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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Energy Use In American Food Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dale Pfeiffer (2006, 29) opens the fifth chapter of his book Eating Fossil Fuels with the statement, “Current civilization is founded upon an abundance of cheap energy derived from hydrocarbons.” He presents the natural extension of that premise to food production in the opening of his sixth chapter, “Modern industrial agriculture is unsustainable. It has been pushed to the limit and is in

Michael Minn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Food Holding Cabinets to someone by E-mail Hot Food Holding Cabinets to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

3

IMPACTS OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON FOOD SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for a healthy and active life”. This definition was adopted at the World Food Summit in 1996 (FAO, 1996) when references to food safety,

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 8 Barriers to Soy Protein Applications in Food Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 8 Barriers to Soy Protein Applications in Food Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

5

Biocatalysis and Biotechnology for Functional Foods and Industrial Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Divided into two sections, this book covers the latest applications for enzyme catalysis, biotransformation, bioconversion, fermentation, genetic engineering, and product recove Biocatalysis and Biotechnology for Functional Foods and Industrial Products H

6

Application of controlled thermonuclear reactor fusion energy for food production  

SciTech Connect

Food and energy shortages in many parts of the world in the past two years raise an immediate need for the evaluation of energy input in food production. The present paper investigates systematically (1) the energy requirement for food production, and (2) the provision of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy for major energy intensive sectors of food manufacturing. Among all the items of energy input to the ''food industry,'' fertilizers, water for irrigation, food processing industries, such as beet sugar refinery and dough making and single cell protein manufacturing, have been chosen for study in detail. A controlled thermonuclear power reactor was used to provide electrical and thermal energy for all these processes. Conceptual design of the application of controlled thermonuclear power, water and air for methanol and ammonia synthesis and single cell protein production is presented. Economic analysis shows that these processes can be competitive. (auth)

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hot Food Holding Cabinets Hot Food Holding Cabinets Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets October 7, 2013 - 11:08am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including hot food holding cabinets, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying the label, check the qualified products lists maintained on the ENERGY STAR website. This product category overview covers the following: Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements

8

Global Water Availability and Requirements for Future Food Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares, spatially explicitly and at global scale, per capita water availability and water requirements for food production presently (1971–2000) and in the future given climate and population change (2070–99). A vegetation and ...

D. Gerten; J. Heinke; H. Hoff; H. Biemans; M. Fader; K. Waha

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 11 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Other Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 11 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Other Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioche

10

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 15 Formation and Content of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 15 Formation and Content of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

11

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 16 Determination of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods and Biological Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 16 Determination of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods and Biological Samples Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition

12

Dr Writer s Food Products Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dr Writer s Food Products Pvt Ltd Dr Writer s Food Products Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Dr. Writerâ€(tm)s Food Products Pvt. Ltd. Place Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Sector Biomass Product Mumbai-based biomass project developer. Coordinates 19.076191°, 72.875877° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":19.076191,"lon":72.875877,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

Use of cooling-temperature heat for sustainable food production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food production and energy are undoubtedly interlinked. However, at present food production depends almost exclusively on direct use of stored energy sources, may they be nuclear-, petroleum- or bio-based. Furthermore, non-storage based “renewable” energy systems, like wind and solar, need development before bering able to contribute at a significant level. This presentation will point towards surplus heat as a way to bridge the gap between today’s food systems and truly sustainable ones, suitable to be performed in urban and peri-urban areas. Considering that arable land and fresh water resources are the base for our present food systems, but are limited, in combination with continued urbanisation, such solutions are urgently needed. By combining the use of surplus energy with harvest of society’s organic side flows, like e.g. food waste and aquatic based cash crops, truly sustainable and urban close food systems are possible at a level of significance also for global food security.

CERN. Geneva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 15 Food Uses for Soybean Oil and Alternatives to Trans Fatty Acids in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 15 Food Uses for Soybean Oil and Alternatives to Trans Fatty Acids in Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science &

15

Soy Protein ProductsChapter 6 Uses in Food Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soy Protein Products Chapter 6 Uses in Food Systems Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry 92B3B17CCACD0D1166530AEA8D994D92 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Uses in

16

Frying Technology and PracticesChapter 9 Technology of Coating and Frying Food Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frying Technology and Practices Chapter 9 Technology of Coating and Frying Food Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

17

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 14 Food Use of Whole Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 14 Food Use of Whole Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

18

Energy production from food industry wastewaters using bioelectrochemical cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conversion of waste and renewable resources to energy using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is an upcoming technology for enabling a cleaner and sustainable environment. This paper assesses the energy production potential from the US food industry wastewater resource. It also reports on an experimental study investigating conversion of wastewater from a local milk dairy plant to electricity. An MFC anode biocatalyst enriched on model sugar and organic acid substrates was used as the inoculum for the dairy wastewater MFC. The tests were conducted using a two-chamber MFC with a porous three dimensional anode and a Pt/C air-cathode. Power densities up to 690 mW/m2 (54 W/m3) were obtained. Analysis of the food industry wastewater resource indicated that MFCs can potentially recover 2 to 260 kWh/ton of food processed from wastewaters generated during food processing, depending on the biological oxygen demand and volume of water used in the process. A total of 1960 MW of power can potentially be produced from US milk industry wastewaters alone. Hydrogen is an alternate form of energy that can be produced using bioelectrochemical cells. Approximately 2 to 270 m3 of hydrogen can be generated per ton of the food processed. Application of MFCs for treatment of food processing wastewaters requires further investigations into electrode design, materials, liquid flow management, proton transfer, organic loading and scale-up to enable high power densities at the larger scale. Potential for water recycle also exists, but requires careful consideration of the microbiological safety and regulatory aspects and the economic feasibility of the process.

Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Food and Yard Waste Compost as a Nutrient Source for Corn Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Utilizing food and yard waste (FYW) compost for plant production requires determination of application rates that support crop production, improve soil properties and avoid excessive… (more)

Garnett, Angela

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Effective Supply Chain Management Strategy for Food Products: An Insight to Linked Partnerships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores and extends the supply chain management strategy for food products effectively and efficiently through analysis of insights to linked partnerships within the supply chain due to the possibility of a global food crisis. The required ... Keywords: Food Crisis Resolution, Logistics Management, Strategic Partnership, Supply Chain Management Strategy, Supply Chain Strategy, Supply Chain for Agricultural Products

Witaya Krajaysri

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Improving productivity in food processing industries using simulation: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process optimization is a major decision problem when drawing a balance between meeting variable demands and maintaining the quality of products in food processing industries. Simulation is a useful technique to study the effects of system changes in ... Keywords: business process reengineering, food processing, production planning, productivity, simulation models

Seraj Yousef Abed

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Representation of Energy Use in the Food Products Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional representations of energy in the manufacturing sector have tended to represent energy end-uses rather than actual energy service demands. While this representation if quite adequate for understanding how energy is used today, for forecasting future technology choices it is creates a rigid representation of how future energy is used. This representation can restrict the range of technology choices considered, particularly for fuel switching and on-site conversion processes such as combined heat and power (CHP). This paper discusses the differences between energy end-uses and service demands, proposes an approach for approximating service demands and discusses the ramifications of this alternative representation to energy modeling. An example for food products manufacturing (NAICS 311) is provided as an example.

Elliott, N. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Production of Biogas from Wastewaters of Food Processing Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Process used in converting biodegradable, soluble, organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters to a directly-burnable biogas composed mainly of methane has been developed, tested, and commercially applied in Holland. Operations on wastewater from the processing of sugar beets have shown hydraulic retention times of less than 10 hours with reactor loadings of at least 10 Kg COD per m3 digester volume per day and purification efficiencies exceeding 90%. Biogas production is at a rate of about 1 therm (100000 BTU) per 10 Kg COD treated. A moderately sized (1000 m3) wastewater treatment plant processing the order of 10000 Kg COD per day will, therefore, produce the order of 1000 therms of energy per day while, at the same time, reducing the COD level in the effluent by an order of magnitude. The set of conditions required for efficient operation of this anaerobic process will be discussed. The process is unique in its mixed sludge bed approach allowing for tolerance of swings in Ph (6-8) at relatively low temperatures (32 C - 38 C) which can be readily achieved from most wastewater streams with little expenditure of additional energy. Sludge production is remarkably low, only about 5% of the COD loading, greatly alleviating disposal problems. These characteristics are conducive for the use of the anaerobic process to recover energy from a variety of wastewaters rich in carbohydrate-type substances as produced routinely as a by product of many types of food processing activities.

Sax, R. I.; Holtz, M.; Pette, K. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Distant harvest : the production and price of organic food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic food is growing in popularity, enjoying a 15 to 20% increase in sales, yearly, since about 1997, according to the Organic Trade Association. Organic produce makes up about 2% of the United States' total food sales ...

Sherburne, Morgan (Morgan L.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 3 Soy Isoflavones: Chemistry, Processing Effects, Health Benefits, and Commercial Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 3 Soy Isoflavones: Chemistry, Processing Effects, Health Benefits, and Commercial Production Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

26

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 19 Food Uses of Palm Oil and Its Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 19 Food Uses of Palm Oil and Its Components Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

27

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 20 Palm Oleochemicals in Non-food Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 20 Palm Oleochemicals in Non-food Applications Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemis

28

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients\tChapter 2 Edible Soybean Products in the Current Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 2 Edible Soybean Products in the Current Market Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

29

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 22 Availability and Labeling of Flaxseed Food Products and Supplements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 22 Availability and Labeling of Flaxseed Food Products and Supplements Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry P

30

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 9 Value-Added Products from Extruding-Expelling of Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 9 Value-Added Products from Extruding-Expelling of Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

31

Effects Of Cash Crop Production On Food Crop Productivity In Zimbabwe: Synergies Or Trade-Offs?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is published by the Department of Agricultural Economics and the Department of Economics, Michigan State University (MSU). Support for this study was provided by the Food Security and Productivity Unit of the Productive Sectors Growth and Environmental Division, Office of Sustainable Development, Africa Bureau, USAID (AFR/SD/PSGE/FSP), through the Food Security II Cooperative Agreement between Michigan State University and the United States Agency for International Development, through the Africa Bureau's Office of Sustainable Development, Africa Bureau, AID/Washington. Govereh is a visiting research scholar and Jayne is a visiting associate professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics, Michigan State University. The authors acknowledge the help of Paul Strasberg, Takashi Yamano, Maxwell Mudhara, and E. Mazhangara in the preparation of the paper; all remaining errors are ours. ii

Carl Liedholm; Michael T. Weber; Jones Govereh; Jones Govereh; T.S. Jayne; T. S. Jayne

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2001, Texas agriculture generated $14 billion in cash receipts. The production, processing, distribution and consumption of food and fiber products contributes substantially to the economy of Texas. This publication reports the contributions of the food and fiber system and individual commodities.

Nelson, Gene

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional FoodsChapter 4 Production of Marine Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods Chapter 4 Production of Marine Oils Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Production of

34

UNDERSTANDING THE LINK BETWEEN ETHANOL PRODUCTION AND FOOD PRICES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Food prices have increased rapidly in recent years, and so has ethanol consumption. Some studies have claimed that there is a connection between those two.… (more)

Monteiro, Nathalia Ferreira

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

GULF OF MEXICO SHRIMP PRODUCTION: A FOOD WEB HYPOTHESISl R. WARREN FLINT AND NANCY N. RABALAIS'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GULF OF MEXICO SHRIMP PRODUCTION: A FOOD WEB HYPOTHESISl R. WARREN FLINT AND NANCY N. RABALAIS. With the comple- tion of a 3-yr multidisciplinary environmental study of the south Texas continental shelf (Flint

36

AOCS/SFA Edible Oils Manual, 2nd EditionChapter 4 Oil Processing for the Production of Snack Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS/SFA Edible Oils Manual, 2nd Edition Chapter 4 Oil Processing for the Production of Snack Foods Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology AOCS 9BB55FA134CE6032BA8427D4D9656634 Press Downloadable pdf ...

37

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study`s scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study's scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Absorption of zinc and iron by rats fed meals containing sorghum food products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc and iron absorption from freeze-dried traditionally-prepared sorghum food products was studied in rats. After a period of marginal zinc or iron depletion, rats were fed test meals containing 1 of 4 sorghum foods cooked maize gruel or an inorganic mineral each of which was extrinsically labeled with either /sup 65/Zn or /sup 59/Fe before being added to the diets. Absorption was determined by whole body percent retention of the initial radioisotope dose over a period of 19 days. Iron was highly available from all products tested (75-83%) with no significant differences in absorption among groups (p>0.05). Zinc from fermented Aceta (97%) was more available than that from the other sorghum products (69-78%) or maize gruel (76%). Zinc from acid To (78%) and Aceta (97%) was as available as that from zinc oxide in the control diet (93%) (p>0.05). There were no significant differences in zinc absorption among groups fed Acid To (78%), neutral To (76), alkali To (69%) or maize gruel (76%) (psorghum foods. Iron and zinc were highly available from all sorghum foods. Reduction phytate by fermentation increased Zn availability.

Stuart, S.M.A.; Johnson, P.E.; Hamaker, B.; Kirleis, A.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 11 CLA in Functional Food: Enrichment of Animal Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 11 CLA in Functional Food: Enrichment of Animal Products Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Downloadable pdf of Cha

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sludge to increase biogas production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small increase in methane production was observed applying sonication pretreatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas productions between 720 and 1100 mL/Lreactor day were achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Volatile solids removal efficiencies ranged between 53% and 60%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower methane yields were obtained when operating under thermophilic conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum OLR in lab-scale CSTR was 1.2-1.3 g VS/L day (HRT: 20 days). - Abstract: Anaerobic co-digestion strategies are needed to enhance biogas production, especially when treating certain residues such as cattle/pig manure. This paper presents a study of co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sewage sludge. With the aim of maximising biogas yields, a series of experiments were carried out under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions using continuously stirred-tank reactors, operating at different hydraulic residence times. Pretreatment with ultrasound was also applied to compare the results with those obtained with non-pretreated waste. Specific methane production decreases when increasing the OLR and decreasing HRT. The maximum value obtained was 603 LCH{sub 4}/kg VS{sub feed} for the co-digestion of a mixture of 70% manure, 20% food waste and 10% sewage sludge (total solid concentration around 4%) at 36 Degree-Sign C, for an OLR of 1.2 g VS/L day. Increasing the OLR to 1.5 g VS/L day led to a decrease of around 20-28% in SMP. Lower methane yields were obtained when operating at 55 Degree-Sign C. The increase in methane production when applying ultrasound to the feed mixtures does not compensate for the energy spent in this pretreatment.

Maranon, E., E-mail: emara@uniovi.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University Institute of Technology of Asturias, Campus of Gijon, University of Oviedo, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Castrillon, L.; Quiroga, G.; Fernandez-Nava, Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University Institute of Technology of Asturias, Campus of Gijon, University of Oviedo, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Gomez, L.; Garcia, M.M. [Zero Emissions Technology, 41018 Seville (Spain)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

The use of daylight in the design of a controlled environment for food production in the Caribbean and other equatorial climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the use of daylight in the design of a controlled environment for food production in the Caribbean and other Equatorial climates. An expanding population has put a tremendous burden on the food ...

Charles, Curtis B

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hydrogen production from food wastes and gas post-treatment by CO{sub 2} adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dark fermentation process of food wastes was studied over an extended period. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreasing the HRT of the process negatively affected the specific gas production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of CO{sub 2} was successfully attained using a biomass type activated carbon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2} concentration in the range of 85-95% was obtained for the treated gas-stream. - Abstract: The production of H{sub 2} by biological means, although still far from being a commercially viable proposition, offers great promise for the future. Purification of the biogas obtained may lead to the production of highly concentrated H{sub 2} streams appropriate for industrial application. This research work evaluates the dark fermentation of food wastes and assesses the possibility of adsorbing CO{sub 2} from the gas stream by means of a low cost biomass-based adsorbent. The reactor used was a completely stirred tank reactor run at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) while the concentration of solids of the feeding stream was kept constant. The results obtained demonstrate that the H{sub 2} yields from the fermentation of food wastes were affected by modifications in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) due to incomplete hydrolysis. The decrease in the duration of fermentation had a negative effect on the conversion of the substrate into soluble products. This resulted in a lower amount of soluble substrate being available for metabolisation by H{sub 2} producing microflora leading to a reduction in specific H{sub 2} production. Adsorption of CO{sub 2} from a gas stream generated from the dark fermentation process was successfully carried out. The data obtained demonstrate that the column filled with biomass-derived activated carbon resulted in a high degree of hydrogen purification. Co-adsorption of H{sub 2}S onto the activated carbon also took place, there being no evidence of H{sub 2}S present in the bio-H{sub 2} exiting the column. Nevertheless, the concentration of H{sub 2}S was very low, and this co-adsorption did not affect the CO{sub 2} capture capacity of the activated carbon.

Redondas, V. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Leon, IRENA-ESTIA, Avda. de Portugal 41, Leon 24071 (Spain); Gomez, X., E-mail: xagomb@unileon.es [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Leon, IRENA-ESTIA, Avda. de Portugal 41, Leon 24071 (Spain); Garcia, S.; Pevida, C.; Rubiera, F. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Moran, A. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Leon, IRENA-ESTIA, Avda. de Portugal 41, Leon 24071 (Spain); Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Consumer approval of genetic modification of food products: a comparison of United States and South Korean perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic modification presents the potential to advance not only agricultural production but to increase quality of life as well. The potential this innovation presents will be irrelevant if the public is unwilling to accept and adopt it. The following study examines public perceptions of biotechnology, specifically the consumer approval of genetically modified food products. This study was based on data collected from a national survey conducted in both the United States and South Korea. The United States survey was designed to be nationally representative and consisted of 1201 respondents. The South Korean survey was also designed to be nationally representative and consisted of 1054 respondents Analysis was conducted using two questions from the survey questionnaire as dependent variables: (1) approval of the use of genetic modification in the creation of plant-based food products, and (2) approval of the use of genetic modification in the creation of animal-based food products. This study utilized probit models for binary choice and ordered probit models to analyze the likelihood of consumer approval of the use of genetic modification for the creation of food products. Findings indicated that consumers in the U.S. and South Korea who possessed an accurate knowledge of the applications and outcomes of GM technology were more likely to approve of its use for the creation of foods than those who had inaccurate or no knowledge of the technology. Additionally, the majority of consumers in the U.S. and South Korea believe that GM foods should be labeled as such. Those consumers who felt GM labeling to be necessary were less likely to approve of the GM of foods than those who did not feel GM labeling to be necessary. It was also found that consumers in both countries are less approving of the GM of animals than the GM of plants. Consumer approval of the use of genetic modification in the creation of food products can be increased with proper education that provides accurate knowledge of the applications of GM. Labeling of GM products is likely to result in a decrease in demand, which may be offset by public educational campaigns.

Gillett, Mary Caperton

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Comparison of emissions from selected commercial kitchen appliances and food products  

SciTech Connect

Effluents have been measured from various grease-producing cooking processes in an attempt to quantify the emissions that enter typical commercial kitchen exhaust hoods. The appliances tested include gas and electric versions of single-sided griddles, open-vat deep fat fryers, under-fired broilers, full size convection ovens, and six burner ranges. Food products include hamburger, chicken breast, fries, sausage pizza, and a spaghetti meal. Emission data were obtained for particles, grease vapor, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and hydrocarbons. Velocity and temperature fields were measured in the plume above each appliance. Results show that a large fraction of the grease emission is typically in vapor form. The broilers emit significantly more particles less than 2.5 {micro}m in size (PM 2.5) than the other appliances tested. Combustion by-products were measured for all gas appliances. Both the gas and electric broilers emitted significant amounts of CO when hamburgers were cooked. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were below detectable limits in all tests.

Kuehn, T.H.; Gerstler, W.D.; Pui, D.Y.H.; Ramsey, J.W.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

REVIEW Algal Photosynthesis as the Primary Driver for a Sustainable Development in Energy, Feed, and Food Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract High oil prices and global warming that accompany the use of fossil fuels are an incentive to find alternative forms of energy supply. Photosynthetic biofuel production represents one of these since for this, one uses renewable resources. Sunlight is used for the conversion of water and CO2 into biomass. Two strategies are used in parallel: plantbased production via sugar fermentation into ethanol and biodiesel production through transesterification. Both, however, exacerbate other problems, including regional nutrient balancing and the world's food supply, and suffer from the modest efficiency of photosynthesis. Maximizing the efficiency of natural and engineered photosynthesis is therefore of utmost importance. Algal photosynthesis is the system of choice for this particularly for energy applications. Complete conversion of CO2 into biomass is not necessary for this. Innovative methods of synthetic biology allow one to combine photosynthetic and fermentative metabolism via the so-called Photanol approach to form biofuel directly from Calvin cycle intermediates through use of the naturally transformable cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Beyond providing transport energy and chemical feedstocks, photosynthesis will continue to be used for food and feed applications. Also for this application, arguments of efficiency will become more and more important as the size of the world population continues to increase. Photosynthetic cells can be used for food applications in various innovative forms, e.g., as a substitute for the fish proteins in the diet supplied to carnivorous fish or perhaps—after acid

Ida G. Anemaet; Martijn Bekker; Klaas J. Hellingwerf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Declining global per capita agricultural production and warming oceans threaten food security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per capita production levels in 2030 similar to those of theby 14% between 2008 and 2030. Climate change is likely tocereal production by 2030. If done sustainably, raising

Funk, Chris C.; Brown, Molly E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Enzymes and microorganisms in food industry waste processing and conversion to useful products: a review of the literature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bioconversion of food processing wastes is receiving increased attention with the realization that waste components represent an available and utilizable resource for conversion to useful products. Liquid wastes are characterized as dilute streams containing sugars, starches, proteins, and fats. Solid wastes are generally cellulosic, but may contain other biopolymers. The greatest potential for economic bioconversion is represented by processes to convert cellulose to glucose, glucose to alcohol and protein, starch to invert sugar, and dilute waste streams to methane by anaerobic digestion. Microbial or enzymatic processes to accomplish these conversions are described.

Carroad, P.A.; Wilke, C.R.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The production of chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1993--March 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic objective of this project is to convert waste streams from the food processing industry to usable fuels and chemicals using novel bioreactors. These bioreactors should allow economical utilization of waste (whey, waste sugars, waste starch, bottling wastes, candy wastes, molasses, and cellulosic wastes) by the production of ethanol, acetone/butanol, organic acids (acetic, lactic, and gluconic), yeast diacetyl flavor, and antifungal compounds. Continuous processes incorporating various processing improvements such as simultaneous product separation and immobilized cells are being developed to allow commercial scale utilization of waste stream. The production of ethanol by a continuous reactor-separator is the process closest to commercialization with a 7,500 liter pilot plant presently sited at an Iowa site to convert whey lactose to ethanol. Accomplishments during 1993 include installation and start-up of a 7,500 liter ICRS for ethanol production at an industry site in Iowa; Donation and installation of a 200 liter yeast pilot Plant to the project from Kenyon Enterprises; Modeling and testing of a low energy system for recovery of ethanol from vapor is using a solvent absorption/extractive distillation system; Simultaneous saccharification/fermentation of raw corn grits and starch in a stirred reactor/separator; Testing of the ability of `koji` process to ferment raw corn grits in a `no-cook` process.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, H.; Salicetti-Piazza, L.; Borgos-Rubio, N.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

The impact of including water constraints on food production within a CGE framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research explores the long-term relationship between water resources, irrigated land use change and crop production within a computable general equilibrium modeling framework. The modeling approach is developed on a ...

Baker, Jonathan (Jonathan Early)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Edible Oleogels: Structure and Health ImplicationsChapter 6 Candelilla Wax as an Organogelator for Vegetable Oils–An Alternative to Develop trans-free Products for the Food Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edible Oleogels: Structure and Health Implications Chapter 6 Candelilla Wax as an Organogelator for Vegetable Oils–An Alternative to Develop trans-free Products for the Food Industry Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology A2C008

52

The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year's project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Well production casing Brady No. 5 well, Geothermal Food Processors, Inc. , Fernley, Nevada. Falure analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Failure of the casing of the Brady No. 5 resulted from severe external corrosion. The well is located in a mineral flat and it is proposed that during wet periods the exterior of the casing was exposed to aerated saturated chloride and/or sulfate salt solutions. These solutions appear to have completely destroyed the surface conductor and upper string casing and associated cements. The production casing then corroded until mechanical failure occurred.

