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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, Weapons Neutron Research Facility Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, Weapons Neutron Research Facility Experiments: The Effects of 800 MeV Proton Irradiation on the Corrosion of Tungsten, Tantalum, Stainless Steel, and Gold R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion & Environmental Effects Laboratory MST-6

2

Detection of uranium-based nuclear weapons using neutron-induced fission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although plutonium-based nuclear weapons can usually be detected by their spontaneous emission of neutrons and gammas, the radiation emitted by weapons based entirely on highly-enriched uranium can often be easily shielded. Verification of a treaty that limits the number of such weapons may require an active technique, such as interrogating the suspect assembly with an external neutron source and measuring the number of fission neutrons produced. Difficulties include distinguishing between source and fission neutrons, the variations in yield for different materials and geometries, and the possibility of non-nuclear weapons that may contain significant amounts of fissionable depleted uranium. We describe simple measurements that test the induced-fission technique using an isotopic Am-Li source, an novel energy-sensitive neutron detector, and several small assemblies containing {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, lead, and polyethylene. In all cases studied, the neutron yields above the source energy are larger for the {sup 235}U assemblies than for assemblies containing only lead or depleted uranium. For more complex geometries, corrections for source transmission may be necessary. The results are promising enough to recommend further experiments and calculations using examples of realistic nuclear and non-nuclear weapons. 5 refs., 11 figs.

Moss, C.E.; Byrd, R.C.; Feldman, W.C.; Auchampaugh, G.F.; Estes, G.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ewing, R.I.; Marlow, K.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Detection of uranium-based nuclear weapons using neutron-induced fission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although plutonium-based nuclear weapons can usually be detected by their spontaneous emission of neutrons and gammas, the radiation emitted by weapons based entirely on highly-enriched uranium can often be easily shielded. Verification of a treaty that limits the number of such weapons may require an active technique, such as interrogating the suspect assembly with an external neutron source and measuring the number of fission neutrons produced. Difficulties include distinguishing between source and fission neutrons, the variations in yield for different materials and geometries, and the possibility of non-nuclear weapons that may contain significant amounts of fissionable depleted uranium. We describe simple measurements that test the induced-fission technique using an isotopic Am-Li source, an novel energy-sensitive neutron detector, and several small assemblies containing {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, lead, and polyethylene. In all cases studied, the neutron yields above the source energy are larger for the {sup 235}U assemblies than for assemblies containing only lead or depleted uranium. For more complex geometries, corrections for source transmission may be necessary. The results are promising enough to recommend further experiments and calculations using examples of realistic nuclear and non-nuclear weapons. 5 refs., 11 figs.

Moss, C.E.; Byrd, R.C.; Feldman, W.C.; Auchampaugh, G.F.; Estes, G.P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Ewing, R.I.; Marlow, K.W. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

weapons material  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2%2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

5

Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 All Issues submit Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear testing experience The nuclear weapons designers who developed their skills during...

6

Nuclear weapons modernizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

7

Identification of nuclear weapons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for non-invasively indentifying different types of nuclear weapons is disclosed. A neutron generator is placed against the weapon to generate a stream of neutrons causing fissioning within the weapon. A first detects the generation of the neutrons and produces a signal indicative thereof. A second particle detector located on the opposite side of the weapon detects the fission particles and produces signals indicative thereof. The signals are converted into a detected pattern and a computer compares the detected pattern with known patterns of weapons and indicates which known weapon has a substantially similar pattern. Either a time distribution pattern or noise analysis pattern, or both, is used. Gamma-neutron discrimination and a third particle detector for fission particles adjacent the second particle detector are preferably used. The neutrons are generated by either a decay neutron source or a pulled neutron particle accelerator.

Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.

1987-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

cvm magazine Newest Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21 cvm magazine Newest Weapon in War on Pet Cancer Radiation Oncology Service includes state tightly around the tumor, minimizing effects to healthy tissue. This is done with a multi-leaf collimator

Langerhans, Brian

9

Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

Senglaub, M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Constraining potential nuclear-weapons proliferation from civilian reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cessation of the Cold War and renewed international attention to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction are leading to national policies aimed at restraining nuclear-weapons proliferation that could occur through the nuclear-fuel cycle. Argonne, which has unique experience, technology, and capabilities, is one of the US national laboratories contributing to this nonproliferation effort.

Travelli, A.; Gaines, L.L.; Minkov, V.; Olson, A.P.; Snelgrove, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Applying Agile MethodstoWeapon/Weapon-Related Software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper provides information and guidance to the Department of Energy (DOE) sites on Agile software development methods and the impact of their application on weapon/weapon-related software development. The purpose of this white paper is to provide an overview of Agile methods, examine the accepted interpretations/uses/practices of these methodologies, and discuss the applicability of Agile methods with respect to Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) Technical Business Practices (TBPs). It also provides recommendations on the application of Agile methods to the development of weapon/weapon-related software.

Adams, D; Armendariz, M; Blackledge, M; Campbell, F; Cloninger, M; Cox, L; Davis, J; Elliott, M; Granger, K; Hans, S; Kuhn, C; Lackner, M; Loo, P; Matthews, S; Morrell, K; Owens, C; Peercy, D; Pope, G; Quirk, R; Schilling, D; Stewart, A; Tran, A; Ward, R; Williamson, M

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

12

Preparing Non-nuclear Engineers for the Nuclear Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preparing Non-nuclear Engineers for the Nuclear Field Elizabeth K. Ervin The University. An understanding of power generation is important for all modern-day engineers, and nuclear energy serves as a good-four universities have nuclear- related programs, including Nuclear or Radiological Engineering, Nuclear Science

Ervin, Elizabeth K.

13

Weapons Program Associate Directors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition3 WaterFebruary 18,the Geeks:WeakWeapons

14

Nuclear Weapons Journal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&D ConsortiumNuclearSafeguardsResearchNuclear Weapons

15

Non-nuclear, low-carbon, or both? The case of Taiwan*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-nuclear, low-carbon, or both? The case of Taiwan* Yen-Heng Henry Chen *Reprinted from Energy-7492 Fax: (617) 253-9845 Email: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;Non-nuclear43 Q54 Keywords: Economy-wide analysis Non-nuclear policy CO2 reduction The Fukushima nuclear

16

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

17

Hazard classification criteria for non-nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories` Integrated Risk Management Department has developed a process for establishing the appropriate hazard classification of a new facility or operation, and thus the level of rigor required for the associated authorization basis safety documentation. This process is referred to as the Preliminary Hazard Screen. DOE Order 5481.1B contains the following hazard classification for non-nuclear facilities: high--having the potential for onsite or offsite impacts to large numbers of persons or for major impacts to the environment; moderate--having the potential for considerable onsite impacts but only minor offsite impacts to people or the environment; low--having the potential for only minor onsite and negligible offsite impacts to people or the environment. It is apparent that the application of such generic criteria is more than likely to be fraught with subjective judgment. One way to remove the subjectivity is to define health and safety classification thresholds for specific hazards that are based on the magnitude of the hazard, rather than on a qualitative assessment of possible accident consequences. This paper presents the results of such an approach to establishing a readily usable set of non-nuclear facility hazard classifications.

Mahn, J.A.; Walker, S.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Risk in the Weapons Stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Agile Machining and Inspection Non-Nuclear Report (NNR) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a high level summary of the eight major projects funded by the Agile Machining and Inspection Non-Nuclear Readiness (NNR) project (FY06.0422.3.04.R1). The largest project of the group is the Rapid Response project in which the six major sub categories are summarized. This project focused on the operations of the machining departments that will comprise Special Applications Machining (SAM) in the Kansas City Responsive Infrastructure Manufacturing & Sourcing (KCRIMS) project. This project was aimed at upgrading older machine tools, developing new inspection tools, eliminating Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM) in the handling of classified Numerical Control (NC) programs by installing the CRONOS network, and developing methods to automatically load Coordinated-Measuring Machine (CMM) inspection data into bomb books and product score cards. Finally, the project personnel leaned perations of some of the machine tool cells, and now have the model to continue this activity.

Lazarus, Lloyd

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

Request For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Authority-Nuclear Weapons Request For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons This document identifies the nuclear weapon records generated by the Department of Energy's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Weapons engineering tritium facility overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials provide an overview of the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) as introductory material for January 2011 visit to SRS. Purpose of the visit is to discuss Safety Basis, Conduct of Engineering, and Conduct of Operations. WETF general description and general GTS program capabilities are presented in an unclassified format.

Najera, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Control of Nuclear Weapon Data  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The directive establishes the policy, process and procedures for control of nuclear weapon data to ensure that dissemination of the information is restricted to individuals with appropriate clearances, approved authorization and valid need-to-know in keeping with the Atomic Energy Act (as amended) stipulation of ensuring common defense and security. Cancels DOE O 5610.2.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

Laintz, Kenneth E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Non-nuclear power sources for deep space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric propulsion and non-nuclear power can be used in tandem as a replacement for the current chemical booster and radioisotope thermoelectric generators now in use for deep space applications (i.e., to the asteroid belt and beyond). In current generation systems, electric propulsion is usually considered to be impractical because of the lack of high power for deep space, and non-nuclear power is thought to be impractical partly due to its high mass. However, when taken in combination, a solar powered electric upper stage can provide ample power and propulsion capability for use in deep space. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) systems have generally been selected for missions only when other systems are absolutely unavailable. The disadvantages of radioisotopes include the need for nuclear safety as another dimension of concern in payload integration; the lack of assured availability of plutonium in the post-cold-war world; the enormous cost of plutonium-238; and the system complexity introduced by the need to continuously cool the system during the pre-launch phase. A conservative estimate for the total power for the solar array at beginning of life (BOL) may be in the range of 25 kW in order to provide 500 W continuous power at Jupiter. The availability of {approximately} 25 kW(e) in earth orbit raises the interesting possibility of coupling electric propulsion units to this free electric power. If electric propulsion is used to raise the probe from low-earth-orbit to an earth-escape trajectory, the system could actually save on low-earth orbit mass. Electric propulsion could be used by itself in a spiral trajectory orbit raising maneuver to earth escape velocity, or it could be used in conjunction with a chemical upper stage (either solid rocket or liquid), which would boost the payload to an elliptical orbit. The concept is to begin the Earth-Jupiter trip with a swing-by near the Sun close to the orbit of Venus and perhaps even closer if thermal loads can be tolerated. During the solar swing-by, much more power will be produced by the solar panels, allowing the spacecraft's velocity to be increased significantly. The outbound leg of the journey can, therefore, be made much more quickly than with the classical trajectory. For the purposes of a Jupiter mission, it is assumed that 20 km/sec total delta-v would be required. For a payload envelope of 17,304 kg, a 1,900 sec Isp capability means that 11,386 kg of propellant would have to be consumed, leaving 5,917 kg for the mass of the probe plus dry mass of the upper stage. The thruster subsystem would require 765 kg of thruster subsystem mass, and probably less. Assuming tanks, regulators and valves amount to 10% of the propellant mass (very likely a pessimistic assumption), it is possible to assign a mass of 1,150 kg for the tankage subsystem. This results in a mass allowance of at least 4,000 kg for the probe. This compares favorably with the dry mass of 1,637 kg for Galileo, for example, and suggests that more than adequate margin exists. If the payload margin is used for battery storage, flyby missions to the outer planets may be possible.

Kennel, E.B.; Tang, C.; Santarius, J.F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The gas centrifuge and nuclear weapons proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment by centrifugation is the basis for the quick and efficient production of nuclear fuel-or nuclear weapons.

Wood, Houston G. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Glaser, Alexander [Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Program on Science, Technology and Environmental Policy, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Kemp, R. Scott [Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

26

President Truman Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

27

Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

28

Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Non-Nuclear, Low-Carbon, or Both? The Case of Taiwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-Nuclear, Low-Carbon, or Both? The Case of Taiwan Y.H. Henry Chen Report No. 235 December 2012://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Non-Nuclear, Low-Carbon, or Both? The Case of Taiwan Y.-H. Henry Chen* Abstract The Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan has renewed debates on the safety of nuclear power

30

Weapons Program Associate Directors named  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtectiveWaste toWe Visit YouWeapons

31

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines the Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

32

Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition NNSS Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked the WDD working group to disposition the large inventory of legacy classified weapon components scattered across the complex.

Pat Arnold

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

MN4602 Crouch 2004 REASSESSING WEAPON SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MN4602 Crouch 2004 REASSESSING WEAPON SYSTEM OPERATIONAL TEST & EVALUATION METHODOLOGIES LTC Thom support assessing a weapon systems true cost and performance characteristics? S1: Can/should cost, operational effectiveness and suitability be assessed independent of one another? S2: Do current test

34

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. Science-based weapons and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) extends HEDP under extreme conditions that approach the high energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear

35

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons by LtCol Karl Basham Functional areas: Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Weapons, Security The Order establishes...

36

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by Angela Chambers Functional areas: Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense Programs, Nuclear Weapons...

37

Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

prior to 1992 as a result of weapons production. Linking Legacies - Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production Processes to Their Environmental Consequences More Documents...

38

Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production Processes to Their Environmental Consequences Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons...

39

Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963....

40

Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

70th anniversary lecture Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of next 70th anniversary lecture Lab's role in the development of nuclear weapons...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by cdornburg Functional areas: Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense Programs, Nuclear Weapons Programs,...

42

Toward a nuclear weapons free world?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Doubts about the wisdom of relying on nuclear weapons are as old as nuclear weapons themselves. But despite this questioning, nuclear weapons came to be seen as the indispensable element of American (indeed Western) security during the Cold War. By the 1970s and 1980s, however, discontent was growing about the intense US-Soviet nuclear arms competition, as it failed to provide any enduring improvement in security; rather, it was seen as creating ever greater risks and dangers. Arms control negotiations and limitations, adopted as a means to regulate the technical competition, may also have relieved some of the political pressures and dangers. But the balance of terror, and the fears of it, continued. The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) under President Reagan was a very different approach to escaping from the precarious protection of nuclear weapons, in that it sought a way to continue to defend the US and the West, but without the catastrophic risks of mutual deterrence. As such, SDI connoted unhappiness with the precarious nuclear balance and, for many, with nuclear weapons in general. The disappearance of the Warsaw Pact, the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the sudden end of the Cold War seemed to offer a unique opportunity to fashion a new, more peaceful world order that might allow for fading away of nuclear weapons. Scholars have foreseen two different paths to a nuclear free world. The first is a fundamental improvement in the relationships between states such that nuclear weapons are no longer needed. The second path is through technological development, e.g., missile defenses which could provide effective protection against nuclear attacks. The paper discusses nuclear weapon policy in the US, views of other nuclear states, the future of nuclear weapons, and issues in a less-nuclear world.

Maaranen, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Center for International Security Affairs

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

DIRECTED ENERGY WEAPONS (DEWs): A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1980, v, 113, no. 5, p. 60-63. "AF Phillips Lab Looks at Space as Battleground." BMD Monitor, September on Blinding Laser Weapons." Laser Focus World, December 1995, v. 31, p. 62-64. Armstrong, Richard B. "Directed

44

Portable radiation-detection instruments for distinguishing nuclear from non-nuclear munitions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission of gamma rays and fast neutrons by nuclear materials provides a simple means for distinguishing between real nuclear munitions and other assemblies that are non-nuclear, such as nuclear-explosive-like test assemblies (NELAs) and conventional munitions. The presence or absence of significant numbers of neutrons and characteristic plutonium gamma rays are distinguishing attributes for plutonium munitions. The presence of energetic gamma rays from {sup 232}U daughters, if present in sufficient number, is a distinguishing attribute for highly enriched uranium munitions. Some portable instruments are being developed for verifying that munitions are or are not nuclear, and others are already commercially available. The commercial ones have been evaluated for pre-flight non-nuclear verification of NELAs in Air Force flight tests. 7 refs., 5 figs.

Fehlau, P.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

National Certification Methodology for the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories have developed a common framework and key elements of a national certification methodology called Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU). A spectrum from senior managers to weapons designers has been engaged in this activity at the two laboratories for on the order of a year to codify this methodology in an overarching and integrated paper. Following is the certification paper that has evolved. In the process of writing this paper, an important outcome has been the realization that a joint Livermore/Los Alamos workshop on QMU, focusing on clearly identifying and quantifying differences between approaches between the two labs plus developing an even stronger technical foundation on methodology, will be valuable. Later in FY03, such a joint laboratory workshop will be held. One of the outcomes of this workshop will be a new version of this certification paper. A comprehensive approach to certification must include specification of problem scope, development of system baseline models, formulation of standards of performance assessment, and effective procedures for peer review and documentation. This document concentrates on the assessment and peer review aspects of the problem. In addressing these points, a central role is played by a 'watch list' for weapons derived from credible failure modes and performance gate analyses. The watch list must reflect our best assessment of factors that are critical to weapons performance. High fidelity experiments and calculations as well as full exploitation of archival test data are essential to this process. Peer review, advisory groups and red teams play an important role in confirming the validity of the watch list. The framework for certification developed by the Laboratories has many basic features in common, but some significant differences in the detailed technical implementation of the overall methodology remain. Joint certification workshops held in June and December of 2001 and continued in 2002 have proven useful in developing the methodology, and future workshops should prove useful in further refining this framework. Each laboratory developed an approach to certification with some differences in detailed implementation. The general methodology introduces specific quantitative indicators for assessing confidence in our nuclear weapon stockpile. The quantitative indicators are based upon performance margins for key operating characteristics and components of the system, and these are compared to uncertainties in these factors. These criteria can be summarized in a quantitative metric (for each such characteristic) expressed as: (i.e., confidence in warhead performance depends upon CR significantly exceeding unity for all these characteristics). These Confidence Ratios are proposed as a basis for guiding technical and programmatic decisions on stockpile actions. This methodology already has been deployed in certifying weapons undergoing current life extension programs or component remanufacture. The overall approach is an adaptation of standard engineering practice and lends itself to rigorous, quantitative, and explicit criteria for judging the robustness of weapon system and component performance at a detailed level. There are, of course, a number of approaches for assessing these Confidence Ratios. The general certification methodology was publicly presented for the first time to a meeting of Strategic Command SAG in January 2002 and met with general approval. At that meeting, the Laboratories committed to further refine and develop the methodology through the implementation process. This paper reflects the refinement and additional development to date. There will be even further refinement at a joint laboratory workshop later in FY03. A common certification methodology enables us to engage in peer reviews and evaluate nuclear weapon systems on the basis of explicit and objective metrics. The clarity provided by such metrics enables each laboratory and our common customers to understand the meaning and logic

Goodwin, B T; Juzaitis, R J

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

Managing nuclear weapons in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the management and security of nuclear weapons in the post-cold war United States. The definition of what constitutes security is clearly changing in the US. It is now a much more integrated view that includes defense and the economy. The author tries to bring some semblance of order to these themes in this brief adaptation of a presentation.

Miller, G.

1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and reliability of the Nation's nuclear weapons without nuclear testing. The program provides this capability models that are used to assess and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition that approach the high-energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear explosion. Virtually all

48

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

The monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper partially reviews and updates the potential for monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons, including verification of their destruction. Cooperative monitoring with templates of the gamma-ray spectrum are an important tool, dependent on the use of information barriers.

Garwin, Richard L., E-mail: RLG2@us.ibm.com [IBM Fellow Emeritus, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the Department of Defense. Cancels DOE O 452.6.

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Aegis Combat and Weapon Systems Overview 24 hours, $1495  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEprocessensuresthatsystemsaredevelopedtomeet affordable, operationally effective, and timely mission objectives. FocusonengineeringtheWeaponAegis Combat and Weapon Systems Overview 24 hours, $1495 Launched from the Advanced Surface Missile that led to the initiation of Aegis. Topics Include: · AegisOverviewandHistory · AegisBMD · AegisWeapon

Fork, Richard

52

Towards Optimal Placement of Bio-Weapon Chris Kiekintveld  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Vice versa, our objective is to minimize the potential effect of a bio-weapon attack. CommentTowards Optimal Placement of Bio-Weapon Detectors Chris Kiekintveld Department of Computer Science, USA Email: lolerma@episd.edu Abstract--Biological weapons are difficult and expensive to detect

Ward, Karen

53

Management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines and affirms the authorities and responsibilities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for the management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and emphasizes that the management of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile is the DOE's highest priority for the NNSA and the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Cancels DOE O 5600.1.

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

54

GeoffBrumfiel,Washington Nuclear watchdogs and former weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is supposed to help scientists assess the nation's ageing nuclear stockpile without testing the weaponsGeoffBrumfiel,Washington Nuclear watchdogs and former weapons scientists are taking issue existing bombs detonate, so that the stockpile can be maintained without testing the weapons it contains

55

Evaluation of Non-Nuclear Techniques for Well Logging: Technology Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an initial review of the state-of-the-art nuclear and non-nuclear well logging methods and seeks to understand the technical and economic issues if AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources, are reduced or even eliminated in the oil-field services industry. Prior to considering alternative logging technologies, there is a definite need to open up discussions with industry regarding the feasibility and acceptability of source replacement. Industry views appear to range from those who see AmBe as vital and irreplaceable to those who believe that, with research and investment, it may be possible to transition to electronic neutron sources and employ combinations of non-nuclear technologies to acquire the desired petro-physical parameters. In one sense, the simple answer to the question as to whether petro-physical parameters can be sensed with technologies other than AmBe is probably "Yes". The challenges come when attention turns to record interpretation. The many decades of existing records form a very valuable proprietary resource, and the interpretation of subtle features contained in these records are of significant value to the oil-gas exploration community to correctly characterize a well. The demonstration of equivalence and correspondence/correlation between established and any new sensing modality, and correlations with historic records is critical to ensuring accurate data interpretation. Establishing the technical basis for such a demonstration represents a significant effort.

Bond, Leonard J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Dale, Gregory E.; Harris, Robert V.; Moran, Traci L.; Sheen, David M.; Schenkel, Thomas

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Non Nuclear Testing of Reactor Systems In The Early Flight Fission Test Facilities (EFF-TF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Early Flight Fission-Test Facility (EFF-TF) can assist in the design and development of systems through highly effective non-nuclear testing of nuclear systems when technical issues associated with near-term space fission systems are 'non-nuclear' in nature (e.g. system's nuclear operations are understood). For many systems, thermal simulators can be used to closely mimic fission heat deposition. Axial power profile, radial power profile, and fuel pin thermal conductivity can be matched. In addition to component and subsystem testing, operational and lifetime issues associated with the steady state and transient performance of the integrated reactor module can be investigated. Instrumentation at the EFF-TF allows accurate measurement of temperature, pressure, strain, and bulk core deformation (useful for accurately simulating nuclear behavior). Ongoing research at the EFF-TF is geared towards facilitating research, development, system integration, and system utilization via cooperative efforts with DOE laboratories, industry, universities, and other Nasa centers. This paper describes the current efforts for the latter portion of 2003 and beginning of 2004. (authors)

Van Dyke, Melissa; Martin, James [Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, Alabama, 35812 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Electromagnetic Signature Technique as a Promising Tool to Verify Nuclear Weapons Storage and Dismantlement under a Nuclear Arms Control Regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2010 ratification of the New START Treaty has been widely regarded as a noteworthy national security achievement for both the Obama administration and the Medvedev-Putin regime, but deeper cuts are envisioned under future arms control regimes. Future verification needs will include monitoring the storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondaries, and other materials. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under future arms control regimes will pose new challenges. Since acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes, non-nuclear non-sensitive signatures may provide a significant verification tool without the use of additional information barriers. The use of electromagnetic signatures to monitor nuclear material storage containers is a promising technology with the potential to fulfill these challenging requirements. Research performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic signatures of sealed metallic containers can be used to confirm the presence of specific components on a “yes/no” basis without revealing classified information. Arms control inspectors might use this technique to verify the presence or absence of monitored items, including both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. Although additional research is needed to study signature aspects such as uniqueness and investigate container-specific scenarios, the technique potentially offers a rapid and cost-effective tool to verify reduction and dismantlement of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons.

Bunch, Kyle J.; Williams, Laura S.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nuclear weapons and NATO-Russia relations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the development of positive institutional arrangements such as Russian participation in the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Bosnia and the NATO- Russia Permanent Joint Council, the strategic culture of Russia has not changed in any fundamental sense. Russian strategic culture has not evolved in ways that would make Russian policies compatible with those of NATO countries in the necessary economic, social, technological, and military spheres. On the domestic side, Russia has yet to establish a stable democracy and the necessary legal, judicial, and regulatory institutions for a free-market economy. Russia evidently lacks the necessary cultural traditions, including concepts of accountability and transparency, to make these adaptations in the short-term. Owing in part to its institutional shortcomings, severe socioeconomic setbacks have afflicted Russia. Russian conventional military strength has been weakened, and a concomitant reliance by the Russians on nuclear weapons as their ultimate line of defense has increased. The breakdown in the infrastructure that supports Russian early warning and surveillance systems and nuclear weapons stewardship defense, coupled with a tendency towards has exacerbated Russian anxiety and distrust toward NATO. Russia`s reliance on nuclear weapons as the ultimate line of defense, coupled with a tendency toward suspicion and distrust toward NATO, could lead to dangerous strategic miscalculation and nuclear catastrophe.

Cornwell, G.C.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The US nuclear weapon infrastructure and a stable global nuclear weapon regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US nuclear weapons capabilities -- extant force structure and nuclear weapons infrastructure as well as declared policy -- influence other nations' nuclear weapons postures, at least to some extent. This influence can be desirable or undesirable, and is, of course, a mixture of both. How strong the influence is, and its nature, are complicated, controversial, and -- in our view -- not well understood but often overstated. Divergent views about this influence and how it might shape the future global nuclear weapons regime seem to us to be the most serious impediment to reaching a national consensus on US weapons policy, force structure and supporting infrastructure. We believe that a paradigm shift to capability-based deterrence and dissuasion is not only consistent with the realities of the world and how it has changed, but also a desirable way for nuclear weapon postures and infrastructures to evolve. The US and other nuclear states could not get to zero nor even reduce nuclear arms and the nuclear profile much further without learning to manage latent capability. This paper has defined three principles for designing NW infrastructure both at the 'next plateau' and 'near zero.' The US can be a leader in reducing weapons and infrastructure and in creating an international regime in which capability gradually substitutes for weapons in being and is transparent. The current 'strategy' of not having policy or a Congressionally-approved plan for transforming the weapons complex is not leadership. If we can conform the US infrastructure to the next plateau and architect it in such a way that it is aligned with further arms reductions, it will have these benefits: The extant stockpile can be reduced in size, while the smaller stockpile still deters attack on the US and Allies. The capabilities of the infrastructure will dissuade emergence of new challenges/threats; if they emerge, nevertheless, the US will be able to deal with them in time. We will begin to transform the way other major powers view their nuclear capability. Finally, and though of less cosmic importance, it will save money in the long run.

Immele, John D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Development of High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity thermal simulators that not only match the static power profile that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor, but also match the dynamic fuel pin performance during feasible transients. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being developed are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. Static and dynamic fuel pin performances for a proposed reactor design have been determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and initial comparison has been made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analysis, a conceptual high fidelity design will be developed, followed by engineering design, fabrication, and testing to validate the overall design process. Although the resulting thermal simulator will be designed for a specific reactor concept, establishing this rigorous design process will assist in streamlining the thermal simulator development for other reactor concepts. This paper presents the current status of high fidelity thermal simulator design relative to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 25812 (United States); Dixon, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Decision Applications Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Kapernick, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Decision Applications Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Safety issues in fabricating mixed oxide fuel using surplus weapons plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an assessment of the safety issues and implications of fabricating mixed oxide (MOX) fuel using surplus weapons plutonium. The basis for this assessment is the research done at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in identifying and resolving the technical issues surrounding the production of PuO{sub 2} feed, removal of gallium from the PuO{sub 2} feed, the fabrication of test fuel, and the work done at the LANL plutonium processing facility. The use of plutonium in MOX fuel has been successfully demonstrated in Europe, where the experience has been almost exclusively with plutonium separated from commercial spent nuclear fuel. This experience in safely operating MOX fuel fabrication facilities directly applies to the fabrication and irradiation of MOX fuel made from surplus weapons plutonium. Consequently, this paper focuses on the technical difference between plutonium from surplus weapons, and light-water reactor recycled plutonium. Preliminary assessments and research lead to the conclusion that no new process or product safety concerns will arise from using surplus weapons plutonium in MOX fuel.

Buksa, J.; Badwan, F.; Barr, M.; Motley, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEM withSecurity Administration Weapons

63

Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order prescribes how the Department of Energy participates with the Department of Defense (DoD) to ensure the surety (safety, security and control) of military nuclear weapon systems deployed around the world. The Order establishes National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the DoD. Cancels DOE O 5610.13. Canceled by DOE O 452.6A.

2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

Recovery of weapon plutonium as feed material for reactor fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents preliminary considerations for recovering and converting weapon plutonium from various US weapon forms into feed material for fabrication of reactor fuel elements. An ongoing DOE study addresses the disposition of excess weapon plutonium through its use as fuel for nuclear power reactors and subsequent disposal as spent fuel. The spent fuel would have characteristics similar to those of commercial power spent fuel and could be similarly disposed of in a geologic repository.

