < 11000) are presented from which the physical properties of the ionized gas: electron density, oxygen abundances, ionization structure etc. have been derived.

  16. Circumnuclear Regions of Star Formation in Early Type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angeles I. Diaz; Elena Terlevich; Guillermo F. Hagele; Marcelo Castellanos

    2008-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Circumnuclear star forming regions, also called hotspots, are often found in the inner regions of some spiral galaxies where intense processes of star formation are taking place. In the UV, massive stars dominate the observed circumnuclear emission even in the presence of an active nucleus, contributing between 30 and 50% to the H$\\beta$ total emission of the nuclear zone. Spectrophotometric data of moderate resolution (3000 < R < 11000) are presented from which the physical properties of the ionized gas: electron density, oxygen abundances, ionization structure etc. have been derived.

  17. EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

  18. Panhandle Region Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panhandle Regional Transportation Advisory Group

    drivers; shared office staff with PCS Schedule for out of county trips Amarillo MWF Notes on Service Provided Medicaid to Amarillo M-F; school trips M-F; Hereford Satellite Center; some trips to Hereford Senior Center and nursing homes Table 2............................................................................................................................ 2-5 Health and Human Services Organizations ................................................................................. 2-9 History of Regional Coordination of Public Transportation .................................................... 2...

  19. Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii)....

  20. Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  1. Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region Burton H.boss@maine.edu ABSTRACT The optical structure and variability of the Lombok Straits region is poorly understood, but available remotely sensed ocean color indicates that there is a strong optical response and signal

  2. Texas State Planning Region 3 Report of Regional Transportation Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nortex Regional Planning Commission

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the 24 regions studying public transportation in their area was charged with assessing Barriers, Constraints and Best Practices in public transportation. This Coordination Committee addressed this issue with enthusiasm, generating significant topics...DOT requirement that all vehicles be ADA compliant, Medicaid restrictions and Insurance as significant barriers to public transportation. Best practices included sharing of information regarding this project through publication in rural newspapers, inter...

  3. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  4. Deployable structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández Merchan, Carlos Henrique

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis has the purpose of describing the meaning and applications of deployable structures (making emphasis in the scissor-hinged and sliding mechanisms.) and the development of new geometries, details, and mechanisms ...

  5. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  6. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  7. West Central Texas Regional Transportation Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Central Texas Council of Governments

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WEST CENTRAL TEXAS REGIONAL REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION FINAL REPORT NOVEMBER 2006 West Central Texas Regional Transit Coordination Plan Final Report and Executive Summary November 2006 A&R Consulting The Goodman... Workshops 177 Appendix C - Public Meetings 183 West Central Texas Regional Transit Coordination Plan Final Report and Executive Summary November 2006 A&R Consulting The Goodman Corporation November 2006 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...

  8. Application of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to marine structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pathi, Amarkumar

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , be able to support the loads that are applied during its operating lifetime. The structural integrity of components can be assured by knowledge of the material used in their construction. The fracture behavior of a given structure or material depends... or fatigue cracks. Ship structures operate in or near the ductile-brittle transition region, where the failure mechanism is unstable cleavage. Consequently materials are characterized by a transition temperature region above which they may be safely used...

  9. Liquid metal feeding through dendritic region in Ni-Hard white iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Dogan, Omer N.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid permeability in the dendritic regions is one of the factors that determine porosity formation and macro segregation in castings. Permeability in the dendritic structure of Ni-Hard white iron was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of microstructural coarsening on the permeability was also investigated. Permeability increased with coarsening dendritic structure in Ni-Hard white iron.

  10. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  11. Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to libraryOpen EnergyInformation|Regions

  12. Structured Finance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... Strengthening aStructure ofof the CompleteStructure

  13. Electrical network method for the thermal or structural characterization of a conducting material sample or structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, M.G.

    1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for modeling a conducting material sample or structure system, as an electrical network of resistances in which each resistance of the network is representative of a specific physical region of the system. The method encompasses measuring a resistance between two external leads and using this measurement in a series of equations describing the network to solve for the network resistances for a specified region and temperature. A calibration system is then developed using the calculated resistances at specified temperatures. This allows for the translation of the calculated resistances to a region temperature. The method can also be used to detect and quantify structural defects in the system.

  14. The Fractal Distribution of HII Regions in Disk Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nestor Sanchez; Emilio J. Alfaro

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that the gas has a fractal structure in a wide range of spatial scales with a fractal dimension that seems to be a constant around Df = 2.7. It is expected that stars forming from this fractal medium exhibit similar fractal patterns. Here we address this issue by quantifying the degree to which star-forming events are clumped. We develop, test, and apply a precise and accurate technique to calculate the correlation dimension Dc of the distribution of HII regions in a sample of disk galaxies. We find that the determination of Dc is limited by the number of HII regions, since if there are fractal dimension among galaxies, contrary to a universal picture sometimes claimed in literature. The fractal dimension exhibits a weak but significant correlation with the absolute magnitude and, to a lesser extent, with the galactic radius. The faintest galaxies tend to distribute their HII regions in more clustered (less uniform) patterns. The fractal dimension for the brightest HII regions within the same galaxy seems to be smaller than for the faintest ones suggesting some kind of evolutionary efffect, but the obtained correlation remains unchanged if only the brightest regions are taken into account.

  15. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nonproliferation and Arms Control Analysis Dept.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations. Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  16. Nanocrystal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisler, Hans J. (Stoneham, MA); Sundar, Vikram C. (Stoneham, MA); Walsh, Michael E. (Everett, MA); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Bawendi, Moungi G. (Cambridge, MA); Smith, Henry I. (Sudbury, MA)

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II-VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  17. Nanocrystal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II–VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  18. Use of computer to analyze and archive biological data (sequence and structural information) on a large scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Sheldon

    classification #12;Given a structure, identify the regions of secondary structure ­ DSSP, Stride, DEFINE of the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics National Center for Biotechnology Information National Library to structural classification · Distance alignment matrix (DALI) · Combinatorial extension (CE) · Sequential

  19. Primordial Star Forming Regions in a CDM Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Zhang; Michael L. Norman; Peter Anninos; Tom Abel

    1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a three-dimensional 2-level hierarchical cosmological code with a realistic and robust treatment of multi-species non-equilibrium ionization and radiative cooling processes, and use it to investigate primordial star forming regions that originate from high-\\sigma perturbations in a standard CDM dominated cosmology. We find it is possible to produce gravitationally bound and cooled structures at very high redshift (z ~ 40) with baryonic masses as small as ~1000Ms. The molecular hydrogen formation in these small scale structures follows very well the analytical predictions of Abel (1995) and Tegmark et al. (1996). We also discuss the minimum mass that cosmological structures must have in order to be able to cool and collapse.

  20. Experimental data confronts nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical content of experimental data for a variety of excitation energies and angular momenta is summarized. The specific nuclear structure questions which these data address are considered. The specific regions discussed are: low-spin data near the particle separation thresholds; low-spin data at intermediate excitation energies; high-spin, near-yrast data and high-spin data at larger excitation energies. 63 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID) has developed an experimentally validated cradle-to-grave modeling and simulation effort to optimize automotive components in order to decrease weight and cost, yet increase performance and safety in crash scenarios. In summary, the three major objectives of this project are accomplished: To develop experimentally validated cradle-to-grave modeling and simulation tools to optimize automotive and truck components for lightweighting materials (aluminum, steel, and Mg alloys and polymer-based composites) with consideration of uncertainty to decrease weight and cost, yet increase the performance and safety in impact scenarios; To develop multiscale computational models that quantify microstructure-property relations by evaluating various length scales, from the atomic through component levels, for each step of the manufacturing process for vehicles; and To develop an integrated K-12 educational program to educate students on lightweighting designs and impact scenarios. In this final report, we divided the content into two parts: the first part contains the development of building blocks for the project, including materials and process models, process-structure-property (PSP) relationship, and experimental validation capabilities; the second part presents the demonstration task for Mg front-end work associated with USAMP projects.

  2. Enhancing regional security agreements through cooperative monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes that strengthening regional capabilities for formulating and implementing arms control and confidence-building measures is a tangible method of enhancing regional security. It discusses the importance of developing a regional infrastructure for arms control and confidence building and elucidates the role of technology in facilitating regional arms control and confidence-building agreements. In addition, it identifies numerous applications for regional cooperative monitoring in the areas of arms control, resource management, international commerce and disaster response. The Cooperative Monitoring Center at Sandia National Laboratories, whose aim is to help individual countries and regions acquire the tools they need to develop their own solutions to regional problems, is discussed briefly. The paper ends with recommendations for establishing regional cooperative monitoring centers.

  3. REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES ANALYSIS SYSTEM Kaimeng Sun Institute of Agricultural Information, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing,P. R. China 100081 Abstract: In this paper, a system for analyzing the strategic adjustment of regional agricultural

  4. DC High School Science Bowl Regionals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This event is the Washington, D.C. High School Regional competition for the US National Science Bowl. The regional competition is run by the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, and the...

  5. Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund Program, coordinated by the Empire State Development program, is operated in six regions by nonprofit organizations and provides working capital loans (up to ...

  6. Superconducting structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  7. Terminal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frank (Langenhagen, DE); Allais, Arnaud (Hannover, DE); Mirebeau, Pierre (Villebon sur Yvette, FR); Ganhungu, Francois (Vieux-Reng, FR); Lallouet, Nicolas (Saint Martin Boulogne, FR)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

  8. Superconducting Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  9. Image patch analysis of sunspots and active regions. I. Intrinsic dimension and correlation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Kevin R; Delouille, Veronique; De Visscher, Ruben; Watson, Fraser; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complexity of an active region is related to its flare-productivity. Mount Wilson or McIntosh sunspot classifications measure such complexity but in a categorical way, and may therefore not use all the information present in the observations. Moreover, such categorical schemes hinder a systematic study of an active region's evolution for example. We propose fine-scale quantitative descriptors for an active region's complexity and relate them to the Mount Wilson classification. We analyze the local correlation structure within continuum and magnetogram data, as well as the cross-correlation between continuum and magnetogram data. We compute the intrinsic dimension, partial correlation, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) of image patches of continuum and magnetogram active region images taken from the SOHO-MDI instrument. We use masks of sunspots derived from continuum as well as larger masks of magnetic active regions derived from the magnetogram to analyze separately the core part of an active region fr...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaic Regional Testing Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grid Integration, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Photovoltaic, Photovoltaic Regional Testing Center (PV RTC), Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation...

  11. 6, 1092910958, 2006 Regional scale CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using radon A. I. Hirsch Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes A. I (Adam.Hirsch@noaa.gov) 10929 #12;ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using

  12. Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everest, Graham R

    Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East of England #12;Low Carbon Innovation Centre Report for EEDA Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective 20/04/2009 ii Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East

  13. Segmentation into fuzzy regions using topographic distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp-Foliguet, Sylvie

    recognition from fuzzy regions. Keywords: Segmentation, Fuzzy region, Watershed, Color image, TopographicSegmentation into fuzzy regions using topographic distance SYLVIE PHILIPP­FOLIGUET 1 MARCELO@dcc.ufmg.br, arnaldo@dcc.ufmg.br 3 Supported by CAPES. Abstract. This paper exposes an algorithm that leads to a fuzzy

  14. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities: (1) the demilitarization of the Sinai region between Israel and Egypt in the 1970s; (2) the 1991 quadripartite agreement for monitoring nuclear facilities among Brazil, Argentina, The Argentine-Brazilian Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency; and (3) a bilateral Open Skies agreement between Hungary and Romania in 1991. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations.Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  15. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  16. Airfoil structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

  17. Airfoil structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, Gary A. (Poway, CA); Twardochleb, Christopher Z. (Alpine, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

  18. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Young, Peter R.; Stenborg, Guillermo [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic observations with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode have revealed large areas of high-speed outflows at the periphery of many solar active regions. These outflows are of interest because they may connect to the heliosphere and contribute to the solar wind. In this paper, we use slit rasters from EIS in combination with narrowband slot imaging to study the temperature dependence and morphology of an outflow region and show that it is more complicated than previously thought. Outflows are observed primarily in emission lines from Fe XI to Fe XV. Observations at lower temperatures (Si VII), in contrast, show bright fan-like structures that are dominated by inflows. These data also indicate that the morphology of the outflows and the fans is different, outflows are observed in regions where there is no emission in Si VII. This suggests that the fans, which are often associated with outflows in studies involving imaging data, are not directly related to the active region outflows.

  19. Photodetector with absorbing region having resonant periodic absorption between reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Brennan, T.M.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A photodetector is disclosed that is responsive to a wavelength or wavelengths of interest which have heretofore been unrealized. The photodetector includes a resonant cavity structure bounded by first and second reflectors, the resonant cavity structure being resonant at the wavelength or wavelengths of interest for containing a plurality of standing waves therein. The photodetector further includes a radiation absorbing region disposed within the resonant cavity structure, the radiation absorbing region including a plurality of radiation absorbing layers spaced apart from one another by a distance substantially equal to a distance between antinodes of adjacent ones of the standing waves. Each of radiation absorbing layers is spatially positioned at a location of one of the antinodes of one of the standing waves such that radiation absorption is enhanced. The radiation absorbing layers may be either bulk layers or quantum wells includes a plurality of layers, each of which is comprised of a strained layer of InGaAs. Individual ones of the InGaAs layers are spaced apart from one another by a GaAs barrier layer. 11 figs.

  20. Relativisticlike structure of classical thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernando Quevedo; Alberto Sanchez; Alejandro Vazquez

    2014-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze in the context of geometrothermodynamics a Legendre invariant metric structure in the equilibrium space of an ideal gas. We introduce the concept of thermodynamic geodesic as a succession of points, each corresponding to a state of equilibrium, so that the resulting curve represents a quasi-static process. A rigorous geometric structure is derived in which the thermodynamic geodesics at a given point split the equilibrium space into two disconnected regions separated by adiabatic geodesics. This resembles the causal structure of special relativity, which we use to introduce the concept of adiabatic cone for thermodynamic systems. This result might be interpreted as an alternative indication of the inter-relationship between relativistic physics and classical thermodynamics.

  1. Northwest Regional Technology Center, March 2013 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to homeland security in the region, and this issue highlights Puget Sound Regional Blue Force Tracking Puget Sound Regional Blue Force Tracking Initiative The Puget Sound Regional Blue Force Tracking (BFTS the Puget Sound Area Maritime Security Committee Area of Responsibility. As part of the Initiative

  2. Emitting gas regions in Mrk 493: An extensive Fe II line emission region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. C. Popovic; A. Smirnova; D. Ilic; A. Moiseev; J. Kovacevic; V. Afanasiev

    2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed 3D spectroscopic observations of Mrk 493 in order to investigate the Fe II emitting region and their possible connection with the Hydrogen emitting region. We found that there is a strong Fe II emission in an extensive region ~ 4" x 4" around Sy 1 nucleus. The Fe II line width indicates that these lines are originated in an intermediate line region.

  3. Two stage serial impingement cooling for isogrid structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Morrison, Jay A.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for cooling a wall (24) of a component having an outer surface with raised ribs (12) defining a structural pocket (10), including: an inner wall (26) within the structural pocket and separating the wall outer surface within the pocket into a first region (28) outside of the inner wall and a second region (40) enclosed by the inner wall; a plate (14) disposed atop the raised ribs and enclosing the structural pocket, the plate having a plate impingement hole (16) to direct cooling air onto an impingement cooled area (38) of the first region; a cap having a skirt (50) in contact with the inner wall, the cap having a cap impingement hole (20) configured to direct the cooling air onto an impingement cooled area (44) of the second region, and; a film cooling hole (22) formed through the wall in the second region.

  4. Improved substrate structures for InP-based devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.; Sheldon, P.

    1988-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A substrate structure for an InP-based semiconductor device having an InP-based film is disclosed. The substrate structure includes a substrate region having a light-weight bulk substrate and an upper GaAs layer. An interconnecting region is disposed between the substrate region and the InP-based device. The interconnecting region includes a compositionally graded intermediate layer substantially lattice matched at its one end to the GaAs layer and substantially lattice matched at its opposite end to the InP-based film. The interconnecting region further includes a dislocation mechanism disposed between the GaAs layer and the InP-based film in cooperation with the graded intermediate layer, the buffer mechanism blocking and inhibiting propagation of threading dislocations between the substrate region and the InP-based device. 1 fig.

  5. Substrate structures for InP-based devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.W.; Sheldon, P.

    1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A substrate structure for an InP-based semiconductor device having an InP based film is described. The substrate structure includes a substrate region having a lightweight bulk substrate and an upper GaAs layer. An interconnecting region is disposed between the substrate region and the InP-based device. The interconnecting region includes a compositionally graded intermediate layer substantially lattice-matched at the opposite end to the InP=based film. The interconnecting region further includes a dislocation mechanism disposed between the GaAs layer and the InP-based film in cooperation with the graded intermediate layer, the buffer mechanism blocking and inhibiting propagation of threading dislocations between the substrate region, and the InP-based device.

  6. Substrate structures for InP-based devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO); Sheldon, Peter (Lakewood, CO)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A substrate structure for an InP-based semiconductor device having an InP based film is disclosed. The substrate structure includes a substrate region having a lightweight bulk substrate and an upper GaAs layer. An interconnecting region is disposed between the substrate region and the InP-based device. The interconnecting region includes a compositionally graded intermediate layer substantially lattice-matched at one end to the GaAs layer and substantially lattice-matched at the opposite end to the InP-based film. The interconnecting region further includes a dislocation mechanism disposed between the GaAs layer and the InP-based film in cooperation with the graded intermediate layer, the buffer mechanism blocking and inhibiting propagation of threading dislocations between the substrate region, and the InP-based device.