Ellis, P.F.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients is written to serve as a reference for food product developers, food technologists, nutritionists, plant breeders, academic and government professionals, college graduates, and anyone who is interested in learni

56

Graduate Study Food Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide to Graduate Study Field of Food Science and Technology Cornell University #12;Field of Food Science and Technology DE P A R T M E N T O F FO O D SC I E N C E A N D TE C H N O L O G Y Mission Science represents the application of the basic sciences, biotechnology, and engineering to the production

Walter, M.Todd

57

Peak Oil Food Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Network Network Jump to: navigation, search Name Peak Oil Food Network Place Crested Butte, Colorado Zip 81224 Website http://www.PeakOilFoodNetwork. References Peak Oil Food Network[1] LinkedIn Connections This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Peak Oil Food Network is a networking organization located in Crested Butte, Colorado, and is open to the general public that seeks to promote the creation of solutions to the challenge of food production impacted by the peak phase of global oil production. Private citizens are encouraged to join and contribute by adding comments, writing blog posts or adding to discussions about food and oil related topics. Peak Oil Food Network can be followed on Twitter at: http://www.Twitter.com/PeakOilFoodNtwk Peak Oil Food Network on Twitter

58

Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are serious concerns about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy and nutrient and water use efficiency of large-scale, first generation bio-energy feedstocks currently in use. A major question is whether biofuels obtained from these feedstocks are effective in combating climate change and what impact they will have on soil and water resources. Another fundamental issue relates to the magnitude and nature of their impact on food prices and ultimately on the livelihoods of the poor. A possible solution to overcome the current potentially large negative effects of large-scale biofuel production is developing second and third generation conversion techniques from agricultural residues and wastes and step up the scientific research efforts to achieve sustainable biofuel production practices. Until such sustainable techniques are available governments should scale back their support for and promotion of biofuels. Multipurpose feedstocks should be investigated making use of the bio-refinery concept (bio-based economy). At the same time, the further development of non-commercial, small scale

Science Council Secretariat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Soy Protein Products - Electronic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients is written to serve as a reference for food product developers, food technologists, nutritionists, plant breeders, academic and government professionals... Soy Protein Products - Electronic Version eChapters F

60

Functional Foods Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contains five (5) titles regarding functional foods. Functional Foods Package Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Value Packages Nutrition Health Food Science Biochemistry This Value Package includes: ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Transparency in complex dynamic food supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food supply chains are increasingly complex and dynamic due to (i) increasing product proliferation to serve ever diversifying and globalising markets as a form of mass customisation with resulting global flows of raw materials, ingredients and products, ... Keywords: Consumer and governmental demands, Food supply chain, Governance, Information systems, Quality and safety standards, Transparency

J. H. Trienekens; P. M. Wognum; A. J. M. Beulens; J. G. A. J. van der Vorst

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Moose Food  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moose Food Moose Food Name: Mrs. Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My husband & I own 30 acres of prime moose habitat. Unfortunately they have just about eaten up all of the aquatic browse. Either that or the hard winters in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the fact that we have a shallow lake has killed these plants the moose like. What would be best to plant native to our lakes in michigan for the moose? They like aquatic plants the best that we have observed from afar, but what kinds. Hope you can help. The biologist for our area is new & didn't have any names of aquatic plants. Replies: Dear Mrs. The following sites may be useful: http://www.mooseworld.com/moosebrowse.htm http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF9/910.html http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/taxbre/value_and_use.html

63

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 6 Harmonization of Cholesterol Oxidation Product Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 6 Harmonization of Cholesterol Oxidation Product Analysis Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

64

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 14 Cholesterol Oxidation Products: Other Biological Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 14 Cholesterol Oxidation Products: Other Biological Effects Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

65

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 13 Cholesterol Oxidation Products and Atherosclerosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 13 Cholesterol Oxidation Products and Atherosclerosis Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

66

Data - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data - Food Community Data - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Search Terms Category -Any- Agriculture Investment and Engineering Animals and Animal Systems Agriculture Fire Hazard Food/Non-Food Agricultural Products Geography and Environment Human Health and Nutrition International Trade Local and Regional Food Systems Markets, Prices, and Economics Natural Resources and Environment Plants and Plant Systems Agriculture Rural Development Science and Technology Water Quality Watershed Protection Items per page 25 50 100 Apply Name Downloads Rating Pesticide Data Program 1994 The USDA Pesticide Data Program (PDP) database provides national data on pesticide residues in food and water, with an emphasis on foods consumed by infants and children. PDP data are used primarily...

67

Business plan for the frozen food industry in Morocco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I develop a business plan for a frozen food company (Chiwate) that will operate in Morocco. Until very recently, the frozen food product-line in Morocco was very restricted. However, recent demographic and ...

Miri, Leila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

HEART SMART NUTRITION Prepare Food Right--Ensure It's Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lesson 4 HEART SMART NUTRITION Prepare Food Right--Ensure It's Light To prepare foods lower in fat Heart Smart? True or False ______ 1. A cholesterol- free product is also fat-free. True or False

69

Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Gender, IFIs and Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Haiti, the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere, suffers from chronic food insecurity (World Food Program, 2010). One third of the population is food insecure, the most vulnerable of whom are women and children. International Financial

Elizabeth Arend; Lisa Vitale

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 9 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Meat and Meat Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 9 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Meat and Meat Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutritio

72

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 8 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Milk and Dairy Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 8 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Milk and Dairy Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutriti

73

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 10 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Seafood and Seafood Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 10 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Seafood and Seafood Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

74

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 7 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Egg and Egg Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 7 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Egg and Egg Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition

75

Holiday Food Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Drive Food Drive Holiday Food Drive During the recent holiday food drive, employees donated enough food to provide about 23,604 holiday meals for Northern New Mexico families. More than 432 frozen turkeys were donated this year by employees and other donors during 'Bring a Turkey to Work Day,' an annual Lab event that takes places Thanksgiving week. September 16, 2013 LANL employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Giving Drives Ed Vigil Community Programs Office (505) 665-9205 Email Giving Drives Enrique Trujillo Community Programs Office (505) 665-6384 Email Helping feed Northern New Mexico families Community partners The Food Depot (Santa Fe) Del Norte Credit Union Smith's Food and Drug Giving Holiday Food Drive Holiday Gift Drive LANL Laces Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund

76

Creating visibility: understanding the design space for food waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Support for ecological sustainability is of growing interest and the over-consumption, production and disposal of foods are a major concern for sustainability, ethics and the economy. However, there is a deficit in current understandings of how technologies ... Keywords: food waste, human food interaction, in-home tour, mobile diary, qualitative study, sustainability

Eva Ganglbauer; Geraldine Fitzpatrick; Georg Molzer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Teaming Profile - McCain Foods and Gardner Denver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ID 83318 Business: Air Compressor Manufacturing Business: Food Processing Tom Beck Jordan Green Product Specialist Engineering Manager Phone: 217-231-5842 Phone: 630-857-4938...

78

Food and Agriculture Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International cereal prices (in US dollar terms) have been increasing since 2003, but it is domestic prices that affect food consumption and production. This paper analyzes, for seven large Asian countries, the extent to which domestic prices have increased since 2003 and presents several conclusions. First, the data show that the increases in world cereal prices have been accompanied by a real depreciation of the US dollar. For many countries (but not all), this depreciation has neutralized a substantial proportion of the increase in world prices. Second, domestic commodity specific policies in several of these Asian countries have further stabilized domestic prices relative to the change in world prices. This has been especially true for rice, the main staple food in the region, but it is also true for wheat. On average, through the end of 2007, the increase in real domestic rice prices was about onethird of the increase in real US dollar world market rice prices. Third, for the specific cases analyzed here, producer or farmgate prices have changed by approximately the same percentage as consumer prices. Thus, in these Asian countries, domestic markets seem to be transmitting price changes between farmers and consumers rather efficiently. Fourth, the

David Dawe; Of The United Nations; David Dawe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Food Sales | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sales Jump to: navigation, search Building Type Food Sales Definition Buildings used for retail or wholesale of food. Sub Categories grocery store or food market, gas station with...

80

Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found in the environment to provide a basis for comparison.

A. R. Smith; K. J. Thomas; E. B. Norman; D. L. Hurley; B. T. Lo; Y. D. Chan; P. V. Guillaumon; B. G. Harvey

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

82

The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1991--December 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year`s project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Pacific Sustainability Index Scores Consumer Food, Food Production, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations. Biofuel prices at wholesale reflect the buyers' value of these fuels, which includes the price. Biofuel prices at the wholesale level are the prices that link supply and demand for each type of biofuel July 2012 EPA and RFS2: Market Impacts of Biofuel Mandate Waiver Options

Morhardt, Emil

84

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 7 Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 7 Lipids Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing Press

85

The US Consumer Product Safety Commission's Conformity ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Foods, drugs, cosmetics, medical devices (FDA) ? Pesticides, rodenticides (EPA) ? Tobacco products (FDA) ? Firearms (BATF) Page 4. China ...

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

2012 Food for Thought  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as Safeway and Whole Foods, department stores like JC Penney and Sears, apparel companies Gap and VF Corporation, and DIY and big ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Food Structure & Functionality Forum Newsletter January 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the January 2013 Food Structure & Functionality Forum newsletter. Food Structure & Functionality Forum Newsletter January 2013 Food Structure & Functionality Forum Division division divisions food materials food structure Food Structure & Functional

88

West Pico Food | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pico Food Pico Food Jump to: navigation, search Name West Pico Food Place Vernon, California Sector Solar Product A distributor of wholesale frozen foods to supermarket chains in Southern California, which has had a solar installation built on its roof. Coordinates 42.761624°, -72.511495° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.761624,"lon":-72.511495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

Collaborate - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborate - Food Community Collaborate - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Collaborate This Food, Agriculture, and Rural Community establishes a unified point of access to data and statistics, and tools to identify relevant data sets. Providing researchers and other users of data and statistics with authoritative, high quality sources will realize greater benefits from public research, help to coordinate effort and reduce duplication in scientific investigation, and reveal new connections for innovative uses. It is hoped that this community will foster the development of new applications and tools to improve agricultural production, human health and nutrition, environmental benefits, and global food security and poverty

90

Designer Sorghum Combining the High Digestibility and Waxy Grain Traits of Sorghum for Improved Nutrition Bioethanol Beer Feed and Food Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L). Moench) is used for human consumption in parts of Africa and Asia and as an animal feed mainly in the U.S. Though sorghum grain contains higher amounts of protein than other cereal grains such as wheat and corn, it is not as readily available for enzyme degradation in humans and animals. Protein body matrices called kafirins surround the starch granules in sorghum. Because the protein is less digestible, the starch is also less digestible for biofuel production. However variation for this trait exists and the line P850029 has a higher protein digestibility compared to other normal grain sorghum lines. This increase in digestibility of protein is due to the rearrangement of the kafirins in the prolamin protein bodies where, the ?-kafirins are rearranged in the seed endosperm and the amount of ?-kafirin in the grain is also reduced. The assay to phenotype the HD trait is time consuming and unpredictable. So identifying a quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the protein digestibility trait in sorghum would be beneficial in breeding. A recombinant inbred lines (RILs) population derived from P850029 x ‘Sureno’, were developed and used to map QTL regulating the protein digestibility trait. A single QTL was identified on chromosome 1 between Xtxp43 and Xtxp329. Validation of the identified QTL was done on heterogenous inbred families (HIFs). The results validate the same QTL identified on the RIL population on chromosome 1. Later the high digestibility trait (HD) was integrated with the Waxy trait in sorghum. The Waxy (WX) sorghums have starch completely in the form of amylopectin. The effect of endosperm type on ethanol yield and fermentation efficiencies was studied among HD, WX and HD-WX lines. The HD-WX lines fermented in a shorter time i.e. completed fermentation in 48 h and their fermentation efficiencies were also higher around 90%. The DDGS of the HD-WX lines also had lower residual starch content and 50% higher amino acid lysine content when compared to wildtype sorghum. Moreover, the relation between endosperm traits and grain yield in sorghum has not been fully explored. In this study, we compared the yield and yield components of four unique endosperm phenotypes, HD, WX, HD-WX and wildtype lines. A total of 100 F2:4 derived recombinant inbred lines population from a cross between Tx2907/P850029 were selected with 25 lines from each HD, WX, HD-WX and wild-type line were included in the study. These lines were grown in three replications in College Station and Halfway, Texas in a randomized complete block design. The results show that there are no significant differences in the grain yield.

Jampala, Babitha

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 21 Soybean Production and Processing in Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 21 Soybean Production and Processing in Brazil Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutritio

92

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 2 Breeding, Genetics, and Production of Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 2 Breeding, Genetics, and Production of Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrit

93

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 3 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by Gas Chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 3 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by Gas Chromatography Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemi

94

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 5 Economics of Soybean Production, Marketing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 5 Economics of Soybean Production, Marketing, and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology He

95

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 19 Soy Protein Products, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 19 Soy Protein Products, Processing, and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nu

96

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 2 Extraction and Purification of Cholesterol Oxidation Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 2 Extraction and Purification of Cholesterol Oxidation Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pr

97

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

98

Summer Food Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMMER FOOD SAFETY SUMMER FOOD SAFETY Year after year, we hear and read the same advice: Handle food carefully in the summer because foodborne illness -- also known as "food poisoning" -- is more prevalent in warmer weather. Do foodborne illnesses increase during the summer months? If so, why? Yes, foodborne illnesses do increase during the summer, and the answer appears to be twofold. First, there are the natural causes. Bacteria are present throughout the environment in soil, air, water, and in the bodies of people and animals. These microorganisms grow faster in the warm summer months. Most foodborne bacteria grow fastest at temperatures from 90 to 110 °F. Bacteria also need moisture to flourish, and summer weather is often hot and humid. Given the right circumstances, harmful bacteria can quickly multiply on food to large numbers.

99

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Food Holding Cabinets ENERGY STAR Qualified Products Updated May 2012 FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product...

100

Effects of Biofuel Policies on World Food Insecurity -- A CGE Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The food vs. fuel debate has heated up since the 2008 global food crisis when major crop prices dramatically increased. Heavily subsidized biofuel production was blamed for diverting food crops from food production and diverting resources from food and feed production, triggering a food crisis globally and leading to increases in the world food insecure population. Few studies have quantified the effects of biofuel policies on world food prices and world food insecurity. This study added the Brazil and China's biofuel sectors to an existing global trade CGE model, and applies the measurement of food insecurity as developed by FAO. Alternative scenarios were food insecurity. Results are examined with focus on (1) effects on domestic biofuel productions, (2) change in food commodity productions and trade, (3) change in land use and land rents, and (4) change in regional undernourished populations. Results indicated that biofuel expansion is not cost competitive to traditional fossil fuel. Without any policy incentives, huge expansion of biofuel production is not likely under current technology. The conventional biofuel mandates in U.S., Brazil and China lead to increases in world food insecurity, while the advanced biofuel mandate in U.S. has the opposite effect. Subsidies to biofuels production help to lessen the increase in world food insecurity that is caused by increases in conventional biofuel production. Additionally, the effects from U.S. biofuel policies are smaller but more widespread than the effects from Brazil or China's biofuel policies. Overall, the long term effects of biofuel production expansion on world food insecurity are much smaller than expected.

Lu, Jiamin

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Food Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Sub Categories fast food, restaurant or cafeteria References EIA CBECS Building Types 1 References EIA CBECS...

102

Food science-based instruction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The food industry faces a shortage of graduates needed to fill scientific and technical positions available in the coming years, and university food science programs… (more)

Peacock, Amy Rowley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

10/1/2010 1 Biotech Foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for new materials and energy sources Develop Crops as production vehicles for medicines and vaccines) ­2000 American Society of Microbiology ­2000 American Medical Association ­2001 US National Research"... states Joel Cohen and colleagues in a brief issued by the International Food Policy Research Institute

Hammock, Bruce D.

104

Metro Vancouver: Designing for Urban Food Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

His work as a landscape architect over the past 17 years hasKunigk is a landscape architect and researcher at Greenskinson the role landscape architects and planners can take in

Roehr, Daniel; Kunigk, Isabel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Metro Vancouver: Designing for Urban Food Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

green streets, and green energy interventions in cities.farming, public space, green energy, social, and educationalFor example, energy intensive green house agriculture may

Roehr, Daniel; Kunigk, Isabel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Focus Area: Other Biofuels Topics: Training Material Website: www.fao.org/bioenergy/foodsecurity/befsci/en/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/bioenergy-and-food-security-criteria- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This website-created by the Bioenergy and food Security project of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)-provides policymakers and practitioners a set of criteria, indicators, good practices, and policy options for sustainable bioenergy production to

107

An evaluation of food security in Manitoba: an issue of sustainable supply.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The discipline of Sociology has been quiet regarding the production of food by industrial agriculture. However, there are issues that potentially undermine the ability of… (more)

Sasaki, Nicholas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Applying experimental economics to determine consumers' willingness to pay for food attributes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Changes in the features of food demand and consumption have moved from the mass consumption model towards an increasing qualitative differentiation of products and demand.… (more)

Van Zyl, Karlien

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Green food through green food: a human centered design approach to green food technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Real sustainability will only be possible by consuming less." A ubiquitous computing path to consume less while improving health is to help us consume less processed food (60-70% of US/UK diet) in favor of whole food. The paper shows both the ... Keywords: design, food, health, processed food

m.c. schraefel

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 10 Minor Constituents and Phytochemicals of Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 10 Minor Constituents and Phytochemicals of Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition -

111

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 13 Soybean Oil Modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 13 Soybean Oil Modification Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry P

112

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 12 Soybean Oil Purification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 12 Soybean Oil Purification Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry P

113

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 8 Soybean Proteins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 8 Soybean Proteins Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing

114

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 9 Soybean Carbohydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 9 Soybean Carbohydrates Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Proce

115

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 1 Cholesterol Oxidation Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 1 Cholesterol Oxidation Mechanisms Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   ...

116

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 11 Oil Recovery from Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 11 Oil Recovery from Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

117

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 9 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 9 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Brazil Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutri

118

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 7 The Economics of Malaysian Palm Oil Production, Marketing and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 7 The Economics of Malaysian Palm Oil Production, Marketing and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology H

119

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 10 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Nigeria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 10 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Nigeria Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nut

120

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 21 Oil Palm Biomass for Various Wood-based Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 21 Oil Palm Biomass for Various Wood-based Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioc

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 12 Origin and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Biological Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 12 Origin and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Biological Samples Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bi

122

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 5 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by Thin-Layer Chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 5 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by Thin-Layer Chromatography Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - B

123

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 4 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 4 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health -

124

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 17 Biological Effects of Phytosterol Oxidation Products, Future Research Areas and Concluding Remarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 17 Biological Effects of Phytosterol Oxidation Products, Future Research Areas and Concluding Remarks Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology

125

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

126

Michelle Springfield Food Insecurity: The prospects for Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................................................44 4 Kenya and Ethiopia as examples of food insecure countries ..........................................................................................................................................148 Food aid from developing countries Countries. IASSTD The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology IATP

Sheldon, Nathan D.

127

Fast food in a Chinese provincial city: a comparative analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than a decade ago American fast food entered the Chinese market. Since then the number of fast food and organized chain restaurants in China has multiplied. Chinese consumers, especially those who live in large urban areas, have accepted Western-style fast food restaurants that serve French fries and other popular dishes as a way of life. Inspired by the success of the symbolism of McDonald's and KFC, many Chinese restaurants have tried to use traditional Chinese culture to lure customers into what is advertised as indigenous, modern fast food outlets. Recently some Chinese fast food entrepreneurs have successfully developed local versions of the Western fast food system. Based on my three months� ethnographic research in Huai�an, I address the competitive situation between American fast food restaurants and local Chinese restaurants by examining service, price, management, food, and customer expectations. Specifically, this case analysis includes one of the largest American fast food chains and one of the largest Chinese fast food restaurant chains. The data are based on participant observation, informal and formal interviews, a sample survey, and historical documents. The study finds that in Huai�an, one local Chinese fast food restaurant, after improving décor, hygiene and service, has experienced increasing success in the local market. I show that the globalization process has experienced two types of localization in Huai�an. First, Western chains have striven to adapt to the consumers in Huai�an, by insisting on a high degree of local ownership and by modestly tailoring their products to local taste. Second, the mere presence of these Western chains has encouraged Chinese entrepreneurs to develop decidedly local versions of modern fast food enterprises.

Zhu, Haiying

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Food Movements Unite! Strategies to Transform Our Food Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ac- tivists and practitioners from organizations such as Via Campesina, the Slow Food Movement, and the World

McLean, Lindsey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

From production to processing, Georgia agriculture is the single largest industry in the state.As an industry, it supports the state with jobs, food and fiber and adds numerous other benefits that stretch far beyond our  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in crops, livestock, biofuels, agritourism or locally grown food, we'll show you the facts of 2011Kissick......................................................................................................................24 emerging Biofuels Dr. George A. Shumaker and Audrey Luke the fastest rate of employment growth followed by transportation and warehousing. Wholesalers

Arnold, Jonathan

130

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dressing and modeling food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The food and the kitchen that it is made in are key components of our film Ratatouille. We treated them almost as if they were characters that grew and changed along with the story line. It was extremely important to create a kitchen that becomes ...

Han Cho

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry FAPC Food Process Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

172-1 Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-172 Robert M and Natural Resources Introduction Carbon strategy is a term that refers to a systematic plan of action for managing carbon consumption and emissions related to food manufacturing and distribution activities

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

133

EU approves food labeling rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New food-labeling regulations are in place in the European Union after the European Parliament (EP) approved rules aimed at helping consumers make “better informed, healthier [sic] choices.” EU approves food labeling rules Inform Magazine Inform Archives

134

Food for fuel: The price of ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of corn to ethanol in the US since 2005 has been a major cause of global food price increases during that time and has been shown to be ineffective in achieving US energy independence and reducing environmental impact. We make three key statements to enhance understanding and communication about ethanol production's impact on the food and fuel markets: (1) The amount of corn used to produce the ethanol in a gallon of regular gas would feed a person for a day, (2) The production of ethanol is so energy intensive that it uses only 20% less fossil fuel than gasoline, and (3) The cost of gas made with ethanol is actually higher per mile because ethanol reduces gasoline's energy per gallon.

Albino, Dominic K; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A food dehydration facility was constructed near the town of Zunil, Guatemala, to demonstrate the use of geothermal energy for industrial applications. The facility, with some modifications to the design, was found to work quite satisfactorily. Tests using five different products were completed during the time geothermal energy was used in the plant. During the time the plant was not able to use geothermal energy, a temporary diesel-fueled boiler provided the energy to test dehydration on seven other crops available in this area. The system demonstrates that geothermal heat can be used successfully for dehydrating food products. Many other industrial applications of geothermal energy could be considered for Zunil since a considerable amount of moderate-temperature heat will become available when the planned geothermal electrical facility is constructed there. 6 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Maldonado, O. (Consultecnia, Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Cooper, L. (Energy Associates International, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Caicedo, A. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy November 1, 2013 - 1:28pm Addthis Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? 1.4 billion pounds of pumpkins are produced in the U.S. each year, many of which end up in landfills or compost piles after Halloween. Oakland's EBMUD collects food waste and uses microbes to convert it into methane gas that is burned to generate electricity. The Energy Department is helping to fund the development of integrated biorefineries, industrial centers dedicated to converting plant material into biofuels and other products. To commemorate National Energy Action Month, we're featuring some scarily

137

Potential of biogas production from livestock manure in China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With great change of food pattern on Chinese people‘s table, livestock production has been expanded to meet increasing demand of meat, egg and dairy products.… (more)

Liu, Gougou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Memorandum on Land Use Change and the Global Food System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LUC (Land Use Change) term in an LCA assessment of a biofuel’s global warming effect (GW), while superposable for small excursions, is not independent of other events in the global food system. In particular, the GW effect of biofuel use resulting from remote land use change mediated by global grain markets is probably larger to the extent that food supplies are under pressure from whatever other causes. Fuel use of any inputs to food production, especially land, unambiguously causes an increase in food prices relative to what they would otherwise be as long as the demand curve for food slopes upward to the left. Limited opportunities do exist for what are termed ‘pro-poor ’ land use strategies; namely positve, synergestic, interactions of biofuel production and food availability. An example from Africa is included in this memo. Past experience with the ‘Green Revolution ’ of agricultural intensification suggests, however, that the chance to improve the sitation of the global poor can be exceedingly difficult to implement. Discussion Current analysis of the global warming (GW) effect resulting from the substitution of biofuels for petroleum recognizes that land use change (LUC) remote in space (and possibly time) induced by competition with food consumption for biofeedstocks may be large, and that the carbon releases from these changes may not only reduce the GW advantage of [some] biofuels over petroleum but actually reverse it. The discussion has been especially influenced by two recent journal articles (Fargione, Hill, Tilman, Polasky, & Hawthorne, 2008; Searchinger et al., 2007). Because LUC is ‘caused ’ directly by price changes for food crops, discussion of policy implications, including especially discussion in the popular press (for example, (Garber, 2008)), has noted the rapid worldwide increase in food prices, especially grains, over the past two or three years. A good part of that discussion comprises contradictory assertions about whether the increase in US corn ethanol production is responsible for the increases, part of them, or very little. Other

Richard Rhoda; Daniel Kammen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Life-Cycle Analysis of Alternatives for the Management of Waste Hot-Mix Asphalt, Commercial Food Waste, and Construction and Demolition Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effective management of commercially generated food waste presents an opportunity for avoided global warming potential, renewable energy production, and renewable agrochemical production. The vast majority… (more)

Levis, James William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Biofuels and Food Security. A report by the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In October 2011, the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) recommended a ''review of biofuels policies -- where applicable and if necessary -- according to balanced science-based assessments of the opportunities and challenges that they may represent for food security so that biofuels can be produced where it is socially, economically and environmentally feasible to do so''. In line with this, the CFS requested the HLPE (High Level Panel of Experts) to ''conduct a science-based comparative literature analysis taking into consideration the work produced by the FAO and Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) of the positive and negative effects of biofuels on food security''. Recommendations from the report include the following. Food security policies and biofuel policies cannot be separated because they mutually interact. Food security and the right to food should be priority concerns in the design of any biofuel policy. Governments should adopt the principle: biofuels shall not compromise food security and therefore should be managed so that food access or the resources necessary for the production of food, principally land, biodiversity, water and labour are not put at risk. The CFS should undertake action to ensure that this principle is operable in the very varied contexts in which all countries find themselves. Given the trend to the emergence of a global biofuels market, and a context moving from policy-driven to market-driven biofuels, there is an urgent need for close and pro-active coordination of food security, biofuel/bioenergy policies and energy policies, at national and international levels, as well as rapid response mechanisms in case of crisis. There is also an urgent need to create an enabling, responsible climate for food and non-food investments compatible with food security. The HLPE recommends that governments adopt a coordinated food security and energy security strategy, which would require articulation around the following five axes/dimensions: Adapt to the change to global, market-driven dynamics; Address the land, water and resource implications of biofuel policies; Foster the transition from biofuels to comprehensive food-energy policies; Promote research and development; and, Develop methods and guidelines for coordinated food, Biofuels, and bio-energy policies at national and international levels.