Armantrout, G.A.; Bronson, M.A.; Choi, Jor-Shan [and others

1994-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

65

Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons Design, Certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

66

Gordon Assesses Security At Nuclear Weapons Complex News.....  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Anson Franklin, 202586-7371 September 21, 2001 NNSA Administrator Gordon Assesses Security Of the Nuclear Weapons Complex John Gordon, Administrator of the Department of Energy's...

67

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1D Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense...

68

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01:...

69

Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons.

Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

71

A thousand suns : political motivations for nuclear weapons testing .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nuclear weapon testing is the final step in the nuclear development process, an announcement of ability and strength. The consequences of a nuclear test are… (more)

Raas, Whitney

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

atmospheric nuclear weapon: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coles, Taylor Marie 2014-04-27 26 A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons CERN Preprints...

73

america nuclear weapons: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

power plant Laughlin, Robert B. 27 A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons CERN Preprints...

74

atmospheric nuclear weapons: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coles, Taylor Marie 2014-04-27 26 A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons CERN Preprints...

75

Joint Venture Established Between Russian Weapons Plant And the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Venture Established Between Russian Weapons Plant And the Largest Dialysis Provider in the U.S. | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS...

76

Date Set for Closure of Russian Nuclear Weapons Plant - NNSA...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Date Set for Closure of Russian Nuclear Weapons Plant - NNSA Is Helping Make It Happen | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission...

77

TRACKING SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FROM WEAPONS TO DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supporting nuclear nonproliferation and global security principles, beginning in 1994 the United States has withdrawn more than 50 metric tons (MT) of government-controlled plutonium from potential use in nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, established protocols for the tracking of this "excess" and "surplus" plutonium, and for reconciling the current storage and utilization of the plutonium to show that its management is consistent with the withdrawal policies. Programs are underway to ensure the safe and secure disposition of the materials that formed a major part of the weapons stockpile during the Cold War, and growing quantities have been disposed as waste, after which they are not included in traditional nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A) data systems. A combination of resources is used to perform the reconciliations that form the basis for annual reporting to DOE, to U.S. Department of State, and to international partners including the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Allender, J.; Beams, J.; Sanders, K.; Myers, L.

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

UN Security Council: Iran violating ban on nuclear weapons programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UN Security Council: Iran violating ban on nuclear weapons programs 7 September 2011 Denouncement comes after International Atomic Energy Agency submits a report claiming Iran continues to make advances weaponization of its nuclear program. The United States, Germany, France and Britain joined forces in exposing

79

Advanced Heat Exchanger Development for Molten Salts in Nuclear and Non Nuclear Systems  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700°C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850°C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.

Sabharwall, Piyush; Clark, Denis; Sridharan, Kumar; Zheng, Guiqiu; Anderson, Mark

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Advanced Heat Exchanger Development for Molten Salts in Nuclear and Non Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700°C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850°C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.

Piyush Sabharwall; Denis Clark; Kumar Sridharan; Guiqiu Zheng; Mark Anderson

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - alamos thermonuclear weapon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thermonuclear weapon Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alamos thermonuclear weapon Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Dr. Lodwick's research...

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembled chemical weapons Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical weapons Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assembled chemical weapons Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Locations and Status of...

83

Hydrodynamic experiment provides key data for Stockpile Stewardship  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

predictively model and assess weapon performance in the absence of full-scale underground nuclear testing," said Webster. Los Alamos hydrodynamic experiment provides key data for...

84

Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped charged jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Macroencapsulation Equivalency Guidance for Classified Weapon Components and NNSSWAC Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has a surplus of classified legacy weapon components generated over the years with no direct path for disposal. The majority of the components have been held for uncertainty of future use or no identified method of sanitization or disposal. As more weapons are retired, there is an increasing need to reduce the amount of components currently in storage or on hold. A process is currently underway to disposition and dispose of the legacy/retired weapons components across the DOE complex.

Poling, J.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Introduction to Pits and Weapons Systems (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Nuclear Explosive Package includes the Primary, Secondary, Radiation Case and related components. This is the part of the weapon that produces nuclear yield and it converts mechanical energy into nuclear energy. The pit is composed of materials that allow mechanical energy to be converted to electromagnetic energy. Fabrication processes used are typical of any metal fabrication facility: casting, forming, machining and welding. Some of the materials used in pits include: Plutonium, Uranium, Stainless Steel, Beryllium, Titanium, and Aluminum. Gloveboxes are used for three reasons: (1) Protect workers and public from easily transported, finely divided plutonium oxides - (a) Plutonium is very reactive and produces very fine particulate oxides, (b) While not the 'Most dangerous material in the world' of Manhattan Project lore, plutonium is hazardous to health of workers if not properly controlled; (2) Protect plutonium from reactive materials - (a) Plutonium is extremely reactive at ambient conditions with several components found in air: oxygen, water, hydrogen, (b) As with most reactive metals, reactions with these materials may be violent and difficult to control, (c) As with most fabricated metal products, corrosion may significantly affect the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of the product; and (3) Provide shielding from radioactive decay products: {alpha}, {gamma}, and {eta} are commonly associated with plutonium decay, as well as highly radioactive materials such as {sup 241}Am and {sup 238}Pu.

Kautz, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

87

The chromosomal polymorphism of Drosophila subobscura: a microevolutionary weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW The chromosomal polymorphism of Drosophila subobscura: a microevolutionary weapon to monitor the effect of the global rising of temperatures on the genetic composition of populations. Indeed, the long

Huey, Raymond B.

88

A thousand suns : political motivations for nuclear weapons testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear weapon testing is the final step in the nuclear development process, an announcement of ability and strength. The consequences of a nuclear test are far from easy to bear, however: economic sanctions can be crippling ...

Raas, Whitney

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Arms Control: US and International efforts to ban biological weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons Convention, the treaty that bans the development, production, and stockpiling and acquisition of biological weapons was opened for signature in 1972 and came into force in 1975 after being ratified by 22 governments, including the depository nations of the USA, the United Kingdom, and the former Soviet Union. In support of the Convention, the USA later established export controls on items used to make biological weapons. Further, in accordance with the 1990 President`s Enhanced Proliferation Control Initiative, actions were taken to redefine and expand US export controls, as well as to encourage multilateral controls through the Australia Group. Thus far, the Convention has not been effective in stopping the development of biological weapons. The principal findings as to the reasons of the failures of the Convention are found to be: the Convention lacks universality, compliance measures are effective, advantage of verification may outweigh disadvantages. Recommendations for mitigating these failures are outlined in this report.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

91

An assessment of North Korea's nuclear weapons capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In February of 2013, North Korea conducted its third nuclear weapons test. Speculations are that this test was conducted to further develop a warhead small enough to fit on an intercontinental ballistic missile. This test ...

Sivels, Ciara (Ciara Brooke)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Briefing, Classification of Nuclear Weapons-Related Information- June 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This brief will familiarize individuals from agencies outside of DOE who may come in contact with RD and FRD with the procedures for identifying, classifying, marking, handling, and declassifying documents containing Nuclear Weapons-Related Information.

93

DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. After more than a...

94

Weapons Activities/ Advanced Simulation and Computing Campaign FY 2011 Congressional Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the entire weapons lifecycle, from design to safe processes for dismantlement. The ASC simulations play

95

EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

96

Optical bullet-tracking algorithms for weapon localization in urban environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localization of the sources of small-arms fire, mortars, and rocket propelled grenades is an important problem in urban combat. Weapons of this type produce characteristic signatures, such as muzzle flashes, that are visible in the infrared. Indeed, several systems have been developed that exploit the infrared signature of muzzle flash to locate the positions of shooters. However, systems based on muzzle flash alone can have difficulty localizing weapons if the muzzle flash is obscured or suppressed. Moreover, optical clutter can be problematic to systems that rely on muzzle flash alone. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a projectile tracking system that detects and localizes sources of small-arms fire, mortars and similar weapons using the thermal signature of the projectile rather than a muzzle flash. The thermal signature of a projectile, caused by friction as the projectile travels along its trajectory, cannot be concealed and is easily discriminated from optical clutter. The LLNL system was recently demonstrated at the MOUT facility of the Aberdeen Test Center [1]. In the live-fire demonstration, shooters armed with a variety of small-arms, including M-16s, AK-47s, handguns, mortars and rockets, were arranged at several positions in around the facility. Experiments ranged from a single-weapon firing a single-shot to simultaneous fire of all weapons on full automatic. The LLNL projectile tracking system was demonstrated to localize multiple shooters at ranges up to 400m, far greater than previous demonstrations. Furthermore, the system was shown to be immune to optical clutter that is typical in urban combat. This paper describes the image processing and localization algorithms designed to exploit the thermal signature of projectiles for shooter localization. The paper begins with a description of the image processing that extracts projectile information from a sequence of infrared images. Key to the processing is an adaptive spatio-temporal filter developed to suppress scene clutter. The filtered image sequence is further processed to produce a set of parameterized regions, which are classified using several discriminate functions. Regions that are classified as projectiles are passed to a data association algorithm that matches features from these regions with existing tracks, or initializes new tracks as needed. A Kalman filter is used to smooth and extrapolate existing tracks. Shooter locations are determined by solving a combinatorial least-squares solution for all bullet tracks. It also provides an error ellipse for each shooter, quantifying the uncertainty of shooter location. The paper concludes with examples from the live-fire exercise at the Aberdeen Test Center.

Roberts, R S; Breitfeller, E F

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL`s Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

DOE weapons laboratories' contributions to the nation's defense technology base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons laboratories can contribute to a stronger defense technology base is addressed in testimony before the Subcommittee on Defense Industry and Technology of the Senate Armed Services Committee. The importance of the defense technology base is described, the DOE technology base is also described, and some technology base management and institutional issues are discussed. Suggestions are given for promoting a more stable, long-term relationship between the DOE weapons laboratories and the Department of Defense. 12 refs., 2 figs.

Hecker, S.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The future of nonnuclear strategic weapons. Final summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this brief study, Pan Heuristics (PAN) has (1) evaluated the future importance of nonnuclear strategic weapons (NNSW), (2) considered their impact on forces and operations, and (3) investigated the technical requirements to support NNSW. In drawing conclusions, PAN has emphasized aspects that might be important to Los Alamos National Laboratory over the long run. It presents them here in a format similar to that used in a briefing at the laboratory. This paper reflects independent PAN research as well as conclusions drawn from discussions with other offices and individuals involved in nonnuclear strategic weapons development.

Brody, R.; Digby, J. [Pan Heuristics, Marina del Rey, CA (United States)

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Evaluation of Non-Nuclear Techniques for Well Logging: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this study is the understanding of the technical obstacles that hinder the replacement of and the disadvantages from the loss of extensive interpretation experience based on data accumulated with AmBe. Enhanced acoustic and electromagnetic sensing methods in combination with non-isotope-based well logging techniques have the potential to complement and/or replace existing isotope-based techniques, providing the opportunity to reduce oil industry dependence on isotopic sources such as AmBe.

Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Harris, R. V.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Moran, Traci L.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Experiences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin Film XRDEvanExecutiveSRD-13Experiences with

102

Disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in Westinghouse reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the feasibility of using weapons-grade plutonium in the form of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing Westinghouse reactors. We have designed three transition cycles from an all LEU core to a partial MOX core. We found that four...

Alsaed, Abdelhalim Ali

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A.

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

104

Proceedings of the Tungsten Workshop for Hard Target Weapons Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this meeting was to review and exchange information and provide technical input for improving technologies relevant to the Hard Target Weapons Program. This workshop was attended by representatives from 17 organizations, including 4 Department of Defense (DoD) agencies, 8 industrial companies, and 5 laboratories within DOE. Hard targets are defined as reinforced underground structures that house enemy forces, weapon systems, and support equipment. DOE-ORO and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) have been involved in advanced materials research and development (R&D) for several DOE and DoD programs. These programs are conducted in close collaboration with Eglin AFB, Department of the Army`s Picatinny Arsenal, and other DoD agencies. As part of this ongoing collaboration, Eglin AFB and Oak Ridge National Laboratory planned and conducted this workshop to support the Hard Target Weapons Program. The objectives of this workshop were to (1) review and identify the technology base that exists (primarily due to anti-armor applications) and assess the applicability of this technology to the Hard Target Weapons Program requirements; (2) determine future directions to establish the W materials, processing, and manufacturing technologies suitable for use in fixed, hard target penetrators; and (3) identify and prioritize the potential areas for technical collaboration among the participants.

Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Hayden, H.W.; Davis, R.M.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

CRAD, Configuration Management- Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Configuration Management program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Weapons Facility.

107

The role of nuclear weapons in the year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication presents the proceedings for the workshop, The Role of Nuclear Weapons in the Year 2000, held on October 22--24, 1990. The workshop participants considered the changing nature of deterrence and of our strategic relationship with the Soviet Union, the impact of nuclear proliferation on regional conflicts, and ways that the nuclear forces might be restructured to reflect new political circumstances.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

An analysis of technical and policy drivers in Current U.S. nuclear weapons force structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. nuclear weapons force structure accounts for the number and types of strategic and nonstrategic weapon systems in various locations that comprise the nuclear arsenal. While exact numbers, locations, and detailed designs ...

Baker, Amanda, S. B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft missiles weapons Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Naval Research Summary: Program managers 467 Program managers Aircraft carriers Combat boots Combat ships Submarines Weapons... Axisymmetric Missile Configuration Hypersonic...

110

Title: Weapons on Campus Effective Date: October 1, 2011 Responsible Office: William & Mary Police  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Weapons on Campus Effective Date: October 1, 2011 Responsible Office: William & Mary Police the prohibition on weapons, firearms, combustibles, and explosives. II. PURPOSE The purpose of this policy by restricting weapons possession on university property. III.DEFINITIONS "law enforcement officials" means

Shaw, Leah B.

111

Research Literature: Effects of Conducted Energy Weapons (CEWs) | p. 1/82 Biomedical research literature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Literature: Effects of Conducted Energy Weapons (CEWs) | p. 1/82 Biomedical research literature with respect to the effects of Conducted Energy Weapons Andy Adler, David P Dawson, Maimaitjian: Institutions involved in research on CEWs 82 #12;Research Literature: Effects of Conducted Energy Weapons (CEWs

Adler, Andy

112

A simple method for rapidly processing HEU from weapons returns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method based on the use of a high temperature fluidized bed for rapidly oxidizing, homogenizing and down-blending Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from dismantled nuclear weapons is presented. This technology directly addresses many of the most important issues that inhibit progress in international commerce in HEU; viz., transaction verification, materials accountability, transportation and environmental safety. The equipment used to carry out the oxidation and blending is simple, inexpensive and highly portable. Mobile facilities to be used for point-of-sale blending and analysis of the product material are presented along with a phased implementation plan that addresses the conversion of HEU derived from domestic weapons and related waste streams as well as material from possible foreign sources such as South Africa or the former Soviet Union.

McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Crystalline ceramics: Waste forms for the disposal of weapons plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (i) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (ii) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass ``logs``; (iii) deep borehole disposal (National Academy of Sciences Report, 1994). The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nuclear energy in a nuclear weapon free world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prospect of a nuclear renaissance has revived a decades old debate over the proliferation and terrorism risks of the use of nuclear power. This debate in the last few years has taken on an added dimension with renewed attention to disarmament. Increasingly, concerns that proliferation risks may reduce the prospects for realizing the vision of a nuclear-weapon-free world are being voiced.

Pilat, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

SNL/NM weapon hardware characterization process development report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process used by Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico to characterize weapon hardware for disposition. The report describes the following basic steps: (1) the drawing search process and primary hazard identification; (2) the development of Disassembly Procedures (DPs), including demilitarization and sanitization requirements; (3) the generation of a ``disposal tree``; (4) generating RCRA waste disposal information; and (5) documenting the information. Additional data gathered during the characterization process supporting hardware grouping and recycle efforts is also discussed.

Graff, E.W.; Chambers, W.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Towards a tactical nuclear weapons treaty? Is There a Role of IAEA Tools of Safeguards?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, there is growing interest in formal negotiations on non-strategic or tactical nuclear weapons. With the negotiations of New START, there has been much speculation that a tactical nuclear weapons treaty should be included in the follow on to New START. This paper examines the current policy environment related to tactical weapons and some of the issues surrounding the definition of tactical nuclear weapons. We then map out the steps that would need to be taken in order to begin discussions on a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. These steps will review the potential role of the IAEA in verification of a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. Specifically, does IAEA involvement in various arms control treaties serve as a useful roadmap on how to overcome some of the issues pertaining to a tactical nuclear weapons treaty?

Saunders, Emily C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowberry, Ariana N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fearey, Bryan L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

117

Depleted-Uranium Weapons the Whys and Wherefores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The only military application in which present-day depleted-uranium (DU) alloys out-perform tungsten alloys is long-rod penetration into a main battle-tank's armor. However, this advantage is only on the order of 10% and disappearing when the comparison is made in terms of actual lethality of complete anti-tank systems instead of laboratory-type steel penetration capability. Therefore, new micro- and nano-engineered tungsten alloys may soon out-perform existing DU alloys, enabling the production of tungsten munition which will be better than uranium munition, and whose overall life-cycle cost will be less due to the absence of the problems related to the radioactivity of uranium. The reasons why DU weapons have been introduced and used are analysed from the perspective that their radioactivity must have played an important role in the decision making process. It is found that DU weapons belong to the diffuse category of low-radiological-impact nuclear weapons to which emerging types of low-yield, i.e., fourth...

Gsponer, A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Application of a Virtual Reactivity Feedback Control Loop in Non-Nuclear Testing of a Fast Spectrum Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a compact, fast-spectrum reactor, reactivity feedback is dominated by core deformation at elevated temperature. Given the use of accurate deformation measurement techniques, it is possible to simulate nuclear feedback in non-nuclear electrically heated reactor tests. Implementation of simulated reactivity feedback in response to measured deflection is being tested at the Nasa Marshall Space Flight Center Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF). During tests of the SAFE-100 reactor prototype, core deflection was monitored using a high resolution camera. 'Virtual' reactivity feedback was accomplished by applying the results of Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to core deflection measurements; the computational analysis was used to establish the reactivity worth of various core deformations. The power delivered to the SAFE-100 prototype was then adjusted accordingly via kinetics calculations. The work presented in this paper will demonstrate virtual reactivity feedback as core power was increased from 1 kWt to 10 kWt, held approximately constant at 10 kWt, and then allowed to decrease based on the negative thermal reactivity coefficient. (authors)

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Al, 35812 (United States); Forsbacka, Matthew [NASA Headquarters, 300 E St. S, Washington, DC 20465 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Multiphysics Thermal-Fluid Design Analysis of a Non-Nuclear Tester for Hot-Hydrogen Materials and Component Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this effort is to perform design analyses for a non-nuclear hot-hydrogen materials tester, as a first step towards developing efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber design and analysis. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective, and thermal radiative heat transfers. The goals of the design analyses are to maintain maximum hot-hydrogen jet impingement energy and to minimize chamber wall heating. The results of analyses on three test fixture configurations and the rationale for final selection are presented. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

Wang, T.-S.; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, 35812 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. Department ofTheEnergyWeaponsDepartment"It is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

LANL | Physics | Nuclear Weapons and Global Security Data Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJeffersonJonathanMultimaterial2Recovery ActNuclear Weapons and Global

122

Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch WelcomeSciencePrograms Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Stewardship

123

Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Nuclear Weapons:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch WelcomeSciencePrograms Nuclear Weapons Stockpile

124

Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Nuclear Weapons:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch WelcomeSciencePrograms Nuclear Weapons StockpileSafety &

125

Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of reactor and weapons plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An accelerator-based conversion (ABC) system is presented that is capable of rapidly burning plutonium in a low-inventory sub-critical system. The system also returns fission power to the grid and transmutes troublesome long-lived fission products to short lived or stable products. Higher actinides are totally fissioned. The system is suited not only to controlled, rapid burning of excess weapons plutonium, but to the long range application of eliminating or drastically reducing the world total inventory of plutonium. Deployment of the system will require the successful resolution of a broad range of technical issues introduced in the paper.

Jensen, R.J.; Trapp, T.J.; Arthur, E.D.; Bowman, C.D.; Davidson, J.W.; Linford, R.K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

EIS-0225: Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environemental impact of a proposal to continue operation of the Pantex Plant and associated storage of nuclear weapon components. Alternatives considered include: ...

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic weapon tests Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

By dissembling random nuclear weapons in the stockpile and closely inspecting and testing... explosives and nuclear materials at the Nevada Test Site to gather diagnostic...

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic weapons Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for an automatic... Qaeda has nuclear weapons. 1 In order to perform this assessment task, DiscipleLTA will ask ... Source: Tecuci, Gheorghe - Department of Computer Science,...

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - army weapon systems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Defense (Do... D) is in the process of destroying the entire U.S. stockpile of aging and obsolete chemical weapons. ... Source: National Center for Environmental Health-...

130

Regime Security Theory: Why Do States With No Clear Strategic Security Concerns Obtain Nuclear Weapons? .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Current realist explanations of why states decide to develop nuclear weapons cannot account for the behavior of states that lack a clear strategic threat. An… (more)

Beasley, Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Nuclear dependence| The Russian Federation's future reliance on nuclear weapons for national security.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The Russian Federation's reliance on nuclear weapons for national security will steadily increase over time. Based on current evidence and historical data, the Russian… (more)

Lukszo, Adam J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic weapons research Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and model nuclear weapon performance in three dimensions. LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAMS: By upgrading Source: Rhoads, James - Space Telescope Science Institute Collection: Physics 9...

133

Seaborne Delivery Interdiction of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the next 10-20 years, the probability of a terrorist attack using a weapon of mass destruction (WMD) on the United States is projected to increase. At some point over the next few decades, it may be inevitable that a terrorist group will have access to a WMD. The economic and social impact of an attack using a WMD anywhere in the world would be catastrophic. For weapons developed overseas, the routes of entry are air and sea with the maritime vector as the most porous. Providing a system to track, perform a risk assessment and inspect all inbound marine traffic before it reaches US coastal cities thereby mitigating the threat has long been a goal for our government. The challenge is to do so effectively without crippling the US economy. The Portunus Project addresses only the maritime threat and builds on a robust maritime domain awareness capability. It is a process to develop the technologies, policies and practices that will enable the US to establish a waypoint for the inspection of international marine traffic, screen 100% of containerized and bulk cargo prior to entry into the US if deemed necessary, provide a palatable economic model for transshipping, grow the US economy, and improve US environmental quality. The implementation strategy is based on security risk, and the political and economic constraints of implementation. This article is meant to provide a basic understanding of how and why this may be accomplished.

Glauser, H

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

134

Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapon detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration / signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two-dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed . Signal / image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far-field and narrow bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a K[sub a]-band system.

Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapon detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration / signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two-dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed . Signal / image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far-field and narrow bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a K{sub a}-band system.

Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Linking legacies: Connecting the Cold War nuclear weapons production processes to their environmental consequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US has begun addressing the environmental consequences of five decades of nuclear weapons production. In support of this effort, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the waste streams generated during each step in the production of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, this report responds to this mandate, and it is the Department`s first comprehensive analysis of the sources of waste and contamination generated by the production of nuclear weapons. The report also contains information on the missions and functions of nuclear weapons facilities, on the inventories of waste and materials remaining at these facilities, as well as on the extent and characteristics of contamination in and around these facilities. This analysis unites specific environmental impacts of nuclear weapons production with particular production processes. The Department used historical records to connect nuclear weapons production processes with emerging data on waste and contamination. In this way, two of the Department`s legacies--nuclear weapons manufacturing and environmental management--have become systematically linked. The goal of this report is to provide Congress, DOE program managers, non-governmental analysts, and the public with an explicit picture of the environmental results of each step in the nuclear weapons production and disposition cycle.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Underwater Bomb Trajectory Prediction for Stand-off Assault (Mine/IED) Breaching Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Underwater Bomb Trajectory Prediction for Stand-off Assault (Mine/IED) Breaching Weapon Fuse To support the development and evaluation of the Stand-off Assault Breaching Weapon Fuse Improvement (SOABWFI for developing an effective system for use against IEDs and mines. The Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM

Chu, Peter C.

138

Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the belief that the possession of nuclear weapons will improve its security. Nothing that the United States1 Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2] The end of the Cold War changed "the balance of nuclear terror" and with it the centrality of nuclear forces in U

Deutch, John

139

ITAR Categories Category I -Firearms, Close Assault Weapons and Combat Shotguns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Associated Equipment Category XVI - Nuclear Weapons, Design and Testing Related Items Category XVII, Incendiary Agents and Their Constituents. Category VI - Vessels of War and Special Naval Equipment. Category Energy Weapons Category XIX - [Reserved] Category XX - Submersible Vessels, Oceanographic and Associated

140

The Meteorological Monitoring program at a former nuclear weapons plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Meteorological Monitoring program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is to provide meteorological information for use in assessing the transport, and diffusion, and deposition of effluent actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by plant operations. Achievement of this objective aids in protecting health and safety of the public, employees, and environment, and directly supports Emergency Response programs at RFP. Meteorological information supports the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, remediation activities, and emergency responses. As the mission of the plant changes from production of nuclear weapons parts to environmental cleanup and economic development, smaller releases resulting from remediation activities become more likely. These possible releases could result from airborne fugitive dust, evaporation from collection ponds, or grass fires.

Maxwell, D.R.; Bowen, B.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nonlethal weapons as force options for the Army  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper suggests that future challenges to US national security will be very different from those previously experienced. In a number of foreseeable circumstances, conventional military force will be inappropriate. The National Command Authority, and other appropriate levels of command, need expanded options available to meet threats for which the application of massive lethal force is counterproductive or inadvisable. It is proposed that nonlethal concepts be developed that provide additional options for military leaders and politicians. Included in this initiative should be exploration of policy, strategy, doctrine, and training issues as well as the development of selected technologies and weapons. In addition, civilian law enforcement agencies have similar requirements for less-than-lethal systems. This may be an excellent example for a joint technology development venture.

Alexander, J.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Implications of a North Korean Nuclear Weapons Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Democratic People`s Republic of Korea (DPRK) is one of the Cold War`s last remaining totalitarian regimes. Rarely has any society been as closed to outside influences and so distant from political, economic, and military developments around the globe. In 1991 and in 1992, however, this dictatorship took a number of political steps which increased Pyongyang`s interaction with the outside world. Although North Korea`s style of engagement with the broader international community involved frequent pauses and numerous steps backward, many observers believed that North Korea was finally moving to end its isolated, outlaw status. As the end of 1992 approached, however, delay and obstruction by Pyongyang became intense as accumulating evidence suggested that the DPRK, in violation of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), was seeking to develop nuclear weapons. On March 12, 1993, North Korea announced that it would not accept additional inspections proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to resolve concerns about possible violations and instead would withdraw from the Treaty. Pyongyang`s action raised the specter that, instead of a last act of the Cold War, North Korea`s diplomatic maneuvering would unravel the international norms that were to be the basis of stability and peace in the post-Cold War era. Indeed, the discovery that North Korea was approaching the capability to produce nuclear weapons suggested that the nuclear threat, which had been successfully managed throughout the Cold War era, could increase in the post-Cold War era.

Lehman, R.F. II

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Plus c`est la meme chose: The future of nuclear weapons in Europe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the end of the Cold War, the United States perhaps more than any other nuclear weapon state has deeply questioned the future role of nuclear weapons, both in a strategic sense and in Europe. It is probably the United States that has raised the most questions about the continuing need for and efficacy of nuclear weapons, and has expressed the greatest concerns about the negative consequences of continuing nuclear weapons deployment. In the US, this period of questioning has now come to a pause, if not a conclusion. In late 1994 the United States decided to continue to pursue reductions in numbers of nuclear weapons as well as other changes designed to reduce the dangers associated with the possession of nuclear weapons. But at the same time the US concluded that some number of nuclear forces would continue to be needed for national security for the foreseeable future. These necessary nuclear forces include a continuing but greatly reduced stockpile of nuclear bombs deployed in Europe under NATO`s New Strategic Concept. If further changes to the US position on nuclear weapons in Europe are to occur, it is likely to be after many years, and only in the context of dramatic additional improvements in the political and geo-political climate in and around Europe. The future role of nuclear weapons in Europe, as discussed in this report, depends in part on past and future decisions by the United States. but it must also be noted that other states that deploy nuclear weapons in Europe--Britain, France, and Russia, as well as the NATO alliance--have shown little inclination to discontinue their deployment of such weapons, whatever the United States might choose to do in the future.

Maaranen, S.A.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Safeguards and security requirements for weapons plutonium disposition in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explores the issues surrounding the safeguarding of the plutonium disposition process in support of the United States nuclear weapons dismantlement program. It focuses on the disposition of the plutonium by burning mixed oxide fuel in light water reactors (LWR) and addresses physical protection, material control and accountability, personnel security and international safeguards. The S and S system needs to meet the requirements of the DOE Orders, NRC Regulations and international safeguards agreements. Experience has shown that incorporating S and S measures into early facility designs and integrating them into operations provides S and S that is more effective, more economical, and less intrusive. The plutonium disposition safeguards requirements with which the US has the least experience are the implementation of international safeguards on plutonium metal; the large scale commercialization of the mixed oxide fuel fabrication; and the transportation to and loading in the LWRs of fresh mixed oxide fuel. It is in these areas where the effort needs to be concentrated if the US is to develop safeguards and security systems that are effective and efficient.