  7. Sign singularity and flares in solar active region NOAA 11158

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Kazachenko, Maria D; Krucker, Sam; Primavera, Leonardo; Servidio, Sergio; Vecchio, Antonio; Welsch, Brian T; Fisher, George H; Lepreti, Fabio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Active Region NOAA 11158 has hosted a number of strong flares, including one X2.2 event. The complexity of current density and current helicity are studied through cancellation analysis of their sign-singular measure, which features power-law scaling. Spectral analysis is also performed, revealing the presence of two separate scaling ranges with different spectral index. The time evolution of parameters is discussed. Sudden changes of the cancellation exponents at the time of large flares, and the presence of correlation with EUV and X-ray flux, suggest that eruption of large flares can be linked to the small scale properties of the current structures.

  8. Passive solar residential design within a traditional and regional context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeiffer, P.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper demonstrates how energy-efficient design can embody local symbolism and regionalism. A passive solar residence can be cost-effective, operate extremely efficiently, and conform to traditional residential aesthetics. The subject structure is a five-bedroom, 2600-ft/sup 2/ (240-m/sup 2/) residence located in the temperate climate of the mid-Atlantic states. It was constructed in 1984 and has been occupied for two years. The author presents actual energy consumption data and discusses passive solar design strategies.

  9. Modeling Dynamics in the Central Regions of Disk Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac Shlosman

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The central regions of disk galaxies are hosts to supermassive black holes whose masses show a tight correlation with the properties of surrounding stellar bulges. While the exact origin of this dependency is not clear, it can be related to the very basic properties of dark matter halos and the associated gas and stellar dynamics in the central kpc of host galaxies. In this review we discuss some of the recent developments in modeling the wide spectrum of dynamical processes which can be affiliated with the above phenomena, such as the structure of molecular tori in AGN, structure formation in triaxial halos, and dissipative and non-dissipative dynamics in nested bar systems, with a particular emphasis on decoupling of gaseous nuclear bars. We also briefly touch on the subject of fueling the nuclear starbursts and AGN.

  10. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF COOLING PLASMA IN QUIESCENT ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, E. [Artep, Inc. at Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., 20375-5320, Washington DC (United States); Miralles, M. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-50, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Curdt, W. [Max Planck Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max Planck Strasse 2, Katlenburg-Lindau 37191 (Germany); Hara, H. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, we use SOHO/SUMER, SOHO/UVCS, SOHO/EIT, SOHO/LASCO, STEREO/EUVI, and Hinode/EIS coordinated observations of an active region (AR 10989) at the west limb taken on 2008 April 8 to study the cooling of coronal loops. The cooling plasma is identified using the intensities of SUMER spectral lines emitted at temperatures in the 4.15 {<=} log T {<=} 5.45 range. EIS and SUMER spectral observations are used to measure the physical properties of the loops. We found that before cooling took place these loops were filled with coronal hole-like plasma, with temperatures in the 5.6 {<=} log T {<=} 5.9 range. SUMER spectra also allowed us to determine the plasma temperature, density, emission measure, element abundances, and dynamic status during the cooling process. The ability of EUVI to observe the emitting region from a different direction allowed us to measure the volume of the emitting region and estimate its emission measure. Comparison with values measured from line intensities provided us with an estimate of the filling factor. UVCS observations of the coronal emission above the active region showed no streamer structure associated with AR 10989 at position angles between 242{sup 0}and 253.{sup 0} EIT, LASCO, and EUVI-A narrowband images and UVCS spectral observations were used to discriminate between different scenarios and monitor the behavior of the active region in time. The present study provides the first detailed measurements of the physical properties of cooling loops, a very important benchmark for theoretical models of loop cooling and condensation.

  11. Enforcement Policy Statement: Regional Standards Enforcement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    42 U.S.C. 6291-6309, which set forth amended energy conservation standards for central air conditioners and heat pumps, including regional standards in certain States....

  12. BPA Regional Science Bowl Begins Jan. 31

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional-Science-Bowl-Begins-Jan-31 Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

  13. Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  14. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Validation Phase ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Validation Phase Core Storage R&D Storage Infrastructure Strategic Program Support NATCARBAtlas Program Plan Project Portfolio...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Vermont Photovoltaic Regional Test...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic Regional Test Center (RTC). The RTC will enable research on integrating solar panels into the statewide smart grid and help reduce the cost of solar power. The...

  16. Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes a number of regional districts, commissions, and authorities with the power to implement regulations and development plans for protected park and recreational areas.

  17. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the Basin and Range Province and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  18. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report covers the states that largely fall into the Southeastern Reliability Corporation (SERC) region: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

  19. Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  20. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northwest Region Workshop, held in Seattle July 15, 2011.

  1. Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  2. Regional Resource Centers for Innovation Brochure (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogsland, J.

    2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes OIT's Regional Resource Centers for Innovation (RCIs), which provide the Innovation and Invention program grantees and other small business energy innovators commercialization assistance.

  3. Northeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  4. The metallicity of circumnuclear star forming regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Diaz; E. Terlevich; M. Castellanos; G. F. Hagele

    2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a spectrophotometric study of circumnuclear star forming regions (CNSFR) in the early type spiral galaxies: NGC 2903, NGC 3351 and NGC 3504, all of them of over solar metallicity according to standard empirical calibrations. A detailed determination of their abundances is made after careful subtraction of the very prominent underlying stellar absorption. It is found that most regions show the highest abundances in HII region-like objects. The relative N/O and S/O abundances are discussed. In is also shown that CNSFR, as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller ``softness parameter" -- \\eta' -- values, and therefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  5. The metallicity of circumnuclear star forming regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Díaz, A I; Castellanos, M; Hägele, G F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a spectrophotometric study of circumnuclear star forming regions (CNSFR) in the early type spiral galaxies: NGC 2903, NGC 3351 and NGC 3504, all of them of over solar metallicity according to standard empirical calibrations. A detailed determination of their abundances is made after careful subtraction of the very prominent underlying stellar absorption. It is found that most regions show the highest abundances in HII region-like objects. The relative N/O and S/O abundances are discussed. In is also shown that CNSFR, as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller ``softness parameter" -- \\eta' -- values, and therefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  6. Western Regional Emergency Medicine Student Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel A; Fernandez, Jorge

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Regional Emergency Medicine Student Symposium DanielFernandez, MD Keck School of Medicine of the University ofDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Los Angles, CA The Western

  7. H I ABSORPTION TOWARD H II REGIONS AT SMALL GALACTIC LONGITUDES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.; Dickey, J. M.; Dawson, J. R. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001 (Australia); McClure-Griffiths, N. M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Anderson, L. D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Bania, T. M. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a comprehensive study of H I absorption toward H II regions located within |l| < 10 Degree-Sign . Structures in the extreme inner Galaxy are traced using the longitude-velocity space distribution of this absorption. We find significant H I absorption associated with the Near and Far 3 kpc Arms, the Connecting Arm, Bania's Clump 1, and the H I Tilted Disk. We also constrain the line-of-sight distances to H II regions, by using H I absorption spectra together with the H II region velocities measured by radio recombination lines.

  8. anemia mga1 region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Plants Websites Summary: 652013 1 Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium Regional GHG Emissions - Outlook June 4, 2013...

  9. Maximum likelihood density modification by pattern recognition of structural motifs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron density for a crystallographic structure having protein regions and solvent regions is improved by maximizing the log likelihood of a set of structures factors {F.sub.h } using a local log-likelihood function: (x)+p(.rho.(x).vertline.SOLV)p.sub.SOLV (x)+p(.rho.(x).vertline.H)p.sub.H (x)], where p.sub.PROT (x) is the probability that x is in the protein region, p(.rho.(x).vertline.PROT) is the conditional probability for .rho.(x) given that x is in the protein region, and p.sub.SOLV (x) and p(.rho.(x).vertline.SOLV) are the corresponding quantities for the solvent region, p.sub.H (x) refers to the probability that there is a structural motif at a known location, with a known orientation, in the vicinity of the point x; and p(.rho.(x).vertline.H) is the probability distribution for electron density at this point given that the structural motif actually is present. One appropriate structural motif is a helical structure within the crystallographic structure.

  10. Predicting Functional Regions of Objects Chaitanya Desai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanan, Deva

    regions. We compare "blind" approaches that ig- nore image data, bottom-up approaches that reason about). We benchmark a wide variety of algo- rithms for producing such outputs, including blind baselines- fords little use to an observer. The central thesis of this work is that functional regions

  11. THE ECONOMIC SITUATION IN THE ECE REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ECONOMIC SITUATION IN THE ECE REGION DIETER HESSE ECONOMIC ANALYSIS DIVISION UNECE #12;Major trends in the global economy so far in 2003 Global economic activity picked up ­ but uneven regional growth forces United States remains main engine of global economic growth Japan and Asian emerging

  12. Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India Jeffrey D. Sachs, Nirupam Bajpai and Ananthi Ramiah Papers #12;Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India Jeffrey D. Sachs Center for International Development (CID) Harvard University Ananthi_Ramiah@harvard.edu This paper was prepared for the Asian Economic

  13. Roadmap: Associate of Arts Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 12-Mar-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major GPA Overall GPA 61 2.000 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year

  14. Roadmap: Associate of Arts Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 27-Feb-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 2 of 2 | Last

  15. Roadmap: Associate of Science Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 27-Feb-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 2 of 2

  16. Roadmap: Associate of Science Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 12-Mar-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study GPA Overall GPA 61 2.000 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog

  17. Cardiff School of City and Regional Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    Cardiff School of City and Regional Planning Undergraduate Degree Programmes www School of City and Regional Planning 11 BSc Geography (Human) 13 BSc Geography (Human) and Planning 15 to Find Us #12;Welcome 1www.cardiff.ac.uk/cplan Thank you for your interest in the Cardiff School of City

  18. MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................. 24 #12;v ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BOEM Bureau of Ocean Energy Management BMPMID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research #12;MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research

  19. DAPS: Database of Aligned Protein Structures

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mallick, Parag; Rice, Danny; Eisenberg, David

    How is DAPS constructed? We begin with the set of all chains from the current release of the PDB. An all on all search is done on the list to find pairs that have the same fold acoording to both the FSSP and CATH databases and clustered into groups by a representative structure (representative structures have less than 25% sequence identity to each other). For each protein pair, regions aligned by the DALI program are extracted from the corresponding FSSP file, or recomputed using DALI-lite. In domain DAPS, only regions that are called "domains" by CATH are included in the alignment. The amino acid type, secondary structure type, and solvent accessibility are extracted from the DSSP file and written pairwise into the database. DAPS is updated with updates of CATH.[Taken from http://nihserver.mbi.ucla.edu/DAPS/daps_help.html

  20. Phases and Structures of Interstellar Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Elmegreen

    1999-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal and chemical phases of the cool component of interstellar gas are discussed. Variations with galactocentric radius and from galaxy to galaxy are mostly the result of changes in the ambient interstellar pressure and radiation field. Interstellar structure that is hierarchical or fractal in the cloudy parts and has large and connected empty regions between these clouds is probably the result of turbulence. Such structure opens up the disk to the transmission of OB star light into the halo, and it provides for a diffuse ionized component that tapers away gradually from each dense HII region. Fractal cloud structure may also produce the cloud and clump mass functions, and perhaps even the star cluster mass function.

  1. THE EXPANSION OF ACTIVE REGIONS INTO THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Huw; Jeska, Lauren; Leonard, Drew, E-mail: hmorgan@aber.ac.uk [Sefydliad Mathemateg a Ffiseg, Prifysgol Aberystwyth, Ceredigion SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced image processing of Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) C2 observations reveals the expansion of the active region closed field into the extended corona. The nested closed-loop systems are large, with an apparent latitudinal extent of 50 Degree-Sign , and expanding to heights of at least 12 R{sub Sun }. The expansion speeds are {approx}10 km s{sup -1} in the AIA/SDO field of view, below {approx}20 km s{sup -1} at 2.3 R{sub Sun }, and accelerate linearly to {approx}60 km s{sup -1} at 5 R{sub Sun }. They appear with a frequency of one every {approx}3 hr over a time period of around three days. They are not coronal mass ejections (CMEs) since their gradual expansion is continuous and steady. They are also faint, with an upper limit of 3% of the brightness of background streamers. Extreme ultraviolet images reveal continuous birth and expansion of hot, bright loops from a new active region at the base of the system. The LASCO images show that the loops span a radial fan-like system of streamers, suggesting that they are not propagating within the main coronal streamer structure. The expanding loops brighten at low heights a few hours prior to a CME eruption, and the expansion process is temporarily halted as the closed field system is swept away. Closed magnetic structures from some active regions are not isolated from the extended corona and solar wind, but can expand to large heights in the form of quiescent expanding loops.

  2. Regional geology of eastern Idaho and western Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, P.K.; Kuntz, M.A.; Platt, L.B. (eds.)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first section, Regional Synthesis, consists of a single 53-page chapter entitled The track of the Yellowstone hot spot: Volcanism faulting, and uplift.'' The authors' approach is to interpret major features or regional geology as resulting in large part from the last 16 Ma of southwesterly migration by the North American plate over a stationary thermal plume in the mantle. Evidence that may relate to the Yellowstone hot spot model is presented under headings dealing with volcanic track of the hot spot, neotectonic faulting associated with the hot spot, and regional topographic anomalies which may have resulted from hot spot-induced uplift or subsidence. The second section of the book deals with the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Each chapter is a separate article by different authors, so coverage is of selected topics in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt rather than a comprehensive overview. Extensional tectonics is the topic of the book's third section. Field investigations of two major structures, the Grand Valley fault and the Teton normal fault, are presented in chapters eight and nine, respectively. Chapter ten focuses on surficial gravity slide sheets that are well-exposed in the area, with particular emphasis on their structural features and mechanisms of emplacement. The final 90 pages of the book make up a four-chapter section that deals with the eastern Snake River plain (ESRP). Topical coverage is quite varied, ranging from details of Quaternary stratigraphy at one site to an overview of the eastern Snake River plain basaltic volcanism and an investigation of ignimbrites of the Heise volcanic field.

  3. Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production@nmsu.edu #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth i Disclaimer This report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic

  4. The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , when attributed on a consumption basis, California's per capita emissions are over 25 percent higherThe CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional Input-Output (MRIO) Approach: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions

  5. Electroluminescent apparatus having a structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer disposed on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains color-changing and non-color-changing regions arranged in a particular pattern.

  6. Control of Regional and Global Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary idea for regional and global weather control. He offers to cover cities, bad regions of country, full country or a continent by a thin closed film with control clarity located at a top limit of the Earth troposphere (4 - 6 km). The film is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric pressure and connected to ground by thin cables. It is known, the troposphere defines the Earth weather. Authors show this closed dome allows to do a full control of the weather in a given region (the day is always fine, the rain is only in night, no strong wind). The average Earth (white cloudy) reflectance equal 0.3 - 0.5. That means the Earth losses about 0.3 - 0.5 of a solar energy. The dome controls the clarity of film and converts the cold regions to subtropics and creates the hot deserts, desolate wildernesses to the prosperous regions with temperate climate. That is a realistic and the cheapest method of the weather control in the Earth at the current time. Key words: Global weather control, gigantic film dome, converting a cold region to subtropics, converting desolate wilderness to a prosperous region.

  7. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  8. Stellar Populations in Circumnuclear Star Forming Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Diaz; M. Alvarez-Alvarez; M. Castellanos

    2002-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the stellar populations and gas physical conditions in Circumnuclear Star Forming Regions (CNSFR) based on broad and narrow band photometry and spectrophotometric data, which have been analyzed with the use of evolutionary population synthesis and photoionization models. It is found that most CNSFR show composite stellar populations of slightly different ages. They seem to have the highest abundances in HII region-like objects, showing also N/O overabundances and S/O underabundances by a factor of about three. Also, CNSFR as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller $\\eta$' values, and thereforefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  9. Active Constraint Regions for Optimal Operation of Distillation Magnus G. Jacobsen and Sigurd Skogestad*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    , NTNU, N-7491, Trondheim, Norway ABSTRACT: When designing the control structure of distillation columnsActive Constraint Regions for Optimal Operation of Distillation Columns Magnus G. Jacobsen presented in an earlier paper, to find how the active constraints for distillation columns change

  10. Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

  11. Bioenergy Watershed Restoration in Regions of the West: What are the Environmental/Community Issues?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Huff, D.D.; Kaufmann, M.R.; Shepperd, W.D.; Sheehan, J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the western mountainous regions, wildfire risks are elevated due to both fire suppression activities which have changed the forest structure making it more susceptible to stand-killing fires and the expansion of human structures (houses, light commercial) into these same forests, By providing a market for currently noncommercial but flammable materials (small trees, tops, and branches), new and existing bioenergy industries could be a key factor in reducing the regional forest fuel loads. Although bioenergy would appear to be an ideal answer to the problem in many ways, the situation is complicated and numerous issues need resolution. A public fearful of logging in these regions needs assurance that harvesting for bioenergy is an environmentally and socially responsible solution to the current fuel build up in these forests. This is especially important given that biomass harvesting cannot pay its own way under current energy market conditions and would have to be supported in some fashion.