NONE

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Biofuels and Food Security. A report by the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition  

SciTech Connect

In October 2011, the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) recommended a ''review of biofuels policies -- where applicable and if necessary -- according to balanced science-based assessments of the opportunities and challenges that they may represent for food security so that biofuels can be produced where it is socially, economically and environmentally feasible to do so''. In line with this, the CFS requested the HLPE (High Level Panel of Experts) to ''conduct a science-based comparative literature analysis taking into consideration the work produced by the FAO and Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) of the positive and negative effects of biofuels on food security''. Recommendations from the report include the following. Food security policies and biofuel policies cannot be separated because they mutually interact. Food security and the right to food should be priority concerns in the design of any biofuel policy. Governments should adopt the principle: biofuels shall not compromise food security and therefore should be managed so that food access or the resources necessary for the production of food, principally land, biodiversity, water and labour are not put at risk. The CFS should undertake action to ensure that this principle is operable in the very varied contexts in which all countries find themselves. Given the trend to the emergence of a global biofuels market, and a context moving from policy-driven to market-driven biofuels, there is an urgent need for close and pro-active coordination of food security, biofuel/bioenergy policies and energy policies, at national and international levels, as well as rapid response mechanisms in case of crisis. There is also an urgent need to create an enabling, responsible climate for food and non-food investments compatible with food security. The HLPE recommends that governments adopt a coordinated food security and energy security strategy, which would require articulation around the following five axes/dimensions: Adapt to the change to global, market-driven dynamics; Address the land, water and resource implications of biofuel policies; Foster the transition from biofuels to comprehensive food-energy policies; Promote research and development; and, Develop methods and guidelines for coordinated food, Biofuels, and bio-energy policies at national and international levels.

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

143

Food Safety and Nutrition in MML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Material Measurement Laboratory's program area in Food Safety and Nutrition. MML Program Area: Food Safety and Nutrition. ...

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Vantage Point: Views on Food, Fuel and 24 May, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable & efficient resource use Land, soil, water Biofuels - done right* Rural employment Rural markets "In defense of biofuels, done right" "...bioenergy is not only compatible with food production; it can;Global deforestation rate drops 2000-2010 (FAO Forest Resource Assessment 2010) U.S. Biofuel Production

145

Production of ethanol from cellulose (sawdust).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of ethanol from food such as corn, cassava etc. is the most predominate way of producing ethanol. This has led to a shortage… (more)

Otulugbu, Kingsley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Award Review Analysis of Food Allergen Structures and Development of Foods for Allergic Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food allergy is one of the important health problems, and countermeasures are socially required. We have been undertaking studies on wheat allergens and their epitopes, and have developed a method for producing hypoallergenic wheat flour by enzymatic modification. The hypoallergenic products are now provided to patients. More noteworthy, by taking hypoallergenic cupcakes over a long period, more than half of patients are hyposensitized and become able to eat normal wheat products. This suggests that the hypoallergenic wheat flour can act as anti-allergenic via allergen-specific immunotolerance. This series of studies was followed by expansive research on food allergy: analysis of epitopes of bovine serum albumin (the major beef allergen), isolation and identification of inhibitory peptides for allergen absorption at the intestine, evaluation of hesperetin as an inhibitor of degranulation of mast cells, and the development of PCR detection methods for verifying allergen labeling and for identifying hidden allergic ingredients in processed foods. Key words: food allergy; epitope; hypoallergenic wheat flour; allergen permeation; Caco-2 The worldwide prevalence of allergic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis has increased during the last two decades, 1) and it is assumed that in Japan more than one-third of the population is now suffering from at least one of these diseases. Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Hen’s egg, 2) cow’s milk, 3) wheat 4) and peanuts 5) are generally known allergens for food-allergic patients. Allergens are proteins characterized by their ability to induce a pathogenic IgE response in susceptible individuals, giving rise to asthma, atopic dermatitis, and rhinitis. Although the reasons that certain individuals suffer particular hypersensitivities are unclear, there is evidence that both genetic and environmental factors influence susceptibility. 6)

Soichi Tanabe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Particulate Waste Product Combustion System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The disposal of low value by-products from the processing of agricultural food crops presents many energy consuming problems to the food producing industry. Consequently, industry has the continuous problem of utilization or disposal of the by-products within the frame work of its economic structure. The system presented here is an approach to an economical way of utilizing waste by-products for an energy source there-by reducing dependency on traditional fuel sources.

King, D. R.; Chastain, C. E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 8 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Malaysia and Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 8 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Malaysia and Indonesia Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology

149

Measuring availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive in-store survey may capture the availability of healthful food alternatives in different store types in two rural counties. The purpose of this study was to: (1) compare the availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties; and (2) compare the variety of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties. This study also acts as a pilot test for further food availability research in four other rural counties of the Brazos Valley. An unobtrusive, observational survey was used to measure availability of healthful food in all (100%) grocery, convenience, and discount stores (n=44) in two rural counties in the Brazos Valley of Texas. Results from the surveys indicated that availability of healthful food alternatives varied greatly among the three different store types and two counties surveyed. Grocery stores (n=7) were more likely than convenience (n=31) and discount (n=6) stores to offer fresh fruits and vegetables, leanmeat options, and low-fat/skim milk products. Fresh fruits and vegetables were available in 100% of grocery stores. Only 16.1% of convenience stores, compared with 0.0% in discount stores, offered fresh fruits and vegetables. Variety of fruits and vegetables varied greatly among the three different store types and the two counties surveyed. Findings suggest that the survey utilized was feasible in determining the availability of healthful food items in two rural counties. Implications of this study include the need for knowledge and awareness of rural consumers and rural food supply. Furthermore, nutrition education for rural consumers and those purchasing foods provided to rural areas is desired. This study provided that further investigation into the availability of healthful foods in rural areas is needed.

Bustillos, Brenda Diane

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Plastic packaging: Migration of plastics into foods. March 1972-November 1989 (Citations from the Food Science and Technology Abstracts data base). Report for March 1972-November 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning the leaching of plastics and plasticizers from packaging materials into foods. Measurement of plastics in oils and dairy products is emphasized. Analytical methods, toxicology, and legislation concerning plastic migration and food safety are included. (This updated bibliography contains 191 citations, 27 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Phytoplankton fuels Delta food web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass — CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE, VOLUME 57 , NUMBER 4 and therefore the food supplyand biomass in many aquatic systems. A low nutrient supply

Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Müller-Solger, Anke B.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Food Safety Knowledge Level of Certified Food Managers Who Attended Two Self-Selected Training Courses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The foodservice industry is dependent on millions of employees daily to ensure proper and safe food handling of food products consumed by the general public. The State of Texas requires food establishments’ management or person in charge be trained in food protection. For this inquiry, the researcher studied the knowledge level gained by food mangers from two food companies and two certification courses. There were 90 food service operations that participated in the study. The data was collected through the use of a food safety knowledge test instrument. The scope of the study was to explore the level of food safety knowledge of two self-selected certified food managers in Texas. Sixty-five percent (65.6%) of the certified food managers were certified by course A and 34.4% were certified by course B. The researcher explored two educational theories that are often utilized in the agricultural education discipline. Adult education and training programs in agriculture should use appropriate and effective instructional methods. Creswell and Martin (1993) inferred a linkage between adult education and instructional design as it related to agriculture. This study explored the phenomenon regarding certified food manager training courses and knowledge level through certification. In agricultural education, lives are affected through education and training. Trede and Wade (1993) suggested that agricultural education helps people improve their lives through an educational process using scientific knowledge. The participants’ knowledge test scores were as follows: course A (n=59) 72.9% and course B (n=31) 69.0%. The resulting t-test was determined to the knowledge test score of course A and course B, and proved not to be statistically significant at an alpha level .05. Thus, the researcher concluded instructional design and adult learning theory did not have an impact on the knowledge level of participants as a result of the two self-selected courses for certified food manager training in this study. Food safety knowledge of participants who spoke English or Korean as their native languages were analyzed closely as they represented the largest population of the participants. Korean as a native language represented the largest group at 45.6% of the population. English as a native language represented the second largest group at 43.3% of the population. Certified Food Manager Training is offered in these languages throughout Texas. Differences were found within the participants’ native or first languages. The certified food managers who identified as English and Korean native or first language resulted a statistically significant comparison when analyzed via independent t-test. The researcher recommends further research on affects of native language on certified food manager training. This research study discusses potential improvements that may be implemented in future research for certified food management training. The scope of this study utilized two self selected courses that were available to the participating certified food managers. For example, the Food Safety Knowledge Test instrument which was developed specifically for the scope of this research. Although this instrument was only used once it served as a suitable tool for this research project and could serve as a guide for the development of future research instruments. The researcher suggests that future researchers consider utilizing a tested and established research instrument. A study with a broader scope including courses supported by other National and State level accreditation organization as well as increasing the number of participant; may yield additional findings.

Payton, Larry Sean

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Food Environments Near Home and School Related to Consumption of Soda and Fast Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fried Food Away From Home With Body Mass Index and DietJuly 2011 Food Environments Near Home and School Related toof the food environment near home with diet healthier food

Babey, Susan H; Wolstein, Joelle; Diamant, Allison L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Free 3-MCPD in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reference list for Free 3-MCPD(3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )in Foods. Free 3-MCPD in Foods 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certified chemists chloropropanediol contaminants detergents esters fat

155

Linguistic Acculturation and Food Behaviors among Mexican-Origin Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that  sell  food.   Restaurant  spending  includes  dine-­?of  Eating  Fast  Food  or   Restaurant  Food  within  the  Food  or  Sit-­?Down  Restaurants  in  the  Previous  Two  

Langellier, Brent Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book comprehensively reviews several aspects of cholesterol oxidation products: cholesterol oxidation mechanisms, analytical determination, origin and content of these compounds in foods and biological samples, and their biological effects, with an em

157

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Biomass Program recently implemented the Biofuels Initiative, or 30x30 program, with the dual goal of reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil by making cellulosic ethanol cost competitive with gasoline by 2012 and by replacing 30 percent of gasoline consumption with biofuels by 2030. Experience to date with increasing ethanol production suggests that it distorts agricultural markets and therefore raises concerns about the sustainability of the DOE 30 X 30 effort: Can the U.S. agricultural system produce sufficient feedstocks for biofuel production and meet the food price and availability expectations of American consumers without causing environmental degradation that would curtail the production of both food and fuel? Efforts are underway to develop computer-based modeling tools that address this concern and support the DOE 30 X 30 goals. Beyond technical agronomic and economic concerns, however, such models must account for the publics’ growing interest in sustainable agriculture and in the mitigation of predicted global climate change. This paper discusses ongoing work at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies that investigates the potential consequences and long-term sustainability of projected biomass harvests by identifying and incorporating “sustainable harvest indicators” in a computer modeling strategy.

Grosshans, Raymond R.; Kostelnik, Kevin, M.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Biomass Program recently implemented the Biofuels Initiative, or 30x30 program, with the dual goal of reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil by making cellulosic ethanol cost competitive with gasoline by 2012 and by replacing 30 percent of gasoline consumption with biofuels by 2030. Experience to date with increasing ethanol production suggests that it distorts agricultural markets and therefore raises concerns about the sustainability of the DOE 30x30 effort: Can the U.S. agricultural system produce sufficient feedstocks for biofuel production and meet the food price and availability expectations of American consumers without causing environmental degradation that would curtail the production of both food and fuel? Efforts are underway to develop computer-based modeling tools that address this concern and support the DOE 30x30 goals. Beyond technical agronomic and economic concerns, however, such models must account for the publics’ growing interest in sustainable agriculture and in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. This paper discusses ongoing work at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies that investigates the potential consequences and long-term sustainability of projected biomass harvests by identifying and incorporating “sustainable harvest indicators” in a computer modeling strategy.

Raymond R. Grosshans; Kevin M. Kostelnik; Jacob J. Jacobson

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Protein and Co-Products Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protein and Co-Products division include professionals interested in proteins and co-products from biomaterial for food, feed, and industrial applications as well as extraction, separation, purification, and characterization technologies. Protein and Co-Pr

160

Lipid Oxidation: Challenges in Food Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid oxidation in food systems is one of the most important factors which affect food quality, nutrition, safety, color and consumers’ acceptance. Lipid Oxidation: Challenges in Food Systems Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol con

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

What’s in a Claim? Would a Food Not Labeled “Natural” Taste as Sweet?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consumers purchase foods labeled as “natural” for a variety of reasons, assuming, for example, that these foods are less processed, have improved health benefits, or have less impact on the environment. But does a “natural” product provide all of those ben

162

Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Portfolio includes: paper 1. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: literature review  – paper 2. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: comparative analysis… (more)

Lok, Stanley Yap Peng.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Food Industry 2000: Food Processing Opportunities, Challenges, New Technology Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of some of the major factors affecting the food processing industry, i. e., economic pressures, consumer concerns and pressures, regulatory restrictions, and general conservatism. The food industry must be responsive to the growing consumer interest in the relationship between diet and general health, to the changes in consumer demographics and desires, and to the opportunities offered by new technology, especially electrotechnologies.

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

164

Food Apps | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 next Global Food Security Showing 1 - 4 of 22 results. aWhere aWhere transforms how global development initiatives are managed and monitored. aWhere's location intelligence...

165

The new food-tech city : adapting Chicago's post-stockyard urbanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the latent potential of Chicago's former Union Stock Yard, which consequentially draws attention to the polarities of industrial food production. The Union Stock Yard was once symbolic of an era where ...

Burnham, Justin (Justin Paul)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Time Series Analysis of Food Price and Its Input Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid increases in consumer food price beginning in 2007 generated interest in identifying the main factors influencing these increases. In subsequent years, food prices have fluctuated, but generally have continued their ascent. The effects of crude oil, gasoline, corn, and ethanol prices, as well as, the relative foreign exchange rate of the U.S. dollar and producer price indexes for food manufacturing and fuel products on domestic food prices are examined. Because the data series are non-stationary and cointegrated, a vector error correction model is estimated. Weak exogeneity and exclusion tests in the cointegration space are performed. Directed acyclical graphs are used to specify contemporaneous causal relationships. Dynamic interactions among the series are given by impulse response functions and forecast error variance decompositions. Weak exogeneity tests indicate all eight series work to bring the system back into equilibrium following a shock to the system. Further, exclusion tests suggest crude oil, gasoline, food CPI, ethanol, and food PPI variables are not in the long-run relationships. Dynamic analyses suggest the following relationships. Ethanol price is not a major factor in domestic food prices, suggesting that food prices are largely unaffected by the recent increased use of corn-based ethanol for fuel. Crude oil prices, corn prices, and the relative foreign exchange rate of the U.S. dollar, however, do influence domestic food prices with corn price contributing the most to food price variability. Innovation accounting inferences are robust to potential different contemporaneous causal specifications.

Routh, Kari 1988-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Chloroesters in foods: An emerging issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection, in some foods and vegetable oils, of fatty acid esters of the contaminant known as 3-MCPD is an emerging issue for food and vegetable oil processors Chloroesters in foods: An emerging issue Inform Magazine Inform Archives 3-MCPD Food Sci

168

A simulation study to increase the capacity of a rusk production line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was conducted in a food processing company on its Rusk production line. The goal of the study was to increase the production rate of the line to meet the continuously increasing demand on its product within the existing limited space in the ... Keywords: business process reengineering, food processing, production planning, productivity, simulation models

Seraj Yousef Abed

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricul- tural chemistry and bioenergy. J Ag Food Chem Parkmass as feedstock for a bioenergy and bioproducts industry:benefits of utilizing bioenergy crops and waste products

Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Food Services | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Services Food Services Food Services The Department offers many food services for employees within the Headquarters' buildings. Forrestal Forrestal Cafeteria (2nd floor, West Building). See the Cafeteria web page for further information. Hours: Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Breakfast hours are from 6:45 a.m. until 10:00 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m., and a "Happy Hour" is featured from 2:00-2:30 p.m. offering 30% off all hot and cold buffet items. Other Places to Eat, Forrestal Food services available inside the Forrestal building (DOE Powerpedia) Places to eat near the Forrestal building (DOE Powerpedia) Germantown Germantown Cafeteria - See the Cafeteria web page for further information. Hours: Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Breakfast hours are from 7:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m.

171

Mesquite pods into nutritious foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesquite trees produce bean pods that a new process can turn into nutrient-rich foods. A simple, automated procedure converts the dried mesquite pods into a high-protein, sweet-tasting flour and a gum that can be used as a natural thickening additive in foods. Standard food-processing equipment can be used. For flour, whole pods are ground with a disk mill, which produces a mixture of seeds and flour. The mixture is then sifted to separate the two components. Its the seeds that contain the gum - a thin, white film that lines the inside of the hard, brown seed coat. To extract gum, seeds are split and soaked in an alkali solution. The solution, after being neutralized, is sprayed through a fine-mist nozzle into a heated chamber, where it dries as a fine powder of edible gum. This spray-drying is the same process that converts fresh milk into powdered. Analyses showed that the natural gum in mesquite pods is better than the guar gum US food processors now import to use as a natural thickener in ice cream; salad dressings, puddings, and other foods.

Wood, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Food Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The food processing industry is the fourth largest consumer of energy in the US industrial sector. Food processors use nearly 1,200 trillion Btu of energy per year. The industry is comprised of more than 21,000 processing plants. Total production values make it $400 billion industry. While energy represents on average between one and two percent of total operating costs, in some industry sub-sectors energy comprises as much as 20%. Major energy end-uses include drying, refrigeration, process heating and cooling, and machine drives. Energy efficiency becomes more important in an industry of tight margins. Today, Americans spend the same percentage of disposable income on food as they did 20 years ago. The Food Marketing Institute notes that supermarket sales were only expected to rise about 2% in 2000. Rising energy costs, increasing restrictions on land application of waste, sanitation standards, and a high demand for product quality, and processed foods contribute to the industry's energy and power quality needs. In addition to documenting a variety of energy end uses in the industry in spring 2000, E SOURCE surveyed 148 plant managers by telephone and conducted in-depth interviews with 8 corporate energy managers. We asked the plant managers to respond to a variety of questions on topics such as decision-making, plant energy use, electricity and deregulation, natural gas use, energy services and outsourcing, energy efficiency, and plans for plant renovations and new construction. In our interviews with the corporate energy managers, we explored their current strategies for purchasing energy and energy services and asked them what they expect to do in the future. This paper provides some of the key findings from this report including an overview of industry challenges, key energy end-uses and innovations, and valuable insights from energy managers on the energy issues that food processors face.

Adams, N.; Milmoe, P. H.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS SRS Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank AIKEN, S.C. - (June 7, 2012) Today, the Savannah River Site (SRS) donated $22,000 and 18,000 pounds of food during its annual food drive for the Golden Harvest Food Bank. Several SRS organizations participated in this food drive-Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Remediation, U.S. Forest Service-Savannah River, URS and WSI- Savannah River. The SRS food drive is one of Golden Harvest Food Bank's largest, local fund-raisers. According to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC President and CEO Dwayne Wilson, the Site's past food drives have collec- tively yielded over 262,475 pounds of food for Golden Harvest. "We're pleased to support Golden Harvest in their highly effective efforts as they strive

174

Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

Cameron, Caitlin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

World Food Crisis: Imperfect Markets Starving Development, A Decomposition of Recent Food Price Increases.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The recent decade has experienced two rather substantial food price spikes. This thesis sets out to provide an in-depth look at the recent food price… (more)

Costello, Christine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Genetic Engineered Food and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Engineered Food and Safety Genetic Engineered Food and Safety Name: Christopher Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is genetically engineered food safe to eat? Replies: Well, I hope so, since I and you and all of us have been eating it for centuries. All common foodstuffs have been seriously engineered since they were discovered. The modern tomato plant, apple tree, wheat stalk, and corn plant bear only a general resemblance to their ancestors, as farmers have engineered them to increase their yield, shelf life, resistance to disease, etc. It is, however, true that up until recently changes to the genetic code of foodstuffs could only be made via natural mutation (which occurs via naturally-occuring ionizing radiation and mutagenic chemicals), and the food engineer's job was limited to selecting those changes he wanted to preserve, and those he wanted to weed out. Now you can induce mutations directly, with intention and forethought, and avoid much of the waiting around for natural mutation that was heretofore necessary in plant breeding.

177

Food Battery Competition Sponsored by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food Battery Competition Sponsored by: The University of Tennessee, Materials Research Society (MRS growing populations and energy needs forever. Batteries have evolved a great deal and when you compare the bulky, heavy, toxic car lead batteries to the novel and outstanding lithium-ion batteries, you can

Tennessee, University of

178

Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2011 Hiroshi Sakuragi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Large amounts of fossil fuels are consumed every day in spite of increasing environmental problems. To preserve the environment and construct a sustainable society, the use of biofuels derived from different kinds of biomass is being practiced worldwide. Although bioethanol has been largely produced, it commonly requires food crops such as corn and sugar cane as substrates. To develop a sustainable energy supply, cellulosic biomass should be used for bioethanol production instead of grain biomass. For this purpose, cell surface engineering technology is a very promising method. In biobutanol and biodiesel production, engineered host fermentation has attracted much attention; however, this method has many limitations such as low productivity and low solvent tolerance of microorganisms. Despite these problems, biofuels such as bioethanol, biobutanol, and biodiesel are potential energy sources that can help establish a sustainable society. 1.

Hiroshi Sakuragi; Kouichi Kuroda; Mitsuyoshi Ueda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 22 Oil Palm as Bioenergy Feedstock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 22 Oil Palm as Bioenergy Feedstock Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Process

180

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 6 Measurement and Maintenance of Soybean Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 6 Measurement and Maintenance of Soybean Quality Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle)Chapter 5 Production of Vegetable Oils and Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle) Chapter 5 Production of Vegetable Oils and Fats Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Down

182

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 1 Production and Composition of Frying Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 1 Production and Composition of Frying Fats eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Press

183

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 3 Oil Palm Genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 3 Oil Palm Genomics Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing 0641F6393F

184

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 16 Bioenergy and Biofuels from Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 16 Bioenergy and Biofuels from Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bio

185

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 1 The History of the Soybean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 1 The History of the Soybean Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

186

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 25 Sustainable Development of Palm Oil Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 25 Sustainable Development of Palm Oil Industry Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemi

187

The bottom of the ocean food chain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The bottom of the ocean food chain 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2013 All Issues submit The bottom of the ocean food chain Global ocean...