Thomas, L.L.; Strait, R.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Fission Energy and Systems Safety Program

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Subject:Persons With Weapons at UW Madison Date:Wed, 19 Oct 2011 14:27:43 -0400 (EDT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

law goes into effect on November 1, 2011 all weapons will remain prohibited in UW Madison buildingsSubject:Persons With Weapons at UW Madison Date:Wed, 19 Oct 2011 14:27:43 -0400 (EDT) From. If you see a person who is not a police officer in uniform carrying a weapon in a UW Madison building

Balser, Teri C.

146

vol. 166, no. 3 the american naturalist september 2005 Weapon Performance, Not Size, Determines Mating Success and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with bite force. These results indicate that weapon performance has far stronger effects on fitness thanvol. 166, no. 3 the american naturalist september 2005 Weapon Performance, Not Size, Determines the head (i.e., jaws and associated musculature) as a weapon when territorial interactions escalate

Husak, Jerry F.

147

Techniques to evaluate the importance of common cause degradation on reliability and safety of nuclear weapons.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the nuclear weapon stockpile ages, there is increased concern about common degradation ultimately leading to common cause failure of multiple weapons that could significantly impact reliability or safety. Current acceptable limits for the reliability and safety of a weapon are based on upper limits on the probability of failure of an individual item, assuming that failures among items are independent. We expanded the current acceptable limits to apply to situations with common cause failure. Then, we developed a simple screening process to quickly assess the importance of observed common degradation for both reliability and safety to determine if further action is necessary. The screening process conservatively assumes that common degradation is common cause failure. For a population with between 100 and 5000 items we applied the screening process and conclude the following. In general, for a reliability requirement specified in the Military Characteristics (MCs) for a specific weapon system, common degradation is of concern if more than 100(1-x)% of the weapons are susceptible to common degradation, where x is the required reliability expressed as a fraction. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon subsystem if more than 0.1% of the population is susceptible to common degradation. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon component or overall weapon system if two or more components/weapons in the population are susceptible to degradation. Finally, we developed a technique for detailed evaluation of common degradation leading to common cause failure for situations that are determined to be of concern using the screening process. The detailed evaluation requires that best estimates of common cause and independent failure probabilities be produced. Using these techniques, observed common degradation can be evaluated for effects on reliability and safety.

Darby, John L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Assessing the risk from the depleted uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern for the neighboring countries, about the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study a worst-case scenario is assumed mainly to assess the risk for Greece and other neighboring countries of Yugoslavia at similar distances . The risk of the weapons currently in use is proved to be negligible at distances greater than 100 Km. For shorter distances classified data of weapons composition are needed to obtain a reliable assessment.

Liolios, T E

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Bioforensics: Characterization of biological weapons agents by NanoSIMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anthrax attacks of Fall 2001 highlight the need to develop forensic methods based on multiple identifiers to determine the origin of biological weapons agents. Genetic typing methods (i.e., DNA and RNA-based) provide one attribution technology, but genetic information alone is not usually sufficient to determine the provenance of the material. Non-genetic identifiers, including elemental and isotopic signatures, provide complementary information that can be used to identify the means, geographic location and date of production. Under LDRD funding, we have successfully developed the techniques necessary to perform bioforensic characterization with the NanoSIMS at the individual spore level. We have developed methods for elemental and isotopic characterization at the single spore scale. We have developed methods for analyzing spore sections to map elemental abundance within spores. We have developed rapid focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning techniques for spores to preserve elemental and structural integrity. And we have developed a high-resolution depth profiling method to characterize the elemental distribution in individual spores without sectioning. We used these newly developed methods to study the controls on elemental abundances in spores, characterize the elemental distribution of in spores, and to study elemental uptake by spores. Our work under this LDRD project attracted FBI and DHS funding for applied purposes.

Weber, P K; Ghosal, S; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Hutcheon, I D

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

150

Proceedings: 17th Asilomar conference on fire and blast effects of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the 1983 conference was to provide for the technical exchange of ideas relating to the science and technology of the immediate effects of nuclear weapon explosions. Separate abstracts were prepared for 39 of the papers.

Hickman, R.G.; Meier, C.A. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A system for the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo cotainerships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new approach to the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo containerships is proposed. The ship-based approach removes the constraints of current thinking by addressing the threat of ...

Gallagher, Shawn P., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Auratic Weapons, World War II, and Cultural Hegemony in The Lord of the Rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When Merry and Pippin are abducted by the Orc army, oneof the Orcs, Uglúk, takes their knives away from them. Merrywith the weapons causes the orc to cast them away. Once

Silverstein, Michelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Human Capital Ecosystem Underlying the PLA’s Network Weapons Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Underlying the PLA’s Network Weapons Developmentthe People’s Liberation Army (PLA). Although China’s networkdevelopment and some of the key PLA institutes that appear

McREYNOLDS, Joe; RAGLAND, Leigh A.; CHANG, Amy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Imaging the ionization track of alpha recoils for the directional detection of weapons grade plutonium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the dawn of the nuclear weapons era, political, military, and scientific leaders around the world have been working to contain the proliferation of Special Nuclear Material and explosively fissile material. This paper ...

Koch, William Lawrence

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A quantitative assessment of nuclear weapons proliferation risk utilizing probabilistic methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparative quantitative assessment is made of the nuclear weapons proliferation risk between various nuclear reactor/fuel cycle concepts using a probabilistic method. The work presented details quantified proliferation ...

Sentell, Dennis Shannon, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Surface water transport and distribution of uranium in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extent of remobilization of uranium from contaminated soils adjacent to a nuclear weapons processing facility during episodic rain events was investigated. In addition, information on the solid phase associations of U in floodplain and suspended...

Batson, Vicky Lynn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

E-Print Network 3.0 - air weapon fatalities Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Defense (Do... D) is in the process of destroying the entire U.S. stockpile of aging and obsolete chemical weapons. The original... stockpile contained 63 million pounds...

158

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic weapons establishment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

establishment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic weapons establishment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 B I O G R A P H Y Dr. Paul...

159

Mission emphasis and the determination of needs for new weapon systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efforts to understand the determination of needs of new weapon systems must take into account inputs and actions beyond the formally documented requirements generation process. This study analyzes three recent historical ...

Gillespie, Daniel Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Environmental behavior of hafnium : the impact on the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental and analytical studies were performed to examine the environmental behavior of hafnium and its utility as a neutron poison for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in Yucca Mountain. The hydrolysis of ...

Cerefice, Gary Steven

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

US weapons-useable plutonium disposition policy: implementation of the MOX fuel option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US WEAPONS-USEABLE PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION POLICY: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MOX FUEL OPTION A Thesis by VANESSA L. GONZALEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1998 Major Subject: Political Science US WEAPONS-USEABLE PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION POLICY: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MOX FUEL OPTION A Thesis by VANESSA L. GONZALEZ Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment...

Gonzalez, Vanessa L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology Evaluation and Training Range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a long history for providing technology evaluation and training for military and other federal level Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) response agencies. Currently there are many federal organizations and commercial companies developing technologies related to detecting, assessing, mitigating and protecting against hazards associated with a WMD event. Unfortunately, very few locations exist within the United States where WMD response technologies are realistically field tested and evaluated using real chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive materials. This is particularly true with biological and radiological hazards. Related to this lack of adequate WMD, multi-hazard technology testing capability is the shortage of locations where WMD response teams can train using actual chemical, biological, and radiological material or highly realistic simulates. In response to these technology evaluation and training needs, the INL has assembled a consortium of subject matter experts from existing programs and identified dedicated resources for the purpose of establishing an all-hazards, WMD technology evaluation and training range. The author describes the challenges associated with creating the all-hazards WMD technology evaluation and training range and lists the technical, logistical and financial benefits of an all-hazards technology evaluation and training range. Current resources and capabilities for conducting all-hazard technology evaluation and training at the INL are identified. Existing technology evaluation and training programs at the INL related to radiological, biological and chemical hazards are highlighted, including successes and lessons learned. Finally, remaining gaps in WMD technology evaluation and training capabilities are identified along with recommendations for closing those gaps.

Kevin Larry Young

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Igniting the Light Elements: The Los Alamos Thermonuclear Weapon Project, 1942-1952  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American system of nuclear weapons research and development was conceived and developed not as a result of technological determinism, but by a number of individual architects who promoted the growth of this large technologically-based complex. While some of the technological artifacts of this system, such as the fission weapons used in World War II, have been the subject of many historical studies, their technical successors--fusion (or hydrogen) devices--are representative of the largely unstudied highly secret realms of nuclear weapons science and engineering. In the postwar period a small number of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's staff and affiliates were responsible for theoretical work on fusion weapons, yet the program was subject to both the provisions and constraints of the US Atomic Energy Commission, of which Los Alamos was a part. The Commission leadership's struggle to establish a mission for its network of laboratories, least of all to keep them operating, affected Los Alamos's leaders' decisions as to the course of weapons design and development projects. Adapting Thomas P. Hughes's ''large technological systems'' thesis, I focus on the technical, social, political, and human problems that nuclear weapons scientists faced while pursuing the thermonuclear project, demonstrating why the early American thermonuclear bomb project was an immensely complicated scientific and technological undertaking. I concentrate mainly on Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Theoretical, or T, Division, and its members' attempts to complete an accurate mathematical treatment of the ''Super''--the most difficult problem in physics in the postwar period--and other fusion weapon theories. Although tackling a theoretical problem, theoreticians had to address technical and engineering issues as well. I demonstrate the relative value and importance of H-bomb research over time in the postwar era to scientific, politician, and military participants in this project. I analyze how and when participants in the H-bomb project recognized both blatant and subtle problems facing the project, how scientists solved them, and the relationship this process had to official nuclear weapons policies. Consequently, I show how the practice of nuclear weapons science in the postwar period became an extremely complex, technologically-based endeavor.

Anne C. Fitzpatrick

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

DOE (Department of Energy) nuclear weapon R and T (research, development, and testing): Objectives, roles, and responsibilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of the DOE nuclear weapons research, development, and testing program is given along with a description of the program objectives and the roles and responsibilities of the various involved organizations. The relationship between the DoD and DOE is described and the division of responsibilities for weapon development as well as the coordinated planning and acquisition activities are reviewed. Execution of the RD T program at the nuclear weapons laboratories is outlined. 24 refs., 3 figs.

Otey, G.R.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Radiocesium Discharges and Subsequent Environmental Transport at the Major U.S. Weapons Production Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiocesium is one of the more prevalent radionuclides in the environment as a result of weapons production related atomic projects in the United States and the former Soviet Union. Radiocesium discharges during the 1950's account for a large fraction of the historical releases from U.S. weapons production facilities. Releases of radiocesium to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems during the early ,years of nuclear weapons production provided the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary studies on the transport mechanisms of this potentially hazardous radionuclide. The major U.S. Department of Energy facilities (Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina) are located in regions of the country that have different geographical characteristics. The facility siting provided diverse backgrounds for the development of an understanding of environmental factors contributing to the fate and transport of radiocesium. In this paper, we summarize the significant environmental releases of radiocesium in the early -years of weapons production and then discuss the historically significant transport mechanisms for r37Cs at the three facilities that were part of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex.

Garten, Jr. C.T.; Hamby, D.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

Restructuring the DOE Laboratory Complex to Advance Clean Energy, Environmental Sustainability, and a Global Future without Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Restructuring the DOE Laboratory Complex to Advance Clean Energy, Environmental Sustainability, and a Global Future without Nuclear Weapons - December Commission meeting

167

Candidate processes for diluting the {sup 235}U isotope in weapons-capable highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating options for rendering its surplus inventories of highly enriched uranium (HEU) incapable of being used to produce nuclear weapons. Weapons-capable HEU was earlier produced by enriching uranium in the fissile {sup 235}U isotope from its natural occurring 0.71 percent isotopic concentration to at least 20 percent isotopic concentration. Now, by diluting its concentration of the fissile {sup 235}U isotope in a uranium blending process, the weapons capability of HEU can be eliminated in a manner that is reversible only through isotope enrichment, and therefore, highly resistant to proliferation. To the extent that can be economically and technically justified, the down-blended uranium product will be made suitable for use as commercial reactor fuel. Such down-blended uranium product can also be disposed of as waste if chemical or isotopic impurities preclude its use as reactor fuel.

Snider, J.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Exploring the Possible Use of Information Barriers for future Biological Weapons Verification Regimes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a path forward for implementing information barriers in a future generic biological arms-control verification regime. Information barriers have become a staple of discussion in the area of arms control verification approaches for nuclear weapons and components. Information barriers when used with a measurement system allow for the determination that an item has sensitive characteristics without releasing any of the sensitive information. Over the last 15 years the United States (with the Russian Federation) has led on the development of information barriers in the area of the verification of nuclear weapons and nuclear components. The work of the US and the Russian Federation has prompted other states (e.g., UK and Norway) to consider the merits of information barriers for possible verification regimes. In the context of a biological weapons control verification regime, the dual-use nature of the biotechnology will require protection of sensitive information while allowing for the verification of treaty commitments. A major question that has arisen is whether - in a biological weapons verification regime - the presence or absence of a weapon pathogen can be determined without revealing any information about possible sensitive or proprietary information contained in the genetic materials being declared under a verification regime. This study indicates that a verification regime could be constructed using a small number of pathogens that spans the range of known biological weapons agents. Since the number of possible pathogens is small it is possible and prudent to treat these pathogens as analogies to attributes in a nuclear verification regime. This study has determined that there may be some information that needs to be protected in a biological weapons control verification regime. To protect this information, the study concludes that the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array may be a suitable technology for the detection of the genetic information associated with the various pathogens. In addition, it has been determined that a suitable information barrier could be applied to this technology when the verification regime has been defined. Finally, the report posits a path forward for additional development of information barriers in a biological weapons verification regime. This path forward has shown that a new analysis approach coined as Information Loss Analysis might need to be pursued so that a numerical understanding of how information can be lost in specific measurement systems can be achieved.

Luke, S J

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid system is subcritical, a LIFE engine can burn any fertile or fissile nuclear material, including unenriched natural or depleted U and SNF, and can extract a very high percentage of the energy content of its fuel resulting in greatly enhanced energy generation per metric ton of nuclear fuel, as well as nuclear waste forms with vastly reduced concentrations of long-lived actinides. LIFE engines could thus provide the ability to generate vast amounts of electricity while greatly reducing the actinide content of any existing or future nuclear waste and extending the availability of low cost nuclear fuels for several thousand years. LIFE also provides an attractive pathway for burning excess weapons Pu to over 99% FIMA (fission of initial metal atoms) without the need for fabricating or reprocessing mixed oxide fuels (MOX). Because of all of these advantages, LIFE engines offer a pathway toward sustainable and safe nuclear power that significantly mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizes nuclear waste. An important aspect of a LIFE engine is the fact that there is no need to extract the fission fuel from the fission blanket before it is burned to the desired final level. Except for fuel inspection and maintenance process times, the nuclear fuel is always within the core of the reactor and no weapons-attractive materials are available outside at any point in time. However, an important consideration when discussing proliferation concerns associated with any nuclear fuel cycle is the ease with which reactor fuel can be converted to weapons usable materials, not just when it is extracted as waste, but at any point in the fuel cycle. Although the nuclear fuel remains in the core of the engine until ultra deep actinide burn up is achieved, soon after start up of the engine, once the system breeds up to full power, several tons of fissile material is present in the fission blanket. However, this fissile material is widely dispersed in millions of fuel pebbles, which can be tagged as individual accountable items, and thus made difficult to diver

Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

NEW - DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

172

Waste component recycle, treatment, and disposal integrated demonstration (WeDID) nuclear weapon dismantlement activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the drivers in the dismantlement and disposal of nuclear weapon components is Envirorunental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. The primary regulatory driver for these components is the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Nuclear weapon components are heterogeneous and contain a number of hazardous materials including heavy metals, PCB`S, selfcontained explosives, radioactive materials, gas-filled tubes, etc. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment, Disposal and Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) is a Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) sponsored program. It also supports DOE Defense Program (DP) dismantlement activities. The goal of WeDID is to demonstrate the end-to-end disposal process for Sandia National Laboratories designed nuclear weapon components. One of the primary objectives of WeDID is to develop and demonstrate advanced system treatment technologies that will allow DOE to continue dismantlement and disposal unhindered even as environmental regulations become more stringent. WeDID is also demonstrating waste minimization techniques by recycling a significant weight percentage of the bulk/precious metals found in weapon components and by destroying the organic materials typically found in these components. WeDID is concentrating on demonstrating technologies that are regulatory compliant, are cost effective, technologically robust, and are near-term to ensure the support of DOE dismantlement time lines. The waste minimization technologies being demonstrated by WeDID are cross cutting and should be able to support a number of ERWM programs.

Wheelis, W.T.

1993-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Waste component recycle, treatment, and disposal integrated demonstration (WeDID) nuclear weapon dismantlement activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the drivers in the dismantlement and disposal of nuclear weapon components is Envirorunental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. The primary regulatory driver for these components is the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Nuclear weapon components are heterogeneous and contain a number of hazardous materials including heavy metals, PCB'S, selfcontained explosives, radioactive materials, gas-filled tubes, etc. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment, Disposal and Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) is a Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) sponsored program. It also supports DOE Defense Program (DP) dismantlement activities. The goal of WeDID is to demonstrate the end-to-end disposal process for Sandia National Laboratories designed nuclear weapon components. One of the primary objectives of WeDID is to develop and demonstrate advanced system treatment technologies that will allow DOE to continue dismantlement and disposal unhindered even as environmental regulations become more stringent. WeDID is also demonstrating waste minimization techniques by recycling a significant weight percentage of the bulk/precious metals found in weapon components and by destroying the organic materials typically found in these components. WeDID is concentrating on demonstrating technologies that are regulatory compliant, are cost effective, technologically robust, and are near-term to ensure the support of DOE dismantlement time lines. The waste minimization technologies being demonstrated by WeDID are cross cutting and should be able to support a number of ERWM programs.

Wheelis, W.T.

1993-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

174

Non Nuclear NTR Environmental Simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear Thermal Rockets or NTR's have been suggested as a propulsion system option for vehicles traveling to the moon or Mars. These engines are capable of providing high thrust at specific impulses at least twice that of today's best chemical engines. The performance constraints on these engines are mainly the result of temperature limitations on the fuel coupled with a limited ability to withstand chemical attack by the hot hydrogen propellant. To operate at maximum efficiency, fuel forms are desired which can withstand the extremely hot, hostile environment characteristic of NTR operation for at least several hours. The simulation of such an environment would require an experimental device which could simultaneously approximate the power, flow, and temperature conditions which a nuclear fuel element (or partial element) would encounter during NTR operation. Such a simulation would allow detailed studies of the fuel behavior and hydrogen flow characteristics under reactor like conditions to be performed. The goal of these simulations would be directed toward expanding the performance envelope of NTR engines over that which was demonstrated during the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs of the 1970's. Current planning calls for such a simulator to be constructed at the Marshall Space Flight Center over the coming year, and it is anticipated that it will be used in the future to evaluate a wide variety of fuel element designs and the materials of which they are constructed. This present work addresses the initial experimental objectives of the NTR simulator with regard to reproducing the fuel degradation patterns previously observed during the NERVA testing.

Emrich, William J. Jr. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, M.S. XD21, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

U.S. Army weapon systems human-computer interface style guide. Version 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A stated goal of the US Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIs) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of HCI design guidance documents. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA), now termed the Joint Technical Architecture-Army (JTA-A). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide, which resulted in the US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide Version 1. Based on feedback from the user community, DISC4 further tasked PNNL to revise Version 1 and publish Version 2. The intent was to update some of the research and incorporate some enhancements. This document provides that revision. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for the RT/NRT Army system domain across the weapon systems subdomains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each subdomain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their subdomains.

Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.; Donohoo, D.T.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

The role of the DOE weapons laboratories in a changing national security environment: CNSS papers No. 8, April 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contributions of the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons laboratories to the nation's security are reviewed in testimony before the Subcommittee on Procurement and Military Nuclear Systems of the House Armed Services Committee. Also presented are contributions that technology will make in maintaining the strategic balance through deterrence, treaty verification, and a sound nuclear weapons complex as the nation prepares for significant arms control initiatives. The DOE nuclear weapons laboratories can contribute to the broader context of national security, one that recognizes that military strength can be maintained over the long term only if it is built upon the foundations of economic strength and energy security. 9 refs.

Hecker, S.S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The PEACE PIPE: Recycling nuclear weapons into a TRU storage/shipping container  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes results of a contract undertaken by the National Conversion Pilot Project (NCPP) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to fabricate stainless steel ``pipe`` containers for use in certification testing at Sandia National Lab, Albuquerque to qualify the container for both storage of transuranic (TRU) waste at RFETS and other DOE sites and shipping of the waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). The paper includes a description of the nearly ten-fold increase in the amount of contained plutonium enabled by the product design, the preparation and use of former nuclear weapons facilities to fabricate the components, and the rigorous quality assurance and test procedures that were employed. It also describes how stainless steel nuclear weapons components can be converted into these pipe containers, a true ``swords into plowshare`` success story.

Floyd, D.; Edstrom, C. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp. (United States); Biddle, K.; Orlowski, R. [BNFL, Inc. (United States); Geinitz, R. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States); Keenan, K. [USDOE-RFFO (United States); Rivera, M. [Science Applications International Corp./LATA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The effects of using Cesium-137 teletherapy sources as a radiological weapon (dirty bomb)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While radioactive sources used in medical diagnosis do not pose a great security risk due to their low level of radioactivity, therapeutic sources are extremely radioactive and can presumably be used as a radiological weapon. Cobalt-60 and Cesium-137 sources are the most common ones used in radiotherapy with over 10,000 of such sources currently in use worldwide, especially in the developing world, which cannot afford modern accelerators. The present study uses computer simulations to investigate the effects of using Cesium-137 sources from teletherapy devices as a radiological weapon. Assuming a worst-case terrorist attack scenario, we estimate the ensuing cancer mortality, land contamination, evacuation area, as well as the relevant evacuation, decontamination, and health costs in the framework of the linear risk model. The results indicate that an attack with a Cesium-137 dirty bomb in a large metropolitan city (especially one that would involve several teletherapy sources) although would not cause any sta...

Liolios, Theodore

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Preliminary study on weapon grade uranium utilization in molten salt reactor miniFUJI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary study on weapon grade uranium utilization in 25MWth and 50MWth of miniFUJI MSR (molten salt reactor) has been carried out. In this study, a very high enriched uranium that we called weapon grade uranium has been employed in UF{sub 4} composition. The {sup 235}U enrichment is 90 - 95 %. The results show that the 25MWth miniFUJI MSR can get its criticality condition for 1.56 %, 1.76%, and 1.96% of UF{sub 4} with {sup 235}U enrichment of at least 93%, 90%, and 90%, respectively. In contrast, the 50 MWth miniFUJI reactor can be critical for 1.96% of UF{sub 4} with {sup 235}U enrichment of at smallest amount 95%. The neutron spectra are almost similar for each power output.

Aji, Indarta Kuncoro [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Waris, A., E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa No. 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Laboratory directed research and development on disposal of plutonium recovered from weapons. FY1994 final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project was conceived as a multi-year plan to study the use of mixed plutonium oxide-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel in existing nuclear reactors. Four areas of investigation were originally proposed: (1) study reactor physics including evaluation of control rod worth and power distribution during normal operation and transients; (2) evaluate accidents focusing upon the reduced control rod worth and reduced physical properties of PuO{sub 2}; (3) assess the safeguards required during fabrication and use of plutonium bearing fuel assemblies; and (4) study public acceptance issues associated with using material recovered from weapons to fuel a nuclear reactor. First year accomplishments are described. Appendices contain 2 reports entitled: development and validation of advanced computational capability for MOX fueled ALWR assembly designs; and long-term criticality safety concerns associated with weapons plutonium disposition.

Pitts, J.H.; Choi, J.S.

1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Literature survey of blast and fire effects of nuclear weapons on urban areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American literature of the past 30 years on fire and blast effects of nuclear weapons on urban areas has been surveyed. The relevant work is briefly sketched and areas where information is apparently lacking are noted. This report is intended to provide the basis for suggesting research priorities in the fire and blast effects area for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. It is also intended to provide entry into the literature for researchers. over 850 references are given.

Reitter, T.A.; McCallen, D.B.; Kang, S.W.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

NNSA Weapons Chief Participates in ROTC Day at Lawrence Livermore National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Weapons Chief

183

Modeling of the performance of weapons MOX fuel in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both the Russian Federation and the US are pursing mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel in light water reactors (LWRs) for the disposition of excess plutonium from disassembled nuclear warheads. Fuel performance models are used which describe the behavior of MOX fuel during irradiation under typical power reactor conditions. The objective of this project is to perform the analysis of the thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior of weapons MOX fuel pins under LWR conditions. If fuel performance analysis indicates potential questions, it then becomes imperative to assess the fuel pin design and the proposed operating strategies to reduce the probability of clad failure and the associated release of radioactive fission products into the primary coolant system. Applying the updated code to anticipated fuel and reactor designs, which would be used for weapons MOX fuel in the US, and analyzing the performance of the WWER-100 fuel for Russian weapons plutonium disposition are addressed in this report. The COMETHE code was found to do an excellent job in predicting fuel central temperatures. Also, despite minor predicted differences in thermo-mechanical behavior of MOX and UO{sub 2} fuels, the preliminary estimate indicated that, during normal reactor operations, these deviations remained within limits foreseen by fuel pin design.

Alvis, J.; Bellanger, P.; Medvedev, P.G.; Peddicord, K.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Gellene, G.I. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

North Korea's nuclear weapons program:verification priorities and new challenges.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive settlement of the North Korean nuclear issue may involve military, economic, political, and diplomatic components, many of which will require verification to ensure reciprocal implementation. This paper sets out potential verification methodologies that might address a wide range of objectives. The inspection requirements set by the International Atomic Energy Agency form the foundation, first as defined at the time of the Agreed Framework in 1994, and now as modified by the events since revelation of the North Korean uranium enrichment program in October 2002. In addition, refreezing the reprocessing facility and 5 MWe reactor, taking possession of possible weapons components and destroying weaponization capabilities add many new verification tasks. The paper also considers several measures for the short-term freezing of the North's nuclear weapon program during the process of negotiations, should that process be protracted. New inspection technologies and monitoring tools are applicable to North Korean facilities and may offer improved approaches over those envisioned just a few years ago. These are noted, and potential bilateral and regional verification regimes are examined.

Moon, Duk-ho (Korean Consulate General in New York)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Need for a Strong Science and Technology Program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex for the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper I argue for the need for a strong Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex as the basis for maintaining a credible deterrence capability. The current Nuclear Posture Review establishes a New Triad as the basis for the United States deterrence strategy in a changing security environment. A predictive science capability is at the core of a credible National Nuclear Weapons program in the 21st Century. In absence of nuclear testing, the certification of our current Nuclear Weapons relies on predictive simulations and quantification of the associated simulation uncertainties. In addition, a robust nuclear infrastructure needs an active research and development program that considers all the required nuclear scenarios, including new configurations for which there is no nuclear test data. This paper also considers alternative positions to the need for a Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons complex.

Garaizar, X

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

186

EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to relocate the Weapons Component Testing Facility from Building 450 to Building 207, both within Technical Area 16, at the U.S....

187

Opportunities exist for the diversion of weapons-usable material at the front end of the fuel cycle, during which  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, North Korea, Pakistan, and South Africa. (South Africa abandoned its nuclear weapons in 1991. Libya of setting up its own enrichment or spent-fuel treat- ment facilities is enormous. Countries with a new

Laughlin, Robert B.

188

Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Department's Excess Weapons Inventories and Selected Sensitive Equipment used by Protective Forces"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 11, 2001, the Department of Energy has, on several occasions, revised its security posture based on identified threats and adversaries. These revisions in security posture have driven Departmental sites to upgrade their defensive and tactical equipment. Subsequent changes in the perceived threats have, in some cases, led to a reduction in the need for certain types of weapons, thus creating a pool of surplus equipment. These surplus weapons could potentially be used by other Department sites and Federal law enforcement agencies. Recent Office of Inspector General reports have raised concerns with the adequacy of controls related to defensive and tactical equipment. For example, our report on Management Controls Over Defense Related High Risk Property (OAS-M-08-06, April 2008) found that administrative controls over certain defense related high risk property were not sufficient for providing accountability over these items. Because of prior reported weaknesses in controls over defensive and tactical equipment, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department and its contractors were properly managing excess weapons inventories and selected sensitive equipment used by protective forces. Our review disclosed that the Department was not always properly managing its inventories of excess weapons and selected sensitive equipment. We identified issues with the retention of unneeded weapons at many locations and with the identification and tracking of sensitive items. More specifically: Sites maintained large inventories of weapons that were no longer needed but had not been made available for use by either other Departmental sites or other Federal law enforcement agencies. For instance, at six of the locations included in our review we identified a total of 2,635 unneeded weapons with a total acquisition value of over $2.8 million that had not been officially declared as excess - an action that would have made them available for others to use. In addition; Sites were not always identifying, tracking and properly disposing of potentially high risk and sensitive equipment. In particular, we identified control weaknesses in this area related to weapons sights and scopes. These issues occurred because the Department did not have processes in place to properly manage excess inventories of weapons. In particular, the Department does not have requirements for ensuring timely declaration of excess weapons. Additionally, certain sites indicated that they were unwilling to give up excess weapons because of the possibility that they may be needed in the future. However, other sites had a need for some of these weapons and could have avoided purchasing them had they been made available through the excess screening process. Also, we found that the Department lacks clear guidance on the identification of high risk/sensitive equipment. Except for immaterial differences, we were able to locate and verify accountability over the items of defensive and tactical equipment we selected for review. Specifically, we took statistical samples of weapons, ammunition, and other related equipment and were able to verify their existence. While these accountability measures were noteworthy, additional action is necessary to strengthen controls over weapon and sensitive equipment management. Untimely declaration of excess weapons may result in an inefficient use of scarce Government resources. Similarly, if selected high risk/sensitive equipment is not properly categorized and tracked, accountability issues may occur. To address these issues, we made recommendations aimed at improving the management of these categories of defensive and tactical equipment.