  12. Enforcement Policy Statement: Compliance Period for Regional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Compliance Period for Regional Standards Applicable to Central Air Conditioners April 24, 2014 On June 27, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published in the Federal...

  13. Sierra Nevada Region - Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Sierra Nevada Region is one of five offices in the Western Area Power Administration. SN markets power in northern and central California, and portions of Nevada, to wholesale...

  14. Detection Of Amplified Or Deleted Chromosomal Regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokke, Trond (San Fransisco, CA), Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA), Gray, Joe W. (San Fransisco, CA)

    1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  15. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokke, Trond (San Francisco, CA); Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  16. Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIRPC is a regional council of local governments serving the citizens of Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties in Northwest Indiana. NIRPC provides a forum that enables the citizens of Northwest...

  17. INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MIDWEST REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS MIDWEST REGION November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions Energy Regulatory Commission, any individual Commissioner, or the Commission itself #12;3-i Contents Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 A. Description of the Midwest

  18. Public School Transportation National and Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Public School Transportation National and Regional Perspectives: An Update Presented to Education University #12;Table of Contents I. Current Transportation Funding Policies ..................................................................................................................................1 B. Transportation Funding Options Used by States

  19. Contact Upper Great Plains Regional Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Plains Regional Office Mailing Address: PO Box 35800 Billings, MT 59107-5800 406-255-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-358-3415 Fax: 406-255-2900 Organizational chart with phone numbers...

  20. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northeast Region Workshop, held in Philadelphia, May 19–20, 2011.

  1. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in San Jose, California, August 25­–26, 2011.

  2. 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in Los Angeles on September 30, 2010.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaic Regional Testing Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Test Center (RTC). The RTC will enable research on integrating solar panels into the statewide smart grid and help reduce the cost of solar power. The Vermont RTC...

  4. What is the Broad Line Region?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    What is the Broad Line Region (BLR) made of? What determines its location? Why is it sometimes missing? What controls its properties? Some recent results and new approaches which may shed light on these issues are briefly described.

  5. About Upper Great Plains Regional Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7,800 miles of Federal power lines, which are connected with other regional transmission systems and groups. To keep power moving through the system, we rely on our operations in...

  6. AWEA Wind Energy Regional Summit: Northeast

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AWEA Wind Energy Northeast Regional Summit will connect you with New England-area wind energy professionals and offers the opportunity to discuss significant issues related to land-based and...

  7. Changing the Structure Boundary Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasev, Viktor; Dzlieva, Elena; Ivanov, Artyom [St.-Petersburg State University, Physics Faculty, Ulianovskaya 1, Peterhof, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of previously obtained results shows that hexagonal crystal lattice is the dominant type of ordering, in particular, in striated glow discharges. We explore the possibility for changing the dust distribution in horizontal cross sections of relatively highly ordered structures in a glow-discharge. Presuming that boundary geometry can affect dust distribution, we used cylindrical coolers held at 0 deg. C and placed against a striation containing a structure, to change the geometry of its outer boundary. By varying the number of coolers, their positions, and their separations from the tube wall, azimuthally asymmetric thermophoretic forces can be used to form polygonal boundaries and vary the angles between their segments (in a horizontal cross section). The corner in the structure's boundary of 60 deg. stimulates formation of hexagonal cells. The structure between the supported parallel boundaries is also characterized by stable hexagonal ordering. We found that a single linear boundary segment does not give rise to any sizable domain, but generates a lattice extending from the boundary (without edge defects). A square lattice can be formed by setting the angle equal to 90 deg. . However, angles of 45 deg. and 135 deg. turned out easier to form. Square lattice was created by forming a near-135 deg. corner with four coolers. It was noted that no grain ordering is observed in the region adjacent to corners of angles smaller than 30 deg. , which do not promote ordering into cells of any shape. Thus, manipulation of a structure boundary can be used to change dust distribution, create structures free of the ubiquitous edge defects that destroy orientation order, and probably change the crystal lattice type.

  8. Clusters of Extragalactic Ultra Compact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsey E. Johnson; Chip Kobulnicky; Phil Massey; Peter Conti

    2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the detection of optically thick free-free radio sources in the galaxies M33, NGC 253, and NGC 6946 using data in the literature. We interpret these sources as being young, embedded star birth regions, which are likely to be clusters of ultracompact HII regions. All 35 of the sources presented in this article have positive radio spectral indices alpha>0 suggesting an optically thick thermal bremsstrahlung emission arising in the HII region surrounding hot stars. Energy requirements indicate a range of a several to >500 O7V star equivalents powering each HII region. Assuming a Salpeter IMF, this corresponds to integrated stellar masses of 0.1--60,000 Msun. For roughly half of the sources in our sample, there is no obvious optical counterpart, giving further support for their deeply embedded nature. Their luminosities and radio spectral energy distributions are consistent with HII regions having electron densities from 1500 cm^-3 to 15000 cm^-3 and radii of 1 - 7 pc. We suggest that the less luminous of these sources are extragalactic ultracompact HII region complexes, those of intermediate luminosity are similar to W49 in the Galaxy, while the brightest will be counterparts to 30 Doradus. These objects constitute the lower mass range of extragalactic ``ultradense HII regions'' which we argue are the youngest stages of massive star cluster formation yet observed. This sample is beginning to fill in the continuum of objects between small associations of ultracompact HII regions and the massive extragalactic clusters that may evolve into globular clusters.

  9. Regional interpretation of Kansas aeromagnetic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarger, H.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aeromagnetic mapping techniques used in a regional aeromagnetic survey of the state are documented and a qualitative regional interpretation of the magnetic basement is presented. Geothermal gradients measured and data from oil well records indicate that geothermal resources in Kansas are of a low-grade nature. However, considerable variation in the gradient is noted statewide within the upper 500 meters of the sedimentary section; this suggests the feasibility of using groundwater for space heating by means of heat pumps.

  10. Regions of influence for two iterative methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifeste, Arlee Ross

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject Mathematics REGIONS OF INFLUENCE FOR TWO ITERATIVE METHODS A Thesis By ARLEE ROSS LEIFESTE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (N b )' January 1966 ACKNOWLEDGMENT The author wishes... purpose of the present discussion is to initiate a study of the "regions of influence" of the various solutions of the simul- taneous equations involved. Let the simultaneous functions be denoted and let ( y , y , , y 1 be a point of n...

  11. Residential market transformation: National and regional indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura L.; McNamara, Maureen; Suozzo, Margaret

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of programs are underway to address market barriers to the adoption of energy-efficient residential technologies and practices. Most are administered by utilities, states, or regions that rely on the Energy Star as a consistent platform for program marketing and messaging. This paper reviews regional and national market transformation activities for three key residential end-uses -- air conditioning, clothes washing, and lighting -- characterizing current and ongoing programs; reporting on progress; identifying market indicators; and discussing implications.

  12. SEARCHING FOR NEW HYPERCOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Pandian, Jagadheep D. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kurtz, Stan, E-mail: asanchez@arcetri.astro.it [Centro de RadioastronomIa y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypercompact (HC) H II regions are, by nature, very young H II regions, associated with the earliest stages of massive star formation. They may represent the transition phase as an early B-type star grows into an O-type star. Unfortunately, so few HC H II regions are presently known that their general attributes and defining characteristics are based on small number statistics. A larger sample is needed for detailed studies and good statistics. Class II methanol masers are one of the best indicators of the early stages of massive star formation. Using the Arecibo Methanol Maser Galactic Plane Survey-the most sensitive blind survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers to date-we selected 24 HC H II region candidates. We made Expanded Very Large Array continuum observations at 3.6 and 1.3 cm to search for HC H II regions associated with these masers. We identified six potential HC H II regions in our sample based on the presence of optically thick free-free emission. Overall, we find that 30% of the methanol masers have an associated centimeter radio continuum source (separation less than 0.1 pc), which is in general agreement with previous studies.

  13. Preliminary direct heat geothermal resource assessment of the Tennessee Valley region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary appraisal of the direct heat geothermal energy resources of the Tennessee Valley region has been completed. This region includes Kentucky, Tennessee and parts of adjacent states. Intermediate and deep aquifers were selected for study. Basement and Top-of-Knox structure and temperature maps were compiled from oil and gas well data on file at various state geological survey offices. Results of this study indicate that the New Madrid seismic zone is the only area within the region that possesses potential for direct heat utilization. In other areas geothermal energy is either too deep for economical extraction or it will not be able to compete with other local energy resources. The only anomalously high temperature well outside the New Madrid seismic zone was located in the Rome Trough and near the central part of the eastern Kentucky coal basin. Geothermal energy in that region would face strong competition from coal, oil and natural gas.

  14. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with geotextile underlayment. The riprap will be a stone barrier consisting of large rock that is buried below ground then graded upward toward the transmission structure...

  15. Variably porous structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul V. (Savoy, IL); Yu, Xindi (Urbana, IL)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a monolithic porous structure, comprises electrodepositing a material on a template; removing the template from the material to form a monolithic porous structure comprising the material; and electropolishing the monolithic porous structure.

  16. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, R.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R. B. Firestone and E.11089 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE by R.B. Firestone and E.iii- NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R.B Firestone and E. Browne

  17. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes five states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah) and contiguous areas from three adjacent states (west Texas, south Wyoming, and west Kansas). This energy-rich region exhibits some of the largest growth rates in the nation, and it contains two major CO{sub 2} pipeline networks that presently tap natural subsurface CO{sub 2} reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery at a rate of 30 million tons per year. The ten largest coal-fired power plants in the region produce 50% (140 million tons CO{sub 2}/y) of the total CO{sub 2} from power-plant fossil fuel combustion, with power plant emissions close to half the total CO{sub 2} emissions. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, the five major electric utility industries, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs including the Western Governors Association, and data sharing agreements with four other surrounding states. The Partnership is developing action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region, as well as the non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. The establishment of a website network to facilitate data storage and information sharing, decision-making, and future management of carbon sequestration in the region is a priority. The Southwest Partnership's approach includes (1) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, (2) assessing and initiating public acceptance of possible sequestration approaches, and (3) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. The Partnership will also identify potential gaps in monitoring and verification approaches needed to validate long-term storage efforts.

  18. Ring diagram analysis of the characteristics of solar oscillation modes in active regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Rajaguru; Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of intense magnetic fields in and around sunspots is expected to modify the solar structure and oscillation frequencies. Applying the ring diagram technique to data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we analyze the characteristics of high-degree f and p modes near active regions and compare them with the characteristics of the modes in quiet regions. As expected from earlier results, the f- and p-mode frequencies of high degree modes are found to be significantly larger in magnetically active regions. In addition, we find that the power in both f and p modes is lower in active regions, while the widths of the peaks are larger, indicating smaller lifetimes. We also find that the oscillation modes are more asymmetric in active regions than those in quiet regions, indicating that modes in active regions are excited closer to the surface. While the increase in mode frequency is monotonic in frequency, all other characteristics show more complex frequency dependences.

  19. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  20. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  1. Multilateral, regional and bilateral energy trade governance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal-Arcas, Rafael; Grasso, Costantino; Rios, Juan Alemany (Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom))

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current international energy trade governance system is fragmented and multi-layered. Streamlining it for greater legal cohesiveness and international political and economic cooperation would promote global energy security. The current article explores three levels of energy trade governance: multilateral, regional and bilateral. Most energy-rich countries are part of the multilateral trading system, which is institutionalized by the World Trade Organization (WTO). The article analyzes the multilateral energy trade governance system by focusing on the WTO and energy transportation issues. Regionally, the article focuses on five major regional agreements and their energy-related aspects and examines the various causes that explain the proliferation of regional trade agreements, their compatibility with WTO law, and then provides several examples of regional energy trade governance throughout the world. When it comes to bilateral energy trade governance, this article only addresses the European Union’s (EU) bilateral energy trade relations. The article explores ways in which gaps could be filled and overlaps eliminated whilst remaining true to the high-level normative framework, concentrating on those measures that would enhance EU energy security.

  2. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  3. Future regional climate change in the ten hydrologic regions of California: A climate modeling investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Lisa C

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    snow accumulation (mm snow water equivalent) by region.Bell, J.L. , Jour. American Water Resources Assoc. , 591-CO, 1993. Department of Water Resources (DWR), California

  4. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Sandhya (Bloomington, MN); Tuttle, Gary L. (Ames, IA); Sigalas, Mihail (Ames, IA); McCalmont, Jonathan S. (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

    2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  5. Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    #12;Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY REGION 1 Regional Lead Millie Davenport HGIC County Coordinator Matt Burns Pickens County Coordinator Marty Watt Anderson County Coordinator Morris Warner Oconee REGION 2 Regional Lead Danny Howard Greenville County Coordinator

  6. The Corona Australis Star Forming Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralph Neuhäuser; Jan Forbrich

    2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    At a distance of about 130 pc, the Corona Australis molecular cloud complex is one of the nearest regions with ongoing and/or recent star formation. It is a region with highly variable extinction of up to AV~45 mag, containing, at its core, the Coronet protostar cluster. There are now 55 known optically detected members, starting at late B spectral types. At the opposite end of the mass spectrum, there are two confirmed brown dwarf members and seven more candidate brown dwarfs. The CrA region has been most widely surveyed at infrared wavelengths, in X-rays, and in the millimeter continuum, while follow-up observations from centimeter radio to X-rays have focused on the Coronet cluster.

  7. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson; Rick Allis; Barry Biediger; Joel Brown; Jim Cappa; George Guthrie; Richard Hughes; Eugene Kim; Robert Lee; Dennis Leppin; Charles Mankin; Orman Paananen; Rajesh Pawar; Tarla Peterson; Steve Rauzi; Jerry Stuth; Genevieve Young

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes six whole states, including Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah, roughly one-third of Texas, and significant portions of adjacent states. The Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. The Partnership made great progress in this first year. Action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are almost finished, including both technical and non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. All partners in the Partnership are taking an active role in evaluating and ranking optimum sites and technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. We are identifying potential gaps in all aspects of potential sequestration deployment issues.

  8. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  9. Sandia Energy - Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Materials, Reliability, & Standards Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health...

  10. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or coarser spatial resolution. Further, LLNL has now built a capability in state-of-the-science mesoscale climate modeling that complements that which it has in global climate simulation, providing potential sponsors with an end-to-end simulation and analysis program.

  11. Global Study of Nuclear Structure Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Kulagin; R. Petti

    2005-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a phenomenological study of unpolarized nuclear structure functions for a wide kinematical region of x and Q^2. As a basis of our phenomenology we develop a model which takes into account a number of different nuclear effects including nuclear shadowing, Fermi motion and binding, nuclear pion excess and off-shell correction to bound nucleon structure functions. Within this approach we perform a statistical analysis of available data on the ratio of the nuclear structure functions F_2 for different nuclei in the range from the deuteron to the lead. We express the off-shell effect and the effective scattering amplitude describing nuclear shadowing in terms of few parameters which are common to all nuclei and have a clear physical interpretation. The parameters are then extracted from statistical analysis of data. As a result, we obtain an excellent overall agreement between our calculations and data in the entire kinematical region of x and Q^2. We discuss a number of applications of our model which include the calculation of the deuteron structure functions, nuclear valence and sea quark distributions and nuclear structure functions for neutrino charged-current scattering.

  12. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  13. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  14. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  15. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  16. 2030 Northwest Arkansas Regional Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning Commission

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    united front. B. Regional Transportation History An early road was established through Northwest Arkansas in the 1830s linking Fort Smith to points in southern Missouri and on to St. Louis. By the mid 1800s many roads crossed the growing region including... the historic Butterfield Overland Coach Road that linked St. Louis and San Francisco. The Civil War brought troop movements through the area with major battles being fought at Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove. The University of Arkansas was established in 1872...

  17. SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewin, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference – San Antonio, TX Doug Lewin December 18, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas... Dec. 16-18 SPEER • Member-based, non-profit organization • The Newest Regional Energy Efficiency Organization (REEO) • Founded in 2011 • 38 members from wide cross section of E.E. industries ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy...

  18. SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewin, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference – San Antonio, TX Doug Lewin December 18, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas... Dec. 16-18 SPEER • Member-based, non-profit organization • The Newest Regional Energy Efficiency Organization (REEO) • Founded in 2011 • 38 members from wide cross section of E.E. industries ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy...

  19. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

  20. Earth Structure Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth Structure Introduction Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton, unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 210/4/2010 Aerial views #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 310/4/2010 http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/Ben/ES/ #12

  1. Structural Signature of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Glasses H. L. Peng,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Structural Signature of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Glasses H. L. Peng,1,2 M. Z. Li,2,* and W the degree of local fivefold symmetry (LFFS) as the structural indicator to predict plastic deformation of local structures and find that the plastic events prefer to be initiated in regions with a lower degree

  2. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  3. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

  4. Regional Interagency Steering GIS Sub-Committee for FEMA's Region II Caribbean Area Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Regional Interagency Steering GIS Sub-Committee for FEMA's Region II Caribbean Area Division Jimmy Rodríguez-Zamora Caribbean Area Division, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00918 Department of Homeland Security also. This effort is being carried out at the Caribbean Area Division as New York and New Jersey

  5. Minutes of Southern Region Animal Waste Team: Southern Regional Water Quality Project Animal Waste Management Topic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Southern Animal and Waste Management Quarterly 2. Format & length: Electronic, pdf and MSWord (by requestMinutes of Southern Region Animal Waste Team: Southern Regional Water Quality Project Animal Waste with the Symposium on the State of the Science: Animal Manure and Waste Management Attended by: M. Risse (UGA), T

  6. Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) on Regional Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHEVs are expected to penetrate market soon. If recharging occurs during off-peak hours, the grid will not be significantly affected. However, peak-time recharging may lead to capacity shortfalls. This paper analyzes the potential impact of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and emissions levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 U.S. regions under 7 recharging scenarios. The simulations predict that the PHEV introduction could impact demand peaks, reduce reserve margins, and increase prices. The type of power generation used to recharge the PHEVs and associated emissions will depend upon the region and the timing of the recharge.