188

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New applications of omega-3 fatty acids from both plant and marine sources in food supplements and pharmaceuticals. Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary

189

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The wet corn milling industry emits almost a sixth of the energy-related carbon in the food industry. ...

190

Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

174-1 Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-174 and Natural Resources Carbon footprinting in the food industry is an activity that determines the greenhouse.g. tons) of carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent per functional unit (e.g. kg or liter of goods sold) (PAS2050

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

191

Food Security in the Western US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food Security in the Western US and Pacific Territories 23 Rural Connections Nov. 2009 By PeteR BaRcinas ADAP is tackling the food security implications of climate change, rising sea levels, and fuel costs Pacific (aDaP) Regional Food security and Sufficiency Project brings together community, local, state

192

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive new soybean reference book, a volume from the AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds, disseminates key soybean oilseed information. Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry P

193

Gardner Denver and McCain Foods Teaming Profile | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gardner Denver and McCain Foods Teaming Profile Gardner Denver and McCain Foods Teaming Profile Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

194

Vision - Food | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vision - Food Vision - Food Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture This website is supported by the Interagency Council on Agricultural and Rural Statistics (ICARS). ICARS is the effort of the US federal government's statistical agencies in support of the "Global Strategy to Improve Agriculture and Rural Statistics" which was developed under the United Nations Statistical Commission. The impetus for the Global Strategy was the recognition that agriculture and rural statistics are declining across the globe at the same time as new data requirements are emerging. ICARS brings together experts from economic, demographic, environmental and agricultural statistical agencies and from natural resource agencies to

195

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 10 Soy Molasses: Processing and Utilization as a Functional Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 10 Soy Molasses: Processing and Utilization as a Functional Food Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pre

196

Phosphorus Flow Analysis for Food Production and Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ISASMELT™ for Recycling of Valuable Elements Contributing to a More Sustainable Society · Leaching of Uranium and Vanadium from Korean Domestic Ore.

197

TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL PREDICTION OF RADIOCAESIUM TRANSFER TO FOOD PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear accidents such as those at Windscale (1957) and Chernobyl (1986). An important route by which and cesium via the grass-cow-milk pathway after the Chernobyl accident. Health Physics 66:653-665 6. Müller H

Crout, Neil

198

Canola and Rapeseed: Production, Processing, Food Quality, and Nutrition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With a focus on current health issues, this book presents information on the chemistry of minor constituents of canola and rapeseed. It includes research on bioactive compounds and identifies new areas of interest for industrial application of functional f

199

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 16 Minor Constituents of Palm Oil: Characterization, Processing, and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 16 Minor Constituents of Palm Oil: Characterization, Processing, and Application Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Methods and Analyses eChapters Food Science

200

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 13 The Physicochemical Properties of Palm Oil and Its Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 13 The Physicochemical Properties of Palm Oil and Its Components Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nut

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 20 Human Nutrition Value of Soybean Oil and Soy Protein  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 20 Human Nutrition Value of Soybean Oil and Soy Protein Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health -

202

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 18 Health and Nutritional Properties of Palm Oil and Its Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 18 Health and Nutritional Properties of Palm Oil and Its Components Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health -

203

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 4 Tissue Culture and Genetic Engineering of Oil Palm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 4 Tissue Culture and Genetic Engineering of Oil Palm Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bio

204

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 2 Breeding and Genetics of the Oil Palm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 2 Breeding and Genetics of the Oil Palm Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pr

205

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 14 Polymorphic Properties of Palm Oil and Its Major Component Triacyglycerols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 14 Polymorphic Properties of Palm Oil and Its Major Component Triacyglycerols Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology

206

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 6 Effect of Pests and Diseases on Oil Palm Yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 6 Effect of Pests and Diseases on Oil Palm Yield Food Science Health Nutrition Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Process

207

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 20 Sensory Evaluation of Frying Fat and Deep-Fried Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 20 Sensory Evaluation of Frying Fat and Deep-Fried Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioch

208

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 24 Traceability of RSPO Certified Sustainable Palm Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 24 Traceability of RSPO Certified Sustainable Palm Oil Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - B

209

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 12 Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil Refining and Fractionation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 12 Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil Refining and Fractionation Technology Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health

210

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 16 Flaxseed and Flaxseed Products in Kidney Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 16 Flaxseed and Flaxseed Products in Kidney Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

211

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 1 A Brief History of the Oil Palm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 1 A Brief History of the Oil Palm Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processi

212

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 15 Measurement and Maintenance of Palm Oil Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 15 Measurement and Maintenance of Palm Oil Quality Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioch

213

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 3 Harvesting, Storing, and Post-Harvest Management of Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 3 Harvesting, Storing, and Post-Harvest Management of Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology H

214

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 23 Waste and Environmental Management in the Malaysian Palm Oil Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 23 Waste and Environmental Management in the Malaysian Palm Oil Industry Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Heal

215

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 18 Nutritional Properties and Feeding Values of Soybeans and Their Coproducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 18 Nutritional Properties and Feeding Values of Soybeans and Their Coproducts Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science

216

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 11 Oil Recovery from Palm Fruits and Palm Kernel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 11 Oil Recovery from Palm Fruits and Palm Kernel Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochem

217

Senegal food and energy study: energy use and opportunities for energy-related improvements in the food system  

SciTech Connect

The growth of agriculture, the mainstay of Senegal's economy, is contingent upon the acquisition of imported energy. This study examines the key constituents of the Senegalese food system in relation to energy supply and demand. The study first analyzes the food system (crop characteristics, and physical and institutional components) and the energy system (sources, costs, supply/conversion technologies, and consumption patterns). Next, energy-use profiles are provided on the production and distribution processes of millet/sorghum, rice, groundnuts, and fish. Household cooking practices are also discussed. Recommendations to improve irrigation, the second key to increasing food supplies, include funding for low-capacity photovoltaic and solar-thermal systems, setting up windmills in coastal areas, and designing large-capacity solar plants similar to those at Bakel. To save energy at the household level, wood or charcoal cooking stoves must be made more efficient and the use of biogas plants should be studied. To counter the serious depletion of fuelwood, Senegal's main indigenous energy resource, energy-efficient charcoal production should be developed, the charcoal industry reorganized, and afforestation and forest management programs expanded.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Free Online Food Safety Legislation Training - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 25, 2011 ... F4ESL - From Farm to Fork European Food Safety Legislation Training Programme is an EU Project under EC LLP Leonardo da Vinci Program ...

219

Energy Efficiency in Food-Service Facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Food-service facilities have high energy intensities compared to other commercial buildings due to their energy use for cooking and refrigeration. Assessing the energy performance… (more)

Paillat, Etienne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Future of Food in Suburbia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses resilience for the future of Canadian suburbs, through the lens of buildings and food, particularly against the backdrop of peak oil and… (more)

Khalid, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cat under Food and Water Stress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions Referencing NEWTON About NEWTON About Ask A Scientist Education At Argonne Cat under Food and Water Stress Name: Nitin Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside...

223

Food Industry - Motor Contactors Burning Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of motor contactors that have burnt up several times in the last year at a food manufacturing facility.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Free Online Food Safety Legislation Training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 25, 2011 ... F4ESL - From Farm to Fork European Food Safety Legislation Training Programme is an EU Project under EC LLP Leonardo da Vinci Program ...

225

Long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Korean food waste was found to contain low level of trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved by adding trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron played an important role in anaerobic digestion of food waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt addition further enhanced the process performance in the presence of iron. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste in a semi-continuous single-stage reactor could be stabilized by supplementing trace elements. Contrary to the failure of anaerobic digestion of food waste alone, stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved for 368 days by supplementing trace elements. Under the conditions of OLR (organic loading rates) of 2.19-6.64 g VS (volatile solid)/L day and 20-30 days of HRT (hydraulic retention time), a high methane yield (352-450 mL CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added}) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed. The subsequent investigation on effects of individual trace elements (Co, Fe, Mo and Ni) showed that iron was essential for maintaining stable methane production. These results proved that the food waste used in this study was deficient in trace elements.

Zhang Lei, E-mail: wxzyfx@yahoo.com [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Dalian 116024 (China); Jahng, Deokjin, E-mail: djahng@mju.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, Myongji University, San 38-2, Namdong, Cheoin-Gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do 449-728 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Pigeonpea genomics initiative (PGI): an international effort to improve crop productivity of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effort to improve crop productivity of pigeonpea (CajanusMallikarjuna International Crops Research Institute for thean important food legume crop in the semi-arid regions of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Food & Nutrition | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services, is designed to provide members of the public with convenient access to information about U.S. farmers market locations, directions, operating times, product...

228

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Development of the foods grasping mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this mechanism, and shows performance. Key Words: Remote shopping, Mobile Manipulator, Foods handling 1. 1·1 1) 1Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­Development of the foods grasping mechanism­ Tetsuo) Abstract-- Our purpose is developing the remote shopping system as a concrete application. A human uses

Ohya, Akihisa

229

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Method of handling foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­ Method of handling foods ­ Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, Akihisa a mobile manipulator as a teleoperated tool for accessing and manipulating remote objects. A human uses the system to select and buy fresh foods of a super market from a remote location via the Internet. We

Ohya, Akihisa

230

Food practices as situated action: exploring and designing for everyday food practices with households  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Household food practices are complex. Many people are unable to effectively respond to challenges in their food environment to maintain diets considered to be in line with national and international standards for healthy eating. We argue that recognizing ... Keywords: everyday practice, food, health, situated action

Rob Comber; Jettie Hoonhout; Aart van Halteren; Paula Moynihan; Patrick Olivier

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Resource Conservation in Snack Food Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frito-Lay, Inc., the world's largest salty snack food company, operates 39 manufacturing facilities in the U.S. and Canada. Operations in these facilities require substantial amounts of energy and water. In the past, these resources have been perceived as "free" by the manufacturing function. This perception, and the resulting practices, has resulted in significant opportunity for resource conservation. This paper describes Frito-Lay's Resource Conservation program, which is a nation-wide productivity effort aimed at reducing the consumption and cost of electrical energy, fuels, water, and nitrogen. Key elements of the program include Resource Conservation "opportunity" audits, benchmarking, implementation of "no debate" operating practices, performance tracking and reporting, awareness training, "strike-team" audits for under-performing facilities, and integration into the existing "Green Team" environmental management system. The program has driven real improvement in the awareness of environmental and resource conservation concerns among manufacturing associates as well as substantial reduction in our consumption of water and energy resources.

Perry, L. E.; Meyers, G. R.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Cat under Food and Water Stress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asimikas Asimikas Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: USA Date: N/A Question: How long can a domestic cat live without food, and drink water only? Replies: Asimikas, If at all possible, attempt to coax food into the cat by mixing wet cat food with water until 'soupy', and use a syringe to inject food into the back of the cat's mouth. The cat probably won't like this, but if you try repeatedly and with gentle firmness, you may successfully get food into the feline. From observing a case as a veterinary assistant, a cat refusing solid food can go several days on water alone. Then, the cat generally begins to refuse water as well and there is a noticeable gauntness about the body shape of the cat. The skin on the back, for example, when gently pinched will not quickly spring back to laying flat as it should --- this indicates serious dehydration on a subcutaneous level, indicating the cat needs an IV to get fluids in quickly before organ failure etc. Again, this is the general series of events I observed in a vet's office when a cat was brought in, having refused food for more than a few days. A vet should definitely be contacted if a feline has refused food for two consecutive days or more.

233

Thermocatalytic conversion of food processing wastes: Topical report, FY 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The efficient utilization of waste produced during food processing operations is a topic of growing importance to the industry. While incineration is an attractive option for wastes with relatively low ash and moisture contents (i.e., under about 50 wt % moisture), it is not suitable for wastes with high moisture contents. Cheese whey, brewer's spent grain, and fruit pomace are examples of food processing wastes that are generally too wet to burn efficiently and cleanly. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a thermocatalytic conversion process that can convert high-moisture wastes (up to 98 wt % moisture) to a medium-Btu fuel gas consisting primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. At the same time, the COD of these waste streams is reduced by 90% to 99%, Organic wastes are converted by thermocatalytic treatment at 350/degree/C to 400/degree/C and 3000 to 4000 psig. The process offers a relatively simple solution to waste treatment while providing net energy production from wastes containing as little as 2 wt % organic solids (this is equivalent to a COD of approximately 25,000 mg/L). This report describes continuous reactor system (CRS) experiments that have been conducted with food processing wastes. The purpose of the CRS experiments was to provide kinetic and catalyst lifetime data, which could not be obtained with the batch reactor tests. These data are needed for commercial scaleup of the process.

Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Service/Product Provider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wheatstone Energy Frito-Lay Wheatstone Energy Frito-Lay 1975 The Exchange, Ste. 320 7701 Legacy Dr. Atlanta, GA 30339 Plano, TX 75024 Business: Lighting, Electrical, HVAC Business: Snack Foods James B. Dore, Director, Sales and Marketing Rob Schasel, Director, Energy & Utilities Phone: 770-916-7107 Phone: 972-334-5567 Email: jim.dore@wheatstoneenergy.com Email: robert.d.schasel@fritolay.com Frito-Lay leverages its energy effort by partnering with Wheatstone Energy to identify and implement lighting improvements resulting in savings of $2.2 million. Project Scope Wheatstone provided turnkey services in upgrading the lighting systems at 96 distribution centers and 16 snack food production plants across North America. Project Summary In addressing lighting retrofits and lighting control strategies, Wheatstone's turnkey services included

235

High-oleic canola oils and their food applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-oleic canola oils are among the major healthful oils replacing trans fat in food processing and foodservices in North America. High-oleic canola oils and their food applications Inform Magazine Edible Applications Food Structure and Functionality

236

Refrigeration needs for sustainable preservation of horticultural products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fresh horticultural products are highly perishable and need refrigeration for further preservation. Refrigeration needs energy consumption with consequent economical cost and damage for the environment. The objective of the present work was to use efficiently ... Keywords: energy efficiency, food salads, halophytes, postharvest technologies, refrigeration, safe food, sustainability

Custódia Gago; Ana Rita Sousa; Miriam Julião; Graça Miguel; Dulce Antunes; Thomas Panagopoulos

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Geothermal absorption refrigeration for food processing industries. Final report, December 13, 1976--November 13, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first step in the economic analysis of the integration of geothermally powered absorption refrigeration into a food processing plant was an evaluation of the potential geothermal sites in the Western United States. The evaluation covered availability of raw materials, transportation, adequate geothermal source, labor, and other requirements for food processing plants. Several attractive geothermal sites were identified--Raft River, Idaho; Sespe Hot Springs, California; Vale Hot Springs, Oregon; Weisler-Crane Creek, Idaho; Cosco Hot Springs, California; and the Imperial Valley, California. The most economically attractive food processing industry was then matched to the site based on its particular energy, raw material, and transportation requirements. The more promising food processors identified were for frozen potato or vegetable products, freeze-dried products, and meat processing. For the refrigeration temperature range of +32/sup 0/F to -40/sup 0/F and geothermal temperature range of 212/sup 0/F to 300/sup 0/F, an absorption refrigeration system had to be identified, designed, and evaluated. Both the conventional ammonia/water and an organic absorption refrigeration system using monochlorodifluoromethane (R-22) as the refrigerant and dimethyl formamide (DMF) as the absorbent were studied. In general, only a 60/sup 0/F to 100/sup 0/F temperature drop would be effectively used for refrigeration leaving the remainder of the allowable temperature drop available for other use. The economic evaluation of the geothermal system installed in a food processing plant required the comparison of several principal alternatives. These alternatives were evaluated for three different food processing plants located at their optimum geothermal site: a forzen potato product processing plant located at Raft River, Idaho; a freeze-dried product plant located at Sespe Hot Springs, California; a beef slaughter operation located in the Imperial Valley of California. (JGB)

Harris, R.L.; Olson, G.K.; Mah, C.S.; Bujalski, J.H.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

New Food-Addiction Link Found  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 20, 2002 May 20, 2002 Electronic newsroom 02-40 New Food-Addiction Link Found Mere sight/smell of food spikes levels of brain “pleasure” chemical UPTON, NY — Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory have found that the mere display of food — where food-deprived subjects are allowed to smell and taste their favorite foods without actually eating them — causes a significant elevation in brain dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with feelings of pleasure and reward. This activation of the brain’s dopamine motivation circuits is distinct from the role the brain chemical plays when people actually eat, and may be similar to what addicts experience when craving drugs. “Eating is a highly reinforcing behavior, just like taking illicit drugs,” said psychiatrist Nora Volkow, the study’s lead investigator. “But this is the first time anyone has shown that the dopamine system can be triggered by food when there is no pleasure associated with it since the subjects don’t eat the food. This provides us with new clues about the mechanisms that lead people to eat other than just for the pleasure of eating, and in this respect may help us understand why some people overeat.” The study will appear in the June 1, 2002 issue of Synapse (now available online ).

239

Big Data, New Physics and Geospatial Super-Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Big Data, New Physics and Geospatial Super-Food. Purpose: As ... amazing. As it turns out, geospatial data are analytic super-food. ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

240

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS Internet Food...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet Food Service for SRS Employees Sought Greater Aiken-Augusta area food service companies are invited to consider providing meal ordering via the internet for delivery to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on...

242

SUSTAINABILITY INDICATORS IN THE VERMONT-REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Food systems are inherently complex areas of interaction between economic, environmental, and social factors. The local food movement in Vermont presents new opportunities to shape… (more)

Schattman, Rachel

243

Central, peripheral, and contextual regulation of food intake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A, Grinker, JA. Food and water intake, meal patterns andreceptors in food and water intake. Neuropharmacology.hyperdipsic response (>10 ml water intake within 30 min) to

Parylak, Sarah Lynne; Parylak, Sarah Lynne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Cocoa Butter and Related CompoundsChapter 17 Methods and Technologies Related to Shea Butter Chemophysical Properties and to the Delivery of Bioactives in Chocolate and Related Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cocoa Butter and Related Compounds Chapter 17 Methods and Technologies Related to Shea Butter Chemophysical Properties and to the Delivery of Bioactives in Chocolate and Related Products Food Science Health Nutrition eChapters Food Science

245

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 17 Enzymatic and Chemical Modification of Palm Oil, Palm Kernel Oil, and Its Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 17 Enzymatic and Chemical Modification of Palm Oil, Palm Kernel Oil, and Its Fractions Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Te

246

Human exposure through food chains:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using information collected under the community right to know'' provision of the Superfund reauthorization act, the US Environmental Protection Agency has revealed that some two to three billion pounds of toxic chemicals are released annually to the atmosphere from industries in the US. Human populations can contact these environmental pollutants through food, water, and air in varying amounts each day throughout a lifetime. A realistic strategy for managing the potential health risks of industrial emissions requires a comprehensive approach with adequate attention to uncertainties. Using contaminant transfers from air to milk and as a case study, I consider here two important issues in exposure assessment --- (1) estimation of and (2) reduction of uncertainty in exposure estimates. This case study provides a distinction between variability, ignorance and uncertainty. For the air/milk pathways, I explore the use of exposure models that combine information on environmental partitioning with data on human diet, behavior patterns, and physiology into a numerical expression that links ambient air concentrations with chronic daily intake. I examine how uncertainty limits current exposure modeling efforts and suggest research to reduce these uncertainty. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

McKone, T.E.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

This paper was published in Soft Matter as part of the Food Science web theme issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wheat dough, all-purpose flour wheat dough, and cake flour wheat dough. Both ultrasound and conventional. Introduction 1.1. Dough based systems-importance of characterization Wheat flour and water mixtures, doughs, are used in the manufacture of many different food products. A wheat flour and water mixture when subjected

Weeks, Eric R.

248

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel Preliminary Food & Fuel Gap Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

To promote economic growth and energy security, and to protect the environment, the U.S. is pursuing a national strategy of energy independence and climatic protection in which domestic renewable carbon-neutral biofuels displace 30 percent of U.S. oil consumption by the mid-21st century. Such fuels, including ethanol and biodiesel, will be produced from biological feed stocks (biomass). The availability of this billion-ton biomass will hinge on the application of modern scientific and engineering tools to create a highly-integrated biofuel production system. Efforts are underway to identify and develop energy crops, ranging from agricultural residues to genetically engineered perennials; to develop biology-based processing methods; and, to develop large-scale biorefineries to economically convert biomass into fuels. In addition to advancing the biomass-to-biofuel research and development agenda, policy makers are concurrently defining the correct mix of governmental supports and regulations. Given the volumes of biomass and fuels that must flow to successfully enact a national biomass strategy, policies must encourage large-scale markets to form and expand around a tightly integrated system of farmers, fuel producers and transporters, and markets over the course of decades. In formulating such policies, policy makers must address the complex interactions of social, technical, economic, and environmental factors that bound energy production and use. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The INL Bioenergy Program supports the DOE and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Key multidisciplinary INL capabilities are being leveraged to address major science and technology needs associated with the cost-effective utilization of biomass. INL’s whole crop utilization (WCU) vision is focused on the use of the entire crop, including both the grain and traditionally discarded plant biomass to produce food, feed, fiber, energy, and value-added products.

Ray Grosshans; Kevin M. Kostelnik; Jake Jacobson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Volunteers from West Valley Demonstration Project gather before distributing items collected in an annual food drive. Volunteers from West Valley Demonstration Project gather before distributing items collected in an annual food drive. Volunteer John Schelble helps unload a delivery truck at a food pantry. Volunteer John Schelble helps unload a delivery truck at a food pantry. John Rizzo passes canned food to John Rendall to deliver to a food pantry. John Rizzo passes canned food to John Rendall to deliver to a food pantry.

250

Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting multiple household food inventories over the course of 30 days to examine weekly food variability. Household food availability influences the foods individuals choose to consume; therefore, by assessing the home food environment a better understanding of what people are eating can be obtained. Methods of measuring home food availability have been developed and tested in recent years; however most of these methods assess food availability on one occasion only. This study aimed to capture "usual" availability by using multiple assessments. After the development and pre-testing of the 171-item home observation guide to determine the presence and amount of food items in the home (refrigerator, freezer, pantry, elsewhere), two trained researchers recruited a convenience sample of 9 households (44.4% minority), administered a baseline questionnaire (personal info, shopping habits, food resources, and food security), and conducted 5 in-home assessments (5-7 day interval) over a 30-day period. Each in-home assessment included shopping and fast food activities since the last assessment and an observational survey of types and amounts of foods present. The final in-home assessment included an audio recorded interview on food habits and beliefs. Complete data were collected from all 9 women (32.8 y +/- 6.0; 3 married; 4 +/- 1.6 adults/children in household; 4 SNAP; 6 food insecure) and their households. Weekly grocery purchases (place, amount, and purpose) use (frequency) varied from once (n=1) to every week (n=5); 4 used fast food 2-3 times/wk for 4 weeks. Quantity and types of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables varied by week and by family. The feasibility of conducting multiple in-home assessments was confirmed with 100% retention from all participants. This methodology is important in that it provided detailed information on intra-monthly variation in food availability. The findings suggest the inadequacy of a single measure to assess food availability in the home.

Sisk, Cheree L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Global Food Security | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Food Security Global Food Security aWhere aWhere transforms how global development initiatives are managed and monitored. aWhere's location intelligence data management platform enables integration of complex agricultural, environmental and public health data into local, actionable insight. Application URL: http://www.awhere.com/en-us Read more about aWhere 0 comment(s) | Food Frequency Method Online A fast, low cost, effective method to assess micro-nutrient deficiencies in a developing country on a household basis, while also allowing for an aggregation to a community or regional basis quickly and effectively. Application URL: http://www.foodfrequencyonline.org/index Read more about Food Frequency Method Online 0 comment(s) | e-Afghan AG e-Afghan Ag provides credible relevant information to those helping farmers

252

A systems approach to food accident analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food borne illnesses lead to 3000 deaths per year in the United States. Some industries, such as aviation, have made great strides increasing safety through careful accident analysis leading to changes in industry practices. ...

Helferich, John D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

BNL Blood Drives: Iron-rich foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Blood Drives: Iron-Rich Foods Blood Drive Home Seafood: Fish (cod, sardines, tuna, clams, oysters, shrimp) Poultry: Chicken, eggs, yolk Lean Red Meats: Beef, lamb, veal, pork,...

254

Early Days of Food and Environmental Virology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel cells, so that the water produced as a byproduct wasproblem. Although the water produced by the hydrogen–oxygenof food produced for human consumption, plus water ad lib.