None

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Baseline radionuclide concentrations in soils and vegetation around the proposed Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility and the Weapons Subsystems Laboratory at TA-16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preoperational environmental survey is required by the Department of Energy (DOE) for all federally funded research facilities that have the potential to cause adverse impacts on the environment. Therefore, in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, an environmental survey was conducted over the proposed sites of the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) and the Weapons Subsystems Laboratory (WSL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at TA-16. Baseline concentrations of tritium ({sup 3}H), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu) and total uranium were measured in soils, vegetation (pine needles and oak leaves) and ground litter. Tritium was also measured from air samples, while cesium ({sup 137}Cs) was measured in soils. The mean concentration of airborne tritiated water during 1987 was 3.9 pCi/m{sup 3}. Although the mean annual concentration of {sup 3}H in soil moisture at the 0--5 cm (2 in) soil depth was measured at 0.6 pCi/mL, a better background level, based on long-term regional data, was considered to be 2.6 pCi/mL. Mean values for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 218}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium in soils collected from the 0--5 cm depth were 1.08 pCi/g, 0.0014 pCi/g, 0.0325 pCi/g, and 4.01 {micro}g/g, respectively. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) needles contained higher values of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium than did leaves collected from gambel`s oak (Quercus gambelii). In contrast, leaves collected from gambel`s oak contained higher levels of {sup 137}Cs than what pine needles did.

Fresquez, P.R.; Ennis, M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Surplus weapons-grade plutonium: a resource for exploring and terraforming Mars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the end of the Cold War, greater than 100 metric tons (MT) of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) have become surplus to defense needs in the United States and the Former Soviet Union. This paper is a proposal for an option for WGPu disposition, i.e., use of the plutonium as a fuel for nuclear reactors for Mars exploration and eventual terraforming. WGPu was used in nuclear weapons because it has a much smaller critical mass than highly enriched uranium, allowing lighter weapons with consequent longer ranges. Similarly, WGPu reactors would also require smaller amounts of fuel to attain a critical mass, making the reactor much lighter overall and resulting in large savings in launch costs. The greater than 100 MT of WGPu would generate about 1000 billion kilowatt hours of heat energy, much of which could be converted into electricity. The waste heat would also be useful to a Martian outpost or colony. A potential way of getting the WGPu reactors into space is a large gas gun like that being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to orbit materials by achieving high velocity at the surface, greatly reducing launch costs and enhancing reliability. Reactor components would be launched on conventional rockets or space shuttles, the reactor fuel rods would be injected into orbit using the gas gun, and the reactor would be assembled in space. Implementation of this proposal would allow disposition of a serious, expensive problem on earth by removing the WGPu from the planet and simultaneously provide a very large energy resource for Mars exploration and terraforming.

Muscatello, A.C.; Houts, M.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Neutralization of chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction using nuclear methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these radioactive particles would be carried into the upper atmosphere and would undergo decay and fall to the earth very slowly. Thus, they would likely not pose an immcd(a(e danger to health, although there (s potential for a long-term hazard (Glasstone... the differences in results. This information could be used to validate the MCNP inodel so thai it can be used in future research in neutralization using nuclear devices. REFERENCFS Glasstone, S. and Dolan, P. J. , ed. The El'fects of Nuclear Weapons. 3rd...

McAffrey, Veronica Lynn

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

NONE

1991-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. Department ofTheEnergyWeaponsDepartment"ItOversight

194

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. of Energy, Office ofNuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to

195

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. of Energy, Office ofNuclear Weapons StrategyU.S.Department

196

Mobile Pit verification system design based on passive special nuclear material verification in weapons storage facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mobile 'drive by' passive radiation detection system to be applied in special nuclear materials (SNM) storage facilities for validation and compliance purposes has been designed through the use of computational modeling and new radiation detection methods. This project was the result of work over a 1 year period to create optimal design specifications to include creation of 3D models using both Monte Carlo and deterministic codes to characterize the gamma and neutron leakage out each surface of SNM-bearing canisters. Results were compared and agreement was demonstrated between both models. Container leakages were then used to determine the expected reaction rates using transport theory in the detectors when placed at varying distances from the can. A 'typical' background signature was incorporated to determine the minimum signatures versus the probability of detection to evaluate moving source protocols with collimation. This established the criteria for verification of source presence and time gating at a given vehicle speed. New methods for the passive detection of SNM were employed and shown to give reliable identification of age and material for highly enriched uranium (HEU) and weapons grade plutonium (WGPu). The finalized 'Mobile Pit Verification System' (MPVS) design demonstrated that a 'drive-by' detection system, collimated and operating at nominally 2 mph, is capable of rapidly verifying each and every weapon pit stored in regularly spaced, shelved storage containers, using completely passive gamma and neutron signatures for HEU and WGPu. This system is ready for real evaluation to demonstrate passive total material accountability in storage facilities. (authors)

Paul, J. N.; Chin, M. R.; Sjoden, G. E. [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 770 State St, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Report to Congress on stockpile reliability, weapon remanufacture, and the role of nuclear testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes two issues: (1) ''whether past warhead reliability problems demonstrate that nuclear explosive testing is needed to identify or to correct stockpile reliability,'' or (2) ''whether a program of stockpile inspection, nonnuclear testing, and remanufacture would be sufficient to deal with stockpile reliability problems.'' Chapter 1 examines the reasons for nuclear testing. Although the thrust of the request from Congressman Aspin et al., has to do with the need for nuclear testing as it relates to stockpile reliability and remanufacture, there are other very important reasons for nuclear testing. Since there has been increasing interest in the US Congress for more restrictive nuclear test limits, we have addressed the overall need for nuclear testing and the potential impact of further nuclear test limitations. Chapter 1 also summarizes the major conclusions of a recent study conducted by the Scientific and Academic Advisory Committee (SAAC) for the President of the University of California; the SAAC report is entitled, ''Nuclear Weapon Tests: The Role of the University of California-Department of Energy Laboratories.'' Chapter 2 presents a brief history of stockpile problems that involved post-deployment nuclear testing for their resolution. Chapter 3 addresses the problems involved in remanufacturing nuclear weapons, and Chapter 4 discusses measures that should be taken to prepare for possible future restrictive test limits.

Miller, G.H.; Brown, P.S.; Alonso, C.T.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Los Alamos neutron science center nuclear weapons stewardship and unique national scientific capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation gives an overview of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and its contributions to science and the nuclear weapons program. LANSCE is made of multiple experimental facilities (the Lujan Center, the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), the Ultra-Cold Neutron facility (UCN), the proton Radiography facility (pRad) and the Isotope Production Facility (IPF)) served by the its kilometer long linear accelerator. Several research areas are supported, including materials and bioscience, nuclear science, materials dynamics, irradiation response and medical isotope production. LANSCE is a national user facility that supports researchers worldwide. The LANSCE Risk Mitigation program is currently in progress to update critical accelerator equipment to help extend the lifetime of LANSCE as a key user facility. The Associate Directorate of Business Sciences (ADBS) plays an important role in the continued success of LANSCE. This includes key procurement support, human resource support, technical writing support, and training support. LANSCE is also the foundation of the future signature facility MARIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes).

Schoenberg, Kurt F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of thermonuclear-fusion energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of "points" highlighting the strategic-political and military-technical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and fo...

Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

High-value use of weapons-plutonium by burning in molten salt accelerator-driven subcritical systems or reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of thermal-spectrum molten-salt reactors and accelerator-driven subcritical systems to the destruction of weapons-return plutonium is considered from the perspective of deriving the maximum societal benefit. The enhancement of electric power production from burning the fertile fuel {sup 232}Th with the plutonium is evaluated. Also the enhancement of destruction of the accumulated waste from commercial nuclear reactors is considered using the neutron-rich weapons plutonium. Most cases examined include the concurrent transmutation of the long-lived actinide and fission product waste ({sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 126}Sn and {sup 79}Se).

Bowman, C.D.; Venneri, F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. This document is the bibliography.

Schultz, V. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA)); Schultz, S.C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA)); Robison, W.L. (ed.) (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Consequence modeling for nuclear weapons probabilistic cost/benefit analyses of safety retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The consequence models used in former studies of costs and benefits of enhanced safety retrofits are considered for (1) fuel fires; (2) non-nuclear detonations; and, (3) unintended nuclear detonations. Estimates of consequences were made using a representative accident location, i.e., an assumed mixed suburban-rural site. We have explicitly quantified land- use impacts and human-health effects (e.g. , prompt fatalities, prompt injuries, latent cancer fatalities, low- levels of radiation exposure, and clean-up areas). Uncertainty in the wind direction is quantified and used in a Monte Carlo calculation to estimate a range of results for a fuel fire with uncertain respirable amounts of released Pu. We define a nuclear source term and discuss damage levels of concern. Ranges of damages are estimated by quantifying health impacts and property damages. We discuss our dispersal and prompt effects models in some detail. The models used to loft the Pu and fission products and their particle sizes are emphasized.

Harvey, T.F.; Peters, L.; Serduke, F.J.D.; Hall, C.; Stephens, D.R.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

U.S. weapons-usable plutonium disposition policy: Implementation of the MOX fuel option  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive case study was conducted on the policy problem of disposing of US weapons-grade plutonium, which has been declared surplus to strategic defense needs. Specifically, implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel disposition option was examined in the context of national and international nonproliferation policy, and in contrast to US plutonium policy. The study reveals numerous difficulties in achieving effective implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option including unresolved licensing and regulatory issues, technological uncertainties, public opposition, potentially conflicting federal policies, and the need for international assurances of reciprocal plutonium disposition activities. It is believed that these difficulties can be resolved in time so that the implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option can eventually be effective in accomplishing its policy objective.

Woods, A.L. [ed.] [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Gonzalez, V.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Political Science

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Surplus weapons plutonium: Technologies for pit disassembly/conversion and MOX fuel fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will provide a description of the technologies involved in the disposition of plutonium from surplus nuclear weapon components (pits), based on pit disassembly and conversion and on fabrication of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for disposition through irradiation in nuclear reactors. The MOX/Reactor option is the baseline disposition plan for both the US and russian for plutonium from pits and other clean plutonium metal and oxide. In the US, impure plutonium in various forms will be converted to oxide and immobilized in glass or ceramic, surrounded by vitrified high level waste to provide a radiation barrier. A similar fate is expected for impure material in Russia as well. The immobilization technologies will not be discussed. Following technical descriptions, a discussion of options for monitoring the plutonium during these processes will be provided.

Toevs, J.W.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Environmental Radiation Dose Reconstruction for U.S. and Russian Weapons Production Facilities: Hanford and Mayak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Another way to look at Cold War legacies is to examine the major environmental releases that resulted from past operation of Cold War-related facilities for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. Examining these historical releases and the resultant radiation dose to individuals living near these facilities is called environmental dose reconstruction. Dose reconstructions have been performed or are underway at most large Cold War installations in the United States, such as the Hanford facility; several are also underway in other countries, such as at the Mayak facility in Russia. The efforts in the United States are mostly based on historical operating records and current conditions, which are used to estimate environmental releases, transport, and human exposure. The Russian efforts are largely based on environmental measurements and measurements of human subjects; environmental transport modelling, when conducted, is used to organize and validate the measurements. Past operation of Cold War-related facilities for the manufacture of nuclear weapons has resulted in major releases of radionuclides into the environment. Reconstruction of the historical releases and the resultant radiation dose to individuals in the public living near these facilities is called environmental dose reconstruction. Dose reconstructions have been performed or are underway at most large Cold War installations in the United States; several are also underway in other countries. The types of activity performed, the operating histories, and the radionuclide releases vary widely across the different facilities. The U.S. Hanford Site and the Russian Mayak Production Association are used here to illustrate the nature of the assessed problems and the range of approaches developed to solve them.

Ansbaugh, Lynn R.; Degteva, M. O.; Kozheurov, V. P.; Napier, Bruce A.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Vorobiova, M. I.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

Janeen Denise Robertson

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Cooperative measures to support the Indo-Pak Agreement Reducing Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2012, India and Pakistan reaffirmed the Agreement on Reducing the Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons. Despite a history of mutual animosity and persistent conflict between the two countries, this agreement derives strength from a few successful nuclear confidence building measures that have stood the test of time. It also rests on the hope that the region would be spared a nuclear holocaust from an accidental nuclear weapon detonation that might be misconstrued as a deliberate use of a weapon by the other side. This study brings together two emerging strategic analysts from South Asia to explore measures to support the Agreement and further develop cooperation around this critical issue. This study briefly dwells upon the strategic landscape of nuclear South Asia with the respective nuclear force management structures, doctrines, and postures of India and Pakistan. It outlines the measures in place for the physical protection and safety of nuclear warheads, nuclear materials, and command and control mechanisms in the two countries, and it goes on to identify the prominent, emerging challenges posed by the introduction of new weapon technologies and modernization of the respective strategic forces. This is followed by an analysis of the agreement itself leading up to a proposed framework for cooperative measures that might enhance the spirit and implementation of the agreement.

Mishra, Sitakanta; Ahmed, Mansoor

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Dose reduction through robotics and automation of nuclear weapons dismantlement and storage procedures at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the end of the Cold War and subsequent break up of the Soviet Union, the number of weapons in the nuclear stockpile now greatly exceeds any foreseeable future need (Quirck et al., 1993). To compensate for this excess, an estimated 20...

Thompson, David Andrew

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Plan offered to revive nukes. [US DOE would fabricate fuel from weapons for WNP-1 and 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses a new plan that would allow work to resume on two uncompleted nuclear power units in Washington state at a cost of $3.3 billion under an agreement with the federal government. If approved, the Department of Energy would fabricate plutonium from US and former Soviet Union weapons into fuel.

Not Available

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): Naval Weapons Station, operable unit 2, Yorktown, VA, September 29, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents a determination that the No Further Remedial Action Decision with Institutional Controls is sufficient to protect human health and the environment for Operable Unit No. II (OU II), Site 16, the West Road Landfill and Site Screening Area (SSA) 16, the Building 402 Metal Disposal Area at the Naval Weapons Station (WPNSTA) Yorktown (Site 16/SSA 16).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

American perspectives on security : energy, environment, nuclear weapons, and terrorism : 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report findings from an Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone among the American public in mid-2010 on US energy and environmental security. Key areas of investigation include public perceptions shaping the context for debate about a comprehensive national energy policy, and what levels of importance are assigned to various prospective energy technologies. Additionally, we investigate how public views on global climate change are evolving, how the public assesses the risks and benefits of nuclear energy, preferences for managing used nuclear fuel, and public trust in sources of scientific and technical information. We also report findings from a national Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone in mid-2010 on public views of the relevance of US nuclear weapons today, support for strategic arms control, and assessments of the potential for nuclear abolition. Additionally, we analyze evolving public views of the threat of terrorism, assessments of progress in the struggle against terrorism, and tolerance for intrusive antiterror policies. Where possible, findings from each survey are compared with previous surveys in this series for analyses of trends.

Herron, Kerry Gale (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Silva, Carol L. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the radiological burden due to the battle-field use of circa 400 tons of depleted-uranium munitions in Iraq (and of about 40 tons in Yugoslavia) is comparable to that arising from the hypothetical battle-field use of more than 600 kt (respectively 60 kt) of high-explosive equivalent pure-fusion fourth-generation nuclear weapons. Despite the limited knowledge openly available on existing and future nuclear weapons, there is sufficient published information on their physical principles and radiological effects to make such a comparison. In fact, it is shown that this comparison can be made with very simple and convincing arguments so that the main technical conclusions of the paper are undisputable -- although it would be worthwhile to supplement the hand calculations presented in the paper by more detailed computer simulations in order to consolidate the conclusions and refute any possible objections.

Gsponer, A; Vitale, B; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Vitale, Bruno

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Implications of Thermonuclear-Fusion Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of “points ” highlighting the strategic-political and militarytechnical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and foster further nuclear proliferation throughout the world. The safety and environmental problems related to the operation of largescale fusion facilities such as ITER (which contain massive amounts of hazardous and/or radioactive materials such as tritium, lithium, and beryllium, as well as neutron-activated structural materials) are not addressed in this paper.

André Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Modeling Techniques Used to Analyze Safety of Payloads for Generic Missile Type Weapons Systems During an Indirect Lightning Strike  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During lightning strikes buildings and other structures can act as imperfect Faraday Cages, enabling electromagnetic fields to be developed inside the facilities. Some equipment stored inside these facilities may unfortunately act as antenna systems. It is important to have techniques developed to analyze how much voltage, current, or energy dissipation may be developed over valuable components. In this discussion we will demonstrate the modeling techniques used to accurately analyze a generic missile type weapons system as it goes through different stages of assembly. As work is performed on weapons systems detonator cables can become exposed. These cables will form different monopole and loop type antenna systems that must be analyzed to determine the voltages developed over the detonator regions. Due to the low frequencies of lightning pulses, a lumped element circuit model can be developed to help analyze the different antenna configurations. We will show an example of how numerical modeling can be used to develop the lumped element circuit models used to calculate voltage, current, or energy dissipated over the detonator region of a generic missile type weapons system.

Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Crull, E W; Brown Jr., C G

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

215

The U.S.-Russian joint studies on using power reactors to disposition surplus weapon plutonium as spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, the US and the Russian Federation completed an initial joint study of the candidate options for the disposition of surplus weapons plutonium in both countries. The options included long term storage, immobilization of the plutonium in glass or ceramic for geologic disposal, and the conversion of weapons plutonium to spent fuel in power reactors. For the latter option, the US is only considering the use of existing light water reactors (LWRs) with no new reactor construction for plutonium disposition, or the use of Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) heavy water reactors. While Russia advocates building new reactors, the cost is high, and the continuing joint study of the Russian options is considering only the use of existing VVER-1000 LWRs in Russia and possibly Ukraine, the existing BN-60O fast neutron reactor at the Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant in Russia, or the use of the Canadian CANDU reactors. Six of the seven existing VVER-1000 reactors in Russia and the eleven VVER-1000 reactors in Ukraine are all of recent vintage and can be converted to use partial MOX cores. These existing VVER-1000 reactors are capable of converting almost 300 kg of surplus weapons plutonium to spent fuel each year with minimum nuclear power plant modifications. Higher core loads may be achievable in future years.

Chebeskov, A.; Kalashnikov, A. [State Scientific Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering; Bevard, B.; Moses, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pavlovichev, A. [State Scientific Center, Moscow (Russian Federation). Kurchatov Inst.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. Primary sources of information in preparing this bibliography were bibliographies on Oceania, citations in published papers, CIS Index and Abstracts, Monthly Catalog of United States Government Publications, Nuclear Science Abstracts, Energy Research Abstracts, numerous bibliographies on radiation ecology, and suggestions by many individuals whom we contacted. One goal in this bibliography is to include complete documentation of the source of congressional reports and other government-related publications. In addition, page numbers for material in this bibliography are provided in parentheses when the subject matter of a book or document is not restricted to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands.

Robison, W.L. (ed.) (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Schultz, V. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA)); Schultz, S.C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The distribution and history of nuclear weapons related contamination in sediments from the Ob River, Siberia as determined by isotopic ratios of Plutonium, Neptunium, and Cesium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the sources and transport of nuclear weapons related contamination in the Ob River region, Siberia. In addition to being one of the largest rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean, the bulk of the former ...

Kenna, Timothy C

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium...

219

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"To prevent accidents and inadvertent or unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear weapons and nuclear explosives. In conjunction with the Department of Defense (DoD), to protect the public health and...

220

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Light water reactor mixed-oxide fuel irradiation experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is sponsoring and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading an irradiation experiment to test mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium. In this multiyear program, sealed capsules containing MOX fuel pellets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The planned experiments will investigate the utilization of dry-processed plutonium, the effects of WG plutonium isotopics on MOX performance, and any material interactions of gallium with Zircaloy cladding.

Hodge, S.A.; Cowell, B.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A review of "European Weapons and Armour From the Renaissance to the Industrial Revolution" by Ewart Oakeshott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arrangements of subject matter. Ewart Oakeshott. European Weapons and Armour From the Renaissance to the Industrial Revolution. Rochester, NY: #14;e Boydell Press, 2012. Xviii + 288 pp. + c. illus. $28.45. Review by #31;#8;#18;#28;#25;#8; #7;. #19...;#23;#25;#6;#24;#30;, #7;#24;#29;#20;#6;#24;#7;#31;#25;#26; #17;#24;#30;#30;#31;#6;#31;-#25;#24;#17;#11;#27;#22;#30;#30;#31;, #7;#8;. Oakeshott has written an engaging book of great use to scholars and students of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. #14;e book...

Furgol, Edward M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

On the public perception of the risks from nuclear weapons: Would oralloy be more acceptable than plutonium?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We technologists generally only address risk magnitudes in our analyses, although other studies have found nineteen additional dimensions for the way the public perceives risk. These include controllability, voluntariness, catastrophic potential, and trust in the institution putting forth the risk. We and the geneml public use two different languages, and to understand what their concerns are, we need to realize that the culture surrounding nuclear weapons is completely alien to the general public. Ultimately, the acceptability of a risk is a values question, not a technical question. For most of the risk dimensions, the public would perceive no significant difference between using oralloy and plutonium. This does not mean that the suggested design change should not be proposed, only that the case for, or against, it be made comprehensively using the best information available today. The world has changed: the ending of the cold war has decreased the benefit of nuclear weapons in the minds of the public and the specter of Chernobyl has increased the perceived risks of processes that use radioactive materials. Our analyses need to incorporate the lessons pertinent to this newer world.

Kunsman, D.M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

On the public perception of the risks from nuclear weapons: Would oralloy be more acceptable than plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We technologists generally only address risk magnitudes in our analyses, although other studies have found nineteen additional dimensions for the way the public perceives risk. These include controllability, voluntariness, catastrophic potential, and trust in the institution putting forth the risk. We and the geneml public use two different languages, and to understand what their concerns are, we need to realize that the culture surrounding nuclear weapons is completely alien to the general public. Ultimately, the acceptability of a risk is a values question, not a technical question. For most of the risk dimensions, the public would perceive no significant difference between using oralloy and plutonium. This does not mean that the suggested design change should not be proposed, only that the case for, or against, it be made comprehensively using the best information available today. The world has changed: the ending of the cold war has decreased the benefit of nuclear weapons in the minds of the public and the specter of Chernobyl has increased the perceived risks of processes that use radioactive materials. Our analyses need to incorporate the lessons pertinent to this newer world.

Kunsman, D.M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A comparison of the additional protocols of the five nuclear weapon states and the ensuing safeguards benefits to international nonproliferation efforts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the 6 January 2009 entry into force of the Additional Protocol by the United States of America, all five declared Nuclear Weapon States that are part of the Nonproliferation Treaty have signed, ratified, and put into force the Additional Protocol. This paper makes a comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the five Additional Protocols in force by the five Nuclear Weapon States with respect to the benefits to international nonproliferation aims. This paper also documents the added safeguards burden to the five declared Nuclear Weapon States that these Additional Protocols put on the states with respect to access to their civilian nuclear programs and the hosting of complementary access activities as part of the Additional Protocol.

Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leitch, Rosalyn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS & FACILITIES AT BNL: BLIP & NSLS II Peter Wanderer Superconducting Magnet). Current user: LBNE ­ materials for Project X. · Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment ­ Abandoned gold mine

McDonald, Kirk

228

Technical advantages and political necessity of public involvement in environmental remediation: The case of the U.S. and Russian weapons complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental remediation is an enormous challenge for the governments of the US, Russia, and other states in eastern and central Europe. Historically, governments have withheld issues related to nuclear weapons from public policy debate. As a result of revelations about human health impacts and environmental contamination, serious credibility problems exist for managers of weapons facilities. However, public involvement can contribute to better definition of problems, to identification of a range of potential solutions, and to increased public acceptance of outcomes. Decision makers can maximize the benefits of public involvement by integrating specific processes into their environmental remediation project planning and management.

Shideler, J.C. [JK Research Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Examination of the proposed conversion of the U.S. Navy nuclear fleet from highly enriched Uranium to low enriched Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons creates a loophole that allows a non-nuclear-weapon country to avoid international safeguards governing fissile materials if it claims that the materials will be used ...

McCord, Cameron (Cameron Liam)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Examination of the proposed conversion of the U.S. Navy nuclear fleet from highly enriched Uranium to low enriched Uranium .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??.The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons creates a loophole that allows a non-nuclear-weapon country to avoid international safeguards governing fissile materials if it… (more)

McCord, Cameron (Cameron Liam)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Toward a more rigorous application of margins and uncertainties within the nuclear weapons life cycle : a Sandia perspective.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the conceptual framework that is being used to define quantification of margins and uncertainties (QMU) for application in the nuclear weapons (NW) work conducted at Sandia National Laboratories. The conceptual framework addresses the margins and uncertainties throughout the NW life cycle and includes the definition of terms related to QMU and to figures of merit. Potential applications of QMU consist of analyses based on physical data and on modeling and simulation. Appendix A provides general guidelines for addressing cases in which significant and relevant physical data are available for QMU analysis. Appendix B gives the specific guidance that was used to conduct QMU analyses in cycle 12 of the annual assessment process. Appendix C offers general guidelines for addressing cases in which appropriate models are available for use in QMU analysis. Appendix D contains an example that highlights the consequences of different treatments of uncertainty in model-based QMU analyses.

Klenke, Scott Edward; Novotny, George Charles; Paulsen Robert A., Jr.; Diegert, Kathleen V.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Physical and Computational Modeling for Chemical and Biological Weapons Airflow Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need for information on dispersion and infiltration of chemical and biological agents in complex building environments. A recent collaborative study conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Bechtel Corporation Research and Development had the objective of assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for simulation of flow around complicated buildings through a comparison of experimental and numerical results. The test facility used in the experiments was INEEL’s unique large Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) flow system. The CFD code used for modeling was Fluent, a widely available commercial flow simulation package. For the experiment, a building plan was selected to approximately represent an existing facility. It was found that predicted velocity profiles from above the building and in front of the building were in good agreement with the measurements.

McEligot, Donald Marinus; Mc Creery, Glenn Ernest; Pink, Robert John; Barringer, C.; Knight, K. J.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Evaluation of weapons-grade mixed oxide fuel performance in U.S. Light Water Reactors using COMETHE 4D release 23 computer code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The COMETHE 4D Release 23 computer code was used to evaluate the thermal, chemical and mechanical performance of weapons-grade MOX fuel irradiated under U.S. light water reactor typical conditions. Comparisons were made to and UO? fuels exhibited...

Bellanger, Philippe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

The proliferation of surface-to-surface missiles and weapons of mass destruction and the emerging role of tactical missile defenses in Israel, Syria and Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proliferation of surface-to-surface missiles (SSMs) and weapons of mass destruction has become one of the more serious security threats to post-Cold War peace. This dissertation examines the history of proliferation within the Middle East by focusing primarily on three trend-setting countries: Israel, Syria and Iran. Building on the theoretical framework established by Lewis A. Dunn and Herman Kahn, this dissertation examines why and how Israel, Syria and Iran have procured SSMs and weapons of mass destruction. The author also includes an analysis of tactical missile defenses and their impact on proliferation trends. The final section investigates the numerous arms control treaties and supplier cartels designed to halt or slow the pace of unconventional weapons proliferation. In many instances, Iraq serves as the primary example of how well-intentioned nonproliferation efforts have fallen short. This dissertation reveals some of the major flaws in these regimes while proposing necessary improvements if nonproliferation efforts are to succeed. In conclusion, this dissertation returns to the expanded Dunn-Kahn nuclear proliferation model. By categorizing the various reasons as to why countries choose to procure unconventional weapons, a more successful nonproliferation policy can be constructed. However, this dissertation warns that without political solutions to long-term disputes in the region, western-imposed nonproliferation regimes will fail. Thus, nonproliferation policies must be accompanied or preceded by a vigorous diplomatic and political effort to solve seemingly intractable differences.

Clark, T.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Leveraging U.S. nuclear weapons policy to advance U.S. nonproliferation goals : implications of major theories of international relations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National policymakers are currently considering a dilemma of critical importance to the continued security of the United States: how can U.S. nuclear weapons policies be leveraged to benefit U.S. nuclear nonproliferation goals in the near-term, without sacrificing U.S. national security? In its role supporting U.S. nuclear weapons policy, Sandia National Laboratories has a responsibility to provide objective technical advice to support policy deliberations on this question. However, to best fulfill this duty Sandia must have a broader understanding of the context of the problem. To help develop this understanding, this paper analyzes the two predominant analytical perspectives of international relations theory to explore their prescriptions for how nuclear weapons and nonproliferation policies interact. As lenses with which to view and make sense of the world, theories of international relations must play a crucial role in framing the trade-offs at the intersection of the nuclear weapons and nonproliferation policy domains. An analysis of what these theories suggest as courses of action to leverage nuclear weapons policies to benefit nonproliferation goals is then offered, with particular emphasis on where the policy prescriptions resulting from the respective theories align to offer near-term policy changes with broad theoretical support. These policy prescriptions are then compared to the 2001 Nuclear Posture Review to understand what the theories indicate policymakers may have gotten right in their dealing with the nuclear dilemma, and where they may have gone wrong. Finally, a brief international relations research agenda is proposed to help address the dilemma between nuclear deterrence and nuclear nonproliferation policies, with particular emphasis on how such an agenda can best support the needs of the policy community and a potential 'all things nuclear' policy deliberation and decision-support framework.