  7. african region summary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model (MRCM) in simulating the West African monsoon. The MRCM is built on the Regional Climate Model, ... Im, Eun-Soon 12 Regional Summary Gulf of Mexico Region Management...

  8. Drive-access transit : a regional analytical framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, James B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A framework for analyzing drive-access transit at a regional level is developed in this research. This framework is intended primarily for in-house use by regional transit agencies, yet has implications for the regional ...

  9. Interaction Region Issues at the NLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Maruyama, T.; /SLAC

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Two detector concepts are being investigated for the Next Linear Collider. This paper discusses the current design of the interaction region for one of them, based on a 6 Tesla solenoid and silicon based tracking. Topics include masking layout, backgrounds and the suppression of final quadrupole jitter. All calculations are based on the 1 TeV design parameters.

  10. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, J.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  11. Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional Reduction in Cadmium in Blue Crabs J connected to the Hudson River estuary. A major Superfund dredging cleanup in 1994-1995 removed most ofcadmiumsedimentconcentrationswithinthecovefollowing the cleanup. This unique study demonstrates the efficacy of a major dredging cleanup

  12. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  13. Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inventories of emissions of the trace species included in the study at the appropriate sectoral, spatial inventories calculated global emissions by large geographic areas (Vfkhelyi, 1985), with very little spatial to compile regional to global inventories of anthropogenic emissions. This discussion is by no means

  14. Regional Report New Jersey's New Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutgers Regional Report New Jersey's New Economy Growth Challenges James W. Hughes Dean Edward J July 2006 #12;advanced new-economy peers--New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts--have been experi- encing employment declines in the post­2000 period in a number of important "new economy" sectors

  15. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an existing collaborative process through which new and existing technologies and management systems Committee (SRWQPC) promotes the development and delivery of effective management systems that can be adaptedSouthern Region Water Quality Coordination Project September 14, 2004 to June 1, 2005 Progress

  16. Magnetic Landscape of Sun's Polar Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Tsuneta; K. Ichimoto; Y. Katsukawa; B. W. Lites; K. Matsuzaki; S. Nagata; D. Orozco Suarez; T. Shimizu; M. Shimojo; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; T. K. Suzuki; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the magnetic landscape of the polar region of the Sun that is unprecedented in terms of high spatial resolution, large field of view, and polarimetric precision. These observations were carried out with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard \\emph{Hinode}. Using a Milne-Eddington inversion, we found many vertically-oriented magnetic flux tubes with field strength as strong as 1 kG that are scattered in latitude between 70-90 degree. They all have the same polarity, consistent with the global polarity of the polar region. The field vectors were observed to diverge from the center of the flux elements, consistent with a view of magnetic fields that expand and fan out with height. The polar region is also covered with ubiquitous horizontal fields. The polar regions are the source of the fast solar wind channelled along unipolar coronal magnetic fields whose photospheric source is evidently rooted in the strong field, vertical patches of flux. We conjecture that vertical flux tubes with large expansion around the photosphere-corona boundary serve as efficient chimneys for Alfven waves that accelerate the solar wind.

  17. Pennsylvania Institute of State and Regional Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    SDCPa Pennsylvania State Data Center Institute of State and Regional Affairs Penn State Harrisburg 777 W. Harrisburg Pike Middletown, PA 17057-4898 Phone: (717) 948-6336 Fax: (717) 948-6754 E-mail: Pa in Pennsylvania since it was established at Penn State Harrisburg in 1973. The Institute was created as a means

  18. Patentanwlte in der Region Aachen Bauer, Dirk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen (RWTH)

    Patentanwälte in der Region Aachen Bauer, Dirk Patent- und Rechtsanwälte Bauer, Wagner, Priesmeyer, Klaus Dr. Patentanwälte Potthast & Spengler Auf der Rur, 52459 Inden Tel.: (02465) 86 29 144, mail@kleinespatent.de Busse, Frank Patent- und Rechtsanwälte Bauer, Wagner, Priesmeyer Grüner Weg 1, 52070 Aachen Tel.: (0241

  19. VANCOUVER FOREST REGION 2100 LABIEUX ROAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Paul Kuster and Frank Ullmann, Operations Manager. Assistance in planning and fieldwork were provided days and work on weekends and nights. Funding for this project was provided by Her Majesty the Queen, through the Vancouver Regional Office Research budget and the Squamish Forest District operational budget

  20. Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, L. Scott

    1 Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region 39th Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference October 2nd - 3rd, 2009 Scott Southworth U. S. Geological Survey L. Scott Eaton James Madison University Meghan H. Lamoreaux College of William & Mary William C. Burton U. S. Geological Survey Christopher M

  1. Quasar H II Regions During Cosmic Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo A. Alvarez; Tom Abel

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic reionization progresses as HII regions form around sources of ionizing radiation. Their average size grows continuously until they percolate and complete reionization. We demonstrate how this typical growth can be calculated around the largest, biased sources of UV emission, such as quasars, by further developing an analytical model based on the excursion set formalism. This approach allows us to calculate the sizes and growth of the HII regions created by the progenitors of any dark matter halo of given mass and redshift with a minimum of free parameters. Statistical variations in the size of these pre-existing HII regions are an additional source of uncertainty in the determination of very high redshift quasar properties from their observed HII region sizes. We use this model to demonstrate that the transmission gaps seen in very high redshift quasars can be understood from the radiation of only their progenitors and associated clustered small galaxies. The fit sets a lower limit on the redshift of overlap at z = 5.8 +/- 0.1. This interpretation makes the transmission gaps independent of the age of the quasars observed. If this interpretation were correct it would raise the prospects of using radio interferometers currently under construction to detect the epoch of reionization.

  2. Regional Transit System: Return on Investment Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Regional Transit System: Return on Investment Assessment May 2014 #12;1 Today's agenda Itasca transit options Enables strategic, efficient investment in long-term infrastructure, e.g., energy grid are seeking cities with good transit Transit can be a cost-efficient way to add capacity in corridors

  3. Crossing the Transition Region High Altitude Observatory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : enhanced emission at TR temperatures Much lower density in umbra and plume: (log(Ne/cm 3)=10 Lyman line profiles not reversed in umbra and plume TR above sunspots is higher and probably more extended than in the surrounding plage region ------plage -.-.-.penumbra ......umbra ____plume #12;Outline Recent observations

  4. Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation THE RECENT MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE DEVEL- opments in Brazil for com- mercial genetically modified (GM) crops in both the scientific and regulatory arena. The release of GM crops in these coun- tries might result in the unintentional entry of GM seeds into neighboring

  5. PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Nanotechnology for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    4/19/2011 Present PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Nanotechnology for Industry May 31, 2011 9 _____________________________________________________________ _____________The field of nanotechnology continues to be one of the leading forces behind our nation's ability to develop, commercialize, and produce advancements that are enabled by nanotechnology. Therefore, Drexel

  6. From Ultracompact to Extended HII Regions. II: Cloud Gravity and Stellar Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Franco; Guillermo Garcia-Segura; Stan Kurtz

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical evolution of HII regions with and without stellar motion in dense, structured molecular clouds is studied. Clouds are modeled in hydrostatic equilibrium, with gaussian central cores and external halos that obey r**-2 and r**-3 density power laws. The cloud gravity is included as a time-independent, external force. Stellar velocities of 0, 2, 8, and 12 km/s are considered. When stellar motion is included, stars move from the central core to the edge of the cloud, producing transitions from ultracompact to extended HII regions as the stars move into lower density regions. The opposite behavior occurs when stars move toward the cloud cores. The main conclusion of our study is that ultracompact HII regions are pressure-confined entities while they remain embedded within dense cores. The confinement comes from ram and/or ambient pressures. The survival of ultracompact regions depends on the position of the star with respect to the core, the stellar life-time, and the core crossing time. Stars with velocities less than the cloud dispersion velocity can produce cometary shapes smaller than 0.1 pc at times of 20,000 yr or more. The sequence Ultracompact to Compact to Extended HII region shows a variety of unpredictable structures due to ionization-shock front instability. Some ultracompact HII regions with a core-halo morphology might be explained by self-blocking effects, when stars overtake and ionize leading, piled-up clumps of neutral gas. We use thermal energy to support the cloud against gravity; the results remain the same if other types of isotropic cloud support are used.

  7. SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first year of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (third and fourth quarter) of the project (April 1--September 30, 2004) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, Texas and Virginia were added during the second quarter of the project and no geographical changes occurred during the third or fourth quarter of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, general mapping and screening of sources and sinks has been completed, with integration and Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping ongoing. The first step focused on the macro level characterization of the region. Subsequent characterization will focus on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB has completed a preliminary assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has conducted a survey and focus group meeting to gain insight into approaches that will be taken to educate and involve the public. Task 5.0 and 6.0 will be implemented beginning October 1, 2004. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB will evaluate findings from work performed during the first year and shift the focus of the project team from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team will develop an integrated approach to implementing and setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. During this semiannual period special attention was provided to Texas and Virginia, which were added to the SECARB region, to ensure a smooth integration of activities with the other 9 states. Milestones completed and submitted during the third and fourth quarter included: Q3-FY04--Complete initial development of plans for GIS; and Q4-FYO4--Complete preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues.

  8. Flows and Waves in Braided Solar Coronal Magnetic Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pant, V; Banerjee, Dipankar

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the high frequency dynamics in the braided magnetic structure of an active region (AR 11520) moss as observed by High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C). We detect quasi periodic flows and waves in these structures. We search for high frequency dynamics while looking at power maps of the observed region. We find that shorter periodicites (30 - 60 s) are associated with small spatial scales which can be resolved by Hi-C only. We detect quasi periodic flows with wide range of velocities from 13 - 185 km/s associated with braided regions. This can be interpreted as plasma outflows from reconnection sites. We also find presence of short period and large amplitude transverse oscillations associated with braided magnetic region. Such oscillations could be triggered by reconnection or such oscillation may trigger reconnection.

  9. SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHP (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first 18-months of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (fifth and sixth project quarters) of the project (October 1, 2004-March 31, 2005) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, no changes occurred during the fifth or sixth quarters of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, refinements have been made to the general mapping and screening of sources and sinks. Integration and geographical information systems (GIS) mapping is ongoing. Characterization during this period was focused on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB continues to expand upon its assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has used results of a survey and focus group meeting to refine approaches that are being taken to educate and involve the public. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB has evaluated findings from work performed during the first 18-months. The focus of the project team has shifted from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team is developing an integrated approach to implementing the most promising opportunities and in setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. Milestones completed during the fifth and sixth project quarters included: (1) Q1-FY05--Assess safety, regulatory and permitting issues; and (2) Q2-FY05--Finalize inventory of major sources/sinks and refine GIS algorithms.

  10. Regional setting of Niobrara Formation in Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas is currently produced from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation in northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and several small fields in Nebraska. As a part of studies of low-permeability gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains, the regional geologic setting of the Niobrara has been investigated in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Structural contours of the Ardmore Bentonite Bed suggest that the area of thin Niobrara strata presently approximates the south flank of the Williston basin and north flank of the Denver and Kennedy basins. Chalk tongues are interpreted as low-angle shelf surfaces, known as carbonate ramps, which sloped gently to the northwest and southeast off a paleotectonic high. The paleotectonic high cut obliquely across the seaway and was close to the position of the Transcontinental arch that influenced Paleozoic sedimentation. As a result, the present-day stratigraphy and structural setting of the Niobrara are different north and south of the arch crest. 58 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  11. adaptive localization regions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Developing regional and local scenarios for climate change mitigation and adaptation Geosciences Websites Summary: Developing regional...

  12. american monsoon region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and circulation in October Xue, Yongkang 30 Vegetation response to Holocene climate change in monsoon-influenced region Yan Zhao a, Geosciences Websites Summary: forest region;...

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  14. Wind energy resources atlas. Volume 1. Northwest region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concering regional wind energy resource assessment; regional features; and state features for Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

  15. OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability...

  16. Passive Housing for an Aggressive Region | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Passive Housing for an Aggressive Region Passive Housing for an Aggressive Region July 17, 2012 - 1:59pm Addthis Lynn Meyer Presidential Management Fellow, Office of Energy...

  17. Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency, call slides and...

  18. ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) (Redirected from West African Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE)) Jump...

  19. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines...

  20. Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date...

  1. Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness...

  2. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States...

  3. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and computational study. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and...

  4. Refraction Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Heimgartner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date...

  5. Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness...

  6. May 29 Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar to Highlight Regional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9 Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar to Highlight Regional Transmission Planning Efforts May 29 Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar to Highlight Regional Transmission Planning Efforts May...

  7. anabaena variabilis regions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 250 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

  8. andean region salta: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 260 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

  9. ashanti region ghana: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 307 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

  10. asc ascarylose region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 313 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

  11. andes region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 274 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

  12. abortus ure2 region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 226 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

  13. adjacent regions implications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in schizophrenia. A. Browne Browne, Antony 7 Regional Implications of Global Climate Change for the Great Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Regional...

  14. Washington Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Regions National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and...

  15. Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students |...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Minnesota Regions Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle...

  16. A Retrospective Filter Trust Region Algorithm For Unconstrained ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    algorithm gives a good estimation of trust region radius, relaxes the condition of accepting a trial step for the usual trust region methods. Under reasonable ...

  17. DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers February...

  18. Energy Department Announces First Regional Gasoline Reserve to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces First Regional Gasoline Reserve to Strengthen Fuel Resiliency Energy Department Announces First Regional Gasoline Reserve to Strengthen Fuel Resiliency May 2, 2014 -...

  19. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  20. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  1. Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness...

  2. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  3. United States Regional Administrator Region 9, Arizona, California Environmental Protection 75 Haw thorne Street Haw aii, Nevada, Guam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    United States Regional Administrator Region 9, Arizona, California Environmental Protection 75 Haw Cities Network ASU Receives Environmental Award for Collaborative Sustainability Efforts SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Administrator Jared Blumenfeld today recognized

  4. New Results on Nucleon Spin Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2005-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent precision spin structure data from Jefferson Lab have significantly advanced our knowledge of nucleon structure in the valence quark (high-x) region and improved our understanding of higher-twist effects, spin sum rules and quark-hadron duality. First, results of a precision measurement of the neutron spin asymmetry, A{sub 1}{sup n}, in the high-x region are discussed. The new data shows clearly, for the first time, that A{sub 1}{sup n} becomes positive at high x. They provide crucial input for the global fits to world data to extract polarized parton distribution functions. Preliminary results on A{sub 1}{sup p} and A{sub 1}{sup d} in the high-x region have also become available. The up and down quark spin distributions in the nucleon were extracted. The results for {Delta}d/d disagree with the leading-order pQCD prediction assuming hadron helicity conservation. Then, results of a precision measurement of the g{sub 2}{sup n} structure function to study higher-twist effects are presented. The data show a clear deviation from the lead-twist contribution, indicating a significant higher-twist (twist-3 or higher) effect. The second moment of the spin structure functions and the twist-3 matrix element d{sub 2}{sup n} results were extracted at a high Q{sup 2} of 5 GeV{sup 2} from the measured A{sub 2}{sup n} in the high-x region in combination with existing world data and compared with a Lattice QCD calculation. Results for d{sub 2}{sup n} at low-to-intermediate Q{sup 2} from 0.1 to 0.9 GeV{sup 2} were also extracted from the JLab data. In the same Q{sup 2} range, the Q{sup 2} dependence of the moments of the nucleon spin structure functions was measured, providing a unique bridge linking the quark-gluon picture of the nucleon and the coherent hadronic picture. Sum rules and generalized forward spin polarizabilities were extracted and compared with Chiral Perturbation Theory calculations and phenomenological models. Finally, preliminary results on the resonance spin structure functions in the Q{sup 2} range from 1 to 4 GeV{sup 2} were presented, which, in combination with DIS data, will enable a detailed study of the quark-hadron duality in spin structure functions.

  5. OUTFLOWS AND DARK BANDS AT ARCADE-LIKE ACTIVE REGION CORE BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tarr, L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode have revealed outflows and non-thermal line broadening in low intensity regions at the edges of active regions (ARs). We use data from Hinode's EIS, Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer instrument to investigate the boundaries of arcade-like AR cores for NOAA ARs 11112, 10978, and 9077. A narrow, low intensity region that is observed at the core's periphery as a dark band shows outflows and increased spectral line broadening. This dark band is found to exist for days and appears between the bright coronal loop structures of different coronal topologies. We find a case where the dark band region is formed between the magnetic field from emerging flux and the field of the pre-existing flux. A magnetic field extrapolation indicates that this dark band is coincident with the spine lines or magnetic separatrices in the extrapolated field. This occurs over unipolar regions where the brightened coronal field is separated in connectivity and topology. This separation does not appear to be infinitesimal and an initial estimate of the minimum distance of separation is found to be Almost-Equal-To 1.5-3.5 Mm.