Cliver, Dean O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Sechage solaire des aliments (solar food drying and conservation of food for year-round consumption)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an introduction to food drying as a measure to avoid the loss of agricultural surpluses, and conserve food for year-round consumption. It discusses the basic rules of food drying and gives an overview of various methods and appropriate dryer constructions. It also provides detailed explanations on how to process vegetables, fruits, and meats and gives advice on storage and cooking.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

By the MSU Food Security Group 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decades of research have led to substantially improved understanding of the nature of food insecurity. 2 Until the food crisis of 2007/08, a combination of economic growth and targeted programs resulted in a steady fall in the percentage of the world’s population suffering from under-nutrition (from 20 % in 1990/92 to 16 % in 2006). 3 Yet over a billion people still face both

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Supporting small-scale dairy farmers in increasing milk production ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 13, 2010 ... (irrigation scheme, plant supply area, national production) while alleviating the ... The recent increase in food demand and the consequences this has for prices ..... selection and management of forage crops, design of dietary.

258

Mobile Food Fusion: Using the Power of Mobile Food to Create a New Restaurant Typology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mobile food vending has recently experienced a dramatic resurgence, providing lucrative opportunities for entrepreneurs in a difficult economy. By accessing larger regional networks that engage… (more)

Bohlman, Steven Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

FOOD-ASTRUCTURE: Re-Articulating the Architectural Space of Food Distribution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract a. Material processes and their catalysts shape urban and exurban morphology. b. Food distribution is an example of a material process. Its catalysts are… (more)

Bartell, Christopher R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Trade My Food | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trade My Food Trade My Food Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trade My Food Agency/Company /Organization: Boston Cleanweb Hackathon Focus Area: Agriculture, Food Supply Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Application prototype User Interface: Website Website: hackerleague.org/hackathons/boston-cleanweb-hackathon/hacks/trade-my-f Country: USA Web Application Link: www.FoodForYouFoodFor.Me Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Cleanweb Hackathon, Boston, Community Generated UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 42.3490737°, -71.0481764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3490737,"lon":-71.0481764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Agricultural productivity potential assessment by using rainfall contribution index in Sub-Sahara Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food deficit alleviation is the most important aspect for poverty reduction in the entire Sub-Sahara African (SSA) region. This alleviation can be achieved by increasing agricultural productivity. The deficit is in one way or the other attributed to ... Keywords: agricultural water, effective rainfall, food deficit, planting period, productivity, rainfall contribution index

Yu-Min Wang; Seydou Traore; Willy Namaona; Tienfuan Kerh

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Food and Beverage Manufacturing Subsectors in Lane County, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and employment multipliers that indicate that the brewing, flour milling, and a few other select food

Oregon, University of

263

ENERGY STAR Focus on Energy Efficiency in Food Processing | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Processing Food Processing Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Tools for benchmarking energy management practices Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants

264

Glass Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40, pp. 162 - 186. Glass Production, Shortland, UEE 2009AINES Short Citation: Shortland 2009, Glass Production. UEE.Andrew, 2009, Glass Production. In Willeke Wendrich (ed. ),

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Production Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hall (2005), “Prices, Production, and Inventories over theProduction Targets ? Guillermo Caruana CEMFI caruana@cem?.esthe theory using monthly production targets of the Big Three

Caruana, Guillermo; Einav, Liran

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Pottery Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paul T. Nicholson. ) Pottery Production, Nicholson, UEE 2009Short Citation: Nicholson 2009, Pottery Production. UEE.Paul T. , 2009, Pottery Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Nicholson, Paul T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Cordage Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

294: fig. 15-3). Cordage Production, Veldmeijer, UEE 2009Short Citation: Veldmeijer, 2009, Cordage Production. UEE.André J. , 2009, Cordage Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Veldmeijer, André J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

New book on `Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security in More than 80 persons participated in the presentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New book on `Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security in Bolivia' More than 80 persons participated in the presentation of a new book, `Innovación Tecnológica, Soberanía y Seguridad Alimentaría' (Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security). The book was written by Freddy

Richner, Heinz

269

Energy and process substitution in the frozen-food industry: geothermal energy and the retortable pouch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment is made of the possibilities of using geothermal energy and an aseptic retortable pouch in the food processing industry. The focus of the study is on the production of frozen broccoli in the Imperial Valley, California. Background information on the current status of the frozen food industry, the nature of geothermal energy as a potential substitute for conventional fossil fuels, and the engineering details of the retortable pouch process are covered. The analytical methodology by which the energy and process substitution were evaluated is described. A four-way comparison of the economics of the frozen product versus the pouched product and conventional fossil fuels versus geothermal energy was performed. A sensitivity analysis for the energy substitution was made and results are given. Results are summarized. (MCW)

Stern, M.W.; Hanemann, W.M.; Eckhouse, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy...

271

Biomass production by desert halophytes: alleviating the pressure on food production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desert plants, i.e., plants that are adapted to grow under extreme desert conditions were studied with the aim of identifying new sources for energy crops. Such crops should not compete with conventional agriculture for valuable resources of fertile ... Keywords: Euphorbia tirucalii, biofuel, biomass, desert halophytes, saline water, tamarix

Amram Eshel; Aviah Zilberstein; Chingiz Alekparov; Tamar Eilam; Israel Oren; Yoel Sasson; Riccardo Valentini; Yoav Waisel

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Data Call - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Call - Food Community Data Call - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Data Call Understanding food, agriculture, and rural issues is a multidisciplinary effort that incorporates natural resources and land use, biological and physical sciences, international commodity and financial market information, social sciences, human health and nutrition, and many other areas. Relevant data collection and compilation of official statistics occur throughout the U.S. government, not just in agencies with an explicit focus on agriculture. With so many different sources of knowledge and widely felt areas of impact, successful data integration and distribution requires making full use of new approaches and technologies.

273

Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A biomechanical model of swallowing for understanding the influence of saliva and food bolus viscosity on flavour release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After swallowing a liquid or a semi-liquid food product, a thin film responsible for the dynamic profile of aroma release coats the pharyngeal mucosa. The objective of the present article was to understand and quantify physical mechanisms explaining pharyngeal mucosa coating. An elastohydrodynamic model of swallowing was developed for Newtonian liquids that focused on the most occluded region of the pharyngeal peristaltic wave. The model took lubrication by a saliva film and mucosa deformability into account. Food bolus flow rate and generated load were predicted as functions of three dimensionless variables: the dimensionless saliva flow rate, the viscosity ratio between saliva and the food bolus, and the elasticity number. Considering physiological conditions, the results were applied to predict aroma release kinetics. Two sets of conditions were distinguished. The first one was obtained when the saliva film is thin, in which case food bolus viscosity has a strong impact on mucosa coating and on flavour rel...

De Loubens, Clément; Doyennette, Marion; Tréléa, Ioan Cristian; Souchon, Isabelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Categories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Covered Product Categories Covered Product Categories Learn More Read about buying and selling energy-efficient products. Commit to buying and specifying energy-efficient products. Federal agencies are required by law to purchase products that are designated by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP-designated) or qualified by ENERGY STAR. Some products must also meet EPEAT or low standby power requirements. To find out which program applies to each category, see Procuring Energy-Efficient Products. Choose a covered product category below for guidance on requirements and choosing, purchasing, installing, and using energy-efficient products. Heating & Cooling (Space & Water) Lighting IT & Electronics Food Service Appliances Other Commercial Space Heating and Cooling

276

Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods  

SciTech Connect

An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides, and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized.

Garrison, W. M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Satiating Effects of Rye Foods Hanna Isaksson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= 15 Increased satiety during 120 min (Hlebowicz et al., 2008b) Bread with 80% whole-grain wheat flour., 1998) Bread with 15% pearled barley flour (6 g df) Control: refined wheat bread (0.1 g df) Higher rye foods, compared with iso-caloric refined wheat bread, served as parts of breakfast meals in cross

278

ORGANICS: YARD TRIMMINGS AND FOOD SCRAPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the methodology used in EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate streamlined life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for yard trimmings and food scraps beginning at the point of waste generation. The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with these two organic material types in the following three

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Food Safety & Functionality Forum Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryFood Structure & Functionality Forum Division2013 Members116 Members as of July 1, 2013Acevedo, NuriaUniversity of GuelphAmes, IA, USAAdriaenssens, MarkBarry CallebautPennsauken, NJ, USAAimutis, WilliamCargill IncWayzata

280

Recipe for Reform: The Food Economy Movement in Britain During the First World War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lectures Suitable for Food Economy Exhibitions. Apr. 1917.F. C. No. 17: Food Economy Exhibitions: Suggestions forF. C. No. 44: Food Economy Exhibitions: Suggestions as to

Buckley, Michael Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Food Nutrition Link--Level III Nutrition for the Health of It  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-H members in the level three food project learn about nutrients, foods of different cultures, and careers in the food industry.

Bielamowicz, Mary K.; Cooksey, Dymple C.; Hall, Charles R.

1995-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

The effects of background adaptation and food availability on habitat preference of Corythoichthys flavofasciatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADAPTATION AND FOOD AVAILABILITY ON HABITAT PREFERENCE OFchoice is related to the availability of food, presence ofbackground adaptation, food availability, or a combination

Iyer, Neetha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Homeward Bound: Food-Related Transportation Strategies in Low Income and Transit Dependent Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Ad Hoc Food Security ing Home the Broccoli: Innovativeor administrative home for food security planning, includingtheir goods home. broadly, food security approaches. The

Gottlieb, Robert; Fisher, Andrew; Dohan, Marc; O'Connor, Linda; Parks, Virginia

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Examining Food Risk in the Large using a Complex, Networked System-of-sytems Approach  

SciTech Connect

The food production infrastructure is a highly complex system of systems. Characterizing the risks of intentional contamination in multi-ingredient manufactured foods is extremely challenging because the risks depend on the vulnerabilities of food processing facilities and on the intricacies of the supply-distribution networks that link them. A pure engineering approach to modeling the system is impractical because of the overall system complexity and paucity of data. A methodology is needed to assess food contamination risk 'in the large', based on current, high-level information about manufacturing facilities, corrunodities and markets, that will indicate which food categories are most at risk of intentional contamination and warrant deeper analysis. The approach begins by decomposing the system for producing a multi-ingredient food into instances of two subsystem archetypes: (1) the relevant manufacturing and processing facilities, and (2) the networked corrunodity flows that link them to each other and consumers. Ingredient manufacturing subsystems are modeled as generic systems dynamics models with distributions of key parameters that span the configurations of real facilities. Networks representing the distribution systems are synthesized from general information about food corrunodities. This is done in a series of steps. First, probability networks representing the aggregated flows of food from manufacturers to wholesalers, retailers, other manufacturers, and direct consumers are inferred from high-level approximate information. This is followed by disaggregation of the general flows into flows connecting 'large' and 'small' categories of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, and consumers. Optimization methods are then used to determine the most likely network flows consistent with given data. Vulnerability can be assessed for a potential contamination point using a modified CARVER + Shock model. Once the facility and corrunodity flow models are instantiated, a risk consequence analysis can be performed by injecting contaminant at chosen points in the system and propagating the event through the overarching system to arrive at morbidity and mortality figures. A generic chocolate snack cake model, consisting of fluid milk, liquid eggs, and cocoa, is described as an intended proof of concept for multi-ingredient food systems. We aim for an eventual tool that can be used directly by policy makers and planners.

Ambrosiano, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newkirk, Ryan [U OF MINNESOTA; Mc Donald, Mark P [VANDERBILT U

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

285

A center for food, Kowloon City, Hong Kong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern day living limits us from understanding and seeing where our food comes from and how it was planted, grown, and manufactured. As we become more and more conscious about our diets, our relationship to food is more ...

Chan, Kwan Yue, 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Curbside eating : mobilizing food trucks to activate public space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past 5 years, cities across the United States have seen the rise of a new form of street vending: the modern food truck. Nearly overnight, food trucks have become an expected and anticipated occurrence in many ...

Sheppard, Alison Marguerite

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

trans Fatty acid content of foods in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing evidence that dietary consumption of trans fatty acid (TFA) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease has made TFA a hot topic among people, food industries, and government officials in China. trans Fatty acid content of foods in China

288

Buffers between grazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sheep and the edge of a food crop was adequate to preventgrazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety Thedomestic animals and the crop edge is adequate to minimize

Hoar, Bruce R; Atwill, Edward R; Carlton, Lesa; Celis, Jorge; Carabez, Jennifer; Nguyen, Tran

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Ebeling: Handbook of Indian Foods and Fibers of Arid America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research has barely begun. Handbook of Indian Foods andeffort was remarkable, and his Handbook should be a standard

Sutton, Mark Q

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Review: Wireless sensors in agriculture and food industry-Recent development and future perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview on recent development of wireless sensor technologies and standards for wireless communications as applied to wireless sensors. Examples of wireless sensors and sensor networks applied in agriculture and food production ... Keywords: Bluetooth, CAN, CDMA, GPRS, GSM, HVAC, IEEE, IT, IrDA, LAN, M2M, MEMS, NCAP, NIST, PDA, RAS, RFID, SPWAS, STIM, TEDS, TII, USDA, WINA, WLAN, WPAN, WPS, WPSRD, WiFi, ZigBee

Ning Wang; Naiqian Zhang; Maohua Wang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Food web complexity and chaotic population Gregor F. Fussmann1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT Food web complexity and chaotic population dynamics Gregor F. Fussmann1 * and Gerd Heber2 1 their complexity increases. We determined the dynamical stability of a universe of mathematical, nonlinear food web, chaotic dynamics increases with the number of trophic levels in a food web but decreases with the degree

Fussman, Gregor

292

Negotiating food waste: Using a practice lens to inform design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecological sustainability is becoming of increasing concern to the HCI community, though little focus has been given yet to issues around food waste. Given the environmental impact of food waste, there is potential to make a significant difference. To ... Keywords: Everyday practice, design, food and waste, sustainability

Eva Ganglbauer, Geraldine Fitzpatrick, Rob Comber

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Zero emissions systems in the food processing industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The food processing industry is part of an interlinked group of sectors. It plays an important role in the economic development of every country. However, a strongly growing food processing industry greatly magnifies the problems of waste management, ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, food processing industry, pineapple waste, zero emissions system

Uyen Nguyen Ngoc; Hans Schnitzer

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Covered Product Categories | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies » Energy-Efficient Products » Covered Product Technologies » Energy-Efficient Products » Covered Product Categories Covered Product Categories October 7, 2013 - 10:26am Addthis Federal agencies are required by law to purchase products that are designated by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP-designated) or qualified by ENERGY STAR. Choose a product category for information about purchasing, installing, and using energy-efficient products. Heating & Cooling (Space & Water) Lighting IT & Electronics Food Service Appliances Other Commercial Space Heating and Cooling Boilers Light Commercial Heating and Cooling Chillers: Air-Cooled Electric Water-Cooled Electric Ground-Source Heat Pumps Commercial Water Heating Gas Water Heaters Residential Space Heating and Cooling Air-Source Heat Pumps Boilers

295

Recipe for Reform: The Food Economy Movement in Britain During the First World War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Food Economy League Handbook for Housewives. 24thThe National Food Fund Handbook for Housewives. 1915. Women,of Food. Food Economy Handbook. Dec. 1917. GD Gt Brit.

Buckley, Michael Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Changing Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages and Tobacco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in household and per capita consumption of energy and water, and also at food, beverages, and tobacco, products invites several questions: Did per capita energy use increase from 1949 to 1973 due to bigger houses US primary energy consumption from 1949 to 2001 (Figure 1). In 1949, U.S. energy use per person stood

Diamond, Richard

297

To achieve food and energy security, sustainable bioenergy has become an important goal for many countries. The use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significant impacts on food or feed production. Calculating tradeoffs between the economics of redesigned for residential, industrial and commercial activities and infrastructure. Social and economic forces influence how in greenhouse gas emissions resulting from indirect land-use change. Some researchers (Campbell et al., 2008

Kaper, Hans G.

298

FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 FOREWORD We are pleased to present the 9th annual Radioactivity in Food and the Environment report, which contains radiological monitoring data for 2003. This report is the second to contain radiological monitoring data from our four agencies, providing a complete picture of the levels of radioactivity found in food and the environment in the UK. The report builds on the success of last year’s report by considering a new methodology of assessing dose to the public for some of the UK’s nuclear sites. This new methodology takes account of all public exposure routes in a realistic way, leading to an improved and more reliable assessment of dose to the public from

Radiological Monitoring; Bamber Bridge; Preston Pr Bx; Castle Place; Erskine Court; Stirling Fk Tr

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

PETRO: Higher Productivity Crops for Biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: The 10 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s PETRO Project, short for “Plants Engineered to Replace Oil,” aim to develop non-food crops that directly produce transportation fuel. These crops can help supply the transportation sector with agriculturally derived fuels that are cost-competitive with petroleum and do not affect U.S. food supply. PETRO aims to redirect the processes for energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in plants toward fuel production. This would create dedicated energy crops that serve as a domestic alternative to petroleum-based fuels and deliver more energy per acre with less processing prior to the pump.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A biomechanical model of swallowing for understanding the influence of saliva and food bolus viscosity on flavour release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After swallowing a liquid or a semi-liquid food product, a thin film responsible for the dynamic profile of aroma release coats the pharyngeal mucosa. The objective of the present article was to understand and quantify physical mechanisms explaining pharyngeal mucosa coating. An elastohydrodynamic model of swallowing was developed for Newtonian liquids that focused on the most occluded region of the pharyngeal peristaltic wave. The model took lubrication by a saliva film and mucosa deformability into account. Food bolus flow rate and generated load were predicted as functions of three dimensionless variables: the dimensionless saliva flow rate, the viscosity ratio between saliva and the food bolus, and the elasticity number. Considering physiological conditions, the results were applied to predict aroma release kinetics. Two sets of conditions were distinguished. The first one was obtained when the saliva film is thin, in which case food bolus viscosity has a strong impact on mucosa coating and on flavour release. More importantly, we demonstrated the existence of a second set of conditions. It was obtained when the saliva film is thick and the food bolus coating the mucosa is very diluted by saliva during the swallowing process and the impact of its viscosity on flavour release is weak. This last phenomenon explains physically in vivo observations for Newtonian food products found in the literature. Moreover, in this case, the predicted thickness of the mix of food bolus with saliva coating the mucosa is approximately of 20 $\\mu$m; value in agreement with orders of magnitude found in the literature.

Clément De Loubens; Albert Magnin; Marion Doyennette; Ioan Cristian Tréléa; Isabelle Souchon

2013-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Food Applications List | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Applications List Food Applications List Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Apps & Maps This page highlights apps and websites for Food, Agriculture, and Rural community. Showing 1 - 25 of 48 results. Resources sort ascending Type Last Updated On Web Soil Survey Web Soil Survey (WSS) provides soil data and information produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is operated by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and provides access to the largest natural resource information system in the world. Agriculture 04/28/2013 VegScape This U.S. vegetative crop condition tool provides satellite-based U.S. crop condition vegetation assessment and monitoring web service; provides data exploration and visualization tools; delivers public dissemination of NASS geospatial vegetation condition; and decision support tools providing open quantitative access, interactive visualization, web based data dissemination, and geospatial queries. Agriculture 05/17/2013

302

A Look at Food Service Buildings - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Service Food Service Home: A Look at CBECS Building Activities How large are they? How many employees are there? Where are they located? How old are they? Who owns and occupies them? How do they use energy and how much does it cost? How do they use electricity? How do they use natural gas? What types of equipment do they use? How do they measure up on conservation efforts? Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) FOOD SERVICE BUILDINGS There were an estimated 285,000 food service buildings in the U.S. in 1995. Number of Buildings In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), food service buildings are those used for the preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption; they include buildings such as fast food establishments, full service restaurants, caterers, cafeterias, diners, and bars.

303

Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads from urban runoff. Atmospheric deposition is a lower priority for source control in the Bay Area due to a combination of a lack of major local sources. Internal net production of MeHg is the dominant source of MeHg that enters the food web. Controlling internal net production is the second primary management approach, and has the potential to reduce food web MeHg in some habitats more effectively and within a much shorter time-frame. Controlling net MeHg production and accumulation in the food web of upstream reservoirs and ponds is very promising due to the many features of these ecosystems that can be manipulated. The most feasible control options in tidal marshes relate to the design of flow patterns and subhabitats in restoration projects. Options for controlling MeHg production in open Bay habitat are limited due primarily to the highly dispersed distribution of Hg throughout the ecosystem. Other changes in these habitats may also have a large influence on food web MeHg, including temperature changes due to global warming, sea level rise, food web alterations due to introduced species and other causes, and changes in sediment supply. Other options for reducing or mitigating exposure and risk include controlling bioaccumulation, cleanup of contaminated sites, and reducing other factors (e.g., habitat availability) that limit at-risk wildlife populations.

Davis, J.A., E-mail: jay@sfei.org [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Looker, R.E. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Yee, D. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Marvin-Di Pasquale, M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grenier, J.L. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Austin, C.M. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Brodberg, R. [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States); Blum, J.D. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

RMOTC - Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production RMOTC Pumpjack in action During the process of the sale of NPR-3, RMOTC will focus on maximizing the value of the NPR-3 site and will continue with its Production Optimization Projects. NPR-3 includes 9,481 acres with more than 400 oil-producing wells. Current oil production is at approximately 240 barrels of oil per day. In July 2013, RMOTC began working on a number of Production Optimization Projects within the NPR-3 field, with the goal to optimize and improve flow and efficiency. Production Optimization Projects include repairing and replacing existing infrastructure with new infrastructure in order to optimize current wells and bring additional wells online. These Production Optimization Projects will continue throughout 2013 and are focused on improving current production and creating revenue for the America tax payer.

305

Antihydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

Antihydrogen production in ATHENA is analyzed more carefully. The most important peculiarities of the different experimental situations are discussed. The protonium production via the first matter-antimatter chemical reaction is commented too.

Rizzini, Evandro Lodi; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola [Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l'Ingegneria e per i Materiali, Universita di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Tin Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...descending order, Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Bolivia, and Australia. These countries supply more than 85% of total world production....

307

The Effect of Fast Food Restaurants on Obesity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We investigate the health consequences of changes in the supply of fast food using the exact geographical location of fast food restaurants. Specifically, we ask how the supply of fast food affects the obesity rates of 3 million school children and the weight gain of over 1 million pregnant women. We find that among 9 th grade children, a fast food restaurant within a tenth of a mile of a school is associated with at least a 5.2 percent increase in obesity rates. There is no discernable effect at.25 miles and at.5 miles. Among pregnant women, models with mother fixed effects indicate that a fast food restaurant within a half mile of her residence results in a 2.5 percent increase in the probability of gaining over 20 kilos. The effect is larger, but less precisely estimated at.1 miles. In contrast, the presence of non-fast food restaurants is uncorrelated with obesity and weight gain. Moreover, proximity to future fast food restaurants is uncorrelated with current obesity and weight gain, conditional on current proximity to fast food. The implied effects of fast-food on caloric intake are at least one order of magnitude smaller for mothers, which suggests that they are less constrained by travel costs than school children. Our results imply that policies restricting access to fast food near schools could

Janet Currie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Evaluation of food waste disposal options by LCC analysis from the perspective of global warming: Jungnang case, South Korea  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Various food waste disposal options were evaluated from the perspective of global warming. > Costs of the options were compared by the methodology of life cycle assessment and life cycle cost analysis. > Carbon price and valuable by-products were used for analyzing environmental credits. > The benefit-cost ratio of wet feeding scenario was the highest. - Abstract: The costs associated with eight food waste disposal options, dry feeding, wet feeding, composting, anaerobic digestion, co-digestion with sewage sludge, food waste disposer, incineration, and landfilling, were evaluated in the perspective of global warming and energy and/or resource recovery. An expanded system boundary was employed to compare by-products. Life cycle cost was analyzed through the entire disposal process, which included discharge, separate collection, transportation, treatment, and final disposal stages, all of which were included in the system boundary. Costs and benefits were estimated by an avoided impact. Environmental benefits of each system per 1 tonne of food waste management were estimated using carbon prices resulting from CO{sub 2} reduction by avoided impact, as well as the prices of by-products such as animal feed, compost, and electricity. We found that the cost of landfilling was the lowest, followed by co-digestion. The benefits of wet feeding systems were the highest and landfilling the lowest.