Walter, Andrew

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

TRIO experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

MEMS Reliability: Infrastructure, Test Structures, Experiments, and Failure Modes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The burgeoning new technology of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) shows great promise in the weapons arena. We can now conceive of micro-gyros, micro-surety systems, and micro-navigators that are extremely small and inexpensive. Do we want to use this new technology in critical applications such as nuclear weapons? This question drove us to understand the reliability and failure mechanisms of silicon surface-micromachined MEMS. Development of a testing infrastructure was a crucial step to perform reliability experiments on MEMS devices and will be reported here. In addition, reliability test structures have been designed and characterized. Many experiments were performed to investigate failure modes and specifically those in different environments (humidity, temperature, shock, vibration, and storage). A predictive reliability model for wear of rubbing surfaces in microengines was developed. The root causes of failure for operating and non-operating MEMS are discussed. The major failure mechanism for operating MEMS was wear of the polysilicon rubbing surfaces. Reliability design rules for future MEMS devices are established.

TANNER,DANELLE M.; SMITH,NORMAN F.; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; EATON,WILLIAM P.; HELGESEN,KAREN SUE; CLEMENT,J. JOSEPH; MILLER,WILLIAM M.; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; PETERSON,KENNETH A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

How training and experience affect the benefits of autonomy in a dirty-bomb experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dirty-bomb experiment conducted at the INL is used to evaluate the effectiveness and suitability of three different modes of robot control. The experiment uses three distinct user groups to understand how participants’ background and training affect the way in which they use and benefit from autonomy. The results show that the target mode, which involves automated mapping and plume tracing together with a point and click tasking tool, provides the best performance for each group. This is true for objective performance such as source detection and localization accuracy as well as subjective measures such as perceived workload, frustration and preference. The best overall performance is achieved by the Explosive Ordinance Disposal group which has experience in both robot teleoperation and dirty bomb response. The user group that benefits least from autonomy is the Nuclear Engineers that have no experience with either robot operation or dirty bomb response. The group that benefits most from autonomy is the Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Response Team that has extensive experience related to the task, but no robot training.

David J. Bruemmer; Curtis W. Nielsen; David I. Gertman

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Laboratory measurement verification of laser hazard analysis for miles weapon simulators used in force on force exercises.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the change in the batteries used with the Small Arm Laser Transmitters (SALT) from 3-volts dc to 3.6-volts dc and changes to SNL MILES operating conditions, the associated laser hazards of these units required re-evaluation to ensure that the hazard classification of the laser emitters had not changed as well. The output laser emissions of the SNL MILES, weapon simulators and empire guns, used in Force-On-Force (FOF) training exercises, was measured in accordance to the ANSI Standard Z136.4-2005, ''Recommended Practice for Laser Safety Measurements for Hazard Evaluation''. The laser hazard class was evaluated in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, ''Safe Use of Lasers'', using ''worst'' case conditions associated with these MILES units. Laser safety assessment was conducted in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2005, ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The laser hazard evaluation of these MILES laser emitters was compared to and supersedes SAND Report SAND2002-0246, ''Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components'', which used ''actual'' operating conditions of the laser emitters at the time of its issuance.

Augustoni, Arnold L.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Management approaches for environmental restoration at the U.S. Department of Energy Weapons Complex, Savannah River Site: A case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the management approaches for environmental restoration at the US Department of Energy Weapons Complex. A brief chronology of environmental restoration complex-wide is presented. This chronology, which focuses on the changing climate at DOE facilities, is then keyed to activities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina, USA. Past, present, and future environmental restoration activities at SRS are discussed, reflecting the change in emphasis at the site.

Johnson, S.V. [USDOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, SC (United States); Mayberry, J.J. [Ebasco Environmental Div., Augusta, GA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

experiment, collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Departamento Energias Renovables, Plataforma Solar de Almeria, E-04080 Almeria, Spain Departamento de Lenguajes y ca. factor 10 less complex then imaging solar Cerenkov exp.:smaller cost, fewer systematic errors #12; 5 Rainer Plaga The GRAAL experiment, ECRS Lodz July 2000 Location of GRAAL " Plataforma Solar de

242

Monitoring under the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement : the prospects of antineutrino detection as an IAEA verification metric for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After the end of World War II, the world entered an even more turbulent period as it faced the beginnings of the Cold War, during which the prospect of mutually assured destruction between the world's largest nuclear weapon ...

Copeland, Christopher Michael, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex.

Sype, T.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fischer, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS, AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT - 11052  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical Separation Facilities (canyons).

Bergren, C.; Flora, M.; Belencan, H.

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

245

ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

Bergren, C

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

weapons material protection  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

that gradually transfers responsibility for maintaining the security systems to Russia.

247

Nuclear Weapons Latency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................... 14 Fig. 4. Conceptual flow of Latency tool Petri Net simulation. ........................................ 18 Fig. 5. Overall flow of Latency Tool. .............................................................................. 19 Fig. 6. Latency... density function bound simulations. .............. 43 xi Fig. 14. The expansion of one transition into a series of transitions. A simple Petri net with (a) 1 transition T1, (b) T1 replaced by two transitions in series, T1a and T1b, both half...

Sweeney, David J

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

National Security, Weapons Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries &NST DivisionNationalEnergySafetyNational

249

Sandia's Nuclear Weapons Mission  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for USMaterialstheterahertz sources andwindBRUSandia's Nuclear

250

National Laboratory's Weapons Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleetEngineeringAnnual ReportNational Lab Day -drawsAbout

251

Modeling coupled blast/structure interaction with Zapotec, benchmark calculations for the Conventional Weapon Effects Backfill (CONWEB) tests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling the response of buried reinforced concrete structures subjected to close-in detonations of conventional high explosives poses a challenge for a number of reasons. Foremost, there is the potential for coupled interaction between the blast and structure. Coupling enters the problem whenever the structure deformation affects the stress state in the neighboring soil, which in turn, affects the loading on the structure. Additional challenges for numerical modeling include handling disparate degrees of material deformation encountered in the structure and surrounding soil, modeling the structure details (e.g., modeling the concrete with embedded reinforcement, jointed connections, etc.), providing adequate mesh resolution, and characterizing the soil response under blast loading. There are numerous numerical approaches for modeling this class of problem (e.g., coupled finite element/smooth particle hydrodynamics, arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian methods, etc.). The focus of this work will be the use of a coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) solution approach. In particular, the development and application of a CEL capability within the Zapotec code is described. Zapotec links two production codes, CTH and Pronto3D. CTH, an Eulerian shock physics code, performs the Eulerian portion of the calculation, while Pronto3D, an explicit finite element code, performs the Lagrangian portion. The two codes are run concurrently with the appropriate portions of a problem solved on their respective computational domains. Zapotec handles the coupling between the two domains. The application of the CEL methodology within Zapotec for modeling coupled blast/structure interaction will be investigated by a series of benchmark calculations. These benchmarks rely on data from the Conventional Weapons Effects Backfill (CONWEB) test series. In these tests, a 15.4-lb pipe-encased C-4 charge was detonated in soil at a 5-foot standoff from a buried test structure. The test structure was composed of a reinforced concrete slab bolted to a reaction structure. Both the slab thickness and soil media were varied in the test series. The wealth of data obtained from these tests along with the variations in experimental setups provide ample opportunity to assess the robustness of the Zapotec CEL methodology.

Bessette, Gregory Carl

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Contracting in the national interest: Establishing the legal framework for the interaction of science, government, and industry at a nuclear weapons laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, the nation's nuclear ordnance laboratory, is operated on a no-profit, no-fee basis by ATandT Technologies, Inc., as a prime contractor for the Department of Energy. This unique arrangement began in 1949 when President Harry Truman personally requested that ATandT assume management of the nuclear weapons laboratory as a service in the national interest. The story of how this unusual relationship came about makes for an interesting chapter in the annals of US legal and institutional history. This report describes the historical background, political negotiations, and prime contract provisos that established the legal framework for the Labs.

Furman, N.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Chemistry and Materials Science Weapons-Supporting Research and Laboratory-Directed Research and Development. Second half progress report, FY 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research are surface research, uranium research, physics and processing of metals, energetic materials. Group study areas included strength of Al and Al-Mg/alumina bonds, advanced synchrotron radiation study of materials, and theory, modeling, and computation. Individual projects were life prediction for composites and thermoelectric materials with exceptional figures of merit. The laboratory-directed R and D include director`s initiatives (aerogel-based electronic devices, molecular levels of energetic materials), individual projects, and transactinium institute studies. An author index is provided.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Environmental assessment for the purchase of Russian low enriched uranium derived from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States is proposing to purchase from the Russian Federation low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) resulting from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union. The purchase would be accomplished through a proposed contract requiring the United States to purchase 15,250 metric tons (tonnes) of LEU (or 22,550 tonnes of UF{sub 6}) derived from blending 500 metric tones uranium (MTU) of HEU from nuclear warheads. The LEU would be in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and would be converted from HEU in Russia. The United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) is the entity proposing to undertake the contract for purchase, sale, and delivery of the LEU from the Russian Federation. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is negotiating the procedure for gaining confidence that the LEU is derived from HEU that is derived from dismantled nuclear weapons (referred to as ``transparency),`` and would administer the transparency measures for the contract. There are six environments that could potentially be affected by the proposed action; marine (ocean); US ports of entry; truck or rail transportation corridors; the Portsmouth GDP; the electric power industry; and the nuclear fuel cycle industry. These environmental impacts are discussed.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thermo-Mechanical Response of a TRISO Fuel Particle in a Fusion/Fission Engine for Incineration of Weapons Grade Plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Fusion-based (LIFE) engine is an advanced energy concept under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LIFE engine could be used to drive a subcritical fission blanket with fertile or fissile fuel. Current LIFE engine designs envisages fuel in pebble bed form with TRISO (tristructural isotropic) particles embedded in a graphite matrix, and pebbles flowing in molten salt Flibe (2LiF+BeF{sub 2}) coolant at T {approx} 700C. Weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) fuel is an attractive option for LIFE engine involving the achievement of high fractional burnups in a short lifetime frame. However, WGPu LIFE engine operating conditions of high neutron fast fluence, high radiation damage, and high Helium and Hydrogen production pose severe challenges for typical TRISO particles. The thermo-mechanical fuel performance code HUPPCO (High burn-Up fuel Pebble Performance COde) currently under development accounts for spatial and time dependence of the material elastic properties, temperature, and irradiation swelling and creep mechanisms. In this work, some aspects of the thermo-mechanical response of TRISO particles used for incineration of weapons grade fuel in LIFE engine are analyzed. Preliminary results show the importance of developing reliable high-fidelity models of the performance of these new fuel designs and the need of new experimental data relevant to WGPu LIFE conditions.

Caro, M; DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, A

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

256

ENERGY PARTITIONING, ENERGY COUPLING (EPEC) EXPERIMENTS AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy-partitioning, energy-coupling (EPEC) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will simultaneously measure the coupling of energy into both ground shock and air-blast overpressure from a laser-driven target. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of seismic and air-blast phenomena caused by a nuclear weapon. In what follows, we discuss the motivation for our investigation and briefly describe NIF. Then, we introduce the EPEC experiments, including diagnostics, in more detail.

Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Dunlop, W H; Compton, S M; Kane, J O; Mirkarimi, P B; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

257

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-Q1FY14 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

fundamental properties of material, plasma, radiation, fusion ignition, and thermonuclear burn at temperatures and pressures relevant to those obtained in a nuclear weapon....

258

Military and diplomatic roles and options for managing and responding to the proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction. Final report: Program on Stability and the Offense/Defense Relationship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The March seminar, ``Military and Diplomatic Roles and Options`` for managing and responding to proliferation, featured three presentations: the military and diplomatic implications of preemptive force as a counterproliferation option; an in-depth assessment of the threat posed by biological weapons; and, a new proposed US counterproliferation policy.

Hallenbeck, R.A.; Gill, J.M.; Murray, B.L.

1993-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

259

The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was initiated in 1974 to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites throughout the United States that were part of the Nation's early atomic weapons and energy programs during the 1940  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, investigate, and clean up or control sites throughout the United States that were part of the Nation's early atomic weapons and energy programs during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. Activities at the sites were performed by the Manhattan Engineer District or under the Atomic Energy Commission. Both were predecessors

US Army Corps of Engineers

260

Chlorine-36 in Water, Snow, and Mid-Latitude Glacial Ice of North America: Meteoric and Weapons-Tests Production in the Vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of chlorine-36 (36Cl) were made for 64 water, snow, and glacial-ice and -runoff samples to determine the meteoric and weapons-tests-produced concentrations and fluxes of this radionuclide at mid-latitudes in North America. The results will facilitate the use of 36Cl as a hydrogeologic tracer at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This information was used to estimate meteoric and weapons-tests contributions of this nuclide to environmental inventories at and near the INEEL. The data presented in this report suggest a meteoric source 36Cl for environmental samples collected in southeastern Idaho and western Wyoming if the concentration is less than 1 x 10 7 atoms/L. Additionally, concentrations in water, snow, or glacial ice between 1 x 10 7 and 1 x 10 8 atoms/L may be indicative of a weapons-tests component from peak 36Cl production in the late 1950s. Chlorine-36 concentrations between 1 x 10 8 and 1 x 10 9 atoms/L may be representative of re-suspension of weapons-tests fallout airborne disposal of 36Cl from the INTEC, or evapotranspiration. It was concluded from the water, snow, and glacial data presented here that concentrations of 36Cl measured in environmental samples at the INEEL larger than 1 x 10 9 atoms/L can be attributed to waste-disposal practices.

L. DeWayne; J. R. Green (USGS); S. Vogt, P. Sharma (Purdue University); S. K. Frape (University of Waterloo); S. N. Davis (University of Arizona); G. L. Cottrell (USGS)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Closing the circle on the splitting of the atom: The environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production in the United States and what the Department of Energy is doing about it  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the grand scheme of things we are a little more than halfway through the cycle of splitting the atom for weapons purposes. If we visualize this historic cycle as the full sweep of a clockface, at zero hour we would find the first nuclear chain reaction by Enrico Fermi, followed immediately by the Manhattan Project and the explosion of the first atomic bombs. From two o`clock until five, the United States built and ran a massive industrial complex that produced tens of thousands of nuclear weapons. At half past, the Cold War ended, and the United States shut down most of its nuclear weapons factories. The second half of this cycle involves dealing with the waste and contamination from nuclear weapons production - a task that had, for the most part, been postponed into the indefinite future. That future is now upon us. Dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War is in many ways as big a challenge for us today as the building of the atomic bomb was for the Manhattan Project pioneers in the 1940s. Our challenges are political and social as well as technical, and we are meeting those challenges. We are reducing risks, treating wastes, developing new technologies, and building democratic institutions for a constructive debate on our future course.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Radioactive Waste Management in Non-Nuclear Countries - 13070  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper challenges internationally accepted concepts of dissemination of responsibilities between all stakeholders involved in national radioactive waste management infrastructure in the countries without nuclear power program. Mainly it concerns countries classified as class A and potentially B countries according to International Atomic Energy Agency. It will be shown that in such countries long term sustainability of national radioactive waste management infrastructure is very sensitive issue that can be addressed by involving regulatory body in more active way in the infrastructure. In that way countries can mitigate possible consequences on the very sensitive open market of radioactive waste management services, comprised mainly of radioactive waste generators, operators of end-life management facilities and regulatory body. (authors)

Kubelka, Dragan; Trifunovic, Dejan [SORNS, Frankopanska 11, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)] [SORNS, Frankopanska 11, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A historical application of social amplification of risk model: Economic impacts of risk events at nuclear weapons facilities?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public perceptions of risk have proven to be a critical barrier to the federal government`s extensive, decade-long, technical and scientific effort to site facilities for the interim storage and permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The negative imagery, fear, and anxiety that are linked to ``nuclear`` and ``radioactive`` technologies, activities, and facilities by the public originate from the personal realities and experiences of individuals and the information they receive. These perceptions continue to be a perplexing problem for those responsible for making decisions about federal nuclear waste management policies and programs. The problem of understanding and addressing public perceptions is made even more difficult because there are decidedly different opinions about HLW held by the public and nuclear industry and radiation health experts.

Metz, W.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Lessons learned from commercial experience with nuclear plant decontamination to safe storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has successfully performed decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) on many production reactors it. DOE now has the challenge of performing D&D on a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe-storage status before conducting D&D-for perhaps as much as 20 yr. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and transition to D&D. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this paper are directly applicable to transitioning the DOE Weapons Complex.

Fischer, S.R.; Partain, W.L.; Sype, T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present status of double beta decay experiments are reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments, NEMO-3 and CUORICINO, are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments are considered. In these experiments sensitivity for the effective neutrino mass will be on the level of (0.1-0.01) eV.

A. S. Barabash

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/16: The Potential of Technology for the Control of Small Weapons: Applications in Developing Countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For improving the control of small arms, technology provides many possibilities. Present and future technical means are described in several areas. With the help of sensors deployed on the ground or on board aircraft, larger areas can be monitored. Using tags, seals, and locks, important objects and installations can be safeguarded better. With modern data processing and communication systems, more information can be available, and it can be more speedily processed. Together with navigation and transport equipment, action can be taken faster and at greater range. Particular considerations are presented for cargo control at roads, seaports, and airports, for monitoring designated lines, and for the control of legal arms. By starting at a modest level, costs can be kept low, which would aid developing countries. From the menu of technologies available, systems need to be designed for the intended application and with an understanding of the local conditions. It is recommended that states start with short-term steps, such as acquiring more and better radio transceivers, vehicles, small aircraft, and personal computers. For the medium term, states should begin with experiments and field testing of technologies such as tags, sensors, and digital communication equipment.

ALTMANN, JURGEN

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

A. S. Barabash

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

268

DOE plutonium disposition study: Analysis of existing ABB-CE Light Water Reactors for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core reactivity and basic fuel management calculations were conducted on the selected reactors (with emphasis on the System 80 units as being the most desirable choice). Methods used were identical to those reported in the Evolutionary Reactor Report. From these calculations, the basic mission capability was assessed. The selected reactors were studied for modification, such as the addition of control rod nozzles to increase rod worth, and internals and control system modifications that might also be needed. Other system modifications studied included the use of enriched boric acid as soluble poison, and examination of the fuel pool capacities. The basic geometry and mechanical characteristics, materials and fabrication techniques of the fuel assemblies for the selected existing reactors are the same as for System 80+. There will be some differences in plutonium loading, according to the ability of the reactors to load MOX fuel. These differences are not expected to affect licensability or EPA requirements. Therefore, the fuel technology and fuel qualification sections provided in the Evolutionary Reactor Report apply to the existing reactors. An additional factor, in that the existing reactor availability presupposes the use of that reactor for the irradiation of Lead Test Assemblies, is discussed. The reactor operating and facility licenses for the operating plants were reviewed. Licensing strategies for each selected reactor were identified. The spent fuel pool for the selected reactors (Palo Verde) was reviewed for capacity and upgrade requirements. Reactor waste streams were identified and assessed in comparison to uranium fuel operations. Cost assessments and schedules for converting to plutonium disposition were estimated for some of the major modification items. Economic factors (incremental costs associated with using weapons plutonium) were listed and where possible under the scope of work, estimates were made.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Biodiversity conservation and the extinction of experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fostering support for conserva- tion, some forms of `education' might have the opposite effect. Entrepreneur an effective motivator [4]. Failure to engender broad-based support might also be a function to identify correctly an automatic weapon by its report than they are a bird by its call [6]. Such examples

Miller, James R.

270

Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M.ExtracellularBradbury ScienceAntibacterialBrendan M.Brent

271

Experiment Safety Assurance Package for Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in an Average Power Position (I-24) in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fissile Material Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan details a series of test irradiations designed to investigate the use of weapons-grade plutonium in MOX fuel for light water reactors (LWR) (Cowell 1996a, Cowell 1997a, Thoms 1997a). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons-derived test fuel contains small amounts of gallium (about 2 parts per million). A concern exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel and into the clad, inducing embrittlement. For preliminary out-of-pile experiments, Wilson (1997) states that intermetallic compound formation is the principal interaction mechanism between zircaloy cladding and gallium. This interaction is very limited by the low mass of gallium, so problems are not expected with the zircaloy cladding, but an in-pile experiment is needed to confirm the out-of-pile experiments. Ryskamp (1998) provides an overview of this experiment and its documentation. The purpose of this Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP) is to demonstrate the safe irradiation and handling of the mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) Fuel Average Power Test (APT) experiment as required by Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) 3.9.1 (LMITCO 1998). This ESAP addresses the specific operation of the MOX Fuel APT experiment with respect to the operating envelope for irradiation established by the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO 1997a). Experiment handling activities are discussed herein.

J. M . Ryskamp; R. C. Howard; R. C. Pedersen; S. T. Khericha

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Irish Potato Fertilizer Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO 101 January, 1908. ish Potato Fertilizer Experiments - Postoffice, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS OFFICERS. GOVERNING BOARD. (Board of Directors... was sc Be Irish Potato Fl nents W. S. Hotchkiss and E. J. Kyle. e fertilizer work with the Irish potato at Troupe was first planned fall of 1902. The results which were gotten upon harvesting the the spring of 1903 were so opposed, especially...

Hotchkiss, W.S.; Kyle, E. J. (Edwin Jackson)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Double Beta Decay Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present, neutrinoless double beta decay is perhaps the only experiment that can tell us whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. Given the significance of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}, there is a widespread interest for these rare event studies employing a variety of novel techniques. This paper describes the current status of DBD experiments. The Indian effort for an underground NDBD experiment at the upcoming INO laboratory is also presented.

Nanal, Vandana [Dept. of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

274

Principal Associate Director - Weapons Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentations Presentations926Innovation|Science,

275

Weapons Quality Assurance Qualification Standard  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradleyBudget Water PowerLast Saturday |the5-2008

276

Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtectiveWaste toWe Visit| National

277

AIR FORCE SPECIAL WEAPONS CENTER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March_ ,'I- i.(

278

Conference: Synergy Between Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kaxiras (Harvard) Synopsis ­ Society's ceaseless demand for clean, renewable energy resources on rapidly developing areas of nanoscale computation, will hold a conference on energy research, experimentAn NNIN/C Conference: Synergy Between Experiment and Computation in Energy ­ Looking to 2030. Yu

Heller, Eric

279

Undergraduate reactor control experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise.

Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 232}Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of {sup 235}U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving {sup 233}U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

(Acts adopted under Title V of the Treaty on European Union) COUNCIL COMMON POSITION 2005/329/PESC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

element in the further deve- lopment of nuclear energy applications for peaceful purposes. (2) On 17 to the Verification Agreement between the Non-Nuclear-Weapon States of the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION, Having regard to the Treaty on European Union

Sussex, University of

283

The Neutron EDM Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron EDM experiment has played an important part over many decades in shaping and constraining numerous models of CP violation. This review article discusses some of the techniques used to calculate EDMs under various theoretical scenarios, and highlights some of the implications of EDM limits upon such models. A pedagogical introduction is given to the experimental techniques employed in the recently completed ILL experiment, including a brief discussion of the dominant systematic uncertainties. A new and much more sensitive version of the experiment, which is currently under development, is also outlined.

P. G. Harris

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

Simulated pion photoproduction experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction: In this paper, I will be assessing the capabilities of the Neutral Meson Spectrometer (NMS) detector in a planned experiment at the High Intensity Gamma Source at Duke University. I will review the relevant ...

Howe, Ethan (Ethan Gabriel Grief)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

General relativity and experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

T. Damour

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Corporate Operating Experience Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program helps to prevent the recurrence of significant adverse events/trends by sharing performance information, lessons learned and good practices across the DOE complex.

287

The MAJORANA Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MAJORANA collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment, an R&D effort that will field approximately 40kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR.

The MAJORANA Collaboration

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Majorana Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Keillor, M. E.; Kephart, J. D.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F. T. III [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Back, H. O. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bergevin, M.; Chan, Y.-D.; Detwiler, J. A.; Loach, J. C. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); and others

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

The MAJORANA Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, John; Wolfe, B. A.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY11-4Q FINAL ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

fundamental properties of material, plasma, radiation, fusion ignition, and thermonuclear burn at temperatures and pressures relevant to those obtained in a nuclear weapon....

291

2012-12-06 Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY12-4Q ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

fundamental properties of material, plasma, radiation, fusion ignition, and thermonuclear burn at temperatures and pressures relevant to those obtained in a nuclear weapon....

292

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY12-1Q v5 ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

fundamental properties of material, plasma, radiation, fusion ignition, and thermonuclear burn at temperatures and pressures relevant to those obtained in a nuclear weapon....

293

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY13-4Q final ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

fundamental properties of material, plasma, radiation, fusion ignition, and thermonuclear burn at temperatures and pressures relevant to those obtained in a nuclear weapon....

294

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY12-2Q (Final) ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

fundamental properties of material, plasma, radiation, fusion ignition, and thermonuclear burn at temperatures and pressures relevant to those obtained in a nuclear weapon....

295

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY12-3Qv2 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

fundamental properties of material, plasma, radiation, fusion ignition, and thermonuclear burn at temperatures and pressures relevant to those obtained in a nuclear weapon....

296

Quarterly SSP Experiment Summary-FY13-1Q 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

fundamental properties of material, plasma, radiation, fusion ignition, and thermonuclear burn at temperatures and pressures relevant to those obtained in a nuclear weapon....

297

Dulye Leadership Experience The Ultimate Professional Development Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experience Do YOU have what it takes to join the team? Find out more at dle.dulye.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DulyeLeadershipExperience Twitter: DLE4SU #12;Dulye Leadership Experience Program Overview Dulye Leadership Experience The Dulye Leadership Experience (DLE) is a full scholarship, professional development program for Syracuse University

Crowston, Kevin

298

AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

Depken, J.C.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A demonstration mobility experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corporation, Albuquerque& New Nhxico& for his assl. stance and advice in the preparation of the crystslsl snd my wife, Ellen, who corrected gram&asr& typed, proofread& and offered sncouragesmnt throughout the comple- tion of this thesis, I I I 8 I w... Shockley Haynes mobil. ty experiment. Tp Fig, 2. Sketch of oscilloscope trace from asr1y version of tha Shoo'klay Hagrnes momlity experiment, drift toward the eollsotor point with e velocity~? whereMLO the h ~ ability of a boles Ths Current tlsw...

Martin, Howard Lawrence

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The MAJORANA Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

Guiseppe, V.E. [Univ S Dakota; Keller, C. [Univ S Dakota; Mei, D-M [Univ S Dakota; Perevozchikov, O. [Univ S Dakota; Perumpilly, G. [Univ S Dakota; Thomas, K. [Univ S Dakota; Xiang, W. [Univ S Dakota; Zhang, C. [Univ S Dakota; Aalseth, C.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Aguayo, E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Ely, J. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Fast, J.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hoppe, E.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hossbach, T.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Keillor, M. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kephart, J.D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kouzes, R. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Miley, H.S. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Mizouni, L. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Myers, A.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Reid, D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Amman, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Bergevin, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Chan, Y-D [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Detwiler, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Loach, J.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Martin, R.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Poon, A.W.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Prior, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Yaver, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, F.T. III [University of South Carolina; Creswick, R. [University of South Carolina; Farach, H. [University of South Carolina; Mizouni, L. [University of South Carolina; Avignone, Frank Titus [ORNL; Bertrand Jr, Fred E [ORNL; Capps, Gregory L [ORNL; Cooper, Reynold J [ORNL; Radford, David C [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Wilkerson, John F [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Yu, Chang-Hong [ORNL; Back, H.O. [University of North Carolina; Leviner, L. [North Carolina State University; Young, A.R. [North Carolina State University; Back (et al.), H.O. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC; Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Hong, H. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Howard, S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Medlin, D. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Sobolev, V. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Barabash, A.S. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Konovalov, S.I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Vanyushin, I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Yumatov, V. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Barbeau, P.S. [University of Chicago; Collar, J.I. [University of Chicago; Fields, N. [University of Chicago; Boswell (et al.), M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brudanin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Egorov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Gusey, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Kochetov, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Timkin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Yakushev, E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bugg, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Efremenko, M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Dept Phys, Seattle, WA; Busch, M. [Duke University; Esterline, J. [Duke University; Swift, G. [Duke University; Tornow, W. [Duke University/TUNL; Ejiri, H. [Osaka University; Hazama, R. [Osaka University; Nomachi, M. [Osaka University; Shima, T. [Osaka University; Finnerty (et al.), P. [University of North Carolina; et al.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The OLYMPUS Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collected over two running periods in 2012. This paper provides details on the accelerator, target, detectors, and operation of the experiment.