  6. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential to permanently store CO2 for literally 100s of years even if all the CO2 emissions from the region's large point sources were stored there, an unlikely scenario under any set of national carbon emission mitigation strategies. The terrestrial sequestration opportunities in the region have the biophysical potential to sequester up to 20% of annual emissions from the region's large point sources of CO2. This report describes the assumptions made and methods employed to arrive at the results leading to these conclusions. It also describes the results of analyses of regulatory issues in the region affecting the potential for deployment of sequestration technologies. Finally, it describes the public outreach and education efforts carried out in Phase I including the creation of a web site dedicated to the MRCSP at www.mrcsp.org.

  7. Water Masers Toward Ultracompact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kurtz; P. Hofner

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a survey in the 6_{16}-5_{23} rotational water transition toward 33 galactic ultracompact HII regions. Maser emission is detected toward 18 of these sources; two are new detections. High quality spectra are provided for all 18 sources. We discuss the detection rate of this survey and the correlation of various maser properties with other physical parameters. In addition, we report wide-bandwidth (316 km/s), moderate-resolution (~ 3'') water maser observations of the HH80-81 region. We report the first detection of water maser emission at the approximate velocity of the molecular core. This emission is coincident with the extreme tip of the thermal jet, and well-removed from the much stronger and well-known maser emission at the position of VLA-3.

  8. The Structure of the Broad Line Region in AGN: I. Reconstructed Velocity-Delay Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, C J; Horne, Keith; Bentz, M C; Pogge, R W; Denney, K D; De Rosa, G; Martini, Paul; Kochanek, C S; Zu, Y; Shappee, B; Siverd, R; Beatty, T G; Sergeev, S G; Kaspi, S; Salvo, C Araya; Bird, J C; Bord, D J; Borman, G A; Che, X; Chen, C; Cohen, S A; Dietrich, M; Doroshenko, V T; Efimov, Yu S; Free, N; Ginsburg, I; Henderson, C B; King, A L; Mogren, K; Molina, M; Mosquera, A M; Nazarov, S V; Okhmat, D N; Pejcha, O; Rafter, S; Shields, J C; Skowron, J; Szczygiel, D M; Valluri, M; van Saders, J L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present velocity-resolved reverberation results for five active galactic nuclei. We recovered velocity-delay maps using the maximum-entropy method for four objects: Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, 3C120, and PG2130+099. For the fifth, Mrk 6, we were only able to measure mean time delays in different velocity bins of the H\\beta\\ emission line, but see tentative evidence of combined virial motion and infalling gas. The four velocity-delay maps show unique dynamical signatures for each object. For 3C120, the Balmer lines show kinematic signatures consistent with both an inclined disk and infalling gas, but the HeII 4686 emission line is suggestive only of inflow. The Balmer lines in Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, and PG 2130+099 show signs of infalling gas, but the HeII emission in Mrk 335 is consistent with an inclined disk. The maps for 3C120 and Mrk 335 are two of the most clearly defined velocity-delay maps to date. These maps constitute a large increase in the number of objects for which we have resolved velocity-delay maps and ...

  9. Irregular structures observed below 71 km in the night-time polar D-region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The payload contained two instru- ments. PIP (positive ion probe) measured positive ion current and CPP (cold plasma probes) measured electron current as well as electron temperature. The latter parameter archipelago. The ®rst instrumented rocket was launched on 20 November, 1997, at 1730 UT during geomagnetically

  10. THE PHYSICAL STRUCTURE OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: THE SERPENS CLUSTER COMPARED WITH OTHER REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, Isa; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)] [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Merin, Bruno [Herschel Science Center, European Space Astronomy Centre (ESA), P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada (Madrid) (Spain)] [Herschel Science Center, European Space Astronomy Centre (ESA), P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada (Madrid) (Spain); Pontoppidan, Klaus M., E-mail: oliveira@astro.as.utexas.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral energy distributions are presented for 94 young stars surrounded by disks in the Serpens Molecular Cloud, based on photometry and Spitzer/IRS spectra. Most of the stars have spectroscopically determined spectral types. Taking a distance to the cloud of 415 pc rather than 259 pc, the distribution of ages is shifted to lower values, in the 1-3 Myr range, with a tail up to 10 Myr. The mass distribution spans 0.2-1.2 M {sub Sun }, with median mass of 0.7 M {sub Sun }. The distribution of fractional disk luminosities in Serpens resembles that of the young Taurus Molecular Cloud, with most disks consistent with optically thick, passively irradiated disks in a variety of disk geometries (L {sub disk}/L {sub star} {approx} 0.1). In contrast, the distributions for the older Upper Scorpius and {eta} Chamaeleontis clusters are dominated by optically thin lower luminosity disks (L {sub disk}/L {sub star} {approx} 0.02). This evolution in fractional disk luminosities is concurrent with that of disk fractions: with time disks become fainter and the disk fractions decrease. The actively accreting and non-accreting stars (based on H{alpha} data) in Serpens show very similar distributions in fractional disk luminosities, differing only in the brighter tail dominated by strongly accreting stars. In contrast with a sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars, the T Tauri stars in Serpens do not have a clear separation in fractional disk luminosities for different disk geometries: both flared and flat disks present wider, overlapping distributions. This result is consistent with previous suggestions of a faster evolution for disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars. Furthermore, the results for the mineralogy of the dust in the disk surface (grain sizes, temperatures and crystallinity fractions, as derived from Spitzer/IRS spectra) do not show any correlation to either stellar and disk characteristics or mean cluster age in the 1-10 Myr range probed here. A possible explanation for the lack of correlation is that the processes affecting the dust within disks have short timescales, happening repeatedly, making it difficult to distinguish long-lasting evolutionary effects.

  11. Urban Form and Travel Patterns at the Regional Scale Considering Polycentric Urban Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Young-Jae

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ) per capita and daily transit passenger miles (DPMT) per capita. To overcome major problems of previous studies, i.e., lack of generalizability and multicollinearity, a cross-sectional analysis of 203 U.S. urbanized areas was conducted, using directed...

  12. Crustal and Uppermost Mantle Structure beneath the Western United States from USArray Regional Phase Analysis /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehler, Janine Sylvia

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. [2008]). Interpretation of seismic tomography maps isresolution, interpretation of imaged seismic anoma- lies

  13. Gasoline price spikes and regional gasoline context regulations : a structural approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muehlegger, Erich J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1999, gasoline prices in California, Illinois and Wisconsin have spiked occasionally well above gasoline prices in nearby states. In May and June 2000, for example, gasoline prices in Chicago rose twenty eight cents ...

  14. Lightning location characteristics and vertical structure analysis of isolated storm cells in the TOGA COARE region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnaby, Stephen Andrew

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    producing storm cells, and non-lightning producing cells over the tropical oceans. The characteristics of lightning locations with respect to radar reflectivity were also examined. Lightning characteristics of flashes associated with TOGA COARE storm cells...

  15. Geophysical Study of Basin-Range Structure Dixie Valley Region, Nevada |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown,JumpValley near Winnemucca,Open Energy

  16. UNCORRECTEDPROOF 1 Mapping the regional influence of genetics on brain structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    a , Marina Barysheva a , Sarah K. Madsen a , 4 Christina Avedissian a , Yi- ^ Yu Chou a , Greig I. de Zubicaray c , Katie McMahon c , Margaret Wright d , 5 Arthur W. Toga a , Paul M. Thompson a 6 a Laboratory

  17. Mapping the regional influence of genetics on brain structure variability --A Tensor-Based Morphometry study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    a , Sarah K. Madsen a , Christina Avedissian a , Yi-Yu Chou a , Greig I. de Zubicaray c , Katie L. McMahon c , Margaret J. Wright d , Arthur W. Toga a , Paul M. Thompson a, a Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Department

  18. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick airfoil is described for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%--26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4--1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects. 3 Figs.

  19. West Central Texas Regional Transportation Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Central Texas Council of Governments

    "Best Practice" Approach with Respect to Medical Transportation Program. The Medical Transportation Program is the outstanding example of successful recent regional coordination in West Central Texas. Recommendation # 1 - Coordinated... trips. CARR provides a significant level of demand response service within Brown County to Brownwood. Service is provided to other communities in Brown County such as Bangs, May, Rising Star and Zephyr. No service is provided to Abilene. No human...

  20. Regional Service Planning for the Coastal Bend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coastal Bend Council of Governments

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the most effective transportation possible with available resources. Coordinated Planning: ? SAFETEA-LU requires the establishment of a locally developed, coordinated public transit-human services transportation plan for all FTA human service... their service area, but 8 cite a lack of funding, community awareness, and resources as barriers to development. Corpus Christi Regional Transportation Authority: The CCRTA is the metropolitan transit authority that serves Corpus Christi and parts...

  1. Assistance Focus: Asia/Pacific Region (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center Ask an Expert service connects governments seeking policy information and advice with one of more than 30 global policy experts who can provide reliable and unbiased quick-response advice and information. The service is available at no cost to government agency representatives from any country and the technical institutes assisting them. This publication presents summaries of assistance provided to governments in the Asia/Pacific region, including the benefits of that assistance.

  2. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Census Region

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1998

  3. Reappraising Transition Region Line Widths in light of Recent Alfvén Wave Discoveries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott W. McIntosh; Bart De Pontieu; Theodore D. Tarbell

    2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a new interpretation of ultraviolet transition region emission line widths observed by the SUMER instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). This investigation is prompted by observations of the chromosphere at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode revealing that all chromospheric structures above the limb display significant transverse (Alfvenic) perturbations. We demonstrate that the magnitude, network sensitivity and apparent center-to-limb isotropy of the measured line widths (formed below 250,000K) can be explained by an observationally constrained forward-model in which the line width is caused by the line-of-sight superposition of longitudinal and Alfvenic motions on the small-scale (spicular) structures that dominate the chromosphere and low transition region.

  4. Structuring beyond architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foxe, David M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the layering and negotiation of structural devices in urban settings. Its point of departure is a series of patterns of how structural design and urban design interact and overlap, from which are ...

  5. Physically Based Global Downscaling: Regional Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.; Fox, Jared

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate simulated by a global atmosphere/land model with a physically-based subgrid orography scheme is evaluated in ten selected regions. Climate variables simulated for each of multiple elevation classes within each grid cell are mapped according the high-resolution distribution of surface elevation in each region. Comparison of the simulated annual mean climate with gridded observations leads to the following conclusions. At low to moderate elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates increasing precipitation, decreasing temperature, and increasing snow with increasing elevation within regions smaller than 100 km. At high elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates a decrease in precipitation with increasing elevation. Too little precipitation is simulated on the windward side of mountain ranges and too much precipitation is simulated on the lee side. The simulated sensitivity of surface air temperature to surface elevation is too strong, particularly in valleys influenced by drainage circulations. Observations show little evidence of a “snow shadow”, so the neglect of the subgrid rainshadow does not produce an unrealistic simulation of the snow distribution. Summertime snow area, which is a proxy for land ice, is much larger than observed. Summertime snow water equivalent is far less than the observed thickness of glaciers because a 1 m upper bound on snow water is applied to the simulations and because snow transport by slides is neglected. The 1 m upper bound on snow water equivalent also causes an underestimate of seasonal snow water during late winter, compared with gridded station measurements. Potential solutions to these problems are discussed.

  6. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  7. Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Hill; Kenneth Nemeth; Gary Garrett; Kimberly Sams

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern States Energy Board's (SSEB) 'Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies' program began on June 1, 2003, and was completed on January 31, 2009. The project proved beneficial in providing state decision-makers with information that assisted them in removing barriers or implementing incentives to deploy clean coal technologies. This was accomplished through two specific tasks: (1) domestic energy security and diversity; and (2) the energy-water interface. Milestones accomplished during the project period are: (1) Presentations to Annual Meetings of SSEB Members, Associate Member Meetings, and the Gasification Technologies Council. (2) Energy: Water reports - (A) Regional Efforts to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies: Impacts and Implications for Water Supply and Quality. June 2004. (B) Energy-Water Interface Challenges: Coal Bed Methane and Mine Pool Water Characterization in the Southern States Region. 2004. (C) Freshwater Availability and Constraints on Thermoelectric Power Generation in the Southeast U.S. June 2008. (3) Blackwater Interactive Tabletop Exercise - Decatur, Georgia April 2007. (4) Blackwater Report: Blackwater: Energy and Water Interdependency Issues: Best Practices and Lessons Learned. August 2007. (5) Blackwater Report: BLACKWATER: Energy Water Interdependency Issues REPORT SUMMARY. April 2008.

  8. Northern New Mexico regional airport market feasibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is about the market for airline travel in northern New Mexico. Interest in developing a northern New Mexico regional airport has periodically surfaced for a number of years. The New Mexico State Legislature passed a memorial during the 1998 Second Session calling for the conduct of a study to determine the feasibility of building a new regional airport in NNM. This report is a study of the passenger market feasibility of such an airport. In addition to commercial passenger market feasibility, there are other feasibility issues dealing with siting, environmental impact, noise, economic impact, intermodal transportation integration, region-wide transportation services, airport engineering requirements, and others. These other feasibility issues are not analyzed in any depth in this report although none were discovered to be show-stoppers as a by-product of the authors doing research on the passenger market itself. Preceding the need for a detailed study of these other issues is the determination of the basic market need for an airport with regular commercial airline service in the first place. This report is restricted to an in-depth look at the market for commercial passenger air service in NNM. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  10. Western Regional Center of the National Institute for Climatic Change Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hungate, Bruce A. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goal of this project was fostering, integrating, synthesizing, and disseminating experimental, observational, and modeling research on predicted climate change in the western region of the U.S. and the impacts of that change on the structure, productivity, and climatic interactions of the region's natural and managed ecological systems. This was accomplished through administering a competitive grants program developed in collaboration with the other four regional centers of the NICCR. The activities supported included efforts to synthesize research on climate change in the western U.S. through meta-analysis studies, model comparisons, and data synthesis workshops. Results from this work were disseminated to the scientific and public media. This project also supported the development of the NICCR web site, hosted at NAU, which was used as the means to accept pre-proposal and proposal submissions for each funding cycle, and served as a clearing house for public outreach for results from NICCR-funded research

  11. Evolution of Magnetic Helicity and Energy Spectra of Solar Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, D D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We adopt an isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field for estimating magnetic energy and helicity spectra as well as current helicity spectra of individual active regions and the change of their spectral indices with the solar cycle. The departure of the spectral index of current helicity from 5/3 is analyzed, and it is found that it is lower than that of magnetic energy. There is no obvious relationship between the change of the normalized magnetic helicity and the integral scale of the magnetic field for individual active regions. The evolution of the spectral index reflects the development and distribution of various scales of magnetic structures in active regions. It is found that around solar maximum the magnetic energy and helicity spectra are steeper.

  12. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  13. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  14. The logic of regionalism: a comparative study of regionalism in Europe and Asia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Mi-Kyung

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the balance between the state?s public power and the state?s market governability, consequently resulting in a political convergence toward a majoritarian political system based on individualism and delegative democracy. However, regionalism is realized...

  15. Studying Transition Region Phenomena with Solar-B/EIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Young

    2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition region lines in active regions can become strongly enhanced in coronal footpoints and active region blinkers. The weak transition region lines found in the Solar-B/EIS wavebands will thus become useful for diagnostic studies of these events. EIS count rates predicted from SOHO/CDS spectra are presented, and a Mg VII density diagnostic is highlighted.

  16. Students benefit the Laboratory and the region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer SolarStructureChallenge | DepartmentStudents

  17. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  18. The New House of the Region of Hannover - Building Energy Efficient in a Public Private Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, T.; Plesser, S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    / 3 91 - 35 84 plesser@igs.bau.tu-bs.de The New House of the Region of Hannover - Building energy Efficient in a Public Private Partnership Topic: Examples of advanced/demonstration buildings Key words: Demonstration building, PPP..., public private partnership, commissioning, energy efficiency, user comfort Public Private Partnerships are an increasingly popular approach to carry out public infra-structure projects. PPPs aim at reducing costs and risk and improving service...

  19. Role of Wind in Vernacular Architecture of Hot and Humid Region of Iran 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najafabadi, R. A.; Daneshvar, K.; Pakseresht, K.; Pooryousefzadeh, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the structure, and whose projecting ends were usually left to serve as scaffolding for cleaning and maintenance (figure 7). Figure 7- Plan of wind tower shows an X configuration. Wind towers are often classified by the number of directions from...ROLE OF WIND IN VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE OF HOT AND HUMID REGION OF IRAN RAHMAN AZARI NAJAFABADI ACADEMIC STAFF STUDENT KIMIYA DANESHVAR SAHAR PAKSERESHT SARA POORYOUSEFZADEH STUDENT STUDENT ART...

  20. Deformation of layered rocks in the ramp regions of thrust faults: a study with rock models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Judith Savaso

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and thrust belts for example, thrust faults commonly occur along specific stratigraphic horizons, and folding and faulting within thrust sheets often involves slip along bedding planes (e. g. , Rich, 1934; Douglas, 1950; Dahl str om, 1970; Price, 1981...). With the regional framework of many fold and thrust belts well estab- lished, the current emphasis of many studies has turned to defining the geometries, kinematics, and deformation mechanisms of individual thrust belt structures, and the intrinsic and extrinsic...