Kim, Mi-Hyung, E-mail: mhkim9@snu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Planning, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yul-Eum, E-mail: yesong0724@dongguk.edu [Department of Philosophy, Dongguk University, Pil-Dong 3-Ga, Jung-Gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Life Science, Dongguk University, Pil-Dong 3-Ga, Jung-Gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Han-Byul, E-mail: kuackyang@ssu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Soongsil University, Sangdo-Ro 369, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Wk, E-mail: kimjw@snu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Planning, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sun-Jin, E-mail: sjhwang@khu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Center for Environmental Studies, Kyung Hee University, Seocheon-Dong, Giheung-Gu, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Three essays on the effect of information on product valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefits and consequences of controversial products are debated in the public arena for the protection of consumers and to evaluate the market decisions made by industry and government. The food industry continues to develop new foods as well as processes to bring food to the market. Some of these processes bring to issue the safety of the products or the impact on the market, workers, or environment. Such controversial products or processes include BSE (mad cow disease), genetically modified organisms (GMO), antibiotics, pesticides, carbon monoxide modified atmosphere packaging, and food irradiation. This thesis sets out with the objective of understanding, developing, and utilizing methodologies similar to those used in other contingent valuation studies to evaluate how consumers are influenced by varying information using food irradiation as a focus subject. Food irradiation is a technological food process that continues to be debated and much information favoring and opposing it is readily available to the public, making it a suitable subject about which to study information effects and consumer acceptance. To accomplish this objective, consumers were surveyed in grocery stores in the state of Texas during the spring of 2006. As irradiated foods are not currently widely available, a hypothetical product, irradiated mangoes, was used to elicit information from survey participants. The survey was comprised of two parts. First general information regarding consumer knowledge and trust of food irradiation as well as willingness to pay (WTP) was collected. Second, varying information regarding food irradiation (positive, negative, or mixed) was presented and questioning was reaccomplished. Evaluation of the survey data was made in three papers, each comprising its own chapter in this thesis. The first paper evaluates consumers’ initial trust and knowledge of food irradiation and how these factors interact with information in changing WTP. The second paper assesses responses for a “cheap talk” effect. Cheap talk is informing consumers of the existence of hypothetical bias in studies of this type with the goal being to reduce this bias to real life response equivalence. The third paper evaluates not only WTP, but also how consumer trust is affected by varying forms of information.

Brummett, Robert George

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Illinois biomass resources: annual crops and residues; canning and food-processing wastes. Preliminary assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Illinois, a major agricultural and food-processing state, produces vast amounts of renewable plant material having potential for energy production. This biomass, in the form of annual crops, crop residues, and food-processing wastes, can be converted to alternative fuels (such as ethanol) and industrial chemicals (such as furfural, ethylene, and xylene). The present study provides a preliminary assessment of these Illinois biomass resources, including (a) an appraisal of the effects of their use on both agriculture and industry; (b) an analysis of biomass conversion systems; and (c) an environmental and economic evaluation of products that could be generated from biomass. It is estimated that, of the 39 x 10/sup 6/ tons of residues generated in 1978 in Illinois from seven main crops, about 85% was collectible. The thermal energy equivalent of this material is 658 x 10/sup 6/ Btu, or 0.66 quad. And by fermenting 10% of the corn grain grown in Illinois, some 323 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in 1978. Another 3 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in the same year from wastes generated by the state's food-processing establishments. Clearly, Illinois can strengthen its economy substantially by the development of industries that produce biomass-derived fuels and chemicals. In addition, a thorough evaluation should be made of the potential for using the state's less-exploitable land for the growing of additional biomass.

Antonopoulos, A A

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Production of bacterial cellulose from alternate feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS and HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

D. N. Thompson; M. A. Hamilton

2000-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Whole Building Efficiency for Whole Foods: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with Whole Foods Market under the Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program to design and implement a new store in Raleigh, North Carolina. The result was a design with a predicted energy savings of 40% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, and 25% energy savings over their standard design. Measured performance of the as-built building showed that the building did not achieve the predicted performance. A detailed review of the project several months after opening revealed a series of several items in construction and controls items that were not implemented properly and were not fully corrected in the commissioning process.

Deru, M.; Doebber, I.; Hirsch, A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

UPDATE July 2012 | The Food Crises: The US Drought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent droughts in the midwestern United States threaten to cause global catastrophe driven by a speculator amplified food price bubble. Here we show the effect of speculators on food prices using a validated quantitative model that accurately describes historical food prices. During the last six years, high and fluctuating food prices have lead to widespread hunger and social unrest. While a relative dip in food prices occurred during the spring of 2012, a massive drought in the American Midwest in June and July threatens to trigger another crisis. In a previous paper, we constructed a model that quantitatively agreed with food prices and demonstrated that, while the behavior could not be explained by supply and demand economics, it could be parsimoniously and accurately described by a model which included both the conversion of corn into ethanol and speculator trend following. An update to the original paper in February 2012 demonstrated that the model previously published was predictive of the ongoing pric...

Lagi, Marco; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Dose calculation methodology for irradiation treatment of complex-shaped foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dose calculation methodology was developed for irradiation treatment of complex-shaped foods. To obtain satisfactory electron beam irradiation of food products, a strict process control is required to ensure that the dose delivered to all parts of the treated product falls within some specified range. The Monte Carlo electron transport simulation and computer tomography (CT) scan technology were used to predict the dose distribution in complex shaped foods, an apple phantom composed of paraffin wax, chloroform, and methyl yellow, and a chicken carcass. The Monte Carlo code used was successfully tested against the experimental data, resulting in less than 5% discrepancy between the simulated and measured data. For 1.35 MeV electron beam simulation of apple phantom, tilting and axial rotation ensures dose distribution of the entire surface of the phantom, even reaching the critical regions of the apple stem and calyx ends. For 1 and 5 MeV X-ray simulations, both depth-dose curves show exponential attenuation after a build-up region. The depth to peak for the former is shorter than that of the latter. For 1.35 MeV electron beam simulation of a chicken carcass, dose adsorption occurred up to 5-7 mm deep, resulting in surface irradiation of the carcass. For 10 MeV electron beam simulation, the doses within the carcass reached a peak of 1.2 times the incident dose with increasing depth. Two-sided X-ray (5 MeV) irradiation significantly improved the dose uniformity ratio, from 2.5 to 1.8. A web-based integrated system was developed for data manipulation and management for irradiation treatment of foods. Based on CT scan, three dimensional geometry modeling was used to provide input data to the general Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. A web-based interface provided the on-line capability to formulate input data for MCNP and to visualize output data generated by MCNP. The integrated Matlab and Matlab Web Server programs automatically functions through the steps and procedures for data input and output during simulation. In addition, a database having D10 values (decimal reduction value), food nutrition composition, and qualities was integrated into the dose planning system to support food irradiation treatment.

Kim, Jongsoon

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NIST, Food Marketing Institute Co-Host Webinar on Ensuring ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST, Food Marketing Institute Co-Host Webinar on Ensuring Accurate Net Weights in Retail. From NIST Tech Beat: March 1, 2011. ...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Food Machinery and Chemical...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Letter; Barr, Jr. to Ardis; Subject: Wisconsin Nitrogen Fixation Process; September 9, 1954 WV.04-3 - MemorandumChecklist; Williams to File; Subject: Food Machinery Corps; June...

317

Avista Utilities (Gas and Electric)- Commercial Food Equipment Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers incentives to customers who improve efficiency through electric food service equipment retrofits. A variety of cooking and refrigeration equipment are eligible for rebates...

318

Avista Utilities (Gas & Electric)- Commercial Food Equipment Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers incentives to customers who improve efficiency through food service equipment retrofits. A variety of cooking and refrigeration equipment are eligible for rebates through...

319

Food Safety/Nutrition/Cosmetics Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 03/15/2013 The US agricultural system is a major exporter of raw materials such as grain and finished foods. A large part ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

Developer Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 Next (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector + A Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Model estimates food-versus-biofuel trade-off  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. 2008. Income distribution implica- tions of biofuels.Sustainable Biofuels and Human Security Conference,of Food and Agriculture 2008: Biofuels: Prospects, risks and

Rajagapol, Deepak; Sexton, Steven; Hochman, Gal; Roland-Holst, David; Zilberman, David D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Topic: Productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... General Information: 301-975-5020 mfg@nist ... competitive in the global market, companies need to ... become more efficient in energy, production and ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

Silicon Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... An Investigation into the Electrochemical Production of Si by the FFC Cambridge Process: Emre Ergül1; ?shak Karakaya2; Metehan Erdo?an2; ...

324

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

325

Hydrogen Production  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org Increase your H2IQ More information Making...

326

Enhancement of the Safety of Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project evaluated the effects of a combination of irradiation, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), and natural anti-microbials on the sensory and microbiological properties of several meat and poultry products. In laboratory testing and consumer panel evaluation, some of the meat products were found to have a dark color and a distinct odor; but microbiological evaluation indicated that all products were very safe and their storage properties had been greatly enhanced.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

327

Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of water, and produces 5.4 MT of phosphogypsum as a by-product (Ayres and Ayres 1998). The process also

328

Analysis of health aspects, food acceptability, and economics benefits of the solar box cooker in Sierra Leone. Rept. for 1 Oct 88-31 May 90 (Final)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides the results of a project whose aim was ascertaining the effectiveness of the Solar Box Cooker as an instrument for cooking and pasteurizing water, as well as, the degree to which it and its products are acceptable to the people of Sierra Leone. Specific Objectives were as follows: (1) To ascertain the extent of reduction of pathogenic micro-organism of foods cooked and water pasteurized via the solar box cooker in the village environment; (2) To determine the acceptability of solar box cooked food as compared with foods cooked via the traditional methods; (3) To estimate the costs savings of fuel and labor for foods cooked via the solar box cooker; and (4) To adopt Solar Box Cooker technologyfor successful use in a designated developing country.

Carpenter, B.W.; Davis, L.

1990-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Large River Food Webs: Influence of Nutrients, Turbidity, and Flow, and Implications for Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans impact rivers in many ways that modify ecological processes yielding ecosystem services. In order to mitigate anthropogenic impacts, scientists are challenged to understand interactions among physicochemical factors affecting large river food webs. An understanding of socioeconomic factors also is critical for ecosystem management. In this dissertation, I explore spatiotemporal patterns in floodplain river food webs and political barriers to management of environmental flows, an important factor influencing river ecology. In Chapter II, I reviewed the scientific literature to test conceptual models of river food webs and predictions of environmental factors that might produce variation in basal production sources supporting consumer biomass. My review indicates that algae are the predominant production source for large rivers worldwide, but consumers assimilate C3 plants in rivers 1) with high sediment loads and low transparency during high flow pulses, 2) with high dissolved organic matter concentrations, and 3) following periods of high discharge or leaf litter fall that increase the amount of terrestrial material in the particulate organic matter pool. In Chapter III, I descrobe field research conducted to examine relationships among hydrology, nutrient concentrations, turbidity, and algal primary production and biomass in the littoral zone of five rivers in Texas, Peru, and Venezuela differing in physicochemical conditions. I used stable isotope signatures to estimate contributions of algal-versus terrestrial-based production sources to consumers during different hydrologic periods. My research indicates that during flow pulses in floodplain rivers, a decrease in algal biomass and productivity, combined with increased inputs of terrestrial organic matter, can result in increased terrestrial support of metazoan consumers in the aquatic food web. In 2007, Texas Senate Bill 3 directed that environmental flow recommendations be developed for river basins. Despite emphasis on use of the "best available science" to develop environmental flow regimes and "stakeholder involvement" to address needs of all water users, for the first two basins to complete the SB3 process, final environmental flow rules did not mimic a natural flow regime. In Chapter IV, I reviewed this process, concluding that incentives for river authorities to increase compromise with diverse stakeholders should result in more sustainable management of freshwater.

Roach, Katherine

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Oilseeds: at the center of food, water, and energy security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Readers have indicated the sustainable use of food, water, and energy by the world’s growing population will be the most pressing challenge. Here, inform explores the interrelatedness of these critical resources. Oilseeds: at the center of food, water, and

331

For a Few Cents More: Why Supersize Unhealthy Food?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health-care experts believe that increases in portion sizes served by food vendors contribute to the obesity epidemic. This paper shows that food vendors can profit handsomely by using supersizing strategies where regular portion sizes are priced sufficiently ... Keywords: moderating policies, obesity, overeating, pricing, public policy, self-control, social responsibility, supersizing, temptation

Paul W. Dobson; Eitan Gerstner

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Microsoft Word - Lipid_Food_Chemistry_Proctor.doc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FDSC 6133 Food Lipid Chemistry Instructor: Dr. A. Proctor Room N204. Department of Food Science Phone: 575-2980 E mail: aproctor@uark.edu Time/Place: Mon/Wed/Fri 8.15-9.05am FDSC N221 Texts:

333

The Food Crises: A quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent increases in basic food prices are severely impacting vulnerable populations worldwide. Proposed causes such as shortages of grain due to adverse weather, increasing meat consumption in China and India, conversion of corn to ethanol in the US, and investor speculation on commodity markets lead to widely differing implications for policy. A lack of clarity about which factors are responsible reinforces policy inaction. Here, for the first time, we construct a dynamic model that quantitatively agrees with food prices. The results show that the dominant causes of price increases are investor speculation and ethanol conversion. Models that just treat supply and demand are not consistent with the actual price dynamics. The two sharp peaks in 2007/2008 and 2010/2011 are specifically due to investor speculation, while an underlying upward trend is due to increasing demand from ethanol conversion. The model includes investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take ad...

Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Energy Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set Energy Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set Energy Efficiency Goals for Industry Energy Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set Energy Efficiency Goals for Industry February 17, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis PORTLAND, OR - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Northwest Food Processors Association today set ambitious goals to reduce energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial sector. DOE Industrial Technologies Program Manager Douglas Kaempf and Northwest Food Processors Association (NWFPA) President David Zepponi signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) announcing an industry-wide target of reducing energy intensity (energy use per unit of output) by 25 percent over the next ten years. This aggressive goal demonstrates the continued leadership of the Northwest region and the

335

Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Security, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Climate Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Adaptation, Finance, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.fao.org/docrep/013/i1881e/i1881e00.htm References: "Climate-Smart" Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Security, Adaptation and Mitigation [1] Scope "Agriculture in developing countries must undergo a significant transformation in order to meet the related challenges of achieving food security and responding to climate change. Projections based on population

336

EM's Portsmouth Site Donations Lead to Food Pantry Reopening | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM's Portsmouth Site Donations Lead to Food Pantry Reopening EM's Portsmouth Site Donations Lead to Food Pantry Reopening EM's Portsmouth Site Donations Lead to Food Pantry Reopening September 6, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Community Action Committee Senior/Social/Transit Assistant Program Director Pamela Crawford unloads pantry donations from EM’s Portsmouth site employees. | Photos courtesy of the Office of Environmental Management. Community Action Committee Senior/Social/Transit Assistant Program Director Pamela Crawford unloads pantry donations from EM's Portsmouth site employees. | Photos courtesy of the Office of Environmental Management. It took two trucks and a van to transport the food items to the pantry in the Aug. 27 drop-off. It took two trucks and a van to transport the food items to the pantry in

337

The use of specialty sorghums for expanded snack food processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical, chemical, and antioxidant properties of extrudates prepared from specialty tannin sorghum (CSC3xR28) and Tx430 black sorghums were evaluated. White food type sorghums (ATx631xRTx436) and commercial corn meal were also extruded. Sorghums were extruded as whole kernels or cracked (broken) kernels through a Maddox MX-3001 high-friction extruder. Cracked sorghum fortified with bran (0 -50%) derived from decortication or roller-milling were also extruded. Tannin sorghums extruded similarly to white food-type sorghums, with very little difference in extrudate quality. Cracking the sorghums produced lower feed rates, higher specific mechanical energy (SME) and extrudates that were less dense, more expanded, and softer than whole kernel extrudates. Whole and cracked sorghum materials had feed rates similar to corn meal, but lower SME. Corn meal extrudates were less dense, more expanded, and softer than sorghum extrudates. Cracked and whole black sorghum extrudates were less expanded than hi-tannin and white sorghum extrudates, due to the black sorghum's soft endosperm and thick, fibrous pericarp. With increased fiber, all extrudates had decreased SME and expansion, with increased bulk density and breaking force with the addition of bran. These effects, were more pronounced in extrudates containing decorticated bran vs. roller-milled bran. The decorticated bran had smaller particle size, higher density, lower endosperm content, and greater dietary fiber content than roller-milled bran. Also, increases in dietary fiber content in the extrudates were strongly correlated to increases in bran fortification in the raw feed stock. Tannin and black bran extrudates showed increased phenol, tannin (high-tannin), and antioxidants where bran was added. Phenols, tannins, and antioxidants in tannin extrudates ranged between 10.3-30.9 mg GAE/g, 7.1-55.2 CE mg/g, and 68.3-212.2 umol TE/g, respectively. Phenols and antioxidant activity in black sorghum extrudates ranged from 4.2 -7.8 mg GAE/g and 39.7 - 73.3 umol TE/g, respectively. Specialty tannin and black sorghums can be used to produce extruded snacks high in fiber and antioxidant activity. Optimum product characteristics, along with nutraceutical benefits, will need further determination.

Turner, Duane Lawrence

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

REFRIGERATIONREFRIGERATION ((svsv: Kylteknik): Kylteknik) 424503 E 2010 #6424503 E 2010 #6 --rzrz 6. Food cooling and freezing6. Food cooling and freezingg f gg f g  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and quality of life, population growth, consumption Cooling and freezing of food gives important alternatives 6. Food cooling and freezing6. Food cooling and freezingg f gg f g Ron Zevenhoven Ã?Ã?bo Akademi, , nutricity, change taste, etc. Special considerations in food freezing and cooling are, for l h f i d bl i

Zevenhoven, Ron

339

Continuous fermentation of food scraps with constant pH control to produce carboxylic acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global energy demands combined with environmental restrictions are fueling a move to alternative energy sources. Biofuels are formed from biomass; the MixAlco process is one such method. In this work, food scraps are explored as a potential feedstock to the MixAlco process. Batch fermentation with various temperatures, buffers, and pH control methods elucidated the behavior of food scraps during fermentation. The pH and reactor configuration were limiting factors when maximizing production. A fermentor was developed and tested with constant pH control. This resulted in elevated concentration (100 g/L) and selectivity (82%) of desired products. The fermentation resulted in elevated concentrations, but low conversion of solids. The undigested material may serve as a nutrient source for fermenting lignocellulosic feedstocks. Combining various nutrient sources with lignocellulose, such as bagasse, resulted in additional production and further conversion. Multiple nutrient sources were tested resulting in total acid concentration ranging from 20.2 to 34.5 g/L.

Coleman Jr., Stanley Albert

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional dynamics of these systems. This shortcoming is especially evident with regard to trophic structure and energy flow. In this study I use natural abundances of carbon and nitrogen isotopes to examine patterns of energy flow and food-chain length of large-river food webs characterized by different landscape-scale hydrologic features. Ten locations along an approximately 500 km stretch of the Upper Paran�¡ River Basin, Brazil, provided the setting for this work. Carbon derived from C3 plants and phytoplankton were the dominant energy sources across all webs, but relative contributions differed among landscape types (low-gradient river, high-gradient river, river stretches downstream of reservoirs, and reservoirs). Increases in food chain length corresponded with higher relative importance of phytoplankton derived carbon, likely due to size-structured effects of the phytoplankton-zooplankton-secondary consumer trophic link. River impoundment corresponded with decreased ecological and economic efficiency of fisheries production, an important ecosystem service provided by many tropical rivers.

Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

342

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 5 Soy Flour: Varieties, Processing, Properties, and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 5 Soy Flour: Varieties, Processing, Properties, and Applications Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pre

343

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle)Chapter 8 Fat as, or in, Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle) Chapter 8 Fat as, or in, Food Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

344

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd EditionChapter 20 Oil in Water Foods: Mayonnaise and Salad Dressing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 20 Oil in Water Foods: Mayonnaise and Salad Dressing Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry   D

345

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 8 Labeling of Trans Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 8 Labeling of Trans Fatty Acids Food Science Health Nutrition eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Labeli

346

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 1 Trans Fatty Acid Effects on Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 1 Trans Fatty Acid Effects on Cardiovascular Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS 7D1218959FAE1721B6FEA28

347

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 5 Ruminant Trans Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 5 Ruminant Trans Fatty Acids Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapt

348

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 6 Consumption of Trans Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 6 Consumption of Trans Fatty Acids Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of

349

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 2 Trans Fats and Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 2 Trans Fats and Cancer Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2

350

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 3 Safety and Efficacy of CLA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 3 Safety and Efficacy of CLA Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapt

351

Frying Technology and PracticesChapter 10 Fried Foods and Their Interaction with Packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frying Technology and Practices Chapter 10 Fried Foods and Their Interaction with Packaging Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloa

352

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 6 Soy Protein Concentrate: Technology, Properties, and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 6 Soy Protein Concentrate: Technology, Properties, and Applications Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

353

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 7 Isolated Soy Protein: Technology, Properties, and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 7 Isolated Soy Protein: Technology, Properties, and Applications Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pre

354

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 13 Soy Sauce as Natural Seasoning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 13 Soy Sauce as Natural Seasoning Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable

355

The Use of Ozone as an Antimicrobial Agent: Agricultural and Food Processing Technical Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ozone treatment, a highly effective disinfectant long used in Europe, deactivates even the most stubborn organisms. Food processors can use ozone to disinfect raw fruits and vegetables during processing or to disinfect water used for washing foods and food plant equipment. Food researchers and regulators have confirmed ozone as safe. In 1997, EPRI convened an expert panel that submitted a Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) affirmation of ozone in food applications to the U.S. Food and Drug Administratio...

2001-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Food For Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens in the Greater Cleveland Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food for Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens inwell documented, the social impact of urban and communityunderstanding of their social impact. Introduction Food and

Flachs, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Investigating Opportunities to Strengthen the Local Food System in South Eastern Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 2004, a local food system report, entitled Toward a Sustainable Food System: Assessment and Action Plan for Localization in Washtenaw County, Michigan, was released… (more)

Buck, Karl; Kaminski, Laura; Stockmann, Deirdra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A Duration Analysis of Food Safety Recall Events in the United States: January, 2000 to October, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The safety of the food supply in the United States has become an issue of prominence in the minds of ordinary Americans. Several government agencies, including the United States Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration, are charged with the responsibility of preserving the safety of the food supply. Food is withdrawn from the market in a product recall when tainted or mislabeled and has the potential to harm the consumer in some manner. This research examines recall events issued by firms over the period of January, 2000 through October, 2009 in the United States. Utilizing economic and management theory to establish predictions, this study employs the Cox proportional hazard regression model to analyze the effects of firm size and branding on the risk of recall recurrence. The size of the firm was measured in both billions of dollars of sales and in thousands of employees. Branding by the firm was measured as a binary variable that expressed if a firm had a brand and as a count of the number of brands within a firm. This study also provides a descriptive statistical analysis and several findings based on the recall data specifically relating to annual occurrences, geographical locations of the firms involved, types of products recalled, and reasons for recall. We hypothesized that the increasing firm size would be associated with increased relative risk of a recall event while branding and an increasing portfolio of brands would be associated with decreased relative risk of a recall event. However, it was found that increased firm size and branding by the firm are associated with an increased risk of recall occurrence. The results of this research can have implications on food safety standards in both the public and private sectors.

Joy, Nathaniel Allen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

360

Adaptive Experimentation and Domestic Food Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper examines the dynamics of maize production in distinct environments and localities in Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana, and the various factors that have influenced patterns of agricultural adaptation, innovation and transformation. Specifically, it analyses the influences of neoliberal policies on the institutional framework of maize seed policy, on the technical recommendations of state institutions and on farmer production systems. Drawing on detailed interviews with market traders and small-scale producers, it also contrasts the priorities of farmers with the recommendations of agricultural services and the extent to which research recommendations reflect or fail to reflect the actual developments in maize production systems. Finally, it explores the implications of policy support for the commercialisation of seeds for the wider seed system, including interactions between the formal, informal and market sectors.