R. Milner; D. K. Hasell; M. Kohl; U. Schneekloth; N. Akopov; R. Alarcon; V. A. Andreev; O. Ates; A. Avetisyan; D. Bayadilov; R. Beck; S. Belostotski; J. C. Bernauer; J. Bessuille; F. Brinker; B. Buck; J. R. Calarco; V. Carassiti; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; N. D'Ascenzo; R. De Leo; J. Diefenbach; T. W. Donnelly; K. Dow; G. Elbakian; D. Eversheim; S. Frullani; Ch. Funke; G. Gavrilov; B. Gläser; N. Görrissen; J. Hauschildt; B. S. Henderson; Ph. Hoffmeister; Y. Holler; L. D. Ice; A. Izotov; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; J. Kelsey; D. Khaneft; P. Klassen; A. Kiselev; A. Krivshich; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; D. Lenz; S. Lumsden; Y. Ma; F. Maas; H. Marukyan; O. Miklukho; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; Y. Naryshkin; C. O'Connor; R. Perez Benito; R. Perrino; R. P. Redwine; D. Rodríguez Pińeiro; G. Rosner; R. L. Russell; A. Schmidt; B. Seitz; M. Statera; A. Thiel; H. Vardanyan; D. Veretennikov; C. Vidal; A. Winnebeck; V. Yeganov

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

303

FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Majorana Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in Ge-76. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

V. E. Guiseppe; for the Majorana Collaboration

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

ATA beam director experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes beam director elements for an experiment at the Advanced Test Accelerator. The elements described include a vernier magnet for beam aiming, an achromat magnet, and an isolation system for the beam interface. These components are built at small scale for concept testing. (JDH)

Lee, E.P.; Younger, F.C.; Cruz, G.E.; Nolting, E.

1986-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Majorana Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

Aalseth, Craig E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Bai, Xinhua; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hong, H.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Medlin, D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perevozchikov, O.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Reid, Douglas J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Ronquest, M. C.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, V.; Zhang, C.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

POLARIZED TARGET EXPERIMENT AT FERMILAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Experiment 61 at Fermilab, which is a large collaborationBernie Sandler, From From Fermilab. Alan Jonckheere andTARGET EXPERIMENT AT FERMILAB Owen Chamberlain January 1977

Chamberlain, O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Gross decontamination experiment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Electronics for Satellite Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tracking detector for the LAT science instrument on the GLAST mission is an example of a large-scale particle detection system built primarily by particle physicists for space flight within the context of a NASA program. The design and fabrication model in most ways reflected practice and experience from particle physics, but the quality assurance aspects were guided by NASA. Similarly, most of the electronics in the LAT as a whole were designed and built by staff at a particle physics lab. This paper reports on many of the challenges and lessons learned in the experience of designing and building the tracking detector and general LAT electronics for use in the NASA GLAST mission.

Johnson, Robert P.; /UC, Santa Cruz

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

The OLYMPUS Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collect...

Milner, R; Kohl, M; Schneekloth, U; Akopov, N; Alarcon, R; Andreev, V A; Ates, O; Avetisyan, A; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Belostotski, S; Bernauer, J C; Bessuille, J; Brinker, F; Buck, B; Calarco, J R; Carassiti, V; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; D'Ascenzo, N; De Leo, R; Diefenbach, J; Donnelly, T W; Dow, K; Elbakian, G; Eversheim, D; Frullani, S; Funke, Ch; Gavrilov, G; Gläser, B; Görrissen, N; Hauschildt, J; Henderson, B S; Hoffmeister, Ph; Holler, Y; Ice, L D; Izotov, A; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Kelsey, J; Khaneft, D; Klassen, P; Kiselev, A; Krivshich, A; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lenz, D; Lumsden, S; Ma, Y; Maas, F; Marukyan, H; Miklukho, O; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Naryshkin, Y; O'Connor, C; Benito, R Perez; Perrino, R; Redwine, R P; Pińeiro, D Rodríguez; Rosner, G; Russell, R L; Schmidt, A; Seitz, B; Statera, M; Thiel, A; Vardanyan, H; Veretennikov, D; Vidal, C; Winnebeck, A; Yeganov, V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

Depken, J.C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ``as run``; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

Depken, J.C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

2169 steel waveform experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe - phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mm-thick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

APT radionuclide production experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium ({sup 3}H, a heavy isotope of hydrogen) is produced by low energy neutron-induced reactions on various elements. One such reaction is n+{sup 3}He {yields}>{sup 3}H+{sup 1}H in which {sup 3}He is transmuted to tritium. Another reaction, which has been used in reactor production of tritium, is the n+{sup 6}Li {yields}> {sup 3}H+{sup 4}He reaction. Accelerator Production of Tritium relies on a high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy protons reacting with a heavy nucleus produce a shower of low-energy neutrons and a lower-mass residual nucleus. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides produced in the spallation target for two reasons. From an engineering point of view, one must understand short-lived isotopes that may contribute to decay heat. From a safety viewpoint, one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects due to accidental dispersion during operation. The authors have performed an experiment to measure the production of radioisotopes in stopping-length W and Pb targets irradiated by a 800 MeV proton beam, and are comparing the results to values obtained from calculations using LAHET and MCNP. The experiment was designed to pay particular attention to the short half-life radionuclides, which have not been previously measured. In the following, they present details of the experiment, explain how they analyzed the data and obtain the results, how they perform the calculations, and finally, how the experimental data agree with the calculations.

Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D. [and others

1994-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fundamental experiments in velocimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One can understand what velocimetry does and does not measure by understanding a few fundamental experiments. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is an interferometer that will produce fringe shifts when the length of one of the legs changes, so we might expect the fringes to change whenever the distance from the probe to the target changes. However, by making PDV measurements of tilted moving surfaces, we have shown that fringe shifts from diffuse surfaces are actually measured only from the changes caused by the component of velocity along the beam. This is an important simplification in the interpretation of PDV results, arising because surface roughness randomizes the scattered phases.

Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hull, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shinas, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Water Vapor Experiment Concludes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition3 Water Vapor Experiment Concludes The

317

BNL | Active ATF Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsToolsBES ReportsExperiment Start-up ATFScienceActive

318

BNL | Completed ATF Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsToolsBES ReportsExperiment Start-upCFN People

319

Sharing Smart Grid Experiences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smart Grid Experiences through Performance Feedback

320

The majorana experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MAJORANA Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, MAJORANA aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype DEMONSTRATOR module are presented. Our proposed method uses the well-established technique of searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in high purity Ge-diode radiation detectors that play both roles of source and detector. The use of P-PC Ge detectors present advances in background rejection and a Significantly lower energy threshold than conventional Ge detector technologies. The lower energy threshold opens up a broader and exciting physics program including searches for dark matter and axions concurrent with the double-beta decay search. The DEMONSTRATOR should establish that the backgrounds are low enough to justify scaling to tonne-scale experiment, probe the neutrino effective mass region above 100 meV, and search the low energy region with a sensitivity to dark matter. The DEMONSTRATOR will be sited at the 4850-ft level (4200 m.w.e) of the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake and preparations for construction are currently underway.

Rielage, Keith R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boswell, Melissa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gehman, Victor M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kidd, Mary F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Roque, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ronquest, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Harry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steele, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Well-characterized open pool experiment data and analysis for model validation and development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four Well-Characterized Open Pool fires were conducted by Fire Science and Technology Department. The focus of the Well-Characterized Open Pool fire series was to provide environmental information for open pool fires on a physics first principal basis. The experiments measured the burning rate of liquid fuel in an open pool and the resultant heat flux to a weapon-sized object and the surrounding environment with well-characterized boundary and initial conditions. Results presented in this report include a general description of test observation (pre- and post-test), wind measurements, fire plume topology, average fuel recession and heat release rates, and incident heat flux to the pool and to the calorimeters. As expected, results of the experiments show a strong correlation between wind conditions, fuel vaporization (mass loss) rate, and incident heat flux to the fuel and ground surface and calorimeters. Numerical fire simulations using both temporally- and spatially-dependant wind boundary conditions were performed using the Vulcan fire code. Comparisons of data to simulation predictions showed similar trends; however, simulation-predicted incident heat fluxes were lower than measured.

Sundberg, David W.; Brown, Alexander L.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Disposition of transuranic residues from plutonium isentropic compression experiment (Pu-ice) conducted at Z machine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1992, the U.S. Congress passed legislation to discontinue above- and below-ground testing of nuclear weapons. Because of this, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must rely on laboratory experiments and computer-based calculations to verify the reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Z machine was developed by the DOE to support its science-based approach to stockpile stewardship. SNL/NM researchers also use the Z machine to test radiation effects on various materials in experiments designed to mimic nuclear explosions. Numerous components, parts, and materials have been tested. These experiments use a variety of radionuclides; however, plutonium (Pu) isotopes with greater than ninety-eight percent enrichment are the primary radionuclides used in the experiments designed for stockpile stewardship. In May 2006, SNL/NM received authority that the Z Machine Isentropic Compression Experiments could commence. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided the plutonium targets and loaded the target assemblies, which were fabricated by SNL/NM. LANL shipped the loaded assemblies to SNL/NM for Z machine experiments. Three experiments were conducted from May through July 2006. The residues from each experiment, which weighed up to 913 pounds, were metallic and packaged into a respective 55-gallon drum each. Based on a memorandum of understanding between the two laboratories, LANL provides the plutonium samples and the respective radio-isotopic information. SNL/NM conducts the experiments and provides temporary storage for the drums until shipment to LANL for final waste certification for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. This paper presents a comprehensive approach for documenting generator knowledge for characterization of waste in cooperation with scientists at the two laboratories and addresses a variety of topics such as material control and accountability, safeguards of material, termination of safeguards for eventual shipment from SNL/NM to LANL, associated approvals from DOE-Carlsbad Field Office, which governs WIPP and various notifications. It portrays a comprehensive approach needed for successful completion of a complex project between two national laboratories.

Goyal, Kapil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; French, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphrey, Betty J [WESTON SOLUTIONS INC.; Gluth, Jeffry [SNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE experiment reports: 1990 Run Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This year was the third in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each six-month LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred thirty-four proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic nature to the Laboratory. Our definition of beam availability is when the proton current from the PSR exceeds 50% of the planned value. The PSR ran at 65{mu}A current (average) at 20 Hz for most of 1990. All of the scheduled experiments were performed and experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods.

DiStravolo, M.A. (comp.)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

February 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to maintain its aging stockpile. Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear testing experience Do new nuclear weapons designers receive the training needed to...

325

The Tokamak Physics Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) [Nevins {ital et} {ital al}., {ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion}, Wuerzburg (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1992), Vol. 3, p. 279] is to develop the scientific basis for an economically competitive and continuously operating tokamak fusion power source. This complements the primary mission of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ITER Document Ser. No. 18 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991)], the demonstration of ignition and long-pulse burn, and the integration of nuclear technologies. The TPX program is focused on making the demonstration power plant that follows ITER as compact and attractive as possible, and on permitting ITER to achieve its ultimate goal of steady-state operation. This mission of TPX requires the development of steady-state regimes with high beta, good confinement, and a high fraction of a self-driven bootstrap current. These regimes must be compatible with plasma stability, strong heat-flux dispersion in the divertor region, and effective particle control.

Davidson, R.C.; Goldston, R.J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Neilson, G.H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Thomassen, K.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ultrafast gas switching experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluation of the DHCE Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE) experiment was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during cycle 12, which was completed in 1992. The purpose of the experiment was to enhance helium generation in vanadium alloys to simulate fusion reactor helium-to-dpa ratios with a target goal of 4-5 appm He/dpa. The Fusion Materials Science Program is considering mounting another experiment in hopes of gathering additional data on the effect of helium on the mechanical and physical properties of vanadium structural materials. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was assigned the task of evaluating the feasibility of conducting another DHCE experiment by carefully evaluating the results obtained of the first DHCE experiment. This report summarizes the results of our evaluation and presents recommendations for consideration by the Materials Science Coordinators Organization.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Baldwin, David L.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Future Cosmic Microwave Background Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarise some aspects of experiments currently being built or planned, and indulge in wild speculation about possibilities on the more distant horizon.

Mark Halpern; Douglas Scott

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

329

Storage and disposition of weapons usable fissile materials (FMD) PEIS: Blending of U-233 to {lt}12% or {lt}5% enrichment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Data report, Draft: Version 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium-233 (U-233), a uranium isotope, is a fissionable material capable of fueling nuclear reactors or being utilized in the manufacturing of nuclear weapons. As such, it is controlled as a special nuclear material. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) currently store the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) supply of unirradiated U-233 fuel materials. Irradiated U-233 is covered by the national spent nuclear fuel (SNF) program and is not in the scope of this report. The U-233 stored at ORNL is relatively pure uranium oxide in the form of powder or monolithic solids. This material is currently stored in stainless steel canisters of variable lengths measuring about 3 inches in diameter. The ORNL material enrichment varies with some material containing considerable amounts of U-235. The INEL material is fuel from the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Program and consists of enriched uranium and thorium oxides in zircaloy cladding. The DOE inventory of U-233 contains trace quantities of U-232, and daughter products from the decay of U-232 and U-233, resulting in increased radioactivity over time. These increased levels of radioactivity generally result in the need for special handling considerations.

Shaber, E.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1992 run cycle. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This year was the fifth in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory, examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred sixty-seven proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic interest to the Laboratory; six experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods. Oversubscription for instrument beam time by a factor of three was evident with 839 total days requested and only 371 available for allocation.

DiStravolo, M.A. [comp.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Experiments in Physics Physics 1291  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Conservation of Energy 97 1-9 Standing Waves 105 1-10 Specific Heat and Mechanical Equivalent of Heat 115 #12;#12;Introduction 1-0 General Instructions 1 Purpose of the Laboratory The laboratory experiments described in this manual are an important part of your physics course. Most of the experiments are designed to illustrate

Columbia University

333

Work Experience Guidance for Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Work Experience Guidance for Managers When approached with a request for work experience, managers. Any queries regarding CRB checks should be directed to your designated HR Manager. When a work any work, paid or unpaid: Before 7am or after 7pm For more than two hours on a school day or Sunday

334

DHS Research Experience Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I learned a great deal during my summer internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). I plan to continue a career in research, and I feel that my experience at LLNL has been formative. I was exposed to a new area of research, as part of the Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) group, and I had the opportunity to work on projects that I would not have been able to work on anywhere else. The projects both involved the use of a novel mass spectrometer that was developed at LLNL, so I would not have been able to do this research at any other facility. The first project that Zachary and I worked on involved using SPAMS to detect pesticides. The ability to rapidly detect pesticides in a variety of matrices is applicable to many fields including public health, homeland security, and environmental protection. Real-time, or near real-time, detection of potentially harmful or toxic chemical agents can offer significant advantages in the protection of public health from accidental or intentional releases of harmful pesticides, and can help to monitor the environmental effects of controlled releases of pesticides for pest control purposes. The use of organophosphate neurotoxins by terrorists is a possibility that has been described; this is a legitimate threat, considering the ease of access, toxicity, and relatively low cost of these substances. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) has successfully been used to identify a wide array of chemical compounds, including drugs, high explosives, biological materials, and chemical warfare agent simulants. Much of this groundbreaking work was carried out by our group at LLNL. In our work, we had the chance to show that SPAMS fulfills a demonstrated need for a method of carrying out real-time pesticide detection with minimal sample preparation. We did this by using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer to obtain spectra of five different pesticides. Pesticide samples were chosen to represent four common classes of pesticides that are currently used in the US. Permethrin (a pyrethrin insecticide), dichlorvos and malathion (organophosphates), imidacloprid (a chloronicotinyl pesticide), and carbaryl (a carbamate) were selected for analysis. Samples were aerosolized either in water (using a plastic nebulizer) or in ethanol (using a glass nebulizer), and the particles entered the SPAMS instrument through a focusing lens stack. The particles then passed through a stage with three tracking lasers that were used to determine each particle's velocity. This velocity was used to calculate when to fire a desorption/ionization (D/I) laser in order to fragment the particle for analysis in a dual polarity time of flight mass spectrometer. Signals were digitized, and then analyzed using LLNL-developed software. We obtained chemical mass spectral signatures for each pesticide, and assigned peaks to the mass spectra based on our knowledge of the pesticides chemical structures. We then proved the robustness of our detection method by identifying the presence of pesticides in two real-world matrices: Raid{trademark} Ant Spray and a flea collar. To sample these, we simply needed to direct aerosolized particles into the SPAMS instrument. The minimal sample preparation required makes SPAMS very attractive as a detector. Essentially, we were able to show that SPAMS is a reliable and effective method for detecting pesticides at extremely low concentrations in a variety of matrices and physical states. The other project that I had the opportunity to be a part of did not involve data collection in the lab; it consisted of analyzing a large amount of data that had already been collected. We got to look at data collected over the course of about two months, when the SPAMS instrument was deployed to a public place. The machine sampled the air and collected spectra for over two months, storing all the spectra and associated data; we then looked at an approximately two-month subset of this data to search for patterns in the types of particles being detected. Essentially, we we

Venkatachalam, V

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

335

Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience: Applying Results, Reaching Beyond Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience: Applying Results,...

336

New Safety and Technical Challenges and Operational Experience on the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Safety and Technical Challenges and Operational Experience on the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

337

Modeling Warm Dense Matter Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Center (NERSC) at LBNL and has been shown to scale well to thousands of CPUs. New surface tension models that are being implemented and applied to WDM experiments. Some of...

338

Essays in macroeconomics and experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation consists of four chapters on empirical and experimental macroeconomics and other experimental topics. Chapter 1 uses a laboratory experiment to test the predictions of a dynamic global game designed to ...

Shurchkov, Olga

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Maintenance FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insulation Enclosure Remote Maintenance Module FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM describes the status of the configuration development and the integration of the major subsystem components vessel structural stiffness, this configuration makes use of the cooling jacket as nuclear shielding

340

DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order institutes a DOE wide program for the management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and facilitate the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Cancels DOE O 210.2.

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

GCFR thermal-hydraulic experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal-hydraulic experimental studies performed and planned for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) core assemblies are described. The experiments consist of basic studies performed to obtain correlations, and bundle experiments which provide input for code validation and design verification. These studies have been performed and are planned at European laboratories, US national laboratories, Universities in the US, and at General Atomic Company

Schlueter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Dalle Donne, M.; Gat, U.; Fenech, H.; Hanson, D.; Hudina, M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

OSI Passive Seismic Experiment at the Former Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-site inspection (OSI) is one of the four verification provisions of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Under the provisions of the CTBT, once the Treaty has entered into force, any signatory party can request an on-site inspection, which can then be carried out after approval (by majority voting) of the Executive Council. Once an OSI is approved, a team of 40 inspectors will be assembled to carry out an inspection to ''clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of Article I''. One challenging aspect of carrying out an on-site inspection (OSI) in the case of a purported underground nuclear explosion is to detect and locate the underground effects of an explosion, which may include an explosion cavity, a zone of damaged rock, and/or a rubble zone associated with an underground collapsed cavity. The CTBT (Protocol, Section II part D, paragraph 69) prescribes several types of geophysical investigations that can be carried out for this purpose. One of the methods allowed by the CTBT for geophysical investigation is referred to in the Treaty Protocol as ''resonance seismometry''. This method, which was proposed and strongly promoted by Russia during the Treaty negotiations, is not described in the Treaty. Some clarification about the nature of the resonance method can be gained from OSI workshop presentations by Russian experts in the late 1990s. Our understanding is that resonance seismometry is a passive method that relies on seismic reverberations set up in an underground cavity by the passage of waves from regional and teleseismic sources. Only a few examples of the use of this method for detection of underground cavities have been presented, and those were done in cases where the existence and precise location of an underground cavity was known. As is the case with many of the geophysical methods allowed during an OSI under the Treaty, how resonance seismology really works and its effectiveness for OSI purposes has yet to be determined. For this experiment, we took a broad approach to the definition of ''resonance seismometry''; stretching it to include any means that employs passive seismic methods to infer the character of underground materials. In recent years there have been a number of advances in the use of correlation and noise analysis methods in seismology to obtain information about the subsurface. Our objective in this experiment was to use noise analysis and correlation analysis to evaluate these techniques for detecting and characterizing the underground damage zone from a nuclear explosion. The site that was chosen for the experiment was the Mackerel test in Area 4 of the former Nevada Test Site (now named the Nevada National Security Site, or NNSS). Mackerel was an underground nuclear test of less than 20 kT conducted in February of 1964 (DOENV-209-REV 15). The reason we chose this site is because there was a known apical cavity occurring at about 50 m depth above a rubble zone, and that the site had been investigated by the US Geological Survey with active seismic methods in 1965 (Watkins et al., 1967). Note that the time delay between detonation of the explosion (1964) and the time of the present survey (2010) is nearly 46 years - this would not be typical of an expected OSI under the CTBT.

Sweeney, J J; Harben, P

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100 tonusingdeposition.EnergyExpedited6

344

Retail Choice Experiments: Comparing Early-AdopterExperience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the experience with retail choice of non-residential electricity customers during the period from early 1998 through the first few months of 2000. Key findings include: (1) customers in California received a significantly smaller discount from utility tariffs than customers in other competitive markets; (2) this sample of large commercial/industrial customers believed they were benefiting significantly more from commodity savings from contracts with retail electricity service providers (RESP) than from value-added services; and,(3) market rules appear to be critical to customer experiences with retail competition, yet the relationship between market rules and market development is inadequately understood.

Golove, William

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Next generation “Stage IV” dark energy experiments under design during this grant, and now under construction, will enable the determination of the properties of dark energy and dark matter to unprecedented precision using multiple complementary probes. The most pressing challenge in these experiments is the characterization and understanding of the systematic errors present within any given experimental configuration and the resulting impact on the accuracy of our constraints on dark energy physics. The DETF and the P5 panel in their reports recommended “Expanded support for ancillary measurements required for the long-term program and for projects that will improve our understanding and reduction of the dominant systematic measurement errors.” Looking forward to the next generation Stage IV experiments we have developed a program to address the most important potential systematic errors within these experiments. Using data from current facilities it has been feasible and timely to undertake a detailed investigation of the systematic errors. In this DOE grant we studied of the source and impact of the dominant systematic effects in dark energy measurements, and developed new analysis tools and techniques to minimize their impact. Progress under this grant is briefly reviewed in this technical report. This work was a necessary precursor to the coming generations of wide-deep probes of the nature of dark energy and dark matter. The research has already had an impact on improving the efficiencies of all Stage III and IV dark energy experiments.

Tyson, J. Anthony [University of California, Davis

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

Kumm, W.H.

1984-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

347

Workforce Transition Model for DOE-AL non-nuclear reconfiguration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by the US Department of Energy Albuquerque Field Office (DOE-AL) to develop a workforce assessment and transition planning tool to support integrated decision making at a single DOE installation. The planning tool permits coordinated, integrated workforce planning to manage growth, decline, or transition within a DOE installation. The tool enhances the links and provides commonality between strategic, programmatic, and operations planners and human resources. Successful development and subsequent complex-wide implementation of the model will also facilitate planning at the national level by enforcing a consistent format on data that are now collected by installations in corporate-specific formats that are not amenable to national-level analyses. The workforce assessment and transition planning tool consists of two components: the Workforce Transition Model and the Workforce Budget Constraint Model. The Workforce Transition Model, the preponderant of the two, assists decision makers to identify and evaluates alternatives for transitioning the current workforce to meet the skills required to support projected workforce requirements. The Workforce Budget Constraint Model helps estimate the number of personnel that will be affected given a workforce budget increase or decrease and assists in identifying how the corresponding hiring or layoffs should be distributed across the common occupational classification system (COCS) occupations. The conceptual models and the computer implementation are described.

Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinoless double beta decay is the only process known so far able to test the neutrino intrinsic nature: its experimental observation would imply that the lepton number is violated by two units and prove that neutrinos have a Majorana mass components, being their own anti-particle. While several experiments searching for such a rare decay have been performed in the past, a new generation of experiments using different isotopes and techniques have recently released their results or are taking data and will provide new limits, should no signal be observed, in the next few years to come. The present contribution reviews the latest public results on double beta decay searches and gives an overview on the expected sensitivities of the experiments in construction which will be able to set stronger limits in the near future.

Alberto Garfagnini

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinoless double beta decay is the only process known so far able to test the neutrino intrinsic nature: its experimental observation would imply that the lepton number is violated by two units and prove that neutrinos have a Majorana mass components, being their own anti-particle. While several experiments searching for such a rare decay have been performed in the past, a new generation of experiments using different isotopes and techniques have recently released their results or are taking data and will provide new limits, should no signal be observed, in the next few years to come. The present contribution reviews the latest public results on double beta decay searches and gives an overview on the expected sensitivities of the experiments in construction which will be able to set stronger limits in the near future.

Garfagnini, Alberto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.1D.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.1C.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

352

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled by DOE O 452.1B.

1997-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing. June 8, 2012 Nondestructive Laser...

354

Oklahoma Homicides: An Examination of Weapon Selection.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study examined 216 solved homicide cases from the state of Oklahoma. The cases occurred from 1995 to 2005. The purpose of the study was… (more)

Kinard, Demita

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Working toward a world without nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limiting the number of warheads is a good beginning, but getting to the end state calls for new thinking. Six specific steps can start us down that path.

Drell, Sidney D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Hoover Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

356

Method and apparatus for detecting concealed weapons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for classifying a ferromagnetic object within a sensing area may include a magnetic field sensor that produces magnetic field data. A signal processing system operatively associated with the magnetic field sensor includes a neural network. The neural network compares the magnetic field data with magnetic field data produced by known ferromagnetic objects to make a probabilistic determination as to the classification of the ferromagnetic object within the sensing area. A user interface operatively associated with the signal processing system produces a user-discernable output indicative of the probabilistic determination of the classification of the ferromagnetic object within a sensing area.

Kotter, Dale K.; Fluck, Frederick D.

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

RS-Weapons X-Rays  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans |QuerylNuclear Power PlantFrequencyand

358

Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is

359

Weapons production | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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360

weapons material protection | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

weapons material | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Reviewwill help prepareAi-rapter |warhead protection| National

362

AEC and control of nuclear weapons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations During the months between

363

The Lead Radius Experiment PREX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed PREX experiment at Jefferson Lab will measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons at an energy of 850 MeV and a scattering angle of 6 degrees. Since the Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a clean measurement of R{sub n} with a projected experimental precision of 1 %. In addition to being a fundamental test of nuclear theory, a precise measurement of R{sub n} pins down the density dependence of the symmetry energy of neutron rich nuclear matter which has impacts on neutron star structure, heavy ion collisions, and atomic parity violation experiments.

Robert Michaels

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

364

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Reactor accelerator coupling experiments: a feasability study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) are a set of neutron source driven subcritical experiments under temperature feedback conditions. These experiments will involve coupling an accelerator driven neutron source to a TRIGA reactor...

Woddi Venkat Krishna, Taraknath

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

366

David Bohms EPR Gedanken Experiment Frank Rioux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

David Bohms EPR Gedanken Experiment Frank Rioux In 1951 David Bohm proposed a gedanken experiment, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) in 1935. In this thought experiment a spin1/2 pair is prepared in a singlet state

Rioux, Frank

367

Hydrogen Piping Experience in Chevron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Piping Experience in Chevron Refining Ned Niccolls Materials Engineer Chevron Energy Technology Company Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 #12;Outline 2 Overall perspectives from long term use of hydrogen piping in refining. Piping specifications and practices. The (few

368

BUILDING MOBILE EXPERIENCES Frank Bentley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING MOBILE EXPERIENCES Frank Bentley Principal Staff Research Scientist Motorola Mobility of teaching mobile apps class at MIT ! Strong believer in user-inspired innovation ! Have brought several new? ! Investigating the interaction between people and mobile computing devices ! Creating compelling mobile

Glinz, Martin

369

Current Direct Neutrino Mass Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this contribution we review the status and perspectives of direct neutrino mass experiments. These experiments investigate the kinematics of $\\beta$-decays of specific isotopes ($^3$H, $^{187}$Re, $^{163}$Ho) to derive model-independent information on the averaged electron (anti-) neutrino mass, which is formed by the incoherent sum of the neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. We first review the kinematics of $\\beta$-decay and the determination of the neutrino mass, before giving a brief overview of past neutrino mass measurements (SN1987a-ToF studies, Mainz and Troitsk experiments for $^3$H, cryo-bolometers for $^{187}$Re). We then describe the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment which is currently under construction at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The large-scale setup will use the MAC-E-Filter principle pioneered earlier to push the sensitivity down to a value of 200 meV(90% C.L.). KATRIN faces many technological challenges that have to be resolved with regar...

Drexlin, G; Mertens, S; Weinheimer, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

ID-69 Sodium drain experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments to determine the sodium retention and drainage from the two key areas of an ID-69. This information is then used as the initiation point for guidelines of how to proceed with washing an ID-69 in the IEM Cell Sodium Removal System.

Johnston, D.C.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

apply skills & experience build skills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

senior apply skills & experience junior build skills sophomore research & execute freshman explore options1 2 3 4 s u p p o r t4-year career action plan parent about the center for career development Remind your student that it is never too soon or too late to seek an internship or summer job. build

Alvarez, Pedro J.

372

Neutrino Oscillations Experiments at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino oscillations provide an unique opportunity to probe physics beyond the Standard Model. Fermilab is constructing two new neutrino beams to provide a decicive test of two of the recent positive indications for neutrino oscillations: MiniBOONE experiment will settle the LSND controversy, MINOS will provide detailed studies of the region indicated by the SuperK results.