  1. The Chimalapas Region, Oaxaca, Mexico: a high-priority region for bird conservation in Mesoamerica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Navarro-Sigü enza, Adolfo G.; Herná ndez-Bañ os, Blanca E.; Escalona-Segura, Griselda; Rebó n-Gallardo, Fanny; Rodrí guez-Ayala, Emir; Figueroa-Esquivel, Elsa M.; Cabrera-Garcí a, Leonardo

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chimalapas lie in the easternmost corner of Oaxaca (Figure 1), at the shared border of Oaxaca, Veracruz and Chiapas. With Chajul (Chiapas) and Calakmul (Campeche) they rank among the largest pristine tropical regions of Mexico, holding an impressive number... of vegetation types, including cloud forest, trop- ical rainforest, semi-deciduous tropical forest, humid pine-oak forest, and deciduous tropical forest (Binford 1989, Wendt 1989, 1993; Figure 2). The region had its geological origins in the Upper Cretaceous...

  2. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  3. Structural health monitoring for ship structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Angel, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bement, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salvino, Liming [NSWC, CADEROCK

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.

  4. Multiscale dynamics of solar magnetic structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim M. Uritsky; Joseph M. Davila

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiscale topological complexity of solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries. We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying this dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al., 2007) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of Grassberger - Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  5. A magnetotelluric investigation of crustal structure in southeastern Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parizek, Daniel Joseph

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The consistent deep electrical strike may also suggest that the NN-trend of surface structures in the region was controlled by pre-existing, deep seated, NW-trending structures. Correlation between heat flow and depth to the crustal conductive zone... cross-section wi th the apparent resistivity model Conductive temperature profiles for major heat flow provinces in the United States (from Shankland and Ander, in press) 51 52 56 Page Figure 15. Heat flow sites in southeastern Arizona...

  6. Structural genomics - A goldmine of blueprints for structure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - A goldmine of blueprints for structure-based drug design. Structural genomics - A goldmine of blueprints for structure-based drug design. Abstract: In late 2007 the National...

  7. Insights into subgenomic RNA synthesis in coronaviruses from structural and biophysical studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Lichun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 5’ untranslated region (UTR) of coronaviral genomes contains cis-acting sequences necessary for replication, transcription and translation. A consensus secondary structural model of the 5' 140 nucleotides of the 5' UTRs of nine coronaviruses (Co...

  8. LocARNA-P: Accurate boundary prediction and improved detection of structural RNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, T.

    Current genomic screens for noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) predict a large number of genomic regions containing potential structural ncRNAs. The analysis of these data requires highly accurate prediction of ncRNA boundaries and ...

  9. Structural constraints on the exhumation of the Tso Morari Dome, NW Himalaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Ryan J

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tso Morari culmination in the Ladakh region of northwest India is a large (>3,000 km²) structural dome cored by coesite-bearing rocks of Indian continental crustal affinity. As one of only two localities in the Himalaya ...

  10. PROTEINSStructure, Function, and Genetics 26:217-235 (1996) Structural Aspects of the Functional Modules in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (PKCa) have been generated on the basis of knownrelated structures.The catalytic region at the C for subsequent PKC activation,16J7and PKCa canbe completely inactivated, in vitro, by treating it with a Serl

  11. The solution structure of ribosomal protein S17E from Methanobacterium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and are about half the length of the eukaryotic homologs which have an additional C-terminal region. Here we report the three-dimensional solution structure of S17E. S17E folds...

  12. Structural investigation and allosteric properties of a unique disulfide bond in C-terminal Src kinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Jamie E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Budde, Mutations in the N-terminal regulatory region reduceStructure of the carboxyl-terminal Src kinase, Csk. JournalActivation of the COOH-terminal Src kinase (Csk) by cAMP-

  13. Lake Region Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groupsIllinois:Lake Region Electric Cooperative

  14. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Midwest Region

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322DevelopmentConfigurationMidwest Region

  15. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southwest Region

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines

  16. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Western Region

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region About U.S. Natural Gas

  17. Enforcement Policy Statement: Regional Standards Enforcement Rulemaking

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 - December 23,EnergyRegional

  18. Regional Standards Enforcement Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energy RecoveryofRegional Standards

  19. Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California: EnergyHolocene Magmatic Geothermal Region

  20. Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 TermoelectricaPaving the path forIn-Vehicle,Pennsylvania Regional

  1. Iceland Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas:ITC Transmission Jump to:Iceland Geothermal Region

  2. Indonesia Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty,Jump7 VarnishInformationIndigenousGeothermal Region

  3. Regional Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.JuneAs part of itsRefiningHydrogenRegional

  4. NUCLEAR REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I

  5. WIPP Mine Rescue Team Wins Regional Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 -VisualizingVoteFundingComputersTeamRegional

  6. Form:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,Forked River,event nameREGION Input

  7. Turkey Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-StateTucsonTurboTech PrecisionGeothermal Region

  8. Active region based on graded-gap InGaN/GaN superlattices for high-power 440- to 470-nm light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsatsulnikov, A. F., E-mail: Andrew@beam.ioffe.ru; Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Ber, B. Ya.; Kazantsev, D. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Mizerov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Center for Microelectronics, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Park, Hee Seok [Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd. (Korea, Republic of); Hytch, M.; Hue, F. [National Center for Scientific Research, Center for Material Elaboration and Structural Studies (France)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural and optical properties of light-emitting diode structures with an active region based on ultrathin InGaN quantum wells limited by short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices from both sides have been investigated. The dependences of the external quantum efficiency on the active region design are analyzed. It is shown that the use of InGaN/GaN structures as limiting graded-gap short-period superlattices may significantly increase the quantum efficiency.

  9. Identifying structural damage from images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, ZhiQiang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensor-based structural health monitoring: Framework,al. , 2003), and structural health monitoring (e.g. Gandhiintroduction to structural health monitoring. Philosophical

  10. Geology and recognition criteria for uraniferous humate deposits, Grants Uranium Region, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, S.S.; Saucier, A.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geology of the uraniferous humate uranium deposits of the Grants Uranium Region, northwestern New Mexico, is summarized. The most important conclusions of this study are enumerated. Although the geologic characteristics of the uraniferous humate deposits of the Grants Uranium Region are obviously not common in the world, neither are they bizarre or coincidental. The source of the uranium in the deposits of the Grants Uranium Region is not known with certainty. The depositional environment of the host sediments was apparently the mid and distal portions of a wet alluvial fan system. The influence of structural control on the location and accumulation of the host sediments is now supported by considerable data. The host sediments possess numerous important characteristics which influenced the formation of uraniferous humate deposits. Ilmenite-magnetite distribution within potential host sandstones is believed to be the simplest and most useful regional alteration pattern related to this type of uranium deposit. A method is presented for organizing geologic observations into what is referred to as recognition criteria. The potential of the United States for new districts similar to the Grants Uranium Region is judged to be low based upon presently available geologic information. Continuing studies on uraniferous humate deposits are desirable in three particular areas.

  11. Finite-time rotation number: a fast indicator for chaotic dynamical structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Szezech Jr.; A. B. Schelin; I. L. Caldas; S. R. Lopes; P. J. Morrison; R. L. Viana

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lagrangian coherent structures are effective barriers, sticky regions, that separate phase space regions of different dynamical behavior. The usual way to detect such structures is via finite-time Lyapunov exponents. We show that similar results can be obtained for single-frequency systems from finite-time rotation numbers, which are much faster to compute. We illustrate our claim by considering examples of continuous and discrete-time dynamical systems of physical interest.

  12. A study of a macro-spicule and a transition region explosive event in a solar coronal hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A study of a macro-spicule and a transition region explosive event in a solar coronal hole M. D Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China-spicules (jet-like structures seen at the solar limb) are believed to be the dominant mechanism for mass

  13. An overview of wireless structural health monitoring for civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    An overview of wireless structural health monitoring for civil structures BY JEROME PETER LYNCH health monitoring systems that interrogate structural data for signs of damage. After the hardware computing; wireless telemetry; structural health monitoring 1. Introduction Society's built environment

  14. Regional discrimination studies. Scientific report No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayward, C.; Herrin, E.; Sorrell, G.G.; Tibuleac, I.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part (1) describes TXAR in detail. The first Alpha-type station proposed by the GSE in 1993 is the Texas Experimental Seismic System (TEXESS), now designated TXAR, located at Lajitas, Texas, and operated by SMU during GSETT-1 and GSETT-2. Part (2) describes the results of the study of 144 events recorded at TXAR. The correlation method used allows the analysis of weak regional to teleseismic events and the identification of successive phases for each event. Corrected phase velocities show Pn first arrivals come to TXAR from as far as 2000 km. Events at greater distances have mantle P waves as first arrivals. Part (3) describes construction of a new Ground Truth Data Base using regional events from a variety of sources. Known sources include mine explosions, normal earthquakes, earthquake swarms, and very shallow earthquakes induced by hydrocarbon production. These induced earthquakes are only 1 to 4 km deep and have been observed with magnitudes ranging from 1.0 to 4.6. We believe all events in the Permian Basin of Texas to the northeast of TXAR are induced and are associated with oil and gas fields Part (4) are the Acknowledgements required by the contract.

  15. High-resolution observations of active region moss and its dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, R J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The \\textit{High resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C)} has provided the sharpest view of the EUV corona to date. In this paper we exploit its impressive resolving power to provide the first analysis of the fine-scale structure of moss in an active region. The data reveal that the moss is made up of a collection of fine threads, that have widths with a mean and standard deviation of $440\\pm190$~km (Full Width Half Maximum). {The brightest moss emission is located at the visible head of the fine-scale structure and the fine structure appears to extend into the lower solar atmosphere.} The emission decreases along the features implying the lower sections are most likely dominated by cooler transition region plasma. These threads appear to be the cool, lower legs of the hot loops. In addition, the increased resolution allows for the first direct observation {of physical displacements of the moss fine-structure in a direction transverse to its central axis. Some of these transverse displacements demonstrate periodic b...

  16. Quark-hadron duality and truncated moments of nucleon structure functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Psaker, A. [Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia 23668 (United States); American University of Nigeria, Yola (Nigeria); Melnitchouk, W. [Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Christy, M. E. [Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia 23668 (United States); Keppel, C. [Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia 23668 (United States)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ a novel new approach to study local quark-hadron duality using 'truncated' moments, or integrals of structure functions over restricted regions of x, to determine the degree to which individual resonance regions are dominated by leading twist. Because truncated moments obey the same Q{sup 2} evolution equations as the leading twist parton distributions, this approach makes possible for the first time a description of resonance region data and the phenomenon of quark-hadron duality directly from QCD.

  17. Method for the thermal characterization, visualization, and integrity evaluation of conducting material samples or complex structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Marcos G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for modeling a conducting material sample or structure (herein called a system) as at least two regions which comprise an electrical network of resistances, for measuring electric resistance between at least two selected pairs of external leads attached to the surface of the system, wherein at least one external lead is attached to the surface of each of the regions, and, using basic circuit theory, for translating measured resistances into temperatures or thermophysical properties in corresponding regions of the system.

  18. Diffusion injected multi-quantum well light-emitting diode structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riuttanen, L., E-mail: lauri.riuttanen@aalto.fi; Nykänen, H.; Svensk, O.; Suihkonen, S.; Sopanen, M. [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Kivisaari, P.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The attention towards light-emitting diode (LED) structures based on nanowires, surface plasmon coupled LEDs, and large-area high-power LEDs has been increasing for their potential in increasing the optical output power and efficiency of LEDs. In this work we demonstrate an alternative way to inject charge carriers into the active region of an LED, which is based on completely different current transport mechanism compared to conventional current injection approaches. The demonstrated structure is expected to help overcoming some of the challenges related to current injection with conventional structures. A functioning III-nitride diffusion injected light-emitting diode structure, in which the light-emitting active region is located outside the pn-junction, is realized and characterized. In this device design, the charge carriers are injected into the active region by bipolar diffusion, which could also be utilized to excite otherwise challenging to realize light-emitting structures.

  19. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  20. Cosmogony of Generic Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Buchert

    1994-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of formation of generic structures in the Universe is addressed, whereby first the kinematics of inertial continua for coherent initial data is considered. The generalization to self--gravitating continua is outlined focused on the classification problem of singularities and metamorphoses arising in the density field. Self--gravity gives rise to an internal hierarchy of structures, and, dropping the assumption of coherence, also to an external hierarchy of structures dependent on the initial power spectrum of fluctuations.

  1. Investigating Flow-Structure Interactions in Cerebral Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Visualization of blood flow in a cerebral aneurysm. Streamlines (colored by fluid velocity magnitude) reveal the complexity of the flow, isocontours of vorticity show blood vortex structures (colored by pressure), and the flexible arterial wall is colored by the stress magnitude, where regions in red indicate areas of high stress.

  2. Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, Iosif

    Biology Crystallography NMR Spectroscopy Protein Informatics Structural Bioinformatics Computational Structural Biology Protein Engineering Protein Design Drug Design Molecular Modeling Proteomics Structural Weissig (Eds) Structural bioinformatics Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley-Liss, 2003. Jenny Gu, Philip Bourne (Eds

  3. Structural building response review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations.

  4. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has...

  5. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in...

  6. Effective Incentive Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents an in-depth look at effective incentive structures, how to clarify your program goals, and tips to plan for the long term.

  7. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Structures & Applications Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser...

  8. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    regarding the integrity of the structure. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff...

  9. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  10. THE DYNAMICS AND HEATING OF ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doschek, G. A., E-mail: george.doschek@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I examine the dynamics of active regions using spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. I show the relationship between non-thermal velocities, Doppler outflows and downflows, intensities, and electron density for two representative active regions out of a group of 18 active regions examined. Results from the other active regions are summarized. Imaging spectra of these active regions were obtained from a number of different EIS raster observations. In the case of the outflows for the two representative regions, two-Gaussian fits were made to line profiles of Fe XII and Fe XIII to obtain quantitative information on high-speed components of the outflows. A three-Gaussian fit was made for the Fe XII line at {lambda}195.119. The highest speed outflows occur in weak regions adjacent to the bright loops in active regions. They are weak (less than 5% of the intensity of the main spectral component in the brightest parts of active regions) and even in the extensive flow regions they are generally less than 25% of the intensity of the main component. The outflow regions are characterized by long or open magnetic field lines and I suggest that the apparent absence of these higher speed outflows in bright regions is due to abundant stationary plasma in the closed bright loop regions that mask or overwhelm the outflow signal.

  11. Galaxy Structural Parameters in Source Extractor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. W. Holwerda

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade, the Concentration, Asymmetry and Smoothness (CAS), as well as the M20 and GINI parameters have become popular to automatically classify distant galaxies in images. Ellipticals, spirals and irregular galaxies all appear to occupy different regions of this parameter space. At the same time, the Source Extractor (SE) program has become the mainstay to produce ob ject catalogs from large image surveys. A logical next step would be to incorporate the structural parameters into the Source Extractor software. There are however several problems that arise: 1) the CAS parameters are fits to the images and Source Extractor eschews fits in the interest of speed, 2) the definition of the structural parameters changed over time. Now that there is a clear and agreed-upon definition of the structural parameters, I am incorporating computed versions in the Source Extractor code (v2.5). The fitted CAS parameters are available for the GOODS-N/S fields and I compare the computed structural parameters to those found by the previous fits. My goal is to expand the source structure information in Source Extractor catalogs in order to improve automatic identification of sources, specifically of distant galaxies. The computed parameters perform reasonably close to the fitted versions but noise appears in faint ob jects due to a lack of information. For a subset of objects, the asymmetry signal is outside the SE boundaries and Smoothness still fails to compute for many ob jects. Type classification based on the SE parameters still lacks resolving power.

  12. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; Wehrli, C.; Stohl, A.; Mazzola, M.; Lanconelli, C.; Vitale, V.; Stebel, K.; Aaltonen, V.; de Leeuw, G.; Rodriguez, E.; Herber, A. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Zielinski, T.; Petelski, T.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Xue, Y.; Mei, L.; Istomina, L.; Wagener, R.; McArthur, B.; Sobolewski, P. S.; Kivi, R.; Courcoux, Y.; Larouche, P.; Broccardo, S.; Piketh, S. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i) a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

  13. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; et al

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i)more »a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.« less

  14. An Analysis of Surface and Subsurface Lineaments and Fractures for Oil and Gas Exploration in the Mid-Continent Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Genliang; and George, S.A.

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive literature search was conducted and geological and mathematical analyses were performed to investigate the significance of using surface lineaments and fractures for delineating oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region. Tremendous amount of data were acquired including surface lineaments, surface major fracture zones, surface fracture traces, gravity and magnetic lineaments, and Precambrian basement fault systems. An orientation analysis of these surface and subsurface linear features was performed to detect the basic structural grains of the region. The correlation between surface linear features and subsurface oil and gas traps was assessed, and the implication of using surface lineament and fracture analysis for delineating hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region discussed. It was observed that the surface linear features were extremely consistent in orientation with the gravity and magnetic lineaments and the basement faults in the Mid-Continent region. They all consist of two major sets bending northeast and northwest, representing, therefore, the basic structural grains of the region. This consistency in orientation between the surface and subsurface linear features suggests that the systematic fault systems at the basement in the Mid-Continent region have probably been reactivated many times and have propagated upward all the way to the surface. They may have acted as the loci for the development of other geological structures, including oil and gas traps. Also observed was a strong association both in orientation and position between the surface linear features and the subsurface reservoirs in various parts of the region. As a result, surface lineament and fracture analysis can be used for delineating additional oil and gas reserves in the Mid-Continent region. The results presented in this paper prove the validity and indicate the significance of using surface linear features for inferring subsurface oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region. Any new potential oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region, if they exist, will be likely associated with the northeast- and northwest-trending surface lineaments and fracture traces in the region.