Modernisation Farmer; Kojo Sebastian Amanor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Global production through 2005  

SciTech Connect

Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

Foreman, N.E. [Petroconsultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Evaluating Alternative "Countermeasures" Against Food Contamination Resulting From Nuclear Accidents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl have far reaching impacts on ecological systems. Likewise they have major implications for agricultural systems, since crops and livestock can become contaminated and rendered unfit for human consumption. A range of `countermeasures' exists however, which can mitigate these impacts and allow food products to be saved. The CESER project has been concerned with the development of a system to assess the environmental side-effects of such countermeasures. Estimates of the economic costs of these environmental side-effects have been made for a number of case study sites in the UK, using environmental models and an original contingent valuation study. Estimates of farm level (private) costs are also included. 1. Professor, Department of Economics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8RT 2. Senior Lecturer, Department of Environmental Science, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA 3. former Research Associate, Department of Environmental Science, University of Stirling 4. former Research Associate, Department. of Environmental Science, University of Stirling. Manuscript date: 4/10/2000. Acknowledgements An earlier version of this paper was presented to the Agricultural Economics Society conference, Belfast, March 1999. The CESER project was funded by the European Union's Fourth Framework, Nuclear Fission Safety Programme (DGXII). Several academic institutions from across Europe participated in this project, including the University of Stirling, University of Bremen, Finnish Environment Institute, North-Trondelag College (Norway) and University of Salzburg. David Aitchison and Bill Jamieson of the cartography unit in the Department of Environmental Science, University of Stirling created the images used in the contingent valuation su...

Nick Hanley; Carol A. Salt; Mike Wilson; Meara Culligan-Dunsmore

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Effectiveness of three bulking agents for food waste composting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rather than landfilling, composting the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes recycles the waste as a safe and nutrient enriched soil amendment, reduces emissions of greenhouse gases and generates less leachate. The objective of this project was to investigate the composting effectiveness of three bulking agents, namely chopped wheat (Triticum) straw, chopped mature hay consisting of 80% timothy (milium) and 20% clover (triphullum) and pine (pinus) wood shavings. These bulking agents were each mixed in duplicates at three different ratios with food waste (FW) and composted for 10 days using prototype in-vessel composters to observe their temperature and pH trends. Then, each mixture was matured in vertical barrels for 56 days to measure their mass loss and final nutrient content and to visually evaluate their level of decomposition. Chopped wheat straw (CWS) and chopped hay (CH) were the only two formulas that reached thermophilic temperatures during the 10 days of active composting when mixed with FW at a wet mass ratio of 8.9 and 8.6:1 (FW:CWS and FW:CH), respectively. After 56 days of maturation, these two formulas were well decomposed with no or very few recognizable substrate particles, and offered a final TN exceeding the original. Wood shavings (WS) produced the least decomposed compost at maturation, with wood particles still visible in the final product, and with a TN lower than the initial. Nevertheless, all bulking agents produced compost with an organic matter, TN, TP and TK content suitable for use as soil amendment.

Adhikari, Bijaya K. [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada); Barrington, Suzelle [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada)], E-mail: suzelle.barrington@mcgill.ca; Martinez, Jose [Cemagref, Rennes Regional Centre, 7 avenue du Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); King, Susan [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrogen by reacting an ash containing material with water and at least one halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine and iodine to form reaction products including carbon dioxide and a corresponding hydrogen halide is claimed. The hydrogen halide is decomposed to separately release the hydrogen and the halogen. The halogen is recovered for reaction with additional carbonaceous materials and water, and the hydrogen is recovered as a salable product. In a preferred embodiment the carbonaceous material, water and halogen are reacted at an elevated temperature. In accordance with another embodiment, a continuous method for the production of hydrogen is provided wherein the carbonaceous material, water and at least one selected halogen are reacted in one zone, and the hydrogen halide produced from the reaction is decomposed in a second zone, preferably by electrolytic decomposition, to release the hydrogen for recovery and the halogen for recycle to the first zone. There also is provided a method for recovering any halogen which reacts with or is retained in the ash constituents of the carbonaceous material.

Darnell, A.J.; Parkins, W.E.

1978-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

Product Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1 Wrought alloy products and tempers...or cold-finished Rivets Forgings and forging stock Foil Fin stock Drawn Extruded Rod Bar Wire 1050 . . . . . . . . . H112 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1060 O, H12, H14, H16, H18 O, H12, H14, H112 O, H12, H14, H18, H113 O, H112 . . . .

366

NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative food face-off | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

food face-off | National food face-off | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative food face-off NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative food face-off Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative holds a Feds Feeds Family face-off

367

Removing Odors from Refrigerators and Freezers after Food has Spoiled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If food has spoiled in a refrigerator or freezer because of a power outage or some other reason, undesirable odors can result. This publication explains how to eliminate odors from these appliances.

FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Geothermal Food Processors Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Fernley, Nevada Coordinates 39.6079683°, -119.2518349° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

369

Mathematics: Food, Soil, Water, Air, Free Speech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Atrazine in Contaminated Soils Using Dairy-Manure Biochar Xinde Cao,*, Lena Ma, Yuan Liang, Bin Gao, Florida 32611 bS Supporting Information ' INTRODUCTION Biochar is increasingly receiving attention, and crop residues have been used for biochar production.1 Biochar is produced as a soil amendment

Russo, Bernard

370

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

SciTech Connect

For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

SciTech Connect

For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Global fish production and climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

373

Reinventing Africa into a Global Supplier of Food Goods: An Analysis of Agri-business Development, Sustainability, Supply Chain Integration and Export in Developing Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wholesalers - Food manufacturers, processors and retailers Selling and Trading - Food and beverage manufacturers - Packaging firms - Biofuel

Chisholm, Lisa M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

One thousand friends of food : strategies for the implementation of local food policy in New York City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is an exploration into how New York City can incorporate local food system planning into their existing sustainability program by capitalizing on recent energy and grassroots initiatives. I argue for the ...

Morris, Deborah Helaine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

UPDATE February 2012 - The Food Crises: Predictive validation of a quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increases in global food prices have led to widespread hunger and social unrest---and an imperative to understand their causes. In a previous paper published in September 2011, we constructed for the first time a dynamic model that quantitatively agreed with food prices. Specifically, the model fit the FAO Food Price Index time series from January 2004 to March 2011, inclusive. The results showed that the dominant causes of price increases during this period were investor speculation and ethanol conversion. The model included investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take advantage of increased expected returns. Here, we extend the food prices model to January 2012, without modifying the model but simply continuing its dynamics. The agreement is still precise, validating both the descriptive and predictive abilities of the analysis. Policy actions are needed to avoid a third speculative bubble that would cause prices to rise above recent peaks by the end of 2012.

Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Production Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Figure 1 shows the sequence of shapes in the production of a hollow handle for a table knife formed and coined in a 410 kg (900 lb) pneumatic drop hammer. The work metal was 0.81 mm (0.032 in.) thick copper alloy C75700 (nickel silver, 65â??12) annealed to a hardness of 35 to 45 HRB; blank size was 25 by...

377

Novel Techniques and Their Wide Applications to Health Foods, Medical and Agricultural Biotechnology in Relation to Policy Making on Genetically Modified Crops and Foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selected applications of novel techniques in Agricultural Biotechnology, Health Food formulations and Medical Biotechnology are being reviewed with the aim of unraveling future developments and policy changes that are likely to open new markets for Biotechnology and prevent the shrinking or closing of existing ones. Amongst the selected novel techniques with applications in both Agricultural and Medical Biotechnology are: immobilized bacterial cells and enzymes, microencapsulation and liposome production, genetic manipulation of microorganisms, development of novel vaccines from plants, epigenomics of mammalian cells and organisms, and biocomputational tools for molecular modeling related to disease and Bioinformatics. Both fundamental and applied aspects of the emerging new techniques are being discussed in relation to their anticipated, marked impact on future markets and present policy changes that are needed for success in either Agricultural or Medical Biotechnology. The novel techniques are illustrated ...

Baianu, I C; Lozano, P; Lin, H C

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Domestic food and sustainable design: a study of university student cooking and its impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In four university student kitchens over twenty-one days, we captured participants' food preparation activity, quantified the greenhouse gas emissions and direct energy connected to the food and cooking, and talked to participants about their food practices. ... Keywords: energy, everyday life, food, greenhouse gas, practices, sustainability

Adrian K. Clear; Mike Hazas; Janine Morley; Adrian Friday; Oliver Bates

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A real-time food safety management system for receiving operations in distribution centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food safety plan is being promoted in the food industry by the Hong Kong Government as a preliminary quality control tool. However, it appears to be a challenging task for Distribution Centers (DC) that handles food inventory since most of them are lack ... Keywords: Case-Based Reasoning, Food safety, Operating procedures, RFID, Receiving operations

S. I. Lao; K. L. Choy; G. T. S. Ho; Y. C. Tsim; T. C. Poon; C. K. Cheng

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Systems for sustainability and transparency of food supply chains - Current status and challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food chains need to become more sustainable to regain and retain consumer trust after several food incidents and scandals that have taken place in the past. Consumers increasingly wish to be informed about the safety of their food, its origin, and the ... Keywords: Food supply chain, Sustainability, Traceability, Transparency, e-Communication

P. M. (Nel) Wognum; Harry Bremmers; Jacques H. Trienekens; Jack G. A. J. van der Vorst; Jacqueline M. Bloemhof

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ......................................................................................................................................... 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ........................................................................................................................................................... 17 Animal Science ............................................................................................................................................................. 29 Dairy Science

Sze, Lawrence

382

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ......................................................................................................................................... 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ........................................................................................................................................................... 16 Animal Science ............................................................................................................................................................. 28 Dairy Science

Sze, Lawrence

383

Optimization-based trade-off analysis of biodiesel crop production for managing an agricultural catchment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Political agendas worldwide include increased production of biofuel, which multiplies the trade-offs among conflicting objectives, including food and fodder production, water quantity, water quality, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. Quantification ... Keywords: Bioenergy, Crop rotation schemes, Genetic algorithm, Land use, River basin management, Water quality

Sven Lautenbach, Martin Volk, Michael Strauch, Gerald Whittaker, Ralf Seppelt

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Model estimates food-versus-biofuel trade-off  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associ- ated with biofuel production and model the effectspolicymakers blame biofuel production mandates for the foodfood crisis struck as biofuel production, driven largely by

Rajagapol, Deepak; Sexton, Steven; Hochman, Gal; Roland-Holst, David; Zilberman, David D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief primer on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat, and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. References for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper.

Singh, S.P.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. Because the subject is vast and the space is limited, references for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper. 24 references.

Singh, S.P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Sugar Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar Production Sugar Production Name: Lauren Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: This is the experiment I did: our class took 6 sugars, placed them in test tubes and put three drops of yeast in each test tube. we then placed them in the incubator for one day and the next day looked at our results. the purpose was to find out with sugar would produce the most carbon dioxide. two of the sugars that we tested were LACTOSE and STARCH. my question is, why are lactose and starch the only sugars who didn't produce any, or very very little, carbon dioxide? and how is this process related to glycolysis? Replies: Bacteria and yeast are very efficient with their enzyme systems. They don't make enzymes they can't use. Yeast don't have the enzymes necessary to metabolize lactose. Starch is a complex sugar and yeast needs certain enzymes to break starch down into sugar. Every chemical reaction needs its own enzyme.

388

Carbohydrate production by phytoplankton and degradation in the marine microbial food web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advanced oxygen enrichment technology. However, there are also over 100 thermal treatment plants based: Stoker (CFB) (Figure and they are c e feed, to mak of Chinese MS he total ther is estimated 50 facilities Institute o f the Chinese y Prof. Yunhan of Zhejiang U eported to be s/day are unde cy of scaveng results

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

389

Food production after peak oil| Oregon's Willamette river basin as a bioregional case study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Agriculture will experience radical new challenges in the next forty years. Peak oil, which is likely to occur before 2020, will result in potentially… (more)

Hruska, Tracy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Effect of cyclone assisted milling on legume flour characteristics and functionality in selected food products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Legumes (cowpea and soybean) were milled using a cyclone-assisted attrition mill to produce fine legume flour. Milling variations consisted of alterations in mill design and… (more)

Jarrard, Mark, Jr.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Food–drug interactions in the summary of product characteristics of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

interactions and the recommendations for their preven- tion are often scarce. ... registration procedure followed, influence the informa- tion characteristics ..... implement the adequate measures and policies given the current situation.

392

Animal testing of beauty products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animal testing of beauty products Animal testing of beauty products Name: Wayers Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I consider animal testing to be cruel and unnecessary in most cases. I do not disapprove entirely with the testing of drugs and beneficial technology on animals; but I completely have a problem with testing unimportant items, such as make up, hair spray, and other beauty products on innocent lives. Are there any other methods of testing companies can use that wouldn't involve the harming of animals? Wayers Replies: Experience, theoretical models and testing on cell cultures can offer guidelines for a good guess as to what will happen when you throw some new chemical into a human body, but there are examples of where even very careful guesses have proved in practice to be terribly wrong (Thalidomide and DES come to mind). Given the very high level of safety that people demand from substances that go in or on their bodies, the only testing method that is considered reliable enough at present for new chemicals is to try the stuff out on some living creature that can tell you if it hurts or is sick. And even then you must be sure the creature is as similar as possible, at least in the part of the body you are worried about, to human beings. (This is itself a real challenge, and progress in treating disease is often hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model.) Thus ultimately comes the difficult ethical choice you are concerned with: namely, who or what gets to be the guinea pig? In terms of beauty products, there are enough people who feel as you do that there are a number of product lines which are guaranteed to be made without animal testing (they use ingredients that have been tested earlier on animals and are now recognized as safe). You can find them in natural foods and ecologically-conscious stores.

393

Soil-to-Plant Concentration Ratios for Assessing Food Chain Pathways in Biosphere Models  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report summarizes characteristics of samples of soils and groundwater from three geographical regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and analyses performed to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Because the uptake and behavior of radionuclides in plant roots, plant leaves, and animal products depends on the chemistry of the water and soil coming in contact with plants and animals, water and soil samples collected from these regions of the United States were used in experiments at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to determine radionuclide soil-to-plant concentration ratios. Crops and forage used in the experiments were grown in the soils, and long-lived radionuclides introduced into the groundwater provide the contaminated water used to water the grown plants. The radionuclides evaluated include 99Tc, 238Pu, and 241Am. Plant varieties include alfalfa, corn, onion, and potato. The radionuclide uptake results from this research study show how regional variations in water quality and soil chemistry affect radionuclide uptake. Section 3 summarizes the procedures and results of the uptake experiments, and relates the soil-to-plant uptake factors derived. In Section 4, the results found in this study are compared with similar values found in the biosphere modeling literature; the study’s results are generally in line with current literature, but soil- and plant-specific differences are noticeable. This food-chain pathway data may be used by the NRC staff to assess dose to persons in the reference biosphere (e.g., persons who live and work in an area potentially affected by radionuclide releases) of waste disposal facilities and decommissioning sites.

Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Effect of pollen diet and honey bee (apis mellifera l.) primer pheromones on worker bee food producing glands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines three factors that may influence the change in protein content and size of the brood food glands in honey bees. Effects on the mandibular gland, involved in the production of brood food and in royal jelly, have not been examined in relation to primer pheromones while effects on the hypopharyngeal glands, also involved in the production of brood food, have not been examined in relation to queen mandibular pheromone. This thesis provides preliminary insight into how these pheromones affect the extractable protein content of brood food glands. The first study in this thesis assessed the effects of brood pheromone (BP), queen mandibular pheromone (QMP), and pollen presence on the protein content of hypopharyngeal and mandibular glands of the honey bee. In this study, newly emerged bees were caged for 12 days in one of eight treatments: Queenless state: 1) control (no pollen + no pheromone), 2) pollen, 3) BP, 4) BP + pollen; Queenright state: 1) QMP, 2) QMP + pollen, 3) BP + QMP, 4) BP + QMP + pollen. This study indicated that regardless of pheromone treatment, the most influential factor on gland protein content and size was pollen. The second experiment examined effects of varying pollen dilution on hypopharyngeal and mandibular gland protein content, bee mass, and lipid content of the honey bee. In this experiment, newly emerged bees were caged for 7 days and fed one of five treatments: pollen, 1:1 pollen: cellulose (vol:vol), 1:2 pollen: cellulose (vol:vol); 1:3 pollen: cellulose (vol:vol), and cellulose. This study indicated that bees on the pollen diet were significantly greater than all other diluted diets in measurements of hypopharyngeal gland protein content, lipid content, and mass with significantly less consumption. However, mandibular gland protein content of bees on the pollen diet was significantly greater only from pure cellulose.

Peters, Lizette Alice

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome The Production Services site contains links to each of the division's groups with descriptions of their services. Our goal is to update this website frequently to reflect ongoing service upgrades which, by planning and design, are added so that we can continue to meet your needs in a constantly changing work environment. Note: The Graphic Design Studio has been relocated to the second floor in the north wing of the Research Support Building 400. The telephone number remains the same, X7288. If you have any questions, please call supervisor, Rick Backofen, X6183. Photography Photography services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of photography services available. Video Video services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of video services available.

396

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Jump to: navigation, search Name Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Agency/Company /Organization World Agroforestry Centre Partner Program on Forests Sector Land Focus Area Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.profor.info/profor/ Country Niger, Malawi, Zambia UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

397

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom September 30, 2011 - 10:06am Addthis Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

398

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom September 30, 2011 - 10:06am Addthis Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

399

Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security The New Mexico Consortium expects to complete the 27,000 square foot laboratory and office facility next spring. May 22, 2012 Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202 Email Los Alamos, N.M., May 22, 2012 - U.S. Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) spoke at the groundbreaking ceremony marking the start of construction on the New Mexico Consortium's (NMC) biological research facility last Friday afternoon. Senator Udall noted New Mexico's novel and extensive contributions to our nation's renewable energy efforts and congratulated LANL, the NMC, and Richard Sayre on their commitment to advancing the nations goals for energy

400

EM Employees at West Valley Help Beat Goal for Food Banks | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees at West Valley Help Beat Goal for Food Banks Employees at West Valley Help Beat Goal for Food Banks EM Employees at West Valley Help Beat Goal for Food Banks December 5, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis West Valley Demonstration Project has a reputation for strong community involvement. Pictured here are the volunteers who distributed food to seven food banks. West Valley Demonstration Project has a reputation for strong community involvement. Pictured here are the volunteers who distributed food to seven food banks. WEST VALLEY, N.Y. - EM employees and their contractor counterparts at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) have supported their local food banks for several years, and this year was no exception. With just two days to go in the recent eight-day food drive, the employees and contractors at WVDP and other volunteers had collected only 43,982

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century MarketsChapter 1 Impact of Research on the Economic Outlook for Soybeans and Soybean Products in Global Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century Markets Chapter 1 Impact of Research on the Economic Outlook for Soybeans and Soybean Products in Global Markets Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry P

402

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century MarketsChapter 12 The Path to Economically Viable Foreign Protein Co-Products of Oilseeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century Markets Chapter 12 The Path to Economically Viable Foreign Protein Co-Products of Oilseeds Biochemistry Biofuels - Bioproducts eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

403

Effect of sorghum type and processing on the antioxidant properties of sorghum [sorghum bicolor (l.) moench] based foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Antioxidant properties of sorghum are related to sorghum type and method of processing into foods. Tannin and non-tannin sorghums and their products were evaluated for total phenols, tannins and antioxidant activity. Total phenols were determined using the Folin Ciocalteu method, and tannins were determined by the vanillin-HCl method. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using the ABTS (2,2¢- azinobis(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) and DPPH (2,2¢-diphenyl-Ipicrylhydrazyl) assays. Tannin sorghums and their products had higher total phenols, tannins and antioxidant activity than non-tannin sorghum grain and products. Fermentation, extrusion cooking and porridge making reduced measurable phenols, tannins and in vitro antioxidant activity. Reduction was probably due to phenols binding to the food components, thus reducing their solubility in the extracting solvents; 1% HCl in methanol and 70% aqueous acetone. The procyanidin profile obtained using normal phase HPLC and fluorescent detection showed that extrusion cooking and porridge making lowered extractability of polymers (DP>8), while that of oligomers (DP 2-8) and monomers in porridges was not significantly changed. This indicated increased interactions of procyanidin polymers with the food matrix, especially with protein. Pepsin treatment of sorghum extrudates and porridges significantly improved the antioxidant activity and recovery. The highest antioxidant activity was in the supernatants of pepsin hydrolysates. Amylase treatment alone did not significantly affect phenol content and antioxidants, except in bread containing non-tannin white sorghum bran, where there was a slight increase in phenols. The combination of pepsin followed by amylase treatment of porridges and extrudates had effects similar to those of pepsin alone. Improved extractability of antioxidants on pepsin treatment was due to either the release of phenolic antioxidants or protein hydrolysates high in aromatic amino acid residues such as tyrosine, also known for their antioxidant activity. In either situation the improved antioxidant activity could mean that once food is digested it can potentially protect the gastrointestinal tract against oxidative stress generated from the diet and that produced by food interactions during digestion. There is scope to explore other biological methods like use of other proteases to improve antioxidant recovery. Further work would thus determine contribution of phenolic compounds to improved antioxidant activity, and also identify the phenolics.

Ngwenya, Nomusa Rhoda

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Economic analysis of wind-powered refrigeration cooling/water-heating systems in food processing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in refrigeration cooling and water heating systems in food processing plants. Types of plants included were meat and poultry, dairy, fruit and vegetable, and aquaculture.

Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Stone Tool Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the author. ) Stone Tool Production, Hikade, UEE 2010Short Citation: Hikade 2010, Stone Tool Production. UEE.Thomas, 2010, Stone Tool Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Hikade, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production:...

407

Direct application of east coast geothermal resources in a frozen food plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic viability of retrofitting an existing frozen food plant in Salisbury, Maryland to utilize the anticipated geothermal resources in that area was evaluated, via a budgetary level design and cost estimating analysis. Based on predicted reservoir data, a design concept was developed from production well through the plant to final brine disposal. A parametric analysis of capital and operating costs was performed which covered the range of geothermal design data developed. Relevant social, financial, environmental, legal, and regulatory institutional relationships were examined and ways to eliminate any barriers they presented against the proposed application were explored. Based on results from the other tasks, the existing DOE East Coast Geothermal Development Plan was evaluated and possible alterations were proposed. (MHR)

Ammerlaan, A.C.F.; Knebel, M.E.; Czarnecki, R.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

International Food Policy Research Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Food Policy Research Institute Food Policy Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Food Policy Research Institute Name International Food Policy Research Institute Address 2033 K St, NW Place Washington, DC Zip 20006-1002 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Phone number +1 202-862-5600 Website http://www.ifpri.org/contact Coordinates 38.902873°, -77.046518° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.902873,"lon":-77.046518,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

409

Minimum Energy Ventilation for Fast Food Restaurant Kitchens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooking equipment exhaust systems have a significant impact on the energy consumption of fast food restaurants. This research investigated issues that relate to the energy performance of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and demonstrated that significant energy and cost savings can be achieved by reducing ventilation rates.

1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

MMU Sustainable Food Policy Statement Purpose of Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the environmental impact of supply. It has been established that food has high indirect carbon emissions and a high: Increase the use of seasonal fruit and vegetables through planning and promoting of menus that reflect in- house) that reflect the availability of fruit and vegetables that are in season and abundant

411

ShapingTHE FUTURE Biofuels or food? Quest for land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ShapingTHE FUTURE Biofuels or food? Quest for land poses a threat to poor women in Africa. PAGE 4 an impetus both for biofuels and for `green artificial fertiliser'." n TEXT: DAVID STEPHANSSON Even better countries. It is estim- ated that biofuels accounted for 30 per cent of the increase in grain prices from

412

Networks Against Time: From Food to Pharma Anna Nagurney  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pharmaceutical Industry, Issues, and a Full Model Some Other Issues in Supply Chain Networks that We Have Against Time #12;Automotive Supply Chains Anna Nagurney Networks Against Time #12;Energy Supply Chains and Competitive Advantage Fascinating Facts About Food Perishability Why User Behavior Must be Captured in Supply

Nagurney, Anna

413

Energy Conservation in the Food Industry : Terminal Flour Mill.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an energy study that was conducted at Terminal Flour Mill in Portland, Oregon. Terminal Flour Mill is one of five food industry (SIC 20) plants that are being studied. Energy conservation measures (ECM's) are divided into two groups; operation and maintenance (O and M) measures, and equipment modification measures.