Adam Para

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Experiments in Physics Physics 1291  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Laboratory The laboratory experiments described in this manual are an important part of your physics course-3 Velocity, Acceleration, and g 35 1-4 Projectile Motion and Conservation of Energy 45 1-5 Conservation. Whenever possible, the material will have been discussed in lecture before you come to the laboratory

Columbia University

374

Experiments in Physics Physics 1291  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The laboratory experiments described in this manual are an important part of your physics course. Most-8 Projectile Motion and Conservation of Energy 97 1-9 Standing Waves 105 1-10 Specific Heat and Mechanical Equivalent of Heat 115 #12;#12;Introduction 1-0 General Instructions 1 Purpose of the Laboratory

Columbia University

375

DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes a DOE wide program for management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and to expand the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Canceled by DOE O 210.2A. Does not cancel other directives.

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Organic Photovoltaics Experiments Showcase 'Superfacility' Concept Collaboration Key to Enabling On-The-Fly HPC...

377

Hydrogen Embrittlement Fundamentals, Modeling, and Experiment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Hydrogen Embrittlement Fundamentals, Modeling, and Experiment Hydrogen Embrittlement Fundamentals, Modeling, and Experiment Embrittlement, under static load could be a result of...

378

Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Equipment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Apparatus PSSC NOTE01 15-Jan-2013 When bringing a piece of apparatus to the APS for an experiment that will involve pressure,...

379

Operational experience of the OC-OTEC experiments at NELH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Research Institute, under funding and program direction from the US Department of Energy, has been operating a small-scale test apparatus to investigate key components of open- cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The apparatus started operations in October 1987 and continues to provide valuable information on heat-and mass-transfer processes in evaporators and condensers, gas sorption processes as seawater is depressurized and repressurized, and control and instrumentation characteristics of open-cycle systems. Although other test facilities have been used to study some of these interactions, this is the largest apparatus of its kind to use seawater since Georges Claude`s efforts in 1926. The information obtained from experiments conducted in this apparatus is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which a positive net power production is expected to be demonstrated for the first time with OC-OTEC. This paper describes the apparatus, the major tests conducted during its first 18 months of operation, and the experience gained in OC-OTEC system operation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

Link, H.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Meson Photoproduction Experiments with CLAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to light baryon spectroscopy. Meson photoprodcution experiments are essential part of this program. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and availability of circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beams and frozen spin polarized targets provide unique conditions for this type of experiments. This combination of experimental tools gives a remarkable opportunity to measure double polarization observables for different pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction processes. For the first time, a complete or nearly complete measurement became possible and will facilitate model independent extraction of the reaction amplitude. An overview of the experimental program and its current status together with recent results on double polarization measurements in ?{sup +} photoproduction are presented.

Eugene Pasyuk

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Compass Experiment at CERN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has a broad physics program focused on the study of the spin structure of the nucleon and on hadron spectroscopy. Key measurements for the spin program are the gluon contribution to the spin of the nucleon, flavor dependent quark spin distribution, and the measurement of the transverse spin structure function. The apparatus consists of a two-stage spectrometer designed for high data rates and equipped with high-resolution tracking, particle identification, electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry. Data taking has started in 2002. Following the CERN SPS shut down in 2005, the experiment will resume data taking in 2006 and is planned to continue (at least) until 2010. Few hundreds of Terabytes of data are put on tape each year. Out of this large amount of data first important physics results have been obtained.

Magnon, A. [DAPNIA/SPhN, CEA-Saclay, F91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier et al., Physics of Plasmas, 13 (2006) 056111]. High- beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability made LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment operating in the U.S. fusion program. A significant measure of progress in the LDX research program was the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole and the resulting observations of confinement improvement. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements were made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma was created by multi frequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 GHz, 6.4 GHz, 10.5 GHz and 28 GHz allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole was levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature was estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities to approach 1e18 m?3. We have found that levitation causes a strong inwards density pinch [Boxer et al., Nature Physics, 6 (2010) 207] and we have observed the central plasma density increase dramatically indicating a significant improvement in the confinement of a thermal plasma species.

Kesner, Jay [Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Mauel, Michael [Columbia University

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Practical experience with Title V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Having prepared numerous Title V permit applications and applications for synthetic minor status, the do`s and don`ts of this experience are evaluated. The philosophy for what goes into the application is reviewed, with special regard to the EPA {open_quotes}White Paper{close_quotes} on streamlining the process. The pros and cons of accepting and applying for synthetic minor status are evaluated.

Hoffnagle, G.F. [TRC Environmental, Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; /UCLA; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

Thermal blooming experiments. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this program were to design an experiment for determining the effect of stimulated thermal Brillouin scattering (STBS) on single pulse laser propagation and to establish the ability of both a wave optics code and of linearized theory to predict the results of the experiment accurately. The second goal is particularly important because no experimental verification of analytical tools currently in use for single pulse high power laser propagation is available. When a high power laser propagates through the atmosphere, a small fraction of the laser energy is absorbed, creating acoustic waves that may move a significant distance transverse to the propagation direction during the pulse. Such waves lead to the well-known t{sup 3}-blooming refractive-index variations. When such blooming is sufficiently strong, the induced refractive-index alters the intensity profile of the beam farther along the propagation path. This altered intensity profile induces a somewhat different refractive-index profile that may reinforce the path-integrated t{sup 3} blooming. This self-enhancement may be called near-forward stimulated thermal Brillouin scattering (STBS). The design effort described here was carried out much like the proposed experimental program, which calls for the interaction of experimental work with analytical theory and with a wave optics code, A linearized theory of STBS was developed. Results from this theory were compared to output from a wave optics propagation code for several well defined sets of operating conditions. Once good agreement between theory and code simulation was obtained for these test conditions, the theory was used to define and operating regime for a laboratory scale thermal blooming experiment that would provide information relevant to high power laser propagation. A conceptual design for this experiment was then generated and, finally, and experimental set-up, including diagnostics, was proposed.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

AGS experiments: 1990, 1991, 1992. Ninth edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a description of the following: AGS Experimental Area - High Energy Physics FY 1993 and Heavy Ion Physics FY 1993; Table of Beam Parameters and Fluxes; Experiment Schedule ``as run``; Proposed 1993 Schedule; A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Publications of AGS Experiments; and List of AGS Experimenters.

Depken, J.C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The Suli Experience | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Suli Experience Students and mentors talk about the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program...

388

LANL Conduct of Engineering Scope and Major Activities M = Required. G = Guidance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Realization Standard Design Guide maintained by Sandia National Lab for Nuclear Weapons Complex. LANL as a LANL Design Guide. Note 1: Higher Hazard facilities include nuclear hazard category 2 & 3 and high and moderate hazard non-nuclear facilities Note 2: Lower Hazard facilities include radiological facilities, low

389

Risk-Based Ranking Experiences for Cold War Legacy Facilities in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past two decades, a number of government agencies in the United States have faced increasing public scrutiny for their efforts to address the wide range of potential environmental issues related to Cold War legacies. Risk-based ranking was selected as a means of defining the relative importance of issues. Ambitious facility-wide risk-based ranking applications were undertaken. However, although facility-wide risk-based ranking efforts can build invaluable understanding of the potential issues related to Cold War legacies, conducting such efforts is difficult because of the potentially enormous scope and the potentially strong institutional barriers. The U.S. experience is that such efforts are worth undertaking to start building a knowledge base and infrastructure that are based on a thorough understanding of risk. In both the East and the West, the legacy of the Cold War includes a wide range of potential environmental issues associated with large industrial complexes of weapon production facilities. The responsible agencies or ministries are required to make decisions that could benefit greatly from information on the relative importance of these potential issues. Facility-wide risk-based ranking of potential health and environmental issues is one means to help these decision makers. The initial U.S. risk-based ranking applications described in this chapter were “ground-breaking” in that they defined new methodologies and approaches to meet the challenges. Many of these approaches fit the designation of a population-centred risk assessment. These U.S. activities parallel efforts that are just beginning for similar facilities in the countries of the former Soviet Union. As described below, conducting a facility-wide risk-based ranking has special challenges and potential pitfalls. Little guidance exists to conduct major risk-based rankings. For those considering undertaking such efforts, the material contained in this chapter should be useful background information.

Droppo, James G.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical assemblies of precisely known materials and reproducible and easily calculated geometries have been constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the 1940s. Initially, these assemblies were built to provide information necessary for the nuclear weapons development effort. Subsequently, intensive studies of the assemblies themselves were undertaken to provide a better understanding of the physics of the fission process and other nuclear reactions in the nuclear materials from which these machine were constructed and in other materials irradiated in these assemblies. Some of these assemblies (notably Jezebel, Flattop, Big Ten, and Godiva) have been used as benchmark assemblies to compare the results of experimental measurements and computations of certain nuclear reaction parameters. These comparisons are used to validate both the input nuclear data and the computational methods. In addition to these normally fueled benchmark assemblies, other assembly machines are fueled periodically to provide specific and detailed results for parameter sensitivity studies for a large number of applications. Some of these machines and their applications are described.

Dowdy, E.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Physics with the ALICE experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALICE experiment at LHC collects data in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV and in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV. Highlights of the detector performance and an overview of experimental results measured with ALICE in pp and AA collisions are presented in this paper. Physics with proton-proton collisions is focused on hadron spectroscopy at low and moderate $p_T$. Measurements with lead-lead collisions are shown in comparison with those in pp collisions, and the properties of hot quark matter are discussed.

Yuri Kharlov; for the ALICE collaboration

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

Physics with the ALICE experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ALICE experiment at LHC collects data in pp collisions at 1497-1 = 0.9, 2.76, and 7 TeV and in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV. Highlights of the detector performance and an overview of experimental results measured with ALICE in pp and AA collisions are presented in this paper. Physics with protonproton collisions is focused on hadron spectroscopy at low and moderate p{sub t}. Measurements with lead-lead collisions are shown in comparison with those in pp collisions, and the properties of hot quark matter are discussed.

Kharlov, Yu. V. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Attosecond Double-Slit Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new scheme for a double-slit experiment in the time domain is presented. Phase-stabilized few-cycle laser pulses open one to two windows (slits) of attosecond duration for photoionization. Fringes in the angle-resolved energy spectrum of varying visibility depending on the degree of which-way information are measured. A situation in which one and the same electron encounters a single and a double slit at the same time is observed. The investigation of the fringes makes possible interferometry on the attosecond time scale. From the number of visible fringes, for example, one derives that the slits are extended over about 500 as.

Lindner, F.; Schaetzel, M.G.; Baltuska, A.; Goulielmakis, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Walther, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Krausz, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Institut fuer Photonik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Gusshausstr. 27, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Milosevic, D.B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Bauer, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Paulus, G.G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States)

2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

394

Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of neutrinoless double beta decay is of outmost importance for neutrino physics. It is considered to be the gold plated channel to probe the fundamental character of neutrinos and to determine the neutrino mass. From the experimental point about nine different isotopes are explored for the search. After a general introduction follows a short discussion on nuclear matrix element calculations and supportive measurements. The current experimental status of double beta searches is presented followed by a short discussion of the ideas and proposals for large scale experiments.

K. Zuber

2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

Experiment Report Instructions General Instructions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin Film XRDEvanExecutiveSRD-13ExperiencesReport

396

Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Small Break Air Ingress Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The small break air-ingress experiment, described in this report, is designed to investigate air-ingress phenomena postulated to occur in pipes in a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTRs). During this experiment, air-ingress rates were measured for various flow and break conditions through small holes drilled into a pipe of the experimental apparatus. The holes were drilled at right angles to the pipe wall such that a direction vector drawn from the pipe centerline to the center of each hole was at right angles with respect to the pipe centerline. Thus the orientation of each hole was obtained by measuring the included angle between the direction vector of each hole with respect to a reference line anchored on the pipe centerline and pointing in the direction of the gravitational force. Using this reference system, the influence of several important parameters on the air ingress flow rate were measured including break orientation, break size, and flow velocity . The approach used to study the influence of these parameters on air ingress is based on measuring the changes in oxygen concentrations at various locations in the helium flow circulation system as a function of time using oxygen sensors (or detectors) to estimate the air-ingress rates through the holes. The test-section is constructed of a stainless steel pipe which had small holes drilled at the desired locations.

Chang Oh; Eung Soo Kim

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The polarized SRF gun experiment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RF electron guns are capable of producing electron bunches with high brightness, which outperform DC electron guns and may even be able to provide electron beams for the ILC without the need for a damping ring. However, all successful existing guns for polarized electrons are DC guns because the environment inside an RF gun is hostile to the GaAs cathode material necessary for polarization. While the typical vacuum pressure in a DC gun is better than 10{sup -11} torr the vacuum in an RF gun is in the order of 10{sup -9} torr. Experiments at BINP Novosibirsk show that this leads to strong ion back-bombardment and generation of dark currents, which destroy the GaAs cathode in a short time. The situation might be much more favorable in a (super-conducting) SRF gun. The cryogenic pumping of the gun cavity walls may make it possible to maintain a vacuum close to 10{sup -12} torr, solving the problem of ion bombardment and dark currents. Of concern would be contamination of the gun cavity by evaporating cathode material. This report describes an experiment that Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in collaboration with Advanced Energy Systems (AES) is conducting to answer these questions.

Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Grover, R.; Todd, R.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Schultheiss, T.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier, Phys. Plasmas, v13, p. 056111, 2006]. High-beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability makes LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment now operating in the U.S. fusion program. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements are made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma is created by multifrequency electron cyclotron resonance heating allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole is levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature is estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities reach 1.0E18 (1/m3). Several significant discoveries resulted from the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole. For the first time, toroidal plasma with pressure approaching the pressure of the confining magnetic field was well-confined in steady-state without a toroidal magnetic field. Magnetic levitation proved to be reliable and is now routine. The dipole's cryostat allows up to three hours of "float time" between re-cooling with liquid helium and providing scientists unprecedented access to the physics of magnetizd plasma. Levitation eliminates field-aligned particle sources and sinks and results in a toroidal, magnetically-confined plasma where profiles are determined by cross-field transport. We find levitation causes the central plasma density to increase dramatically and to significantly improve the confinement of thermal plasma [Boxer, Nature-Physics, v8, p. 949, 2010]. Several diagnostic systems have been used to measure plasma fluctuations, and these appear to represent low-frequency convection that may lead to adiabatic heating and strongly peaked pressure profiles. These experiments are remarkable, and the motivate wide-ranging studies of plasma found in space and confined for fusion energy. In the following report, we describe: (i) observations of the centrally-peaked density profile that appears naturally as a consequence of a strong turbulent pinch, (ii) observations of overall density and pressure increases that suggest large improvements to the thermal electron confinement time result occur during levitation, and (iii) the remarkable properties of low-frequency plasma fluctuations that cause magnetized plasma to "self-organize" into well-confined, centrally-peaked profiles that are relative to fusion and to space.

Kesner, Jay; Mauel, Michael

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

HERS experiment cause for confidence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

Misti A Lillo

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The COMPASS Experiment at CERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The COMPASS experiment makes use of the CERN SPS high-intensitymuon and hadron beams for the investigation of the nucleon spin structure and the spectroscopy of hadrons. One or more outgoing particles are detected in coincidence with the incoming muon or hadron. A large polarized target inside a superconducting solenoid is used for the measurements with the muon beam. Outgoing particles are detected by a two-stage, large angle and large momentum range spectrometer. The setup is built using several types of tracking detectors, according to the expected incident rate, required space resolution and the solid angle to be covered. Particle identification is achieved using a RICH counter and both hadron and electromagnetic calorimeters. The setup has been successfully operated from 2002 onwards using a muon beam. Data with a hadron beam were also collected in 2004. This article describes the main features and performances of the spectrometer in 2004; a short summary of the 2006 upgrade is also given.

Abbon, P.; Alexakhin, V.Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alekseev, M.G.; Amoroso, A.; Angerer, H.; Anosov, V.A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Becker, M.; Bedfer, Y.; Berglund, P.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bosteels, M.; Bradamante, F.; Braem, A.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Chalifour, M.; Chapiro, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; Cristaudo, P.; Dafni, T.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; d'Ambrosio, C.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Delagnes, E.; De Masi, R.; Deck, P.; Dedek, N.; Demchenko, D.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Dolgopolov, A.V.; Donati, A.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Durand, D.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Franz, J.; Fratnik, F.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchs, U.; Garfagnini, R.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Gheller, J.M.; Giganon, A.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Gougnaud, F.; Grabmuller, S.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grunemaier, A.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hagemann, R.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heckmann, J.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Horn, I.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanchin, I.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kalinnikov, V.; Kang, D.; Karstens, F.; Kastaun, W.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kiefer, J.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Kramer, D.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kubart, J.; Kuhn, R.; Kukhtin, V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kuzmin, N.A.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levinski, V.; Levorato, S.; Lyashenko, V.I; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Manuilov, I.V.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Masek, L.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Matthia, D.; Maximov, A.N.; Menon, G.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Molinie, F.; Mota, F.; Mutter, A.; Nagel, T.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Niebuhr, M.; Niinikoski, T.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Parsamyan, B.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz, B.; Pereira, H.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piedigrossi, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Platzer, K.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Procureur, S.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.-F.; Ramos, S.; Razaq, I.; Rebourgeard, P.; Reggiani, D.; Reicherz, G.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Rousse, J.Y.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Ryabchikov, D.; Samartsev, A.G.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Merce, M.Sans; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sauli, F.; Savin, Igor A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, H.; Schmitt, L.; Schonmeier, P.; Schroeder, W.; Seeharsch, D.; Seimetz, M.; Setter, D.; Shaligin, A.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Shishkin, A.A.; Siebert, H.-W.; Silva, L.; Simon, F.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sora, D.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Tarte, G.; Takabayashi, N.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Thers, D.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Toeda, T.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Trippel, S.; Urban, J.; Valbuena, R.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Wiedner, U.; Wiesmann, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Ziembicki, M.; Zlobin, Y.L.; Zvyagin, A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Rationalization of EPR Coincidence Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coincidence experiments on EPR pairs show strong violations of Bell's Inequalities at certain filter settings which is widely believed to mean that local hidden variable models cannot explain these results. In this paper it is shown that the 'non-separable' singlet density matrix can be represented as a sum of separable density matrices which are products of individual non-hermitian spin operator states. This decomposition is consistent with the intuitive notion that after separation from the singlet the two physical systems should be described by a product state. In spite of the non-hermiticity, the values of the relevant spin observables are real. A new local hidden variable model inspired by this decomposition is discussed.

B. C. Sanctuary

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

404

Summarizing my DHS Internship Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the author addresses four main topics: (1) A description of the topic of his internship at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; (2) A description of his contributions to the project; (3) A discussion of research directions beneficial to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS); and (4) A discussion of the impact the internship experience had on his career aspirations. He feels the first three points can best be addressed using the contents of a paper his mentor, Dr. Tina Eliassi-Rad, and he have published based on their work this summer [Roberts and Eliassi-Rad, 2006]. Sections 2 - 5 are intended for this purpose and have been excerpted from that paper. He concludes this paper in Section 6 with a discussion of the fourth point.

Roberts, D L

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

405

Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Interactive portraiture : designing intimate interactive experiences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I present a set of interactive portrait experiences that strive to create an intimate connection between the viewer and the portrayed subject; an emotional experience, one of personal reflection. My interactive ...

Zuckerman, Orit

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Suspended sediment erosion in laboratory flume experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory flume experiments are used to examine the role of suspended sediment abrasion in bedrock channel erosion. A range of topographies was used, from a planar bed to a sinuous and scalloped inner channel. Experiments ...

Cornell, Katrina Muir

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING EDUCATION #12;This project is a collaboration with the authors and NAE. #12;Infusing Real World Experiences into Engineering Education 2012 #12;2 Preface The aim

Napier, Terrence

409

Building Knowledge through Families of Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Knowledge through Families of Experiments Victor R. Basili, Fellow, IEEE, Forrest Shull, and build models that represent the common observations about the discipline. This paper discusses building knowledge in an incremental manner through the replication of experiments within families

Basili, Victor R.

410

Proposal for PLASMA LENS EXPERIMENT AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for PLASMA LENS EXPERIMENT AT THE FINAL FOCUS TEST BEAM April 1, 1997 THE PLASMA LENS.....................................................................................3 1.1 Plasma Focusing ......................................................................3 1.2 Previous Plasma Lens Experiments.................................................4 1.3 Plasma Lens

411

Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment is currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, USA. An overview and status of the experiment are given.

Martin, R. D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and Department of Physics, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Abgrall, N.; Chan, Y-D.; Hegai, A.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P.; Vetter, K. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R.; Soin, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone III, F. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertrand, F. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); and others

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

The INEL beryllium multiplication experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experiment to measure the multiplication of 14-MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium has been completed. The experiment consists of determining the ratio of {sup 56}Mn activities induced in a large manganese bath by a central 14-MeV neutron source, with and without a beryllium sample surrounding the source. In the manganese bath method a neutron source is placed at the center of a totally-absorbing aqueous solution of MnSo{sub 4}. The capture of neutrons by Mn produces a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the emission rate of the source. As applied to the measurement of the multiplication of 14- MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium, the neutron source is a tritium target placed at the end of the drift tube of a small deuteron accelerator. Surrounding the source is a sample chamber. When the sample chamber is empty, the neutrons go directly to the surrounding MnSO{sub 4} solution, and produce a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate. When the chamber contains a beryllium sample, the neutrons first enter the beryllium and multiply through the (n,2n) process. Neutrons escaping from the beryllium enter the bath and produce a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate multiplied by the effective value of the multiplication in bulk beryllium. The ratio of the activities with and without the sample present is proportional to the multiplication value. Detailed calculations of the multiplication and all the systematic effects were made with the Monte Carlo program MCNP, utilizing both the Young and Stewart and the ENDF/B-VI evaluations for beryllium. Both data sets produce multiplication values that are in excellent agreement with the measurements for both raw and corrected values of the multiplication. We conclude that there is not real discrepancy between experimental and calculated values for the multiplication of neutrons in bulk beryllium. 12 figs., 11 tabs., 18 refs.

Smith, J.R.; King, J.J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

SOURCE PHENOMENOLOGY EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments (SPE) have resulted in an important dataset for the nuclear monitoring community. The 19 dedicated single-fired explosions and multiple delay-fired mining explosions were recorded by one of the most densely instrumented accelerometer and seismometer arrays ever fielded, and the data have already proven useful in quantifying confinement and excitation effects for the sources. It is very interesting to note that we have observed differences in the phenomenology of these two series of explosions resulting from the differences between the relatively slow (limestone) and fast (granodiorite) media. We observed differences at the two SPE sites in the way the rock failed during the explosions, how the S-waves were generated, and the amplitude behavior as a function of confinement. Our consortium's goal is to use the synergy of the multiple datasets collected during this experiment to unravel the phenomenological differences between the two emplacement media. The data suggest that the main difference between single-fired chemical and delay-fired mining explosion seismograms at regional distances is the increased surface wave energy for the latter source type. The effect of the delay-firing is to decrease the high-frequency P-wave amplitudes while increasing the surface wave energy because of the longer source duration and spall components. The results suggest that the single-fired explosions are surrogates for nuclear explosions in higher frequency bands (e.g., 6-8 Hz Pg/Lg discriminants). We have shown that the SPE shots, together with the mining explosions, are efficient sources of S-wave energy, and our next research stage is to postulate the possible sources contributing to the shear-wave energy.

Jessie L. Bonner; Brian Stump; Mark Leidig; Heather Hooper; Xiaoning (David) Yang; Rongmao Zhou; Tae Sung Kim; William R. Walter; Aaron Velasco; Chris Hayward; Diane Baker; C. L. Edwards; Steven Harder; Travis Glenn; Cleat Zeiler; James Britton; James F. Lewkowicz

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

Post-accident inhalation exposure and experience with plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the issue of inhalation exposure immediately afterward and for a long time following a nuclear accident. For the cases where either a nuclear weapon burns or explodes prior to nuclear fission, or at locations close to a nuclear reactor accident containing fission products, a major concern is the inhalation of aerosolized plutonium (Pu) particles producing alpha-radiation. We have conducted field studies of Pu- contaminated real and simulated accident sites at Bikini, Johnston Atoll, Tonopah (Nevada), Palomares (Spain), Chernobyl, and Maralinga (Australia).

Shinn, J

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

Wendel, Mark W [ORNL] [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Sangrey, Robert L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Shea, Thomas J [ORNL] [ORNL; Hasegawa, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Kogawa, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Naoe, Dr. Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Farny, Dr. Caleb H. [Boston University] [Boston University; Kaminsky, Andrew L [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Lorentz Symmetry, the SME, and Gravitational Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This proceedings contribution summarizes the implications of recent SME-based investigations of Lorentz violation for gravitational experiments.

Jay D. Tasson

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Lorentz Symmetry, the SME, and Gravitational Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This proceedings contribution summarizes the implications of recent SME-based investigations of Lorentz violation for gravitational experiments.

Tasson, Jay D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

NOvA Experiment - The Local Community  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Local proprietors Steve and Deb Wieber discuss the impact of the NOvA experiment on their community.

Deb Wieber

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

420

NOvA Experiment - The Local Community  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local proprietors Steve and Deb Wieber discuss the impact of the NOvA experiment on their community.

Deb Wieber

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Experiments with Branching using General Disjunctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 Acknowledgement. The computational experiments were undertaken on a cluster provided by High Performance Com- puting at Lehigh University. CPLEX

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

422

Experiments with MASS A. Tokovinin, V. Kornilov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Turbina program, and these data were analyzed subsequently in great detail. After finishing the experiment

Tokovinin, Andrei A.

423

Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

424

Today and Future Neutrino Experiments at Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of undergoing experiments and new experiment propositions at Krasnoyarsk underground nuclear reactor are presented

Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov; L. A. Popeko; A. V. Cherny; G. A. Shishkina

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

425

AGS experiments -- 1991, 1992, 1993. Tenth edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: (1) FY 1993 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1994--95 AGS schedule; (3) AGS experiments {ge} FY 1993 (as of 30 March 1994); (4) AGS beams 1993; (5) AGS experimental area FY 1991 physics program; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1992 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1993 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program (planned); (9) a listing of experiments by number; (10) two-page summaries of each experiment; (11) listing of publications of AGS experiments; and (12) listing of AGS experiments.

Depken, J.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

PXIE: Project X Injector Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-MW proton facility, Project X, has been proposed and is currently under development at Fermilab. We are planning a program of research and development aimed at integrated systems testing of critical components comprising the front end of the Project X. This program is being undertaken as a key component of the larger Project X R&D program. The successful completion of this program will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing a primary technical risk element within Project X. Integrated systems testing, known as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), will be accomplished with a new test facility under construction at Fermilab and will be completed over the period FY12-16. PXIE will include an H{sup -} ion source, a CW 2.1-MeV RFQ and two superconductive RF (SRF) cryomodules providing up to 25 MeV energy gain at an average beam current of 1 mA (upgradable to 2 mA). Successful systems testing will also demonstrate the viability of novel front end technologies that are expected find applications beyond Project X.

Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne; Holmes, S.D.; Kephart, R.D.; Kerby, J.S.; Lebedev, V.A.; Mishra, C.S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Solyak, N.; Stanek, R.P.; /Fermilab; Li, D.; /LBL, Berkeley

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Shock recovery experiments: An assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systematic shock recovery experiments, in which microstructural and mechanical property effects are characterized quantitatively, constitute an important means of increasing our understanding of shock processes. Through studies of the effects of variations in metallurgical and shock loading parameters on structure/property relationships, the micromechanisms of shock deformation, and how they differ from conventional strain rate processes, are beginning to emerge. This paper will highlight the state-of-the-art in shock recovery of metallic and ceramic materials. Techniques will be described which are utilized to ''soft'' recover shock-loaded metallic samples possessing low residual strain; crucial to accurate ''post-mortem'' metallurgical investigations of the influence of shock loading on material behavior. Illustrations of the influence of shock assembly design on the structure/property relationships in shock-recovered copper samples including such issues as residual strain and contact stresses, and their consequences are discussed. Shock recovery techniques used on brittle materials will be reviewed and discussed in light of recent experimental results. Finally, shock recovery structure/property results and VISAR data on the /alpha/--/omega/ shock-induced phase transition in titanium will be used to illustrate the beneficial link between shock recovery and ''real-time'' shock data. 26 refs., 3 figs.

Gray, G.T. III

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth's climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27[degree]C, but never 31[degree]C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

NTS Volume 2 - Clean Edit.PDF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

supporting the NNSA stockpile stewardship program, which encompasses performing subcritical experiments in support of nuclear weapons stockpile verification efforts and...

430

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

supporting the NNSA stockpile stewardship program, which encompasses performing subcritical experiments in support of nuclear weapons stockpile verification efforts and...