  15. Inter-network regions of the Sun at millimetre wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Wedemeyer-Boehm; H. -G. Ludwig; M. Steffen; J. Leenaarts; B. Freytag

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuum intensity at wavelengths around 1 mm provides an excellent way to probe the solar chromosphere. Future high-resolution millimetre arrays, such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), will thus produce valuable input for the ongoing controversy on the thermal structure and the dynamics of this layer. Synthetic brightness temperature maps are calculated on basis of three-dimensional radiation (magneto-)hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. While the millimetre continuum at 0.3mm originates mainly from the upper photosphere, the longer wavelengths considered here map the low and middle chromosphere. The effective formation height increases generally with wavelength and also from disk-centre towards the solar limb. The average intensity contribution functions are usually rather broad and in some cases they are even double-peaked as there are contributions from hot shock waves and cool post-shock regions in the model chromosphere. Taking into account the deviations from ionisation equilibrium for hydrogen gives a less strong variation of the electron density and with it of the optical depth. The result is a narrower formation height range. The average brightness temperature increases with wavelength and towards the limb. The relative contrast depends on wavelength in the same way as the average intensity but decreases towards the limb. The dependence of the brightness temperature distribution on wavelength and disk-position can be explained with the differences in formation height and the variation of temperature fluctuations with height in the model atmospheres.

  16. GridStat – Cyber Security and Regional Deployment Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, Samuel L.

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    GridStat is a developing communication technology to provide real-time data delivery services to the electric power grid. It is being developed in a collaborative effort between the Electrical Power Engineering and Distributed Computing Science Departments at Washington State University. Improving the cyber security of GridStat was the principle focus of this project. A regional network was established to test GridStat’s cyber security mechanisms in a realistic environment. The network consists of nodes at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Washington State University. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was tasked with performing the security assessment, the results of which detailed a number or easily resolvable and previously unknown issues, as well as a number of difficult and previously known issues. Going forward we recommend additional development prior to commercialization of GridStat. The development plan is structured into three domains: Core Development, Cyber Security and Pilot Projects. Each domain contains a number of phased subtasks that build upon each other to increase the robustness and maturity of GridStat.

  17. Piecewise training for structured prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Charles; McCallum, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    margin methods for structured prediction. In Internationalaccuracy computational gene prediction. PLoS Computationaltraining for structured prediction Charles Sutton · Andrew

  18. LAMPF transition-region mechanical fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, E.D. Jr.; Gallegos, J.D.F.; Harrison, R.; Hart, V.E.; Hunter, W.T.; Rislove, S.E.; Sims, J.R.; Van Dyke, W.J.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the new Transition Region (TR-II) is to optimize the phase matching of the H/sup +/ and H/sup -/ beams during simultaneous transport. TR-II incorporates several design improvements that include larger aperture, a straight beam track, greater beam-path length adjustments, and utility lines integrated with the support system. The close pack density of magnets and beam-line hardware required innovative solutions to magnet design and mounting, vacuum manifolding, and utility routing. Critical magnet placement was accomplished using a new three-dimensional alignment system that does real-time vector calculations on a computer with input from two digital theodolites. All assembly and a large fraction of the mechanical fabrication were done by LAMPF personnel. The TR-II has been operational since September 1983 and routinely transports production beams up to 900-..mu..A current with no major problems.

  19. Radiation levels in the SSC interaction regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groom, D.E. [ed.

    1988-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation environment in a typical SSC detector has been evaluated using the best available particle production models coupled with Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The problems studied include direct charged particle dose, dose inside a calorimeter from the cascades produced by incident photons and hadrons, the flux of neutrons and photons backscattered from the calorimeter into a central cavity, and neutron flux in the calorimeter. The luminosity lifetime at the SSC is dominated by collision losses in the interaction regions, where the luminosity is equivalent to losing an entire full-energy proton beam into the apparatus every six days. The result of an average p-p collision can be described quite simply. The mean charged multiplicity is about 110, and the particles are distributed nearly uniformly in pseudorapidity ({eta}) over all the angles of interest. The transverse momentum distribution is independent of angle, and for our purposes may be written as p{perpendicular}exp(-p{perpendicular}/{beta}). The mean value of p{perpendicular} may be as high as 0.6 GeV/c. Most of the radiation is produced by the very abundant low-p{perpendicular} particles. The dose or neutron fluence produced by individual particles in this energy region are simulated over a wide variety of conditions, and several measurements serve to confirm the simulation results. In general, the response (a dose, fluence, the number of backscattered neutrons, etc.) for an incident particle of momentum p can be parameterized in the form Np{sup {alpha}}, where 0.5 < {alpha}< 1.0. The authors believe most of their results to be accurate to within a factor of two or three, sufficiently precise to serve as the basis for detailed designs.

  20. Wide Area Security Region Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Lu, Shuai; Guo, Xinxin; Gronquist, James; Du, Pengwei; Nguyen, Tony B.; Burns, J. W.

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops innovative and efficient methodologies and practical procedures to determine the wide-area security region of a power system, which take into consideration all types of system constraints including thermal, voltage, voltage stability, transient and potentially oscillatory stability limits in the system. The approach expands the idea of transmission system nomograms to a multidimensional case, involving multiple system limits and parameters such as transmission path constraints, zonal generation or load, etc., considered concurrently. The security region boundary is represented using its piecewise approximation with the help of linear inequalities (so called hyperplanes) in a multi-dimensional space, consisting of system parameters that are critical for security analyses. The goal of this approximation is to find a minimum set of hyperplanes that describe the boundary with a given accuracy. Methodologies are also developed to use the security hyperplanes, pre-calculated offline, to determine system security margins in real-time system operations, to identify weak elements in the system, and to calculate key contributing factors and sensitivities to determine the best system controls in real time and to assist in developing remedial actions and transmission system enhancements offline . A prototype program that automates the simulation procedures used to build the set of security hyperplanes has also been developed. The program makes it convenient to update the set of security hyperplanes necessitated by changes in system configurations. A prototype operational tool that uses the security hyperplanes to assess security margins and to calculate optimal control directions in real time has been built to demonstrate the project success. Numerical simulations have been conducted using the full-size Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) system model, and they clearly demonstrated the feasibility and the effectiveness of the developed technology. Recommendations for the future work have also been formulated.

  1. DOE West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Technical College, 4810 Alben Barkley Dr, Paducah, KY 42001 DOE West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl Contact Regional Co-Coordinator - Buz Smith, DOE Public Affairs 270-441-6821...

  2. DOE South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl DOE South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl March 13, 2015 8:00AM to 8:00PM EDT Shawnee State University, 940 Second Street, Portsmouth,...

  3. Automatically identifying critical input regions and code in applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbin, Michael James

    Applications that process complex inputs often react in different ways to changes in different regions of the input. Small changes to forgiving regions induce correspondingly small changes in the behavior and output. Small ...

  4. Regional distribution of diagenetic carbonate cement in Palaeocene deepwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Regional distribution of diagenetic carbonate cement in Palaeocene deepwater sandstones: North Sea. This study attempts to make a large-scale regional examination of the distribution of carbonate cements

  5. Chillicothe High School wins 2015 South Central Ohio Regional...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Chillicothe High School wins 2015 South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl Chillicothe High School wins 2015 South Central Ohio Regional Science Bowl March 13, 2015 - 6:43pm...

  6. More Regional Science Bowl Winners | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Regional Science Bowl Winners More Regional Science Bowl Winners February 17, 2011 - 3:55pm Addthis The Virginia winners: coach Sharon Webb, Alexander Yang, Steve Qian, Alec...

  7. DC Students Flex Their Mental Muscles in Regional Science Bowl...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DC Students Flex Their Mental Muscles in Regional Science Bowl Competition DC Students Flex Their Mental Muscles in Regional Science Bowl Competition February 23, 2015 - 3:12pm...

  8. Regional Production Economics for Ethylene and Propylene Derivatives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormack, G.; Pavone, T.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many developing countries have implemented aggresslve programs to develop domestic petrochemical capacity. In those regions with abundant, low cost feedstocks, the competitive advantage seems obvious. However, other regions such as South korea...

  9. Alleviating the disparities among the European Community regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karveli, Kalliopi N.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the author identifies the existing disparities among the European Community regions and analyzes their development during the last decade (1980-90), with main emphasis on the disparities between the Community lagging regions...

  10. Studies of two-region subcritical uranium heavy water lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosnell, James Waterbury

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor physics parameters were measured in eleven two-region subcritical assemblies moderated by heavy water. The regions of the assemblies consisted of nine different lattices of various fuel rod size, U235 enrichment, ...

  11. Construction and AvailabilityConstruction and Availability Uncertainty in the RegionalUncertainty in the Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 Construction and AvailabilityConstruction and Availability Uncertainty in the Regional and Technology Availability Construction Costs Economic Retirement Variable Capacity for Existing Units #12;Page to construction power plants or to take other action May include policies for particular resources "Scenario

  12. Northwest Regional Technology Center, May 2013 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response Events Next-Generation Communications Inoperability Virtual Workshop PNNL hosted a Next including Lync, LiveWall and Twitter. The purpose of the workshop, organized by PNNL's Jon Barr, Jessica

  13. Northwest Regional Technology Center, April 2014 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response priorities, interests and goals. This article is the first in a series about the IAB. PNNL: This year marks partnerships and projects that we're working on. PNNL: Who makes up the IAB? JH: What we are is a voluntary

  14. Northwest Regional Technology Center, November 2012 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency Responders to effectively counter a potential threat to our Nation. PNNL, in collaboration with DHS S. To better determine the requirements and needs of First Responders in a daily operational context, PNNL held

  15. Northwest Regional Technology Center, July 2014 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response for the Seattle (WA) Fire Department. This article is the last in a three-part series about the IAB. PNNL: How. PNNL: What are the next major steps or objectives the IAB would like to achieve in 2014 or beyond? JH

  16. Northwest Regional Technology Center, May 2014 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response Department. This article is the second in a three-part series about the IAB. PNNL: Do you think the nation in grant programs. PNNL: What can the first responder community do today to help prepare themselves? JH

  17. Regions of XY homology in the pig X chromosome and the boundary of the pseudoautosomal region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinner, Benjamin M; Lachani, Kim; Sargent, Carole A; Affara, Nabeel A

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    : na@mole.bio.cam.ac.ukDomestic pigs (Sus scrofa) are agriculturally important ani-Background: Sex chromosomes are subject to evolutionary pressures distinct from the remainder of the genome, shaping their structure and sequence content. We...

  18. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  19. 2014-10-20 Issuance: ASRAC Regional Standards Enforcement Working...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Issuance Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) - Central Air Conditioner Regional Standards Enforcement Working Group; Notice of Open...

  20. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) Exploration...

  1. Establishment of Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Centers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation offers an overview of the Regional Test Centers project for Small Wind Turbine testing and certification.

  2. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  3. Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  4. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al., 1985) Exploration Activity...

  5. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  6. STELLAR STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    STELLAR STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION O.R. Pols September 2009 #12;#12;Preface These lecture notes application to the theory of stellar structure and evolution, at a level appro- priate for a third and Evolution, 1990, Springer-Verlag, ISBN 3-540-50211-4 (KIPPENHAHN; K&W) Some sections of this book are still

  7. & Education Structure 2 Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Cinema East Hall University Technology Services Honors Stratford Building Parkway Science Building 1N Kononia House Fourth Ave Building Art Building Science & Education Center Parking Structure 2 Helen Gordon Child Center Science Research & Teaching Center Parking Structure 3 Ho man Hall West

  8. REGIONAL ECONOMICS APPLICATIONS LABORATORY CHICAGO BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    and the drop in manufacturing employment in the Chicago region. In September, the national and regional economy edged up to 77.4 percent in September. In addition, national retail sales increased 1.13 percent Manufacturing Index (CFMMI) increased 0.47 percent in September. In the Chicago region in September

  9. Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report to USDA Forest Service and MN Cooperative. #12;Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report ii Executive Summary We summarize the second year of a project on the Canada lynx ecology in the Great Lakes region. The project is designed

  10. CompilerDirected Dynamic Voltage Scaling Based on Program Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kremer, Ulrich

    Compiler­Directed Dynamic Voltage Scaling Based on Program Regions Chung­Hsing Hsu and Ulrich using dynamic voltage scaling. The compiler identifies pro­ gram regions where the CPU can be slowed down without resulting in a significant overall performance loss. For such regions the lowest CPU

  11. Regional Transportation Coordination Plan for the Capital Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capital Area Regional Transit Coordination Committee

    3588 is to ensure that the benefits of the State?s public transportation resources are maximized through development #24; Regional Transportation Coordination Plan for the Capital Area and implementation of regional public transportation services... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-24 Appendix C ? Public Transportation Providers and Resources in the Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1 Public Transit Providers...

  12. Measurement of Regional Lung Function in Rats Using Hyperpolarized 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of Regional Lung Function in Rats Using Hyperpolarized 3 Helium Dynamic MRI Ben T. Chen,* Anja C.S. Brau, and G. Allan Johnson Dynamic regional lung function was investigated in rats using by a constant flow ventila- tor. Based on regional differences in the behavior of inspired air, the lung

  13. Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report to the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program #12;#12;Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report should be cited as: Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico: U.S. Geological

  14. Hydrogeologic evaluation and numerical simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; Hill, M.C.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ground-water system. The study area covers approximately 100,000 square kilometers between lat 35{degrees}N., long 115{degrees}W and lat 38{degrees}N., long 118{degrees}W and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the and climatic conditions and the complex described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as having two main components: a series of relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper regional flow paths. A significant component of the regional ground-water flow is through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence. Throughout the regional flow system, ground-water flow is probably controlled by extensive and prevalent structural features that result from regional faulting and fracturing. Hydrogeologic investigations over a large and hydrogeologically complex area impose severe demands on data management. This study utilized geographic information systems and geoscientific information systems to develop, store, manipulate, and analyze regional hydrogeologic data sets describing various components of the ground-water flow system.

  15. Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudson, Charles L. (Santa Barbara, CA); Spector, Jerome (Berkeley, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure (10) having a serpene signal conductor (12) within a channel groove (46). The channel groove (46) is formed by a serpentine channel (20) in a trough plate (18) and a ground plane (14). The serpentine signal conductor (12) is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors 28. A beam interaction trough (22) intersects the channel groove (46) to form a plurality of beam interaction regions (56) wherein an electron beam (54) may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor (12).

  16. Mapping karst regions of Illinois: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weibel, C.P.; Panno, S.V. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater contamination may be significant in shallow aquifers in the parts of Illinois where karst occurs. Problems with ground-water contamination in shallow aquifers in karst areas may be significant in parts of Illinois. A study is underway to study factors that contribute to karst development and to map the karst areas of the state, including areas where obvious diagnostic karst geomorphic features are absent. The following generalizations can be made about the structural and stratigraphic factors that control the extent and maturity of karst areas and the development of karstic terrain in Illinois: (1) karstification is restricted to the flanks of the Illinois Basin because most of the basin interior contains carbonate-poor Pennsylvanian bedrock; (2) karstic terrain generally occurs in thick, flatlying, carbonate-rich lithologic units; (3) carbonate to non-carbonate facies changes in formations and the presence of disconformities affect the degree of karstification; (4) structures (folds, faults) may either increase or decrease the likelihood of karstification; and (5) karstification is potentially greater in areas where overlying regolith is absent or thin.

  17. The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional Input-Output (MRIO) Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caron, J.

    We improve on existing estimates of the carbon dioxide (CO2) content of consumption across regions of the United States. Using a multi-regional input-output (MRIO) framework, we estimate the direct and indirect CO2 emissions ...

  18. ISO spectroscopy of compact HII regions in the Galaxy. II Ionization and elemental abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. L. Martin-Hernandez; E. Peeters; C. Morisset; A. G. G. M. Tielens; P. Cox; P. R. Roelfsema; J. -P. Baluteau; D. Schaerer; J. S. Mathis; F. Damour; E. Churchwell; M. F. Kessler

    2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the ISO spectral catalogue of compact HII regions by Peeters et al. (2001), we present a first analysis of the hydrogen recombination and atomic fine-structure lines originated in the ionized gas. The sample consists of 34 HII regions located at galactocentric distances between Rgal = 0 and 15 kpc. The SWS HI recombination lines between 2 and 8 mum are used to estimate the extinction law at these wavelengths for 14 HII regions. An extinction in the K band between 0 and $\\sim$ 3 mag. has been derived. The fine-structure lines of N, O, Ne, S and Ar are detected in most of the sources. Most of these elements are observed in two different ionization stages probing a range in ionization potential up to 41 eV. The ISO data, by itself or combined with radio data taken from the literature, is used to derive the elemental abundances relative to hydrogen. The present data thus allow us to describe for each source its elemental abundance, its state of ionization and to constrain the properties of the ionizing star(s).