United Industries Corporation.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Multivariate Bayesian Semiparametric Models for Authentication of Food and Beverages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- nation of origin of an olive oil bottle is correct or if the variety of a certain bottle of wine matches, the mislabeling of foods represents commercial fraud (Mafra et al.; 2008). On the other hand, producers and beverages of high commercial value, like honey, wines or olive oil, because their prices depend

Quintana, Fernando Andrés

415

METHODOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS IN IMPUTATION, FOOD CONSUMPTION AND OBESITY RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Obesity is a rapidly growing public health threat as well as an economic problem in the United States. The recent changes in eating habits, especially the relative increase of food away from home (FAFH) consumption over the last three decades raised the possibility of causal linkage between obesity and FAFH. This study confirms the positive, significant association between the body mass index and FAFH consumption in adults, consistent with previous findings in the economic and nutrition literature. This work goes a step further, however. We demonstrate FAFH consumption at quick-service restaurants has a significantly larger effect on body mass index than FAFH consumption at full-service restaurants. Further disaggregation of FAFH by meal occasion reveals that lunch consumed away from home has the largest positive effect on body mass index compared to other meal occasions (breakfast, dinner and snacks). Survey data with missing observations or latent variables are not rare phenomena. The missing value imputation methods are combined into two groups, contingent upon the existence or absence of an underlying explicit statistical model. Explicit modeling methods include unconditional mean value imputation, conditional mean and regression imputation, stochastic regression imputation, and multiple imputation. The methods based on implicit modeling include hot deck and cold deck imputation. In the second essay, we review imputation methods commonly used in the agricultural economics literature. Our analysis revealed strong preference of researchers for the regression imputation method. We consider several alternative (regression, mean and median) single imputation methods to impute and to append prices of foods consumed at home (foods commercially purchased and prepared from ingredients) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) dietary intake data. We also demonstrate the superiority of regression imputation method compared to the mean and median imputation methods for commercially prepared foods. For ingredient foods, the results are ambiguous with no imputation method clearly outperforming the others.

Kyureghian, Gayaneh

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fish Bulletin 152. Food Habits of Albacore, Bluefin Tuna, and Bonito In California Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. 1962. Food of albacore tuna, Thunnus germo (Lacepede), inOcean. Inter-Amer. Trop. Tuna Comm. , Bul. , 7 Berry, S.T.B. 1962. Food of albacore tuna, Thunnus germo (Lacepede),

Pinkas, Leo; Oliphant, Malcolm S; Iverson, Ingrid L.K.

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Export Email Add to MyF1000 Food security implications of global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

jobs, revenue, and food, particularly in poor countries. But could we do better? Answering -- in currencies of biomass, food energy, and revenues. The analysis found that 16-31% of world fish stocks

Dunne, Jennifer

418

Accounting for taste : regulating food labeling in the "affluent society," 1945-1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation traces a transformation in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's governance of food markets during the second half of the 20th century. In response to new correlations between diet and risk of disease, ...

Frohlich, Xaq Zachary

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Does Household Food Security Affect Cognitive and Social Development of Kindergartners?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surveyed participated in AFDC/TANF than in food stamps inN Participation in AFDC/TANF in the last 12 months Yes Noin the last 12 months, use of AFDC/TANF, food stamps in the

Stormer, Ame; Harrison, Gail G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Extending the cereus group genomics to putative food-borne pathogens of different toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extending the cereus group genomics to putative food- borneGoltsman, et al Author(s) Division Genomics Extending thecereus group genomics to putative food-borne pathogens of

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 9 Analysis and Characterization of trans Isomers by Silver-Ion HPLC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 9 Analysis and Characterization of trans Isomers by Silver-Ion HPLC Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

422

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 4 Soybean Saponins: Chemistry, Analysis, and Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 4 Soybean Saponins: Chemistry, Analysis, and Potential Health Effects Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

423

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 21 Flaxseed Proteins: Potential Food Applications and Process-Induced Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 21 Flaxseed Proteins: Potential Food Applications and Process-Induced Changes Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemi

424

Food Security Among California's Low-Income Adults Improves, But Most Severely Affected Do Not Share in Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the WIC Program on Food Security Status of Pregnant First-Insecurity and Very Low Food Security Among Adults Age 18M, Carlson S. Household Food Security in the United States,

Harrison, Gail G.; Sharp, Matthew; Manolo-LeClair, George; al., et

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Petroleum - Exploration & Production - EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity. ... Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf.

426

"Honey=sugar" means unhealthy: investigating how people apply knowledge to rate food's healthiness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While previous research studied the high level attributes people consider when they assess the healthiness of food they are familiar with, little work has looked at how people assess arbitrary, potentially unfamiliar, food to decide whether it is a healthy ... Keywords: behavior change, diet, health, healthiness of food

Feng Gao; Enrico Costanza; M. C. Schraefel

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Food-web structure and network theory: The role of connectance and size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food-web structure and network theory: The role of connectance and size Jennifer A. Dunne called food webs possess the characteristic path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree- ments are based on selective use of relatively few food webs, as well as analytical decisions

Dunne, Jennifer

428

Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation Papers Contents Introduction Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation Alaska: a food-web perspective 1647 J. A. Estes, D. F. Doak, A. M. Springer and T. M. Williams Parasites

Pascual, Mercedes

429

Food-Web Structure of Seagrass Communities across Different Spatial Scales and Human Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food-Web Structure of Seagrass Communities across Different Spatial Scales and Human Impacts Marta, a quantification of their food-web structure and functioning, and how these change across space and human impacts the structural features of food webs associated with Zostera marina across 16 study sites in 3 provinces

Myers, Ransom A.

430

Remote Food Shopping Robot System in a Supermarket Realization of the shopping task from remote places  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the experimental result performed with the integrated system. Index Terms-- Remote shopping, Foods handling, Human dailylifeRemote shopping, Foods handling, Human dailylife I. INTRODUCTION In this research we focusedRemote Food Shopping Robot System in a Supermarket ­Realization of the shopping task from remote

Ohya, Akihisa

431

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 7 Zero/Low Trans Margarine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 7 Zero/Low Trans Margarine Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS BE5E5B1D1ACDDD4CB5DD45065EA26BB5 Press ...

432

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 4 Metabolism of Trans and Cis Fatty Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 4 Metabolism of Trans and Cis Fatty Acid Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS 0C05A4BDE92AAC84620807E63F87BEF4

433

Impact of Poverty and Household Food Security on the Use of Preventive Medical Services in the California Health Interview Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a “medical home” regardless of food security status. ThereSecurity Status Food Insecure w/o hunger Have a medical home

Harrison, Gail G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

An Act Concerning the Recycling of Organic Materials by Certain Food Wholesalers, Manufacturers, Supermarkets, and Conference Centers (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act requires all commercial food wholesalers and distributors, industrial food manufacturers, and resource and conservation centers that generate at least 104 tons of organic waste each year...

435

Food Safety versus Environmental Protection on the Central California Coast: Exploring the Science Behind an Apparent Conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O157: H7 in cow manure compost. Journal of Food Protectionduring manure composting. Compost Science & Utilization 12(with contaminated manure composts or irrigation water. Food

Stuart, Diana; Shennan, Carol; Brown, Martha

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fusion, Food, and Fun for Everyone | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion, Food, and Fun for Everyone Fusion, Food, and Fun for Everyone By Patti Wieser April 29, 2010 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Among the demos planned for the May 1 Open House at PPPL is the Van de Graaff electrostatic generator, which caused PPPL's Marianne Tyrrell to have a "hair raising" experience during an earlier PPPL Open House. (Photo by John Bennevich) Among the demos planned for the May 1 Open House at PPPL is the Van de Graaff electrostatic generator, which caused PPPL's Marianne Tyrrell to have a "hair raising" experience during an earlier PPPL Open House. PPPL Science Education Head Andrew Zwicker shows a plasma ball to students visiting the Laboratory. Similar demonstrations will occur at PPPL's May 1 Open House. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office Of Communications)

437

List of Food Service Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Equipment Incentives Service Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 112 Food Service Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 112) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Energy Efficiency Solutions for Business (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Retail Supplier Schools State Government Building Insulation Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Programmable Thermostats Refrigerators LED Exit Signs Evaporative Coolers Vending Machine Controls Food Service Equipment Yes Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment

438

Data Collection for HWIR: Section 10 - Farm Food Chain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DATA COLLECTION FOR THE DATA COLLECTION FOR THE HAZARDOUS WASTE IDENTIFICATION RULE SECTION 10.0 FARM FOOD CHAIN AND TERRESTRIAL FOODWEB DATA Work Assignment Managers Stephen M. Kroner and Technical Direction: David A. Cozzie U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste Washington, DC 20460 Prepared by: Center for Environmental Analysis Research Triangle Institute 3040 Cornwallis Road Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 Under Contract No. 68-W-98-085 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste Washington, DC 20460 October 1999 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS A number of individuals have been involved with the database development in support of the aquatic food web module. David Cozzie and Stephen Kroner of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Solid Waste, provided overall technical direction and review

439

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste?recycling Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food waste?recycling (FWR) wastewater was evaluated as feedstock for two?stage anaerobic digestion at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The FWR wastewater tested contained high concentrations of organic materials and had chemical oxygen demand (COD) >130 g/L and volatile solids (VS) >55 g/L. Two identical two?stage anaerobic digesters were operated to investigate the performance at six HRTs ranging from 10–25 days. In the acidogenic reactor

Gyuseong Han; Seung Gu Shin; Juntaek Lim; Minho Jo; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Energy Conservation in the Food Industry : Follow-up Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

United Industries Corporation (UIC) conducted an energy analysis at five food processing plants (SIC 20) in the winter of 1984-1985. Tour of plants (Alpac, Carnation, Terminal flour mill, Tree Top) were revisited eighteen months later to determine what energy conservation measures (ECM's) had been or would be implemented. Additionally, the follow-up investigation evaluated the actual energy savings that accrued for the implemented ECM's and recorded the plants' views on the usefulness of the energy analysis.

United Industries Corporation.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

442

Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

443

DOE Joins Federal Agencies in Summer Food Drive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joins Federal Agencies in Summer Food Drive Joins Federal Agencies in Summer Food Drive DOE Joins Federal Agencies in Summer Food Drive June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The DOE is working with the Chief Human Capital Officers Council, Office of Personnel Management and other federal agencies to help stock area food banks as part of the fourth annual Feds Feed Families campaign that runs June through August this year. The DOE Feeds Families drive, which is part of the greater federal effort, hopes to alleviate the severe shortage food banks in the Washington, D.C. region and U.S. face during the summer months. DOE hopes to collect at least 230,000 pounds of food this summer. Last year, DOE and other participants in the Feds Feed Families campaign donated a record 5,793,446 pounds of nonperishable food items to local area

444

Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Agency/Company /Organization: Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Implementation, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.cgiar.org/pdf/CCAFS_Strategy_december2009.pdf Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Screenshot References: Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity[1] References ↑ "Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate,_Agriculture_and_Food_Scarcity:_A_Strategy_for_Change&oldid=328536"

445

OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Agriculture, Food Supply Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/38/10/48224529.pdf OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Screenshot References: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture[1] "This preliminary report outlines a broad strategy for green growth in the food and agriculture sector. It is part of the OECD's Green Growth Strategy that seeks to define an economic development path that is

446

The effects of thermal processing on properties of fundamental food polymers in commercial Asian and experimental sorghum noodles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processing variables of 100% sorghum noodles were evaluated. A dough was made, extruded to create noodles then dried. Structural, physical, and cooking characteristics of the experimental sorghum noodles, as well as thin spaghetti, commercial Asian rice, broad bean, tapioca, sweet potato and egg noodles were evaluated. In comparison to the commercial noodles, the experimental sorghum noodles had high dry matter loss, but similar water uptake and moisture. The dry matter loss of sorghum noodles was greatly affected by the heating stage before extrusion, with a lower dry matter loss resulting from a longer heating time. The internal structure of the noodles was evaluated with the ESEM. Starch noodles had a thick starchy continuous phase that was smooth and amorphous. The protein based noodles were held together by a gluten matrix, small endosperm pieces with intact starch granules were visible and suspended within the matrix. Noodles made from any grain or starch other than wheat must rely on starch gelatinization for their structure. The sorghum noodles produced in this experiment indicated that sorghum could be used to produce a non-wheat noodle. A sorghum noodle could be a new food product for those who are gluten-intolerant or an alternative food product for the semi-arid tropic regions where sorghum is a native grain.

Leach, Michelle R

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of food pathway results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the food pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 87 imprecisely-known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, milk growing season dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, area dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, condemnation area, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: fraction of cesium deposition on grain fields that is retained on plant surfaces and transferred directly to grain, maximum allowable ground concentrations of Cs-137 and Sr-90 for production of crops, ground concentrations of Cs-134, Cs-137 and I-131 at which the disposal of milk will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, ground concentrations of Cs-134, I-131 and Sr-90 at which the disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, rate of depletion of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from the root zone, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, transfer of Cs-137 from soil to pasture, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, and the transfer of cesium, iodine and strontium from animal feed to milk.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

ISDA 2010, Montpellier, June 28-30, 2010 1 ENHANCING WATER PRODUCTIVITY THROUGH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and effectively. Multiple uses of water is inevitable to produce more with less water. Water resources projects/ production system is inevitable to produce more with less water. Multiple use systems, operated for domestic into the existing irrigation and water resources systems such that more food may be produced out of available water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

449

WEB RESOURCES: Magnesium Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Mg Production(Australia).pdf 49.21 KB MgProduction_Australia.mht 81.47 KB Mg Production(Brazil Israel Congo Malaysia).pdf 50.48 KB

450

Overview of the Cuban Food MarketOverview of the Cuban Food Market & Prospects for US Exports& Prospects for US Exports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview of the Cuban Food MarketOverview of the Cuban Food Market & Prospects for US Exports& Prospects for US Exports Parr Rosson, Professor & Director Center for North American Studies Department, 2010 #12;SituationSituation Trade Sanctions Reform & Export Enhancement Act (2000) Allows US Exports

451

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC MODIS Land Product Subsets MODIS Collection 5 Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Create subset for user selected site, area, product, and time period. Data for...

452

Production Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Project Accounts Production Project Accounts Overview Most NERSC login accounts are associated with specific individuals and must not be shared. Sometimes it is...

453

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

454

Century Model Product Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Century Model Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of a new model product. The model product "CENTURY: Modeling Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change, Version 4...

455

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Nuclear > Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report Data for: 2005 Release Date: May 15, 2006 Next Release: May 15, 2007

456

Comparison of Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Comparison of Productive Capacity Comparisons of base case productive capacities for this and all previous studies were made (Figure B1).

457

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

458

ENERGY STAR Focus on Energy Efficiency in Food Processing | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip to main content ENERGY STAR logo Skip directly to page content Facebook Twitter YouTube Our Blog Search Search Energy Efficient Products Energy Efficient Products ENERGY STAR...

459

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production a by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 430 468 552 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 98 120 131 313 Textile Mills 57 50 44 314 Textile Product Mills 31 34 36 315 Apparel Manufacturing 66 53 31 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 11 8 7 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 87 94 110 322 Paper Manufacturing 159 160 177 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 104 109 107 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 134 215 523 325 Chemical Manufacturing 415 470 657 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 158 183 212 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 85 97 134

460

Illinois coal production pushes Illinois Basin production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal production in the Illinois Basin during the first half of 2012 (64.4 million short tons) was 13% higher than the same period in 2011. This ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Solar demonstration project in a fast-food restaurant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are given of a two-phase program in which the first phase included the successful use of heat reclamation equipment and energy conservation techniques at a typical fast-food restaurant. The project's second phase involved the engineering, designing, installation and interfacing of a solar collector system at the facility. The report will help to serve as a guide for other restaurants around the state, and possibly the nation, which wish to install energy saving systems, or adopt energy-saving techniques, geared to their special needs and equipment.

McClenahan, D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Cogeneration handbook for the food processing industry. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the food processing industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Eakin, D.E.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fasbender, A.G.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By-products generated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

464

Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Biomass, Agriculture Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.fao.org/bestpractices/index_en.htm Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Screenshot References: FAO Best Practices[1] Logo: Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Summary "FAO's new model is based on a determination to learn from the Organization's experience and will require new mechanisms that allow and

465

The role of knowledge management in supply chains: evidence from the Italian food industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study deals with interorganisational Knowledge Management (KM) in the Italian food industry. Based on case studies, the paper defines the need for knowledge sharing amongst supply chain members in different collaborative activities. Then ... Keywords: Italy, SCM, case studies, collaborative supply networks, e-business, electronic business, food industry, food supply chain, information technology, knowledge management, supply chain collaboration, supply chain management, supply chain performance

Mariano Corso; Seyhan Firdevs Dogan; Riccardo Mogre; Alessandro Perego

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

An Integrative Modeling Framework to Evaluate the Productivity and Sustainability of Biofuel Crop Production Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially-explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: 1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, 2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and 3) an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a 9-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to 1) simulate biofuel crop production, 2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and 3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; West, T. O.; Post, W. M.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bandaru, V. P.; Nichols, J.; Williams, J.R.

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

467

An integrative modeling framework to evaluate the productivity and sustainability of biofuel crop production systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: (1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, (2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and (3) an evolutionary multiobjective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a nine-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to (1) simulate biofuel crop production, (2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and (3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

Zhang, X [University of Maryland; Izaurralde, R. C. [University of Maryland; Manowitz, D. [University of Maryland; West, T. O. [University of Maryland; Thomson, A. M. [University of Maryland; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Nichols, Jeff [ORNL; Williams, J. [AgriLIFE, Temple, TX

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Name Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Address Viale delle Terme di Caracalla Place Rome, Italy Year founded 1945 Phone number (+39) 06 57051 Website http://www.fao.org/about/en/ Coordinates 41.8792066°, 12.4952115° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8792066,"lon":12.4952115,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

469

SensorNet: Food and Public Health Safety - Oak Ridge National ...  

SensorNet: Food and Public Health Safety Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

470

Taking ramen seriously : food, labor, and everyday life in modern Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laced noodles made from wheat flour, and various toppingsthe popularity of other wheat-flour based foods such asof rice in relation to wheat flour particularly after the

Solt, George Sekine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food and Drug Administration Green Energy Management Systemthe project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS)the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS)

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

The connection between the issue of food waste and its collection for biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Reduction is the best way of handling the issue of food waste, however, considering the difficulties of achieving reduction, a collection of waste for… (more)

Blomgren, My

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Body Mass Index, Neighborhood Fast Food and Restaurant Concentration, and Car Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VW. Weight status and restaurant availability: a multilevelL, MacIntyre S. McDonald's restaurants and neighborhoodprevalence of fast food restaurants: state- level analysis.

Inagami, Sanae; Cohen, Deborah A.; Brown, Arleen F.; Asch, Steven M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Conservative Nutrition: The Industrial Food Supply and Its Critics, 1915-1985  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Significance. NRC Bull. No. 109. Washington: NRC, 1943.NRC Food and Nutrition Board, Committee on NutritionTheir Techniques and Value. NRC Bull. No. 17. Washington:

Renner, Martin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency: Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey”, Washington,impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulativeemerging technologies on energy consumption in the U.S. food

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Essays on the Economics of Climate Change, Biofuel and Food Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 2.4.2 Biofuelwith Non-convex iii 2.4.1 Biofuelal. Model estimates food-versus-biofuel trade-o?. California

Seguin, Charles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Sorting It out: Food Waste Separation in Large New Zealand Hotels: Barriers and Incentives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Food waste presents a resource management challenge for New Zealand communities, businesses and governance institutions. The energy, labour, soil, water and myriad other inputs used… (more)

Singleton, Richard L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Food-Regional Crop Areas and Climatic Profiles | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food-Regional Crop Areas and Climatic Profiles Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities...

479

FOCUS GROUPS ON CONSUMER ATTITUDES ON FOOD SAFETY EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS IN KENTUCKY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Four focus groups were conducted in Kentucky to evaluate differences in the participants knowledge of safe food handling practices, where they obtained their knowledge, which… (more)

Coleman, Holly Holbrook

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-manufacturing food products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Federal Reserve Bank of of Kansas City Markets, Not Mandates, Shape Ethanol Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2012 drought has reignited the food versus fuel debate. After cutting U.S. corn production below recent years ’ consumption, the drought sparked a U.S. grain shortage and sent global food prices soaring. As the grain shortage intensified, pressure to relieve the shortage by easing ethanol mandates mounted. Escalating ethanol mandates under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), which fueled the expansion of the U.S. ethanol industry, will soon exceed the amount of ethanol than can be used in current U.S. gasoline blends. Some industry participants believe that a waiver of the mandate has the potential to reduce ethanol production and relieve high corn prices. However, ethanol production may not decline significantly, even if the mandates are waived temporarily,

Main Street; Nathan Kauffman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production a by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 432 459 487 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 116 110 115 313 Textile Mills 55 52 42 314 Textile Product Mills 32 34 32 315 Apparel Manufacturing 67 53 31 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 11 8 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 88 95 98 322 Paper Manufacturing 172 163 160 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 107 106 99 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 221 241 254 325 Chemical Manufacturing 437 468 510 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 162 181 175

483

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3b. Value of Production a by Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2006 > Table 3b and 2006 > Table 3b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3b. Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 429 456 539 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 103 104 125 313 Textile Mills 57 45 39 314 Textile Product Mills 31 31 33 315 Apparel Manufacturing 65 43 30 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 6 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 91 88 112 322 Paper Manufacturing 155 152 171 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 100 95 100 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 136 218 551 325 Chemical Manufacturing 419 452 662 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 164 172 212

484

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access All of the MODIS ASCII Subsets are available from the ORNL DAAC's ftp site. The directory structure of the ftp site is based on the abbreviated names for the MODIS Products. Terra MODIS products are abbreviated "MOD", Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MYD" and combined Terra and Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MCD". The abbreviated names also include the version number (also known as collection). For specific products, please refer to the following table: Product Acronym Spatial Resolution Temporal Frequency Terra V005 SIN Aqua V005 SIN Terra/Aqua Combined V005 SIN Surface Reflectance SREF 500 m 8 day composites MOD09A1 MYD09A1 ---------- Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity TEMP 1 km 8 day composites MOD11A2 MYD11A2 ----------

485

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

486

Industrial Oil Products Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A forum for professionals involved in research, development, engineering, marketing, and testing of industrial products and co-products from fats and oils, including fuels, lubricants, coatings, polymers, paints, inks, cosmetics, dielectric fluids, and ad

487

The Product Creation Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Product Creation Process is described in its context. A phased model is shown, as many organisations use such a model as blueprint. The operational organisation of the product creation process is discussed, especially the role of the operational leader.

Gerrit Muller

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Casthouse Productivity and Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011 ... Cast Shop for Aluminum Production: Casthouse Productivity and ... performance indicator called Specific Energy Consumption [SEC] ... Improved Monolithic Materials for Lining Aluminum Holding and Melting Furnaces: Andy ...

489

Bio-Based Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Almost all of the products we currently make from fossil fuels can also be made from biomass. These bioproducts, or bio-based products, are not only made from renewable sources, but they also often...

490

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

491

Topic: Product Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: Product Data. Event. Model-Based Enterprise Summit. TDP Standards Development Summit. Group. Life Cycle Engineering Group. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

492

CERTIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Sawnwood 13% Panels 9% RW & primary 5% Windows & doors 5% Pulp & paper 5% DIY products 6% Trade & retailers

493

Soy Protein Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book will provide an overview of the key benefits of soy protein products in an easily understood format. ...

494

Table 3. Product Applications  

of all hazardous metals, low -level radioactive waste, fission products and transuranics • Macroencapsulation of contaminated debris, metal and ...

495

MSID Products, Tools, & Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SID Products, Tools, & Services. XML Testbed - collection of XML-Related Tools; Express Engine - STEP (ISO 10303) development ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

496

IEEE 1588 Products & Implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Facsimile. 100 Bureau Drive, M/S 8220 Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8220. IEEE 1588 Products & Implementations. This page ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

497

Seamless Steel Tubular Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...). The tank also contained the search units.Fig. 6 Seamless and welded austenitic stainless steel tubular products were

498

Strangeness Production at COSY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper gives an overview of strangeness-production experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. Results on kaon-pair and phi meson production in pp, pd and dd collisions, hyperon-production experiments and Lambda p final-state interaction studies are presented.

Frank Hinterberger; Hartmut Machner; Regina Siudak

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

499

Coal production 1989  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

500

Nanoparticle Technology for Biorefining of Non-Food Source Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this proposed work is to develop and optimize the synthesis of mesoporous nanoparticle materials that are able to selectively sequester fatty acids from hexane extracts from algae, and to catalyze their transformation, as well as waste oils, into biodiesel. The project involves studies of the interactions between the functionalized MSN surface and the sequestering molecules. We investigate the mechanisms of selective extraction of fatty acids and conversion of triglycerides and fatty acids into biodiesel by the produced nanoparticles. This knowledge is used to further improve the properties of the mesoporous nanoparticle materials for both tasks. Furthermore, we investigate the strategies for scaling the synthesis of the catalytic nanomaterials up from the current pilot plant scale to industrial level, such that the biodiesel obtained with this technology can successfully compete with food crop-based biodiesel and petroleum diesel.

Pruski, Marek; Trewyn, Brian G.; Lee, Young-Jin; Lin, Victor S.-Y.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z