431

Deuterium accelerator experiments for APT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories in California initiated an experimental program to determine whether tritium retention in the tube walls and permeation through the tubes into the surrounding coolant water would be a problem for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), and to find ways to mitigate the problem, if it existed. Significant holdup in the tube walls would limit the ability of APT to meet its production goals, and high levels of permeation would require a costly cleanup system for the cooling water. To simulate tritium implantation, a 200 keV accelerator was used to implant deuterium into Al 6061-T and SS3 16L samples at temperatures and particle fluxes appropriate for APT, for times varying between one week and five months. The implanted samples were characterized to determine the deuterium retention and Permeation. During the implantation, the D(d,p)T nuclear reaction was used to monitor the build-up of deuterium in the implant region of the samples. These experiments increased in sophistication, from mono-energetic deuteron implants to multi-energetic deuteron and proton implants, to more accurately reproduce the conditions expected in APT. Micron-thick copper, nickel, and anodized aluminum coatings were applied to the front surface of the samples (inside of the APT walls) in an attempt to lower retention and permeation. The reduction in both retention and permeation produced by the nickel coatings, and the ability to apply them to the inside of the APT tubes, indicate that both nickel-coated Al 6061-T6 and nickel-coated SS3 16L tubes would be effective for use in APT. The results of this work were submitted to the Accelerator Production of Tritium project in document number TPO-E29-Z-TNS-X-00050, APT-MP-01-17.

Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hertz, Kristin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Cowgill, Donald F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Romanian experience on packaging testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With more than twenty years ago, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), through its Reliability and Testing Laboratory, was licensed by the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body- CNCAN and to carry out qualification tests [1] for packages intended to be used for the transport and storage of radioactive materials. Radioactive materials, generated by Romanian nuclear facilities [2] are packaged in accordance with national [3] and the IAEA's Regulations [1,6] for a safe transport to the disposal center. Subjecting these packages to the normal and simulating test conditions accomplish the evaluation and certification in order to prove the package technical performances. The paper describes the qualification tests for type A and B packages used for transport and storage of radioactive materials, during a period of 20 years of experience. Testing is used to substantiate assumption in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural response. The Romanian test facilities [1,3,6] are used to simulate the required qualification tests and have been developed at INR Pitesti, the main supplier of type A packages used for transport and storage of low radioactive wastes in Romania. The testing programme will continue to be a strong option to support future package development, to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on radioactive material packages or component sections, such as packages used for transport of radioactive sources to be used for industrial or medical purposes [2,8]. The paper describes and contain illustrations showing some of the various tests packages which have been performed during certain periods and how they relate to normal conditions and minor mishaps during transport. Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design there are also presented and commented. (authors)

Vieru, G. [IAEA Technical Expert, Head, Reliability and Testing Lab., Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Cygnus Performance in Subcritical Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources with the following specifications: 4-rad dose at 1 m, 1-mm spot size, 50-ns pulse length, 2.25-MeV endpoint energy. The facility is located in an underground tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site. Here SubCritical Experiments (SCEs) are performed to study the dynamic properties of plutonium. The Cygnus sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for these tests. Since SCEs are single-shot, high-value events - reliability and reproducibility are key issues. Enhanced reliability involves minimization of failure modes through design, inspection, and testing. Many unique hardware and operational features were incorporated into Cygnus to insure reliability. Enhanced reproducibility involves normalization of shot-to-shot output also through design, inspection, and testing. The first SCE to utilize Cygnus, Armando, was executed on May 25, 2004. A year later, April - May 2005, calibrations using a plutonium step wedge were performed. The results from this series were used for more precise interpretation of the Armando data. In the period February - May 2007 Cygnus was fielded on Thermos, which is a series of small-sample plutonium shots using a one-dimensional geometry. Pulsed power research generally dictates frequent change in hardware configuration. Conversely, SCE applications have typically required constant machine settings. Therefore, while operating during the past four years we have accumulated a large database for evaluation of machine performance under highly consistent operating conditions. Through analysis of this database Cygnus reliability and reproducibility on Armando, Step Wedge, and Thermos is presented.

G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, S. Lutz, C. Mitton, et al.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Current Experiments in Particle Physics (September 1996)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. This report contains full summaries of 180 approved current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. The focus of the report is on selected experiments which directly contribute to our better understanding of elementary particles and their properties such as masses, widths or lifetimes, and branching fractions.

Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Bilak, S.V.; Illarionova, N.S.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Strokovsky, E.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kettle, P.-R.; Olin, A.; Armstrong, F.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The BigBoss Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (k{sub max} = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (k{sub max} = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.

Schelgel, D.; Abdalla, F.; Abraham, T.; Ahn, C.; Allende Prieto, C.; Annis, J.; Aubourg, E.; Azzaro, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Baugh, C.; Bebek, C.; Becerril, S.; Blanton, M.; Bolton, A.; Bromley, B.; Cahn, R.; Carton, P.-H.; Cervanted-Cota, J.L.; Chu, Y.; Cortes, M.; /APC, Paris /Brookhaven /IRFU, Saclay /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, CPT /Durham U. / /IEU, Seoul /Fermilab /IAA, Granada /IAC, La Laguna / /IAC, Mexico / / /Madrid, IFT /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. / / /New York U. /Valencia U.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Current experiments in elementary particle physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Current experiments in elementary particle physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Oyanagi, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)); Dodder, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov (USSR). Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Dodder, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russian Federation); Illarionova, N.S. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lehar, F. [CEN Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oyanagi, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Sciences; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frosch, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Operating Experience Summary, 2013-03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Investigation: Contamination at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Due to Deficiencies in Conduct of Operations ...5 Page 1 Page 5 Page 1 of 12 Operating Experience Summary...

440

International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Experiment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

interaction to evaluate sealing and clay barrier performance; 2) EBS Experiment -thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behavior of the EBS under heating conditions and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Review of double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The brief review of current experiments on search and studying of double beta decay processes is done. Best present limits on $\\langle m_{\

A. S. Barabash

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

442

Review of double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The brief review of current experiments on search and studying of double beta decay processes is done. Best present limits on $\\langle m_{\

Barabash, A S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Playing games with EPR-type experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An approach towards quantum games is proposed that uses the unusual probabilities involved in EPR-type experiments directly in two-player games.

Azhar Iqbal

2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

Recent Results From The Daya Bay Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors at $\\sim$kilometer baselines. The relative measurement of the $\\bar\

Chao Zhang; for the Daya Bay Collaboration

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

Recent Results From The Daya Bay Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors at $\\sim$kilometer baselines. The relative measurement of the $\\bar\

Zhang, Chao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Cavendish Experiment in General Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions of Einstein's equations are discussed in which the ``gravitational force" is balanced by an electrical force, and which can serve as models for the Cavendish experiment.

Dieter R. Brill

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

447

State Experience in Hydrogen Infrastructure in California  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Experience in Hydrogen Infrastructure in California Gerhard H Achtelik Jr. February 17, 2011 Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop California Environmental Protection...

448

INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT, MONTICELLO, SOUTH CAROLINA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letters INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,12091 INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,transient data from a hydraulic fracturing experiment have

Narasimhan, T.N.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Column Experiments for Radionuclide Adsorption Studies of the Culebra Dolomite: Retardation Parameter Estimation for Non-Eluted Actinide Species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been developing a nuclear waste disposal facility, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located approximately 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP is designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic wastes produced by the defense nuclear-weapons program. Performance assessment analyses (U.S. DOE, 1996) indicate that human intrusion by inadvertent and intermittent drilling for resources provide the only credible mechanisms for significant releases of radionuclides horn the disposal system. These releases may occur by five mechanisms: (1) cuttings, (2) cavings, (3) spallings, (4) direct brine releases, and (5) long-term brine releases. The first four mechanisms could result in immediate release of contaminant to the accessible environment. For the last mechanism, migration pathways through the permeable layers of rock above the Salado are important, and major emphasis is placed on the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation because this is the most transmissive geologic layer in the disposal system. For reasons of initial quantity, half-life, and specific radioactivity, certain isotopes of Th, U, Am, and Pu would dominate calculated releases from the WIPP. In order to help quanti~ parameters for the calculated releases, radionuclide transport experiments have been carried out using five intact-core columns obtained from the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. This report deals primarily with results of mathematical analyses related to the retardation of %J%, 24%, and 24'Am in two of these cores (B-Core - VPX26-11A and C-Core - VPX28-6C). All B-Core transport experiments were done using Culebra-simukmt brine relevant to the core recovery location (the WIPP air-intake shaft - AIS). Most experiments with C-Core were done with AIS brine with some admixture of a brine composition (ERDA-6) that simulated deeper formation brines. No significant changes in transport behavior were observed for changes in brine. Hydraulic characteristics (i.e., apparent porosity and apparent dispersion coefficient) for the cores were obtained via experiments using conservative tracer `Na. Elution experiments carried out over periods of a few days with tracers `*U and %Np indicated that these tracers were weakly retarded as indicated by delayed elution of these species. Elution experiments with tracers `%, 24'Pu, and 24'Ani were performed, but no elution of any of these species was observed in any flow experiment to date, including experiments of up to two years duration. However, B-Core was subjected to tomographic analysis from which a retardation factor can be inferred for%. Moreover, the fact of non- elution for 24*Pu and 24'Am after more than two years brine flow through C-Core can be coupled with the minimum detectable activity for each of these species to compute minimum retardation factors in C-Core. The retardation factors for all three species can then be coupled with the apparent hydraulic characteristics to estimate an apparent minimum solutionhock distribution coefficient, &, for each actinide. The specific radionuclide isotopes used in these experiments were chosen to facilitate analysis. Even though these isotopes are not necessarily the same as those that are most important to WIPP performance, they are isotopes of the same elements, and . their chemical and transport properties are therefore identical to those of isotopes in the WIPP inventory. The retardation factors and & values deduced from experimental results strongly support the contention that sorption in the Culebra provides an effective barrier to release of Th, Pu, and Am during the regulatory period.

Brown, G.O.; Lucero, D.A.; Perkins, W.G.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Informational experiments with microparticles and atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepting information as a physical category and ascribing to inanimate matter some spirit (consciousness, intelligence) allows to explain quantum-mechanical phenomena, including delayed-choice and EPR-Bohm-Bell experiments, as well as irreversibility of time, remaining on the basis of local realism, and suggest essentially new experiments with microparticles and atoms in which information plays the principal role.

Raoul Nakhmanson

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fusion Ignition Research Experiment Engineering Status Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the world. The FIRE web site has been chosen as a selection for the Scout Report for Science and EngineeringFusion Ignition Research Experiment -FIRE- Engineering Status Report For Fiscal Year 2000 Issued on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE), a tokamak designed for burning plasma research. Engineering

452

Robotics Science & Technology for Burning Plasma Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotics Science & Technology for Burning Plasma Experiments J. N. Herndon, T. W. Burgess, M. M, General Atomics, San Diego, California. #12;Robotics Challenges in Burning Plasma Experiments · Control x x x x x x earthmoving equipment electric robots Conventional Machines DMHP Machines x x x x

453

EXPLORATORY EXPERIMENTS IN GUIDING SALMON FINGERLINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Federal, State or cooperating agencies and in processed form for economy and to avoid delay in publicationEXPLORATORY EXPERIMENTS IN GUIDING SALMON FINGERLINGS BY A NARROW D.C. ELECTRIC FIELD Marine L. Farley, Director EXPLORATORY EXPERIMENTS IN GUIDING SALMON FINGERLINGS BY A NARROW D. C, ELECTRIC

454

The Immigration Experience in Saskatchewan's Labour Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Immigration Experience in Saskatchewan's Labour Market Douglas Durst Faculty of Social Work.durst@uregina.ca The Immigration Experience in Saskatchewan's Labour Market EDITORIAL AND DISTRIBUTION OFFICE Social Policy Research Unit (SPR) Faculty of Social Work University of Regina Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4S 0A2 Phone

Argerami, Martin

455

Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2004. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2004 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE neutrino experiment, and SY 120 activities.

Bromberg, C.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Holmes, S.; Louis, W.; Meyer, A.; Moore, Craig D.; Raja, R.; Ramberg, E.; Roser, R.; /Fermilab

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Proposed New Antiproton Experiments at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermilab operates the world's most intense source of antiprotons. Recently various experiments have been proposed that can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Tevatron Collider running or after the Tevatron Collider finishes in about 2010. We discuss the physics goals and prospects of the proposed experiments.

Daniel M. Kaplan

2008-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

458

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience There are myriad ways to build experience Sciences at Columbia University offers on-campus research opportunities for the summer term Dec. 13 - March careereducation.columbia.edu Join LionSHARE ­ CCE's internship/job board Double Discovery Center Volunteer

Shepard, Kenneth

459

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience There are so many ways to build experience The Columbia University Office of Government and Community Affairs provides assistance to undergraduates.edu/academics/research/science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship The Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University

Hone, James

460

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia University Opportunities to Gain Experience There are so many ways to build experience Program The Columbia University Office of Government and Community Affairs provides assistance.edu/academics/research/science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship The Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University

Hone, James

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Status of the AlCap experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The AlCap experiment is a joint project between the COMET and Mu2e collaborations. Both experiments intend to look for the lepton-flavour violating conversion $\\mu + A \\rightarrow e + A$, using tertiary muons from high-power pulsed proton beams. In these experiments the products of ordinary muon capture in the muon stopping target are an important concern, both in terms of hit rates in tracking detectors and radiation damage to equipment. The goal of the AlCap experiment is to provide precision measurements of the products of nuclear capture on Aluminium, which is the favoured target material for both COMET and Mu2e. The results will be used for optimising the design of both conversion experiments, and as input to their simulations. Data was taken in December 2013 and is currently being analysed.

Litchfield, R Phillip

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Status of the AlCap experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The AlCap experiment is a joint project between the COMET and Mu2e collaborations. Both experiments intend to look for the lepton-flavour violating conversion $\\mu + A \\rightarrow e + A$, using tertiary muons from high-power pulsed proton beams. In these experiments the products of ordinary muon capture in the muon stopping target are an important concern, both in terms of hit rates in tracking detectors and radiation damage to equipment. The goal of the AlCap experiment is to provide precision measurements of the products of nuclear capture on Aluminium, which is the favoured target material for both COMET and Mu2e. The results will be used for optimising the design of both conversion experiments, and as input to their simulations. Data was taken in December 2013 and is currently being analysed.

R. Phillip Litchfield

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

Theory, experiment and computer simulation of the electrostatic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theory, experiment and computer simulation of the electrostatic potential at crystalelectrolyte interfaces . Theory, experiment and computer simulation of the electrostatic...

464

Voices of Experience | Insights into Advanced Distribution Management...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Voices of Experience | Insights into Advanced Distribution Management Systems (February 2015) Voices of Experience | Insights into Advanced Distribution Management Systems...

465

Emergency First Responders' Experience with Colorimetric Detection Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nationwide, first responders from state and federal support teams respond to hazardous materials incidents, industrial chemical spills, and potential weapons of mass destruction (WMD) attacks. Although first responders have sophisticated chemical, biological, radiological, and explosive detectors available for assessment of the incident scene, simple colorimetric detectors have a role in response actions. The large number of colorimetric chemical detection methods available on the market can make the selection of the proper methods difficult. Although each detector has unique aspects to provide qualitative or quantitative data about the unknown chemicals present, not all detectors provide consistent, accurate, and reliable results. Included here, in a consumer-report-style format, we provide “boots on the ground” information directly from first responders about how well colorimetric chemical detection methods meet their needs in the field and how they procure these methods.

Sandra L. Fox; Keith A. Daum; Carla J. Miller; Marnie M. Cortez

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Solar axion search with the CAST experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside the magnet pipe of an LHC dipole. The analysis of the data recorded during the first phase of the experiment with vacuum in the magnet pipes has resulted in the most restrictive experimental limit on the coupling constant of axions to photons. In the second phase, CAST is operating with a buffer gas inside the magnet pipes in order to extent the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axion masses. We will present the first results on the $^{4}{\\rm He}$ data taking as well as the system upgrades that have been operated in the last year in order to adapt the experiment for the $^{3}{\\rm He}$ data taking. Expected sensitivities on the coupling constant of axions to photons will be given for the recent $^{3}{\\rm He}$ run just started in March 2008.

CAST Collaboration; E. Arik; S. Aune; D. Autiero; K. Barth; A. Belov; B. Beltrán; S. Borghi; F. S. Boydag; H. Bräuninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; L. Di Lella; O. B. Dogan; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; H. Fischer; J. Franz; J. Galán; E. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gómez; M. Hasinoff; F. H. Heinsius; I. Hikmet; D. H. H. Hoffmann; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; D. Kang; T. Karageorgopoulou; M. Karuza; K. Königsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; K. Kousouris; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; C. Lasseur; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzón; D. Miller; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; A. Ortiz; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; A. Placci; G. Raiteri; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. Rodríguez; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; Y. Semertzidis; P. Serpico; S. K. Solanki; R. Soufli; L. Stewart; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; J5D. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

ORISE: Recent Graduate Research Experiences - Lindsay Gabbert  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, accepts scientists at all levels and provides them with laboratory experience and...

468

FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE PLASTIC BALL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE PLASTIC BALL H.H. Gutbrod, A.scheme for one module Plastic Soil Response (based on protonS Ropidity ——» Fig. 3. Plastic Ball acceptance in the plane

Gutbrod, H.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

User experience design of complex systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over recent years, the global marketplace and its consumers have developed a mutual recognition for the rising prominence of design that delivers high quality user experience. For the provider of products and services, ...

Reily, Todd R. (Todd Richard)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring.

Martin, P.S.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Experiments on decision making and auctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory (Gilboa and Schmeidler, 1995). The basic premise behind Case-Based Decision Theory (henceforth CBDT) is that a DM uses her past experience to help evaluate current choices, rather than constructing beliefs about certain states of the world...

Watson, Elizabeth Ann

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

472

West Virginia University 1 First Year Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia University 1 First Year Experience FAQs · What is a First-Year Seminar? · Who must the knowledge and skills necessary for academic success. What are the goals and objectives of FYS? 1. Set

Mohaghegh, Shahab

473

Multi-frequency cable vibration experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of Multi-Frequency cable vibration experiments at Reynolds number 7600 were carried out at the MIT Tow Tank using the Virtual Cable Towing Apparatus (VCTA). Motions observed in a Direct Numerical Simulation of a ...

Wiggins, Andrew (Andrew Dale)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A phenomenology of Galileo's experiments with pendulums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenology of Galileo's experiments with pendulums PAOLO PALMIERI* Abstract. The paper reports in the context of Galileo's writings. The methodology is based on a phenomenological approach to Galileo

Machery, Edouard

475

UEME : the underground electronic music experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The global electronic music scene has remained underground for its entire lifespan, momentarily materializing during an event, a place defined by the music performed and the people who desire the experience. As festivals ...

Ciraulo, Christopher Samuel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Laser experiments explore the hidden sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, the laser experiments BMV and GammeV, searching for light shining through walls, have published data and calculated new limits on the allowed masses and couplings for axion-like particles. In this note we point out that these experiments can serve to constrain a much wider variety of hidden-sector particles such as, e.g., minicharged particles and hidden-sector photons. The new experiments improve the existing bounds from the older BFRT experiment by a factor of two. Moreover, we use the new PVLAS constraints on a possible rotation and ellipticity of light after it has passed through a strong magnetic field to constrain pure minicharged particle models. For masses <~0.05 eV, the charge is now restricted to be less than (3-4)x10^(-7) times the electron electric charge. This is the best laboratory bound and comparable to bounds inferred from the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

M. Ahlers; H. Gies; J. Jaeckel; J. Redondo; A. Ringwald

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

Experiments with interacting Bose and Fermi gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past few years, the study of trapped fermionic atoms evolved from the first cooling experiments which produced quantum degenerate samples to becoming one of the most exciting branches of current atomic physics ...

Stan, Claudiu Andrei

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

ORISE: Recent Graduate Research Experiences - Heather Lavalleur  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at NETL, she set up an experiment using pressure vessels"similar to little rice cookers, according to Lavalleur- to simulate the pressure and temperatures of the deep-well...

479

Fracture of Thermosetting Polymers: Experiments and Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by BRAD EVIN BURGESS FRACTURE OF THERMOSETTING POLYMERS: EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING Approved by: Research Advisor: Amine Benzerga Associate Dean for Undergraduate... Scholars Thesis by BRAD EVIN BURGESS iii ABSTRACT Fracture of Thermosetting Polymers: Experiments and Modeling. (April 2009) Brad Evin Burgess Department of Aerospace Engineering Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Amine Benzerga...

Benzerga, Amine; Burgess, Brad

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

480

Plasma flow switch experiment on Procyon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results obtained from a series of plasma flow switch experiments done on the Procyon explosive pulse power generator. These experiments involved switching into a fixed inductance dummy load and also into a dynamic implosion load. The results indicated that the switch did fairly well at switching current into the load, but the results for the implosion are more ambiguous. The results are compared to calculations and the implications for future plasma flow switch work are discussed.

Benage, J.F. Jr.; Bowers, R.; Peterson, D. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-nuclear weapons experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Why Eppley and Hannah's thought experiment fails  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that Eppley and Hannah's thought experiment establishing that gravity must be quantized is fatally flawed. The device they propose, even if built, cannot establish their claims, nor is it plausible that it can be built with any materials compatible with the values of c ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), G. Finally the device, and any reasonable modification of it, would be so massive as to be within its own Schwarzschild radius--a fatal flaw for any thought experiment.

Mattingly, James [Philosophy Department, Georgetown University, 221 New North, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Storage Experiments with Texas Citrus Fruit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 446 k -. APRIL, 1932 a' -, ' 'STORAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT AGRICULTURAL... fruit in cold storage. ject of this work was to determine the principal causes of loss of ruit in cold storage under ValIey conditions, and to study the effect ain factors on the keeping quality of fruit. evident that pitting, scald, and stem-end rot...

Friend, W. H. (William Heartsill); Bach, Walter J. (Walter Johnson)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2006. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2006 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam in neutrino and antineutrino modes, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and SY 120 activities.

Brice, S.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Holmes, S.; James, C.; Lee, W.; Louis, W.; Moore, C.; Plunkett, R.; Raja, R.; /Fermilab

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most complete data sets describing tropical convection ever collected will result from the upcoming Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the area around Darwin, Northern Australia in January and February 2006. The aims of the experiment, which will be operated in conjunction with the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin, will be to examine convective cloud systems from their initial stages through to the decay of the cirrus generated and to measure their impact on the environment. The experiment will include an unprecedented network of ground-based observations (soundings, active and passive remote sensors) combined with low, mid and high altitude aircraft for in-situ and remote sensing measurements. A crucial outcome of the experiment will be a data set suitable to provide the forcing and evaluation data required by cloud resolving and single column models as well as global climate models (GCMs) with the aim to contribute to parameterization development. This data set will provide the necessary link between the observed cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a large multi-agency experiment including substantial contributions from the United States DOE ARM program, ARM-UAV program, NASA, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, EU programs and many universities.

May, Peter T.; Mather, James H.; Vaughan, Geraint; Jakob, Christian; McFarquhar, Greg; Bower, Keith; Mace, Gerald G.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Validation of the BERT Point Source Inversion Scheme Using the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Experiment Dataset - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A terrorist attack in a U.S. city utilizing biological weapons could have severe consequences. A biological agent could be aerosolized and emitted into the air in the middle of a city, invisibly traveling with the winds, and dosing an unknowing populace. The magnitude of the problem would only be revealed as sick people started arriving several days later at hospitals with symptoms, many already too ill to be saved. A national program has deployed a network of biological agent collectors in U.S. cities to provide early detection of a bio-weapon attack, thereby hastening medical intervention and potentially saving many thousands of lives. In fact, the most effective treatment takes place prior to infection or in its early stages and early warning might reduce the disease progression and, consequently, the possibility of an outbreak. If a biological attack were to occur in a city, one or more collectors may register hits with specific dosages and the city would be alerted that an attack had taken place. This piece of information alone, however, would not be enough to determine how serious the attack was, i.e., how much biological agent was released into the air and where the bio-plume traveled. The first responders and public health communities will want to know what regions were impacted, how many persons might get sick, which people most need medical supplies, and where to clean up. The law enforcement community will want to look for forensic evidence at the release location. The Bio-Agent Event Reconstruction Tool (BERT) has been developed in order to recreate what might have happened during an airborne biological agent attack based on biological agent collector measurements and wind collectors mounted around a city. The tool can be used to estimate possible release areas while eliminating other areas, and can estimate bounds on the amount of material released. The tool can then be used to project forward from the possible source areas to estimate potential hazard zones. Due to a unique source inversion technique - called the upwind collector footprint approach - the tool runs fast and the source regions can be determined in a few minutes. In this report, we provide an overview of the BERT framework, followed by a description of the source inversion technique. The Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment held in Oklahoma City that was used to validate BERT is then described. Subsequent sections describe the metrics used for evaluation, the comparison of the experimental data and BERT output, and under what conditions the BERT tool succeeds and performs poorly. Results are aggregated in different ways (e.g., daytime vs. nighttime releases, 1 vs. 2 vs. 3 hit collectors) to determine if BERT shows any systematic errors. Finally, recommendations are given for how to improve the code and procedures for optimizing performance in operational mode.

Brambilla, Sara [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

486

Early Results from the Qweak Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A subset of results from the recently completed Jefferson Lab Qweak experiment are reported. This experiment, sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model, exploits the small parity-violating asymmetry in elastic ep scattering to provide the first determination of the protons weak charge Qweak(p). The experiment employed a 180 uA longitudinally polarized 1.16 GeV electron beam on a 35 cm long liquid hydrogen target. Scattered electrons corresponding to Q2 of 0.025 GeV2 were detected in eight Cerenkov detectors arrayed symmetrically around the beam axis. The goals of the experiment were to provide a measure of Qweak(p) to 4.2 percent (combined statistical and systematic error), which implies a measure of sin2(thetaw) at the level of 0.3 percent, and to help constrain the vector weak quark charges C1u and C1d. The experimental method is described, with particular focus on the challenges associated with the worlds highest power LH2 target. The new constraints on C1u and C1d provided by the subset of the experiments data analyzed to date will also be shown, together with the extracted weak charge of the neutron.

D. Androic; D. S. Armstrong; A. Asaturyan; T. Averett; J. Balewski; J. Beaufait; R. S. Beminiwattha; J. Benesch; F. Benmokhtar; J. Birchall; R. D. Carlini; G. D. Cates; J. C. Cornejo; S. Covrig; M. M. Dalton; C. A. Davis; W. Deconinck; J. Diefenbach; J. F. Dowd; J. A. Dunne; D. Dutta; W. S. Duvall; M. Elaasar; W. R. Falk; J. M. Finn; T. Forest; D. Gaskel; M. T. W. Gericke; J. Grames; V. M. Gray; K. Grimm; F. Guo; J. R. Hoskins; K. Johnston; D. Jones; M. Jones; R. Jones; M. Kargiantoulakis; P. M. King; E. Korkmaz; S. Kowalski; J. Leacock; J. Leckey; A. R. Lee; J. H. Lee; L. Lee; S. MacEwan; D. Mack; J. A. Magee; R. Mahurin; J. Mammei; J. Martin; M. J. McHugh; D. Meekins; J. Mei; R. Michaels; A. Micherdzinska; A. Mkrtchyan; H. Mkrtchyan; N. Morgan; K. E. Myers; A. Narayan; L. Z. Ndukum; V. Nelyubin; Nuruzzaman; W. T. H van Oers; A. K. Opper; S. A. Page; J. Pan; K. Paschke; S. K. Phillips; M. L. Pitt; M. Poelker; J. F. Rajotte; W. D. Ramsay; J. Roche; B. Sawatzky; T. Seva; M. H. Shabestari; R. Silwal; N. Simicevic; G. R. Smith; P. Solvignon; D. T. Spayde; A. Subedi; R. Subedi; R. Suleiman; V. Tadevosyan; W. A. Tobias; V. Tvaskis; B. Waidyawansa; P. Wang; S. P. Wells; S. A. Wood; S. Yang; R. D. Young; S. Zhamkochyan

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

487

AGR-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the current state of planning for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment will be irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The test will contain six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule will contain a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. The irradiation is planned for about 700 effective full power days (approximately 2.4 calendar years) with a time-averaged, volume-average temperature of approximately 1050 °C. Average fuel burnup, for the entire test, will be greater than 17.7 % FIMA, and the fuel will experience fast neutron fluences between 2.4 and 4.5 x 1025 n/m2 (E>0.18 MeV).

John T. Maki

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Incorporating Experience Curves in Appliance Standards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical analyses in support of U.S. energy conservation standards for residential appliances and commercial equipment have typically assumed that manufacturing costs and retail prices remain constant during the projected 30-year analysis period. There is, however, considerable evidence that this assumption does not reflect real market prices. Costs and prices generally fall in relation to cumulative production, a phenomenon known as experience and modeled by a fairly robust empirical experience curve. Using price data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and shipment data obtained as part of the standards analysis process, we present U.S. experience curves for room air conditioners, clothes dryers, central air conditioners, furnaces, and refrigerators and freezers. These allow us to develop more representative appliance price projections than the assumption-based approach of constant prices. These experience curves were incorporated into recent energy conservation standards for these products. The impact on the national modeling can be significant, often increasing the net present value of potential standard levels in the analysis. In some cases a previously cost-negative potential standard level demonstrates a benefit when incorporating experience. These results imply that past energy conservation standards analyses may have undervalued the economic benefits of potential standard levels.

Garbesi, Karina; Chan, Peter; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Kantner, Colleen; Lekov, Alex; Meyers, Stephen; Rosenquist, Gregory; Buskirk, Robert Van; Yang, Hung-Chia; Desroches, Louis-Benoit