  19. Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; hardin, danny; Estes, Maury

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach ? Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback ? With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements ? Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee ? Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007 ? Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf. ? Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged. ? Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications ? Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems ? Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs ? Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning ? Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability ? Analyzed SAV cover change at five other bays in the Gulf of Mexico to demonstrate extensibility of the analytical tools ? Initiated development of a conceptual model for understanding the causes and effects of HABs in the Gulf of Mexico IT Tool Development ? Established a website with the GoMRC web-based tools at www.gomrc.org ? Completed development of an ArcGIS-based decision support tool for SAV restoration prioritization decisions, and demonstrated its use in Mobile Bay ? Developed a web-based application, called Conceptual Model Explorer (CME), that enables non-GIS users to employ the prioritization model for SAV restoration ? Created CME tool enabling scientists to view existing, and create new, ecosystem conceptual models which can be used to document cause-effect relationships within coastal ecosystems, and offer guidance on management solutions. ? Adapted the science-driven advanced web search engine, Noesis, to focus on an initial set of coastal and marine resource issues, including SAV and HABs ? Incorporated map visualization tools with initial data layers related to coastal wetlands and SAVs

  20. Incorporating Stakeholder Decision Support Needs into an Integrated Regional Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jennie S.; Moss, Richard H.; Runci, Paul J.; Anderson, K. L.; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new modeling effort exploring the opportunities, constraints, and interactions between mitigation and adaptation at regional scale is utilizing stakeholder engagement in an innovative approach to guide model development and demonstration, including uncertainty characterization, to effectively inform regional decision making. This project, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), employs structured stakeholder interactions and literature reviews to identify the most relevant adaptation and mitigation alternatives and decision criteria for each regional application of the framework. The information is used to identify important model capabilities and to provide a focus for numerical experiments. This paper presents the stakeholder research results from the first iRESM pilot region. The pilot region includes the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwest portion of the United States as well as other contiguous states. This geographic area (14 states in total) permits cohesive modeling of hydrologic systems while also providing gradients in climate, demography, land cover/land use, and energy supply and demand. The results from the stakeholder research indicate that iRESM should prioritize addressing adaptation alternatives in the water resources, urban infrastructure, and agriculture sectors, such as water conservation, expanded water quality monitoring, altered reservoir releases, lowered water intakes, urban infrastructure upgrades, increased electric power reserves in urban areas, and land use management/crop selection changes. Regarding mitigation alternatives, the stakeholder research shows a need for iRESM to focus on policies affecting the penetration of renewable energy technologies, and the costs and effectiveness of energy efficiency, bioenergy production, wind energy, and carbon capture and sequestration.

  1. Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of the Caribbean-South American boundary region American continental lithosphere, the Venezuelan archipelago, and the Caribbean oceanic lithosphere

  2. Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

  3. Wake potentials of the ILC Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum chamber of the ILC Interaction Region (IR) is optimized for best detector performance. It has special shaping to minimize additional backgrounds due to the metal part of the chamber. Also, for the same reason this thin vacuum chamber does not have water cooling. Therefore, small amounts of power, which may be deposited in the chamber, can be enough to raise the chamber to a high temperature. One of the sources of 'heating' power is the electromagnetic field of the beam. This field diffracts by non-regularities of the beam pipe and excites free-propagating fields, which are then absorbed by the pipe wall. In addition we have a heating power of the image currents due to finite conductivity of the metallic wall. We will discuss these effects as updating the previous results. The conclusions of this report are: (1) The amount of the beam energy loss in IR is almost equal to the energy loss in one ILC (TESLA) accelerating cryo-module; (2) Addition energy spread at IR is very small; (3) Spectrum of the wake fields is limited 300 GHz; (4) Average power of the wake fields excited in IR is 30 W for nominal ILC parameters; and (5) Pulse power in this case is 6 kilowatts.

  4. Niger delta deepwater region petroleum potential assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D. [Thomas and Associates, Hastings (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    On behalf of the Nigerian Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Resources some 23,000 km of high quality 192 channel, 96 fold seismic, and associated gravity and magnetic data were acquired by TGSI-Mabon Geophysical Co. and made available to the industry in 1991. These data were collected over all deepwater blocks in conjunction with the planned 1993 license round. Later, during 1993 and 1994 TGSI with Mabon Ltd. and Stratum Petroleum Services extended the program onto the shelf (7,000 km) and into the ultra deepwater areas (6,400 km), making possible modern studies of the entire offshore delta complex. In assessing the petroleum potential of an undrilled region, it is useful to refer to analogous basins or provinces already with histories of hydrocarbon exploration and discovery. With this in mind, and using limited data from the already drilled areas of Nigeria offshore, the adjacent West Africa salt basin and Brazil in particular, an attempt is made to discuss the hydrocarbon habitat of the undrilled Niger delta deepwater offshore sedimentary sequences.

  5. Deterring regional threats from nuclear proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spector, L.S.

    1992-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The most prominent shift in the National Military Strategy is from the global Soviet threat to a new focus on regional contingencies. No threat looms larger in these contingencies than the proliferation of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles. This study examines proliferation trends and proposes a predominately diplomatic strategy for containing the problem. Dr. Spector identifies three waves of proliferation: the first is the five states with declared weapons and doctrine-the United States, Russia, Great Britain, France, and China; the second includes a less visible group that developed a covert capability, without testing weapons or declaring a doctrine of deterrence-for example, Israel, India, and probably Pakistan; and, a third wave of would-be proliferators includes radical states like Iraq, Iran, Libya, and North Korea. Spector's political approach is based on the common interest of wave one and two states to prevent further proliferation. Political-economic incentives have already worked in the cases of Brazil, Argentina, Taiwan, and South Africa-states which appear to have abandoned their nuclear weapons programs. Spector does not rule out the option of military force. Force, especially under international sanctions, can be a powerful tool to back diplomatic efforts. Use of force, however, remains a last resort.

  6. The obscured circumnuclear region of NGC 3079

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. P. Israel; P. P. van der Werf; T. G. Hawarden; C. Aspin

    1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Images in the J, H and K bands and in the the v=1-0 S(1) line of H2 of the central region of the almost edge-on galaxy NGC 3079 reveal contributions from direct and scattered starlight, emission from hot dust and molecular gas, and extinction gradients. The central 100 pc suffers an extinction of 6 mag. Extremely red near-infrared colours require the presence of hot dust at about 1000 K. Less reddened parts of the bulge require either a 20% J-band contribution from young stars in a stellar bar, or a 20-30% contribution from scattered stellar light. The nucleus is surrounded by a dense molecular disk of radius 300 pc. Emission from H2 and hot dust traces a cavity of radius 120 pc. In the central few hundred pc, HI spin temperatures must be less than 275 K and the CO-to_H2 conversion factor is at most 5% of the standard Galactic value. This is consistent with theoretical predictions for environments subjected to dissociative shocks, where reformation of H2 is impeded by high dust grain temperatures. The overall molecular gas content of NGC 3079 is normal for a late-type galaxy.

  7. The Influence of Filaments in the Private Flux Region on Divertor Particle and Power Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, J R; Thornton, A J; Walkden, N R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport of particles via intermittent filamentary structures in the private flux region of plasmas in the MAST tokamak has been investigated using a fast framing camera recording visible light emission from the volume of the lower divertor, as well as Langmuir probes and IR thermography monitoring particle and power fluxes to plasma-facing surfaces in the divertor. The visible camera data suggests that, in the divertor volume, fluctuations in light emission above the X-point are strongest in the scrape-off layer (SOL). Conversely, in the region below the X-point, it is found that these fluctuations are strongest in the private flux region (PFR) of the inner divertor leg. Detailed analysis of the appearance of these filaments in the camera data suggests that they are approximately circular, around 1-2cm in diameter. The most probable toroidal mode number is between 2 and 3. These filaments eject plasma deeper into the private flux region, sometimes by the production of secondary filaments, moving at a sp...

  8. Ultra-Compact H II Regions and the Early Lives of Massive Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. G. Hoare; S. E. Kurtz; S. Lizano; E. Keto; P. Hofner

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the phenomenon of ultra-compact H II regions (UCHIIs) as a key phase in the early lives of massive stars. This most visible manifestation of massive star formation begins when the Lyman continuum output from the massive young stellar object becomes sufficient to ionize the surroundings from which it was born. Knowledge of this environment is gained through an understanding of the morphologies of UCHII regions and we examine the latest developments in deep radio and mid-IR imaging. SPITZER data from the GLIMPSE survey are an important new resource in which PAH emission and the ionizing stars can be seen. We review the role played by strong stellar winds from the central stars in sweeping out central cavities and causing the limb-brightened appearance. A range of evidence from velocity structure, proper motions, the molecular environment and recent hydrodynamical modeling indicates that cometary UCHII regions require a combination of champagne flow and bow shock motion. Finally, we discuss the class of hyper-compact H II regions or broad recombination line objects. They are likely to mark the transition soon after the breakout of the Lyman continuum radiation from the young star. Models for these objects are presented, including photo-evaporating disks and ionized accretion flows that are gravitationally trapped. Evolutionary scenarios tracing young massive stars passage through these ionized phases are discussed.

  9. Hard X-rays from Ultra-Compact HII Regions in W49A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, M; Feigelson, E D; Getman, K V; Broos, P S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the Chandra detection of hard X-ray emission from the Welch ring in W49A, an organized structure of ultra-compact (UC) HII regions containing a dozen nascent early-type stars. Two UC HII regions are associated with hard X-ray emission in a deep Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer image exposed for 96.7 ks. One of the two X-ray sources has no near-infrared counterpart and is extended by ~5 arcsec, or ~0.3 pc, at a distance of ~11.4 kpc, which is spatially aligned with the cometary radio continuum emission associated with the UC HII region. The X-ray spectrum of the emission, when fit with a thermal model, indicates a heavily absorbed plasma with extinction of \\~5x10^{23}/cm^{2}, temperature of ~7 keV, and X-ray luminosity in the 3.0-8.0 keV band of ~3x10^{33} ergs/s. Both the luminosity and the size of the emission resemble the extended hard emission found in UC HII regions in Sagittarius B2, yet they are smaller by an order of magnitude than the emission found in massive star clusters such as NGC 3603...

  10. FLOWS AT THE EDGE OF AN ACTIVE REGION: OBSERVATION AND INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boutry, C.; Buchlin, E.; Vial, J.-C. [Universite Paris Sud, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR8617, 91405 Orsay (France); Regnier, S., E-mail: eric.buchlin@ias.u-psud.fr [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Upflows observed at the edges of active regions have been proposed as the source of the slow solar wind. In the particular case of Active Region (AR) 10942, where such an upflow has been already observed, we want to evaluate the part of this upflow that actually remains confined in the magnetic loops that connect AR 10942 to AR 10943. Both active regions were visible simultaneously on the solar disk and were observed by STEREO/SECCHI EUVI. Using Hinode/EIS spectra, we determine the Doppler shifts and densities in AR 10943 and AR 10942 in order to evaluate the mass flows. We also perform magnetic field extrapolations to assess the connectivity between AR 10942 and AR 10943. AR 10943 displays a persistent downflow in Fe XII. Magnetic extrapolations including both ARs show that this downflow can be connected to the upflow in AR 10942. We estimate that the mass flow received by AR 10943 areas connected to AR 10942 represents about 18% of the mass flow from AR 10942. We conclude that the upflows observed on the edge of active regions represent either large-scale loops with mass flowing along them (accounting for about one-fifth of the total mass flow in this example) or open magnetic field structures where the slow solar wind originates.

  11. Dust dynamics and evolution in expanding HII regions. I. Radiative drift of neutral and charged grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akimkin, V V; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya N; Wiebe, D S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider dust drift under the influence of stellar radiation pressure during the pressure-driven expansion of an HII region using the chemo-dynamical model MARION. Dust size distribution is represented by four dust types: conventional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), very small grains (VSGs), big grains (BGs) and also intermediate-sized grains (ISGs), which are larger than VSGs and smaller than BGs. The dust is assumed to move at terminal velocity determined locally from the balance between the radiation pressure and gas drag. As Coulomb drag is an important contribution to the overall gas drag, we evaluate a grain charge evolution within the HII region for each dust type. BGs are effectively swept out of the HII region. The spatial distribution of ISGs within the HII region has a double peak structure, with a smaller inner peak and a higher outer peak. PAHs and VSGs are mostly coupled to the gas. The mean charge of PAHs is close to zero, so they can become neutral from time to time because of char...

  12. GaInN light-emitting diodes using separate epitaxial growth for the p-type region to attain polarization-inverted electron-blocking layer, reduced electron leakage, and improved hole injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyaard, David S., E-mail: meyaad@rpi.edu; Lin, Guan-Bo; Ma, Ming; Fred Schubert, E. [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Cho, Jaehee [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States) [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Semiconductor Physics Research Center, School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang-Heon; Kim, Min-Ho; Shim, HyunWook; Sun Kim, Young [LED Business, Samsung Electronics, Yongin 446-920 (Korea, Republic of)] [LED Business, Samsung Electronics, Yongin 446-920 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A GaInN light-emitting diode (LED) structure is analyzed that employs a separate epitaxial growth for the p-type region, i.e., the AlGaN electron-blocking layer (EBL) and p-type GaN cladding layer, followed by wafer or chip bonding. Such LED structure has a polarization-inverted EBL and allows for uncompromised epitaxial-growth optimization of the p-type region, i.e., without the need to consider degradation of the quantum-well active region during p-type region growth. Simulations show that such an LED structure reduces electron leakage, reduces the efficiency droop, improves hole injection, and has the potential to extend high efficiencies into the green spectral region.

  13. The Road Map For Regional Coordinated Public Transportation West Texas/El Paso Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Texas/El Paso Regional Coordinated Transportation Planning Coalition

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the counties of Brewster, Culberson, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis or Presidio. LULAC Project Amistad was recently awarded the TxDOT Medical Transportation Program contract for the region. An additional fourteen providers operate transportation services... Paso District office. LULAC Project Amistad was recently awarded a contract to provide JARC services in several of the colonias in El Paso County to increase connection with El Paso County Transit and Sun Metro services. Not technically transit...

  14. Structure of mouse IP-10, a chemokine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabeen, Talat; Leonard, Philip; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Acharya, K. Ravi, E-mail: bsskra@bath.ac.uk [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of mouse IP-10 shows a novel tetrameric association. Interferon-?-inducible protein (IP-10) belongs to the CXC class of chemokines and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of various immune and inflammatory responses. It is also a potent angiostatic factor with antifibrotic properties. The biological activities of IP-10 are exerted by interactions with the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR3 expressed on Th1 lymphocytes. IP-10 thus forms an attractive target for structure-based rational drug design of anti-inflammatory molecules. The crystal structure of mouse IP-10 has been determined and reveals a novel tetrameric association. In the tetramer, two conventional CXC chemokine dimers are associated through their N-terminal regions to form a 12-stranded elongated ?-sheet of ?90 Å in length. This association differs significantly from the previously studied tetramers of human IP-10, platelet factor 4 and neutrophil-activating peptide-2. In addition, heparin- and receptor-binding residues were mapped on the surface of IP-10 tetramer. Two heparin-binding sites were observed on the surface and were present at the interface of each of the two ?-sheet dimers. The structure supports the formation of higher order oligomers of IP-10, as observed in recent in vivo studies with mouse IP-10, which will have functional relevance.

  15. Origin of ion-cyclotron turbulence in the downward Birkeland current region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, B.; Jasperse, J. R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts 01731 (United States); Lund, E. J. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States); Grossbard, N. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear stability analysis of the electron velocity distributions, which are observed in the FAST satellite measurements in the downward Birkeland current region of the magnetosphere, is presented. The satellite-measured particle (electrons and protons) velocity distributions are fitted with analytic functions and the dispersion relation is derived in terms of the plasma dispersion functions associated with those distribution functions. Numerical solutions of the dispersion relation show that the bump-on-tail structure of the electron velocity distribution can excite electrostatic ion-cyclotron instabilities by the Landau resonance mechanism. Nonlinear evolution of these instabilities may explain the observed electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in the Birkeland current region. Excitation of other types of instabilities by the fitted electron velocity distributions and their relevance are also discussed.

  16. Particle Acceleration in three dimensional Reconnection Regions: A New Test Particle Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudiger Schopper; Guido T. Birk; Harald Lesch

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic Reconnection is an efficient and fast acceleration mechanism by means of direct electric field acceleration parallel to the magnetic field. Thus, acceleration of particles in reconnection regions is a very important topic in plasma astrophysics. This paper shows that the conventional analytical models and numerical test particle investigations can be misleading concerning the energy distribution of the accelerated particles, since they oversimplify the electric field structure by the assumption that the field is homogeneous. These investigations of the acceleration of charged test particles are extended by considering three-dimensional field configurations characterized by localized field-aligned electric fields. Moreover, effects of radiative losses are discussed. The comparison between homogeneous and inhomogeneous electric field acceleration in reconnection regions shows dramatic differences concerning both, the maximum particle energy and the form of the energy distribution.

  17. Essays on market structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Feng

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most important work in the development of economic theory is associated with the study of market structure. In essence, most markets are two-sided. For example, product markets connect tens of thousands of ...

  18. Optimization of outrigger structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lame, Ali

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing a high rise building has its challenges. Different structural systems have been developed to control the lateral displacement of high rise buildings. One of these systems is called the outrigger which decreases ...

  19. Structure function monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  20. Structure Function Scaling of a 2MASS Extinction Map of Taurus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Padoan; Laurent Cambresy; William Langer

    2002-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the structure function scaling of a 2MASS extinction map of the Taurus molecular cloud complex. The scaling exponents of the structure functions of the extinction map follow the Boldyrev's velocity structure function scaling of supersonic turbulence. This confirms our previous result based on a spectral map of 13CO J=1-0 covering the same region and suggests that supersonic turbulence is important in the fragmentation of this star--forming cloud.